Science.gov

Sample records for potent tumor vaccine

  1. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy.

  2. Vaccination with Irradiated Tumor Cells Engineered to Secrete Murine Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulates Potent, Specific, and Long-Lasting Anti-Tumor Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranoff, Glenn; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Audrey; Golumbek, Paul; Levitsky, Hyam; Brose, Katja; Jackson, Valerie; Hamada, Hirofumi; Pardoll, Drew; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1993-04-01

    To compare the ability of different cytokines and other molecules to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cells, we generated 10 retroviruses encoding potential immunomodulators and studied the vaccination properties of murine tumor cells transduced by the viruses. Using a B16 melanoma model, in which irradiated tumor cells alone do not stimulate significant anti-tumor immunity, we found that irradiated tumor cells expressing murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulated potent, long-lasting, and specific anti-tumor immunity, requiring both CD4^+ and CD8^+ cells. Irradiated cells expressing interleukins 4 and 6 also stimulated detectable, but weaker, activity. In contrast to the B16 system, we found that in a number of other tumor models, the levels of anti-tumor immunity reported previously in cytokine gene transfer studies involving live, transduced cells could be achieved through the use of irradiated cells alone. Nevertheless, manipulation of the vaccine or challenge doses made it possible to demonstrate the activity of murine GM-CSF in those systems as well. Overall, our results have important implications for the clinical use of genetically modified tumor cells as therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell-derived myeloid and plasmacytoid DC-based vaccines are highly potent inducers of tumor-reactive T cell and NK cell responses ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Thordardottir, Soley; Schaap, Nicolaas; Louer, Elja; Kester, Michel G D; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Jansen, Joop; Radstake, Timothy R D; Hobo, Willemijn; Dolstra, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Because of the potent graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) can be a curative therapy for hematological malignancies. However, relapse remains the most frequent cause of treatment failure, illustrating the necessity for development of adjuvant post-transplant therapies to boost GVT immunity. Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is a promising strategy in this respect, in particular, where distinct biologic functions of naturally occurring DC subsets, i.e. myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), are harnessed. However, it is challenging to obtain high enough numbers of primary DC subsets from blood for immunotherapy due to their low frequencies. Therefore, we present here an ex vivo GMP-compliant cell culture protocol for generating different DC subsets from CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) of alloSCT donor origin. High numbers of BDCA1(+) mDCs and pDCs could be generated, sufficient for multiple vaccination cycles. These HSPC-derived DC subsets were highly potent in inducing antitumor immune responses in vitro. Notably, HSPC-derived BDCA1(+) mDCs were superior in eliciting T cell responses. They efficiently primed naïve T cells and robustly expanded patient-derived minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA)-specific T cells. Though the HSPC-pDCs also efficiently induced T cell responses, they exhibited superior capacity in activating NK cells. pDC-primed NK cells highly upregulated TRAIL and possessed strong cytolytic capacity against tumor cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that HSPC-derived DC vaccines, comprising both mDCs and pDCs, may possess superior potential to boost antitumor immunity post alloSCT, due to their exceptional T cell and NK cell stimulatory capacity.

  4. Preventative vaccine-loaded mannosylated chitosan nanoparticles intended for nasal mucosal delivery enhance immune responses and potent tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenjun; Peng, Yixing; Du, Mingzhu; Luo, Juan; Zong, Li

    2013-08-05

    Chitosan (CS) has been extensively used as a protein drug and gene delivery carrier, but its delivery efficiency is unsatisfactory. In this study, a mannose ligand was used to modify CS, which could enhance the delivery efficiency of CS via mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis. A preventative anti-GRP DNA vaccine (pCR3.1-VS-HSP65-TP-GRP6-M2, pGRP) was condensed with mannosylated chitosan (MCS) to form MCS/pGRP nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were intranasally administered in a subcutaneous mice prostate carcinoma model to evaluate the efficacy on inhibition of the growth of tumor cells. The titers of anti-GRP IgG that lasted for 11 weeks were significantly higher than that for administration of CS/pGRP nanoparticles (p < 0.01) and intramuscular administration of a pGRP solution (p < 0.05) to mice. In addition, immunization with MCS/pGRP nanoparticles could suppress the growth of tumor cells. The average tumor weight (0.79 ± 0.30 g) was significantly lower than that in the CS/pGRP nanoparticle group (1.69 ± 0.15 g) (p < 0.01) or that in the pGRP group (1.12 ± 0.37 g) (p < 0.05). Cell binding and cellular uptake results indicated that MCS/pGRP nanoparticles bound with C-type lectin receptors on macrophages. MCS was an efficient targeting gene delivery carrier and could be used in antitumor immunotherapy.

  5. QS-21: a potent vaccine adjuvant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    QS-21 is an potent adjuvant derived from the bark of a Chilean tree, Quillaja saponaria. One of the advantages of this adjuvant is that it promotes a balanced humoral and cell-mediaed immune response and can be widely applicable to a variety of vaccines. This adjuvant has used for some veterinary va...

  6. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bol, Kalijn F; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Pots, Jeanette M; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A M; van de Rakt, Mandy W M M; Scharenborg, Nicole M; de Boer, Annemiek J; van Oorschot, Tom G M; Croockewit, Sandra A J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Mus, Roel D M; van Rossum, Michelle M; van der Graaf, Chantal A A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Adema, Gosse J; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Schreibelt, Gerty

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that contain clinical-grade Toll-like receptor ligands (BCG, Typhim, Act-HIB) and prostaglandin E2 (VAC-DC). Stage III and IV melanoma patients were vaccinated via intranodal injection (12 patients) or combined intradermal/intravenous injection (16 patients) with VAC-DC loaded with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and mRNA encoding tumor antigens gp100 and tyrosinase. Tumor antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored in blood and skin-test infiltrating-lymphocyte cultures. Almost all patients mounted prophylactic vaccine- or KLH-specific immune responses. Both after intranodal injection and after intradermal/intravenous injection, tumor antigen-specific immune responses were detected, which coincide with longer overall survival in stage IV melanoma patients. VAC-DC induce local and systemic CTC grade 2 and 3 toxicity, which is most likely caused by BCG in the maturation cocktail. The side effects were self-limiting or resolved upon a short period of systemic steroid therapy. We conclude that VAC-DC can induce functional tumor-specific responses. Unfortunately, toxicity observed after vaccination precludes the general application of VAC-DC, since in DC maturated with prophylactic vaccines BCG appears to be essential in the maturation cocktail.

  7. Transloading of tumor cells with foreign major histocompatibility complex class I peptide ligand: a novel general strategy for the generation of potent cancer vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, W; Steinlein, P; Buschle, M; Schweighoffer, T; Herbst, E; Mechtler, K; Kirlappos, H; Birnstiel, M L

    1996-01-01

    The major hurdle to be cleared in active immunotherapy of cancer is the poor immunogenicity of cancer cells. In previous attempts to overcome this problem, whole tumor cells have been used as vaccines, either admixed with adjuvant(s) or genetically engineered to express nonself proteins or immunomodulatory factors before application. We have developed a novel approach to generate an immunogeneic, highly effective vaccine: major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-positive cancer cells are administered together with MHC class I-matched peptide ligands of foreign, nonself origin, generated by a procedure we term transloading. Murine tumor lines of the H2-Kd or the H2-Db haplotype, melanoma M-3 and B16-F10, respectively, as well as colon carcinoma CT-26 (H2-Kd), were transloaded with MHC-matched influenza virus-derived peptides and applied as irradiated vaccines. Mice bearing a deposit of live M-3 melanoma cells were efficiently cured by this treatment. In the CT-26 colon carcinoma and the B16-F10 melanoma, high efficacies were obtained against tumor challenge, suggesting the universal applicability of this new type of vaccine. With foreign peptide ligands adapted to the requirements of a desired MHC class I haplotype, this concept may be used for the treatment of human cancers. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8790404

  8. Cancer vaccines: Trafficking of tumor-specific T cells to tumor after therapeutic vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hailemichael, Yared; Overwijk, Willem W.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccines can induce robust activation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells that can destroy tumors. Understanding the mechanism by which cancer vaccines work is essential in designing next-generation vaccines with more potent therapeutic activity. We recently reported that short peptides emulsified in poorly biodegradable, Incomplete Freund’s Adjuvant (IFA) primed CD8+ T cells that did not localize to the tumor site but accumulated at the persisting, antigen-rich vaccination site. The vaccination site eventually became a T cell graveyard where T cells responded to chronically released gp100 peptide by releasing cytokines, including interferon - γ (IFN-γ), which in turn upregulated Fas ligand (FasL) on host cells, causing apoptosis of Fas+ T cells. T cells that escaped apoptosis rapidly became exhausted, memory formation was poor, and therapeutic impact was minimal. Replacing the non-biodegradable IFA-based formulation with water-based, short-lived formulation in the presence of immunostimulatory molecules allowed T cells to traffic to tumors, causing their regression. In this review, we discuss recent advances in immunotherapeutic approaches that could enhance vaccine-primed immune cells fitness and render the tumor microenvironment more accessible for immune cell infiltration. PMID:24796845

  9. Attraction and activation of dendritic cells at the site of tumor elicits potent antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Lapteva, Natalia; Aldrich, Melissa; Rollins, Lisa; Ren, Wenhong; Goltsova, Tatiana; Chen, Si-Yi; Huang, Xue F

    2009-09-01

    Tumor cells harbor unique genetic mutations, which lead to the generation of immunologically foreign antigenic peptide repertoire with the potential to induce individual tumor-specific immune responses. Here, we developed an in situ tumor vaccine with the ability to elicit antitumor immunity. This vaccine comprised an E1B-deleted oncolytic adenovirus expressing beta-defensin-2 (Ad-BD2-E1A) for releasing tumor antigens, recruiting and activating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Intratumoral injections of Ad-BD2-E1A vaccine inhibited primary breast tumor growth and blocked naturally occurring metastasis in mice. Ad-BD2-E1A vaccination induced potent tumor-specific T-cell responses. Splenic and intratumoral DCs isolated from Ad-BD2-E1A-immunized mice were able to stimulate or promote the differentiation of naive T cells into tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells. We further found that the increased numbers of mature CD45RA(+)CD8alpha(+)CD40(+) pDCs infiltrated into Ad-BD2-E1A-treated tumors. The antitumor effect of Ad-BD2-E1A vaccination was abrogated in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) deficient mice, suggesting the critical role of TLR4 in the induction of antitumor immunity by Ad-BD2-E1A. The results of this study indicate that in situ vaccination with the oncolytic BD2-expressing adenovirus preferentially attracts pDCs and promotes their maturation, and thus elicits potent tumor-specific immunity. This vaccine represents an attractive therapeutic strategy for the induction of individualized antitumor immunity.

  10. Fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses as a potent and personalized cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi-Xiang; Liu, Guohong; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2012-07-01

    The recent FDA approval of Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of prostate cancer represents an important milestone of cancer immunotherapy, which, for the first time, validates the concept of bringing true clinical benefit to cancer patients by stimulating patients' own anti-tumor immunity. Among the different experimental cancer immunotherapies, oncolytic virotherapy may represent a low-cost yet potent and personalized cancer vaccine for the treatment of solid tumors. This review describes the constructions of several human herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived oncolytic viruses as candidate cancer vaccines, which induce specific and potent anti-tumor immunity in pre-clinical models, and thus resulting in stronger overall anti-tumor efficacy as compared to oncolytic effect alone. This article also describes the approaches to enhance the antitumor immunity of oncolytic HSVs, and in particular, the key role played by integrating membrane-fusion activity into these viruses. Additionally, this article reviews the potential effect of certain chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. cyclophosphamide) in boosting antitumor immunity induced by oncolytic HSV, and the mechanisms behind it. In summary, all the preclinical and clinical data have suggested that HSV-based oncolytic virotherapies could likely be developed as a new generation of cancer vaccines for the treatment of solid tumors.

  11. A rapid and potent DNA vaccination strategy defined by in vivo monitoring of antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Bins, Adriaan D; Jorritsma, Annelies; Wolkers, Monika C; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2005-08-01

    Induction of immunity after DNA vaccination is generally considered a slow process. Here we show that DNA delivery to the skin results in a highly transient pulse of antigen expression. Based on this information, we developed a new rapid and potent intradermal DNA vaccination method. By short-interval intradermal DNA delivery, robust T-cell responses, of a magnitude sufficient to reject established subcutaneous tumors, are generated within 12 d. Moreover, this vaccination strategy confers protecting humoral immunity against influenza A infection within 2 weeks after the start of vaccination. The strength and speed of this newly developed strategy will be beneficial in situations in which immunity is required in the shortest possible time.

  12. DNA Vaccine Encoding HPV16 Oncogenes E6 and E7 Induces Potent Cell-mediated and Humoral Immunity Which Protects in Tumor Challenge and Drives E7-expressing Skin Graft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Janin; Dutton, Julie L.; Li, Bo; Woo, Wai-Ping; Xu, Yan; Tolley, Lynn K.; Yong, Michelle; Wells, James W.; R. Leggatt, Graham; Finlayson, Neil

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that a novel DNA vaccine technology of codon optimization and the addition of ubiquitin sequences enhanced immunogenicity of a herpes simplex virus 2 polynucleotide vaccine in mice, and induced cell-mediated immunity when administered in humans at relatively low doses of naked DNA. We here show that a new polynucleotide vaccine using the same technology and encoding a fusion protein of the E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is immunogenic in mice. This vaccine induces long-lasting humoral and cell-mediated immunity and protects mice from establishment of HPV16-E7-expressing tumors. In addition, it suppresses growth of readily established tumors and shows enhanced efficacy when combined with immune checkpoint blockade targeted at PD-L1. This vaccine also facilitates rejection of HPV16-E7-expressing skin grafts that demonstrate epidermal hyperplasia with characteristics of cervical and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia. Clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of this vaccine in patients with HPV16+ premalignancies are planned. PMID:28166181

  13. DNA vaccines targeting the encoded antigens to dendritic cells induce potent antitumor immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Jin, Yiqi; Li, Wei; Zhang, Bin; He, Yang; Liu, Hongqiang; Xia, Ning; Wei, Huafeng; Yan, Jian

    2013-08-14

    Although DNA vaccine holds a great potential for cancer immunotherapy, effective long-lasting antitumoral immunity sufficient to induce durable responses in cancer patients remains to be achieved. Considering the pivotal role of dendritic cells (DC) in the antigen processing and presentation, we prepared DC-targeting DNA vaccines by fusing tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu ectodomain to single chain antibody fragment (scFv) from NLDC-145 antibody specific for DC-restricted surface molecule DEC-205 (scFvNLDC-145), and explored its antitumoral efficacy and underlying mechanisms in mouse breast cancer models. In vivo targeting assay demonstrated that scFvNLDC-145 specifically delivered DNA vaccine-encoded antigen to DC. Compared with untargeted HER2/neu DNA vaccines, vaccination with scFvNLDC-145-HER2/neu markedly promoted the HER2/neu-specific cellular and humoral immune responses with long-lasting immune memory, resulting in effective protection against challenge of HER2/neu-positive D2F2/E2 breast tumor while ineffective in parental HER2/neu-negative D2F2 breast tumor. More importantly, in combination with temporary depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) by low-dose cyclophosphamide, vaccination with scFvNLDC-145-HER2/neu induced the regression of established D2F2/E2 breast tumor and significantly retarded the development of spontaneous mammary carcinomas in transgenic BALB-neuT mice. Our findings demonstrate that DC-targeted DNA vaccines for in vivo direct delivery of tumor antigens to DC could induce potent antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses and, if additional combination with systemic Treg depletion, was able to elicit an impressively therapeutic antitumoral activity, providing a rationale for further development of this approach for cancer treatment.

  14. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  15. Complete tumor prevention by engineered tumor cell vaccines employing nonviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Moret-Tatay, Inés; Díaz, Joaquín; Marco, Francisco M; Crespo, Antonio; Aliño, Salvador F

    2003-12-01

    We report that 100% mice survival after tumor challenge is achieved with cytokine-engineered cells employing nonviral lipoplexes and without using viral vectors. We describe this effect with cytokine-secreting tumor cell vaccines, based on cell clones or fresh transfected cells. Tumor cells were transfected with murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or IL-4 plasmids employing the cationic lipid DOTAP, were irradiated (150 Gy) and kept frozen until use. The transfection efficacy was analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. Vaccination induced potent antitumor rejection, resulting in 100% mice survival. Furthermore, the antitumor immunity was long lasting, since a two-fold survival delay was observed in mice after tumor rechallenge (6 months later). While cell clones secreting GM-CSF were the most effective in wild-type tumor cell rejection, little or no effect was observed with clones secreting IL-4. We found similar antitumor efficacy employing fresh transfected cells by nonviral procedures, demonstrating that cells genetically modified by nonviral vectors (both clones and fresh transfected cells) are a safe and efficient tool for antitumor vaccines. These vaccines allow us to achieve the highest antitumor efficacy based on nonviral gene therapy techniques. In addition, the vaccination success with fresh transfected cells simplifies the procedure and provides new insights into the clinical application of nonviral gene therapy procedures.

  16. Vaccines targeting the neovasculature of tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis has a critical role in physiologic and disease processes. For the growth of tumors, angiogenesis must occur to carry sufficient nutrients to the tumor. In addition to growth, development of new blood vessels is necessary for invasion and metastases of the tumor. A number of strategies have been developed to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and further understanding of the interplay between tumors and angiogenesis should allow new approaches and advances in angiogenic therapy. One such promising angiogenic approach is to target and inhibit angiogenesis with vaccines. This review will discuss recent advances and future prospects in vaccines targeting aberrant angiogenesis of tumors. The strategies utilized by investigators have included whole endothelial cell vaccines as well as vaccines with defined targets on endothelial cells and pericytes of the developing tumor endothelium. To date, several promising anti-angiogenic vaccine strategies have demonstrated marked inhibition of tumor growth in pre-clinical trials with some showing no observed interference with physiologic angiogenic processes such as wound healing and fertility. PMID:21385454

  17. Harnessing Naturally Occurring Tumor Immunity: A Clinical Vaccine Trial in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Suyan; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Parveen, Salina; Blachère, Nathalie E.; Morris, Michael J.; Slovin, Susan; Scher, Howard I.; Albert, Matthew L.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies of patients with paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PND) have revealed that apoptotic tumor serves as a potential potent trigger for the initiation of naturally occurring tumor immunity. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety, and immunogenicity of an apoptotic tumor-autologous dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. Methods and Findings We have modeled PND tumor immunity in a clinical trial in which apoptotic allogeneic prostate tumor cells were used to generate an apoptotic tumor-autologous dendritic cell vaccine. Twenty-four prostate cancer patients were immunized in a Phase I, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine. Vaccinations were safe and well tolerated. Importantly, we also found that the vaccine was immunogenic, inducing delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation, with no effect on FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. A statistically significant increase in T cell proliferation responses to prostate tumor cells in vitro (p = 0.002), decrease in prostate specific antigen (PSA) slope (p = 0.016), and a two-fold increase in PSA doubling time (p = 0.003) were identified when we compared data before and after vaccination. Conclusions An apoptotic cancer cell vaccine modeled on naturally occurring tumor immune responses in PND patients provides a safe and immunogenic tumor vaccine. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00289341). Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00289341 PMID:20824184

  18. Therapeutic Anti-Tumor Vaccines: From Tumor Inhibition to Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Chiarella, Paula; Reffo, Verónica; Bruzzo, Juan; Bustuoabad, Oscar D.; Ruggiero, Raúl A.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous immunization trials have proved successful in preventing the growth of experimental animal tumors and human hepatocarcinomas induced by hepatitis B virus. These results have prompted researchers and physicians to use vaccines in a therapeutic mode but the results have, in general, been disappointing even when strongly immunogenic murine tumors were concerned. Data presented herein suggest that immunotherapy induced by a single dose of a dendritic cell-based vaccine against a murine established tumor or against residual tumor cells after debulking the primary tumor, can render not only inhibitory or null but also stimulatory effects on tumor growth. These different effects might be dependent on where the system is located in the immune response curve that relates the quantity of the immune response to the quantity of target tumor cells. We suggest that high ratios render tumor inhibition, medium and very low ratios render null effects and low ratios—between medium and very low ones—render tumor stimulation. Since the magnitude of these ratios would depend on the antigenic profile of the tumor, the immunogenic strength of the vaccine used and the immunological state of the host, studies aimed to determine the magnitude of these variables in each particular case, seem to be necessary as a pre-condition to design rational immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer. In contrast, if these studies are neglected, the worst thing that an immunotherapist could face is not merely a null effect but enhancement of tumor growth. PMID:21892285

  19. Ricin-Holotoxin-Based Vaccines: Induction of Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Tamar; Kronman, Chanoch; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known to which there is no available antidote. Currently, the most promising therapy is based on neutralizing antibodies elicited by active vaccination or given passively. Here, detailed protocols are provided for the production of two ricin holotoxin-based vaccines: monomerized subunit-based vaccine, and a formaldehyde-based ricin toxoid vaccine. Both vaccines were found to be stable with no toxic activity reversion even after long-term storage while eliciting high anti-ricin antibody titers possessing a potent neutralizing activity. The use of these vaccines is highly suitable for both the production of sera that can be used in passive protection experiments and immunization aimed to isolate potent anti-ricin monoclonal antibodies.

  20. A plant-expressed conjugate vaccine breaks CD4+ tolerance and induces potent immunity against metastatic Her2+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chotprakaikiat, Warayut; Allen, Alex; Bui-Minh, Duc; Harden, Elena; Jobsri, Jantipa; Cavallo, Federica; Gleba, Yuri; Stevenson, Freda K.; Ottensmeier, Christian; Klimyuk, Victor; Savelyeva, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Passive antibody therapy for cancer is an effective but costly treatment modality. Induction of therapeutically potent anticancer antibodies by active vaccination is an attractive alternative but has proven challenging in cancer due to tolerogenic pressure in patients. Here, we used the clinically relevant cancer target Her2, known to be susceptible to targeting by antibody therapy, to demonstrate how potent antibody can be induced by vaccination. A novel 44kD Her2 protein fragment was generated and found to be highly effective at inducing anti-Her2 antibody including trastuzumab-like reactivities. In the tolerant and spontaneous BALB-neuT mouse model of metastatic breast cancer this Her2-targeting vaccine was only effective if the fragment was conjugated to a foreign immunogenic carrier; Fragment C of tetanus toxin. Only the conjugate vaccine induced high affinity anti-Her2 antibody of multiple isotypes and suppressed tumor development. The magnitude of CD4+ T-cell help and breadth of cytokines secreted by the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells induced to the foreign antigen was critical. We used a highly efficient plant-based bio-manufacturing process for protein antigens, magnICON, for vaccine expression, to underpin feasibility of future clinical testing. Hence, our novel Her2-targeting conjugate vaccine combines preclinical efficacy with clinical deliverability, thus setting the scene for therapeutic testing. PMID:27471642

  1. Vaccine-induced but not tumor-derived Interleukin-10 dictates the efficacy of Interleukin-10 blockade in therapeutic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Llopiz, Diana; Aranda, Fernando; Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Ruiz, Marta; Infante, Stefany; Belsúe, Virginia; Lasarte, Juan José; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Blocking antibodies against immunosuppressive molecules have shown promising results in cancer patients. However, there are not enough data to define those conditions dictating treatment efficacy. In this scenario, IL-10 is a cytokine with controversial effects on tumor growth. Thus, our aim was to characterize in which setting IL-10 blockade may potentiate the beneficial effects of a therapeutic vaccine In the IL-10-expressing B16-OVA and TC-1 P3 (A15) tumor models, therapeutic vaccination with tumor antigens plus the TLR7 ligand Imiquimod increased IL-10 production. Although blockade of IL-10 signal with anti-IL-10R antibodies did not inhibit tumor growth, when combined with vaccination it enhanced tumor rejection, associated with stronger innate and adaptive immune responses. Interestingly, a similar enhancement on immune responses was observed after simultaneous vaccination and IL-10 blockade in naive mice. However, when using vaccines containing as adjuvants the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) or anti-CD40 agonistic antibodies, despite tumor IL-10 expression, anti-IL-10R antibodies did not provide any beneficial effect on tumor growth and antitumor immune responses. Of note, as opposed to Imiquimod, vaccination with this type of adjuvants did not induce IL-10 and correlated with a lack of in vitro IL-10 production by dendritic cells (DC). Finally, in B16-OVA-bearing mice, blockade of IL-10 during therapeutic vaccination with a multiple adjuvant combination (MAC) with potent immunostimulatory properties but still inducing IL-10 led to superior antitumor immunity and complete tumor rejection. These results suggest that for therapeutic antitumor vaccination, blockade of vaccine-induced IL-10 is more relevant than tumor-associated IL-10.

  2. Elimination of IL-10-inducing T-helper epitopes from an IGFBP-2 vaccine ensures potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Denise L; Holt, Gregory E; Park, Kyong Hwa; Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren; Childs, Jennifer; Higgins, Doreen; Disis, Mary L

    2014-05-15

    Immunization against self-tumor antigens can induce T-regulatory cells, which inhibit proliferation of type I CD4(+) T-helper (TH1) and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells. Type I T cells are required for potent antitumor immunity. We questioned whether immunosuppressive epitopes could be identified and deleted from a cancer vaccine targeting insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP-2) and enhance vaccine efficacy. Screening breast cancer patient lymphocytes with IFN-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 ELISPOT, we found epitopes in the N-terminus of IGFBP-2 that elicited predominantly TH1 whereas the C-terminus stimulated TH2 and mixed TH1/TH2 responses. Epitope-specific TH2 demonstrated a higher functional avidity for antigen than epitopes, which induced IFN-γ (P = 0.014). We immunized TgMMTV-neu mice with DNA constructs encoding IGFBP-2 N-and C-termini. T cell lines expanded from the C-terminus vaccinated animals secreted significantly more type II cytokines than those vaccinated with the N-terminus and could not control tumor growth when infused into tumor-bearing animals. In contrast, N-terminus epitope-specific T cells secreted TH1 cytokines and significantly inhibited tumor growth, as compared with naïve T cells, when adoptively transferred (P = 0.005). To determine whether removal of TH2-inducing epitopes had any effect on the vaccinated antitumor response, we immunized mice with the N-terminus, C-terminus, and a mix of equivalent concentrations of both vaccines. The N-terminus vaccine significantly inhibited tumor growth (P < 0.001) as compared with the C-terminus vaccine, which had no antitumor effect. Mixing the C-terminus with the N-terminus vaccine abrogated the antitumor response of the N-terminus vaccine alone. The clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines targeting self-tumor antigens may be greatly improved by identification and removal of immunosuppressive epitopes.

  3. Vaccination against strontium-90-induced bone tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Triest, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The thesis was tested that immunization against a murine osteosarcoma virus can reduce the incidence of bone tumors induced by /sup 90/Sr. C57BL/6J female mice (190) were divided into three sets of 2 groups. Each set consisted of a control group and an experimental group treated ip with 1.0 muCi /sup 90/Sr at 66 days of age. The three sets of groups received the following additional treatments: none (controls), 6 injections of Formalin-inactivated FBJ osteosarcoma virus (vaccinated group), or 6 injections of active FBJ virus (active virus controls). Only 1 bone tumor developed in a mouse not treated with /sup 90/Sr in the active virus controls. In /sup 90/Sr-treated mice, vaccination reduced bone tumor deaths during the first 600 days from 9 of 36 in controls to 1 of 33 in vaccinated mice (P less than .01), but bone tumor deaths during the entire life-span, 10 of 36 and 5 of 33, respectively, were not significantly different (P . .07). Thus the vaccination procedure delayed the development of bone tumors. In contrast, injection of active virus into /sup 90/Sr-treated mice increased the lifetime incidence of bone tumors from 10 of 36 in controls to 19 of 32 (P . .01).

  4. Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    González, Fermín E; Gleisner, Alejandra; Falcón-Beas, Felipe; Osorio, Fabiola; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are a promising immunological tool for cancer therapy. These stimulate the antitumor response and immunological memory generation. Nevertheless, many patients remain refractory to DC approaches. Antigen (Ag) delivery to DCs is relevant to vaccine success, and antigen peptides, tumor-associated proteins, tumor cells, autologous tumor lysates, and tumor-derived mRNA have been tested as Ag sources. Recently, DCs loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysates were used to induce a potent immunological response. This strategy provides a reproducible pool of almost all potential Ags suitable for patient use, independent of MHC haplotypes or autologous tumor tissue availability. However, optimizing autologous tumor cell lysate preparation is crucial to enhancing efficacy. This review considers the role of cancer cell-derived lysates as a relevant source of antigens and as an activating factor for ex vivo therapeutic DCs capable of responding to neoplastic cells. These promising therapies are associated with the prolonged survival of advanced cancer patients. PMID:25625929

  5. Improving antigenic peptide vaccines for cancer immunotherapy using a dominant tumor-specific T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Jordan, Kimberly R; Munson, Daniel J; Moore, Brandon L; Kappler, John W; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-11-15

    Vaccines that incorporate peptide mimics of tumor antigens, or mimotope vaccines, are commonly used in cancer immunotherapy and function by eliciting increased numbers of T cells that cross-react with the native tumor antigen. Unfortunately, they often elicit T cells that do not cross-react with or that have low affinity for the tumor antigen. Using a high affinity tumor-specific T cell clone, we identified a panel of mimotope vaccines for the dominant peptide antigen from a mouse colon tumor that elicits a range of tumor protection following vaccination. The TCR from this high affinity T cell clone was rarely identified in ex vivo evaluation of tumor-specific T cells elicited by mimotope vaccination. Conversely, a low affinity clone found in the tumor and following immunization was frequently identified. Using peptide libraries, we determined if this frequently identified TCR improved the discovery of efficacious mimotopes. We demonstrated that the representative TCR identified more protective mimotopes than the high affinity TCR. These results suggest that targeting a dominant fraction of tumor-specific T cells generates potent immunity and that consideration of the available T cell repertoire is necessary for targeted T cell therapy. These results have important implications when optimizing mimotope vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Tumor Vaccination With Cytokine-Loaded Microspheres

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    indirect effects of IFN-gamma. J Immunol. 2003;170:400–412. 23. Yan J, Vetvicka V, Xia Y, et al. Beta - glucan , a ‘‘specific’’ biologic response...12, GM-CSF, Breast Cancer , Spontaneous tumors 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF... cancer vaccines, cytokines, adjuvants, immunotherapy, tumor models (J Immunother 2006;29:10–20) I t is now well established that numerous immune

  7. Application of autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine in treatment of tumors of digestive traet

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wei; Wang, Hui; Sun, Tie-Mie; Yao, Wen-Qing; Chen, Li-Li; Jin, Yu; Li, Chun-Ling; Meng, Fan-Juan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To treat patients with stage I-IV malignant tumors of digestive tract using autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV (Newcastle disease virus) vaccine, and observe the survival period and curative effect. METHODS: 335 patients with malignant tumors of digestive tract were treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine. The autologous tumor cell vaccine received were assigned for long-term survival observation. While these failed to obtain the autologous tumor tissue were given with NDV vaccine for a received short-term observation on curative effect. RESULTS: The colorectal cancer patients treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine were divided into two groups: the controlled group (subjected to resection alone) (n = 257), the vaccine group (subjected to both resection and immunotherapy) (n = 310). 25 patients treated with NDV immunotherapy were all at stage IV without having resection. In postoperation adjuvant therapy patients, the 5, 6 and 7-year survival rates were 66.51%, 60.52%, 56.50% respectively; whereas in patients with resection alone, only 45.57%, 44.76% and 43.42% respectively. The average survival period was 5.13 years (resection alone group 4.15 years), the median survival period was over 7 years (resection alone group 4.46 years). There were significant differences between the two groups. The patients treated with resection plus vaccine were measured delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions after vaccination, (indurative scope > 5 mm). The magnitude of DTH was related to the prognosis. The 5-year survival rate was 80% for those with indurations greater than 5 mm, compared with 30% for those with indurations less than 5 mm. The 1-year survival rate was 96% for 25 patients treated with NDV immunotherapy. The total effective rate (CR+PR) was 24.00% in NDV immunotherapy; complete remission (CR) in 1 case (4.00%), partial remission (PR) in 5 cases (20.00%), stabilizedin in 16 cases (64.00%), progression (PD) in 1 case (4.00%). After

  8. Cancer vaccine with mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

    PubMed

    Kozbor, Danuta

    2010-03-01

    The GD2 ganglioside, displayed by five carbohydrate Neu5Acalpha2-8Neu5Acalpha2-3(GalNAcbeta1-4)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta residues attached to a ceramide chain that anchors the ganglioside in the cell membrane, is expressed on neuroectodermally derived tumors. GD2 has been used as a target for passive and active immunotherapy in patients with malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma. We have generated 47-LDA mimotope of GD2 by screening a phage display peptide library with anti-GD2 mAb 14G2a and reported that vaccination with the 47-LDA mimotope elicited GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses as well as MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cells to syngeneic neuroblastoma tumor cells. The cytotoxic activity of the vaccine-induced CTLs was independent of GD2 expression, suggesting recognition of a novel tumor-associated antigen cross-reacting with 47-LDA. Immunoblotting studies using 14G2a mAb demonstrated that this antibody cross-reacts with a 105 kDa glycoprotein expressed by GD2(+) and GD2(-) neuroblastoma and melanoma cells. Functional studies of tumor cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) collagen cultures with 14G2a mAb showed decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, a process regulated by 105 kDa activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (ALCAM/CD166). The CD166 glycoprotein was shown to be recognized by 14G2a antibody, and inhibition of CD166 expression by RNA interference ablated the cell sensitivity to lysis by 47-LDA-induced CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the vaccine-induced CTLs recognize a 47-LDA cross-reactive epitope expressed by CD166 and reveal a novel mechanism of induction of potent tumor-specific cellular responses by mimotopes of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens.

  9. Novel cancer vaccines prepared by anchoring cytokines to tumor cells avoiding gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizard, Philippe; Gross, David-Alexandre; Chenal, Alexandre; Beaumelle, Bruno; Kosmatopoulos, Konstadinos; Gillet, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Cytokines have a strong potential for triggering anticancer immunity if released in the tumor microenvironment. Successful vaccines have been engineered using tumor cells genetically modified to secrete the cytokines. Unfortunately, this approach remains difficult and hazardous to perform in the clinic. We describe a new way of combining cytokines with tumor cells to prepare anticancer vaccines. This consists in anchoring recombinant cytokines to the membrane of killed tumor cells. Attachment is mediated by a fragment of diphtheria toxin (T) genetically connected to the cytokine. It is triggered by an acid pH pulse. The method was applied to IL-2, a potent anti-tumor cytokine. IL-2 anchored to the surface of tumor cells by the T anchor retained its IL-2 activity and remained exposed several days. Interestingly, vaccination of mice with these modified tumor cells induced a protective anti-tumor immunity mediated by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This procedure presents several advantages as compared to the conventional approaches based on the transfection of tumor cells with cytokine genes. It does not require the culture of tumor cells from the patients and eliminates the safety problems connected with viral vectors while allowing the control of the amount of cytokines delivered with the vaccine.

  10. Potent tetravalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Guo, Jin-Peng; An, Huai-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-05-07

    Human botulism is commonly associated with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B, E and F. This suggests that the greatest need is for a tetravalent vaccine that provides protection against all four of these serotypes. In current study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several tetravalent vaccines that protected mice against the four serotypes. Firstly, monovalent replicon vaccine against BoNT induced better antibody response and protection than that of corresponding conventional DNA vaccine. Secondly, dual-expression DNA replicon pSCARSE/FHc or replicon particle VRP-E/FHc vaccine was well resistant to the challenge of BoNT/E and BoNT/F mixture as a combination vaccine composed of two monovalent replicon vaccines. Finally, the dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle tetravalent vaccine could simultaneously and effectively neutralize and protect the four BoNT serotypes. Protection correlated directly with serum ELISA titers and neutralization antibody levels to BoNTs. Therefore, replicon-based DNA or particle might be effective vector to develop BoNT vaccines, which might be more desirable for use in clinical application than the conventional DNA vaccines. Our studies demonstrate the utility of combining dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle vaccines into multi-agent formulations as potent tetravalent vaccines for eliciting protective responses to four serotypes of BoNTs.

  11. Whole Tumor Antigen Vaccines: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Coukos, George; Kandalaft, Lana E.

    2015-01-01

    With its vast amount of uncharacterized and characterized T cell epitopes available for activating CD4+ T helper and CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes simultaneously, whole tumor antigen represents an attractive alternative source of antigens as compared to tumor-derived peptides and full-length recombinant tumor proteins for dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy. Unlike defined tumor-derived peptides and proteins, whole tumor lysate therapy is applicable to all patients regardless of their HLA type. DCs are essentially the master regulators of immune response, and are the most potent antigen-presenting cell population for priming and activating naïve T cells to target tumors. Because of these unique properties, numerous DC-based immunotherapies have been initiated in the clinics. In this review, we describe the different types of whole tumor antigens that we could use to pulse DCs ex vivo and in vivo. We also discuss the different routes of delivering whole tumor antigens to DCs in vivo and activating them with toll-like receptor agonists. PMID:26343191

  12. Plant-made vaccines against West Nile virus are potent, safe, and economically feasible.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    The threat of West Nile virus (WNV) epidemics with increasingly severe neuroinvasive infections demands the development and licensing of effective vaccines. To date, vaccine candidates based on inactivated, live-attenuated, or chimeric virus, and viral DNA and WNV protein subunits have been developed. Some have been approved for veterinary use or are under clinical investigation, yet no vaccine has been licensed for human use. Reaching the milestone of a commercialized human vaccine, however, may largely depend on the economics of vaccine production. Analysis suggests that currently only novel low-cost production technologies would allow vaccination to outcompete the cost of surveillance and clinical treatment. Here, we review progress using plants to address the economic challenges of WNV vaccine production. The advantages of plants as hosts for vaccine production in cost, speed and scalability, especially those of viral vector-based transient expression systems, are discussed. The progress in developing WNV subunit vaccines in plants is reviewed within the context of their expression, characterization, downstream processing, and immunogenicity in animal models. The development of vaccines based on enveloped and non-enveloped virus-like particles is also discussed. These advancements suggest that plants may provide a production platform that offers potent, safe and affordable human vaccines against WNV. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Plant-made vaccines against West Nile virus are potent, safe, and economically feasible

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The threat of West Nile virus (WNV) epidemics with increasingly severe neuroinvasive infections demands the development and licensing of effective vaccines. To date, vaccine candidates based on inactivated, live-attenuated, or chimeric virus, and viral DNA and WNV protein subunits have been developed. Some have been approved for veterinary use or are under clinical investigation, yet no vaccine has been licensed for human use. Reaching the milestone of a commercialized human vaccine, however, may largely depend on the economics of vaccine production. Analysis suggests that currently only novel low-cost production technologies would allow vaccination to outcompete the cost of surveillance and clinical treatment. Here, we review progress using plants to address the economic challenges of WNV vaccine production. The advantages of plants as hosts for vaccine production in cost, speed and scalability, especially those of viral vector-based transient expression systems, are discussed. The progress in developing WNV subunit vaccines in plants is reviewed within the context of their expression, characterization, downstream processing, and immunogenicity in animal models. The development of vaccines based on enveloped and non-enveloped virus-like particles is also discussed. These advancements suggest that plants may provide a production platform that offers potent, safe and affordable human vaccines against WNV. PMID:25676782

  14. Recombinant immune complexes as versatile and potent vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mason, Hugh S

    2016-04-02

    Immune complexes (IC) used as vaccines have the potential to enhance both antibody and cell-mediated immune responses over those obtained with antigen alone. However, difficulty of manufacture represents a significant hurdle to the widespread use of IC as vaccines. Recombinant IC (RIC) and their expression in plants enable manufacturing by the coordinate expression of immunoglobulin and antigen as a fusion protein. The use of a modular RIC system facilitates insertion of antigen genes and provides a broadly applicable platform that can be adapted for a wide variety of antigens.

  15. Augmenting antitumor T-cell responses to mimotope vaccination by boosting with native tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Jordan, Kimberly R; U'ren, Lance; Sprague, Jonathan; Kemmler, Charles B; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with antigens expressed by tumors is one strategy for stimulating enhanced T-cell responses against tumors. However, these peptide vaccines rarely result in efficient expansion of tumor-specific T cells or responses that protect against tumor growth. Mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, elicit increased numbers of T cells that crossreact with the native tumor antigen, resulting in potent antitumor responses. Unfortunately, mimotopes may also elicit cells that do not crossreact or have low affinity for tumor antigen. We previously showed that one such mimotope of the dominant MHC class I tumor antigen of a mouse colon carcinoma cell line stimulates a tumor-specific T-cell clone and elicits antigen-specific cells in vivo, yet protects poorly against tumor growth. We hypothesized that boosting the mimotope vaccine with the native tumor antigen would focus the T-cell response elicited by the mimotope toward high affinity, tumor-specific T cells. We show that priming T cells with the mimotope, followed by a native tumor-antigen boost, improves tumor immunity compared with T cells elicited by the same prime with a mimotope boost. Our data suggest that the improved tumor immunity results from the expansion of mimotope-elicited tumor-specific T cells that have increased avidity for the tumor antigen. The enhanced T cells are phenotypically distinct and enriched for T-cell receptors previously correlated with improved antitumor immunity. These results suggest that incorporation of native antigen into clinical mimotope vaccine regimens may improve the efficacy of antitumor T-cell responses.

  16. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  17. An Adenoviral Vaccine Encoding Full-Length Inactivated Human HER2 Exhibits Potent Immunogenicty and Enhanced Therapeutic Efficacy Without Oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary; Wei, Junping; Osada, Takuya; Glass, Oliver; Lei, Gangjun; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Peplinski, Sharon; Kim, Dong-Wan; Xia, Wenle; Spector, Neil; Marks, Jeffrey; Barry, William; Hobeika, Amy; Devi, Gayathri; Amalfitano, Andrea; Morse, Michael A.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Clay, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Overexpression of the breast cancer oncogene HER2 correlates with poor survival. Current HER2-directed therapies confer limited clinical benefits and most patients experience progressive disease. Because refractory tumors remain strongly HER2+, vaccine approaches targeting HER2 have therapeutic potential, but wild type (wt) HER2 cannot safely be delivered in imunogenic viral vectors because it is a potent oncogene. We designed and tested several HER2 vaccines devoid of oncogenic activity to develop a safe vaccine for clinical use. Experimental Design We created recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing the extracellular domain of HER2 (Ad-HER2-ECD), ECD plus the transmembrane domain (Ad-HER2-ECD-TM) and full length HER2 inactivated for kinase function (Ad-HER2-ki) and determined their immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect in wild type (WT) and HER2 tolerant mice. To assess their safety, we compared their effect on the cellular transcriptome, cell proliferation, anchorage-dependent growth, and transformation potential in vivo. Results Ad-HER2-ki was the most immunogenic vector in WT animals, retained immunogenicity in HER2-transgenic tolerant animals, and showed strong therapeutic efficacy in treatment models. Despite being highly expressed, HER2-ki protein was not phosphorylated and did not produce an oncogenic gene signature in primary human cells. And, in contrast to HER2-wt, cells overexpressing HER2-ki were less proliferative, displayed less anchorage independent growth and were not transformed in vivo. Conclusions Vaccination with mutationally inactivated, non-oncogenic Ad-HER2-ki results in robust polyclonal immune responses to HER2 in tolerant models, which translates into strong and effective anti-tumor responses in vivo. Ad-HER2-ki is thus a safe and promising vaccine for evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:20179231

  18. Tumor-specific immunity and antiangiogenesis generated by a DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin linked to a tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W F; Hung, C F; Chai, C Y; Hsu, K F; He, L; Ling, M; Wu, T C

    2001-09-01

    Antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy and antiangiogenesis have emerged as two attractive strategies for cancer treatment. An innovative approach that combines both mechanisms will likely generate the most potent antitumor effect. We tested this approach using calreticulin (CRT), which has demonstrated the ability to enhance MHC class I presentation and exhibit an antiangiogenic effect. We explored the linkage of CRT to a model tumor antigen, human papilloma virus type-16 (HPV-16) E7, for the development of a DNA vaccine. We found that C57BL/6 mice vaccinated intradermally with CRT/E7 DNA exhibited a dramatic increase in E7-specific CD8(+) T cell precursors and an impressive antitumor effect against E7-expressing tumors compared with mice vaccinated with wild-type E7 DNA or CRT DNA. Vaccination of CD4/CD8 double-depleted C57BL/6 mice and immunocompromised (BALB/c nu/nu) mice with CRT/E7 DNA or CRT DNA generated significant reduction of lung tumor nodules compared with wild-type E7 DNA, suggesting that antiangiogenesis may have contributed to the antitumor effect. Examination of microvessel density in lung tumor nodules and an in vivo angiogenesis assay further confirmed the antiangiogenic effect generated by CRT/E7 and CRT. Thus, cancer therapy using CRT linked to a tumor antigen holds promise for treating tumors by combining antigen-specific immunotherapy and antiangiogenesis.

  19. Targeted delivery of tumor antigens to activated dendritic cells via CD11c molecules induces potent antitumor immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huafeng; Wang, Suhui; Zhang, Dapeng; Hou, Sheng; Qian, Weizhu; Li, Bohua; Guo, Huaizu; Kou, Geng; He, Jinqiu; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun

    2009-07-15

    CD11c is an antigen receptor predominantly expressed on dendritic cells (DC), to which antigen targeting has been shown to induce robust antigen-specific immune responses. To facilitate targeted delivery of tumor antigens to DCs, we generated fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of human HER or its rat homologue neu, fused to the single-chain fragment variable specific for CD11c (scFv(CD11c)-HER2/neu). Induction of cellular and humoral immune responses and antitumoral activity of the fusion proteins admixed with DC-activating CpG oligonucleotides (scFv(CD11c)-HER2/neu(CpG)) were tested in transplantable HER2/neu-expressing murine tumor models and in transgenic BALB-neuT mice developing spontaneous neu-driven mammary carcinomas. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with scFv(CD11c)-HER2(CpG) protected mice from subsequent challenge with HER2-positive, but not HER2-negative, murine breast tumor cells, accompanied by induction of strong HER2-specific T-cell and antibody responses. In a therapeutic setting, injection of scFv(CD11c)-HER2(CpG) caused rejection of established HER2-positive tumors. Importantly, antitumoral activity of such a fusion protein vaccine could be reproduced in immunotolerant BALB-neuT mice, where scFv(CD11c)-neu(CpG) vaccination significantly protected against a subsequent challenge with neu-expressing murine breast tumor cells and markedly delayed the onset of spontaneous mammary carcinomas. CD11c-targeted protein vaccines for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs induce potent immune responses and antitumoral activities and provide a rationale for further development of this approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Curative potential of GM-CSF-secreting tumor cell vaccines on established orthotopic liver tumors: mechanisms for the superior antitumor activity of live tumor cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tai, Kuo-Feng; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Hwang, Lih-Hwa

    2004-01-01

    In preclinical studies, tumor cells genetically engineered to secrete cytokines, hereafter referred to as tumor cell vaccines, can often generate systemic antitumor immunity. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of live or irradiated tumor cell vaccines that secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on established orthotopic liver tumors. Experimental results indicated that two doses (3 x 10(7) cells per dose) of irradiated tumor cell vaccines were therapeutically ineffective, whereas one dose (3 x 10(6) cells) of live tumor cell vaccines caused complete tumor regression. In vivo depletion of CD8+ T cells, but not natural killer cells, restored tumor formation in the live vaccine-treated animals. Additionally, the treatment of cells with live vaccine induced markedly higher levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity than the irradiated vaccines in the draining lymph nodes. The higher levels of cytokine and antigen loads could partly explain the superior antitumor activity of live tumor cell vaccines, but other unidentified mechanisms could also play a role in the early T cell activation in the lymph nodes. A protocol using multiple and higher dosages of irradiated tumor cell vaccines also caused significant regression of liver tumors. These results suggest that the GM-CSF-secreting tumor cell vaccines are highly promising for orthotopic liver tumors if higher levels of immune responses are elicited during early tumor development. Copyright 2004 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Alphaviral Vector-Transduced Dendritic Cells are Successful Therapeutic Vaccines against neu-Overexpressing Tumors in Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Timothy P.; Burgents, Joseph E.; Long, Brian; Ferrer, Ivana; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Tisch, Roland M.; Johnston, Robert E.; Serody, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    While dendritic cell (DC) vaccines can protect hosts from tumor challenge, their ability to effectively inhibit the growth of established tumors remains indeterminate. Previously, we have shown that human DCs transduced with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) were potent stimulators of antigen-specific T cells in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the ability of VRP-transduced DCs (VRP-DCs) to induce therapeutic immunity in vivo against tumors overexpressing the neu oncoprotein. Transduction of murine DCs with VRPs resulted in high-level transgene expression, DC maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Vaccination with VRP-transduced DCs (VRP-DCs) expressing a truncated neu oncoprotein induced robust neu-specific CD8+ T cell and anti-neu IgG responses. Furthermore, a single vaccination with VRP-DCs induced the regression of large established tumors in wild-type mice. Interestingly, depletion of CD4+, but not CD8+, T cells completely abrogated inhibition of tumor growth following vaccination. Taken together, our results demonstrate that VRP-DC vaccines induce potent immunity against established tumors, and emphasize the importance of the generation of both CD4+ T cell and B cell responses for efficient tumor inhibition. These findings provide the rationale for future evaluation VRP-DC vaccines in the clinical setting. PMID:17675184

  2. Alphaviral vector-transduced dendritic cells are successful therapeutic vaccines against neu-overexpressing tumors in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Moran, Timothy P; Burgents, Joseph E; Long, Brian; Ferrer, Ivana; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Tisch, Roland M; Johnston, Robert E; Serody, Jonathan S

    2007-09-04

    While dendritic cell (DC) vaccines can protect hosts from tumor challenge, their ability to effectively inhibit the growth of established tumors remains indeterminate. Previously, we have shown that human DCs transduced with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) were potent stimulators of antigen-specific T cells in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the ability of VRP-transduced DCs (VRP-DCs) to induce therapeutic immunity in vivo against tumors overexpressing the neu oncoprotein. Transduction of murine DCs with VRPs resulted in high-level transgene expression, DC maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Vaccination with VRP-DCs expressing a truncated neu oncoprotein induced robust neu-specific CD8(+) T cell and anti-neu IgG responses. Furthermore, a single vaccination with VRP-DCs induced the regression of large established tumors in wild-type mice. Interestingly, depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+), T cells completely abrogated inhibition of tumor growth following vaccination. Taken together, our results demonstrate that VRP-DC vaccines induce potent immunity against established tumors, and emphasize the importance of the generation of both CD4(+) T cell and B cell responses for efficient tumor inhibition. These findings provide the rationale for future evaluation of VRP-DC vaccines in the clinical setting.

  3. Lipopolyplex potentiates anti-tumor immunity of mRNA-based vaccination.

    PubMed

    Persano, Stefano; Guevara, Maria L; Li, Zhaoqi; Mai, Junhua; Ferrari, Mauro; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Shen, Haifa

    2017-05-01

    mRNA-based vaccines have the benefit of triggering robust anti-cancer immunity without the potential danger of genome integration from DNA vaccines or the limitation of antigen selection from peptide vaccines. Yet, a conventional mRNA vaccine comprising of condensed mRNA molecules in a positively charged protein core structure is not effectively internalized by the antigen-presenting cells. It cannot offer sufficient protection for mRNA molecules from degradation by plasma and tissue enzymes either. Here, we have developed a lipopolyplex mRNA vaccine that consists of a poly-(β-amino ester) polymer mRNA core encapsulated into a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polyethylene glycol)-2000 (EDOPC/DOPE/DSPE-PEG) lipid shell. This core-shell structured mRNA vaccine enters dendritic cells through macropinocytosis. It displayed intrinsic adjuvant activity by potently stimulating interferon-β and interleukin-12 expression in dendritic cells through Toll-like receptor 7/8 signaling. Dendritic cells treated with the mRNA vaccine displayed enhanced antigen presentation capability. Mice bearing lung metastatic B16-OVA tumors expressing the ovalbumin antigen were treated with the lipopolyplex mRNA, and over 90% reduction of tumor nodules was observed. Collectively, this core-shell structure offers a promising platform for mRNA vaccine development.

  4. Neoadjuvant anti-tumor vaccination prior to surgery enhances survival.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Scott A; Cleaver, Amanda; Lakhiani, Devina D; Khong, Andrea; Connor, Theresa; Wylie, Ben; Lesterhuis, W Joost; Robinson, Bruce W S; Lake, Richard A

    2014-09-04

    This study was conducted to determine if anti-tumor vaccination administered prior to partial debulking surgery could improve survival using a murine solid tumour model. Tumor incidence and survival rates were compared in mice bearing subcutaneous AB1-HA mesothelioma tumors that received either sham surgery, debulking surgery or vaccination prior to debulking surgery. Additionally, mice were depleted of CD4 and/or CD8 T lymphocytes during vaccination to assess their involvement in vaccine induced anti-tumor immunity. Flow cytometry was performed to characterise changes in the proportion and activation status of immune cells associated with anti-tumor immunity. Neoadjuvant vaccination combined with debulking surgery resulted in decreased tumor burden, increased survival and generation of tumor-specific immunity compared to surgery alone. Depletion of CD8 T cells completely abrogated any vaccine induced anti-tumor immune response. Conversely, CD4 depletion enhanced CD8 T cell activation resulting in complete tumor regression in 70% of mice treated with combined surgery and vaccination therapy. Tumor free survival was associated with established immunological memory as defined by the induction of effector memory T cells and resistance to rechallenge with parental AB1 mesothelioma cells. Neoadjuvant anti-cancer vaccination combined with partial debulking surgery induced CD8-dependent anti-tumor immunity that significantly delayed tumor outgrowth relative to surgery alone. Complete tumor eradication was observed when vaccination and surgery were performed in CD4 T cell depleted animals. This demonstrates that adjuvant immunotherapy can improve post-surgical survival following cancer debulking surgery and provides a scientific rational for clinical trials of such an approach.

  5. A potent Brucella abortus 2308 Δery live vaccine allows for the differentiation between natural and vaccinated infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junbo; Yin, Shuanghong; Guo, Fei; Meng, Ren; Chen, Chuangfu; Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhiqiang; Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Hu, Shengwei; Ni, Wei; Li, Tiansen; Zhang, Ke

    2014-08-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease that causes animal and human diseases. However, the current Brucella abortus vaccines (S19 and RB51) are deficient; they can cause abortion in pregnant animals. Moreover, when the vaccine S19 is used, tests cannot differentiate natural from vaccinated infection. Therefore, a safer and more potent vaccine is needed. A Brucella abortus 2308 ery promoter mutant (Δery) was constructed to overcome these drawbacks. The growth of the Δery mutant was significantly attenuated in macrophages and mice and induced high protective immunity in mice. Moreover, Δery induced an anti-Brucella-specific IgG (immunoglobulin G) response and stimulated the expression of interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Furthermore, the expression of EryA antigen allowed for the serological differentiation between natural and vaccinated infection in mice. These results indicate that the Δery mutant is a potential attenuated live vaccine candidate against virulent Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) infection.

  6. Nanomedicine as a potent strategy in melanoma tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Pautu, Vincent; Leonetti, Daniela; Lepeltier, Elise; Clere, Nicolas; Passirani, Catherine

    2017-02-20

    Melanoma originated from melanocytes is the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Despite considerable progresses in clinical treatment with the discovery of BRAF or MEK inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, the durability of response to treatment is often limited to the development of acquired resistance and systemic toxicity. The limited success of conventional treatment highlights the importance of understanding the role of melanoma tumor microenvironment in tumor developement and drug resistance. Nanoparticles represent a promising strategy for the development of new cancer treatments able to improve the bioavailability of drugs and increase their penetration by targeting specifically tumors cells and/or tumor environment. In this review, we will discuss the main influence of tumor microenvironment in melanoma growth and treatment outcome. Furthermore, third generation loaded nanotechnologies represent an exciting tool for detection, treatment, and escape from possible mechanism of resistance mediated by tumor microenvironment, and will be highlighted in this review.

  7. Biotechnology approaches to produce potent, self-adjuvanting antigen-adjuvant fusion protein subunit vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Peter Michael

    Traditional vaccination approaches (e.g. live attenuated or killed microorganisms) are among the most effective means to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. These approaches, nevertheless, have failed to yield successful vaccines against many important pathogens. To overcome this problem, methods have been developed to identify microbial components, against which protective immune responses can be elicited. Subunit antigens identified by these approaches enable the production of defined vaccines, with improved safety profiles. However, they are generally poorly immunogenic, necessitating their administration with potent immunostimulatory adjuvants. Since few safe and effective adjuvants are currently used in vaccines approved for human use, with those available displaying poor potency, or an inability to stimulate the types of immune responses required for vaccines against specific diseases (e.g. cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) to treat cancers), the development of new vaccines will be aided by the availability of characterized platforms of new adjuvants, improving our capacity to rationally select adjuvants for different applications. One such approach, involves the addition of microbial components (pathogen-associated molecular patterns; PAMPs), that can stimulate strong immune responses, into subunit vaccine formulations. The conjugation of PAMPs to subunit antigens provides a means to greatly increase vaccine potency, by targeting immunostimulation and antigen to the same antigen presenting cell. Thus, methods that enable the efficient, and inexpensive production of antigen-adjuvant fusions represent an exciting mean to improve immunity towards subunit antigens. Herein we review four protein-based adjuvants (flagellin, bacterial lipoproteins, the extra domain A of fibronectin (EDA), and heat shock proteins (Hsps)), which can be genetically fused to antigens to enable recombinant production of antigen-adjuvant fusion proteins, with a focus on their

  8. Interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar vesicles as synthetic vaccines for potent humoral and cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, James J.; Suh, Heikyung; Bershteyn, Anna; Stephan, Matthias T.; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Bonnie; Sohail, Mashaal; Luo, Samantha; Ho Um, Soong; Khant, Htet; Goodwin, Jessica T.; Ramos, Jenelyn; Chiu, Wah; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2011-03-01

    Vaccines based on recombinant proteins avoid the toxicity and antivector immunity associated with live vaccine (for example, viral) vectors, but their immunogenicity is poor, particularly for CD8+ T-cell responses. Synthetic particles carrying antigens and adjuvant molecules have been developed to enhance subunit vaccines, but in general these materials have failed to elicit CD8+ T-cell responses comparable to those for live vectors in preclinical animal models. Here, we describe interbilayer-crosslinked multilamellar vesicles formed by crosslinking headgroups of adjacent lipid bilayers within multilamellar vesicles. Interbilayer-crosslinked vesicles stably entrapped protein antigens in the vesicle core and lipid-based immunostimulatory molecules in the vesicle walls under extracellular conditions, but exhibited rapid release in the presence of endolysosomal lipases. We found that these antigen/adjuvant-carrying vesicles form an extremely potent whole-protein vaccine, eliciting endogenous T-cell and antibody responses comparable to those for the strongest vaccine vectors. These materials should enable a range of subunit vaccines and provide new possibilities for therapeutic protein delivery.

  9. Cancer vaccines: harnessing the potential of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Although the presence of cancer suggests failure of the immune system to protect against development of tumors, the possibility that immunity can be redirected and focused to generate an anti-tumor response offers great translational possibility. The key to this is identifying antigens likely to be present in any given tumor and functionally critical to tumor survival and growth. Such tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are varied and optimally should be absent from normal tissue. Of particular interest are TAAs associated with the tumor stroma, as immunity directed against the stroma may restrict the ability of the tumor to grow and metastasize. Important to directing the immune system toward an effect anti-tumor response is the understanding of how TAAs are processed and how the tumor is able to evade immune elimination. The process of immunoediting happens in response to the selective pressure that the immune system places upon tumor cell populations and allows for emergence of tumor cells capable of escaping immune destruction. Efforts to harness the immune system for clinical application has been aided by vaccines based on purified recombinant protein or nucleic acid TAAs. For example, a vaccine for canine melanoma has been developed and approved based on immunization with DNA components of tyrosinase, a glycoprotein essential to melanin synthesis. The performance of cancer vaccines has been aided in some cases when supplemented with immunostimulatory molecules such as interleukin 2 or a novel extracellular matrix vaccine adjuvant. Vaccines with the broadest menu of antigenic targets may be those most likely to succeed against cancer. For this reason, tissue vaccines produced from harvested tumor material may offer significant benefit. With several cancer vaccines on the veterinary and human markets, efforts to understand basic tumor immunology are soon to yield great dividends.

  10. Vaccines with interleukin-12-transduced acute myeloid leukemia cells elicit very potent therapeutic and long-lasting protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Dunussi-Joannopoulos, K; Runyon, K; Erickson, J; Schaub, R G; Hawley, R G; Leonard, J P

    1999-12-15

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a heterodimeric cytokine mediating a dynamic interplay between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Preclinical studies have demonstrated that recombinant murine IL-12 (rmIL-12) promotes specific antitumor immunity mediated by T cells in several types of tumors. However, the in vivo antitumor properties of IL-12 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have not been previously reported. We show here in a murine AML model that systemic administration of rmIL-12 significantly delays tumor growth but is incapable of rescuing mice from lethal leukemia. In contrast, AML cells genetically modified to express IL-12 (IL12-AML) using murine stem cell virus (MSCV) p40 + p35 elicit very potent antileukemic activity. Vaccines with lethally irradiated IL12-AML cells protect naive mice against challenge with wild-type AML cells and, more importantly, can cure mice bearing a considerable leukemic burden. Immunized mice show no signs of systemic IL-12 toxicity and their spleen histology is comparable with naive mice spleen. In vivo depletion of IL-12, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), or CD8(+) T cells after injections with live IL12-AML cells abrogates completely the antileukemia immune responses. Studies on the in vitro effects of IFN-gamma on AML cells demonstrate enhanced expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and accessory molecules and induction of the costimulatory molecules B7.1 and B7.2, but no significant direct antiproliferative effect. (51)Cr release assays show that rejection of live IL12-AML cells supports the development of long-lasting leukemia-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that IL12-AML vaccination is a safe and potent immunotherapeutic approach that has a great potential to eliminate minimal residual disease in patients with AML.

  11. Antitumor efficacy of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Wang, D.Q.; Maru, M.; Nakajima, K.; Kato, S.; Kurimura, T.; Wakamiya, N. )

    1990-11-01

    The antitumor efficacies of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccines were examined in murine syngeneic MH134 and X5563 tumor cells. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was inoculated i.p. into C3H/HeN mice that had received whole body X-irradiation at 150 rads. After 3 weeks, the vaccines were administered i.p. 3 times at weekly intervals. One week after the last injection, mice were challenged i.p. with various doses of syngeneic MH134 or X5563 viable tumor cells. Four methods were used for preparing tumor cell vaccines: X-ray irradiation; fixation with paraformaldehyde for 1 h or 3 months; and purification of the membrane fraction. All four vaccines were effective, but the former two vaccines were the most effective. A mixture of the membrane fraction of untreated tumor cells and UV-inactivated vaccinia virus also had an antitumor effect. These results indicate that vaccine with the complete cell structure is the most effective. The membrane fraction of UV-inactivated vaccinia virus-absorbed tumor cells was also effective. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus can react with not only intact tumor cells but also the purified membrane fraction of tumor cells and augment antitumor activity.

  12. A novel, broad spectrum therapeutic HPV vaccine targeting the E7 proteins of HPV16, 18, 31, 45 and 52 that elicits potent E7-specific CD8T cell immunity and regression of large, established, E7-expressing TC-1 tumors.

    PubMed

    Wick, Darin A; Webb, John R

    2011-10-13

    Persistent infection by high risk genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of cervical cancer, which remains one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. In addition, there is a growing appreciation that high risk HPVs are associated with a number of other cancers including anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck cancers. Recently, prophylactic HPV vaccines targeting the two most prevalent high risk HPVs (HPV16 and HPV18) have been deployed in large-scale vaccination campaigns. However, the extent to which these prophylactic vaccines confer protection against other high risk HPV genotypes is largely unknown and prophylactic vaccines have been shown to be ineffective against pre-existing infection. Thus there continues to be an urgent need for effective therapeutic vaccines against HPV. The E7 protein of HPV16 has been widely studied as a target for therapeutic vaccines in HPV-associated cancer settings because HPV16 is the most prevalent of the high risk HPV genotypes. However, HPV16 accounts for only about 50% of cervical cancers and there are at least 15 other high risk HPVs that are known to be oncogenic. We have developed a novel, broad-spectrum, therapeutic vaccine (Pentarix) directed at the E7 proteins from five of the most prevalent high-risk genotypes of HPV worldwide (HPV16, 18, 31, 45 and 52) that together account for more than 80% of all HPV-associated cancers. Pentarix is a recombinant protein-based vaccine that elicits strong, multi-genotype specific CD8 T cell immunity when administered to mice in combination with adjuvants comprised of agonists of the TLR3 or TLR9 family of innate immune receptors. Furthermore, large, established E7-expressing TC-1 tumors undergo rapid and complete regression after therapeutic vaccination of mice with Pentarix. Together, these data suggest that Pentarix may be of clinical value for patients with E7-positive, HPV-associated precancerous lesions or malignant disease.

  13. Potent and tumor specific: arming bacteria with therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Van Dessel, Nele; Swofford, Charles A; Forbes, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are perfect vessels for targeted cancer therapy. Conventional chemotherapy is limited by passive diffusion, and systemic administration causes severe side effects. Bacteria can overcome these obstacles by delivering therapeutic proteins specifically to tumors. Bacteria have been modified to produce proteins that directly kill cells, induce apoptosis via signaling pathways, and stimulate the immune system. These three modes of bacterial treatment have all been shown to reduce tumor growth in animal models. Bacteria have also been designed to convert nontoxic prodrugs to active therapeutic compounds. The ease of genetic manipulation enables creation of arrays of bacteria that release many new protein drugs. This versatility will allow targeting of multiple cancer pathways and will establish a platform for individualized cancer medicine. PMID:25853312

  14. Induction of Potent Immune Responses by Cationic Microparticles with Adsorbed Human Immunodeficiency Virus DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    O'Hagan, Derek; Singh, Manmohan; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Wild, Carl; Barnett, Susan; Chen, Minchao; Schaefer, Mary; Doe, Barbara; Otten, Gillis R.; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of cationic microparticles with adsorbed DNA at inducing immune responses was investigated in mice, guinea pigs, and rhesus macaques. Plasmid DNA vaccines encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag and Env adsorbed onto the surface of cationic poly(lactide-coglycolide) (PLG) microparticles were shown to be substantially more potent than corresponding naked DNA vaccines. In mice immunized with HIV gag DNA, adsorption onto PLG increased CD8+ T-cell and antibody responses by ∼100- and ∼1,000-fold, respectively. In guinea pigs immunized with HIV env DNA adsorbed onto PLG, antibody responses showed a more rapid onset and achieved markedly higher enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neutralizing titers than in animals immunized with naked DNA. Further enhancement of antibody responses was observed in animals vaccinated with PLG/DNA microparticles formulated with aluminum phosphate. The magnitude of anti-Env antibody responses induced by PLG/DNA particles was equivalent to that induced by recombinant gp120 protein formulated with a strong adjuvant, MF-59. In guinea pigs immunized with a combination vaccine containing HIV env and HIV gag DNA plasmids on PLG microparticles, substantially superior antibody responses were induced against both components, as measured by onset, duration, and titer. Furthermore, PLG formulation overcame an apparent hyporesponsiveness of the env DNA component in the combination vaccine. Finally, preliminary data in rhesus macaques demonstrated a substantial enhancement of immune responses afforded by PLG/DNA. Therefore, formulation of DNA vaccines by adsorption onto PLG microparticles is a powerful means of increasing vaccine potency. PMID:11533167

  15. Therapeutic vaccination based on side population cells transduced by the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene elicits potent antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, C; Kohara, H; Inoue, H; Narusawa, M; Ogawa, Y; Hirose-Yotsuya, L; Miyamoto, S; Matsumura, Y; Yamada, K; Takahashi, A; Tani, K

    2017-04-01

    Among cancer immunotherapies, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene-transduced tumor cell vaccine (GVAX) therapies appear promising and have been shown to be safe and effective in multiple clinical trials. However, the antitumor efficacies of GVAX therapy alone are in some cases limited. Here we showed that GVAX therapy targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs) substantially suppressed tumor development in syngeneic immunocompetent mice recapitulating normal immune systems. CSCs were isolated as side population (SP) cells from 4T1 murine breast carcinoma cell line and transduced with GM-CSF gene delivered by non-transmissible Sendai virus (4T1-SP/GM). Impaired tumorigenicity of subcutaneously injected 4T1-SP/GM depended on CD8(+) T cells in concert with CD4(+) T cells and natural killer cells. Mice therapeutically vaccinated with irradiated 4T1-SP/GM cells had markedly suppressed tumor development of subcutaneously transplanted 4T1-SP cells compared with those treated with irradiated cells of non-transduced 4T1-SP cells or non-SP (4T1-NSP/GM) cells. Tumor suppression was accompanied by the robust accumulation of mature dendritic cells at vaccination sites and T-helper type 1-skewed systemic cellular immunity. Our results suggested that CSC cell-based GVAX immunotherapy might be clinically useful for inducing potent tumor-specific antitumor immunity.

  16. Improving T cell responses to modified peptides in tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-03-01

    Immune recognition and elimination of cancerous cells is the primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. However, obstacles including immune tolerance and tumor-induced immunosuppression often limit beneficial immune responses. Vaccination is one proposed intervention that may help to overcome these issues and is an active area of study in cancer immunotherapy. Immunizing with tumor antigenic peptides is a promising, straight-forward vaccine strategy hypothesized to boost preexisting antitumor immunity. However, tumor antigens are often weak T cell agonists, attributable to several mechanisms, including immune self-tolerance and poor immunogenicity of self-derived tumor peptides. One strategy for overcoming these mechanisms is vaccination with mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, which alter the antigen presentation and/or T cell activation to increase the expansion of tumor-specific T cells. Evaluation of mimotope vaccine strategies has revealed that even subtle alterations in peptide sequence can dramatically alter antigen presentation and T cell receptor recognition. Most of this research has been performed using T cell clones, which may not be accurate representations of the naturally occurring antitumor response. The relationship between clones generated after mimotope vaccination and the polyclonal T cell repertoire is unclear. Our work with mimotopes in a mouse model of colon carcinoma has revealed important insights into these issues. We propose that the identification of mimotopes based on stimulation of the naturally responding T cell repertoire will dramatically improve the efficacy of mimotope vaccination.

  17. A novel alphavirus vaccine encoding prostate-specific membrane antigen elicits potent cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Durso, Robert J; Andjelic, Sofija; Gardner, Jason P; Margitich, Dennis J; Donovan, Gerald P; Arrigale, Robert R; Wang, Xinning; Maughan, Maureen F; Talarico, Todd L; Olmsted, Robert A; Heston, Warren D W; Maddon, Paul J; Olson, William C

    2007-07-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an attractive target for active immunotherapy. Alphavirus vaccines have shown promise in eliciting immunity to tumor antigens. This study investigated the immunogenicity of alphavirus vaccine replicon particles (VRP) that encode PSMA (PSMA-VRP). Cells were infected with PSMA-VRP and evaluated for PSMA expression and folate hydrolase activity. Mice were immunized s.c. with PSMA-VRP or purified PSMA protein. Sera, splenocytes, and purified T cells were evaluated for the magnitude, durability, and epitope specificity of the anti-PSMA response. Antibodies were measured by flow cytometry, and cellular responses were measured by IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot and chromium release assays. Cellular responses in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were mapped using overlapping 15-mer PSMA peptides. A Good Laboratory Practice-compliant toxicology study was conducted in rabbits. PSMA-VRP directed high-level expression of active PSMA. Robust T-cell and B-cell responses were elicited by a single injection of 2 x 10(5) infectious units, and responses were boosted following repeat immunizations. Anti-PSMA responses were detected following three immunizations with 10(2) infectious units and increased with increasing dose. PSMA-VRP was more immunogenic than adjuvanted PSMA protein. Responses to PSMA-VRP were characterized by Th-1 cytokines, potent CTL activity, and IgG2a/IgG2b antibodies. T-cell responses in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were directed toward different PSMA peptides. Immunogenic doses of PSMA-VRP were well tolerated in mice and rabbits. PSMA-VRP elicited potent cellular and humoral immunity in mice, and specific anti-PSMA responses were boosted on repeat dosing. PSMA-VRP represents a promising approach for immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  18. Potent Plasmablast-Derived Antibodies Elicited by the NIH Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Diogo M; Silveira, Cassia G T; Ricciardi, Michael J; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Pedreño-Lopez, Núria; Bailey, Varian K; Gutman, Martin J; Maxwell, Helen S; Domingues, Aline; Costa, Priscilla R; Ferrari, Lilian; Goulart, Raphaella; Martins, Mauricio A; Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Kalil, Jorge; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo; Wrammert, Jens; Whitehead, Stephen S; Burton, Dennis R; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Kallas, Esper G; Waktins, David I

    2017-09-06

    live attenuated tetravalent vaccines (LATVs) will be introduced worldwide is higher than ever. While it is widely accepted that dengue virus (DENV)-neutralizing antibody (nAb) titers are associated with protection, the Ab repertoire induced by LATVs remain uncharacterized. Here, we describe the isolation of potent (Neut50 < 0.1 μg/ml) nAbs from a DENV-seropositive volunteer immunized with the tetravalent vaccine Butantan-DV, which is currently in Phase III trials. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Selected anti-tumor vaccines merit a place in multimodal tumor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eva-Maria; Wunderlich, Roland; Ebel, Nina; Rubner, Yvonne; Schlücker, Eberhard; Meyer-Pittroff, Roland; Ott, Oliver J.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal approaches are nowadays successfully applied in cancer therapy. Primary locally acting therapies such as radiotherapy (RT) and surgery are combined with systemic administration of chemotherapeutics. Nevertheless, the therapy of cancer is still a big challenge in medicine. The treatments often fail to induce long-lasting anti-tumor responses. Tumor recurrences and metastases result. Immunotherapies are therefore ideal adjuncts to standard tumor therapies since they aim to activate the patient's immune system against malignant cells even outside the primary treatment areas (abscopal effects). Especially cancer vaccines may have the potential both to train the immune system against cancer cells and to generate an immunological memory, resulting in long-lasting anti-tumor effects. However, despite promising results in phase I and II studies, most of the concepts finally failed. There are some critical aspects in development and application of cancer vaccines that may decide on their efficiency. The time point and frequency of medication, usage of an adequate immune adjuvant, the vaccine's immunogenic potential, and the tumor burden of the patient are crucial. Whole tumor cell vaccines have advantages compared to peptide-based ones since a variety of tumor antigens (TAs) are present. The master requirements of cell-based, therapeutic tumor vaccines are the complete inactivation of the tumor cells and the increase of their immunogenicity. Since the latter is highly connected with the cell death modality, the inactivation procedure of the tumor cell material may significantly influence the vaccine's efficiency. We therefore also introduce high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an innovative inactivation technology for tumor cell-based vaccines and outline that HHP efficiently inactivates tumor cells by enhancing their immunogenicity. Finally studies are presented proving that anti-tumor immune responses can be triggered by combining RT with selected immune

  20. Overview of mimotopes and related strategies in tumor vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Liu, Zhiguo; Fan, Daiming

    2008-12-01

    Tumor vaccine has been studied extensively as an alternative or adjuvant therapy in the treatment of malignant tumors in the hope of prolonging the overall survival rates of cancer patients. The efficacy largely relies on the specificity of the target. In the last decade, many antibody epitopes, called mimotopes, have been revealed as candidates through phage-display technology. These mimotopes do not necessarily consist of amino acid sequences that are identical to the native antigen but they do mimic their structure. Tumor vaccines based on these mimotopes have been proposed as an important developing strategy. Some peptide mimotopes have produced encouraging clinical outcomes. Although most studies are still in the preclinical phase, these findings will possibly pave the way for the development of novel mimotope-based tumor vaccines.

  1. Impaired antigen presentation and potent phagocytic activity identifying tumor-tolerant human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Soares-Schanoski, Alessandra; Jurado, Teresa; Córdoba, Raúl; Siliceo, María; Fresno, Carlos Del; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Toledano, Victor; Vallejo-Cremades, Maria T; Alfonso-Iñiguez, Sergio; Carballo-Palos, Arkaitz; Fernández-Ruiz, Irene; Cubillas-Zapata, Carolina; Biswas, Subhra K; Arnalich, Francisco; García-Río, Francisco; López-Collazo, Eduardo

    2012-06-29

    Monocyte exposure to tumor cells induces a transient state in which these cells are refractory to further exposure to cancer. This phenomenon, termed "tumor tolerance", is characterized by a decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines in response to tumors. In the past, we found that this effect comprises IRAK-M up regulation and TLR4 and CD44 activation. Herein we have established a human model of tumor tolerance and have observed a marked down-regulation of MHCII molecules as well as the MHCII master regulator, CIITA, in monocytes/macrophages. These cells combine an impaired capability for antigen presentation with potent phagocytic activity and exhibit an M2-like phenotype. In addition circulating monocytes isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia patients exhibited the same profile as tumor tolerant cells after tumor ex vivo exposition.

  2. Early Potent Protection against Heterologous SIVsmE660 Challenge Following Live Attenuated SIV Vaccination in Mauritian Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Neil; Ham, Claire; Mee, Edward T.; Rose, Nicola J.; Mattiuzzo, Giada; Jenkins, Adrian; Page, Mark; Elsley, William; Robinson, Mark; Smith, Deborah; Ferguson, Deborah; Towers, Greg; Almond, Neil; Stebbings, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccines represent the most effective means of vaccinating macaques against pathogenic SIV challenge. However, thus far, protection has been demonstrated to be more effective against homologous than heterologous strains. Immune correlates of vaccine-induced protection have also been difficult to identify, particularly those measurable in the peripheral circulation. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe potent protection in 6 out of 8 Mauritian-derived cynomolgus macaques (MCM) against heterologous virus challenge with the pathogenic, uncloned SIVsmE660 viral stock following vaccination with live attenuated SIVmac251/C8. MCM provided a characterised host genetic background with limited Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and TRIM5α allelic diversity. Early protection, observed as soon as 3 weeks post-vaccination, was comparable to that of 20 weeks vaccination. Recrudescence of vaccine virus was most pronounced in breakthrough cases where simultaneous identification of vaccine and challenge viruses by virus-specific PCR was indicative of active co-infection. Persistence of the vaccine virus in a range of lymphoid tissues was typified by a consistent level of SIV RNA positive cells in protected vaccinates. However, no association between MHC class I /II haplotype or TRIM5α polymorphism and study outcome was identified. Conclusion/Significance This SIV vaccine study, conducted in MHC-characterised MCM, demonstrated potent protection against the pathogenic, heterologous SIVsmE660 challenge stock after only 3 weeks vaccination. This level of protection against this viral stock by intravenous challenge has not been hitherto observed. The mechanism(s) of protection by vaccination with live attenuated SIV must account for the heterologous and early protection data described in this study, including those which relate to the innate immune system. PMID:21853072

  3. Adequate antigen availability: a key issue for novel approaches to tumor vaccination and tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2013-03-01

    A crucial parameter for activation of the anti-tumor immune response is an adequate antigen availability (AAA) defined here as the optimal tumor antigen dose and related antigen processing and MHC-II-restricted presentation necessary to efficiently trigger tumor-specific TH cells. We will discuss two distinct experimental systems: a) a preventive anti-tumor vaccination system; b) a therapy-induced anti-tumor vaccination approach. In the first case tumor cells are rendered constitutively MHC-II+ by transfecting them with the MHC-II transcriptional activator CIITA. Here AAA is generated by the function of tumor's newly expressed MHC-II molecules to present tumor-associated antigens to tumor-specific TH cells. In the second case, AAA is generated by treating established tumors with neovasculature-targeted TNFα. In conjuction with Melphalan, targeted TNFα delivery produces extensive areas of tumor necrosis that generate AAA capable of optimally activate tumor-specific TH cells which in turn activate CTL immune effectors. In both experimental systems tumor rejection and persistent and long-lived TH cell anti-tumor memory, responsible of defending the animals from subsequent challenges with tumor cells, are achieved. Based on these and other investigators' results we propose that AAA is a key element for triggering adaptive immune functions resulting in subversion from a pro-tumor to an anti-tumor microenvironment, tumor rejection and acquisition of anti-tumor immune memory. Hypotheses of neuro-immune networks involved in these approaches are discussed. These considerations are important also for the comprehension of how chemotherapy and/or radiation therapies may help to block and/or to eradicate the tumor and for the construction of suitable anti-tumor vaccine strategies.

  4. Current Status of Autologous Breast Tumor Cell-based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Samantha L.; Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Zaharoff, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Approximately 9 of 10 breast cancer-related deaths are attributable to metastasis. Yet, less than 4% of breast cancer patients are initially diagnosed with metastatic cancer. Therefore, the majority of breast cancer-related deaths are due to recurrence and progression of nonmetastatic disease. There is tremendous clinical opportunity for novel adjuvant strategies, such as immunotherapies, that have the potential to prevent progressive recurrences. In particular, autologous tumor cell-based vaccines can train a patient's immune system to recognize and eliminate occult disease. Autologous tumor cell-based vaccines have several advantages including safety, multivalency and patient specificity. Furthermore, because lumpectomy or mastectomy is indicated for the vast majority of breast cancer patients, resected tumors offer a readily available, patient-specific source of tumor antigen. Disadvantages of autologous tumor cell-based vaccines include poor immunogenicity and production inconsistencies. This review summarizes recent progress in the development of autologous breast tumor vaccines and offers insight for overcoming existing limitations. PMID:25308888

  5. NKT cell adjuvant-based tumor vaccine for treatment of myc oncogene-driven mouse B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    West, Alison C.; Steegh, Kim; Duret, Helene; Paget, Christophe; Martin, Ben; Matthews, Geoffrey M.; Shortt, Jake; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Bots, Michael; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2012-01-01

    Immunomodulators are effective in controlling hematologic malignancy by initiating or reactivating host antitumor immunity to otherwise poorly immunogenic and immune suppressive cancers. We aimed to boost antitumor immunity in B-cell lymphoma by developing a tumor cell vaccine incorporating α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) that targets the immune adjuvant properties of NKT cells. In the Eμ-myc transgenic mouse model, single therapeutic vaccination of irradiated, α-GalCer–loaded autologous tumor cells was sufficient to significantly inhibit growth of established tumors and prolong survival. Vaccine-induced antilymphoma immunity required NKT cells, NK cells, and CD8 T cells, and early IL-12–dependent production of IFN-γ. CD4 T cells, gamma/delta T cells, and IL-18 were not critical. Vaccine treatment induced a large systemic spike of IFN-γ and transient peripheral expansion of both NKT cells and NK cells, the major sources of IFN-γ. Furthermore, this vaccine approach was assessed in several other hematopoietic tumor models and was also therapeutically effective against AML-ETO9a acute myeloid leukemia. Replacing α-GalCer with β-mannosylceramide resulted in prolonged protection against Eμ-myc lymphoma. Overall, our results demonstrate a potent immune adjuvant effect of NKT cell ligands in therapeutic anticancer vaccination against oncogene-driven lymphomas, and this work supports clinical investigation of NKT cell–based immunotherapy in patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:22932803

  6. A Vaccine That Co-Targets Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts Results in Enhanced Antitumor Activity by Inducing Antigen Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Yu, Feng; Ji, Minjun; Kakarla, Sunitha; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines targeting only cancer cells have produced limited antitumor activity in most clinical studies. Targeting cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in addition to cancer cells may enhance antitumor effects, since CAFs, the central component of the tumor stroma, directly support tumor growth and contribute to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. To co-target CAFs and tumor cells we developed a new compound DC vaccine that encodes an A20-specific shRNA to enhance DC function, and targets fibroblast activation protein (FAP) expressed in CAFs and the tumor antigen tyrosine-related protein (TRP)2 (DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2). DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2 vaccination induced robust FAP- and TRP2-specific T-cell responses, resulting in greater antitumor activity in the B16 melanoma model in comparison to monovalent vaccines or a vaccine encoding antigens and a control shRNA. DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2 vaccination enhanced tumor infiltration of CD8-positive T cells, and induced antigen-spreading resulting in potent antitumor activity. Thus, co-targeting of tumor cells and CAFs results in the induction of broad-based tumor-specific T-cell responses and has the potential to improve current vaccine approaches for cancer. PMID:24349329

  7. Measles Edmonston Vaccine Strain Derivatives have Potent Oncolytic Activity against Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Musibay, Evidio Domingo; Allen, Cory; Kurokawa, Cheyne; Hardcastle, Jayson J.; Aderca, Ileana; Msaouel, Pavlos; Bansal, Aditya; Jiang, Huailei; DeGrado, Timothy R.; Galanis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor affecting children and young adults, and development of metastatic disease is associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of virotherapy with engineered measles virus (MV) vaccine strains in the treatment of osteosarcoma. Cell lines derived from pediatric patients with osteosarcoma (HOS, MG63, 143B, KHOS-312H, U2-OS and SJSA1) were examined for MV-GFP and MV-NIS gene expression and cytotoxicity as defined by syncytial formation, cell death, and eradication of cell monolayers: significant antitumor activity was demonstrated. Findings were correlated with in vivo efficacy in subcutaneous, orthotopic (tibial bone), and lung metastatic osteosarcoma xenografts treated with the MV derivative MV-NIS via the intratumoral (IT) or intravenous (IV) route. Following treatment, we observed decrease in tumor growth of subcutaneous xenografts (p=0.0374) and prolongation of survival in mice with orthotopic (p<0.0001) and pulmonary metastatic osteosarcoma tumors (p=0.0207). Expression of the NIS transgene in MV-NIS infected tumors allowed for SPECT-CT and PET-CT imaging of virus infected tumors in vivo. Our data support the translational potential of MV-based virotherapy approaches in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:25394505

  8. Green synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extract of anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Devi, V.; Adavallan, K.; Saranya, D.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we have explored anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus (saffron) as a reducing agent for one pot size controlled green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) at ambient conditions. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-vis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The prepared AuNPs showed surface Plasmon resonance centered at 549 nm with average particle size of 15±5 nm. Stable, spherical and triangular crystalline AuNPs with well-defined dimensions were synthesized using anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus (saffron). Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles is confirmed from the HR-TEM, SAED and SEM images, and XRD patterns. From the FTIR spectra it is found that the biomolecules are responsible for capping in gold nanoparticles.

  9. Cationic micelle based vaccine induced potent humoral immune response through enhancing antigen uptake and formation of germinal center.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zichao; Shi, Shuai; Jin, Ling; Xu, Lu; Yu, Jing; Chen, Hao; Li, Xingyi

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles have been proven to be an effective vaccine delivery system that can boost immune responses to subunit vaccines. Herein, we developed and characterized a cationic polymeric polyethylene glycol2000-poly ϵ-caprolactone2000-polyethylenimine2000 (mPEG2000-PCL2000-g-PEI2000) micelle as a potent vaccine delivery system to boost the immune response in vivo. The micelles that we developed exhibited great antigen-loading capability and minimal cytotoxicity in vitro. Meanwhile, micelles facilitated OVA antigen uptake by dendritic cells both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, a micelle-formulated OVA vaccine could significantly promote anti-OVA antibody production by 190-fold and potently enhance T cell proliferation and the secretion of IL-5 and IFN-γ. We attributed these effects to its ability to promote antigen uptake, antigen deposition, and germinal center formation. In conclusion, the mPEG2000-PCL2000-PEI2000 micelle that we developed has potential as potent vaccine delivery system to induce Th2 immune response.

  10. Mimotope vaccine efficacy gets a "boost" from native tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-04-01

    Tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-targeting mimotope peptides exert more prominent immunostimulatory functions than unmodified TAAs, with the caveat that some T-cell clones exhibit a relatively low affinity for TAAs. Combining mimotope-based vaccines with native TAAs in a prime-boost setting significantly improves antitumor immunity.

  11. Vaccination with tumor cells pulsed with foreign peptide induces immunity to the tumor itself

    PubMed Central

    Schlingmann, Tobias R.; Rininsland, Frauke H.; Bartholomae, Wolf C.; Kuekrek, Haydar; Lehmann, Paul V.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    EMT-6 mammary carcinoma and B16 melanoma (B16M) cells are lethal and barely immunogenic in syngeneic BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively. We show that mice vaccinated with tumor cells pulsed with a MHC class I-restricted peptide develop a T cell response, not only to the peptide, but also to the unpulsed tumor. These mice display protective immunity against the unpulsed tumor, and their T cells adoptively transfer tumor-specific protection to immunodeficient SCID mice. Our data have implications for cancer vaccine strategies. Grafting a single well-defined foreign peptide on tumor cells might suffice to trigger anti-tumor immunity. PMID:19589730

  12. Engineered outer membrane vesicle is potent to elicit HPV16E7-specific cellular immunity in a mouse model of TC-1 graft tumor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijie; Huang, Weiwei; Li, Kui; Yao, Yufeng; Yang, Xu; Bai, Hongmei; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Ma, Yanbing

    2017-01-01

    Currently, therapeutic tumor vaccines under development generally lack significant effects in human clinical trials. Exploring a powerful antigen delivery system is a potential approach to improve vaccine efficacy. We sought to explore engineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a new vaccine carrier for efficiently delivering tumor antigens and provoking robust antitumor immune responses. First, the tumoral antigen human papillomavirus type 16 early protein E7 (HPV16E7) was presented on Escherichia coli-derived OMVs by genetic engineering methods, acquiring the recombinant OMV vaccine. Second, the ability of recombinant OMVs delivering their components and the model antigen green fluorescent protein to antigen-presenting cells was investigated in the macrophage Raw264.7 cells and in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in vitro. Third, it was evaluated in TC-1 graft tumor model in mice that the recombinant OMVs displaying HPV16E7 stimulated specific cellular immune response and intervened the growth of established tumor. E. coli DH5α-derived OMVs could be taken up rapidly by dendritic cells, for which vesicle structure has been proven to be important. OMVs significantly stimulated the expression of dendritic cellmaturation markers CD80, CD86, CD83 and CD40. The HPV16E7 was successfully embedded in engineered OMVs through gene recombinant techniques. Subcutaneous immunization with the engineered OMVs induced E7 antigen-specific cellular immune responses, as shown by the increased numbers of interferon-gamma-expressing splenocytes by enzyme-linked immunospot assay and interferon-gamma-expressing CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells by flow cytometry analyses. Furthermore, the growth of grafted TC-1 tumors in mice was significantly suppressed by therapeutic vaccination. The recombinant E7 proteins presented by OMVs were more potent than those mixed with wild-type OMVs or administered alone for inducing specific cellular immunity and suppressing tumor growth. The

  13. Intranasal DNA Vaccination Induces Potent Mucosal and Systemic Immune Responses and Cross-protective Immunity Against Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Torrieri-Dramard, Lea; Lambrecht, Bénédicte; Ferreira, Helena Lage; Van den Berg, Thierry; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    The induction of potent virus-specific immune responses at mucosal surfaces where virus transmission occurs is a major challenge for vaccination strategies. In the case of influenza vaccination, this has been achieved only by intranasal delivery of live-attenuated vaccines that otherwise pose safety problems. Here, we demonstrate that potent mucosal and systemic immune responses, both cellular and humoral, are induced by intranasal immunization using formulated DNA. We show that formulation with the DNA carrier polyethylenimine (PEI) improved by a 1,000-fold the efficiency of gene transfer in the respiratory track following intranasal administration of luciferase-coding DNA. Using PEI formulation, intranasal vaccination with DNA-encoding hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A H5N1 or (H1N1)2009 viruses induced high levels of HA-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies that were detected in bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) and the serum. No mucosal responses could be detected after parenteral or intranasal immunization with naked-DNA. Furthermore, intranasal DNA vaccination with HA from a given H5N1 virus elicited full protection against the parental strain and partial cross-protection against a distinct highly pathogenic H5N1 strain that could be improved by adding neuraminidase (NA) DNA plasmids. Our observations warrant further investigation of intranasal DNA as an effective vaccination route. PMID:20959813

  14. A Potent Gelatinase Inhibitor with Anti-Tumor-Invasive Activity and its Metabolic Disposition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mijoon; Celenza, Giuseppe; Boggess, Bill; Blase, Jennifer; Shi, Qicun; Toth, Marta; Bernardo, M. Margarida; Wolter, William R.; Suckow, Mark A.; Hesek, Dusan; Noll, Bruce C.; Fridman, Rafael; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic tumors lead to more than 90% fatality. Despite the importance of invasiveness of tumors to poor disease outcome, no anti-invasive compounds have been commercialized. We describe herein the synthesis and evaluation of 4-(4-(thiiranylmethylsulfonyl)phenoxy)-phenyl methane-sulfonate (compound 2) as a potent and selective inhibitor of gelatinases (matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9), two enzymes implicated in invasiveness of tumors. It was demonstrated that compound 2 significantly attenuated the invasiveness of human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080). The metabolism of compound 2 involved hydroxylation at the a-methylene, which generates sulfinic acid, thiirane ring-opening, followed by methylation and oxidation, and cysteine conjugation of both the thiirane and phenyl rings. PMID:19207421

  15. Tumor necrosis factor: a potent effector molecule for tumor cell killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, J L; Shepard, H M; Rothstein, J L; Sugarman, B J; Schreiber, H

    1986-01-01

    Activated macrophages (aM phi) destroy more effectively cancer cells than normal cells. The mechanism by which macrophages destroy cancer cells is not known. We report here that tumor cells susceptible to aM phi were killed by recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha), whereas variant tumor cells resistant to aM phi after selection in vitro or in vivo were resistant to killing by rTNF-alpha. The converse selection for rTNF-alpha-resistant variants resulted in cells that were also resistant to killing by aM phi. The sensitivity of macrophage-resistant variants was not changed to other tumoricidal cells or soluble mediators, except that the macrophage-resistant variants were also resistant to the effects of another cytotoxic protein, B-cell lymphotoxin, which is structurally related to rTNF-alpha. Similar results were obtained regardless of whether short-term or long-term cytotoxic effects of aM phi were measured. Finally, it was shown that killing of tumor cells by murine aM phi was completely inhibited with a polyclonal antibody that neutralizes the effects of murine TNF-alpha. These results suggest a major role for TNF-alpha in tumor cell destruction by aM phi in vitro and in vivo. PMID:3487788

  16. Vaccines expressing the innate immune modulator EAT-2 elicit potent effector memory T lymphocyte responses despite pre-existing vaccine immunity.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser Ali; Seregin, Sergey S; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Rastall, David P W; Liu, Chyong-Jy J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The mixed results from recent vaccine clinical trials targeting HIV-1 justify the need to enhance the potency of HIV-1 vaccine platforms in general. Use of first-generation recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) platforms failed to protect vaccinees from HIV-1 infection. One hypothesis is that the rAd5-based vaccine failed due to the presence of pre-existing Ad5 immunity in many vaccines. We recently confirmed that EAT-2-expressing rAd5 vectors uniquely activate the innate immune system and improve cellular immune responses against rAd5-expressed Ags, inclusive of HIV/Gag. In this study, we report that use of the rAd5-EAT-2 vaccine can also induce potent cellular immune responses to HIV-1 Ags despite the presence of Ad5-specific immunity. Compared to controls expressing a mutant SH2 domain form of EAT-2, Ad5 immune mice vaccinated with an rAd5-wild-type EAT-2 HIV/Gag-specific vaccine formulation significantly facilitated the induction of several arms of the innate immune system. These responses positively correlated with an improved ability of the vaccine to induce stronger effector memory T cell-biased, cellular immune responses to a coexpressed Ag despite pre-existing anti-Ad5 immunity. Moreover, inclusion of EAT-2 in the vaccine mixture improves the generation of polyfunctional cytolytic CD8(+) T cell responses as characterized by enhanced production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, cytotoxic degranulation, and increased in vivo cytolytic activity. These data suggest a new approach whereby inclusion of EAT-2 expression in stringent human vaccination applications can provide a more effective vaccine against HIV-1 specifically in Ad5 immune subjects.

  17. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  18. A multi-antigen vaccine in combination with an immunotoxin targeting tumor-associated fibroblast for treating murine melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jinxu; Hu, Biliang; Li, Si; Zhang, Chupei; Liu, Yarong; Wang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutically effective cancer vaccine must generate potent antitumor immune responses and be able to overcome tolerance mechanisms mediated by the progressing tumor itself. Previous studies showed that glycoprotein 100 (gp100), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1), and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) are promising immunogens for melanoma immunotherapy. In this study, we administered these three melanoma-associated antigens via lentiviral vectors (termed LV-3Ag) and found that this multi-antigen vaccine strategy markedly increased functional T-cell infiltration into tumors and generated protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity. We also engineered a novel immunotoxin, αFAP-PE38, capable of targeting fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing fibroblasts within the tumor stroma. When combined with αFAP-PE38, LV-3Ag exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor effects on tumor growth in an established B16 melanoma model. The mechanism of action underlying this combination treatment likely modulates the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment and, consequently, activates cytotoxic CD8+ T cells capable of specifically recognizing and destroying tumor cells. Taken together, these results provide a strong rationale for combining an immunotoxin with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. PMID:27119119

  19. Inhibition of ectopic glioma tumor growth by a potent ferrocenyl drug loaded into stealth lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Lainé, Anne-Laure; Clavreul, Anne; Rousseau, Audrey; Tétaud, Clément; Vessieres, Anne; Garcion, Emmanuel; Jaouen, Gerard; Aubert, Léo; Guilbert, Matthieu; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Passirani, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    In this work, a novel ferrocenyl complex (ansa-FcdiOH) was assessed for brain tumor therapy through stealth lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). Stealth LNCs, prepared according to a one-step process, showed rapid uptake by cancer cells and extended blood circulation time. The ferrocenyl complex was successfully encapsulated into these LNCs measuring 40 nm with a high loading capacity (6.4%). In vitro studies showed a potent anticancer effect of ansa-FcdiOH on 9L cells with a low IC50 value (0.1 μM) associated with an oxidative stress and a dose-dependent alteration of the cell cycle. Repeated intravenous injections of stealth ansa-FcdiOH LNCs in ectopic glioma bearing rats induced a significant tumor growth inhibition, supported by a reduced number of proliferative cells in tumors compared to control group. Additionally, no liver damage was observed in treated animals. These results indicated that stealth ansa-FcdiOH LNCs might be considered as a potential new approach for cancer chemotherapy. In this study, a novel ferrocenyl complex was assessed for brain tumor therapy through stealth lipid nanocapsules, demonstrating no liver damage, and superior tumor volume reduction compared to saline and stealth lipid nanocapsules alone in an ectopic glioma model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Noncoding RNA danger motifs bridge innate and adaptive immunity and are potent adjuvants for vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lilin; Smith, Dan; Bot, Simona; Dellamary, Luis; Bloom, Amy; Bot, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    The adaptive immune response is triggered by recognition of T and B cell epitopes and is influenced by “danger” motifs that act via innate immune receptors. This study shows that motifs associated with noncoding RNA are essential features in the immune response reminiscent of viral infection, mediating rapid induction of proinflammatory chemokine expression, recruitment and activation of antigen-presenting cells, modulation of regulatory cytokines, subsequent differentiation of Th1 cells, isotype switching, and stimulation of cross-priming. The heterogeneity of RNA-associated motifs results in differential binding to cellular receptors, and specifically impacts the immune profile. Naturally occurring double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggered activation of dendritic cells and enhancement of specific immunity, similar to selected synthetic dsRNA motifs. Based on the ability of specific RNA motifs to block tolerance induction and effectively organize the immune defense during viral infection, we conclude that such RNA species are potent danger motifs. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using selected RNA motifs as adjuvants in the context of novel aerosol carriers for optimizing the immune response to subunit vaccines. In conclusion, RNA-associated motifs produced during viral infection bridge the early response with the late adaptive phase, regulating the activation and differentiation of antigen-specific B and T cells, in addition to a short-term impact on innate immunity. PMID:12393853

  1. Targeting tumors with nonreplicating Toxoplasma gondii uracil auxotroph vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Sanders, Kiah L.; Chen, Shan; Bzik, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that has evolved to actively control its invaded host cells. Toxoplasma triggers then actively regulates host innate IL-12 and interferon-γ responses that elicit T cell control of infection. A live, nonreplicating avirulent uracil auxotroph vaccine strain (cps) of Toxoplasma triggers novel innate immune responses that stimulate amplified CD8+ T cell responses and life-long immunity in vaccinated mice. Here, we review recent reports showing that intratumoral treatment with cps activated immune-mediated regression of established solid tumors in mice. We speculate that a better understanding of host-parasite interaction at the molecular level and applying improved genetic models based on Δku80 Toxoplasma strains will stimulate development of highly effective immunotherapeutic cancer vaccine strategies using engineered uracil auxotrophs. PMID:23928100

  2. Viral-mimicking protein nanoparticle vaccine for eliciting anti-tumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Molino, Nicholas M.; Neek, Medea; Tucker, Jo Anne; Nelson, Edward L.; Wang, Szu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful resource for the eradication of cancer, but to overcome the low immunogenicity of tumor cells, a sufficiently strong CD8+ T cell-mediated adaptive immune response is required. Nanoparticulate biomaterials represent a potentially effective delivery system for cancer vaccines, as they can be designed to mimic viruses, which are potent inducers of cellular immunity. We have been exploring the non-viral pyruvate dehydrogenase E2 protein nanoparticle as a biomimetic platform for cancer vaccine delivery. Simultaneous conjugation of a melanoma-associated gp100 epitope and CpG to the E2 nanoparticle (CpG-gp-E2) yielded an antigen-specific increase in the CD8+ T cell proliferation index and IFN-γ secretion by 1.5-fold and 5-fold, respectively, compared to an unbound peptide and CpG formulation. Remarkably, a single nanoparticle immunization resulted in a 120-fold increase in the frequency of melanoma epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in draining lymph nodes and a 30-fold increase in the spleen, relative to free peptide with free CpG. Furthermore, in the very aggressive B16 melanoma murine tumor model, prophylactic immunization with CpG-gp-E2 delayed the onset of tumor growth by approximately 5.5 days and increased animal survival time by approximately 40%, compared to PBS-treated animals. These results show that by combining optimal particle size and simultaneous co-delivery of molecular vaccine components, antigen-specific anti-tumor immune responses can be significantly increased. PMID:26894870

  3. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  4. Tumor lysate-loaded biodegradable microparticles as cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijaya B.; Geary, Sean M.; Gross, Brett P; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Norian, Lyse A.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccines that use tumor lysate (TL) as a source of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have significant potential for generating therapeutic anti-tumor immune responses. Vaccines encompassing TL bypass the limitations of single antigen vaccines by simultaneously stimulating immunity against multiple TAAs, thereby broadening the repertoire of TAA-specific T cell clones available for activation. Administration of TL in particulate form, such as when encapsulated in biodegradable microparticles, increases its immunostimulatory capacity and produces more robust immune responses than when TL is given in soluble form. These effects can be further enhanced by co-administering TL with adjuvants. A number of recent studies using polymeric microparticle delivery of TL, with or without adjuvants, have produced promising results in preclinical studies. In this review, we will discuss current experimental approaches involving TL being pursued in the oncoimmunology field, and comment on strategies such as combining specific chemotherapeutic agents with TL microparticle delivery that may eventually lead to improved survival outcomes for cancer patients. PMID:24219096

  5. A Novel Tumor Antigen and Foxp3 Dual-Targeting Tumor Cell Vaccine Enhances the Immunotherapy in a Murine Model of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    DATES COVERED t 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Novel Tumor Antigen and Foxp3 Dual-Targeting Tumor Cell Vaccine 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhances the...past year I have generated Foxp3-over expressing RENCA cells, as the source of candidate dual targeting tumor cells vaccine . We have performed...controlled vaccine therapy in RENCA model in three different schedules. When applied in a pre- vaccine schedule, RENCA and RENCA Foxp3 tumor cell vaccine

  6. The reprogramming of tumor stroma by HSF1 is a potent enabler of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Scherz-Shouval, Ruth; Santagata, Sandro; Mendillo, Marc L.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Ben-Aharon, Irit; Beck, Andrew H.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Koeva, Martina; Stemmer, Salomon M.; Whitesell, Luke; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Stromal cells within the tumor microenvironment are essential for tumor progression and metastasis. Surprisingly little is known about the factors that drive the transcriptional reprogramming of stromal cells within tumors. We report that the transcriptional regulator Heat-Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) is frequently activated in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), where it is a potent enabler of malignancy. HSF1 drives a transcriptional program in CAFs that complements, yet is completely different from, the program it drives in adjacent cancer cells. This CAF program is uniquely structured to support the malignant potential of cancer cells in a non-cell-autonomous way. Two central stromal signaling molecules—TGFβ and stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF1) – play a critical role. In early stage breast and lung cancer, high stromal HSF1 activation is strongly associated with poor patient outcome. Thus, tumors co-opt the ancient survival functions of HSF1 to orchestrate malignancy in both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous ways, with far-reaching therapeutic implications. PMID:25083868

  7. An optimized peptide vaccine strategy capable of inducing multivalent CD8+ T cell responses with potent antitumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Il; Jung, Soo-Hyun; Sohn, Hyun-Jung; Celis, Esteban; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines are an attractive alternative to conventional therapies for treating malignant tumors, and successful tumor eradication depends primarily on obtaining high numbers of long-lasting tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells. Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines constitute a promising approach for treating cancer, but in most instances low immune responses and suboptimal therapeutic effects are achieved indicating that further optimization is required. We describe here a novel vaccination strategy with peptide-loaded DCs followed by a mixture of synthetic peptides, polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly-IC) and anti-CD40 antibodies (TriVax) for improving the immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy of DC-based vaccines in a melanoma mouse model. TriVax immunization 7–12 d after priming with antigen-loaded DCs generated large numbers of long-lasting multiple antigen-specific CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing tumor cells. These responses were far superior to those generated by homologous immunizations with either TriVax or DCs. CD8+ T cells but not CD4+ T cells or NK cells mediated the therapeutic efficacy of this heterologous prime-boost strategy. Moreover, combinations of this vaccination regimen with programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) blockade or IL2 anti-IL2 antibody complexes led to complete disease eradication and survival enhancement in melanoma-bearing mice. The overall results suggest that similar strategies would be applicable for the design of effective therapeutic vaccination for treating viral diseases and various cancers, which may circumvent current limitations of cell-based cancer vaccines. PMID:26451316

  8. Development and Characterization of a Potent Immunoconjugate Targeting the Fn14 Receptor on Solid Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Marks, John W.; Hittelman, Walter N.; Yagita, Hideo; Cheung, Lawrence H.; Rosenblum, Michael G.; Winkles, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-inducible 14 (Fn14) are a TNF superfamily ligand–receptor pair involved in many cellular processes including proliferation, migration, differentiation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. The Fn14 receptor is expressed at relatively low levels in normal tissues, but it is known to be dramatically elevated in a number of tumor types, including brain and breast tumors. Thus, it seems to be an excellent candidate for therapeutic intervention. We first analyzed Fn14 expression in human tumor cell lines. Fn14 was expressed in a variety of lines including breast, brain, bladder, skin, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, colon, prostate, and cervical cancer cell lines. We then developed an immunoconjugate containing a high-affinity anti-Fn14 monoclonal antibody (ITEM-4) conjugated to recombinant gelonin (rGel), a highly cytotoxic ribosome-inactivating N-glycosidase. Both ITEM-4 and the conjugate were found to bind to cells to an equivalent extent. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that ITEM4-rGel specifically and rapidly (within 2 hours) internalized into Fn14-positive T-24 bladder cancer cells but not into Fn14-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytotoxicity studies against 22 different tumor cell lines showed that ITEM4-rGel was highly cytotoxic to Fn14-expressing cells and was 8- to 8 × 104-fold more potent than free rGel. ITEM4-rGel was found to kill cells by inducing apoptosis with high-mobility group box 1 protein release. Finally, ITEM4-rGel immunoconjugate administration promoted long-term tumor growth suppression in nude mice bearing T-24 human bladder cancer cell xenografts. Our data support the use of an antibody–drug conjugate approach to selectively target and inhibit the growth of Fn14-expressing tumors. PMID:21586630

  9. Optimized tumor cryptic peptides: the basis for universal neo-antigen-like tumor vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Menez-Jamet, Jeanne; Gallou, Catherine; Rougeot, Aude

    2016-01-01

    The very impressive clinical results recently obtained in cancer patients treated with immune response checkpoint inhibitors boosted the interest in immunotherapy as a therapeutic choice in cancer treatment. However, these inhibitors require a pre-existing tumor specific immune response and the presence of tumor infiltrating T cells to be efficient. This immune response can be triggered by cancer vaccines. One of the main issues in tumor vaccination is the choice of the right antigen to target. All vaccines tested to date targeted tumor associated antigens (TAA) that are self-antigens and failed to show a clinical efficacy because of the immune self-tolerance to TAA. A new class of tumor antigens has recently been described, the neo-antigens that are created by point mutations of tumor expressing proteins and are recognized by the immune system as non-self. Neo-antigens exhibit two main properties: they are not involved in the immune self-tolerance process and are immunogenic. However, the majority of the neo-antigens are patient specific and their use as cancer vaccines requires their previous identification in each patient individualy that can be done only in highly specialized research centers. It is therefore evident that neo-antigens cannot be used for patient vaccination worldwide. This raises the question of whether we can find neo-antigen like vaccines, which would not be patient specific. In this review we show that optimized cryptic peptides from TAA are neo-antigen like peptides. Optimized cryptic peptides are recognized by the immune system as non-self because they target self-cryptic peptides that escape self-tolerance; in addition they are strongly immunogenic because their sequence is modified in order to enhance their affinity for the HLA molecule. The first vaccine based on the optimized cryptic peptide approach, Vx-001, which targets the widely expressed tumor antigen telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), has completed a large phase I clinical

  10. Systemic Administration of Interleukin 2 Enhances the Therapeutic Efficacy of Dendritic Cell-Based Tumor Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, K.; Fields, R. C.; Giedlin, M.; Mule, J. J.

    1999-03-01

    We have reported previously that murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with whole tumor lysates can mediate potent antitumor immune responses both in vitro and in vivo. Because successful therapy was dependent on host immune T cells, we have now evaluated whether the systemic administration of the T cell stimulatory/growth promoting cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) could enhance tumor lysate-pulsed DC-based immunizations to further promote protective immunity toward, and therapeutic rejection of, syngeneic murine tumors. In three separate approaches using a weakly immunogenic sarcoma (MCA-207), the systemic administration of non-toxic doses of recombinant IL-2 (20,000 and 40,000 IU/dose) was capable of mediating significant increases in the potency of DC-based immunizations. IL-2 could augment the efficacy of tumor lysate-pulsed DC to induce protective immunity to lethal tumor challenge as well as enhance splenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and interferon-γ production in these treated mice. Moreover, treatment with the combination of tumor lysate-pulsed DC and IL-2 could also mediate regressions of established pulmonary 3-day micrometastases and 7-day macrometastases as well as established 14- and 28-day s.c. tumors, leading to either significant cure rates or prolongation in overall survival. Collectively, these findings show that nontoxic doses of recombinant IL-2 can potentiate the antitumor effects of tumor lysate-pulsed DC in vivo and provide preclinical rationale for the use of IL-2 in DC-based vaccine strategies in patients with advanced cancer.

  11. PU.1 is a potent tumor suppressor in classical Hodgkin lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Hiromichi; Ueno, Shikiko; Tatetsu, Hiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Iino, Tadafumi; Endo, Shinya; Kawano, Yawara; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro; Hata, Hiroyuki; Okada, Seiji; Watanabe, Toshiki; Akashi, Koichi; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Okuno, Yutaka

    2013-02-07

    PU.1 has previously been shown to be down-regulated in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) cells via promoter methylation. We performed bisulfite sequencing and proved that the promoter region and the -17 kb upstream regulatory element of the PU.1 gene were highly methylated. To evaluate whether down-regulation of PU.1 is essential for the growth of cHL cells, we conditionally expressed PU.1 in 2 cHL cell lines, L428 and KM-H2. Overexpression of PU.1 induced complete growth arrest and apoptosis in both cell lines. Furthermore, in a Hodgkin lymphoma tumor xenograft model using L428 and KM-H2 cell lines, overexpression of PU.1 led to tumor regression or stable disease. Lentiviral transduction of PU.1 into primary cHL cells also induced apoptosis. DNA microarray analysis revealed that among genes related to cell cycle and apoptosis, p21 (CDKN1A) was highly up-regulated in L428 cells after PU.1 induction. Stable knockdown of p21 rescued PU.1-induced growth arrest in L428 cells, suggesting that the growth arrest and apoptosis observed are at least partially dependent on p21 up-regulation. These data strongly suggest that PU.1 is a potent tumor suppressor in cHL and that induction of PU.1 with demethylation agents and/or histone deacetylase inhibitors is worth exploring as a possible therapeutic option for patients with cHL.

  12. Immunohistochemical molecular gene expression profile of metastatic brain tumor as a potent personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yasutaka; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Sayaka; Mohri, Hiromi; Kanno, Hiromi; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Tanaka, Shinya

    2013-07-01

    Recent progress in molecule-targeting therapy may yield personalized therapeutic strategies for patients with metastatic brain tumors (MBT), the most frequently encountered intracranial tumors. For this purpose, we investigated the molecular expression profile of MBT to establish the pathological basis for personalized diagnosis. We studied 166 MBT specimens including 70 cases of lung cancer and 34 cases of breast cancer, and performed immunostaining for EGFR, COX-2, and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), among others, which could be target molecules for therapeutic agents or enable prediction of drug efficacy. Loss of MGMT expression was observed in approximately 20-40% of MBT derived from lung, breast, and gastrointestinal cancers, indicating the possibility of treatment of MBT patients with temozolomide. In addition, MBT expressed a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, for example EGFR and HER2, and signal transduction molecules, for example phospho-mTOR and COX-2, irrespective of tumor origin, enabling individualized medication with molecule-targeting drugs. We also identified alteration of molecular expression profile in 4 MBT cases during recurrence. Our results not only reveal the molecular characteristics of MBT but also suggest the possibility of potent personalized medicine for MBT patients.

  13. STING agonist formulated cancer vaccines can cure established tumors resistant to PD-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Kanne, David B; Leong, Meredith; Glickman, Laura Hix; McWhirter, Sarah M; Lemmens, Edward; Mechette, Ken; Leong, Justin J; Lauer, Peter; Liu, Weiqun; Sivick, Kelsey E; Zeng, Qi; Soares, Kevin C; Zheng, Lei; Portnoy, Daniel A; Woodward, Joshua J; Pardoll, Drew M; Dubensky, Thomas W; Kim, Young

    2015-04-15

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is a cytosolic receptor that senses both exogenous and endogenous cytosolic cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs), activating TBK1/IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3), NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), and STAT6 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 6) signaling pathways to induce robust type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokine responses. CDN ligands were formulated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing cellular cancer vaccines--termed STINGVAX--that demonstrated potent in vivo antitumor efficacy in multiple therapeutic models of established cancer. We found that rationally designed synthetic CDN derivative molecules, including one with an Rp,Rp dithio diastereomer and noncanonical c[A(2',5')pA(3',5')p] phosphate bridge structure, enhanced antitumor efficacy of STINGVAX in multiple aggressive therapeutic models of established cancer in mice. Antitumor activity was STING-dependent and correlated with increased activation of dendritic cells and tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Tumors from STINGVAX-treated mice demonstrated marked PD-L1 (programmed death ligand 1) up-regulation, which was associated with tumor-infiltrating CD8(+)IFNγ(+) T cells. When combined with PD-1 (programmed death 1) blockade, STINGVAX induced regression of palpable, poorly immunogenic tumors that did not respond to PD-1 blockade alone. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  15. Evaluation of a protease activation mutant of Sendai virus as a potent live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Maru, M; Haraguchi, M; Sato, K; Hotta, H; Homma, M

    1992-01-01

    A protease activation mutant of Sendai virus, TR-5, was investigated as a candidate for a live vaccine. Vaccination with TR-5 which had been activated by chymotrypsin beforehand (active TR-5) elicited protective immunity against otherwise lethal challenge infection with wild-type Sendai virus in DBA/2, C3H and ICR strains of mice. Less of the active TR-5 was required to confer protection on mice compared with an ordinary ether-inactivated Sendai virus vaccine (split vaccine). The protective immunity elicited by TR-5 lasted longer and the booster effect was more prominent compared to the split vaccine. No seroconversion was observed with contact mice when housed in a cage with mice vaccinated with the active TR-5. The overall results show that the active TR-5 is an effective and safe live vaccine of Sendai virus in mice.

  16. Dendritic cell based genetic immunization stimulates potent tumor protection dependent on CD8 CTL cells in the absence of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Huang, Weiyi

    2008-09-01

    Although antibodies (Abs) produced by B cells can treat cancer in certain models, T cells have been accountable for the major effector to control cancer. Immune recognition toward tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), a melanoma associated antigen up-regulated on the surface of B16F10 melanomas, generally leads to tumor protection mediated by Abs. In this study, immunization with dendritic cells ex vivo transduced with adenovirus encoding TRP-1 stimulates immune activation and potent tumor protection mediated by CD8 T cells in the absence of autoimmune consequence. Transfer of CD8 T cells from immunized mice also leads to tumor protection. The immune activation and CD8 T cell mediated tumor protection rely on the CD4 T cell help. Thus DC based genetic immunization targeting TRP-1, an antigen usually causes Ab predominant immune recognition, is capable of stimulating potent tumor protection dependent on CD8 T cells in the absence of autoimmunity.

  17. Superior induction of anti-tumor CTL immunity by extended peptide vaccines involves prolonged, DC-focused antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Bijker, Martijn S; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Franken, Kees L; Melief, Cornelis J M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Offringa, Rienk

    2008-04-01

    Anti-tumor vaccines consisting of extended CTL peptides in combination with CpG-ODN were shown to be superior to those comprising minimal CTL epitopes and CpG-ODN, in that they elicit stronger effector CTL responses with greater tumoricidal potential. We now demonstrate that this improved performance is primarily due to the focusing of CTL epitope presentation onto activated DC in the inflamed lymph nodes draining the vaccination site. In the case of vaccination with minimal peptides, additional APC including T and B cells are also loaded with CTL epitopes. Our data suggest that circulation of these peptide-loaded lymphocytes leads to epitope presentation in non-inflamed lymphoid organs distal from the vaccination site, in the absence of potent costimulatory signals required for efficient CTL priming. The resulting blend of pro-immunogenic and tolerogenic signals, which results in suboptimal activation of the CTL response, is avoided by vaccinating with extended CTL peptides. An additional advantage of extended CTL peptide vaccines is an increased duration of in vivo epitope presentation.

  18. Genetic vaccination against the melanocyte lineage-specific antigen gp100 induces cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated tumor protection.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, M W; de Boer, A J; Figdor, C G; Adema, G J

    1998-06-15

    Melanocyte lineage-specific antigens, such as gp100, have been shown to induce both cellular and humoral immune responses against melanoma. Therefore, these antigens are potential targets for specific antimelanoma immunotherapy. A novel approach to induce both cellular and humoral immunity is genetic vaccination, the injection of antigen-encoding naked plasmid DNA. In a mouse model, we investigated whether genetic vaccination against the human gp100 antigen results in specific antitumor immunity. The results demonstrate that vaccinated mice were protected against a lethal challenge with syngeneic B16 melanoma-expressing human gp100, but not control-transfected B16. Both cytotoxic T cells and IgG specific for human gp100 could be detected in human gp100-vaccinated mice. However, only adoptive transfer of spleen-derived lymphocytes, not of the serum, isolated from protected mice was able to transfer antitumor immunity to nonvaccinated recipients, indicating that CTLs are the predominant effector cells. CTI, lines generated from human gp100-vaccinated mice specifically recognized human gp100. Interestingly, one of the CTL lines cross-reacted between human and mouse gp100, indicating the recognition of a conserved epitope. However, these CTLs did not appear to be involved in the observed tumor protection. Collectively, our results indicate that genetic vaccination can result in a potent antitumor response in vivo and constitutes a potential immunotherapeutic strategy to fight cancer.

  19. Potent Immunity to Low Doses of Influenza Vaccine by Probabilistic Guided Micro-Targeted Skin Delivery in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Prow, Tarl W.; Crichton, Michael L.; Fairmaid, Emily J.; Roberts, Michael S.; Frazer, Ian H.; Brown, Lorena E.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Over 14 million people die each year from infectious diseases despite extensive vaccine use [1]. The needle and syringe—first invented in 1853—is still the primary delivery device, injecting liquid vaccine into muscle. Vaccines could be far more effective if they were precisely delivered into the narrow layer just beneath the skin surface that contains a much higher density of potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) essential to generate a protective immune response. We hypothesized that successful vaccination could be achieved this way with far lower antigen doses than required by the needle and syringe. Methodology/Principal Findings To meet this objective, using a probability-based theoretical analysis for targeting skin APCs, we designed the Nanopatch™, which contains an array of densely packed projections (21025/cm2) invisible to the human eye (110 µm in length, tapering to tips with a sharpness of <1000 nm), that are dry-coated with vaccine and applied to the skin for two minutes. Here we show that the Nanopatches deliver a seasonal influenza vaccine (Fluvax® 2008) to directly contact thousands of APCs, in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction. By physically targeting vaccine directly to these cells we induced protective levels of functional antibody responses in mice and also protection against an influenza virus challenge that are comparable to the vaccine delivered intramuscularly with the needle and syringe—but with less than 1/100th of the delivered antigen. Conclusions/Significance Our results represent a marked improvement—an order of magnitude greater than reported by others—for injected doses administered by other delivery methods, without reliance on an added adjuvant, and with only a single vaccination. This study provides a proven mathematical/engineering delivery device template for extension into human studies—and we speculate that successful translation of these findings into humans could uniquely assist with

  20. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  1. Soy extract is more potent than genistein on tumor growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-A; Jeong, Kyu-Shik; Kim, Yoo Kyeong

    2008-01-01

    Soybean and soy products have received much attention for their potential heath benefits. Recently it has been reported that the bioactivity of soy products is influenced by the degree of soy processing. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the influence of diets containing genistein and soy extract on the growth of the estrogen-independent human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, implanted into female Balb/c mice. Four-week-old female athymic nude mice (Balb/c) were acclimatized to an AIN-93G control diet for one week prior to initiating the experimental diets. The animals were placed into three treatment groups, each of which was provided with containing DMSO, genistein (750 microg/g AIN-93G diet) or 0.6% soy extract (containing genistein at 750 microg/g AIN-93G diet) for three weeks from one week prior to the injection of MDA-MB-231 cells (1 x 10(6)/site) and subsequently fed on the AIN-93G control diet until sacrifice. The tumor volumes increased steeply in the control group and the genistein-treated group. However, tumor growth was significantly reduced in the soy extract-treated group compared to the control and genistein-treated groups. Immunohistochemistry of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) also revealed that the soy extract treatment effectively reduced cell proliferation of the implanted tumors. In conclusion, soy extract is more potent than genistein in the inhibition of tumor growth, presumably resulting from the synergistic effect of the various bioactive components in the soy extract.

  2. Vaccine-Derived Neutralizing Antibodies to the Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Pentamer Potently Block Primary Cytotrophoblast Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Johnson, Erica; Bian, Chao; Zhuo, Meng; Rajakumar, Augustine; Barry, Peter A.; Britt, William J.; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) elicits neutralizing antibodies (NAb) of various potencies and cell type specificities to prevent HCMV entry into fibroblasts (FB) and epithelial/endothelial cells (EpC/EnC). NAb targeting the major essential envelope glycoprotein complexes gB and gH/gL inhibit both FB and EpC/EnC entry. In contrast to FB infection, HCMV entry into EpC/EnC is additionally blocked by extremely potent NAb to conformational epitopes of the gH/gL/UL128/130/131A pentamer complex (PC). We recently developed a vaccine concept based on coexpression of all five PC subunits by a single modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector, termed MVA-PC. Vaccination of mice and rhesus macaques with MVA-PC resulted in a high titer and sustained NAb that blocked EpC/EnC infection and lower-titer NAb that inhibited FB entry. However, antibody function responsible for the neutralizing activity induced by the MVA-PC vaccine is uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that MVA-PC elicits NAb with cell type-specific neutralization potency and antigen recognition pattern similar to human NAb targeting conformational and linear epitopes of the UL128/130/131A subunits or gH. In addition, we show that the vaccine-derived PC-specific NAb are significantly more potent than the anti-gH NAb to prevent HCMV spread in EpC and infection of human placental cytotrophoblasts, cell types thought to be of critical importance for HCMV transmission to the fetus. These findings further validate MVA-PC as a clinical vaccine candidate to elicit NAb that resembles those induced during HCMV infection and provide valuable insights into the potency of PC-specific NAb to interfere with HCMV cell-associated spread and infection of key placental cells. IMPORTANCE As a consequence of the leading role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in causing permanent birth defects, developing a vaccine against HCMV has been assigned a major public health priority. We have recently introduced a vaccine strategy based

  3. Vaccine-Derived Neutralizing Antibodies to the Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Pentamer Potently Block Primary Cytotrophoblast Infection.

    PubMed

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Johnson, Erica; Bian, Chao; Zhuo, Meng; Rajakumar, Augustine; Barry, Peter A; Britt, William J; Chakraborty, Rana; Diamond, Don J

    2015-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) elicits neutralizing antibodies (NAb) of various potencies and cell type specificities to prevent HCMV entry into fibroblasts (FB) and epithelial/endothelial cells (EpC/EnC). NAb targeting the major essential envelope glycoprotein complexes gB and gH/gL inhibit both FB and EpC/EnC entry. In contrast to FB infection, HCMV entry into EpC/EnC is additionally blocked by extremely potent NAb to conformational epitopes of the gH/gL/UL128/130/131A pentamer complex (PC). We recently developed a vaccine concept based on coexpression of all five PC subunits by a single modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector, termed MVA-PC. Vaccination of mice and rhesus macaques with MVA-PC resulted in a high titer and sustained NAb that blocked EpC/EnC infection and lower-titer NAb that inhibited FB entry. However, antibody function responsible for the neutralizing activity induced by the MVA-PC vaccine is uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that MVA-PC elicits NAb with cell type-specific neutralization potency and antigen recognition pattern similar to human NAb targeting conformational and linear epitopes of the UL128/130/131A subunits or gH. In addition, we show that the vaccine-derived PC-specific NAb are significantly more potent than the anti-gH NAb to prevent HCMV spread in EpC and infection of human placental cytotrophoblasts, cell types thought to be of critical importance for HCMV transmission to the fetus. These findings further validate MVA-PC as a clinical vaccine candidate to elicit NAb that resembles those induced during HCMV infection and provide valuable insights into the potency of PC-specific NAb to interfere with HCMV cell-associated spread and infection of key placental cells. As a consequence of the leading role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in causing permanent birth defects, developing a vaccine against HCMV has been assigned a major public health priority. We have recently introduced a vaccine strategy based on a widely used

  4. Dimers of melampomagnolide B exhibit potent anticancer activity against hematological and solid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Janganati, Venumadhav; Ponder, Jessica; Jordan, Craig T.; Borrelli, Michael J.; Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Crooks, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel carbamate and carbonate dimers of melampomagnolide B (MMB) have been synthesized by reaction of the MMB-triazole carbamate synthon 6 with various terminal diamino and dihydroxy alkanes. The resulting dimeric products 7b, 7c and 7f were selected and evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of 60 human hematological and solid tumor cell lines. The most active compounds, 7b, 7c and 7f, exhibited GI50 values in the range 250-780 nM against the majority of leukemia cell lines in the tumor cell panel. Specifically, compounds 7b and 7f exhibited potent growth inhibition against non-small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H522 (GI50 = 160 nM) and HOP-92 (GI50 = 170 nM), respectively. Also, compound 7f also potently inhibited the growth of melanoma cell lines LOX IMVI, MALME-3M, and UACC-62 (GI50 values = 170, 190 and 190 nM, respectively); breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 (GI50 = 190 nM); colon cancer cell line HCT-116 (GI50 = 190 nM); and renal cancer cell line RXF 393 (GI50 = 160 nM). Compound 7f and the simple dicarbonate dimer of MMB (8) showed anticancer activity 300-fold and 1 × 106-fold, respectively, more cytotoxic than 7f and DMAPT at a concentration of 10 μM against rat 9L-SF gliosarcoma cells. The dimeric compounds 7a-7j & 8 were also screened for antileukemic activity against M9-ENL1 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells and primary AML cell specimens. These compounds exhibited two to twelve-fold more potent antileukemic activity (EC50 = 0.5-2.9 μM) against the M9-ENL1 cell line when compared to parthenolide (EC50 = 6.0 μM). The dimeric analogues were also active against the primary AML cell specimens in the nanomolar to lower micromolar range and exhibited two to ten-fold more potent antileukemic activity (EC50 = 0.86-4.2 μM) when compared to parthenolide (EC50 = 2.5-16 μM). Thus, dimer 7f exhibited promising anticancer activity against a variety of both hematological and solid human tumor cell lines, while dimer 8 was

  5. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-02-02

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma.

  6. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma. PMID:26830149

  7. Potent anti-tumor effects of EGFR-targeted hybrid peptide on mice bearing liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Gaowa, Arong; Horibe, Tomohisa; Kohno, Masayuki; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of EGFR2R-lytic hybrid peptide for the treatment of liver metastasis from colon carcinoma. The cytotoxic activity of the hybrid peptide against luciferase-expressing human colon cancer (HCT-116-luc) cells was determined by the WST-8 assay. The experimental mouse model of liver metastases was generated by splenic injection of HCT-116-luc cells. The hybrid peptide was intravenously injected into mice the day after cell implantation at a dose of 5 mg/kg and this was repeated on alternate days for a total of 7 doses. Saline-treated mice were used as controls. Tumor growth and therapeutic responses were monitored by an IVIS imaging system. It was shown that the hybrid peptide exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against HCT-116-luc cells and the liver metastases were significantly reduced after intravenous injections of hybrid peptide compared with controls. Furthermore, Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that hybrid peptide-treated mice had significantly longer survival than controls. In addition, bright-field and ex vivo imaging of liver tissue revealed that mice treated with the hybrid peptide had significantly fewer tumors compared with controls. These results demonstrated that the EGFR2R-lytic hybrid peptide is a potential treatment option for patients with colorectal cancer metastases in the liver.

  8. The Tumor-Selective Cytotoxic Agent β-Lapachone is a Potent Inhibitor of IDO1

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Hollie E.; LaLonde, Judith M.; Malachowski, William P.; Muller, Alexander J.

    2013-01-01

    β-lapachone is a naturally occurring 1,2-naphthoquinone-based compound that has been advanced into clinical trials based on its tumor-selective cytotoxic properties. Previously, we focused on the related 1,4-naphthoquinone pharmacophore as a basic core structure for developing a series of potent indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) enzyme inhibitors. In this study, we identified IDO1 inhibitory activity as a previously unrecognized attribute of the clinical candidate β-lapachone. Enzyme kinetics-based analysis of β-lapachone indicated an uncompetitive mode of inhibition, while computational modeling predicted binding within the IDO1 active site consistent with other naphthoquinone derivatives. Inhibition of IDO1 has previously been shown to breach the pathogenic tolerization that constrains the immune system from being able to mount an effective anti-tumor response. Thus, the finding that β-lapachone has IDO1 inhibitory activity adds a new dimension to its potential utility as an anti-cancer agent distinct from its cytotoxic properties, and suggests that a synergistic benefit can be achieved from its combined cytotoxic and immunologic effects. PMID:24023520

  9. Chicken HSP70 DNA vaccine inhibits tumor growth in a canine cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Ying; Chuang, Tien-Fu; Guichard, Cécile; El-Garch, Hanane; Tierny, Dominique; Laio, Albert Taiching; Lin, Ching-Si; Chiou, Kuo-Hao; Tsai, Cheng-Long; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Li, Wen-Chiuan; Fischer, Laurent; Chu, Rea-Min

    2011-04-18

    Immunization with xenogeneic DNA is a promising cancer treatment to overcome tolerance to self-antigens. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is over-expressed in various kinds of tumors and is believed to be involved in tumor progression. This study tested a xenogeneic chicken HSP70 (chHSP70) DNA vaccine in an experimental canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) model. Three vaccination strategies were compared: the first (PE) was designed to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of chHSP70 DNA vaccination by delivering the vaccine before tumor inoculation in a prime boost setting, the second (T) was designed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the same prime boost vaccine by vaccinating the dogs after tumor inoculation; the third (PT) was similar to the first strategy (PE), with the exception that the electroporation booster injection was replaced with a transdermal needle-free injection. Tumor growth was notably inhibited only in the PE dogs, in which the vaccination program triggered tumor regression significantly sooner than in control dogs (NT). The CD4(+) subpopulation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and canine HSP70 (caHSP70)-specific IFN-γ-secreting lymphocytes were significantly increased during tumor regression in the PE dogs as compared to control dogs, demonstrating that specific tolerance to caHSP70 has been overcome. In contrast, no benefit of the therapeutic strategy (T) could be noticed and the (PT) strategy only led to partial control of tumor growth. In summary, antitumor prophylactic activity was demonstrated using the chHSP70 DNA vaccine including a boost via electroporation. Our data stressed the importance of DNA electroporation as a booster to get the full benefit of DNA vaccination but also of cancer immunotherapy initiation as early as possible. Xenogeneic chHSP70 DNA vaccination including an electroporation boost is a potential vaccine to HSP70-expressing tumors, although further research is still required to better understand true

  10. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; Del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-15

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases.

  11. Nitroaspirin corrects immune dysfunction in tumor-bearing hosts and promotes tumor eradication by cancer vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santo, Carmela; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Bolla, Manlio; del Soldato, Piero; Melani, Cecilia; Guiducci, Cristiana; Colombo, Mario P.; Iezzi, Manuela; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2005-03-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the immune-mediated destruction of cancer cells. Of the various strategies used by tumors to counteract immune attacks, myeloid suppressors recruited by growing cancers are particularly efficient, often resulting in the induction of systemic T lymphocyte dysfunction. We have previously shown that the mechanism by which myeloid cells from tumor-bearing hosts block immune defense strategies involves two enzymes that metabolize L-arginine: arginase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase. NO-releasing aspirin is a classic aspirin molecule covalently linked to a NO donor group. NO aspirin does not possess direct antitumor activity. However, by interfering with the inhibitory enzymatic activities of myeloid cells, orally administered NO aspirin normalized the immune status of tumor-bearing hosts, increased the number and function of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, and enhanced the preventive and therapeutic effectiveness of the antitumor immunity elicited by cancer vaccination. Because cancer vaccines and NO aspirin are currently being investigated in independent phase I/II clinical trials, these findings offer a rationale to combine these treatments in subjects with advanced neoplastic diseases. arginase | immunosuppression | myeloid cells | nitric oxide | immunotherapy

  12. Multivalent immunity targeting tumor-associated antigens by intra-lymph node DNA-prime, peptide-boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    Smith, K A; Qiu, Z; Wong, R; Tam, V L; Tam, B L; Joea, D K; Quach, A; Liu, X; Pold, M; Malyankar, U M; Bot, A

    2011-01-01

    Active immunotherapy of cancer has yet to yield effective therapies in the clinic. To evaluate the translatability of DNA-based vaccines we analyzed the profile of T-cell immunity by plasmid vaccination in a murine model, using transcriptome microarray analysis and flow cytometry. DNA vaccination resulted in specific T cells expressing low levels of co-inhibitory molecules (most notably PD-1), strikingly different from the expression profile elicited by peptide immunization. In addition, the T-cell response primed through this dual-antigen-expressing plasmid (MART-1/Melan-A and tyrosinase) translated into a substantial proliferation capacity and functional conversion to antitumor effector cells after tyrosinase and MART-1/Melan-A peptide analog boost. Furthermore, peptide boost rescued the immune response against the subdominant tyrosinase epitope. This immunization approach could be adapted to elicit potent immunity against multiple tumor antigens, resulting in a broader immune response that was more effective in targeting human tumor cells. Finally, this study sheds light on a novel mechanism of immune homeostasis through synchronous regulation of co-inhibitory molecules on T cells, highly relevant to heterologous prime boost approaches involving DNA vaccines as priming agents.

  13. Barriers to Radiation-Induced In Situ Tumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wennerberg, Erik; Lhuillier, Claire; Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Pilones, Karsten A.; García-Martínez, Elena; Rudqvist, Nils-Petter; Formenti, Silvia C.; Demaria, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The immunostimulatory properties of radiation therapy (RT) have recently generated widespread interest due to preclinical and clinical evidence that tumor-localized RT can sometimes induce antitumor immune responses mediating regression of non-irradiated metastases (abscopal effect). The ability of RT to activate antitumor T cells explains the synergy of RT with immune checkpoint inhibitors, which has been well documented in mouse tumor models and is supported by observations of more frequent abscopal responses in patients refractory to immunotherapy who receive RT during immunotherapy. However, abscopal responses following RT remain relatively rare in the clinic, and antitumor immune responses are not effectively induced by RT against poorly immunogenic mouse tumors. This suggests that in order to improve the pro-immunogenic effects of RT, it is necessary to identify and overcome the barriers that pre-exist and/or are induced by RT in the tumor microenvironment. On the one hand, RT induces an immunogenic death of cancer cells associated with release of powerful danger signals that are essential to recruit and activate dendritic cells (DCs) and initiate antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, RT can promote the generation of immunosuppressive mediators that hinder DCs activation and impair the function of effector T cells. In this review, we discuss current evidence that several inhibitory pathways are induced and modulated in irradiated tumors. In particular, we will focus on factors that regulate and limit radiation-induced immunogenicity and emphasize current research on actionable targets that could increase the effectiveness of radiation-induced in situ tumor vaccination. PMID:28348554

  14. Blockade of TGF-beta enhances tumor vaccine efficacy mediated by CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Takaku, Shun; Terabe, Masaki; Ambrosino, Elena; Peng, Judy; Lonning, Scott; McPherson, John M; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2010-04-01

    Though TGF-beta inhibition enhances antitumor immunity mediated by CD8(+) T cells in several tumor models, it is not always sufficient for rejection of tumors. In this study, to maximize the antitumor effect of TGF-beta blockade, we tested the effect of anti-TGF-beta combined with an irradiated tumor vaccine in a subcutaneous CT26 colon carcinoma tumor model. The irradiated tumor cell vaccine alone in prophylactic setting significantly delayed tumor growth, whereas anti-TGF-beta antibodies alone did not show any antitumor effect. However, tumor growth was inhibited significantly more in vaccinated mice treated with anti-TGF-beta antibodies compared to vaccinated mice without anti-TGF-beta, suggesting that anti-TGF-beta synergistically enhanced irradiated tumor vaccine efficacy. CD8(+) T-cell depletion completely abrogated the vaccine efficacy, and so protection required CD8(+) T cells. Depletion of CD25(+) T regulatory cells led to the almost complete rejection of tumors without the vaccine, whereas anti-TGF-beta did not change the number of CD25(+) T regulatory cells in unvaccinated and vaccinated mice. Though the abrogation of CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which have been reported to induce TGF-beta production by MDSC through an IL-13-IL-4R-STAT6 pathway, partially enhanced antitumor immunity regardless of vaccination, abrogation of the NKT cell-IL-13-IL-4R-STAT-6 immunoregulatory pathway did not enhance vaccine efficacy. Taken together, these data indicated that anti-TGF-beta enhances efficacy of a prophylactic vaccine in normal individuals despite their not having the elevated TGF-beta levels found in patients with cancer and that the effect is not dependent on TGF-beta solely from CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells or the NKT cell-IL-13-IL-4R-STAT-6 immunoregulatory pathway.

  15. Murine responses to recombinant MVA versus ALVAC vaccines against tumor-associated antigens, gp100 and 5T4.

    PubMed

    Hanwell, David G; McNeil, Bryan; Visan, Lucian; Rodrigues, Lauren; Dunn, Pamela; Shewen, Patricia E; Macallum, Grace E; Turner, Patricia V; Vogel, Thorsten U

    2013-05-01

    Virally vectored cancer vaccines comprise a new form of immunotherapy that aim to generate anti-tumor immune responses with potential for tumor clearance and enhanced patient survival. Here, we compared 2 replication-deficient poxviruses modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and ALVAC(2) in their ability to induce antigen expression and immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) 5T4 and gp100. To facilitate the comparison, recombinant MVA-gp100M and ALVAC(2)-5T4 were constructed to complement existing ALVAC(2)-gp100M and MVA-5T4 vectors. Recombinant TAA expression in chicken embryo fibroblast cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. 5T4 expression was approximately equal for both viruses, whereas ALVAC-derived gp100 was quickly degraded, at a time point when MVA-derived gp100 was still stable and expressed at high levels. Human leukocyte antigen-A2 transgenic mice were vaccinated with recombinant viruses and the CD8 T-cell responses elicited against each TAA were monitored by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot. No 5T4 peptide responses were detected using splenocytes from mice vaccinated with either vector, whereas vaccination with MVA elicited a significantly higher gp100-specific response than ALVAC(2) at 10 PFU (P<0.001). In CD-1 mice, each vector elicited similar 5T4 antibody responses, whereas MVA was more potent and induced gp100 antibody responses at a lower immunization dose than ALVAC (P<0.001). In this study, immunogenicity varied depending on the viral vector used and reflected vector-associated differences in in vitro TAA expression and stability. These findings suggest that novel vector-transgene combinations must be assessed individually when designing vaccines, and that stability of vector-encoded proteins produced in vitro may be useful as a predictor for in vitro immunogenicity.

  16. Co-Expression of Tumor Antigen and Interleukin-2 From an Adenoviral Vector Augments the Efficiency of Therapeutic Tumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Nielsen, Karen Nørgaard; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that for the majority of antigens, adenoviral vaccines expressing the target antigen fused to the MHC associated invariant chain (Ii) induce an accelerated, augmented, and prolonged transgene-specific CD8+ T-cell response. Here we describe a new adenoviral vaccine vector approach where the target antigen fused to Ii is expressed from the adenoviral E1 region and IL-2 is expressed from the E3 region. Immunization of mice with this new vector construct resulted in an augmented primary effector CD8+ T-cell response. Furthermore, in a melanoma model we observed significantly prolonged tumor control in vaccinated wild type (WT) mice. The improved tumor control required antigen-specific cells, since no tumor control was observed, unless the melanoma cells expressed the vaccine targeted antigen. We also tested our new vaccine in immunodeficient (CD80/86 deficient) mice. Following vaccination with the IL-2 expressing construct, these mice were able to raise a delayed but substantial CD8+ T-cell response, and to control melanoma growth nearly as efficaciously as similarly vaccinated WT mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that current vaccine vectors can be improved and even tailored to meet specific demands: in the context of therapeutic vaccination, the capacity to promote an augmented effector T-cell response. PMID:25023330

  17. Dendritic Cells The Tumor Microenvironment and the Challenges for an Effective Antitumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Benencia, Fabian; Sprague, Leslee; McGinty, John; Pate, Michelle; Muccioli, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Many clinical trials have been carried out or are in progress to assess the therapeutic potential of dendritic-cell- (DC-) based vaccines on cancer patients, and recently the first DC-based vaccine for human cancer was approved by the FDA. Herewith, we describe the general characteristics of DCs and different strategies to generate effective antitumor DC vaccines. In recent years, the relevance of the tumor microenvironment in the progression of cancer has been highlighted. It has been shown that the tumor microenvironment is capable of inactivating various components of the immune system responsible for tumor clearance. In particular, the effect of the tumor microenvironment on antigen-presenting cells, such as DCs, does not only render these immune cells unable to induce specific immune responses, but also turns them into promoters of tumor growth. We also describe strategies likely to increase the efficacy of DC vaccines by reprogramming the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22505809

  18. Antitumor cell-complex vaccines employing genetically modified tumor cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, María José; Sendra, Luis; Botella, Rafael; Diaz, Ana; Algás, Rosa; Aliño, Salvador F

    2014-02-19

    The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok) and a low producer (p2F). Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP) IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01). When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05). Significant survival (40%) was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells.

  19. Antitumor Cell-Complex Vaccines Employing Genetically Modified Tumor Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, María José; Sendra, Luis; Botella, Rafael; Diaz, Ana; Algás, Rosa; Aliño, Salvador F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok) and a low producer (p2F). Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP) IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01). When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05). Significant survival (40%) was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells. PMID:24556729

  20. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  1. Design of universal cancer vaccines using natural tumor vessel-specific antigens (SANTAVAC).

    PubMed

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination against endothelial cells (ECs) lining the tumor vasculature represents one of the most attractive potential cancer immunotherapy options due to its ability to prevent solid tumor growth. Using this approach, target antigens can be derived from ECs and used to develop a universal cancer vaccine. Unfortunately, direct immunization with EC preparations can elicit autoimmune vasculitis in normal tissues. Recently, tumor-induced changes to the human EC surface were described that provided a basis for designing efficient EC-based vaccines capable of eliciting immune responses that targeted the tumor endothelium directly. This review examines these data from the perspective of designing EC-based cancer vaccines for the treatment of all solid tumors, including the antigen composition of vaccine formulations, the selection ECs for antigen derivation, the production and control of antigens, and the method for estimating vaccine efficacy and safety. As the vaccine preparation requires a specifically derived set of natural cell surface antigens, a new vaccine preparation concept was formulated. Antigen compositions prepared according to this concept were named SANTAVAC (Set of All Natural Target Antigens for Vaccination Against Cancer).

  2. Virus-like particles and capsomeres are potent vaccines against cutaneous alpha HPVs.

    PubMed

    Senger, Tilo; Schädlich, Lysann; Textor, Sonja; Klein, Corinna; Michael, Kristina M; Buck, Christopher B; Gissmann, Lutz

    2010-02-10

    The potential as prophylactic vaccines of L1-based particles from cutaneous genus alpha human papillomavirus (HPV) types has not been assessed so far. However, there is a high medical need for such vaccines since HPV-induced skin warts represent a major burden for children and for immunocompromised adults, such as organ transplant recipients. In this study, we have examined the immunogenicity of capsomeres and virus-like particles (VLPs) from HPV types 2, 27, and 57, the most frequent causative agents of skin warts. Immunization of mice induced immune responses resembling those observed upon vaccination with HPV 16 L1-based antigens. The antibody responses were cross-reactive but type-restricted in their neutralizing capacities. Application of adjuvant led to an enhanced potential to neutralize the respective immunogen type but did not improve cross-neutralization. Vaccination with capsomeres and VLPs from all four analyzed HPV types induced robust IFNgamma-associated T-cell activation. Immunization with mixed VLPs from HPV types 2, 27, and 57 triggered an antibody response similar to that after single-type immunization and capable of efficiently neutralizing all three types. Our results imply that vaccination with combinations of VLPs from cutaneous HPV types constitutes a promising strategy to prevent HPV-induced skin lesions. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prospective immunotherapies in childhood sarcomas: PD1/PDL1 blockade in combination with tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Theodore S; Anderson, Jennifer L; Federman, Noah

    2016-03-01

    Progress has slowed substantially in improving survival rates for pediatric sarcomas, particularly in refractory and metastatic disease. Significant progress has been made in the field of tumor vaccines for such malignancies, which target established tumor antigens. While tumor vaccines have demonstrated safety and improved survival rates, they are inadequate in mediating the regression of established tumor masses and metastases. Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) is a cell-surface protein induced in a number of adult malignancies. By acting on the corresponding T-cell receptor PD1, PDL1 is able to suppress cytotoxic T-cell-mediated tumor responses. Recent therapeutics blocking this interaction have shown promise in various adult cancers by restoring a functional T-cell response and by directing this response toward an activated, rather than regulatory, T-cell phenotype. We shall discuss the current state of tumor vaccines targeting pediatric sarcomas, review PD1-PDL1 interactions and current therapies targeting these interactions in adult malignancies, and discuss recent studies in which tumor vaccines, combined with PDL1 blockades, produced superior tumor regression compared with the vaccine alone. These studies provide a compelling case for investigation of PDL1 expression and its inhibition in pediatric sarcomas, while continuing to utilize tumor vaccines in tandem to achieve superior clinical outcomes.

  4. Organic chemistry and immunochemical strategies in the design of potent carbohydrate-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Roy, René; Shiao, Tze Chieh

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of carbohydrate antigens processing and uptakes involved in the adaptive immune system is highlighted. To counter balance the poor immunogenicity and T-cell independent characteristics of carbohydrate antigens, chemists have developed original hybrid molecules aimed at targeting specific competent immune cell receptors. Amongst several potential vaccine candidates dedicated against diseases, this short report will focused on those most advance and state of the art organic chemistry involved therein. One case has led to the first example of a commercial vaccine entirely prepared from a synthetic carbohydrate antigen against infections caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Haemophilus influenza type b responsible for pneumonia and acute bacterial meningitis in infants. Other commendable examples will illustrate the immunochemical strategies engaged in the development of anticancer carbohydrate-based vaccines.

  5. Murine Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Whole Tumor Lysates Mediate Potent Antitumor Immune Responses in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, R. C.; Shimizu, K.; Mule, J. J.

    1998-08-01

    The highly efficient nature of dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells raises the possibility of uncovering in tumor-bearing hosts very low levels of T cell reactivity to poorly immunogenic tumors that are virtually undetectable by other means. Here, we demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo capacities of murine bone marrow-derived, cytokine-driven DC to elicit potent and specific anti-tumor responses when pulsed with whole tumor lysates. Stimulation of naive spleen-derived T cells by tumor lysate-pulsed DC generated tumor-specific proliferative cytokine release and cytolytic reactivities in vitro. In addition, in two separate strains of mice with histologically distinct tumors, s.c. injections of DC pulsed with whole tumor lysates effectively primed these animals to reject subsequent lethal challenges with viable parental tumor cells and, important to note, also mediated significant reductions in the number of metastases established in the lungs. Tumor rejection depended on host-derived CD8+ T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD4+ T cells. Spleens from mice that had rejected their tumors contained specific precursor cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The use of whole tumor lysates as a source of tumor-associated antigen(s) for pulsing of DC circumvents several limitations encountered with other methods as well as provides certain distinct advantages, which are discussed. These data serve as rationale for our recent initiation of a phase I clinical trial of immunization with autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC in adult and pediatric cancer patients.

  6. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate.

  7. Rapid Translation of a Novel and Potent Vaccine in HER2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    G. Komen Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship Award (KG080627) (Z.C.H.). References [1] Delcayre A, Estelles A, Sperinde J, Roulon T, Paz P, Aguilar B... moral response, we next investigated these aspects of our Ad-HER2-ki and Ad-HER2-ECD-TM vaccine-induced anti- bodies (VIA). Isotype-specific ELISA

  8. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  9. Vaccines combined with immune checkpoint antibodies promote cytotoxic T cell activity and tumor eradication

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Omar A.; Lewin, Sarah A.; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) cancer vaccine can be used in combination with immune checkpoint antibodies, anti–CTLA-4 or anti–PD-1, to enhance cytotoxic T cell (CTL) activity and induce the regression of solid B16 tumors in mice. Combination therapy obviated the need for vaccine boosting and significantly skewed intratumoral reactions toward CTL activity, resulting in the regression of B16 tumors up to 50mm2 in size and 75% survival rates. These data suggests that combining material-based cancer vaccines with checkpoint antibodies has the potential to mediate tumor regression in humans. PMID:26669718

  10. PD-1 and Tim-3 regulate the expansion of tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced by melanoma vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Pagliano, Ornella; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Sander, Cindy; Janjic, Bratislav; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Tawbi, Hussein A.; Kirkwood, John M.; Moschos, Stergios; Wang, Hong; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Krieg, Arthur; Anderson, Ana C.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2014-01-01

    Although melanoma vaccines stimulate tumor antigen (TA)-specific CD8+ T cells, objective clinical responses are rarely observed. To investigate this discrepancy, we evaluated the character of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells with regard to the inhibitory T cell co-receptors PD-1 and Tim-3 in metastatic melanoma patients who were administered tumor vaccines. The vaccines included incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG) and the HLA-A2-restricted analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V, either by itself or in combination with the pan-DR epitope NY-ESO-1 119-143. Both vaccines stimulated rapid TA-specific CD8+ T-cell responses detected ex vivo, however, TA-specific CD8+ T cells produced more IFN-γ and exhibited higher lytic function upon immunization with MHC class I and class II epitopes. Notably, the vast majority of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1 and a minority also upregulated Tim-3. Levels of PD-1 and Tim-3 expression by vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells at the time of vaccine administration correlated inversely with their expansion in vivo. Dual blockade of PD-1 and Tim-3 enhanced the expansion and cytokine production of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells in vitro. Collectively, our findings support the use of PD-1 and Tim-3 blockades with cancer vaccines to stimulate potent antitumor T cell responses and increase the likelihood of clinical responses in advanced melanoma patients. PMID:24343228

  11. Optimized DNA Vaccines to Specifically Induce Therapeutic CD8 T Cell Responses Against Autochthonous Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Il; Niu, Guilian; Bradley, Norma; Celis, Esteban

    2008-01-01

    Vaccines capable of inducing CD8 T cell responses to antigens expressed by tumor cells are considered as attractive choices for the treatment and prevention of malignant diseases. Our group has previously reported that immunization with synthetic peptide corresponding to a CD8 T cell epitope derived from the rat neu oncogene administered together with a Toll-like receptor agonist as adjuvant, induced immune responses that translated into prophylactic and therapeutic benefit against autochthonous tumors in an animal model of breast cancer (BALB-neuT mice). DNA-based vaccines offer some advantages over peptide vaccines, such as the possibility of including multiple CD8 T cell epitopes in a single construct. Thus, we have evaluated the use of DNA vaccination for its ability to generate effective CD8 T cell responses against breast tumors expressing the rat neu oncogene. The results show that as with peptide vaccination, DNA-based vaccines were very effective in stimulating tumor-reactive CD8 T cell responses. Moreover, vaccination with modified DNA plasmids resulted in significant anti-tumor effects that were mediated by CD8 T cells without the requirement of generating antibodies to the product of rat neu. These results bear importance for the design of DNA vaccines for the treatment and prevention of cancer. PMID:18253731

  12. Successful adoptive immunotherapy with vaccine-sensitized T cells, despite no effect with vaccination alone in a weakly immunogenic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Maryam; Chin, Cynthia S; Graham, Laura J; Miller, Catriona; Lee, Catherine; George, Kimberly; Bear, Harry D

    2003-12-01

    Tumor cell vaccines have been successful at inducing immunity in naïve mice, but only in a few reports has vaccination alone induced regression of established tumors and, generally, only when they are very small. Clinically, vaccinations alone may not be able to cause regression of established human cancers, which tend to be weakly immunogenic. We hypothesized that pharmacologic ex vivo amplification of a vaccination-induced immune response with subsequent adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) to tumor-bearing animals would be more effective in treatment of these animals than vaccination alone. The 4T1 and 4T07 mammary carcinomas are derived from the same parental cell line, but 4T1 is much less immunogenic and more aggressive than 4T07. Vaccination with either 4T1, 4T1-IL-2, or 4T07-IL-2 was not effective as treatment for established 4T1 tumors. However, 4T1 or 4T07-IL-2-vaccine-sensitized draining lymph node (DLN) cells, activated ex vivo with bryostatin 1 and ionomycin and expanded in culture, induced complete tumor regressions when adoptively transferred to 4T1 tumor-bearing animals. This was effective against small tumors as well as more advanced tumors, 10 days after tumor cell inoculation. Furthermore, as would be required for this approach to be used clinically, vaccine-DLN cells obtained from mice with established progressive 4T1 tumors (inoculated 10 days before vaccination) also induced regression of 4T1 tumors in an adoptive host. In none of these experiments was exogenous IL-2 required to induce tumor regression. The response to tumor cell vaccine can be amplified by ex vivo pharmacologic activation of sensitized T cells, which can then cure an established, weakly immunogenic and highly aggressive tumor that was resistant to vaccination alone.

  13. A potent multivalent vaccine for modulation of immune system in atherosclerosis: an in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Atherosclerosis is classically defined as an immune-mediated disease characterized by accumulation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol over intima in medium sized and large arteries. Recent studies have demonstrated that both innate and adaptive immune responses are involved in atherosclerosis. In addition, experimental and human models have recognized many autoantigens in pathophysiology of this disease. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins, β2 glycoprotein I (β-2-GPI), and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) are the best studied of them which can represent promising approach to design worthwhile vaccines for modulation of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods In silico approaches are the best tools for design and evaluation of the vaccines before initiating the experimental study. In this study, we identified immunogenic epitopes of HSP60, ApoB-100, and β-2-GPI as major antigens to construct a chimeric protein through bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we have evaluated physico-chemical properties, structures, stability, MHC binding properties, humoral and cellular immune responses, and allergenicity of this chimeric protein by means of bioinformatics tools and servers. Results Validation results indicated that 89.1% residues locate in favorite or additional allowed region of Ramachandran plot. Also, based on Ramachandran plot analysis this protein could be classified as a stable fusion protein. In addition, the epitopes in the chimeric protein had strong potential to induce both the B-cell and T-cell mediated immune responses. Conclusion Our results supported that this chimeric vaccine could be effectively utilized as a multivalent vaccine for prevention and modulation of atherosclerosis. PMID:26866024

  14. Poly (I:C) enhances the anti-tumor activity of canine parvovirus NS1 protein by inducing a potent anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Tiwari, A K; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P

    2016-09-01

    The canine parvovirus NS1 (CPV2.NS1) protein selectively induces apoptosis in the malignant cells. However, for an effective in vivo tumor treatment strategy, an oncolytic agent also needs to induce a potent anti-tumor immune response. In the present study, we used poly (I:C), a TLR3 ligand, as an adjuvant along with CPV2.NS1 to find out if the combination can enhance the oncolytic activity by inducing a potent anti-tumor immune response. The 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells were used to induce mammary tumor in Balb/c mice. The results suggested that poly (I:C), when given along with CPV2.NS1, not only significantly reduced the tumor growth but also augmented the immune response against tumor antigen(s) as indicated by the increase in blood CD4+ and CD8+ counts and infiltration of immune cells in the tumor tissue. Further, blood serum analysis of the cytokines revealed that Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) were significantly upregulated in the treatment group indicating activation of cell-mediated immune response. The present study reports the efficacy of CPV2.NS1 along with poly (I:C) not only in inhibiting the mammary tumor growth but also in generating an active anti-tumor immune response without any visible toxicity. The results of our study may help in developing CPV2.NS1 and poly (I: C) combination as a cancer therapeutic regime to treat various malignancies.

  15. Vaccination of rabbits with an alkylated toxoid rapidly elicits potent neutralizing antibodies against botulinum neurotoxin serotype B.

    PubMed

    Held, Daniel M; Shurtleff, Amy C; Fields, Scott; Green, Christopher; Fong, Julie; Jones, Russell G A; Sesardic, Dorothea; Buelow, Roland; Burke, Rae Lyn

    2010-06-01

    New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were immunized with several different nontoxic botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BoNT/B) preparations in an effort to optimize the production of a rapid and highly potent, effective neutralizing antibody response. The immunogens included a recombinant heavy chain (rHc) protein produced in Escherichia coli, a commercially available formaldehyde-inactivated toxoid, and an alkylated toxoid produced by urea-iodoacetamide inactivation of the purified active toxin. All three immunogens elicited an antibody response to BoNT/B, detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by toxin neutralization assay, by the use of two distinct mouse toxin challenge models. The induction period and the ultimate potency of the observed immune response varied for each immunogen, and the ELISA titer was not reliably predictive of the potency of toxin neutralization. The kinetics of the BoNT/B-specific binding immune response were nearly identical for the formaldehyde toxoid and alkylated toxoid immunogens, but immunization with the alkylated toxoid generated an approximately 10-fold higher neutralization potency that endured throughout the study, and after just 49 days, each milliliter of serum was capable of neutralizing 10(7) 50% lethal doses of the toxin. Overall, the immunization of rabbits with alkylated BoNT/B toxoid appears to have induced a neutralizing immune response more rapid and more potent than the responses generated by vaccination with formaldehyde toxoid or rHc preparations.

  16. Effective genetic vaccination with a widely shared endogenous retroviral tumor antigen requires CD40 stimulation during tumor rejection phase.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Cingarlini, Sara; Apolloni, Elisa; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; De Santo, Carmela; Macino, Beatrice; Marin, Oriano; Zanovello, Paola

    2003-12-15

    Endogenous retrovirus (ERV) products are recognized by T lymphocytes in mice and humans. As these Ags are preferentially expressed by neoplastic tissues, they might represent an ideal target for active immunization by genetic vaccination. However, i.m. inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding mouse gp70 or p15E, two products of the env gene of an endogenous murine leukemia virus, elicited a weak Ag-specific T lymphocyte response and resulted in partial protection from challenge with mouse tumors possessing these Ags. Depletion experiments showed that CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T lymphocytes were crucial for the antitumor activity of the vaccines. Systemic administration of agonistic anti-CD40 mAb increased the therapeutic potential of genetic vaccination, but only when given during the tumor rejection phase and not at the time of immunization. This effect correlated with a dramatic increase in the number of ERV-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Adjuvant activity of CD40 agonists thus seems to be relevant to enhance the CD8(+) T cell-dependent response in tumor-bearing hosts, suggesting that sustaining tumor-specific T lymphocyte survival in subjects undergoing vaccination might be a key event in the successful vaccination with weak tumor Ags.

  17. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, YA; Seregin, SS; Kousa, YA; Rastall, DPW; Appledorn, DM; Godbehere, S; Schutte, BC; Amalfitano, A

    2014-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general. PMID:23949283

  18. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  19. Chemical conjugate TMV-peptide bivalent fusion vaccines improve cellular immunity and tumor protection.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Alison A; Corbo, Tina A; Wykoff-Clary, Sherri; Palmer, Kenneth E; Pogue, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Chemical conjugation of CTL peptides to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has shown promise as a molecular adjuvant scaffold for augmentation of cellular immune responses to peptide vaccines. This study demonstrates the ease of generating complex multipeptide vaccine formulations using chemical conjugation to TMV for improved vaccine efficacy. We have tested a model foreign antigen target-the chicken ovalbumin-derived CTL peptide (Ova peptide), as well as mouse melanoma-associated CTL epitopes p15e and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (Trp2) peptides that are self-antigen targets. Ova peptide fusions to TMV, as bivalent formulations with peptides encoding additional T-help or cellular uptake via the integrin-receptor binding RGD peptide, showed improved vaccine potency evidenced by significantly enhanced numbers of antigen-reactive T cells measured by in vitro IFNgamma cellular analysis. We measured the biologically relevant outcome of vaccination in protection of mice from EG.7-Ova tumor challenge, which was achieved with only two doses of vaccine ( approximately 600 ng peptide) given without adjuvant. The p15e peptide alone or Trp2 peptide alone, or as a bivalent formulation with T-help or RGD uptake epitopes, was unable to stimulate effective tumor protection. However, a vaccine with both CTL peptides fused together onto TMV generated significantly improved survival. Interestingly, different bivalent vaccine formulations were required to improve vaccine efficacy for Ova or melanoma tumor model systems.

  20. An autologous dendritic cell canine mammary tumor hybrid-cell fusion vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bird, R Curtis; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Church Bird, Allison E; van Ginkel, Frederik W; Lindquist, Joni; Smith, Bruce F

    2011-01-01

    Mammary cancer is among the most prevalent canine tumors and frequently resulting in death due to metastatic disease that is highly homologous to human breast cancer. Most canine tumors fail to raise effective immune reactions yet, some spontaneous remissions do occur. Hybrid canine dendritic cell-tumor cell fusion vaccines were designed to enhance antigen presentation and tumor immune recognition. Peripheral blood-derived autologous dendritic cell enriched populations were isolated from dogs based on CD11c(+) expression and fused with canine mammary tumor (CMT) cells for vaccination of laboratory Beagles. These hybrid cells were injected into popliteal lymph nodes of normal dogs, guided by ultrasound, and included CpG-oligonucleotide adjuvants. Three rounds of vaccination were delivered. Significant IgG responses were observed in all vaccinated dogs compared to vehicle-injected controls. Canine IgG antibodies recognized shared CMT antigens as was demonstrated by IgG-recognition of three unrelated/independently derived CMT cell lines, and recognition of freshly isolated, unrelated, primary biopsy-derived CMT cells. A bias toward an IgG2 isotype response was observed after two vaccinations in most dogs. Neither significant cytotoxic T cell responses were detected, nor adverse or side-effects due to vaccination or due to the induced immune responses noted. These data provide proof-of-principle for this cancer vaccine strategy and demonstrate the presence of shared CMT antigens that promote immune recognition of mammary cancer.

  1. Potent suppressive activity of chlorophyll a and b from green tea (Camellia sinensis) against tumor promotion in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Higashi-Okai, K; Okai, Y

    1998-09-01

    Potent antigenotoxic and anti-tumor promoting activities of chlorophyll a from green tea (camellia sinensis) have been shown using in vitro cell culture experiments (Okai Y. et al. (1996) Mutation Res., 370, 11-17). In the present study, the authors analyzed in vivo effects of chlorophyll a and b from green tea on tumor promotion in mouse skin in the following ways. 1. When chlorophyll a and b from green tea were applied before each treatment by a tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on BALB/c mouse skin initiated by 7, 12-dimethylbenz [a] an-thracene (DMBA), they caused significant suppression in a dose-dependent manner against BALB/c mouse skin tumorigenesis. 2. Chlorophyll a and b showed significant suppressive effects against TPA-induced inflammatory reaction such as edema formation in BALB/c mouse ear skin in a dose-dependent fashion. These results suggest that chlorophyll a and b possess potent suppressive activities against tumor promotion in mouse skin.

  2. Broad antigenic coverage induced by vaccination with virus-based cDNA libraries cures established tumors.

    PubMed

    Kottke, Timothy; Errington, Fiona; Pulido, Jose; Galivo, Feorillo; Thompson, Jill; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Chong, Heung; Ilett, Elizabeth; Chester, John; Pandha, Hardev; Harrington, Kevin; Selby, Peter; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2011-06-19

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires the release of a broad spectrum of tumor antigens in the context of potent immune activation. We show here that a cDNA library of normal tissue, expressed from a highly immunogenic viral platform, cures established tumors of the same histological type from which the cDNA library was derived. Immune escape occurred with suboptimal vaccination, but tumor cells that escaped the immune pressure were readily treated by second-line virus-based immunotherapy. This approach has several major advantages. Use of the cDNA library leads to presentation of a broad repertoire of (undefined) tumor-associated antigens, which reduces emergence of treatment-resistant variants and also permits rational, combined-modality approaches in the clinic. Finally, the viral vectors can be delivered systemically, without the need for tumor targeting, and are amenable to clinical-grade production. Therefore, virus-expressed cDNA libraries represent a novel paradigm for cancer treatment addressing many of the key issues that have undermined the efficacy of immuno- and virotherapy to date.

  3. Development of oral cancer vaccine using recombinant Bifidobacterium displaying Wilms' tumor 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Koichi; Oda, Tsugumi; Saito, Hiroki; Araki, Ayame; Gonoi, Reina; Shigemura, Katsumi; Hashii, Yoshiko; Katayama, Takane; Fujisawa, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2017-06-01

    Several types of vaccine-delivering tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been developed in basic and clinical research. Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1), identified as a gene responsible for pediatric renal neoplasm, is one of the most promising TAA for cancer immunotherapy. Peptide and dendritic cell-based WT1 cancer vaccines showed some therapeutic efficacy in clinical and pre-clinical studies but as yet no oral WT1 vaccine can be administrated in a simple and easy way. In the present study, we constructed a novel oral cancer vaccine using a recombinant Bifidobacterium longum displaying WT1 protein. B. longum 420 was orally administered into mice inoculated with WT1-expressing tumor cells for 4 weeks to examine anti-tumor effects. To analyze the WT1-specific cellular immune responses to oral B. longum 420, mice splenocytes were isolated and cytokine production and cytotoxic activities were determined. Oral administrations of B. longum 420 significantly inhibited WT1-expressing tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice. Immunohistochemical study and immunological assays revealed that B. longum 420 substantially induced tumor infiltration of CD4(+)T and CD8(+)T cells, systemic WT1-specific cytokine production, and cytotoxic activity mediated by WT1-epitope specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, with no apparent adverse effects. Our novel oral cancer vaccine safely induced WT1-specific cellular immunity via activation of the gut mucosal immune system and achieved therapeutic efficacy with several practical advantages over existing non-oral vaccines.

  4. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 1010 peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  5. Mammea E/BB, an isoprenylated dihydroxycoumarin protonophore that potently uncouples mitochondrial electron transport, disrupts hypoxic signaling in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-11-29

    The mammea-type coumarin mammea E/BB (1) was found to inhibit both hypoxia-induced and iron chelator-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in human breast tumor T47D cells with IC(50) values of 0.96 and 0.89 μM, respectively. Compound 1 suppressed the hypoxic induction of secreted VEGF protein (T47D cells) and inhibited cell viability/proliferation in four human tumor cell lines. Compound 1 (at 5 and 20 μM) inhibited human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cell migration. While the mechanisms that underlie their biological activities have remained unknown, prenylated mammea coumarins have been shown to be cytotoxic to human tumor cells, suppress tumor growth in animal models, and display a wide variety of antimicrobial effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 appears to exert an assemblage of cellular effects by functioning as an anionic protonophore that potently uncouples mitochondrial electron transport and disrupts mitochondrial signaling in human tumor cell lines.

  6. Mammea E/BB, An Isoprenylated Dihydroxycoumarin Protonophore that Potently Uncouples Mitochondrial Electron Transport Disrupts Hypoxic Signaling in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The mammea-type coumarin mammea E/BB (1) was found to inhibit both hypoxia-induced and iron chelator-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in human breast tumor T47D cells with IC50 values of 0.96 and 0.89 µM, respectively. Compound 1 suppressed the hypoxic induction of secreted VEGF protein (T47D cells) and inhibited cell viability/proliferation in four human tumor cell lines. Compound 1 (at 5 and 20 µM) inhibited human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cell migration. While the mechanisms that underlay their biological activities have remained unknown, prenylated mammea coumarins have been shown to be cytotoxic to human tumor cells, suppress tumor growth in animal models, and display a wide variety of antimicrobial effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 appears to exert an assemblage of cellular effects by functioning as an anionic protonophore that potently uncouples mitochondrial electron transport and disrupts mitochondrial signaling in human tumor cell lines. PMID:20929261

  7. Pilot study of p62 DNA vaccine in dogs with mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Vladimir; Venanzi, Franco M; Bagashova, Elena; Rud, Oksana; Mariotti, Francesca; Vullo, Cecilia; Catone, Giuseppe; Sherman, Michael Y; Concetti, Antonio; Chursov, Andrey; Latanova, Anastasia; Shcherbinina, Vita; Shifrin, Victor; Shneider, Alexander

    2014-12-30

    Our previous data demonstrated profound anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of p62 (sqstm1) DNA vaccine in rodents with various types of transplantable tumors. Testing anti-cancer medicine in dogs as an intermediary step of translational research program provides two major benefits. First, clinical data collected in target animals is required for FDA/USDA approval as a veterinary anti-cancer drug or vaccine. It is noteworthy that the veterinary community is in need of novel medicine for the prevention and treatment of canine and feline cancers. The second more important benefit of testing anti-cancer vaccines in dogs is that spontaneous tumors in dogs may provide invaluable information for human trials. Here, we evaluated the effect(s) of p62 DNA vaccine on mammary tumors of dogs. We found that p62 DNA vaccine administered i.m. decreased or stabilized growth of locally advanced lesions in absence of its overall toxic effects. The observed antitumor activity was associated with lymphocyte infiltration and tumor encapsulation via fibrotic reaction. This data justifies both human clinical trials and veterinary application of p62 DNA vaccine.

  8. Mreg Activity in Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy and Photodynamic Therapy-Generated Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judith; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid regulatory cells (Mregs) are, together with regulatory T cells (Tregs), a dominant effector population responsible for restriction of the duration and strength of antitumor immune response. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and cancer vaccines generated by PDT are modalities whose effectiveness in tumor destruction is closely dependent on the associated antitumor immune response. The present study investigated whether the immunodepletion of granulocytic Mregs in host mice by anti-GR1 antibody would improve the response of tumors to PDT or PDT vaccines in these animals. Anti-GR1 administration immediately after Temoporfin-PDT of mouse SCCVII tumors abrogated curative effect of PDT. The opposite effect, increasing PDT-mediated tumor cure-rates was attained by delaying anti-GR1 treatment to 1 h post PDT. With PDT vaccines, multiple anti-GR1 administrations (days 0, 4, and 8 post vaccination) improved the therapy response with SCCVII tumors. The results with PDT suggest that neutrophils (boosting antitumor effect of this therapy) that are engaged immediately after photodynamic light treatment are within one hour replaced with a different myeloid population, presumably Mregs that hampers the therapy-mediated antitumor effect. Anti-GR1 antibody, when used with optimal timing, can improve the efficacy of both PDT of tumors in situ and PDT-generated cancer vaccines. PMID:27754452

  9. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L; Brentville, Victoria A; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M; Durrant, Lindy G

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10-40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses.

  10. Tumor immunity within the central nervous system stimulated by recombinant Listeria monocytogenes vaccination.

    PubMed

    Liau, Linda M; Jensen, Eric R; Kremen, Thomas J; Odesa, Sylvia K; Sykes, Steven N; Soung, Michael C; Miller, Jeff F; Bronstein, Jeff M

    2002-04-15

    Tumors arising within the central nervous system (CNS) present the immune system with a challenging target, given the heterogeneous nature of these neoplasms and their location within an "immunologically privileged" site. We used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus nucleoprotein (LCMV-NP) as a pseudotumor antigen to investigate recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a tumor vaccine against s.c. and intracerebral challenges with a NP-expressing glioma, 9L-NP. Using Fischer 344 rats, we demonstrate that vaccination with recombinant L. monocytogenes-NP stimulates protection against s.c., but not intracerebral, 9L-NP tumor challenge in an antigen-specific, CD8(+) T-cell-dependent manner. After s.c. tumor rejection, enhanced antitumor immunity is achieved via epitope spreading that permits complete resistance against lethal intracerebral challenge with 9L-NP and with the untransfected parental 9L tumor. Unlike the CD8(+)-dependent immune responses against s.c. 9L-NP tumors, this expanded intracerebral immunity against endogenous tumor-associated antigens is dependent on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the mechanisms of tumor immunity within the brain are different from those elicited against non-CNS tumors. Furthermore, vaccination approaches exploiting the concept of epitope spreading may enhance the efficacy of antitumor immune responses within the immunologically privileged CNS, potentially mediating tumor cell killing through both CD4(+)- and CD8(+)-dependent effector pathways.

  11. DNA vaccination controls Her-2+ tumors that are refractory to targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Paula J.; Piechocki, Marie P.; Heng, Henry H.; Jacob, Jennifer B.; Jones, Richard F.; Back, Jessica B.; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2008-01-01

    Her-2/neu+ tumor cells refractory to antibody or receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKI) are emerging in treated patients. To investigate if drug resistant tumors can be controlled by active vaccination, gefitinib and antibody sensitivity of four neu+ BALB/c mouse mammary tumor (MMT) lines were compared. Significant differences in cell proliferation and Akt phosphorylation were observed. Treatment-induced drug resistance was associated with increased chromosomal aberrations as shown by spectral karyotyping analysis, suggesting changes beyond neu signaling pathways. When mice were immunized with pneuTM encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of neu, antibody and T cell responses were induced and both drug sensitive and resistant tumor cells were rejected. In T cell depleted mice, drug sensitive tumors were still rejected by vaccination, but drug- refractory tumors survived in some mice, indicating their resistance to anti-neu antibodies. To further test if T cells alone can mediate tumor rejection, mice were immunized with pcytneu encoding full-length cytoplasmic neu that is rapidly degraded by the proteasome to activate CD8 T cells without inducing antibody response. All test tumors were rejected in pcytneu immunized mice, regardless of their sensitivity to gefitinib or antibody. Therefore, CTL activated by the complete repertoire of neu epitopes were effective against all test tumors. These results warrant Her-2 vaccination whether tumor cells are sensitive or resistant to Her-2 targeted drugs or antibody therapy. PMID:18794138

  12. ARGX-110, a highly potent antibody targeting CD70, eliminates tumors via both enhanced ADCC and immune checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    Silence, Karen; Dreier, Torsten; Moshir, Mahan; Ulrichts, Peter; Gabriels, Sofie ME; Saunders, Michael; Wajant, Harald; Brouckaert, Peter; Huyghe, Leander; Van Hauwermeiren, Tim; Thibault, Alain; De Haard, Hans J

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of CD70 has been documented in a variety of solid and hematological tumors, where it is thought to play a role in tumor proliferation and evasion of immune surveillance. Here, we describe ARGX-110, a defucosylated IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) that selectively targets and neutralizes CD70, the ligand of CD27.   ARGX-110 was generated by immunization of outbred llamas. The antibody was germlined to 95% human identity, and its anti-tumor efficacy was tested in several in vitro assays. ARGX-110 binds CD70 with picomolar affinity. In depletion studies, ARGX-110 lyses tumor cells with greater efficacy than its fucosylated version. In addition, ARGX-110 demonstrates strong complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis activity. ARGX-110 inhibits signaling of CD27, which results in blocking of the activation and proliferation of Tregs. In a Raji xenograft model, administration of the fucosylated version of ARGX-110 resulted in a prolonged survival at doses of 0.1 mg/kg and above. The pharmacokinetics of ARGX-110 was tested in cynomolgus monkeys; the calculated half-life is 12 days. In conclusion, ARGX-110 is a potent blocking mAb with a dual mode of action against both CD70-bearing tumor cells and CD70-dependent Tregs. This antibody is now in a Phase 1 study in patients with advanced malignancies expressing CD70 (NCT01813539). PMID:24492296

  13. TCR hypervariable regions expressed by T cells that respond to effective tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kimberly R; Buhrman, Jonathan D; Sprague, Jonathan; Moore, Brandon L; Gao, Dexiang; Kappler, John W; Slansky, Jill E

    2012-10-01

    A major goal of immunotherapy for cancer is the activation of T cell responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). One important strategy for improving antitumor immunity is vaccination with peptide variants of TAAs. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the expansion of T cells that respond to the native tumor antigen is an important step in developing effective peptide-variant vaccines. Using an immunogenic mouse colon cancer model, we compare the binding properties and the TCR genes expressed by T cells elicited by peptide variants that elicit variable antitumor immunity directly ex vivo. The steady-state affinity of the natural tumor antigen for the T cells responding to effective peptide vaccines was higher relative to ineffective peptides, consistent with their improved function. Ex vivo analysis showed that T cells responding to the effective peptides expressed a CDR3β motif, which was also shared by T cells responding to the natural antigen and not those responding to the less effective peptide vaccines. Importantly, these data demonstrate that peptide vaccines can expand T cells that naturally respond to tumor antigens, resulting in more effective antitumor immunity. Future immunotherapies may require similar stringent analysis of the responding T cells to select optimal peptides as vaccine candidates.

  14. Facile Fabrication of Tumor Redox-Sensitive Nanoassemblies of Small-Molecule Oleate Prodrug as Potent Chemotherapeutic Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Sun, Jin; Sun, Bingjun; Liu, Dan; Miao, Lei; Goodwin, Tyler Jay; Huang, Leaf; He, Zhonggui

    2016-12-01

    The conjugate of paclitaxel (PTX) and docosahexaenoic acid has entered into clinical trials. However, the most recent clinical outcomes fell short of expectations, due to the extremely slow drug release from the hydrophobic conjugates. Herein, a novel prodrug-based nanoplatform self-assembled by the disulfide bond linked conjugates of PTX and oleic acid for rapid and differential release of PTX in tumor cells is reported. This redox-responsive prodrug-nanosystem demonstrates multiple therapeutic advantages, including one-step facile fabrication, high drug-loading efficiency (56%, w/w), on-demand drug release responding to redox stimuli, as well as favorable cellular uptake and biodistribution. These advantages result in significantly enhanced antitumor efficacy in vivo, with the tumor almost completely disappearing in mice. Such a uniquely engineered prodrug-nanosystem has great potential to be used as potent chemotherapeutic nanomedicine in clinical cancer therapy.

  15. [The mechanism of anti-tumor immune response against mouse melanoma to xenogeneic vaccination].

    PubMed

    Luo, Feng; Mao, Yong-qiu; Kan, Bing; He, Qiu-Ming; Jiang, Yu; Peng, Feng; Yang, Li; Tian, Ling

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the immunological mechanism for inhibiting melanoma growth in mouse by vaccination with xenogeneic melanocytes. Xenogeneic vaccine was prepared from pig eye melanocytes. By means of indirect ELISA the antibodies against pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells in immunized mice sera were detected and the immunoglobulin subclass were analyzed. Then after purification, the immunoglobulins were used for the inhibition of cell proliferation in vitro. Analyses of cross-reactive antigen in both pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells were performed by Western blot. Xenogeneic vaccine was used before B16 melanoma challenge in C57 BL/c mice and then the growth of tumor was monitored. Meanwhile, other mice immunized with xenogeneic vaccine were depleted of NK cells or CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocytes. The antibodies against pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells in mice sera were not detected by indirect ELISA until 2 weeks after first xenogeneic vaccination, and after the first finding, the antibody titers increased with the time of immunization. The anti-tumor activity and production of autoantibodies, conspicuously those of the elevated IgG, could be abrogated by the depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes. The cross-reactive antigen with 180 kda protein in both pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells was confirmed. Xenogeneic vaccination resulted in inhibition of tumor growth in 90% of the immunized mice. The protective immune response elicited in this fashion was dispelled in the mice depleted of CD4+ T lymphocytes. However this response was found in 70% of the mice depleted of CD8+ T lymphocytes, and the depletion NK cells did not influence the anti-tumor effect of the vaccine. The anti-tumor immune response is capable of inhibiting melanoma growth; both humoral immunity and cellular immunity could be induced by xenogeneic melanocytes vaccination. This immune response is mainly mediated by CD4+ T lymphocytes.

  16. Relating TCR-peptide-MHC affinity to immunogenicity for the design of tumor vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Rachel H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Jordan, Kimberly R.; Dow, Steven W.; Wilson, Darcy B.; Slansky, Jill E.

    2006-01-01

    One approach to enhancing the T cell response to tumors is vaccination with mimotopes, mimics of tumor epitopes. While mimotopes can stimulate proliferation of T cells that recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), this expansion does not always correlate with control of tumor growth. We hypothesized that vaccination with mimotopes of optimal affinity in this interaction will improve antitumor immunity. Using a combinatorial peptide library and a cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone that recognizes a TAA, we identified a panel of mimotopes that, when complexed with MHC, bound the TAA-specific TCR with a range of affinities. As expected, in vitro assays showed that the affinity of the TCR-peptide-MHC (TCR-pMHC) interaction correlated with activity of the T cell clone. However, only vaccination with mimotopes in the intermediate-affinity range elicited functional T cells and provided protection against tumor growth in vivo. Vaccination with mimotopes with the highest-affinity TCR-pMHC interactions elicited TAA-specific T cells to the tumor, but did not control tumor growth at any of the peptide concentrations tested. Further analysis of these T cells showed functional defects in response to the TAA. Thus, stimulation of an antitumor response by mimotopes may be optimal with peptides that increase but do not maximize the affinity of the TCR-pMHC interaction. PMID:16932807

  17. A Novel Immunomodulatory Hemocyanin from the Limpet Fissurella latimarginata Promotes Potent Anti-Tumor Activity in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Arancibia, Sergio; Espinoza, Cecilia; Salazar, Fabián; Del Campo, Miguel; Tampe, Ricardo; Zhong, Ta-Ying; De Ioannes, Pablo; Moltedo, Bruno; Ferreira, Jorge; Lavelle, Ed C.; Manubens, Augusto; De Ioannes, Alfredo E.; Becker, María Inés

    2014-01-01

    Hemocyanins, the huge oxygen-transporting glycoproteins of some mollusks, are used as immunomodulatory proteins with proven anti-cancer properties. The biodiversity of hemocyanins has promoted interest in identifying new anti-cancer candidates with improved immunological properties. Hemocyanins promote Th1 responses without known side effects, which make them ideal for long-term sustained treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated a novel hemocyanin from the limpet/gastropod Fissurella latimarginata (FLH). This protein has the typical hollow, cylindrical structure of other known hemocyanins, such as the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and the Concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). FLH, like the KLH isoforms, is composed of a single type of polypeptide with exposed N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. However, its immunogenicity was significantly greater than that of KLH and CCH, as FLH induced a stronger humoral immune response and had more potent anti-tumor activity, delaying tumor growth and increasing the survival of mice challenged with B16F10 melanoma cells, in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Additionally, FLH-treated mice demonstrated increased IFN-γ production and higher numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated that FLH, but not CCH or KLH, stimulated the rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, IL-23 and TNF-α) by dendritic cells, triggering a pro-inflammatory milieu that may explain its enhanced immunological activity. Moreover, this effect was abolished when deglycosylated FLH was used, suggesting that carbohydrates play a crucial role in the innate immune recognition of this protein. Altogether, our data demonstrate that FLH possesses increased anti-tumor activity in part because it activates a more potent innate immune response in comparison to other known hemocyanins. In conclusion, FLH is a potential new marine adjuvant for immunization and possible cancer immunotherapy. PMID

  18. 4-1BB ligand enhances tumor-specific immunity of poxvirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Hodge, James W.; Kwak, Heesun; Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Schlom, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Howard L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Recombinant poxvirus vaccines have been explored as tumor vaccines. The immunogenicity of these vaccines can be enhanced by co-expressing costimulatory molecules and tumor-associated antigens. While the B7-CD28 interaction has been most comprehensively investigated, other costimulatory molecules utilize different signaling pathways and might provide further cooperation in T cell priming and survival. 4-1BB (CD137) is a TNF family member and is critical for activation and long-term maintenance of primed T-cells. This study was conducted to determine if a poxvirus expressing the ligand for 4-1BB (4-1BBL) could further improve the immune and therapeutic responses of a previously reported poxvirus vaccine expressing a triad of costimulatory molecules (B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3). Experimental Design A recombinant vaccinia virus expressing 4-1BBL was generated and characterized in an in vitro infection system. This vaccine was then used alone or in combination with a vaccinia virus expressing CEA, B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 in CEA-transgenic mice bearing established MC38 tumors. Tumor growth and immune responses against CEA and other tumor-associated antigens were determined. The level of anti-apoptotic proteins in responding T cells was determined by flow cytometry on tetramer selected T cells. Results The combination of 4-1BBL with B7.1-based poxvirus vaccination resulted in significantly enhanced therapeutic effects against CEA-expressing tumors in a CEA transgenic mouse model. This was associated with an increased level of CEA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, induction of antigen spreading to p53 and gp70, increased accumulation of CEA-specific T cells in the tumor microenvironment, and increased expression of bcl-XL and bcl-2 in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccinated mice. Conclusion 4-1BBL cooperates with B7 in enhancing anti-tumor and immunologic responses using a recombinant poxvirus vaccine model. The inclusion of costimulatory molecules targeting

  19. The JAK2 Inhibitor, AZD1480, Potently Blocks Stat3 Signaling and Oncogenesis in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hedvat, Michael; Huszar, Dennis; Herrmann, Andreas; Gozgit, Joseph M.; Schroeder, Anne; Sheehy, Adam; Buettner, Ralf; Proia, David; Kowolik, Claudia M.; Xin, Hong; Armstrong, Brian; Bebernitz, Geraldine; Weng, Shaobu; Wang, Lin; Ye, Minwei; McEachern, Kristen; Chen, Huawei; Morosini, Deborah; Bell, Kirsten; Alimzhanov, Marat; Ioannidis, Stephanos; McCoon, Patricia; Cao, Zhu A.; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard; Zinda, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Summary Persistent activation of Stat3 is oncogenic and is prevalent in a wide variety of human cancers. Chronic cytokine stimulation is associated with Stat3 activation in some tumors, implicating cytokine receptor-associated Jak family kinases. Using Jak2 inhibitors, we demonstrate a central role of Jaks in modulating basal and cytokine-induced Stat3 activation in human solid tumor cell lines. Inhibition of Jak2 activity is associated with abrogation of Stat3 nuclear translocation and tumorigenesis. The Jak2 inhibitor, AZD1480, suppresses the growth of human solid tumor xenografts harboring persistent Stat3 activity. We demonstrate the essential role of Stat3 downstream of Jaks by inhibition of tumor growth using shRNA targeting Stat3. Our data support a key role of Jak kinase activity in Stat3-dependent tumorigenesis. PMID:19962667

  20. 4-1BB Agonists: Multi-Potent Potentiators of Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Curran, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a rapidly expanding field of oncology aimed at targeting, not the tumor itself, but the immune system combating the cancerous lesion. Of the many approaches currently under study to boost anti-tumor immune responses; modulation of immune co-receptors on lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment has thus far proven to be the most effective. Antibody blockade of the T cell co-inhibitory receptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) has become the first FDA approved immune checkpoint blockade; however, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes express a diverse array of additional stimulatory and inhibitory co-receptors, which can be targeted to boost tumor immunity. Among these, the co-stimulatory receptor 4-1BB (CD137/TNFSF9) possesses an unequaled capacity for both activation and pro-inflammatory polarization of anti-tumor lymphocytes. While functional studies of 4-1BB have focused on its prominent role in augmenting cytotoxic CD8 T cells, 4-1BB can also modulate the activity of CD4 T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. 4-1BB’s expression on both T cells and antigen presenting cells, coupled with its capacity to promote survival, expansion, and enhanced effector function of activated T cells, has made it an alluring target for tumor immunotherapy. In contrast to immune checkpoint blocking antibodies, 4-1BB agonists can both potentiate anti-tumor and anti-viral immunity, while at the same time ameliorating autoimmune disease. Despite this, 4-1BB agonists can trigger high grade liver inflammation which has slowed their clinical development. In this review, we discuss how the underlying immunobiology of 4-1BB activation suggests the potential for therapeutically synergistic combination strategies in which immune adverse events can be minimized. PMID:26106583

  1. Establishment of a spontaneous metastasis tumor model for human ErbB-2 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xin; He, Yu; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2017-04-01

    Human ErbB-2 (Her-2) is a critical target for cancer immunotherapy, and its over-expression can promote cancer migration and invasion. Compared with passive antibody therapy, vaccination treatment is more effective in the prevention of cancer recurrence. BALB-neuT mouse is a spontaneous metastasis tumor model used for testing the anti-tumor metastatic effect of rat ErbB-2 (neu) vaccine. However, no spontaneous metastasis tumor model used for evaluating Her-2 vaccine has been developed. In the current study, we attempted to use murine melanoma cell lines to establish a stable spontaneous metastasis tumor model for Her-2 vaccines. We developed Her-2-positive B16F10 and B16BL6 cell lines expressing similar Her-2 levels as the typical human tumor cell line SKBR-3. Results showed that Her-2-positive B16BL6, rather than B16F10, cell line could effectively and spontaneously transfer to the lungs approximately 28days after the removal of primary tumors because it has stronger adhesion and invasion capacities. A stable spontaneous metastasis model was developed through in vivo screening of Her-2-positvie B16BL6 cells twice. This model was successfully applied in the analysis of the anti-metastatic efficacy of a tumor vaccine based on heat shock protein. Thus, we first established a spontaneous metastasis model that stably expresses Her-2 at similar levels as human cancers. This model can be used to evaluate the anti-metastatic efficacy of Her-2 vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. LIN28A immunoreactivity is a potent diagnostic marker of embryonal tumor with multilayered rosettes (ETMR).

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Andrey; Ryzhova, Marina; Jones, David T W; Northcott, Paul A; van Sluis, Peter; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Perry, Arie; Picard, Daniel; Rosenblum, Marc; Giangaspero, Felice; Aronica, Eleonora; Schüller, Ulrich; Hasselblatt, Martin; Collins, V Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Huang, Annie; Pfister, Stefan M; Kool, Marcel

    2012-12-01

    Embryonal tumor with multilayered rosettes (ETMR, previously known as ETANTR) is a highly aggressive embryonal CNS tumor, which almost exclusively affects infants and is associated with a dismal prognosis. Accurate diagnosis is of critical clinical importance because of its poor response to current treatment protocols and its distinct biology. Amplification of the miRNA cluster at 19q13.42 has been identified previously as a genetic hallmark for ETMR, but an immunohistochemistry-based assay for clinical routine diagnostics [such as INI-1 for atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT)] is still lacking. In this study, we screened for an ETMR-specific marker using a gene-expression profiling dataset of more than 1,400 brain tumors and identified LIN28A as a highly specific marker for ETMR. The encoded protein binds small RNA and has been implicated in stem cell pluripotency, metabolism and tumorigenesis. Using an LIN28A specific antibody, we carried out immunohistochemical analysis of LIN28A in more than 800 childhood brain-tumor samples and confirmed its high specificity for ETMR. Strong LIN28A immunoexpression was found in all 37 ETMR samples tested, whereas focal reactivity was only present in a small (6/50) proportion of AT/RT samples. All other pediatric brain tumors were completely LIN28A-negative. In summary, we established LIN28A immunohistochemistry as a highly sensitive and specific, rapid, inexpensive diagnostic tool for routine pathological verification of ETMR.

  3. Hypoxia-activated pro-drug TH-302 exhibits potent tumor suppressive activity and cooperates with chemotherapy against osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Vasilios; Labrinidis, Agatha; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; DeNichilo, Mark; Ingman, Wendy; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a major cause of treatment failure for a variety of malignancies. However, tumor hypoxia also offers treatment opportunities, exemplified by the development compounds that target hypoxic regions within tumors. TH-302 is a pro-drug created by the conjugation of 2-nitroimidazole to bromo-isophosphoramide (Br-IPM). When TH-302 is delivered to regions of hypoxia, Br-IPM, the DNA cross linking toxin, is released. In this study we assessed the cytotoxic activity of TH-302 against osteosarcoma cells in vitro and evaluated its anticancer efficacy as a single agent, and in combination with doxorubicin, in an orthotopic mouse model of human osteosarcoma (OS). In vitro, TH-302 was potently cytotoxic to osteosarcoma cells selectively under hypoxic conditions, whereas primary normal human osteoblasts were protected. Animals transplanted with OS cells directly into their tibiae and left untreated developed mixed osteolytic/osteosclerotic bone lesions and subsequently developed lung metastases. TH-302 reduced tumor burden in bone and cooperated with doxorubicin to protect bone from osteosarcoma induced bone destruction, while it also reduced lung metastases. TH-302 may therefore be an attractive therapeutic agent with strong activity as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy against OS. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis and SAR of 1-acetanilide-4-aminopyrazole-substituted quinazolines: selective inhibitors of Aurora B kinase with potent anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kevin M; Mortlock, Andrew A; Heron, Nicola M; Jung, Frédéric H; Hill, George B; Pasquet, Georges; Brady, Madeleine C; Green, Stephen; Heaton, Simon P; Kearney, Sarah; Keen, Nicholas J; Odedra, Rajesh; Wedge, Stephen R; Wilkinson, Robert W

    2008-03-15

    A new class of 1-acetanilide-4-aminopyrazole-substituted quinazoline Aurora kinase inhibitors has been discovered possessing highly potent cellular activity. Continuous infusion into athymic mice bearing SW620 tumors of the soluble phosphate derivative 2 led to dose-proportional exposure of the des-phosphate compound 8 with a high-unbound fraction. The combination of potent cell activity and high free-drug exposure led to pharmacodynamic changes in the tumor at low doses, indicative of Aurora B-kinase inhibition and a reduction in tumor volume.

  5. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  6. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines. PMID:26583156

  7. [Vaccination].

    PubMed

    Graubner, U B; Liese, J; Belohradsky, B H

    2001-09-01

    Vaccination has been an important part of antiinfectious prophylaxis in pediatric oncology comprising immunizations with special indication like varicella vaccine and follow-up of routine immunizations after chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Studies from the last decade demonstrate a loss of long term immunity to immunization preventable disease in most patients with chemotherapy and BMT who had received appropriate immunization before. So far routine vaccination programs following intensive chemotherapy have not been studied prospectively. Immunization programs following BMT have shown that immunizations with tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, inactivated poliovirus vaccine and influenza vaccine - given at least 12 months after transplantation - are safe and effective. Vaccination with live attenuated trivalent vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella in patients without chronic "graft versus host disease" (GVHD) and without ongoing immunosuppressive therapy, performed 24 months after transplantation, proved to be safe too. Recommendations have been published by 5 different official groups: (1.) "Ständige Impfkommission" (STIKO) and (2.) "Deutsche Gesellschaft für pädiatrische Infektiologie" (DGPI) recommend varicella vaccine für children with leukemia in remission for at least 12 months, for children with solid tumors and for patients getting an organ transplantation. Both societies do not comment on the schedule of booster vaccinations (with live attenuated vaccines) after the end of chemotherapy and after BMT. (3.) "Qualitätssicherungsgruppe" der "Gesellschaft für pädiatrische Onkologie und Hämatologie" (QS-GPOH) recommends immunization with nonliving vaccines when the patient is off therapy for at least 3 months and immunization with live attenuated vaccines when he is off therapy for at least 6 months. This group does not comment on varicella vaccine which has been controversial among pediatric oncologists. (4.) The " Infectious

  8. Small-molecule p21-activated kinase inhibitor PF-3758309 is a potent inhibitor of oncogenic signaling and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Brion W.; Guo, Chuangxing; Piraino, Joseph; Westwick, John K.; Zhang, Cathy; Lamerdin, Jane; Dagostino, Eleanor; Knighton, Daniel; Loi, Cho-Ming; Zager, Michael; Kraynov, Eugenia; Popoff, Ian; Christensen, James G.; Martinez, Ricardo; Kephart, Susan E.; Marakovits, Joseph; Karlicek, Shannon; Bergqvist, Simon; Smeal, Tod

    2010-01-01

    Despite abundant evidence that aberrant Rho-family GTPase activation contributes to most steps of cancer initiation and progression, there is a dearth of inhibitors of their effectors (e.g., p21-activated kinases). Through high-throughput screening and structure-based design, we identify PF-3758309, a potent (Kd = 2.7 nM), ATP-competitive, pyrrolopyrazole inhibitor of PAK4. In cells, PF-3758309 inhibits phosphorylation of the PAK4 substrate GEF-H1 (IC50 = 1.3 nM) and anchorage-independent growth of a panel of tumor cell lines (IC50 = 4.7 ± 3 nM). The molecular underpinnings of PF-3758309 biological effects were characterized using an integration of traditional and emerging technologies. Crystallographic characterization of the PF-3758309/PAK4 complex defined determinants of potency and kinase selectivity. Global high-content cellular analysis confirms that PF-3758309 modulates known PAK4-dependent signaling nodes and identifies unexpected links to additional pathways (e.g., p53). In tumor models, PF-3758309 inhibits PAK4-dependent pathways in proteomic studies and regulates functional activities related to cell proliferation and survival. PF-3758309 blocks the growth of multiple human tumor xenografts, with a plasma EC50 value of 0.4 nM in the most sensitive model. This study defines PAK4-related pathways, provides additional support for PAK4 as a therapeutic target with a unique combination of functions (apoptotic, cytoskeletal, cell-cycle), and identifies a potent, orally available small-molecule PAK inhibitor with significant promise for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:20439741

  9. The antimicrobial peptide pardaxin exerts potent anti-tumor activity against canine perianal gland adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Lin, Chao-Nan; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Yu, Chao Yuan; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Chien, Chi-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Pardaxin is an antimicrobial peptide of 33 amino acids, originally isolated from marine fish. We previously demonstrated that pardaxin has anti-tumor activity against murine fibrosarcoma, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the anti-tumor activity, toxicity profile, and maximally-tolerated dose of pardaxin treatment in dogs with different types of refractory tumor. Local injection of pardaxin resulted in a significant reduction of perianal gland adenoma growth between 28 and 38 days post-treatment. Surgical resection of canine histiocytomas revealed large areas of ulceration, suggesting that pardaxin acts like a lytic peptide. Pardaxin treatment was not associated with significant variations in blood biochemical parameters or secretion of immune-related proteins. Our findings indicate that pardaxin has strong therapeutic potential for treating perianal gland adenomas in dogs. These data justify the veterinary application of pardaxin, and also provide invaluable information for veterinary medicine and future human clinical trials. PMID:25544775

  10. Boronated porphyrins in NCT: Results with a new potent tumor localizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.; Laster, B.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Several chemical methods are available for the solubilization of boronated porphyrins. We have previously reported the tumor localization of nido carboranyl porphyrins in which the icosahedral carborane cages have been opened to give B/sub 9/C/sub 2/ anions. One of these species has shown tumor boron levels of nearly 50 ..mu..g B/g when delivered by week-long subcutaneous infusions. We report here recent in vivo experiments with a new, highly water-soluble porphyrin based on the hematoporphyrin-type of compound in which aqueous solubility is achieved using the two propionic acid side chains of the ''natural'' porphyrin frame. 7 refs.

  11. Systematic In Vivo Inactivation of Chromatin-Regulating Enzymes Identifies Setd2 as a Potent Tumor Suppressor in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Walter, David M; Venancio, Olivia S; Buza, Elizabeth L; Tobias, John W; Deshpande, Charuhas; Gudiel, A Andrea; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Cicchini, Michelle; Yates, Travis J; Feldser, David M

    2017-04-01

    Chromatin-modifying genes are frequently mutated in human lung adenocarcinoma, but the functional impact of these mutations on disease initiation and progression is not well understood. Using a CRISPR-based approach, we systematically inactivated three of the most commonly mutated chromatin regulatory genes in two Kras(G12D)-driven mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma to characterize the impact of their loss. Targeted inactivation of SWI/SNF nucleosome-remodeling complex members Smarca4 (Brg1) or Arid1a had complex effects on lung adenocarcinoma initiation and progression. Loss of either Brg1 or Arid1a were selected against in early-stage tumors, but Brg1 loss continued to limit disease progression over time, whereas loss of Arid1a eventually promoted development of higher grade lesions. In contrast to these stage-specific effects, loss of the histone methyltransferase Setd2 had robust tumor-promoting consequences. Despite disparate impacts of Setd2 and Arid1a loss on tumor development, each resulted in a gene expression profile with significant overlap. Setd2 inactivation and subsequent loss of H3K36me3 led to the swift expansion and accelerated progression of both early- and late-stage tumors. However, Setd2 loss per se was insufficient to overcome a p53-regulated barrier to malignant progression, nor establish the prometastatic cellular states that stochastically evolve during lung adenocarcinoma progression. Our study uncovers differential and context-dependent effects of SWI/SNF complex member loss, identifies Setd2 as a potent tumor suppressor in lung adenocarcinoma, and establishes model systems to facilitate further study of chromatin deregulation in lung cancer. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1719-29. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Vaccine with beta-defensin 2-transduced leukemic cells activates innate and adaptive immunity to elicit potent antileukemia responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Tong; Xu, Bin; An, Li-Li; Dong, Cheng-Ya; Lin, Yong-Min; Shi, Yang; Wu, Ke-Fu

    2006-01-15

    Murine beta-defensin 2 (MBD2) is a small antimicrobial peptide of the innate immune system. Recent study showed that MBD2 could not only recruit immature dendritic cells but also activate them by Toll-like receptor 4 and thus may provide a critical link between the innate immune system and the adaptive immune response. In this report, we examined the antileukemia activity of MBD2 in a murine model of acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) L1210. L1210 cells were engineered to secrete biologically functional MBD2. MBD2-modified L1210 (L1210-MBD2) showed significantly reduced leukemogenecity, resulting in a 80% rate of complete leukemia rejection. Inoculation of mice with L1210-MBD2 induced enhanced CTL and natural killer (NK) activity and augmented interleukin-12 and IFN-gamma production. All the recovered mice from the inoculation showed a protective immunity to the following challenge with parental L1210 cells and generate leukemia-specific memory CTL. Vaccines with irradiated L1210-MBD2 cells could cure 50% leukemia-bearing mice. Depletion of CD8+ T cells but not CD4+ T cells completely abrogated the antileukemia activity of MBD2. Interestingly, NK cells were also required for the MBD2-mediated antileukemia response, although ALL generally display a high degree of resistance to NK-mediated lysis. Our results suggest that MBD2 can activate both innate and adaptive immunity to generate potent antileukemia response, and MBD2 immunotherapy warrants further evaluation as a potential treatment for ALL.

  13. Indole carboxylic acid esters of melampomagnolide B are potent anticancer agents against both hematological and solid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Ponder, Jessica; Penthala, Narsimha R; Janganati, Venumadhav; Jordan, Craig T; Borrelli, Michael J; Crooks, Peter A

    2017-08-18

    A series of novel, heteroaryl carboxylic acid conjugates of the sesquiterpene melampomagnolide-B (MMB, 3) has been evaluated as antitumor agents against an NCI panel of 64 human hematopoetic and solid tumor cell lines. The indole-3-acrylic acid conjugate 7j and the indole-3-carboxylic acid conjugate 7k were found to be the most potent analogs in the series. Compounds 7j and 7k exhibited remarkable growth inhibition, with GI50 values in the range 0.03-0.30 μM and 0.04-0.28 μM, respectively, against the cell lines in the leukemia sub-panel, and GI50 values of 0.05-0.40 μM and 0.04-0.61 μM, respectively, against 90% of the solid tumor cell lines in the NCI panel. Compound 7a was particularly effective against the sub-panel of breast cancer cell lines with GI50 values in the range <0.01-0.30 μM. Compounds 7j, 7a and its water soluble analog 7p also exhibited potent anticancer activity against rat 9L-SF gliosarcoma cells in culture. Compound 7j was the most potent compound in the series in the M9-ENL1 AML cell assay with a lethal dose concentration EC50 value of 720 nM, and exhibited the greatest cytotoxicity against a collection of primary AML stem cell specimens, which included a specimen that was unresponsive to PTL, affording EC50 values in the range 0.33-1.0 μM in three out of four specimens. The results from this study provide further evidence that analogs of the sesquiterpene MMB can be designed to afford molecules with significantly improved anticancer activity. Thus, both 7j and 7k are considered potential lead molecules in the search for new anticancer agents that can be used as treatments for both hematopoetic and solid tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeting myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment enhances vaccine efficacy in murine epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anm Nazmul H; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna; Singel, Kelly L; Grimm, Melissa J; Moysich, Kirsten B; Daudi, Sayeema; Grzankowski, Kassondra S; Lele, Sashikant; Ylagan, Lourdes; Webster, Gill A; Abrams, Scott I; Odunsi, Kunle; Segal, Brahm H

    2015-05-10

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages, and is associated with a high relapse rate. Patients in remission are ideal candidates for immunotherapy aimed at cure or prolonging disease-free periods. However, immunosuppressive pathways in the tumor microenvironment are obstacles to durable anti-tumor immunity. In a metastatic syngeneic mouse model of EOC, immunosuppressive macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in the local tumor environment. In addition, resident peritoneal macrophages from non-tumor-bearing mice were highly immunosuppressive, abrogating stimulated T cell proliferation in a cell contact-dependent manner. Immunization with microparticles containing TLR9 and NOD-2 ligands (MIS416) significantly prolonged survival in tumor-bearing mice. The strategy of MIS416 immunization followed by anti-CD11b administration further delayed tumor progression, thereby establishing the proof of principle that myeloid depletion can enhance vaccine efficacy. In patients with advanced EOC, ascites analysis showed substantial heterogeneity in the relative proportions of myeloid subsets and their immunosuppressive properties. Together, these findings point to immunosuppressive myeloid cells in the EOC microenvironment as targets to enhance vaccination. Further studies of myeloid cell accumulation and functional phenotypes in the EOC microenvironment may identify patients who are likely to benefit from vaccination combined with approaches that deplete tumor-associated myeloid cells.

  15. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a potent suppressor of tumor immunity in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pogoda, Katarzyna; Pyszniak, Maria; Rybojad, Paweł; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic option for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who do not qualify for surgery. In patients with advanced NSCLC, systemic immune suppression is frequently observed, therefore, researchers are investigating the tumor microenvironment for less invasive and more effective methods of treating lung cancer. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSCs) are potent suppressors of tumor immunity; therefore, this population may significantly impede the application of immunotherapy to treat cancer. The present study evaluated the distribution of Mo-MDSCs and monocytes/macrophages in the peripheral blood, lymph nodes and tumor tissue of patients with NSCLC. Furthermore, the profiles of cytokines produced by these cell populations, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12/23p40, IL-10, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), were compared. The cell populations and the expression of cytokines were assessed by flow cytometry after 4 h in culture with mitogens and Brefeldin A. Mo-MDSCs were more numerous than monocytes/macrophages in all tissues and their prevalence was highest in the peripheral blood; they expressed higher levels of TGF-β than monocytes/macrophages in all tissues and expression of TGF-β produced by Mo-MDSCs was higher in the blood than in lymph nodes and tumor tissues. A higher percentage of monocytes/macrophages was observed in lymph nodes and tumor tissues than in blood. CD14+HLA-DR+ cells also produced more IL-10 in lymph nodes than Mo-MDSCs and more IL-1β and TNF in all tissues. A higher prevalence of cluster of differentiation 14+ human leukocyte antigen-D related+ cells secreting IL-1β, TNF and IL-12/23p40 was observed in peripheral blood. Thus, the results of the current study support the statement that Mo-MDSCs and monocytes/macrophages participate in NSCLC induced immunosuppression, and is consistent with previous research into associations between the TGF

  16. A Chlamydomonas-derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 vaccine induces specific tumor protection.

    PubMed

    Demurtas, Olivia C; Massa, Silvia; Ferrante, Paola; Venuti, Aldo; Franconi, Rosella; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP) plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines. An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG), under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5' UTR and the psbA 3' UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein. The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses.

  17. A Chlamydomonas-Derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Vaccine Induces Specific Tumor Protection

    PubMed Central

    Demurtas, Olivia C.; Massa, Silvia; Ferrante, Paola; Venuti, Aldo; Franconi, Rosella; Giuliano, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP) plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines. Methodology/Principal Findings An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG), under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5′ UTR and the psbA 3′ UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein. Conclusions The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses. PMID:23626690

  18. Tumor heterogeneity as a rationale for a multi-epitope approach in an autologous renal cell cancer tumor vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wittke, Stefan; Baxmann, Susann; Fahlenkamp, Dirk; Kiessig, Stephan T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An autologous tumor vaccine already used successfully in the immune therapy of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in detail. The evaluation of potential tumor markers should allow for the assessment of potency according to pharmaceutical regulations. Methods A panel of 36 tumor-associated antigens and cellular marker proteins was characterized in a total of 133 tumor cell lysates by methods such as ELISA, Western blots, and topological proteomics. The induction of tumor-associated antigen-specific antibodies was demonstrated by immunization in mice. Results Tumor heterogeneity was demonstrated: none of the tumor-associated antigens investigated were detectable in each tumor lysate. In parallel, the coincidental presence of potential danger signals was shown for HSP-60 and HSP-70. The presence of both antigen and danger signal allowed a successful induction of an immune response in a murine model. Conclusion The verified tumor heterogeneity indicates the need for a multi-epitope approach for the successful immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26889089

  19. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of “eat me” and “don't eat me” signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80high, CD86high, and CD40high) and functional stimulation (NOhigh, IL-10absent) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of “eat me” signal and “don't eat me” signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  20. Akt inhibition enhances expansion of potent tumor-specific lymphocytes with memory cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Joseph G.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Clever, David; Gros, Alena; Eil, Robert; Tran, Eric; Hanada, Ken-ichi; Yu, Zhiya; Palmer, Douglas C.; Kerkar, Sid P.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Upham, Trevor; Leonardi, Anthony; Aquavella, Nicholas; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Gattinoni, Luca; Muranski, Pawel; Sundrud, Mark S.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) can result in complete regression of advanced cancer in some patients, but the efficacy of this potentially curative therapy might be limited by poor persistence of TIL after adoptive-transfer. Pharmacologic inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase Akt has recently been shown to promote immunologic memory in viral-specific murine models, but whether this approach may enhance features of memory (e.g. long-term persistence) in TIL which are characteristically exhausted and senescent is not established. Here we show that pharmacologic inhibition of Akt enables expansion of TIL with the transcriptional, metabolic and functional properties characteristic of memory T cells. Consequently, Akt inhibition results in enhanced persistence of TIL after adoptive transfer into an immunodeficient animal model and augments anti-tumor immunity of CD8 T cells in a mouse model of cell-based immunotherapy. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt represents a novel immunometabolomic approach to enhance the persistence of anti-tumor T cells and improve the efficacy of cell-based immunotherapy for metastatic cancer. PMID:25432172

  1. Ursolic acid-loaded chitosan nanoparticles induce potent anti-angiogenesis in tumor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Pi, Jiang; Yang, Fen; Wu, Chaomin; Cheng, Xueli; Bai, Haihua; Huang, Dan; Jiang, Jinhuan; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis provides necessary nutrients and oxygen for tumor growth and metastasis; thus, every stage of angiogenesis process is the potential target for cancer therapies. Ursolic acid (UA) is reported to decrease tumor burden through anti-angiogenesis pathway, but its poor water solubility greatly limits its efficiency and clinical application. Here, a simple method for preparing UA-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CH-UA-NPs) with anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activity was demonstrated. In vitro, CH-UA-NPs could significantly inhibit the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). After uptake by HUVECs, CH-UA-NPs were mainly localized in lysosomes and mitochondria, but not nuclei. CH-UA-NPs induced the destruction of lysosome membrane integrity, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and reorganization of cell cytoskeleton. All these changes led to the apoptosis or necrosis in HUVECs. In vivo, CH-UA-NPs could inhibit the angiogenesis in chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and H22 xenograft model. Notably, comparing with free UA, such synthesized CH-UA-NPs could save about tenfold of UA doses, implying that this could significantly decrease the side effects induced by high doses of UA in biological organism. Our data showed that CH-UA-NPs and this nanoparticle-based drug delivery system could be as a potential drug candidate for anti-angiogenesis treatment.

  2. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L.; Brentville, Victoria A.; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M.; Durrant, Lindy G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10–40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses. PMID:27471648

  3. Clinical trials of antitumor vaccination with an autologous tumor cell vaccine modified by virus infection: improvement of patient survival based on improved antitumor immune memory.

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Volker

    2005-06-01

    For active specific immunotherapy of cancer patients, we designed the autologous virus-modified tumor cell vaccine ATV-NDV. The rationale of this vaccine is to link multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) from individual patient-derived tumor cells with multiple danger signals (DS) derived from virus infection (dsRNA, HN, IFN-alpha). This allows activation of multiple innate immune responses (monocytes, dendritic cells, and NK cells) as well as adaptive immune responses (CD4 and CD8 memory T cells). Preexisting antitumor memory T cells from cancer patients could be activated by antitumor vaccination with ATV-NDV as seen by augmentation of antitumor memory delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. In a variety of phase II vaccination studies, an optimal formulation of this vaccine could improve long-term survival beyond what is seen in conventional standard therapies. A new concept is presented which proposes that a certain threshold of antitumor immune memory plays an important role (1) in the control of residual tumor cells which remain after most therapies and (2) for long-term survival of treated cancer patients. This immune memory is T-cell based and most likely maintained by persisting TAAs from residual dormant tumor cells. Such immune memory was prominent in the bone marrow in animal tumor models as well as in cancer patients. Immunization with a tumor vaccine in which individual TAAs are combined with DS from virus infection appears to have a positive effect on antitumor immune memory and on patient survival.

  4. Curcumin Micelles Remodel Tumor Microenvironment and Enhance Vaccine Activity in an Advanced Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Miao, Lei; Wang, Yuhua; Xu, Zhenghong; Zhao, Yi; Shen, Youqing; Xiang, Guangya; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have reported a lipid-based Trp2 peptide vaccine for immunotherapy against melanoma. The suppressive immune microenvironment in the tumor is a major hurdle for an effective vaccine therapy. We hypothesized that curcumin (CUR) would remodel the tumor microenvironment to improve the vaccine activity. Curcumin–polyethylene glycol conjugate (CUR–PEG), an amphiphilic CUR-based micelle, was delivered intravenously (i.v.) to the tumor. Indeed, in the B16F10 tumor–bearing mice, the combination of CUR–PEG and vaccine treatment resulted in a synergistic antitumor effect (P < 0.001) compared to individual treatments. In the immune organs, the combination therapy significantly boosted in vivo cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response (41.0 ± 5.0% specific killing) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production (sevenfold increase). In the tumor microenvironment, the combination therapy led to significantly downregulated levels of immunosuppressive factors, such as decreased numbers of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells (Treg) cells and declined levels of interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 2—in correlation with increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α and IFN-γ as well as an elevation in the CD8+ T-cell population. The results indicated a distinct M2 to M1 phenotype switch in the treated tumors. Combining CUR–PEG and vaccine also dramatically downregulated the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway (76% reduction). Thus, we conclude that CUR–PEG is an effective agent to improve immunotherapy for advanced melanoma. PMID:26334519

  5. Active immunotherapy for cancer patients using tumor lysate pulsed dendritic cell vaccine: a safety study.

    PubMed

    Ovali, E; Dikmen, T; Sonmez, M; Yilmaz, M; Unal, A; Dalbasti, T; Kuzeyli, K; Erturk, M; Omay, S B

    2007-06-01

    Cancer vaccine therapy represents a promising therapeutical option. Consistently, with these new treatment strategies, the use of dendritic cell vaccines is becoming increasingly widespread and currently in the forefront for cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccine in patients with advanced cancers. For this purpose, eighteen patients with relapsed or refractory cancer were vaccinated with peripheral monocyte-derived DCs generated with GM-CSF and IL-4, and pulsed consequently with 100 microg/ml of tumor lysate before maturation in culture in the presence of IL-1beta, PGE2 and TNF alpha for two days. The first two vaccinations were given intradermally every two weeks while further injections were given monthly. Tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell injections were well-tolerated in all patients with no more than grade 1 injection-related toxicity. Local inflammatory response was mainly erythematous which subsided in 48 hrs time. No end organ toxicity or autoimmune toxicity was identified. Clinical responses observed in our study were satisfactory for a phase I clinical study. We observed 4 (22%) objective clinical responses. These responses are significantly correlated with delayed type hypersensitivity testing (DTH) (p < 0.01). The results showed that this active immunotherapy is feasible, safe, and may be capable of eliciting immune responses against cancer.

  6. Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Tetsuo; Hashii, Yoshiko; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Nakata, Jun; Oji, Yusuke; Oka, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Although the prognosis of leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has greatly improved, relapse is still a major cause of death after HSCT. Cancer vaccines may have the potential to enhance the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. The post–allogeneic HSCT period provides a unique platform for vaccination, because (I) tumor burden is minimal, (II) lymphopenia allows for rapid expansion of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), (III) donor-derived CTLs are not exhausted, (IV) inflammation is caused by alloreactions, and (V) the abundance of regulatory T cells is low due to their late recovery. Tumor cell lysates, dendritic cells (DCs), and peptides derived from leukemia-associated antigens (LAAs) have been used as vaccines. Clinical trials with several types of vaccines for post-HSCT patients revealed that the vaccination induced an immunological response and might benefit patients with minimal residual disease; however, the efficacy of this approach must be examined in randomized studies. In addition, it is important to consider the combination of cancer vaccine with checkpoint antibodies, recently shown to be useful in treating leukemia relapse after HSCT. PMID:28078270

  7. A DNA vaccine targeting angiomotin inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Lars; Ambrosino, Elena; Birot, Olivier; Tullus, Carl; Veitonmäki, Niina; Levchenko, Tetyana; Carlson, Lena-Maria; Musiani, Piero; Iezzi, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica; Kiessling, Rolf

    2006-06-01

    Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors have shown promise in preclinical trials, but clinical use has been hindered by low half-life in circulation and high production costs. Here, we describe a strategy that targets the angiostatin receptor angiomotin (Amot) by DNA vaccination. The vaccination procedure generated antibodies that detected Amot on the endothelial cell surface. Purified Ig bound to the endothelial cell membrane and inhibited endothelial cell migration. In vivo, DNA vaccination blocked angiogenesis in the matrigel plug assay and prevented growth of transplanted tumors for up to 150 days. We further demonstrate that a combination of DNA vaccines encoding Amot and the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human EGF receptor 2 (Her-2)/neu oncogene inhibited breast cancer progression and impaired tumor vascularization in Her-2/neu transgenic mice. No toxicity or impairment of normal blood vessels could be detected. This work shows that DNA vaccination targeting Amot may be used to mimic the effect of angiostatin. cancer vaccines | neoplasia | neovascularization | breast cancer | angiostatin

  8. SARS vaccine based on a replication-defective recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus is more potent than one based on a replication-competent vector.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Sagar U; Simon, Ian D; Rose, John K

    2008-06-20

    A SARS vaccine based on a live-attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) recombinant expressing the SARS-CoV S protein provides long-term protection of immunized mice from SARS-CoV infection (Kapadia, S.U., Rose, J. K., Lamirande, E., Vogel, L., Subbarao, K., Roberts, A., 2005. Long-term protection from SARS coronavirus infection conferred by a single immunization with an attenuated VSV-based vaccine. Virology 340(2), 174-82.). Because it is difficult to obtain regulatory approval of vaccine based on live viruses, we constructed a replication-defective single-cycle VSV vector in which we replaced the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene with the SARS-CoV S gene. The virus was only able to infect cells when pseudotyped with the VSV G protein. We measured the effectiveness of immunization with the single-cycle vaccine in mice. We found that the vaccine given intramuscularly induced a neutralizing antibody response to SARS-CoV that was approximately ten-fold greater than that required for the protection from SARS-CoV infection, and significantly greater than that generated by the replication-competent vector expressing SARS-CoV S protein given by the same route. Our results, along with earlier studies showing potent induction of T-cell responses by single-cycle vectors, indicate that these vectors are excellent alternatives to live-attenuated VSV.

  9. Structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 potently inhibits tumor growth mainly through ROS-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Jing; Yu, Bin; Wang, Jun-Wei; Qi, Ping-Ping; Tang, Kai; Huang, Xin; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells always have increased ROS levels, thus making them more vulnerable to persistent endogenous oxidative stress. The biochemical difference between cancer and normal cells could be exploited to achieve selective cancer cell killing by exogenous ROS-producing agents. Herein we described a structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 and its anticancer efficacy. By241 exhibited potent inhibition against human cancer cells and less toxic to normal cells. By241 concentration-dependently induced apoptosis of MGC-803 and EC9706 cells, accompanied with the mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ROS levels. NAC can completely restore the decreased cell viability of MGC-803 cells caused by by241, suggesting ROS-mediated mechanisms. The expression levels of proteins involved in the mitochondrion-related pathways were detected, showing increased expression of proapoptotic proteins and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, and activation of caspases-9/-3, but without activating caspase-8 expression. Pretreatment with Z-VAD-FMK partially rescued by241-induced apoptosis of MGC-803 cells. Additionally, by241 inhibited mTOR, activated p53 and its downstream proteins, cleaved MDM2 and PI3K/AKT as well as NF-κB signaling pathway. In vivo experiments showed that by241 did not have significant acute oral toxicity and exerted good anticancer efficacy against MGC-803 bearing mice models. Therefore, by241 may serve as a lead for further development for cancer therapy. PMID:27527552

  10. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    SciTech Connect

    Witek, Matthew; Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A.; Snook, Adam E.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  11. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  12. Recent Advance in Tumor-associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs)-based Antitumor Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danyang; Shaikh, Abdul Sami; Wang, Fengshan

    2016-04-15

    Cancer cells can be distinguished from normal cells by displaying aberrant levels and types of carbohydrate structures on their surfaces. These carbohydrate structures are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). TACAs were considered as promising targets for the design of anticancer vaccines. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone can only evoke poor immunogenicity because they are unable to induce T-cell-dependent immune responses, which is critical for cancer therapy. Moreover, immunotolerance and immunosuppression are easily induced by using natural occurring TACAs as antigens due to their endogenous property. This review summarizes the recent strategies to overcome these obstacles: (1) covalently coupling TACAs to proper carriers to improve immunogenicity, including clustered or multivalent conjugate vaccines, (2) coupling TACAs to T-cell peptide epitopes or the built-in adjuvant to form multicomponent glycoconjugate vaccines, and (3) developing vaccines based on chemically modified TACAs, which is combined with metabolic engineering of cancer cells.

  13. Therapeutic antitumor efficacy of tumor-derived autophagosome (DRibble) vaccine on head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hang; Luo, Qiong; Xie, Hao; Huang, Xiaofeng; Ni, Yanhong; Mou, Yongbin; Hu, Qingang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Vaccines play important roles in antitumor biotherapy. Autophagy in tumor cells plays a critical role in depredating proteins, including tumor-specific antigens and tumor-associated antigens. We aimed to induce and collect tumor-derived autophagosomes (DRibbles) from tumor cells as a novel antitumor vaccine by inhibiting the functions of proteasomes and lysosomes. Materials and methods DRibbles were prepared and their morphological and autophagic properties characterized. Dendritic cells (DCs) generated from the bone marrow monocytes of mice were cocultured with DRibbles, then surface molecules of DCs and B cells, as well as apoptosis of DCs, were determined by flow cytometry. Meanwhile, functional properties of the DRibble-DCs were examined by mixed lymphocyte reactions and animal experiments. Results The diameter of autophagic nanoparticles with spherical and double-membrane structure was between 200 nm and 500 nm. DRibbles resulted in the upregulation of costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 as well as major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules on DCs, but not MHC-II. The expressions of CD40, CD80, and CD86 and that of MHC-II molecules on B cells were also upregulated. Moreover, suppression of tumor growth and lifetime prolongation was observed in DRibble-DC-vaccinated tumor-bearing mice. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that naïve T cells can be activated effectively by DC cross-presenting antigens on upregulated MHC-I, suggesting that DRibbles be deployed as an effective antitumor vaccine for head and neck cancer immunotherapy in clinical trials. PMID:25792826

  14. Tumor-Mediated Suppression of Dendritic Cell Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    migration to DLNs. A B A 1.2- : .0 4000 rmDC 0., 3000 mDC+TGF-p S. . 0.- 2000 S 0.4m S0.2 Hi n 10000 0.0 CCR1 CCR4 CCR5 CCR6 CCR7 SLC MIP-3p Figure 4...containing tumor microenvironment. Mice bearing established mock transfected (4T1-N) or anti-sense TGF-p-expressing (4T1-asT) tumors received i.t...day Figure 9. Treatment of established 4T1 tumors with Smad7-overexpressing DC. Mice bearing established 4T1-N or 4T1-asT primary tumors received

  15. Effect of HSV-IL12 Loaded Tumor Cell-Based Vaccination in a Mouse Model of High-Grade Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereboeva, Larisa; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Cloud, Gretchen A.; Langford, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    We designed multimodal tumor vaccine that consists of irradiated tumor cells infected with the oncolytic IL-12-expressing HSV-1 virus, M002. This vaccine was tested against the syngeneic neuroblastoma mouse model Neuro 2a injected into the right caudate nucleus of the immunocompetent A/J mice. Mice were vaccinated via intramuscular injection of multimodal vaccine or uninfected irradiated tumor cells at seven and 14 days after tumor establishment. While there was no survival difference between groups vaccinated with cell-based vaccine applied following tumor injection, a premunition prime/boost vaccination strategy produced a significant survival advantage in both groups and sustained immune response to an intracranial rechallenge of the same tumor. The syngeneic but unrelated H6 hepatocellular tumor cell line grew unrestricted in vaccinated mice, indicative of vaccine-mediated specific immunity to Neuro 2a tumors. Longitudinal analyses of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes revealed a primary adaptive T cell response involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Spleen cell mononuclear preparations from vaccinated mice were significantly more cytotoxic to Neuro 2a tumor cells than spleen cells from control mice as demonstrated in a four-hour in vitro cytotoxicity assay. These results strongly suggest that an irradiated whole cell tumor vaccine incorporating IL-12-expressing M002 HSV can produce a durable, specific immunization in a murine model of intracranial tumor. PMID:27610392

  16. Effect of HSV-IL12 Loaded Tumor Cell-Based Vaccination in a Mouse Model of High-Grade Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bauer, David F; Pereboeva, Larisa; Gillespie, G Yancey; Cloud, Gretchen A; Elzafarany, Osama; Langford, Catherine; Markert, James M; Lamb, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    We designed multimodal tumor vaccine that consists of irradiated tumor cells infected with the oncolytic IL-12-expressing HSV-1 virus, M002. This vaccine was tested against the syngeneic neuroblastoma mouse model Neuro 2a injected into the right caudate nucleus of the immunocompetent A/J mice. Mice were vaccinated via intramuscular injection of multimodal vaccine or uninfected irradiated tumor cells at seven and 14 days after tumor establishment. While there was no survival difference between groups vaccinated with cell-based vaccine applied following tumor injection, a premunition prime/boost vaccination strategy produced a significant survival advantage in both groups and sustained immune response to an intracranial rechallenge of the same tumor. The syngeneic but unrelated H6 hepatocellular tumor cell line grew unrestricted in vaccinated mice, indicative of vaccine-mediated specific immunity to Neuro 2a tumors. Longitudinal analyses of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes revealed a primary adaptive T cell response involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Spleen cell mononuclear preparations from vaccinated mice were significantly more cytotoxic to Neuro 2a tumor cells than spleen cells from control mice as demonstrated in a four-hour in vitro cytotoxicity assay. These results strongly suggest that an irradiated whole cell tumor vaccine incorporating IL-12-expressing M002 HSV can produce a durable, specific immunization in a murine model of intracranial tumor.

  17. Ley specific antibody with potent anti-tumor activity is internalized and degraded in lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, J.; Garrigues, U.; Hellström, I.; Hellström, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    BR96 is a monoclonal antibody (MAb) that recognizes many human carcinomas and can kill antigen-positive tumor cells in vitro. Using both gold and radiolabeled MAb, the distribution and cellular processing of BR96 during cytolysis has been determined. After a brief (< 3 minutes) MAb treatment, cells in suspension are stained by the nuclear viability dye propidium iodide. Whole MAb and F(ab')2 fragments are equally cytotoxic; monovalent F(ab) fragments, however, have no effect on dye uptake unless cross-linked with goat anti-mouse IgG. The level of toxicity is dependent on both MAb dose and on cell surface receptor density. Cell contact may regulate receptor expression. BR96 receptors are more abundant on cells migrating into the open areas of a scratch wounded confluent culture than on the adjacent contact-inhibited cells. BR96 can also inhibit the anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells in soft agar showing that its effects on propidium iodide staining are not due to transient changes in membrane permeability. Immunogold electron microscopy reveals that, after a 1-minute treatment, BR96 induces significant infolding of the plasma membrane and that internalized MAb is localized to these structures. Immediately thereafter, large cell surface and intracellular vesicles form, mitochondria are swollen, and membrane integrity is lost. Therefore, BR96 seems to cause morphological changes characteristic of necrosis rather than apoptosis. When bound to adherent carcinoma cells, BR96 is distributed uniformly on the apical surface of cells labeled at 4 C and is enriched at points of cell substratum contact. Upon warming of the cells to 37 C, BR96 localizes in small perinuclear clusters and the cell margin is now devoid of label. Immunogold electron microscopy reveals that BR96 undergoes receptor mediated internalization and is localized within the same coated pits, endosomes, and lysosomes as the transferrin receptor. Quantitative studies using iodinated BR96 show that

  18. Rapid tumor regression in an Asian lung cancer patient following personalized neo-epitope peptide vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fenge; Chen, Caixia; Ju, Tao; Gao, Junqin; Yan, Jun; Wang, Peng; Xu, Qiang; Hwu, Patrick; Du, Xueming; Lizée, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Personalized immunotherapy targeting tumor-specific mutations represents a highly promising approach to cancer treatment. Here, we describe an Asian lung squamous cell carcinoma patient demonstrating frank disease progression following chemotherapy and EGFR inhibitor treatment. Based on tumor mutational profiling and HLA typing, a saline-based multi-epitope peptide vaccine was designed and administered along with topical imiquimod as an adjuvant. Weekly neo-epitope peptide vaccination was followed by a rapid and dramatic regression of multiple lung tumor nodules, while a much larger liver metastasis remained refractory to treatment. Peripheral blood immune monitoring showed that specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were induced primarily against peptide targets encompassing the widely shared EGFR L858R mutation, particularly one restricted to HLA-A*3101. Immunological targeting of this driver mutation may be of particular benefit to Asian lung cancer patients due to its relatively high prevalence within this patient population. PMID:28123873

  19. Methylseleninic acid, a potent growth inhibitor of synchronized mouse mammary epithelial tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sinha, R; Unni, E; Ganther, H E; Medina, D

    2001-02-01

    Selenium compounds have been shown to be effective chemopreventive agents in several animal models and in cultured cells in vitro. It has been proposed that compounds able to generate monomethyl Se have an increased potential to inhibit cell growth. To test this hypothesis, methylseleninic acid (MSeA) and other compounds that could generate methylselenol rapidly were compared with Se compounds that do not generate monomethyl Se, using a well-characterized synchronized TM6 mouse mammary epithelial tumor model in vitro. MSeA at a low micromolar concentration inhibited TM6 growth after 10- to 15-min treatment times. Cells resumed growth after 24 hr but remained sensitive to the fresh addition of monomethyl Se-generators. Dimethyl selenide (DMSe), a putative metabolite of methylselenol, was inactive. Cells treated with 5 microM MSeA were arrested in G1. The effects of 5 microM MSeA on gene expression were evaluated using the Atlas mouse cDNA expression array. A 10-min exposure with MSeA caused a 2- to 3-fold change in the expression of three genes: laminin receptor 1 (decreased), integrin beta (decreased), and Egr-1 (increased). The results provide experimental support for the hypothesis that monomethylated forms of Se are the critical effector molecules in Se-mediated growth inhibition in vitro.

  20. Targeting FXYD2 by cardiac glycosides potently blocks tumor growth in ovarian clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, I-Ling; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Wu, Yi-Ying; Wu, Jia-En; Liang, Chen-Hsien; Tsai, Yao-Tsung; Ke, Jhen-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Hsu, Keng-Fu; Hong, Tse-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is an aggressive neoplasm with a high recurrence rate that frequently develops resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. There are few prognostic biomarkers or targeted therapies exist for patients with OCCC. Here, we identified that FXYD2, the modulating subunit of Na+/K+-ATPases, was highly and specifically expressed in clinical OCCC tissues. The expression levels of FXYD2 were significantly higher in advanced-stage of OCCC and positively correlated with patients' prognoses. Silencing of FXYD2 expression in OCCC cells inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase enzyme activity and suppressed tumor growth via induction of autophagy-mediated cell death. We found that high FXYD2 expression in OCCC was transcriptionally regulated by the transcriptional factor HNF1B. Furthermore, up-regulation of FXYD2 expression significantly increased the sensitivity of OCCC cells to cardiac glycosides, the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitors. Two cardiac glycosides, digoxin and digitoxin, had a great therapeutic efficacy in OCCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that FXYD2 is functionally upregulated in OCCC and may serve as a promising prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target of cardiac glycosides in OCCC. PMID:26910837

  1. Isatin-pyrazole benzenesulfonamide hybrids potently inhibit tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Tanc, Muhammet; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-10-20

    New series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives incorporating pyrazole and isatin moieties were prepared using celecoxib as lead molecule. Biological evaluation of the target compounds was performed against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely against the human isoforms hCA I, II (cytosolic), IX and XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated enzymes). Most of the tested compounds efficiently inhibited hCA I, II and IX, with KIs of 2.5-102 nM, being more effective than the reference drug acetazolamide. Compounds 11e, 11f, 16e and 16f were found to inhibit hCA XII with Ki of 3.7, 6.5, 5.4 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Compounds 11e and 16e, with 5-NO2 substitution on the isatin ring, were found to be selective inhibitors of hCA IX and hCA XII. Docking studies revealed that the NO2 group of both compounds participate in interactions with Asp132 within the hCA IX active site, and with residues Lys67 and Asp130 in hCA XII, respectively.

  2. Tumor prevention in HPV8 transgenic mice by HPV8-E6 DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Awerkiew, Sabine; Hufbauer, Martin; Schädlich, Lysann; Gissmann, Lutz; Eming, Sabine; Pfister, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    The genus beta human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in individuals with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Immunosuppressed transplant recipients are prone to harbor particularly high betapapillomavirus DNA loads, which may contribute to their highly increased risk of SCC. Tumor induction in HPV8 transgenic mice correlates with increased expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E2. In an attempt to prevent skin tumor development, we evaluated an HPV8-E6-DNA vaccine, which was able to stimulate a detectable HPV8-E6-specific cell-mediated immune response in 8/15 immunized mice. When skin of HPV8 transgenic mice was grafted onto non-transgenic littermates, the grafted HPV8 transgenic tissue was not rejected and papillomas started to grow within 14 days all over the transplant of 9/9 non-vaccinated and 7/15 not successfully vaccinated mice. In contrast, no papillomas developed in 6/8 successfully vaccinated mice. In the other two of these eight mice, a large ulcerative lesion developed within the initial papilloma growth or papilloma development was highly delayed. As the vaccine completely or partially prevented papilloma development without rejecting the transplanted HPV8 positive skin, the immune system appears to attack only keratinocytes with increased levels of E6 protein, which would give rise to papillomas.

  3. Immune Escape Mechanisms are Plasmodium's Secret Weapons Foiling the Success of Potent and Persistently Efficacious Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Fouzia; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S

    2015-12-01

    Despite decades of active research, an efficacious vaccine mediating long-term protection is still not available. This review highlights various mechanisms and the different facets by which the parasites outsmart the immune system. An understanding of how the parasites escape immune recognition and interfere with the induction of a protective immune response that provides sterilizing immunity will be crucial to vaccine design.

  4. Cyclophosphamide as a potent inhibitor of tumor thioredoxin reductase in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xufang; Zhang Jinsong . E-mail: zjszyzzc@mail.hf.ah.cn; Xu Tongwen

    2007-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is in the nitrogen mustard group of alkylating antineoplastic chemotherapeutic agents. It is one of the most frequently used antitumor agents for the treatment of a broad spectrum of human cancers. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of thioredoxin and play an important role in multiple cellular events related to carcinogenesis including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell signaling. This enzyme represents a promising target for the development of cytostatic agents. The purpose of this study is to determine whether CTX could target TrxR in vivo. Lewis lung carcinoma and solid H22 hepatoma treated with 50-250 mg/kg CTX for 3 h lost TrxR activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Over 75% and 95% of TrxR activity was lost at the dose of 250 mg/kg. There was, however, a recovery of TrxR activity such that it attained normal levels by 120 h after a dose of 250 mg/kg. In addition, we found that CTX caused a preferential TrxR inhibition over other antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. We also used ascites H22 cells to investigate cancer cells response after TrxR was inhibited by CTX in vivo since CTX is needed to be activated by liver cytochrome P450 enzymes. The time course and dose-dependent changes of cellular TrxR activity were similar with those in tumor tissue. CTX caused a dose-dependent cellular proliferation inhibition which was positively correlated with TrxR inhibition at 3 h. Furthermore, when 3 h CTX-treated cells with various TrxR backgrounds, harvested from ascites-bearing mice, were implanted into mice, the proliferations of these cells were again proportionally dependent on TrxR activity. The TrxR inhibition could thereby be considered as a crucial mechanism contributing to anticancer effect seen upon clinical use of CTX.

  5. The immunogenetics of narcolepsy associated with A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination (Pandemrix) supports a potent gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, I L; Lamb, F; Fink, K; Szakács, A; Silveira, A; Franzén, L; Azhary, V; Maeurer, M; Feltelius, N; Darin, N; Hallböök, T; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Kockum, I; Olsson, T

    2017-03-23

    The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination campaign from 2009 to 2010 was associated with a sudden increase in the incidence of narcolepsy in several countries. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DQB1*06:02 allele, and protective associations with the DQB1*06:03 allele have been reported. Several non-HLA gene loci are also associated, such as common variants of the T-cell receptor-α (TRA), the purinergic receptor P2RY11, cathepsin H (CTSH) and TNFSF4/OX40L/CD252. In this retrospective multicenter study, we investigated if these predisposing gene loci were also involved in vaccination-associated narcolepsy. We compared HLA- along with single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes for non-HLA regions between 42 Pandemrix-vaccinated narcolepsy cases and 1990 population-based controls. The class II gene loci associations supported previous findings. Nominal association (P-value<0.05) with TRA as well as suggestive (P-value<0.1) associations with P2RY11 and CTSH were found. These associations suggest a very strong gene-environment interaction, in which the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain or Pandemrix vaccine can act as potent environmental triggers.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 23 March 2017; doi:10.1038/gene.2017.1.

  6. Synthetic nanoparticle vaccines produced by layer-by-layer assembly of artificial biofilms induce potent protective T-cell and antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Powell, Thomas J; Palath, Naveen; DeRome, Mary E; Tang, Jie; Jacobs, Andrea; Boyd, James G

    2011-01-10

    Nanoparticle vaccines induce potent immune responses in the absence of conventional adjuvant due to the recognition by immune cells of the particle structures, which mimic natural pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. Nanoparticle vaccines were fabricated by constructing artificial biofilms using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of oppositely charged polypeptides and target designed peptides on CaCO(3) cores. LbL nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by dendritic cells in vitro by a mechanism that was at least partially phagocytic, and induced DC maturation without triggering secretion of inflammatory cytokines. LbL nanoparticle delivery of designed peptides to DC resulted in potent cross-presentation to CD8+ T-cells and more efficient presentation to CD4+ T-cells compared to presentation of soluble peptide. A single immunization of mice with LbL nanoparticles containing designed peptide induced vigorous T-cell responses characterized by a balanced effector (IFNγ) and Th2 (IL-4) ELISPOT profile and in vivo CTL activity. Mice immunized with LbL nanoparticles bearing ovalbumin-derived designed peptides were protected from challenge with Listeria monocytogenes ectopically expressing ovalbumin, confirming the relevance of the CTL/effector T-cell responses. LbL nanoparticles also elicited antibody responses to the target epitope but not to the matrix components of the nanoparticle, avoiding the vector or carrier affect that hampers utility of other vaccine platforms. The potency and efficacy of LbL nanoparticles administered in aqueous suspension without adjuvant or other formulation additive, and the absence of immune responses to the matrix components, suggest that this strategy may be useful in producing novel vaccines against multiple diseases.

  7. Polyclonal HER2-specific antibodies induced by vaccination mediate receptor internalization and degradation in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sustained HER2 signaling at the cell surface is an oncogenic mechanism in a significant proportion of breast cancers. While clinically effective therapies targeting HER2 such as mAbs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors exist, tumors overexpressing HER2 eventually progress despite treatment. Thus, abrogation of persistent HER2 expression at the plasma membrane to synergize with current approaches may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. Methods We generated polyclonal anti-HER2 antibodies (HER2-VIA) by vaccinating mice with an adenovirus expressing human HER2, and assessed their signaling effects in vitro and anti-tumor effects in a xenograft model. In addition, we studied the signaling effects of human HER2-specific antibodies induced by vaccinating breast cancer patients with a HER2 protein vaccine. Results HER2-VIA bound HER2 at the plasma membrane, initially activating the downstream kinases extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 and Akt, but subsequently inducing receptor internalization in clathrin-coated pits in a HER2 kinase-independent manner, followed by ubiquitination and degradation of HER2 into a 130 kDa fragment phosphorylated at tyrosine residues 1,221/1,222 and 1,248. Following vaccination of breast cancer patients with the HER2 protein vaccine, HER2-specific antibodies were detectable and these antibodies bound to cell surface-expressed HER2 and inhibited HER2 signaling through blocking tyrosine 877 phosphorylation of HER2. In contrast to the murine antibodies, human anti-HER2 antibodies induced by protein vaccination did not mediate receptor internalization and degradation. Conclusion These data provide new insight into HER2 trafficking at the plasma membrane and the changes induced by polyclonal HER2-specific antibodies. The reduction of HER2 membrane expression and HER2 signaling by polyclonal antibodies induced by adenoviral HER2 vaccines supports human clinical trials with this strategy for those breast cancer patients

  8. Combined synthetic and recombinant techniques for the development of lipoprotein-based, self-adjuvanting vaccines targeting human papillomavirus type-16 associated tumors.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Peter M; Dai, Wei; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Hussein, Waleed M; Maruthayanar, Pirashanthini; Wells, James W; McMillan, Nigel A J; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with various cancers, with HPV16 linked to more than half of cervical cancer cases. Vaccines to prevent HPV infection and cancer development have proven effective, but are not useful in individuals with prior HPV exposure. Treatment vaccines to eradicate or control HPV-associated lesions are therefore desirable for these patients. Herein we describe the development of a process to enable the production of semisynthetic vaccines based on the site-specific attachment of synthetic bacterial lipid analogs (e.g., Pam2Cys) to a non-oncogenic mutant HPV16 E7 protein to generate molecularly defined vaccines. Many cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from E7 are delivered by this approach; potentially ensuring that large numbers of immunized individuals can generate CTLs to clear HPV infected cells. Delivery of this construct reduced the growth of HPV16-associated tumors in a TC1 mouse model, the effects of which were better than the potent CTL epitope HPV16 E7(44-57) administered with Montanide ISA51 adjuvant.

  9. CD8+ T cell independent tumor regression induced by Fc-OX40L and therapeutic vaccination in a mouse model of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A.; Erickson, Jami R.; Johnson, Charles S.; Seiler, Charles E.; Bedi, Jessica; Hu, Peisheng; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Epstein, Alan L.; Ohlfest, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing number of pre-clinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Although some promising advances have been made, the immune response stimulated as a result of immunotherapeutic protocols has been inefficient at complete tumor elimination, primarily due to our lack of understanding of the necessary effector functions of the immune system. We previously demonstrated that a tumor lysate vaccine/Fc-OX40L therapy is capable of inducing enhanced survival and tumor elimination in the GL261 mouse glioma model. The following experiments were performed to determine the mechanism(s) of action of this therapy that elicits a potent anti-tumor immune response. The evidence subsequently outlined indicates a CD8+ T cell independent and CD4+ T cell, NK cell, and B cell dependent means of prolonged survival. CD8+ T cell independent tumor clearance is surprising considering the current focus of many cancer immunotherapy protocols. These results provide evidence for CD8+ T cell independent means of anti-tumor response and should lead to additional examination of the potential manipulation of this mechanism for future treatment strategies. PMID:24293627

  10. Development of an autologous canine cancer vaccine system for resectable malignant tumors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yannelli, J R; Wouda, R; Masterson, T J; Avdiushko, M G; Cohen, D A

    2016-12-01

    While conventional therapies exist for canine cancer, immunotherapies need to be further explored and applied to the canine setting. We have developed an autologous cancer vaccine (K9-ACV), which is available for all dogs with resectable disease. K9-ACV was evaluated for safety and immunogenicity for a variety of cancer types in a cohort of companion dogs under veterinary care. The autologous vaccine was prepared by enzymatic digestion of solid tumor biopsies. The resultant single cell suspensions were then UV-irradiated resulting in immunogenic cell death of the tumor cells. Following sterility and endotoxin testing, the tumor cells were admixed with CpG ODN adjuvant and shipped to the participating veterinary clinics. The treating veterinarians then vaccinated each patient with three intradermal injections (10 million cells per dose) at 30-day intervals (one prime and two boost injections). In a cohort of 20 dogs completing the study, 17 dogs (85%) developed an augmented IgG response to autologous tumor antigens as demonstrated using western blot analysis of pre- and post-peripheral blood samples. We also report several dogs have lived beyond expected survival time based on previously published data. In summary, K9-ACV is an additional option to be considered for the treatment of dogs with resectable cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Induction of protective CTL immunity against peptide transporter TAP-deficient tumors through dendritic cell vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Benedict; Grufman, Per; Fredriksson, Vanoohi; Andersson, Kenth; Roseboom, Marjet; Laban, Sandra; Camps, Marcel; Wolpert, Elisabeth Z; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Offringa, Rienk; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; van Hall, Thorbald

    2007-09-15

    A large proportion of human cancers show deficiencies in the MHC class I antigen-processing machinery. Such defects render tumors resistant to immune eradication by tumoricidal CTLs. We recently identified a unique population of CTL that selectively targets tumor immune-escape variants through recognition of MHC-presented peptides, termed TEIPP (T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing), expressed on cells lacking functional TAP-peptide transporters. Previously, we showed that vaccination with TEIPP peptides mediates protection against TAP-deficient tumors. Here, we further explored the concept of TEIPP-targeted therapy using a dendritic cell (DC)-based cellular vaccine. Impairment of TAP function in DC induced the presentation of endogenous TEIPP antigens by MHC class I molecules, and immunization with these DCs protected mice against the outgrowth of TAP-deficient lymphomas and fibrosarcomas. Immune analysis of vaccinated mice revealed strong TEIPP-specific CTL responses, and a crucial role for CD8(+) cells in tumor resistance. Finally, we show that TEIPP antigens could be successfully induced in wild-type DC by introducing the viral TAP inhibitor UL49.5. Our results imply that immune intervention strategies with TAP-inhibited DC could be developed for the treatment of antigen processing-deficient cancers in humans.

  12. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Muller, David A.; Pearson, Frances E.; Fernando, Germain J.P.; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S.; Corrie, Simon R.; Crichton, Michael L.; Wei, Jonathan C.J.; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, M. Steven; Young, Paul R.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  13. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Muller, David A; Pearson, Frances E; Fernando, Germain J P; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S; Corrie, Simon R; Crichton, Michael L; Wei, Jonathan C J; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Young, Paul R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-02-25

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns.

  14. The Efficacy a DNA Vaccine Containing Inserted and Replicated Regions of the E7 Gene for Treatment of HPV 16 Induced Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Joeli A.; Xu, Xuemei; Kast, W. Martin

    2007-01-01

    A majority of cervical cancers are associated with HPV-16. A DNA vaccine (E7IR) was designed for prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of HPV-16+ tumors containing two repeats of the E7 gene to inactivate transformation and duplicate available epitopes. Mice were vaccinated then tumor challenged, or challenged and then immunized and monitored for tumor volume and survival. Splenocytes were utilized for in vivo CTL assays. The E7IR vaccine demonstrated decreased tumor volume and enhanced survival in prophylactic and therapeutic experiments and improved CTL mediated lysis. The E7IR vaccine shows promise in prevention of tumor formation and elimination of established tumors. PMID:17241713

  15. The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing inserted and replicated regions of the E7 gene for treatment of HPV-16 induced tumors.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Joeli A; Xu, Xuemei; Kast, W Martin

    2007-04-30

    A majority of cervical cancers are associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-16. A DNA vaccine (E7IR) was designed for prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of HPV-16+ tumors containing two repeats of the E7 gene to inactivate transformation and duplicate available epitopes. Mice were vaccinated then tumor challenged, or challenged and then immunized and monitored for tumor volume and survival. Splenocytes were utilized for in vivo CTL assays. The E7IR vaccine demonstrated decreased tumor volume and enhanced survival in prophylactic and therapeutic experiments and improved CTL-mediated lysis. The E7IR vaccine shows promise in prevention of tumor formation and elimination of established tumors.

  16. Evaluating strategies to enhance the anti-tumor immune response to a carbohydrate mimetic peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Jousheghany, Fariba; Artaud, Cecile; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    Carbohydrate mimetic peptides of tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) are T-cell-dependent antigens and, therefore, immunization with these surrogates is predicted to overcome the low immunogenicity of carbohydrate antigens. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show that among the potential immune cells involved, peptide immunization led to an increase in T-cell populations. While peptide mimetics may also function as TLR binding ligands, we did not observe evidence of involvement of NK cells. Examining tumor challenged animals, we observed that peptide immunization and not tumor cells rendered IL-12 responsiveness to T-cells, as T-cells from peptide-immunized mice produced IFN-gamma upon stimulation with IL-12. Cyclophosphamide administration enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of the vaccine, which was achieved by enhancing T-cell responses with no effect on NK cell population. Prophylactic immunization of mice with a DNA construct encoding carbohydrate mimetic peptides indicated a specific role for the mimotope vaccine in anti-tumor immune responses. These data suggest a role for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells induced by mimotopes of TACA in protective immunity against tumor cells.

  17. Prolactin-Stat5 signaling in breast cancer is potently disrupted by acidosis within the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Emerging evidence in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer supports the notion that prolactin-Stat5 signaling promotes survival and maintenance of differentiated luminal cells, and loss of nuclear tyrosine phosphorylated Stat5 (Nuc-pYStat5) in clinical breast cancer is associated with increased risk of antiestrogen therapy failure. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying loss of Nuc-pYStat5 in breast cancer remain poorly defined. Methods We investigated whether moderate extracellular acidosis of pH 6.5 to 6.9 frequently observed in breast cancer inhibits prolactin-Stat5 signaling, using in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches combined with quantitative immunofluorescence protein analyses to interrogate archival breast cancer specimens. Results Moderate acidosis at pH 6.8 potently disrupted signaling by receptors for prolactin but not epidermal growth factor, oncostatin M, IGF1, FGF or growth hormone. In breast cancer specimens there was mutually exclusive expression of Nuc-pYStat5 and GLUT1, a glucose transporter upregulated in glycolysis-dependent carcinoma cells and an indirect marker of lactacidosis. Mutually exclusive expression of GLUT1 and Nuc-pYStat5 occurred globally or regionally within tumors, consistent with global or regional acidosis. All prolactin-induced signals and transcripts were suppressed by acidosis, and the acidosis effect was rapid and immediately reversible, supporting a mechanism of acidosis disruption of prolactin binding to receptor. T47D breast cancer xenotransplants in mice displayed variable acidosis (pH 6.5 to 6.9) and tumor regions with elevated GLUT1 displayed resistance to exogenous prolactin despite unaltered levels of prolactin receptors and Stat5. Conclusions Moderate extracellular acidosis effectively blocks prolactin signaling in breast cancer. We propose that acidosis-induced prolactin resistance represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which breast cancer cells may escape homeostatic

  18. COH-203, a novel microtubule inhibitor, exhibits potent anti-tumor activity via p53-dependent senescence in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Huan; Zuo, Dai-Ying; Bai, Zhao-Shi; Xu, Jing-Wen; Li, Zeng-Qiang; Shen, Qi-Rong; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Wei-Ge; Wu, Ying-Liang

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • COH-203 exhibits anti-hepatoma effects in vitro and in vivo with low toxicity. • COH-203 inhibits tubulin polymerization. • COH-203 induces mitotic arrest followed by mitotic slippage in BEL-7402 cells. • COH-203 induces p53-dependent senescence in BEL-7402 cells. - Abstract: 5-(3-Hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-3H-1, 2-dithiol-3-one (COH-203) is a novel synthesized analogue of combretastatin A-4 that can be classified as a microtubule inhibitor. In this study, we evaluated the anti-hepatoma effect of COH-203 in vitro and in vivo and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. COH-203 was shown to be more effective in inhibiting the proliferation of liver cancer cells compared with normal liver cells. COH-203 also displayed potent anti-tumor activity in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model without significant toxicity. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that treatment with COH-203 induced mitotic arrest by inhibiting tubulin polymerization in BEL-7402 liver cancer cells. Long-term COH-203 treatment in BEL-7402 cells led to mitotic slippage followed by senescence via the p14{sup Arf}–p53–p21 and p16{sup INK4α}–Rb pathways. Furthermore, suppression of p53 via pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) and p53-siRNA attenuated COH-203-induced senescence in BEL-7402 cells, suggesting that COH-203 induced senescence p53-dependently. In conclusion, we report for the first time that COH-203, one compound in the combretastatin family, promotes anti-proliferative activity through the induction of p-53 dependent senescence. Our findings will provide a molecular rationale for the development of COH-203 as a promising anti-tumor agent.

  19. A novel peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine of human telomerase reverse transcriptase induces a potent cytotoxic T-cell response in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hong; Hao, Jia; Wu, Chao; Shi, Yun; Zhao, Xiao-yan; Fang, Dian-chun . E-mail: fandianchun@hotmail.com

    2007-06-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is highly expressed in over 85% of human cancers, which makes it a broadly applicable molecular target for cancer therapy. Several groups have demonstrated that hTERT can efficiently evoke specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses for malignant tumors. In the present study, we developed a novel virus-like particulate peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine (PNDV) of hTERT, which was composed of a low-affinity epitope variant with encoding full-length gene in the same virus-size particulate. We verified the formation of PNDV by DNA retarding assay, DNase I protection assay and transmission electron microscopy, and confirmed its immunogenicity and transfection activities in mammalian cells. Furthermore, in vivo immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice generated efficient IFN-{gamma} secretion and hTERT-specific CTLs which are known to cause selective cell death of telomerase positive gastrointestinal cancer cells. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on collocating a low-affinity epitope variant with a full-length hTERT gene for anti-cancer vaccine design. This novel strategy for vaccine design not only enables enhanced immunity to a universal tumor antigen, but also has the potential to generate CTLs effective in telomerase-positive tumor cells of diverse tissue origins. Therefore, our findings bear significant implications for immunotherapy of human cancers.

  20. A novel combination immunotherapy for cancer by IL-13Rα2-targeted DNA vaccine and immunotoxin in murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hideyuki; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Husain, Syed R; Puri, Raj K

    2011-11-15

    Optimum efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines may require combinations that generate effective antitumor immune responses, as well as overcome immune evasion and tolerance mechanisms mediated by progressing tumor. Previous studies showed that IL-13Rα2, a unique tumor-associated Ag, is a promising target for cancer immunotherapy. A targeted cytotoxin composed of IL-13 and mutated Pseudomonas exotoxin induced specific killing of IL-13Rα2(+) tumor cells. When combined with IL-13Rα2 DNA cancer vaccine, surprisingly, it mediated synergistic antitumor effects on tumor growth and metastasis in established murine breast carcinoma and sarcoma tumor models. The mechanism of synergistic activity involved direct killing of tumor cells and cell-mediated immune responses, as well as elimination of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, consequently, regulatory T cells. These novel results provide a strong rationale for combining immunotoxins with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer.

  1. Development of cell-based tuberculosis vaccines: genetically modified dendritic cell vaccine is a much more potent activator of CD4 and CD8 T cells than peptide- or protein-loaded counterparts.

    PubMed

    Malowany, Janet I; McCormick, Sarah; Santosuosso, Michael; Zhang, Xizhong; Aoki, Naoko; Ngai, Patricia; Wang, Jun; Leitch, Jaina; Bramson, Jonathan; Wan, Yonghong; Xing, Zhou

    2006-04-01

    Genetically modified dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines have not been explored for immunization against tuberculosis. A gene-modified DC vaccine expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) antigen 85A (Ag85A) was developed by using a recombinant replication-deficient adenoviral gene transfer vector (AdAg85A). AdAg85A-transduced DC vaccine (AdAg85/DC) expressed higher levels of IL-12 and was much more immunogenic than Ag85 protein-loaded (pro/DC) or CD4/CD8 T cell peptide-loaded (pep/DC) DC vaccines. Compared to pro/DC or pep/DC, AdAg85/DC elicited a remarkably higher level of ex vivo IFN-gamma production by CD4 and CD8 T cells at weeks 2, 6, and 12 postimmunization, which was coupled with higher frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. By an in vivo CD8 or CD4 T cell cytotoxicity (CTL) assay, AdAg85/DC was shown to provoke much higher and more sustained levels of CD8 and CD4 CTL activity up to 12 weeks postimmunization. Intramuscular (im) AdAg85/DC immunization was more potent than the iv route of AdAg85/DC immunization. Such stronger immunogenicity of im AdAg85/DC vaccination was corroborated with better protection from M.tb challenge. Our results thus suggest that genetically modified DC-based TB vaccine is superior to subunit DC vaccines and has the potential for therapeutic applications.

  2. Synergistic anti-tumor therapy by a comb-like multifunctional antibody nanoarray with exceptionally potent activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huafei; Sun, Yun; Chen, Di; Zhao, He; Zhao, Mengxin; Zhu, Xiandi; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Ge; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fulei; Wei, Huafeng; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneously blocking multiple mediators offers new hope for the treatment of complex diseases. However, the curative potential of current combination therapy by chronological administration of separate monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or multi-specific mAbs is still moderate due to inconvenient manipulation, low cooperative effectors, poor pharmacokinetics and insufficient tumor accumulation. Here, we describe a facile strategy that arms distinct mAbs with cooperative effectors onto a long chain to form a multicomponent comb-like nano mAb. Unlike dissociative parental mAbs, the multifunctional mAb nanoarray (PL-RB) constructed from type I/II anti-CD20 mAbs shows good pharmacokinetics. This PL-RB simultaneously targets distinct epitopes on a single antigen (Ag) and neighboring Ags on different lymphocytes. This unique intra- and intercellular Ag cross-linking endows the multifunctional mAb nanoarray with potent apoptosis activity. The exceptional apoptosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) that are synchronously evoked by the nano PL-RB are further synergistically promoted via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR), which resulted in high intratumor accumulation and excellent anti-lymphoma efficiency.

  3. Induction of Potent and Long-Lived Antibody and Cellular Immune Responses in the Genitorectal Mucosa Could be the Critical Determinant of HIV Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia; Ondondo, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The field of HIV prevention has indeed progressed in leaps and bounds, but with major limitations of the current prevention and treatment options, the world remains desperate for an HIV vaccine. Sadly, this continues to be elusive, because more than 30 years since its discovery there is no licensed HIV vaccine. Research aiming to define immunological biomarkers to accurately predict vaccine efficacy have focused mainly on systemic immune responses, and as such, studies defining correlates of protection in the genitorectal mucosa, the primary target site for HIV entry and seeding are sparse. Clearly, difficulties in sampling and analysis of mucosal specimens, as well as their limited size have been a major deterrent in characterizing the type (mucosal antibodies, cytokines, chemokines, or CTL), threshold (magnitude, depth, and breadth) and viral inhibitory capacity of HIV-1-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa, where they are needed to immediately block HIV acquisition and arrest subsequent virus dissemination. Nevertheless, a few studies document the existence of HIV-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa of HIV-infected aviremic and viremic controllers, as well as in highly exposed persistently seronegative (HEPS) individuals with natural resistance to HIV-1. Some of these responses strongly correlate with protection from HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, thus providing significant clues of the ideal components of an efficacious HIV vaccine. In this study, we provide an overview of the key features of protective immune responses found in HEPS, elite and viremic controllers, and discuss how these can be achieved through mucosal immunization. Inevitably, HIV vaccine development research will have to consider strategies that elicit potent antibody and cellular immune responses within the genitorectal mucosa or induction of systemic immune cells with an inherent potential to home and persist at mucosal sites of HIV entry. PMID

  4. Anti-tumor effects of genetic vaccines against HPV major oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Marcelo Nazário; Paolini, Francesca; Massa, Silvia; Curzio, Gianfranca; Illiano, Elena; Duarte Silva, Anna Jéssica; Franconi, Rosella; Bissa, Massimiliano; Morghen, Carlo De Giuli; de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; Venuti, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Expression of HPV E5, E6 and E7 oncogenes are likely to overcome the regulation of cell proliferation and to escape immunological control, allowing uncontrolled growth and providing the potential for malignant transformation. Thus, their three oncogenic products may represent ideal target antigens for immunotherapeutic strategies. In previous attempts, we demonstrated that genetic vaccines against recombinant HPV16 E7 antigen were able to affect the tumor growth in a pre-clinical mouse model. To improve this anti-HPV strategy we developed a novel approach in which we explored the effects of E5-based genetic immunization. We designed novel HPV16 E5 genetic vaccines based on two different gene versions: whole E5 gene and E5Multi. The last one is a long multi epitope gene designed as a harmless E5 version. Both E5 genes were codon optimized for mammalian expression. In addition, we demonstrated that HPV 16 E5 oncogene is expressed in C3 mouse cell line making it an elective model for the study of E5 based vaccine. In this mouse model the immunological and biological activity of the E5 vaccines were assessed in parallel with the activity of anti-E7 and anti-E6 vaccines already reported to be effective in an immunotherapeutic setting. These E7 and E6 vaccines were made with mutated oncogenes, the E7GGG mutant that does not bind pRb and the E6F47R mutant that is less effective in inhibiting p53, respectively. Results confirmed the immunological activity of genetic formulations based on attenuated HPV16 oncogenes and showed that E5-based genetic immunization provided notable anti-tumor effects.

  5. Suppression of breast tumor growth by DNA vaccination against phosphatase of regenerating liver 3.

    PubMed

    Lv, J; Liu, C; Huang, H; Meng, L; Jiang, B; Cao, Y; Zhou, Z; She, T; Qu, L; Wei Song, S; Shou, C

    2013-08-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL)-3 is highly expressed in multiple cancers and has important roles in cancer development. Some small-molecule inhibitors and antibodies targeting PRL-3 have been recently reported to inhibit tumor growth effectively. To determine whether PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccination can induce immune response to prevent or inhibit the tumor growth, we established mouse D2F2 breast cancer cells expressing PRL-3 (D2F2/PRL-3) and control cells (D2F2/NC) with lentivirus, and constructed pVAX1-Igκ-PRL-3 plasmid (named as K-P3) as DNA vaccine to immunize BALB/c mice. We found that the K-P3 vaccine delivered by gene gun significantly prevented the growth of D2F2/PRL-3 compared with pVAX1-vector (P<0.01), but not of D2F2/NC, and improved the survival of D2F2/PRL-3-innoculated mice. Both PRL-3-targeted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and T-helper type 1 cell immune response (production of high levels of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α) were found to be involved in the preventive effect. Furthermore, PRL-3-targeted DNA immunization inhibited tumor growth of D2F2/PRL-3 cells in mice. We also evaluated the potential of immunization with PRL-3 protein, but no significant therapeutic or preventive effect was obtained on tumor growth. To enhance the immunity of PRL-3, we incorporated different molecular adjuvants, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat-shock protein, CTL antigen 4 and M. tuberculosis T-cell stimulatory epitope (MT), into K-P3 vaccine for expressing the fusion proteins. We found that these adjuvant molecules did not significantly improve the antitumor activity of PRL-3 vaccine, but enhanced the production of PRL-3 antibodies in immunized mice. Summarily, our findings demonstrate that PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccine can generate significantly preventive and therapeutic effects on the growth of breast cancer expressing PRL-3 through the induction of cellular immune responses to PRL-3.

  6. Targeting molecular and cellular inhibitory mechanisms for improvement of antitumor memory responses reactivated by tumor cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Webster, W Scott; Thompson, R Houston; Harris, Kimberley J; Frigola, Xavier; Kuntz, Susan; Inman, Brant A; Dong, Haidong

    2007-09-01

    Development of effective vaccination approaches to treat established tumors represents a focus of intensive research because such approaches offer the promise of enhancing immune system priming against tumor Ags via restimulation of pre-existing (memory) antitumoral helper and effector immune cells. However, inhibitory mechanisms, which function to limit the recall responses of tumor-specific immunity, remain poorly understood and interfere with therapies anticipated to induce protective immunity. The mouse renal cell carcinoma (RENCA) tumor model was used to investigate variables affecting vaccination outcomes. We demonstrate that although a whole cell irradiated tumor cell vaccine can trigger a functional antitumor memory response in the bone marrows of mice with established tumors, these responses do not culminate in the regression of established tumors. In addition, a CD103+ regulatory T (Treg) cell subset accumulates within the draining lymph nodes of tumor-bearing mice. We also show that B7-H1 (CD274, PD-L1), a negative costimulatory ligand, and CD4+ Treg cells collaborate to impair the recall responses of tumor-specific memory T cells. Specifically, mice bearing large established RENCA tumors were treated with tumor cell vaccination in combination with B7-H1 blockade and CD4+ T cell depletion (triple therapy treatment) and monitored for tumor growth and survival. Triple treatment therapy induced complete regression of large established RENCA tumors and raised long-lasting protective immunity. These results have implications for developing clinical antitumoral vaccination regimens in the setting in which tumors express elevated levels of B7-H1 in the presence of abundant Treg cells.

  7. Interest of Tumor-Specific CD4 T Helper 1 Cells for Therapeutic Anticancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galaine, Jeanne; Borg, Christophe; Godet, Yann; Adotévi, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, immunotherapy represents one promising approach for cancer treatment. Recently, spectacular results of cancer immunotherapy clinical trials have confirmed the crucial role of immune system in cancer regression. Therapeutic cancer vaccine represents one widely used immunotherapy strategy to stimulate tumor specific T cell responses but clinical impact remains disappointing in targeting CD8 T cells. Although CD8 T cells have been initially considered to be the main protagonists, it is now clear that CD4 T cells also play a critical role in antitumor response. In this article, we discuss the role of tumor antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses and how we can target these cells to improve cancer vaccines. PMID:26350591

  8. Surface engineering tumor cells with adjuvant-loaded particles for use as cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kawther K; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-02-28

    Cell surface engineering is an expanding field and whilst extensive research has been performed decorating cell surfaces with biomolecules, the engineering of cell surfaces with particles has been a largely unexploited area. This study reports on the assembly of cell-particle hybrids where irradiated tumor cells were surface engineered with adjuvant-loaded, biodegradable, biocompatible, polymeric particles, with the aim of generating a construct capable of functioning as a therapeutic cancer vaccine. Successfully assembled cell-particle hybrids presented here comprised either melanoma cells or prostate cancer cells stably adorned with Toll-like receptor-9 ligand-loaded particles using streptavidin-biotin cross-linking. Both cell-particle assemblies were tested in vivo for their potential as therapeutic cancer vaccines yielding promising therapeutic results for the prostate cancer model. The ramifications of results obtained for both tumor models are openly discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. B lymphocytes as direct antigen-presenting cells for anti-tumor DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Colluru, Viswa Teja; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of remarkable preclinical efficacy, DNA vaccination has demonstrated low immunogenicity in humans. While efforts have focused on increasing cross-presentation of DNA-encoded antigens, efforts to increase DNA vaccine immunogenicity by targeting direct presentation have remained mostly unexplored. In these studies, we compared the ability of different APCs to present antigen to T cells after simple co-culture with plasmid DNA. We found that human primary peripheral B lymphocytes, and not monocytes or in vitro derived dendritic cells (DCs), were able to efficiently encode antigen mRNA and expand cognate tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Similarly, murine B lymphocytes co-cultured with plasmid DNA, and not DCs, were able to prime antigen-specific T cells in vivo. Moreover, B lymphocyte-mediated presentation of plasmid antigen led to greater Th1-biased immunity and was sufficient to elicit an anti-tumor effect in vivo. Surprisingly, increasing plasmid presentation by B cells, and not cross presentation of peptides by DCs, further augmented traditional plasmid vaccination. Together, these data suggest that targeting plasmid DNA to B lymphocytes, for example through transfer of ex vivo plasmidloaded B cells, may be novel means to achieve greater T cell immunity from DNA vaccines. PMID:27661128

  10. Vaccination with a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a tumor antigen breaks immune tolerance and elicits therapeutic antitumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Chakraborty, Mala; Hance, Kenneth W.; Bernstein, Michael B.; Boehm, Amanda L.; Guo, Zhimin; Quick, Deborah; Franzusoff, Alex; Greiner, John W.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a nonpathogenic yeast, has previously been used as a vehicle to elicit immune responses to foreign antigens, and tumor-associated antigens, and has been shown to reduce tumorburden in mice. Studies were designed to determine if vaccination of human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-transgenic mice (where CEA is a self-antigen) with a recombinant S. cerevisiae construct expressing human CEA (yeast-CEA) elicits CEA-specific T-cell responses and antitumor activity. Experimental Design CEA-transgenic mice were vaccinated with yeast-CEA, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were assessed after one and multiple administrations or vaccinations at multiple sites per administration. Antitumor activity was determined by tumor growth and overall survival in both pulmonary metastasis and subcutaneous pancreatic tumor models. Results These studies demonstrate that recombinant yeast can break tolerance and that a) yeast-CEA constructs elicit both CEA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses; b) repeated yeast-CEA administration causes increased antigen-specific T-cell responses after each vaccination; c) vaccination with yeast-CEA at multiple sites induces a greater T-cell response than the same dose given at a single site; d) tumor-bearing mice vaccinated with yeast-CEA show a reduction in tumor burden and increased overall survival compared to mock-treated or control yeast-vaccinated mice in both pulmonary metastasis and subcutaneous pancreatic tumor models. Conclusions Vaccination with a heat-killed recombinant yeast expressing the tumor-associated antigen CEA induces CEA-specific immune responses, reduces tumor burden, and extends overall survival in CEA-transgenic mice. These studies thus form the rationale for the incorporation of recombinant yeast-CEA and other recombinant yeast constructs in cancer immunotherapy protocols. PMID:18594015

  11. Comparative antitumor effect among GM-CSF, IL-12 and GM-CSF+IL-12 genetically modified tumor cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Miguel, A; Herrero, M J; Sendra, L; Botella, R; Algás, R; Sánchez, M; Aliño, S F

    2013-10-01

    Genetically modified cells have been shown to be one of the most effective cancer vaccine strategies. An evaluation is made of the efficacy of both preventive and therapeutic antitumor vaccines against murine melanoma, using C57BL/6 mice and irradiated B16 tumor cells expressing granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-12 (IL-12) or both. Tumor was transplanted by the injection of wild-type B16 cells. Tumor growth and survival were measured to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination. Specific humoral response and immunoglobulin G (IgG) switch were evaluated measuring total IgG and IgG1 and IgG2a subtypes against tumor membrane proteins of B16 cells. In preventive vaccination, all treated groups showed delayed tumor growth. In addition, the group vaccinated to express only GM-CSF achieved 100% animal survival (P<0.005). Vaccination with GM-CSF+IL-12-producing B16 cells yielded lesser results (60% survival, P<0.005). Furthermore, all surviving animals remained disease-free after second tumor implantation 1 year later. The therapeutic vaccination strategies resulted in significantly delayed tumor growth, mainly using B16 cells producing GM-CSF+IL-12 cytokines, with 70% tumor growth inhibition (P<0.001)-although none of the animals reached overall survival. The results obtained suggest that the GM-CSF+IL-12 combination only increases the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines. No differences in classical regulatory T cells were found among the different groups.

  12. Whole blood cells loaded with messenger RNA as an anti-tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Phua, Kyle K L; Boczkowski, David; Dannull, Jens; Pruitt, Scott; Leong, Kam W; Nair, Smita K

    2014-06-01

    The use of a cell-based vaccine composed of autologous whole blood cells loaded with mRNA is described. Mice immunized with whole blood cells loaded with mRNA encoding antigen develop anti-tumor immunity comparable to DC-RNA immunization. This approach offers a simple and affordable alternative to RNA-based cellular therapy by circumventing complex, laborious and expensive ex vivo manipulations required for DC-based immunizations.

  13. Systemic Tolerance Mediated by Melanoma Brain Tumors is Reversible by Radiotherapy and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher M.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Durham, Nicholas M.; Ruzevick, Jacob; Alme, Angela; Francica, Brian J.; Elias, Jimmy; Daniels, Andrew; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Lauer, Peter; Brockstedt, Dirk G.; Baxi, Emily G.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Taube, Janis M.; Pardo, Carlos A.; Brem, Henry; Pardoll, Drew M.; Lim, Michael; Drake, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Immune responses to antigens originating in the CNS are generally attenuated, since collateral damage can have devastating consequences. The significance of this finding for the efficacy of tumor-targeted immunotherapies is largely unknown. Experimental Design The B16 murine melanoma model was used to compare cytotoxic responses against established tumors in the CNS and in the periphery. Cytokine analysis of tissues from brain tumor-bearing mice detected elevated TGF-β secretion from microglia and in the serum and TGF-β signaling blockade reversed tolerance of tumor antigen-directed CD8 T cells. Additionally, a treatment regimen using focal radiation therapy and recombinant Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated for immunologic activity and efficacy in this model. Results CNS melanomas were more tolerogenic than equivalently progressed tumors outside the CNS as antigen-specific CD8 T cells were deleted and exhibited impaired cytotoxicity. Tumor-bearing mice had elevated serum levels of TGF-β; however, blocking TGF-β signaling with a small molecule inhibitor or a monoclonal antibody did not improve survival. Conversely, tumor antigen-specific vaccination in combination with focal radiation therapy reversed tolerance and improved survival. This treatment regimen was associated with increased polyfunctionality of CD8 T cells, elevated T effector to T regulatory cell ratios and decreased TGF-β secretion from microglia. Conclusions These data suggest that CNS tumors may impair systemic antitumor immunity and consequently accelerate cancer progression locally as well as outside the CNS while antitumor immunity may be restored by combining vaccination with radiation therapy. These findings are hypothesis-generating and warrant further study in more contemporary melanoma models as well as human trials. PMID:26490306

  14. Intratumoral injection of attenuated Salmonella vaccine can induce tumor microenvironmental shift from immune suppressive to immunogenic.

    PubMed

    Hong, Eun-Hye; Chang, Sun-Young; Lee, Bo-Ra; Pyun, A-Rim; Kim, Ji-Won; Kweon, Mi-Na; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2013-02-27

    Attenuated Salmonella vaccines show therapeutic anti-cancer effects, but the underlying mechanism has not been well investigated. In the current study, intratumoral (i.t.) injection of recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine (RASV) significantly inhibited Her-2/neu-expressing tumor growth. Although depletion of CD8(+) cells in RASV-treated mice significantly restored tumor growth, the induction of Her-2/neu-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was not well correlated with the generation of the anti-tumor effect. Therefore, we hypothesized that RASV might induce a tumor microenvironmental shift, from immune suppressive to immunogenic, to reduce the suppressive force and finally elicit a successful anti-tumor response. We found that i.t. injection of RASV significantly increased the level of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cells identified as myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC), but a significant portion of these cells were TNF-α-secreting Ly6-G(high) subsets, which can function as antitumor effector cells. We further investigated whether RASV can modulate immunosuppressive Treg cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs was significantly reduced in RASV-treated mice. Thus, i.t. injection of RASV may offer a novel anti-cancer approach by eliciting transformation of immunosuppressive MDSCs into TNF-α-secreting neutrophils and reducing the generation of Treg cells, especially in the presence of tumor-specific CTLs. Collectively, these data will provide us an insight for the development of new anti-tumor approaches to overcome the immunosuppressive environment generated by tumors.

  15. Sublingual vaccination induces mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity for protection against lung tumor challenge.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Schluns, Kimberly S; Anthony, Scott M; Sastry, K Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA) metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer) for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which effectively bridge innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The protective efficacy of immunization with OVA plus aGalCer was antigen-specific as immunized mice challenged with parental B16 tumors lacking OVA expression were not protected. Multiple sublingual immunizations in the presence, but not in the absence of aGalCer, resulted in repeated activation of NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs of immunized animals concurrent with progressively increasing OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses as well as serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Furthermore, sublingual administration of the antigen only in the presence of the aGalCer adjuvant effectively boosted the OVA-specific immune responses. These results support potential clinical utility of sublingual route of vaccination with aGalCer-for prevention of pulmonary metastases.

  16. A heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising the Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain capB mutant and recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing F. tularensis IglC induces potent protective immunity in mice against virulent F. tularensis aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingmei; Bowen, Richard; Sahakian, Jacob; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2013-05-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a category A bioterrorism agent. A vaccine that is safer and more effective than the currently available unlicensed F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is needed to protect against intentional release of aerosolized F. tularensis, the most dangerous type of exposure. In this study, we employed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising intradermally administered LVS ΔcapB (highly attenuated capB-deficient LVS mutant) as the primer vaccine and rLm/iglC (recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing the F. tularensis immunoprotective antigen IglC) as the booster vaccine. Boosting LVS ΔcapB-primed mice with rLm/iglC significantly enhanced T cell immunity; their splenic T cells secreted significantly more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and had significantly more cytokine (IFN-γ and/or tumor necrosis factor [TNF] and/or interleukin-2 [IL-2])-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells upon in vitro IglC stimulation. Importantly, mice primed with LVS ΔcapB or rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, boosted with rLm/iglC, and subsequently challenged with 10 50% lethal doses (LD50) of aerosolized highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 had a significantly higher survival rate and mean survival time than mice immunized with only LVS ΔcapB (P < 0.0001); moreover, compared with mice immunized once with LVS, primed-boosted mice had a higher survival rate (75% versus 62.5%) and mean survival time during the first 21 days postchallenge (19 and 20 days for mice boosted after being primed with LVS ΔcapB and rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, respectively, versus 17 days for mice immunized with LVS) and maintained their weight significantly better (P < 0.01). Thus, the LVS ΔcapB-rLm/iglC prime-boost vaccination strategy holds substantial promise for a vaccine that is safer and at least as potent as LVS.

  17. A Heterologous Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy Comprising the Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain capB Mutant and Recombinant Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes Expressing F. tularensis IglC Induces Potent Protective Immunity in Mice against Virulent F. tularensis Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qingmei; Bowen, Richard; Sahakian, Jacob; Dillon, Barbara Jane

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a category A bioterrorism agent. A vaccine that is safer and more effective than the currently available unlicensed F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is needed to protect against intentional release of aerosolized F. tularensis, the most dangerous type of exposure. In this study, we employed a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy comprising intradermally administered LVS ΔcapB (highly attenuated capB-deficient LVS mutant) as the primer vaccine and rLm/iglC (recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes expressing the F. tularensis immunoprotective antigen IglC) as the booster vaccine. Boosting LVS ΔcapB-primed mice with rLm/iglC significantly enhanced T cell immunity; their splenic T cells secreted significantly more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and had significantly more cytokine (IFN-γ and/or tumor necrosis factor [TNF] and/or interleukin-2 [IL-2])-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon in vitro IglC stimulation. Importantly, mice primed with LVS ΔcapB or rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, boosted with rLm/iglC, and subsequently challenged with 10 50% lethal doses (LD50) of aerosolized highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 had a significantly higher survival rate and mean survival time than mice immunized with only LVS ΔcapB (P < 0.0001); moreover, compared with mice immunized once with LVS, primed-boosted mice had a higher survival rate (75% versus 62.5%) and mean survival time during the first 21 days postchallenge (19 and 20 days for mice boosted after being primed with LVS ΔcapB and rLVS ΔcapB/IglC, respectively, versus 17 days for mice immunized with LVS) and maintained their weight significantly better (P < 0.01). Thus, the LVS ΔcapB-rLm/iglC prime-boost vaccination strategy holds substantial promise for a vaccine that is safer and at least as potent as LVS. PMID:23439306

  18. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine.

  19. EBI-907, a novel BRAFV600E inhibitor, has potent oral anti-tumor activity and a broad kinase selectivity profile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiayin; Lu, Biao; Liu, Dong; Shen, Ru; Yan, Yinfa; Yang, Liuqing; Zhang, Minsheng; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Guoqing; Cao, Hu; Fu, Beibei; Gong, Aishen; Sun, Qiming; Wan, Hong; Zhang, Lianshan; Tao, Weikang; Cao, Jingsong

    2016-01-01

    abstract The oncogenic mutation of BRAFV600E has been found in approximately 8% of all human cancers, including more than 60% of melanoma and 10% of colorectal cancers. The clinical proof of concept in treating BRAFV600E-driving melanoma patients with the BRAF inhibitors has been well established. We have sought to identify and develop novel BRAFV600E inhibitors with more favorable profiles. Our chemistry effort has led to the discovery of EBI-907 as a novel BRAFV600E inhibitor with potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. In a LanthaScreen BRAFV600E kinase assay, EBI-907 showed an IC50 of 4.8 nM, which is >10 -fold more potent than Vemurafenib (IC50 = 58.5 nM). In addition, EBI-907 showed a broader kinase selectivity profile, with potent activity against a number of important oncogenic kinases including FGFR1-3, RET, c-Kit, and PDGFRb. Concomitant with such properties, EBI-907 exhibits potent and selective cytotoxicity against a broader range of BRAFV600E-dependent cell lines including certain colorectal cancer cell lines with innate resistance to Vemurafenib. In BRAFV600E-dependent human Colo-205 and A375 tumor xenograft mouse models, EBI-907 caused a marked tumor regression in a dose-dependent manner, with superior efficacy to Vemurafenib. Our results also showed that combination with EGFR or MEK inhibitor enhanced the potency of EBI-907 in cell lines with innate or acquired resistance to BRAF inhibition alone. Our findings present EBI-907 as a potent and promising BRAF inhibitor, which might be useful in broader indications. PMID:26810733

  20. Active induction of tumor-specific IgE antibodies by oral mimotope vaccination.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Angelika B; Untersmayr, Eva; Knittelfelder, Regina; Duschl, Albert; Pehamberger, Hubert; Zielinski, Christoph C; Scheiner, Otto; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2007-04-01

    A role of IgE antibodies in cancer surveillance has been implicated for a long time. Studies dealing with IgE antibodies directly targeted to tumor antigens have shown marked anticancer effects mediated by this antibody class. Thus, the basic function of IgE antibodies may be to control tumor growth. Thus far, cancer-specific IgE has only been applied passively. Consequently, the aim of this study was to establish an active vaccination protocol to induce tumor antigen-specific IgE antibodies, and to evaluate functional properties. We previously generated epitope mimics, so-called mimotopes, for the epitope recognized by the anti-HER-2 antibody trastuzumab. Upon i.p. immunizations, IgG antibodies with trastuzumab-like properties could be elicited. In the present study, we immunized BALB/c mice via the oral route with these trastuzumab mimotopes, under simultaneous neutralization and suppression of gastric acid. As shown in preceding experiments, this feeding regimen effectively induces Th2 immune responses. Oral immunizations with trastuzumab mimotopes under hypoacidic conditions indeed resulted in the formation of IgE antibodies towards the HER-2 antigen. Moreover, anti-HER-2 IgE-sensitized effector cells mediated SK-BR-3 target cell lysis in an antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay. We conclude that directed and epitope-specific induction of IgE against tumor antigens is feasible with an oral mimotope vaccination regimen, and that these antibodies mediate anticancer effects.

  1. WT1 peptide vaccination combined with BCG-CWS is more efficient for tumor eradication than WT1 peptide vaccination alone.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroko; Kawasaki, Kotomi; Oka, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Kawakami, Manabu; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Hoshida, Yoshihiko; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Nakano, Akiko; Masuda, Tomoki; Wu, Fei; Taniguchi, Yuki; Yoshihara, Satoshi; Elisseeva, Olga A; Oji, Yusuke; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Azuma, Ichiro; Kawase, Ichiro; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2004-07-01

    A Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is expressed at high levels not only in most types of leukemia but also in various types of solid tumors, including lung and breast cancer. WT1 protein has been reported to serve as a target antigen for tumor-specific immunotherapy both in vitro in human systems and in vivo in murine models. We have shown that mice immunized with WT1 peptide or WT1 cDNA could reject a challenge from WT1-expressing tumor cells (a "prophylactic" model). However, it was not examined whether WT1 peptide vaccination had the potency to reject tumor cells in a "therapeutic" setting. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that WT1 peptide vaccination combined with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin cell wall skeleton (BCG-CWS) was more effective for eradication of WT1-expressing tumor cells that had been implanted into mice before vaccination (a "therapeutic" model) compared with WT1 peptide vaccination alone. An intradermal injection of BCG-CWS into mice, followed by that of WT1 peptide at the same site on the next day, generated WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and led to rejection of WT1-expressing leukemia or lung cancer cells. These results showed that BCG-CWS, which was well known to enhance innate immunity, could enhance WT1-specific immune responses (acquired immunity) in combination with WT1 peptide vaccination. Therefore, WT1 peptide vaccination combined with BCG-CWS may be applied to cancer immunotherapy in clinical settings.

  2. A Formulated TLR7/8 Agonist is a Flexible, Highly Potent and Effective Adjuvant for Pandemic Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoeven, Neal; Fox, Christopher B.; Granger, Brian; Evers, Tara; Joshi, Sharvari W.; Nana, Ghislain I.; Evans, Sarah C.; Lin, Susan; Liang, Hong; Liang, Li; Nakajima, Rie; Felgner, Philip L.; Bowen, Richard A.; Marlenee, Nicole; Hartwig, Airn; Baldwin, Susan L.; Coler, Rhea N.; Tomai, Mark; Elvecrog, James; Reed, Steven G.; Carter, Darrick

    2017-01-01

    Since 1997, highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have been transmitted from avian hosts to humans. The severity of H5N1 infection in humans, as well as the sporadic nature of H5N1 outbreaks, both geographically and temporally, make generation of an effective vaccine a global public health priority. An effective H5N1 vaccine must ultimately provide protection against viruses from diverse clades. Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist adjuvant formulations have a demonstrated ability to broaden H5N1 vaccine responses in pre-clinical models. However, many of these agonist molecules have proven difficult to develop clinically. Here, we describe comprehensive adjuvant formulation development of the imidazoquinoline TLR-7/8 agonist 3M-052, in combination with H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) based antigens. We find that 3M-052 in multiple formulations protects both mice and ferrets from lethal H5N1 homologous virus challenge. Furthermore, we conclusively demonstrate the ability of 3M-052 adjuvant formulations to broaden responses to H5N1 HA based antigens, and show that this broadening is functional using a heterologous lethal virus challenge in ferrets. Given the extensive clinical use of imidazoquinoline TLR agonists for other indications, these studies identify multiple adjuvant formulations which may be rapidly advanced into clinical trials in an H5N1 vaccine. PMID:28429728

  3. A Formulated TLR7/8 Agonist is a Flexible, Highly Potent and Effective Adjuvant for Pandemic Influenza Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeven, Neal; Fox, Christopher B; Granger, Brian; Evers, Tara; Joshi, Sharvari W; Nana, Ghislain I; Evans, Sarah C; Lin, Susan; Liang, Hong; Liang, Li; Nakajima, Rie; Felgner, Philip L; Bowen, Richard A; Marlenee, Nicole; Hartwig, Airn; Baldwin, Susan L; Coler, Rhea N; Tomai, Mark; Elvecrog, James; Reed, Steven G; Carter, Darrick

    2017-04-21

    Since 1997, highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have been transmitted from avian hosts to humans. The severity of H5N1 infection in humans, as well as the sporadic nature of H5N1 outbreaks, both geographically and temporally, make generation of an effective vaccine a global public health priority. An effective H5N1 vaccine must ultimately provide protection against viruses from diverse clades. Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist adjuvant formulations have a demonstrated ability to broaden H5N1 vaccine responses in pre-clinical models. However, many of these agonist molecules have proven difficult to develop clinically. Here, we describe comprehensive adjuvant formulation development of the imidazoquinoline TLR-7/8 agonist 3M-052, in combination with H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) based antigens. We find that 3M-052 in multiple formulations protects both mice and ferrets from lethal H5N1 homologous virus challenge. Furthermore, we conclusively demonstrate the ability of 3M-052 adjuvant formulations to broaden responses to H5N1 HA based antigens, and show that this broadening is functional using a heterologous lethal virus challenge in ferrets. Given the extensive clinical use of imidazoquinoline TLR agonists for other indications, these studies identify multiple adjuvant formulations which may be rapidly advanced into clinical trials in an H5N1 vaccine.

  4. Laurenditerpenol, a New Diterpene from the Tropical Marine Alga Laurencia intricata Potently Inhibits HIF-1 Mediated Hypoxic Signaling in Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Zhang, Lei; Bruick, Richard K.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2010-01-01

    The degree of tumor hypoxia correlates with advanced disease stages and treatment resistance. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) promotes tumor cell adaptation and survival under hypoxic conditions. Therefore, specific HIF-1 inhibitors represent an important new class of potential tumor-selective therapeutic agents. A T47D human breast tumor cell-based reporter assay was used to examine extracts of plants and marine organisms for inhibitors of HIF-1 activation. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the lipid extract of the red alga Laurencia intricata yielded a structurally novel diterpene laurenditerpenol (1). The structure of 1 was determined spectroscopically. The relative configurations of the substituents of each ring system were assigned based on NOESY correlations. The absolute configurations of positions C-1 was determined by the modified Mosher ester procedure (directly in NMR tubes). Compound 1 potently inhibited hypoxia-activated HIF-1 (IC50: 0.4 μM) and hypoxia-induced VEGF (a potent angiogenic factor) in T47D cells. Compound 1 selectively inhibits HIF-1 activation by hypoxia but not iron chelator induced activation. Further, 1 suppresses tumor cell survival under hypoxic conditions without affecting normoxic cell growth. Compound 1 inhibits HIF-1 by blocking the induction of the oxygen-regulated HIF-1α protein. Mitochondrial respiration studies revealed that 1 suppresses oxygen consumption. PMID:15620241

  5. Vaccination with Necroptotic Cancer Cells Induces Efficient Anti-tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Aaes, Tania Løve; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Delvaeye, Tinneke; De Craene, Bram; De Koker, Stefaan; Heyndrickx, Liesbeth; Delrue, Iris; Taminau, Joachim; Wiernicki, Bartosz; De Groote, Philippe; Garg, Abhishek D; Leybaert, Luc; Grooten, Johan; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Agostinis, Patrizia; Berx, Geert; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Krysko, Dmitri V

    2016-04-12

    Successful immunogenic apoptosis in experimental cancer therapy depends on the induction of strong host anti-tumor responses. Given that tumors are often resistant to apoptosis, it is important to identify alternative molecular mechanisms that elicit immunogenic cell death. We have developed a genetic model in which direct dimerization of FADD combined with inducible expression of RIPK3 promotes necroptosis. We report that necroptotic cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns and promote maturation of dendritic cells, the cross-priming of cytotoxic T cells, and the production of IFN-γ in response to tumor antigen stimulation. Using both FADD-dependent and FADD-independent RIPK3 induction systems, we demonstrate the efficient vaccination potential of immunogenic necroptotic cells. Our study broadens the current concept of immunogenic cell death and opens doors for the development of new strategies in cancer therapy.

  6. Preclinical evidence that PD1 blockade cooperates with cancer vaccine TEGVAX to elicit regression of established tumors.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Malm, Ian-James; Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Levitsky, Hy; Pardoll, Drew; Kim, Young J

    2014-08-01

    Biomarker studies have shown that expression of the T-cell coregulatory ligand PDL1 on tumor cells correlates with clinical responsiveness to the PD1 antibody nivolumab. Here, we report the findings of a preclinical cancer vaccine study demonstrating vaccine-dependent PDL1 upregulation in the tumor microenvironment. We formulated an IFNγ-inducing cancer vaccine called TEGVAX that combined GM-CSF and multiple Toll-like receptor agonists to increase the number of activated dendritic cells. Treatment of established tumors with TEGVAX retarded tumor growth in a manner associated with enhanced systemic antitumor immunity. Unexpectedly, TEGVAX also upregulated PDL1 expression in the tumor microenvironment, possibly explaining why tumors were not eliminated completely. In support of this likelihood, PDL1 upregulation in this setting relied upon IFNγ-expressing tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and administration of a PD1-blocking antibody with TEGVAX elicited complete regression of established tumors. Taken together, our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to combine IFNγ-inducing cancer vaccines with immune checkpoint blockade.

  7. Designing effective vaccines for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip P; Osada, Takuya; Lyerly, H Kim; Morse, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Achieving long-term control of colorectal cancers with therapeutic vaccines that generate potent anti-tumor T cell and antibody responses has been a goal for more than two decades. To date, clinical trials of these vaccines have demonstrated induction of immune responses, but clinical benefit has been limited. Improved vector delivery systems with enhanced immunostimulatory properties, decreased immunogenicity against vector and improved antigen presentation are some of the key features of modern tumor vaccines. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the various immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment and regional lymph nodes, coupled with a burgeoning ability to impair inhibitory immune synapses, highlights a growing opportunity to induce beneficial antigen-specific responses against tumor. The combination of improved antigenic delivery systems, coupled with therapeutic immune activation, represents state-of-the-art colorectal vaccine design concepts with the goal of augmenting immune responses against tumor and improving clinical outcomes.

  8. Vaccination strategies for neuro-oncology

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John H.; Mitchell, Duane A.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination against cancer-associated antigens has long held the promise of inducting potent antitumor immunity, targeted cytotoxicity while sparing normal tissues, and long-lasting immunologic memory that can provide surveillance against tumor recurrence. Evaluation of vaccination strategies in preclinical brain tumor models has borne out the capacity for the immune system to effectively and safely eradicate established tumors within the central nervous system. Early phase clinical trials have established the feasibility, safety, and immunogenicity of several vaccine platforms, predominantly in patients with glioblastoma. Definitive demonstration of clinical benefit awaits further study, but initial results have been encouraging. With increased understanding of the stimulatory and regulatory pathways that govern immunologic responses and the enhanced capacity to identify novel antigenic targets using genomic interrogation of tumor cells, vaccination platforms for patients with malignant brain tumors are advancing with increasing personalized complexity and integration into combinatorial treatment paradigms. PMID:26516221

  9. DC-based cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gilboa, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Because of the large preexisting antigenic load and immunosuppressive environment within a tumor, inducing therapeutically useful antitumor immunity in cancer patients requires the development of powerful vaccination protocols. An approach gaining increasing popularity in the tumor vaccine field is to immunize cancer patients with their own DCs loaded ex vivo with tumor antigens. The underlying premise of this approach is that the efficiency and control over the vaccination process provided by ex vivo manipulation of the DCs generates an optimally potent APC and a superior method for stimulating antitumor immunity in vivo compared with the more conventional direct vaccination methods, offsetting the added cost and complexity associated with this form of customized cell therapy. PMID:17476349

  10. Potent immune responses and in vitro pro-inflammatory cytokine suppression by a novel adenovirus vaccine vector based on rare human serotype 28

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Christoph A.; Bonnell, Jessica; Hiriyanna, Suja; Fultz, Megan; Nyberg-Hoffman, Cassandra; Chen, Ping; King, C. Richter; Gall, Jason G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors derived from rare human serotypes have been shown to be less potent than serotype 5 (Ad5) at inducing immune responses to encoded antigens. To identify highly immunogenic adenovirus vectors, we assessed pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, binding to the CD46 receptor, and immunogenicity. Species D adenoviruses uniquely suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced high levels of type I interferon. Thus, it was unexpected that a vector derived from a representative serotype, Ad28, induced significantly higher transgene-specific T-cell responses than an Ad35 vector. Prime-boost regimens with Ad28, Ad35, Ad14, or Ad5 significantly boosted T cell and antibody responses. The seroprevalence of Ad28 was confirmed to be <10% in the United States. Together, this shows that a rare human serotype-based vector can elicit strong immune responses, which was not predicted by in vitro results. PMID:20600496

  11. Potent immune responses and in vitro pro-inflammatory cytokine suppression by a novel adenovirus vaccine vector based on rare human serotype 28.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Christoph A; Bonnell, Jessica; Hiriyanna, Suja; Fultz, Megan; Nyberg-Hoffman, Cassandra; Chen, Ping; King, C Richter; Gall, Jason G D

    2010-08-09

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors derived from rare human serotypes have been shown to be less potent than serotype 5 (Ad5) at inducing immune responses to encoded antigens. To identify highly immunogenic adenovirus vectors, we assessed pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, binding to the CD46 receptor, and immunogenicity. Species D adenoviruses uniquely suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced high levels of type I interferon. Thus, it was unexpected that a vector derived from a representative serotype, Ad28, induced significantly higher transgene-specific T cell responses than an Ad35 vector. Prime-boost regimens with Ad28, Ad35, Ad14, or Ad5 significantly boosted T cell and antibody responses. The seroprevalence of Ad28 was confirmed to be <10% in the United States. Together, this shows that a rare human serotype-based vector can elicit strong immune responses, which was not predicted by in vitro results.

  12. Immunization of allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients with tumor cell vaccines enhances graft-versus-tumor activity without exacerbating graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L D; Savary, C A; Mullen, C A

    2000-04-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) induces 2 closely associated immune responses: graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We have previously shown that pretransplant immunization of allogeneic BMT donors with a recipient-derived tumor cell vaccine increases both GVT activity and lethal GVHD because of the priming of donor T cells against putative minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs) on the tumor vaccine cells. The work reported here tested the hypothesis that tumor cell vaccination after BMT would produce an increase in GVT activity without exacerbating GVHD. C3H.SW donor bone marrow and splenocytes were transplanted into major histocompatibility complex-matched, mHAg-mismatched C57BL/6 recipients. One month after BMT, recipients were immunized against either a C57BL/6 myeloid leukemia (C1498) or fibrosarcoma (205). Immunized recipients had a significant increase in survival and protection against tumor growth in both tumor models, and significant tumor protection was seen even in recipients with preexisting micrometastatic cancer before immunization. Alloreactivity appeared to contribute to the in vitro anti-tumor cytolytic activity, but in vivo immunity was tumor specific, and no exacerbation of GVHD was observed. Although the immunodominant mHAg B6(dom1) was shown to be expressed by all B6 tumors tested and was largely responsible for the alloreactivity resulting from tumor immunization of donors, the in vitro alloreactivity of immune recipients was more restricted and was not mediated by recognition of B6(dom1). In conclusion, post-transplant tumor immunization of allogeneic BMT recipients against either a leukemia or a solid tumor can increase GVT activity and survival without exacerbating GVHD.

  13. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides are a potent adjuvant for an inactivated polio vaccine produced from Sabin strains of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunting; Shi, Huiying; Zhou, Jun; Liang, Yanwen; Xu, Honglin

    2009-11-05

    Poliovirus transmission is controlled globally through world-wide use of a live attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV). However, the imminence of global poliovirus eradication calls for a switch to the inactivated polio vaccine (IPV). Given the limited manufacturing capacity and high cost of IPV, this switch is unlikely in most developing and undeveloped countries. Adjuvantation is an effective strategy for antigen sparing. In this study, we evaluated the adjuvanticity of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) for an experimental IPV produced from Sabin strains of poliovirus. Our results showed that CpG-ODN, alone or in combination with alum, can significantly enhance both the humoral and cellular immune responses to IPV in mice, and, consequently, the antigen dose could be reduced substantially. Therefore, our study suggests that the global use of IPV could be facilitated by using CpG-ODN or other feasible adjuvants.

  14. Enhancing whole-tumor cell vaccination by engaging innate immune system through NY-ESO-1/dendritic cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Le; Zheng, Junying; Nguyen, David H; Luong, Quang T; Zeng, Gang

    2013-10-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer/germline antigen (Ag) with distinctively strong immunogenicity. We have previously demonstrated that NY-ESO-1 serves as an endogenous adjuvant by engaging dendritic cell (DC)-surface receptors of calreticulin (CRT) and toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. In the present study, NY-ESO-1 was investigated for its immunomodulatory roles as a molecular adjuvant in whole-tumor cell vaccines using the Renca kidney cancer model. Renca cells were genetically engineered to express NY-ESO-1 on the cell surface to enhance direct interactions with DC. The effect of ectopic cell-surface expression of NY-ESO-1 was investigated on tumor immunogenicity, DC activation, cytotoxic T lymphocytes against model tumor-associated Ags, and the effectiveness of the modified tumor cells as a therapeutic whole-cell vaccine. Cell-surface expression of NY-ESO-1 was able to reduce the tumor growth of Renca cells in BALB/c mice, although the modification did not alter cell proliferation rate in vitro. Directly engaging the innate immune system through NY-ESO-1 facilitated the interaction of tumor cells with DC, leading to enhanced DC activation and subsequent tumor-specific T-cell priming. When used as a therapeutic whole-cell vaccine, Renca cells with NY-ESO-1 on the surface mediated stronger inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis compared with parental Renca or Renca cells expressing a control protein GFP on the surface. Augmented antitumor efficacy correlated with increased CD8 T-cell infiltration into tumors and decreased myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in the spleen. As a cancer/germline Ag and as an immunomodulatory adjuvant through engaging innate immune receptors, NY-ESO-1 offers a unique opportunity for improved whole-tumor cell vaccinations upon the classic GM-CSF-engineered cell vaccines.

  15. [Peptide vaccination for castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Koga, Noriko; Noguchi, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    Since both tumor cells and host immune cell repertoires are diverse and heterogeneous, immune responses against tumor associated antigens shall be substantially different among individual patients with prostate cancer. Subsequently, selection of suitable peptide vaccines for individual patients based on the pre-existing host immunity before vaccination could induce potent anti-tumor responses capable of providing clinical benefit for prostate cancer patients. We have developed a novel immunotherapeutic approach of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) in which a maximum of four human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class IA-matched peptides were selected for vaccination among pooled peptides based on both HLA-class IA type and the pre-existing host immunity before vaccination. We discuss our recent results of clinical studies of peptide vaccination for castration-resistant prostate cancer and the future direction of therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  16. Immune adjuvant effect of a Toxoplasma gondii profilin-like protein in autologous whole-tumor-cell vaccination in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, You-Won; Lim, Sun Min; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Profilin-like protein in Toxoplasma gondii (TgPLP) is a Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist. In this study, we investigated whether TgPLP has an adjuvant effect on immune function in autologous whole-tumor-cell vaccine (AWV) treatment. Mice vaccinated with AWV together with recombinant TgPLP protein had smaller CT26 tumors and increased survival. TgPLP treatment strongly increased the production of IL-12 through MyD88 signaling and several chemokines, including CCL5, CCL12, and XCL1, in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). In addition, TgPLP increased the phagocytosis of tumor cells by BMMs and promoted immune cell mobility on a tumor-matrigel scaffold. TgPLP triggered immune responses as demonstrated by increased expression of antigen presenting cell markers (MHC class I and II, B7.1, and B7.2) in BMMs and increased IL-12 and IFN-γ expression in mice. Mice vaccinated with AWV and TgPLP had more immune cells (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, and macrophages) in the spleen and higher total IgG and IgG2a concentrations in the blood than mice vaccinated with AWV alone. These findings suggest that TgPLP is a TLR-based vaccine adjuvant that enhances antitumor immune responses during vaccination with AWV. PMID:27687589

  17. Production of a novel multi-epitope peptide vaccine for cancer immunotherapy in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Sadraeian, Mohammad; Rahbar, Mohammad Reza; Khoshnoud, Mohammad Javad; Mohkam, Milad; Gholami, Ahmad; Banihashemi, Mehrzad; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    In our previous research, several bioinformatic strategies were utilized to design an efficient multi-epitope peptide vaccine (MEV) against cancer. The designed vaccine consists of Wilms tumor-1 (WT-1) and human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFrC) and HLA-DR epitope (PADRE) helper T lymphocyte (HTL) epitopes and heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) as an immunostimulatory adjuvant. All segments were fused together by suitable linkers. In the current study, we cloned and expressed the designed MEV in E. coli. We subsequently performed in vivo preventative and therapeutic assays to evaluate antitumor efficacy of the vaccine against the HPV-16 E7-expressing murine tumor cell line TC-1 as a model for cancer immunotherapy. The results showed that in preventive experiments, vaccination with MEV significantly augmented the IgG antibody titer and the percentage of tumor-free mice compared to control groups (PBS and E7). Moreover, in therapeutic experiments, vaccination with MEV led to a reduction in the number of metastatic nodules, lung weights and the ratio of lung weights to body weights compared to other groups. In sum, our epitope vaccine could efficiently induce preventive and therapeutic antitumor immunity in TC-1 tumor bearing mice.

  18. IMGN853, a Folate Receptor-α (FRα)-Targeting Antibody-Drug Conjugate, Exhibits Potent Targeted Antitumor Activity against FRα-Expressing Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ab, Olga; Whiteman, Kathleen R; Bartle, Laura M; Sun, Xiuxia; Singh, Rajeeva; Tavares, Daniel; LaBelle, Alyssa; Payne, Gillian; Lutz, Robert J; Pinkas, Jan; Goldmacher, Victor S; Chittenden, Thomas; Lambert, John M

    2015-07-01

    A majority of ovarian and non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma cancers overexpress folate receptor α (FRα). Here, we report the development of an anti-FRα antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), consisting of a FRα-binding antibody attached to a highly potent maytansinoid that induces cell-cycle arrest and cell death by targeting microtubules. From screening a large panel of anti-FRα monoclonal antibodies, we selected the humanized antibody M9346A as the best antibody for targeted delivery of a maytansinoid payload into FRα-positive cells. We compared M9346A conjugates with various linker/maytansinoid combinations, and found that a conjugate, now denoted as IMGN853, with the N-succinimidyl 4-(2-pyridyldithio)-2-sulfobutanoate (sulfo-SPDB) linker and N(2')-deacetyl-N(2')-(4-mercapto-4-methyl-1-oxopentyl)-maytansine (DM4) exhibited the most potent antitumor activity in several FRα-expressing xenograft tumor models. The level of expression of FRα on the surface of cells was a major determinant in the sensitivity of tumor cells to the cytotoxic effect of the conjugate. Efficacy studies of IMGN853 in xenografts of ovarian cancer and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and of a patient tumor-derived xenograft model demonstrated that the ADC was highly active against tumors that expressed FRα at levels similar to those found on a large fraction of ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer patient tumors, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. IMGN853 displayed cytotoxic activity against FRα-negative cells situated near FRα-positive cells (bystander cytotoxic activity), indicating its ability to eradicate tumors with heterogeneous expression of FRα. Together, these findings support the clinical development of IMGN853 as a novel targeted therapy for patients with FRα-expressing tumors.

  19. Strengthened tumor antigen immune recognition by inclusion of a recombinant Eimeria antigen in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Dionisia; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Appledorn, Daniel M; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The need for novel, effective adjuvants that are capable of eliciting stronger cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses to antigenic targets is well understood in the vaccine development field. Unfortunately, many adjuvants investigated thus far are either too toxic for human application or too weak to induce a substantial response against difficult antigens, such as tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). In spite of this trend, clinical investigations of recombinant Eimeria antigen (rEA) have revealed this protein to be a non-toxic immunogenic agent with the ability to trigger a Th1-predominant response in both murine and human subjects. Our past studies have shown that the injection of a rEA-encoding adenovirus (rAd5-rEA) alongside an HIV antigen-encoding adenovirus greatly improves the adaptive immune response against this pathogen-derived transgene. In this report, we investigated whether rAd5-rEA could promote and/or alter cytotoxic memory responses toward carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a colorectal cancer-related TAA. We found that the addition of rAd5-rEA to an Ad-based CEA vaccine induced a dose-dependent increase in several anti-CEA T and B cell responses. Moreover, inclusion of rAd5-rEA increased the number of CEA-derived antigenic epitopes that elicited significant cell-mediated and IgG-mediated recognition. These enhanced anti-CEA immune responses also translated into superior CEA-targeted cell killing, as evaluated by an in vivo cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay. Overall, these results suggest that co-administration of rAd5-rEA with a tumor antigen vaccine can substantially boost and broaden the TAA-specific adaptive memory response, thereby validating the potential of rAd5-rEA to be a beneficial adjuvant during therapeutic cancer vaccination.

  20. The route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influences the recruitment of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the lung that provide potent protection from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Suda, Tatsuya; Kawano, Masaaki; Nogi, Yasuhisa; Ohno, Naohito; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Matsui, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in the lung are considered to confer protection from respiratory viruses. Several groups demonstrated that the route of priming was likely to have an implication for the trafficking of antigen-specific CTLs. Therefore, we investigated whether the route of immunization with adenoviral vaccine influenced the recruitment of virus-specific CTLs in the lung that should provide potent protection from influenza A virus. Mice were immunized with recombinant adenovirus expressing the matrix (M1) protein of influenza A virus via various immunization routes involving intraperitoneal, intranasal, intramuscular, or intravenous administration as well as subcutaneous administration in the hind hock. We found that the immunization route dramatically impacted the recruitment of M1-specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells both in the lung and the spleen. Surprisingly, hock immunization was most effective for the accumulation in the lung of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells that possessed M1-specific cytolytic activity. Further, antigen-driven IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells in the lung, but not in the spleen, were likely to be correlated with the resistance to challenge with influenza A virus. These results may improve our ability to design vaccines that target virus-specific CTL responses to respiratory viruses such as influenza A virus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. All-trans-retinoic acid eliminates immature myeloid cells from tumor-bearing mice and improves the effect of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Cheng, Fengdong; Yu, Bin; Nefedova, Yulia; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Lush, Richard; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

    2003-08-01

    Tumor-induced immunosuppression is one of the crucial mechanisms of tumor evasion of immune surveillance. It contributes greatly to the failure of cancer vaccines. Immature myeloid cells (ImCs) play an important role in tumor-induced immunosuppression. These cells accumulate in large numbers in tumor-bearing hosts and directly inhibit T-cell functions via various mechanisms. In this study, we tried to eliminate ImCs in an attempt to improve antitumor response. In vivo administration of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) dramatically reduced the presence of ImCs in all tested tumor models. This effect was not because of a direct antitumor effect of ATRA or decreased production of growth factors by tumor cells. Experiments with adoptive transfer demonstrated that ATRA differentiated ImC in vivo into mature dendritic cells, macrophages, and granulocytes. Decreased presence of ImC in tumor-bearing mice noticeably improved CD4- and CD8-mediated tumor-specific immune response. Combination of ATRA with two different types of cancer vaccines in two different tumor models significantly prolonged the antitumor effect of the treatment. These data suggest that elimination of ImC with ATRA may open an opportunity to improve the effect of cancer vaccines.

  2. Preclinical evidence that PD-1 blockade cooperates with cancer vaccine TEGVAX to elicit regression of established tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Juan; Malm, Ian-James; Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Levitsky, Hy; Pardoll, Drew; Kim, Young J.

    2015-01-01

    Biomarker studies have shown that expression of the T cell co-regulatory ligand PD-L1 on tumor cells correlates with clinical responsiveness to the PD-1 antibody nivolumab. Here we report the findings of a preclinical cancer vaccine study demonstrating a similiar correlate where PD-L1 is upregulated in the tumor microenvironment. We formulated an IFNγ-inducing cancer vaccine called TEGVAX that combined GM-CSF and multiple toll-like receptor agonists to increase the number of activated dendritic cells. Treatment of established tumors with TEGVAX retarded tumor growth in a manner associated with enhanced systemic anti-tumor immunity. Unexpectedly, TEGVAX also upregulated PD-L1 expression in the tumor microenvironment, possibly explaining why tumors were not eliminated completely. In support of this likelihood, PD-L1 upregulation in this setting relied upon IFNγ-expressing tumor-infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and administration of a PD-1 blocking antibody with TEGVAX elicited complete regression of established tumors. Taken together, our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to combine IFNγ inducing cancer vaccines with immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:24812273

  3. IFN{gamma} markedly cooperates with intratumoral dendritic cell vaccine in dog tumor models.

    PubMed

    Mito, Kai; Sugiura, Kikuya; Ueda, Kana; Hori, Takako; Akazawa, Takashi; Yamate, Jyoji; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hatoya, Shingo; Inaba, Muneo; Inoue, Norimitsu; Ikehara, Susumu; Inaba, Toshio

    2010-09-15

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy can trigger effective immune responses against cancer in human patients. Although accompanied by little toxicity, further improvements are needed to optimize immune responses for fully satisfactory clinical outcomes. IFNγ, a potent inducer of T helper type 1 immune responses, is considered an important tool to realize improvements. In this study, we sought to clarify the effect of IFNγ on the maturation and activation of DCs and the clinical outcome of DC-based cancer therapy in dogs. In vitro experiments indicated that IFNγ significantly enhanced the expression of immune stimulatory molecules and interleukin-12 by DCs derived from canine monocytes. IFNγ also significantly strengthened DC-mediated growth suppression against tumor cell lines. DC inoculation with concomitant delivery of IFNγ into primary or recurrent tumors elicited significant clinical responses, including four complete responses and two partial responses against malignant tumors, also eliciting partial responses against benign but actively growing tumors. Together, our results indicate that combining IFNγ and DCs could induce strong immune responses against tumors, significantly improving clinical outcomes. The present study of dogs bearing common types of cancer in humans offers a unique line of support for the development of human cancer therapies. ©2010 AACR.

  4. Breakthrough of SIV strain smE660 challenge in SIV strain mac239-vaccinated rhesus macaques despite potent autologous neutralizing antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Burton, Samantha L; Kilgore, Katie M; Smith, S Abigail; Reddy, Sharmila; Hunter, Eric; Robinson, Harriet L; Silvestri, Guido; Amara, Rama R; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2015-08-25

    Although the correlates of immunological protection from human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus infection remain incompletely understood, it is generally believed that medium to high titers of serum neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against the challenge virus will prevent infection. This paradigm is based on a series of studies in which passive transfer of HIV-specific nAbs protected rhesus macaques (RMs) from subsequent mucosal challenge with a chimeric human/simian immunodeficiency virus. However, it is unknown whether nAb titers define protection in the setting of active immunization. Here we determined serum nAb titers against breakthrough transmitted/founder (T/F) SIVsmE660-derived envelope glycoprotein (Env) variants from 14 RMs immunized with SIVmac239-based DNA-prime/modified vaccinia virus Ankara-boost vaccine regimens that included GM-CSF or CD40L adjuvants and conferred significant but incomplete protection against repeated low-dose intrarectal challenge. A single Env variant established infection in all RMs except one, with no identifiable genetic signature associated with vaccination breakthrough compared with T/F Envs from four unvaccinated monkeys. Breakthrough T/F Env pseudoviruses were potently neutralized in vitro by heterologous pooled serum from chronically SIVsmE660-infected monkeys at IC50 titers exceeding 1:1,000,000. Remarkably, the T/F Env pseudoviruses from 13 of 14 monkeys were also susceptible to neutralization by autologous prechallenge serum at in vitro IC50 titers ranging from 1:742-1:10,832. These titers were similar to those observed in vaccinated RMs that remained uninfected. These data suggest that the relationship between serum nAb titers and protection from mucosal SIV challenge in the setting of active immunization is more complex than previously recognized, warranting further studies into the balance between immune activation, target cell availability, and protective antibody responses.

  5. Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination combined with temozolomide against newly diagnosed glioblastoma: safety and impact on immunological response.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Kagawa, Naoki; Chiba, Yasuyoshi; Izumoto, Shuichi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Kijima, Noriyuki; Oka, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakajima, Hiroko; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Hosen, Naoki; Oji, Yusuke; Arita, Norio; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the safety of combined Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination and temozolomide treatment of glioblastoma, a phase I clinical trial was designed. Seven patients with histological diagnosis of glioblastoma underwent concurrent radiotherapy and temozolomide therapy. Patients first received Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination 1 week after the end of combined concurrent radio/temozolomide therapy, and administration was continued once per week for 7 weeks. Temozolomide maintenance was started and performed for up to 24 cycles, and the observation period for safety encompassed 6 weeks from the first administration of maintenance temozolomide. All patients showed good tolerability during the observation period. Skin disorders, such as grade 1/2 injection-site reactions, were observed in all seven patients. Although grade 3 lymphocytopenia potentially due to concurrent radio/temozolomide therapy was observed in five patients (71.4 %), no other grade 3/4 hematological or neurological toxicities were observed. No autoimmune reactions were observed. All patients are still alive, and six are on Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination without progression, yielding a progression-free survival from histological diagnosis of 5.2-49.1 months. Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination was stopped in one patient after 12 injections by the patient's request. The safety profile of the combined Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination and temozolomide therapy approach for treating glioblastoma was confirmed.

  6. Forced LIGHT expression in prostate tumors overcomes Treg mediated immunosuppression and synergizes with a prostate tumor therapeutic vaccine by recruiting effector T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lisa; Da Silva, Diane M.; Verma, Bhavna; Gray, Andrew; Brand, Heike E.; Skeate, Joseph G.; Porras, Tania B.; Kanodia, Shreya; Kast, W. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background LIGHT, a ligand for lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) and herpes virus entry mediator, is predominantly expressed on activated immune cells and LTβR signaling leads to the recruitment of lymphocytes. The interaction between LIGHT and LTβR has been previously shown in a virus induced tumor model to activate immune cells and result in tumor regression, but the role of LIGHT in tumor immunosuppression or in a prostate cancer setting, where self antigens exist, has not been explored. We hypothesized that forced expression of LIGHT in prostate tumors would shift the pattern of immune cell infiltration, would inhibit T regulatory cells (Tregs) and would induce prostate cancer tumor associated antigen (TAA) specific T cells that would eradicate tumors. Methods Real Time PCR was used to evaluate expression of forced LIGHT and various other genes in prostate tumors samples. Adenovirus encoding murine LIGHT was injected intratumorally into TRAMP C2 prostate cancer cell tumor bearing mice for in vivo studies. Chemokine and cytokine concentrations were determined by multiplex ELISA. Flow cytometry was used to phenotype tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and expression of LIGHT on the tumor cell surface. Tumor specific lymphocytes were quantified via an ELISpot assay. Treg induction and Treg suppression assays determined Treg functionality after LIGHT treatment. Results LIGHT expression peaked within 48 hours of infection, recruited effector T cells into the tumor microenvironment that recognized mouse prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and inhibited the infiltration of Tregs. Tregs isolated from tumor draining lymph nodes had impaired suppressive capability after LIGHT treatment. LIGHT in combination with a therapeutic vaccine, PSCA TriVax, reduced tumor burden. Conclusion Forced LIGHT treatment combined with PSCA TriVax therapeutic vaccination delays prostate cancer progression in mice by recruiting effector T lymphocytes to the tumor and inhibiting Treg mediated

  7. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans Potently Inhibit Invasion and Serve as a Central Organizer of the Brain Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Siebzehnrubl, Florian A.; Schildts, Michela J.; Yachnis, Anthony T.; Smith, George M.; Smith, Amy A.; Scheffler, Bjorn; Reynolds, Brent A.; Silver, Jerry; Steindler, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains the most pervasive and lethal of all brain malignancies. One factor that contributes to this poor prognosis is the highly invasive character of the tumor. GBM is characterized by microscopic infiltration of tumor cells throughout the brain, whereas non-neural metastases, as well as select lower grade gliomas, develop as self-contained and clearly delineated lesions. Illustrated by rodent xenograft tumor models as well as pathological human patient specimens, we present evidence that one fundamental switch between these two distinct pathologies–invasion and noninvasion–is mediated through the tumor extracellular matrix. Specifically, noninvasive lesions are associated with a rich matrix containing substantial amounts of glycosylated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), whereas glycosylated CSPGs are essentially absent from diffusely infiltrating tumors. CSPGs, acting as central organizers of the tumor microenvironment, dramatically influence resident reactive astrocytes, inducing their exodus from the tumor mass and the resultant encapsulation of noninvasive lesions. Additionally, CSPGs induce activation of tumor-associated microglia. We demonstrate that the astrogliotic capsule can directly inhibit tumor invasion, and its absence from GBM presents an environment favorable to diffuse infiltration. We also identify the leukocyte common antigen-related phosphatase receptor (PTPRF) as a putative intermediary between extracellular glycosylated CSPGs and noninvasive tumor cells. In all, we present CSPGs as critical regulators of brain tumor histopathology and help to clarify the role of the tumor microenvironment in brain tumor invasion. PMID:24068827

  8. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans potently inhibit invasion and serve as a central organizer of the brain tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Silver, Daniel J; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A; Schildts, Michela J; Yachnis, Anthony T; Smith, George M; Smith, Amy A; Scheffler, Bjorn; Reynolds, Brent A; Silver, Jerry; Steindler, Dennis A

    2013-09-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains the most pervasive and lethal of all brain malignancies. One factor that contributes to this poor prognosis is the highly invasive character of the tumor. GBM is characterized by microscopic infiltration of tumor cells throughout the brain, whereas non-neural metastases, as well as select lower grade gliomas, develop as self-contained and clearly delineated lesions. Illustrated by rodent xenograft tumor models as well as pathological human patient specimens, we present evidence that one fundamental switch between these two distinct pathologies--invasion and noninvasion--is mediated through the tumor extracellular matrix. Specifically, noninvasive lesions are associated with a rich matrix containing substantial amounts of glycosylated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), whereas glycosylated CSPGs are essentially absent from diffusely infiltrating tumors. CSPGs, acting as central organizers of the tumor microenvironment, dramatically influence resident reactive astrocytes, inducing their exodus from the tumor mass and the resultant encapsulation of noninvasive lesions. Additionally, CSPGs induce activation of tumor-associated microglia. We demonstrate that the astrogliotic capsule can directly inhibit tumor invasion, and its absence from GBM presents an environment favorable to diffuse infiltration. We also identify the leukocyte common antigen-related phosphatase receptor (PTPRF) as a putative intermediary between extracellular glycosylated CSPGs and noninvasive tumor cells. In all, we present CSPGs as critical regulators of brain tumor histopathology and help to clarify the role of the tumor microenvironment in brain tumor invasion.

  9. Combination of sunitinib with anti-tumor vaccination inhibits T cell priming and requires careful scheduling to achieve productive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jaini, Ritika; Rayman, Patricia; Cohen, Peter A; Finke, James H; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2014-04-01

    Sunitinib, a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor is the frontline therapy for renal and gastrointestinal cancers. We hypothesized that by virtue of its well documented tumor apoptosis and immune adjuvant properties, combination of Sunitinib with anti-tumor immunotherapeutics will provide synergistic inhibition of tumor growth. Our study was designed to evaluate the impact of Sunitinib on immunotherapy mediated anti-tumor immune responses and evaluate its efficacy as a combinatorial therapy with tumor targeted immunotherapeutic vaccination. Mice immunized with recombinant α-lactalbumin, a lactation protein expressed on majority of breast tumors were treated with 1 mg of Sunitinib for seven consecutive days beginning (1) concurrently, on the day of α-lactalbumin immunization or (2) sequentially, on day 9 after immunization. Ten-day lymph nodes or 21 day spleens were tested by ELISPOT assays and flow cytometry to evaluate responsiveness to α-lactalbumin immunization in presence of Sunitinib and distribution of cells involved in T cell antigen priming and proliferation in different lymphoid compartments. In addition, therapeutic efficacy of the α-lactalbumin/ Sunitinib combination was evaluated by monitoring tumor growth in the 4T1 transplanted tumor model. Our studies reveal that concurrent administration of Sunitinib with active vaccination against a targeted tumor antigen inhibits priming to the immunogen due to a drastic decrease in CD11b+CD11c+ antigen presenting cells, leading to failure of vaccination. However, sequential delivery of Sunitinib timed to avoid the priming phase of vaccination results in the desired vaccination mediated boost in immune responses. © 2013 UICC.

  10. Clinical observations on adoptive immunotherapy with vaccine-primed T-lymphocytes secondarily sensitized to tumor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chang, A E; Yoshizawa, H; Sakai, K; Cameron, M J; Sondak, V K; Shu, S

    1993-03-01

    The adoptive immunotherapy of human malignancy requires reliable methods to sensitize and expand patients' T-cells reactive to autologous tumors. In animal studies, we have generated therapeutic effector cells against a poorly immunogenic tumor by a two-step procedure: vaccination of the host followed by the secondary stimulation of vaccine-primed lymph node (LN) cells by in vitro sensitization (IVS) with tumor in the presence of interleukin 2 (IL-2). Based on these observations, we performed a clinical trial in patients with advanced cancer to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of vaccine-primed LN cells which were similarly activated in vitro. Patients were vaccinated with irradiated autologous tumor admixed with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin and had draining LN excised 10 days later for IVS culture. During IVS culture, LN cells expanded up to 14-fold (average of 8.4-fold). A mean of 6.7 x 10(9) cells was infused in ten patients (seven melanoma, three renal cell cancer) along with the concomitant i.v. administration of IL-2 (180,000 IU/kg every 8 h for 5 days). Phenotype analysis of IVS-LN cells revealed 78 +/- 4% CD3+ T-cells which were predominantly CD4+ (67 +/- 5%) with expression of HLA-DR and IL-2 receptor. IVS-LN cells displayed relative specificity of autologous tumor lysis in four of ten cases compared to zero of seven IVS-peripheral blood lymphocytes derived from the same patients as measured by the 51Cr release assay. One mo after therapy, seven of nine patients treated with IVS-LN cells and IL-2 developed delayed-type hypersensitivity reactivity to autologous tumor compared to zero of nine patients treated with tumor vaccination and IL-2 only (P < 0.002). These observations suggest that antitumor reactivity was passively transferred with the IVS-LN cells. Major toxic side effects including fever, hepatic dysfunction, and weight gain associated with the capillary leak syndrome were associated with exogenous IL-2 administration. Tumor vaccination and cell

  11. Antigen capsid-display on human adenovirus 35 via pIX fusion is a potent vaccine platform.

    PubMed

    Salisch, Nadine C; Vujadinovic, Marija; van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Vorthoren, Lars; Serroyen, Jan; Kuipers, Harmjan; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Zahn, Roland; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort

    2017-01-01

    Durable protection against complex pathogens is likely to require immunity that comprises both humoral and cellular responses. While heterologous prime-boost regimens based on recombinant, replication-incompetent Adenoviral vectors (AdV) and adjuvanted protein have been able to induce high levels of concomitant humoral and cellular responses, complex manufacturing and handling in the field may limit their success. To combine the benefits of genetic and protein-based vaccination within one vaccine construct and to facilitate their use, we generated Human Adenovirus 35 (HAdV35) vectors genetically encoding a model antigen based on the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) circumsporozoite (CS) protein and displaying a truncated version of the same antigen (CSshort) via protein IX on the capsid, with or without a flexible glycine-linker and/or a 45Å-spacer. The four tested pIX-antigen display variants were efficiently incorporated and presented on the HAdV35 capsid irrespective of whether a transgene was encoded or not. Transgene-expression and producibility of the display-/expression vectors were not impeded by the pIX-display. In mice, the pIX-modified vectors induced strong humoral antigen-specific immunity that increased with the inclusion of the linker-/spacer molecules, exceeded the responses induced by the genetic, transgene-expressing HAdV35 vector, and surpassed recombinant protein in potency. In addition, the pIX- display/expression vectors elicited high antigen-specific cellular immune responses that matched those of the genetic HAdV35 vector expressing CS. pIX-modified display-/expression HAdV vectors may therefore be a valuable technology for the development of vaccines against complex pathogens, especially in resource-limited settings.

  12. Antigen capsid-display on human adenovirus 35 via pIX fusion is a potent vaccine platform

    PubMed Central

    van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Vorthoren, Lars; Serroyen, Jan; Kuipers, Harmjan; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Zahn, Roland; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort

    2017-01-01

    Durable protection against complex pathogens is likely to require immunity that comprises both humoral and cellular responses. While heterologous prime-boost regimens based on recombinant, replication-incompetent Adenoviral vectors (AdV) and adjuvanted protein have been able to induce high levels of concomitant humoral and cellular responses, complex manufacturing and handling in the field may limit their success. To combine the benefits of genetic and protein-based vaccination within one vaccine construct and to facilitate their use, we generated Human Adenovirus 35 (HAdV35) vectors genetically encoding a model antigen based on the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) circumsporozoite (CS) protein and displaying a truncated version of the same antigen (CSshort) via protein IX on the capsid, with or without a flexible glycine-linker and/or a 45Å-spacer. The four tested pIX-antigen display variants were efficiently incorporated and presented on the HAdV35 capsid irrespective of whether a transgene was encoded or not. Transgene-expression and producibility of the display-/expression vectors were not impeded by the pIX-display. In mice, the pIX-modified vectors induced strong humoral antigen-specific immunity that increased with the inclusion of the linker-/spacer molecules, exceeded the responses induced by the genetic, transgene-expressing HAdV35 vector, and surpassed recombinant protein in potency. In addition, the pIX- display/expression vectors elicited high antigen-specific cellular immune responses that matched those of the genetic HAdV35 vector expressing CS. pIX-modified display-/expression HAdV vectors may therefore be a valuable technology for the development of vaccines against complex pathogens, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:28362809

  13. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Tada, Seiichi; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To develop effective vaccine, we examined the effects of CO{sub 3}Ap as an antigen carrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap was taken up by BMDCs more effectively than free OVA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA-immunized splenocytes was activated by OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap induced strong OVA-specific immune responses to C57BL/6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 3}Ap is promising antigen carrier for the achievement of effective vaccine. -- Abstract: The ability of carbonate apatite (CO{sub 3}Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO{sub 3}Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-{gamma} by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO{sub 3}Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO{sub 3}Ap.

  14. Dibenz[a,c]anthracene: a potent inhibitor of skin-tumor initiation by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene.

    PubMed

    Slaga, T J; Viaje, A; Buty, S G; Bracken, W M

    1978-03-01

    The mechanism by which the weak tumor initiator dibenz[a,c]anthracene (DB[a,c]A) inhibits the skin-tumor-initiating activity of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) was investigated. DB[a,c]A was found to be a potent inhibitor of DMBA initiation when given either 5 min, or 1, 12, or 36 hours before DMBA. Pretreatment of mice with unlabeled DB[a,c]A at either 1, 12, or 36 hours before killing increased the in vitro epidermally mediated covalent binding of [3H]DMBA to DNA more than pretreatment with unlabeled DMBA at comparable times. Only when the tumor experiments were mimicked did a decrease in DMBA covalent binding to DNA in vitro occur. The results suggests that some competition at the level of polycyclic hydrocarbon metabolism or at the genome level may exist between metabolites of the weak carcinogen and those of the strong carcinogen.

  15. Reduced Dose and Intermittent Treatment with Lapatinib and Trastuzumab for Potent Blockade of the HER Pathway in HER-2/neu Overexpressing Breast Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Wiechmann, Lisa S.; Wang, Yen-Chao; Huang, Catherine; Migliaccio, Ilenia; Wu, Meng-Fen; Gutierrez, Carolina; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Arpino, Grazia; Massarweh, Suleiman; Ward, Robin; Soliz, Robert; Osborne, C. Kent; Schiff, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We have shown that incomplete blockade of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor (HER) pathway is a mechanism of resistance to treatment with trastuzumab (T) in HER2-overexpressing tumor xenografts. We now investigate whether the addition of lapatinib (L), a dual HER1/2 kinase inhibitor, to T results in more potent inhibition of the pathway and therefore inhibition of tumor growth, and whether reduced dose and intermittent treatment with the combination is equally effective. Experimental Design Nude mice bearing HER2-overexpressing MCF7/HER2-18 or BT474 xenograft tumors were treated with L, T, alone or in various combinations with other HER inhibitors. L+T for short duration (14, 42 days), intermittent administration (14 days on/off), and reduced dosing (1/2 dose) was also investigated. Inhibition of tumor growth, downstream signaling, proliferation, and induction of apoptosis were assessed. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results L+T was the most effective regimen in both MCF7/HER2-18 and BT474 xenografts with complete tumor regression (CR) observed in all mice. Intermittent and reduced dose treatment (½ dose) resulted in high rates of CR and low rates of tumor recurrence that were comparable to full dose continuous treatment. L+T resulted in significantly reduced downstream signaling and proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Conclusions L+T is a potent and effective combination even when given in reduced dose or intermittent schedule potentially resulting in lower toxicity and reduced cost if translated to patients. These findings warrant timely clinical testing. PMID:21138857

  16. The future of cancer research: prevention, screening, vaccines, and tumor-specific drug combos.

    PubMed

    Blanck, George

    2014-01-01

    New cancer research strategies have developed very rapidly over the past five years, including extensive DNA sequencing of tumor and normal cells; use of highly sensitive cancer cell detection methods; vaccine development and tumor-specific (designer) drugs. These developments have raised questions about where to concentrate efforts in the near future when establishing clinical trials, particularly important in an age of diminishing resources and during a period when competing strategies for cancer control are likely to overwhelm the opportunities for establishing large, effective clinical trials. In particular, it behooves the research community to be mindful of the inevitable, challenging obligation to responsibly choose between clinical trials that offer the credible hope of incremental advances vs. trials that are less traditional but may have revolutionary outcomes.

  17. Efficacy of tumor cell vaccine after incorporating monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) in tumor cell membranes containing tumor-associated ganglioside.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, M H; Brazeau, S M; Morton, D L

    1994-07-15

    Murine B16 melanoma expresses the ganglioside GM3. GM3 shed from tumor cells is immunosuppressive and promotes tumor growth. Reduction or elimination of the shed GM3 could be therapeutic, and the anti-GM3 antibodies may reduce and clear the shed ganglioside. To test this hypothesis, mice were challenged with tumor cells, with or without inducing anti-GM3 antibody response. Since gangliosides are poor immunogens and T-cell independent antigens, an adjuvant (monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a non-toxic lipid A of Salmonella), directed against B-cells, was employed. MPL was incorporated onto liposomes and into the surface membrane of B16 mouse melanoma cells; both are rich in GM3. C57BL/6J mice immunized with MPL-liposomes or MPL-B16 cells responded with elevated levels of anti-GM3 IgM. Non-immunized mice or mice immunized with B16 cells alone or ganglioside GM3 alone (without MPL) elicited poor anti-GM3 IgM response, confirming the GM3's immunologic crypticity and MPL's immunopotentiating effect. MPL's immunopotentiating effect was improved by coupling it to melanoma cell membranes. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with irradiated B16 alone or MPL alone or MPL-conjugated irradiated B16. After three weekly immunizations, each mouse received a challenge dose of viable syngeneic B16. Neither MPL alone nor B16 alone had a significant effect on tumor growth or host survival; however, administration of MPL-conjugated B16 cells significantly prevented tumor growth and prolonged survival. Our results indicate that MPL-incorporated B16 cells augment the anti-GM3 IgM response, which may reverse GM3-induced immunosuppression by eliminating tumor-derived GM3, and restore immunocompetence.

  18. Production and characterization of amplified tumor-derived cRNA libraries to be used as vaccines against metastatic melanomas.

    PubMed

    Carralot, Jean-Philippe; Weide, Benjamin; Schoor, Oliver; Probst, Jochen; Scheel, Birgit; Teufel, Regina; Hoerr, Ingmar; Garbe, Claus; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Pascolo, Steve

    2005-08-22

    Anti-tumor vaccines targeting the entire tumor antigen repertoire represent an attractive immunotherapeutic approach. In the context of a phase I/II clinical trial, we vaccinated metastatic melanoma patients with autologous amplified tumor mRNA. In order to provide the large quantities of mRNA needed for each patient, the Stratagene Creator SMART cDNA library construction method was modified and applied to produce libraries derived from the tumors of 15 patients. The quality of those mRNA library vaccines was evaluated through sequencing and microarray analysis. Random analysis of bacterial clones of the library showed a rate of 95% of recombinant plasmids among which a minimum of 51% of the clones contained a full-Open Reading Frame. In addition, despite a biased amplification toward small abundant transcripts compared to large rare fragments, we could document a relatively conserved gene expression profile between the total RNA of the tumor of origin and the corresponding in vitro transcribed complementary RNA (cRNA). Finally, listing the 30 most abundant transcripts of patient MEL02's library, a large number of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) either patient specific or shared by several melanomas were found. Our results show that unlimited amounts of cRNA representing tumor's transcriptome could be obtained and that this cRNA was a reliable source of a large variety of tumor antigens.

  19. Production and characterization of amplified tumor-derived cRNA libraries to be used as vaccines against metastatic melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Carralot, Jean-Philippe; Weide, Benjamin; Schoor, Oliver; Probst, Jochen; Scheel, Birgit; Teufel, Regina; Hoerr, Ingmar; Garbe, Claus; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Pascolo, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Background Anti-tumor vaccines targeting the entire tumor antigen repertoire represent an attractive immunotherapeutic approach. In the context of a phase I/II clinical trial, we vaccinated metastatic melanoma patients with autologous amplified tumor mRNA. In order to provide the large quantities of mRNA needed for each patient, the Stratagene Creator™ SMART™ cDNA library construction method was modified and applied to produce libraries derived from the tumors of 15 patients. The quality of those mRNA library vaccines was evaluated through sequencing and microarray analysis. Results Random analysis of bacterial clones of the library showed a rate of 95% of recombinant plasmids among which a minimum of 51% of the clones contained a full-Open Reading Frame. In addition, despite a biased amplification toward small abundant transcripts compared to large rare fragments, we could document a relatively conserved gene expression profile between the total RNA of the tumor of origin and the corresponding in vitro transcribed complementary RNA (cRNA). Finally, listing the 30 most abundant transcripts of patient MEL02's library, a large number of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) either patient specific or shared by several melanomas were found. Conclusion Our results show that unlimited amounts of cRNA representing tumor's transcriptome could be obtained and that this cRNA was a reliable source of a large variety of tumor antigens. PMID:16115316

  20. Clinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Tumor-Targeted, Plant-Made Id-KLH Conjugate Vaccines for Follicular Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tusé, Daniel; Ku, Nora; Bendandi, Maurizio; Becerra, Carlos; Collins, Robert; Langford, Nyla; Sancho, Susana Inogés; López-Díaz de Cerio, Ascensión; Pastor, Fernando; Kandzia, Romy; Thieme, Frank; Jarczowski, Franziska; Krause, Dieter; Ma, Julian K-C; Pandya, Shan; Klimyuk, Victor; Gleba, Yuri; Butler-Ransohoff, John E

    2015-01-01

    We report the first evaluation of plant-made conjugate vaccines for targeted treatment of B-cell follicular lymphoma (FL) in a Phase I safety and immunogenicity clinical study. Each recombinant personalized immunogen consisted of a tumor-derived, plant-produced idiotypic antibody (Ab) hybrid comprising the hypervariable regions of the tumor-associated light and heavy Ab chains, genetically grafted onto a common human IgG1 scaffold. Each immunogen was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using twin magnICON vectors expressing the light and heavy chains of the idiotypic Ab. Each purified Ab was chemically linked to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to form a conjugate vaccine. The vaccines were administered to FL patients over a series of ≥6 subcutaneous injections in conjunction with the adjuvant Leukine (GM-CSF). The 27 patients enrolled in the study had previously received non-anti-CD20 cytoreductive therapy followed by ≥4 months of immune recovery prior to first vaccination. Of 11 patients who became evaluable at study conclusion, 82% (9/11) displayed a vaccine-induced, idiotype-specific cellular and/or humoral immune response. No patients showed serious adverse events (SAE) related to vaccination. The fully scalable plant-based manufacturing process yields safe and immunogenic personalized FL vaccines that can be produced within weeks of obtaining patient biopsies.

  1. Potent tumor tropism of induced pluripotent stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells in the mouse intracerebral glioma model.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Amano, Shinji; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Although neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been well-known to have a strong glioma tropism, this activity in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has not yet been fully studied. In the present study, we tested tumor tropic activity of mouse iPSCs and neural stem cells derived from the iPSC (iPS-NSCs) using in vitro Matrigel invasion chamber assay and in vivo mouse intracranial tumor model. Both iPSC and iPS-NSC had a similar potent in vitro tropism for glioma conditioned media. The migrated iPSCs to the gliomas kept expressing Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting no neuronal or glial differentiation. iPSCs or iPS-NSCs labeled with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine were intracranially implanted in the contralateral hemisphere to the GL261 glioma cell implantation in the allogeneic C57BL/6 mouse. Active migration of both stem cells was observed 7 days after implantation. Again, the iPSCs located in the tumor area expressed Nanog-GFP gene, suggesting that the migrated cells were still iPSCs. These findings demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPS-NSCs had potent glioma tropism and could be candidates as vehicles in stem cell-based glioma therapy.

  2. Development of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transfected tumor cell vaccines for the treatment of spontaneous canine cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogge, G S; Burkholder, J K; Culp, J; Albertini, M R; Dubielzig, R R; Keller, E T; Yang, N S; MacEwen, E G

    1998-09-01

    Cytokine gene-engineered tumor vaccines are currently an area of intense investigation in both basic research and clinical medicine. Our efforts to utilize tumor vaccines in an immunotherapeutic manner involve canines with spontaneous tumors. We hypothesized that canine tumor cells, transfected with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) cDNA in a plasmid vector, would prove nontoxic following intradermal administration, generate biologically relevant levels of protein, effect local histological changes at the sites of vaccination, and create a systemic antitumor response. Sixteen tumor-bearing dogs were admitted to a study of ex vivo gene therapy. Tumor tissue was surgically removed, enzymatically and mechanically dissociated, irradiated, transfected, and intradermally injected back into the patients. The dogs were vaccinated with primary autologous tumor cells transfected with hGM-CSF or a reporter control gene. hGM-CSF protein was detected (0.07 to 14.15 ng/vaccination site) at 24 hr postinjection and dramatic histological changes were observed, characterized by neutrophil and macrophage infiltration at the sites of injection of hGM-CSF-transfected tumor cells. This was in stark contrast to the lesser neutrophilic and eosinophilic infiltrates found at control vaccination sites. Objective evidence of an antitumor response was observed in three animals. These data, in a large animal translational model of spontaneous tumors, demonstrate in vivo biological activity of hGM-CSF-transfected autologous tumor cell vaccines.

  3. Mucin-Based Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan P.; MacMillan, Derek

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated cell surface and secreted glycoproteins . In addition to orchestrating cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interactions in healthy organisms mucins are also the major carriers of altered glycosylation in carcinomas. Tumor-associated antigens displayed by cancer cells comprise oligosaccharide and glycopeptide motifs not encountered in the same locale or at the same frequency in healthy cells, and potentially confer a selective advantage to the tumor. Frequently tumor-associated antigens are under-glycosylated and prematurely sialylated, and it is these relatively simple saccharide and glycopeptide structures that have been targeted to serve as drug candidates in most cases. A major goal is to assemble glycopeptide vaccine candidates based on partial mucin sequences and displaying tumor-associated antigens that can mount a potent immunological tumor-specific response when, in reality, the tumor has already coerced the immune system into a state of co-existence.

  4. Hematologic neoplasms: Dendritic cells vaccines in motion.

    PubMed

    Galati, Domenico; Zanotta, Serena

    2017-09-11

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are bone-marrow-derived immune cells accounted for a key role in cancer vaccination as potent antigen-presenting cells within the immune system. Cancer microenvironment can modulate DCs maturation resulting in their accumulation into functional states associated with a reduced antitumor immune response. In this regard, a successful cancer vaccine needs to mount a potent antitumor immune response able to overcome the immunosuppressive tumor milieu. As a consequence, DCs-based approaches are a safe and promising strategy for improving the therapeutic efficacy in hematological malignancies, particularly in combinations with additional treatments. This review summarizes the most significant evidence about the immunotherapeutic strategies performed to target hematologic neoplasms including the tumoral associated antigens (TAA) pulsed on DCs, whole tumor cell vaccines or leukemia-derived DCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Vaccine therapies against digestive-system cancers].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Mitsuru; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2011-09-01

    Cancer vaccine is a promising tool to achieve therapeutic responses in patients by inducing anti-tumor immunity. Several cancer vaccine trials have been performed in patients with digestive-system cancers. Two major candidates are peptide vaccine and dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. Since their clinical impacts are still limited, extensive studies are underway in order to identify more effective antigens or to potentiate DC functions. We developed a novel DC possessing potent stimulating activity for Th1, CTL, and NK cells, which are desirable for clinical DC vaccines. We performed the clinical trial using such DC for the treatment of colorectal cancer. In some of vaccinated patients, the capacity of NK cells and CTLs was successfully enhanced. Thus, cancer vaccines could be a therapeutic option for digestive-system cancers.

  6. Therapeutic vaccination with an interleukin-2-interferon-gamma-secreting allogeneic tumor vaccine in patients with progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer: a phase I/II trial.

    PubMed

    Brill, Thomas H; Kübler, Hubert R; Pohla, Heike; Buchner, Alexander; Fend, Falko; Schuster, Tibor; van Randenborgh, Heiner; Paul, Roger; Kummer, Tania; Plank, Christian; Eisele, Bernd; Breul, Jürgen; Hartung, Rudolf; Schendel, Dolores J; Gansbacher, Bernd

    2009-12-01

    Immunotherapy with whole cell cancer vaccines has been tested in various tumor types. This study investigated the safety profile and antitumor activity of an allogeneic prostate carcinoma cell line, LNCaP, expressing recombinant human interleukin-2 and human interferon-gamma. Thirty HLA-A*0201-matched patients with progressive, castration-resistant prostate cancer received four intradermal injections on days 1, 15, 29, and 92, and then every 90 days, as long as no tumor progression occurred. Three patients received a dose level of 7.5 million cells, and 27 patients received 15 million cells per injection. The primary study criteria were safety and the difference in prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), determined in the pretreatment phase (before the start of vaccination) and in the trial treatment phase (during vaccination). No dose-limiting or autoimmune toxicity was seen. During vaccination there was a significant prolongation of the PSA-DT compared with the prevaccination period (prolongation from 63 to 114 days; p < 0.01; intention to treat). In addition, results showed a period of PSA stabilization of at least 12 weeks, together with stable bone scans in 12 of 30 patients, and 3 patients sustained a >50% decrease in PSA versus baseline. The median overall survival time from first vaccination was 32 months (mean value, 34 months). Immune monitoring revealed T cell stimulation in the majority of patients. This vaccine strategy was found to be safe and well tolerated and was accompanied by prolongation of PSA-DT. The results of this trial warrant clinical development of this vaccine.

  7. Genetic Immunization with CDR3-Based Fusion Vaccine Confers Protection and Long-Term Tumor-Free Survival in a Mouse Model of Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Pierimarchi, Pasquale; Signori, Emanuela; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Tonon, Giancarlo; Fazio, Vito M.; Rinaldi, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against idiotype is a promising strategy for immunotherapy of B-cell malignancies. We have previously shown that CDR3-based DNA immunization can induce immune response against lymphoma and explored this strategy to provide protection in a murine B-cell lymphoma model. Here we performed vaccination employing as immunogen a naked DNA fusion product. The DNA vaccine was generated following fusion of a sequence derived from tetanus toxin fragment C to the VHCDR3109−116 epitope. Induction of tumor-specific immunity as well as ability to inhibit growth of the aggressive 38C13 lymphoma and to prolong survival of vaccinated mice has been tested. We determined that DNA fusion vaccine induced immune response, elicited a strong protective antitumor immunity, and ensured almost complete long-term tumor-free survival of vaccinated mice. Our results show that CDR3-based DNA fusion vaccines hold promise for vaccination against lymphoma. PMID:20445751

  8. Lymph Node-Targeted Immunotherapy Mediates Potent Immunity Resulting in Regression of Isolated or Metastatic HPV-Transformed Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kent A.; Meisenburg, Brenna L.; Tam, Victor L.; Pagarigan, Robb R.; Wong, Raymond; Joea, Diljeet K.; Lantzy, Liz; Carrillo, Mayra A.; Gross, Todd M.; Malyankar, Uriel M.; Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Da Silva, Diane M.; Kündig, Thomas M.; Kast, W. Martin; Qiu, Zhiyong; Bot, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of a novel immunotherapy strategy resulting in immunity to localized or metastatic HPV 16-transformed murine tumors. Experimental design Animals bearing E7-expressing tumors were co-immunized by lymph node injection with E7 49-57 antigen and TLR3-ligand (synthetic dsRNA). Immune responses were measured by flow cytometry and anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated by tumor size and survival. In situ cytotoxicity assays and identification of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and T regulatory cells were used to assess the mechanisms of treatment resistance in bulky disease. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide was explored to augment immunotherapy in late-stage disease. Results In therapeutic and prophylactic settings, immunization resulted in a considerable expansion of E7 49-57 antigen-specific T lymphocytes in the range of 1/10 CD8+ T cells. The resulting immunity was effective in suppressing disease progression and mortality in a pulmonary metastatic disease model. Therapeutic immunization resulted in control of isolated tumors up to a certain volume, and correlated with anti-tumor immune responses measured in blood. In situ analysis showed that within bulky tumors, T cell function was affected by negative regulatory mechanisms linked to an increase in T regulatory cells and could be overcome by cyclophosphamide treatment in conjunction with immunization. Conclusions This study highlights a novel cancer immunotherapy platform with potential for translatability to the clinic and suggests its potential usefulness for controlling metastatic disease, solid tumors of limited size, or larger tumors when combined with cytotoxic agents that reduce the number of tumor-infiltrating T regulatory cells. PMID:19789304

  9. Targeting Attenuated Interferon-α to Myeloma Cells with a CD38 Antibody Induces Potent Tumor Regression with Reduced Off-Target Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pogue, Sarah L.; Taura, Tetsuya; Bi, Mingying; Yun, Yong; Sho, Angela; Mikesell, Glen; Behrens, Collette; Sokolovsky, Maya; Hallak, Hussein; Rosenstock, Moti; Sanchez, Eric; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Doyle, Anthony; Nock, Steffen; Wilson, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFNα) has been prescribed to effectively treat multiple myeloma (MM) and other malignancies for decades. Its use has waned in recent years, however, due to significant toxicity and a narrow therapeutic index (TI). We sought to improve IFNα’s TI by, first, attaching it to an anti-CD38 antibody, thereby directly targeting it to MM cells, and, second, by introducing an attenuating mutation into the IFNα portion of the fusion protein rendering it relatively inactive on normal, CD38 negative cells. This anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) immunocytokine, or CD38-Attenukine™, exhibits 10,000-fold increased specificity for CD38 positive cells in vitro compared to native IFNα and, significantly, is ~6,000-fold less toxic to normal bone marrow cells in vitro than native IFNα. Moreover, the attenuating mutation significantly decreases IFNα biomarker activity in cynomolgus macaques indicating that this approach may yield a better safety profile in humans than native IFNα or a non-attenuated IFNα immunocytokine. In human xenograft MM tumor models, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) exerts potent anti-tumor activity in mice, inducing complete tumor regression in most cases. Furthermore, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) is more efficacious than standard MM treatments (lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone) and exhibits strong synergy with lenalidomide and with bortezomib in xenograft models. Our findings suggest that tumor-targeted attenuated cytokines such as IFNα can promote robust tumor killing while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27611189

  10. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  11. IL-12 Is an Effective Adjuvant to Recombinant Vaccinia Virus-Based Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Jay B.; Chamberlain, Ronald S.; Bronte, Vincenzo; Carroll, Miles W.; Irvine, Kari R.; Moss, Bernard; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    A number of cytokines and costimulatory molecules involved in immune activation have recently been identified including IL-12, a heterodimeric cytokine that supports the development of cell-mediated immunity, and B7-1, a costimulatory molecule involved in the activation of T lymphocytes. We explored the use of these immunomodulants as molecularly defined adjuvants in the function of recombinant anticancer vaccines using a murine model adenocarcinoma, CT26, transduced with a model Ag, β-galactosidase (β-gal). Although IL-12 given alone to mice bearing tumors established for 3 days did not have consistent antitumor activity, a profound therapeutic effect was observed when IL-12 administration was combined with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) encoding β-gal called VJS6. On the basis of the reported synergistic effects of IL-12 and the costimulatory molecule B7-1 (CD80) in vitro, we immunized mice with a double recombinant vaccinia encoding both the model tumor Ag the costimulatory molecule B7-1, designated B7-1β-gal rVV. The adjuvant administration of IL-12 after immunization with this virus significantly enhanced survival in tumor-bearing animals. T cell subset depletions demonstrated that the in vivo activity of IL-12 was largely independent of CD4+ T lymphocytes, whereas the in vivo activity of a B7-1 rVV required both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to elicit maximal therapeutic effect. To our knowledge, this is the first description of B7-1 and IL-12 cooperation in vivo and represents a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of recombinant anticancer vaccines. PMID:8617961

  12. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier.

    PubMed

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Tada, Seiichi; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2011-12-02

    The ability of carbonate apatite (CO(3)Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO(3)Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO(3)Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO(3)Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-γ by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO(3)Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO(3)Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO(3)Ap. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Allorestricted T lymphocytes with a high avidity T-cell receptor towards NY-ESO-1 have potent anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Holger; Hofer, Kathrin; Conrad, Heinke; Guilaume, Philippe; Müller, Julia; Schiemann, Matthias; Lennerz, Volker; Cosma, Antonio; Peschel, Christian; Busch, Dirk H; Romero, Pedro; Bernhard, Helga

    2009-08-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has been targeted as a tumor-associated antigen by immunotherapeutical strategies, such as cancer vaccines. The prerequisite for a T-cell-based therapy is the induction of T cells capable of recognizing the NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells. In this study, we generated human T lymphocytes directed against the immunodominant NY-ESO-1(157-165) epitope known to be naturally presented with HLA-A*0201. We succeeded to isolate autorestricted and allorestricted T lymphocytes with low, intermediate or high avidity TCRs against the NY-ESO-1 peptide. The avidity of the established CTL populations correlated with their capacity of lysing HLA-A2-positive, NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cell lines derived from different origins, e.g. melanoma and myeloma. The allorestricted NY-ESO-1-specific T lymphocytes displayed TCRs with the highest avidity and best anti-tumor recognition activity. TCRs derived from allorestricted, NY-ESO-1-specific T cells may be useful reagents for redirecting primary T cells by TCR gene transfer and, therefore, may facilitate the development of adoptive transfer regimens based on TCR-transduced T cells for the treatment of NY-ESO-1-expressing hematological malignancies and solid tumors.

  14. Expression of LIGHT/TNFSF14 Combined with Vaccination against Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Induces Significant Tumor Regression

    PubMed Central

    Kanodia, Shreya; Da Silva, Diane M.; Karamanukyan, Tigran; Bogaert, Lies; Fu, Yang-Xin; Kast, W. Martin

    2010-01-01

    LIGHT, a ligand for the lymphotoxin-beta receptor, establishes lymphoid-like tissues inside tumor sites and recruits naïve T-cells into the tumor. However, whether these infiltrating T-cells are specific for tumor antigens is not known. We hypothesized that therapy with LIGHT can expand functional tumor-specific CD8+ T-cells that can be boosted using HPV16E6E7-Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles (HPV16-VRP) and that this combined therapy can eradicate HPV16-induced tumors. Our data show that forced expression of LIGHT in tumors results in an increase in expression of interferon gamma (IFNg) and chemottractant cytokines such as IL-1a, MIG and MIP-2 within the tumor and that this tumor microenvironment correlates with an increase in frequency of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells. Forced expression of LIGHT also results in the expansion of functional T-cells that recognize multiple tumor-antigens, including HPV16 E7, and these T-cells prevent the outgrowth of tumors upon secondary challenge. Subsequent boosting of E7-specific T-cells by vaccination with HPV16-VRP significantly increases their frequency in both the periphery and the tumor, and leads to the eradication of large well-established tumors, for which either treatment alone is not successful. These data establish the safety of Ad-LIGHT as a therapeutic intervention in pre-clinical studies and suggest that patients with HPV16+ tumors may benefit from combined immunotherapy with LIGHT and antigen-specific vaccination. PMID:20460520

  15. Priming of tumor-specific T cells in the draining lymph nodes after immunization with interleukin 2-secreting tumor cells: three consecutive stages may be required for successful tumor vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Maass, G; Schmidt, W; Berger, M; Schilcher, F; Koszik, F; Schneeberger, A; Stingl, G; Birnstiel, M L; Schweighoffer, T

    1995-01-01

    Although both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are clearly required to generate long-lasting anti-tumor immunity induced by s.c. vaccination with interleukin 2 (IL-2)-transfected, irradiated M-3 clone murine melanoma cells, some controversy continues about the site and mode of T-cell activation in this system. Macrophages, granulocytes, and natural killer cells infiltrate the vaccination site early after injection into either syngeneic euthymic DBA/2 mice or athymic nude mice and eliminate the inoculum within 48 hr. We could not find T cells at the vaccination site, which argues against the concept that T-cell priming by the IL-2-secreting cancer cells occurs directly at that location. However, reverse transcription-PCR revealed transcripts indicative of T-cell activation and expansion in the draining lymph nodes of mice immunized with the IL-2-secreting vaccine but not in mice vaccinated with untransfected, irradiated M-3 cells. We therefore propose that the antigen-presenting cells, which invade the vaccination site, process tumor-derived antigens and, subsequently, initiate priming of tumor-specific T lymphocytes in lymphoid organs. These findings suggest a three-stage process for the generation of effector T cells after vaccination with IL-2-secreting tumor cells: (i) tumor-antigen uptake and processing at the site of injection by antigen-presenting cells, (ii) migration of antigen-presenting cells into the regional draining lymph nodes, where T-cell priming occurs, and (iii) circulation of activated T cells that either perform or initiate effector mechanisms leading to tumor cell destruction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777545

  16. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy.

  17. A novel sulindac derivative that potently suppresses colon tumor cell growth by inhibiting cGMP phosphodiesterase and β-catenin transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Jason D; Li, Nan; Tinsley, Heather N; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yonghe; Gary, Bernard D; Keeton, Adam B; Xi, Yaguang; Abadi, Ashraf H; Grizzle, William E; Piazza, Gary A

    2012-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely reported to inhibit tumor growth by a COX-independent mechanism, although alternative targets have not been well defined or used to develop improved drugs for cancer chemoprevention. Here, we characterize a novel sulindac derivative referred to as sulindac benzylamine (SBA) that does not inhibit COX-1 or COX-2, yet potently inhibits the growth and induces the apoptosis of human colon tumor cells. The basis for this activity appears to involve cyclic guanosine 3',5',-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) inhibition as evident by its ability to inhibit cGMP hydrolysis in colon tumor cell lysates and purified cGMP-specific PDE5, increase intracellular cGMP levels, and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase G at concentrations that suppress tumor cell growth. PDE5 was found to be essential for colon tumor cell growth as determined by siRNA knockdown studies, elevated in colon tumor cells as compared with normal colonocytes, and associated with the tumor selectivity of SBA. SBA activation of PKG may suppress the oncogenic activity of β-catenin as evident by its ability to reduce β-catenin nuclear levels, Tcf (T-cell factor) transcriptional activity, and survivin levels. These events preceded apoptosis induction and appear to result from a rapid elevation of intracellular cGMP levels following cGMP PDE inhibition. We conclude that PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious NSAID derivatives for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

  18. Isopentenyl pyrophosphate activated CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes display potent anti-tumor activity towards human squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Alan A.Z.; Maniar, Amudhan; Cummings, Jean-Saville; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Schulze, Dan H.; Gastman, Brian R.; Pauza, C. David; Strome, Scott E.; Chapoval, Andrei I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The expression of CD56, a natural killer (NK) cell-associated molecule, on αβ T lymphocytes correlates with their increased anti-tumor effector function. CD56 is also expressed on a subset of γδ T cells. However, anti-tumor effector functions of CD56+ γδ T cells are poorly characterized. Experimental design To investigate the potential effector role of CD56+ γδ T cells in tumor killing, we employed isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and IL-2 expanded γδ T cells from PBMC of healthy donors. Results Thirty to 70% of IPP+IL-2 expanded γδ T cells express CD56 on their surface. Interestingly, while both CD56+ and CD56− γδ T cells express comparable levels of receptors involved in the regulation of γδ T cell cytotoxicity (e.g. NKG2D and CD94) only CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes are capable of killing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and other solid tumor cell lines. This effect is likely mediated by the enhanced release of cytolytic granules, since CD56+ γδ T lymphocytes expressed higher levels of CD107a compared to CD56− controls, following exposure to tumor cell lines. Lysis of tumor cell lines is blocked by concanomycin A and a combination of anti-γδTCR + anti-NKG2D mAb, suggesting that the lytic activity of CD56+ γδ T cells involves the perforin-granzyme pathway and is mainly γδTCR/NKGD2 dependent. Importantly, CD56 expressing γδ T lymphocytes are resistant to Fas ligand and chemically induced apoptosis. Conclusions Our data indicate that CD56+ γδ T cells are potent anti-tumor effectors capable of killing SCC and may play an important therapeutic role in patients with head and neck cancer and other malignancies. PMID:18594005

  19. A Novel Sulindac Derivative that Potently Suppresses Colon Tumor Cell Growth by Inhibiting cGMP Phosphodiesterase and β-Catenin Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Jason D.; Li, Nan; Tinsley, Heather N.; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yonghe; Gary, Bernard D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Xi, Yaguang; Abadi, Ashraf H.; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely reported to inhibit tumor growth by a COX-independent mechanism, although alternative targets have not been well defined or used to develop improved drugs for cancer chemoprevention. Here, we characterize a novel sulindac derivative referred to as sulindac benzylamine (SBA) that does not inhibit COX-1 or COX-2, yet potently inhibits the growth and induces the apoptosis of human colon tumor cells. The basis for this activity appears to involve cyclic guanosine 3′,5′,-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) inhibition as evident by its ability to inhibit cGMP hydrolysis in colon tumor cell lysates and purified cGMP-specific PDE5, increase intracellular cGMP levels, and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase G at concentrations that suppress tumor cell growth. PDE5 was found to be essential for colon tumor cell growth as determined by siRNA knockdown studies, elevated in colon tumor cells as compared with normal colonocytes, and associated with the tumor selectivity of SBA. SBA activation of PKG may suppress the oncogenic activity of β-catenin as evident by its ability to reduce β-catenin nuclear levels, Tcf (T-cell factor) transcriptional activity, and survivin levels. These events preceded apoptosis induction and appear to result from a rapid elevation of intracellular cGMP levels following cGMP PDE inhibition. We conclude that PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious NSAID derivatives for colorectal cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22556201

  20. Targeting the genital tract mucosa with a lipopeptide/recombinant adenovirus prime/boost vaccine induces potent and long-lasting CD8+ T cell immunity against herpes: importance of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; Benmohamed, Lbachir

    2012-11-01

    Targeting of the mucosal immune system of the genital tract with subunit vaccines has failed to induce potent and durable local CD8(+) T cell immunity, which is crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral pathogens, including HSV type 2 (HSV-2), which causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8(+) T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide vaccine and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8(+) T cell epitope (gB(498-505)), and both were delivered intravaginally in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared with mice immunized with the homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo) vaccine, the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice 1) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells, detected in both the genital tract draining nodes and in the vaginal mucosa; 2) had significantly lower virus titers; 3) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and 4) did not succumb to lethal infection (p < 0.005) after intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. Polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells, producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 and exhibiting cytotoxic activity, were associated with protection (p < 0.005). The protective CD8(+) T cell response was significantly compromised in the absence of the adapter MyD88 (p = 0.0001). Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting of the vaginal mucosa with a Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost vaccine elicits a potent, MyD88-dependent, and long-lasting mucosal CD8(+) T cell protective immunity against sexually transmitted herpes infection and disease.

  1. Intranasal influenza vaccination using a new synthetic mucosal adjuvant SF-10: induction of potent local and systemic immunity with balanced Th1 and Th2 responses.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Takashi; Mizuno, Dai; Takei, Tsunetomo; Kunimi, Takuya; Ono, Shinji; Sakai, Satoko; Kido, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    We found previously that bovine pulmonary Surfacten® used in newborns with acute respiratory distress syndrome is a safe and efficacious antigen vehicle for intranasal vaccination. The objective of this study was to industrially produce a synthetic adjuvant mimicking Surfacten® for clinical use without risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We selected three Surfacten lipids and surfactant protein (SP)-C as essential constituents for adjuvanticity. For replacement of the hydrophobic SP-C, we synthesized SP-related peptides and analyzed their adjuvanticity. We evaluated lyophilization to replace sonication for the binding of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) to the synthetic adjuvant. We also added a carboxy vinyl polymer (CVP) to the synthetic adjuvant and named the mixture as SF-10 adjuvant. HA combined with SF-10 was administered intranasally to mice, and induction of nasal-wash HA-specific secretory IgA (s-IgA) and serum IgG with Th1-/Th2-type cytokine responses in nasal cavity and virus challenge test were assessed. Intranasal immunization with HA-SF-10 induced significantly higher levels of anti-HA-specific nasal-wash s-IgA and serum IgG than those induced by HA-poly(I:C), a reported potent mucosal vaccine, and provided highly efficient protection against lethal doses of virus challenge in mice. Anti-HA-specific serum IgG levels induced by HA-SF-10 were almost equivalent to those induced by subcutaneous immunization of HA twice. Intranasal administration of HA-SF-10 induced balanced anti-HA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a in sera and IFN-γ- and IL-4-producing lymphocytes in nasal cavity without any induction of anti-HA IgE. The results suggest that HA-SF-10 is a promising nasal influenza vaccine and that SF-10 can be supplied in large quantities commercially. © 2013 The authors. Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials. PMID:25625927

  3. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials.

  4. Anti-tumor immunity induced by CDR3-based DNA vaccination in a murine B-cell lymphoma model.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Monica; Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Signori, Emanuela; Pierimarchi, Pasquale; Seripa, Davide; Tonon, Giancarlo; Fazio, Vito Michele

    2008-05-30

    The idiotypic structure present on B-cell neoplasms is a tumor-specific antigen and an attractive target for immunotherapy. Here, the tumor protective effects recruited by CDR3-based DNA vaccines in the poorly immunogenic, highly aggressive 38C13 murine B-cell lymphoma model were evaluated. The regions belonging to the idiotypic V(H) and V(L) CDR3 sequences were chosen for the design of two synthetic mini-genes and arranged in high-level expression plasmids. Syngeneic C3H/HeN mice were immunized by intramuscular electroporation with pV(H)CDR3-IL-2 and pV(L)CDR3-IL-2 naked DNAs. This approach provided protection in about 60% of animals challenged with a 2-fold lethal dose of tumor cells, as opposed to non-survivors in control groups. Furthermore, a long-term survival was induced in these mice since they were still alive and tumor-free 4 months following tumor challenge. Analysis of the humoral immunity revealed the presence of antibodies reactive with the peptides encompassing the CDR3 sequences in the sera of vaccinated mice. Moreover, immune sera specifically reacted with the parental 38C13 tumor cells in flow cytometry assays, indicating that such immunization elicited anti-idiotypic antibodies. These findings provide a basis for exploring the use of CDR3-based DNA vaccines against B-cell lymphoma.

  5. Victory and Defeat in the Induction of a Therapeutic Response through Vaccine Therapy for Human and Canine Brain Tumors: A Review of the State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Michael R.; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Andersen, Brian M.; Shaver, Rob; Waldron, Nate N.; Moertel, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor immunotherapy using tumor lysate–based vaccines has made great advances over recent decades. Cancer vaccines aim to elicit adaptive immune responses through various pathways by providing tumor and tumor-associated antigens with an immune stimulant or adjuvant. These anti-tumor vaccines are therefore developed as personalized treatments. Utilizing tumors as a source of vaccine antigens in immunotherapy has demonstrated promising results with minimal toxicity. However, to date, researchers have failed to overcome the overpowering immune suppressive effects within the tumor microenvironment. Immune suppression occurs naturally via multiple mechanisms. These mechanisms serve an important homeostatic role restoring a normal tissue microenvironment following an inflammatory response. Due to these suppressive mechanisms and the inherent heterogeneity of tumors, it is imperative to then elicit and maintain a specific tumoricidal response if vaccine therapy or some other combination of reagents is chosen. In this review, we focus on the historical use of tumors as a source of antigens to elicit a tumoricidal response and the limitations encountered that prevent greater success in immunotherapy. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of various vaccines and their ineffectiveness due to tumor-induced immune suppression. PMID:25404047

  6. Discovery of [7-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-5-methylbenzo [1,2,4]triazin-3-yl]-[4-(2-pyrrolidin-1-ylethoxy)phenyl]amine--a potent, orally active Src kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor activity in preclinical assays.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Glenn; Barrett, Kathy; Boccia, Antonio; Brodhag, Tessa; Cao, Jianguo; Chow, Chun P; Dneprovskaia, Elena; Doukas, John; Fine, Richard; Gong, Xianchang; Gritzen, Colleen; Gu, Hong; Hanna, Ehab; Hood, John D; Hu, Steven; Kang, Xinshan; Key, Jann; Klebansky, Boris; Kousba, Ahmed; Li, Ge; Lohse, Dan; Mak, Chi Ching; McPherson, Andrew; Palanki, Moorthy S S; Pathak, Ved P; Renick, Joel; Shi, Feng; Soll, Richard; Splittgerber, Ute; Stoughton, Silva; Tang, Suhan; Yee, Shiyin; Zeng, Binqi; Zhao, Ningning; Zhu, Hong

    2007-02-01

    We describe the identification of [7-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-5-methylbenzo [1,2,4]triazin-3-yl]-[4-(2-pyrrolidin-1-ylethoxy)phenyl]amine (3), a potent, orally active Src inhibitor with desirable PK properties, demonstrated activity in human tumor cell lines and in animal models of tumor growth.

  7. Xanthatin, a novel potent inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Yu, Jing; Pei, Chong Gang; Li, Yun Yan; Tu, Ping; Gao, Gui Ping; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer treatment. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, xanthatin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. The biochemical profiles of xanthatin were investigated using kinase assay, migration assay, tube formation, Matrigel plug assay, western blot, immunofluorescence and human tumor xenograft model. Xanthatin significantly inhibited growth, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cell as well as inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated angiogenesis. In addition, it inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator. Moreover, xanthatin directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Oral administration of xanthatin could markedly inhibit human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that xanthatin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate.

  8. Low-Dose Metronomic Cyclophosphamide Combined with Vascular Disrupting Therapy Induces Potent Anti-Tumor Activity in Preclinical Human Tumor Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Daenen, Laura G.; Shaked, Yuval; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Voest, Emile E.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Chaplin, David; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) preferentially target the established but abnormal tumor vasculature, resulting in extensive intratumoral hypoxia and cell death. However, a rim of viable tumor tissue remains from which angiogenesis-dependent regrowth can occur, in part via mobilization and tumor colonization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs). Co-treatment with an agent that blocks CEPs, such as VEGF-pathway targeting biologic antiangiogenic drugs, results in enhanced anti-tumor efficacy. We asked whether an alternative therapeutic modality – low-dose metronomic (LDM) chemotherapy could achieve the same result, given its CEP targeting effects. Experimental Design We studied the combination of the VDA OXi-4503 with daily administration of CEP-inhibiting, low-dose metronomic (LDM) cyclophosphamide to treat primary orthotopic tumors using the 231/LM2-4 breast cancer cell line and MeWo melanoma cell line. In addition, CEP mobilization and various tumor characteristics were assessed. Results We found that daily oral LDM cyclophosphamide was capable of preventing the CEP spike and tumor colonization induced by OXi-4503; this was associated with a decrease in the tumor rim and marked suppression of primary 231/LM2-4 growth in nude as well as SCID mice. Similar results were found in MeWo bearing nude mice. The delay in tumor growth was accompanied by significant decreases in micro-vessel density, perfusion and proliferation, and a significant increase in tumor cell apoptosis. No overt toxicity was observed. Conclusions The combination of OXi-4503 and metronomic chemotherapy results in prolonged tumor control, thereby expanding the list of therapeutic agents that can be successfully integrated with metronomic low-dose chemotherapy. PMID:19825805

  9. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  10. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-06-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers.

  11. Potent activity of soluble B7RP-1-Fc in therapy of murine tumors in syngeneic hosts.

    PubMed

    Ara, Gulshan; Baher, Angelo; Storm, Neal; Horan, Tom; Baikalov, Claudia; Brisan, Emil; Camacho, Reuben; Moore, Alison; Goldman, Hartt; Kohno, Tadahiko; Cattley, Russell C; Van, Gwyneth; Gaida, Kevin; Zhang, Ming; Whoriskey, John S; Fong, David; Yoshinaga, Steven K

    2003-02-10

    We have characterized a receptor:ligand pair, ICOS:B7RP-1, that is structurally and functionally related to CD28:B7.1/2. We reported previously that B7RP-1 costimulates T cell proliferation and immune responses (Yoshinaga et al., Nature 1999;402:827-32; Guo et al., J Immunol 2001;166:5578-84; Yoshinaga et al., Int Immunol 2000;12:1439-47). We report that B7RP-1-Fc causes rejection or growth inhibition of Meth A, SA-1 and EMT6 tumors in syngeneic mice. Established Meth A tumors were rejected effectively with a single dose of B7RP-1-Fc, however, the treatment was less effective on larger tumors. Mice that rejected Meth A tumors previously by Day 30, also rejected a subsequent Meth A challenge on Day 60, without additional B7RP-1-Fc treatment, indicating a long-lived memory response. Tumor cells believed to be less immunogenic, such as P815 and EL-4 cells, were less responsive to this treatment. The EL-4 responsiveness to the B7RP-1-Fc treatment was enhanced, however, by pre-treatment of the mice with cyclophosphamide. As expected, T cells appeared to be targeted by B7RP-1-Fc treatment. Thus, the administration of soluble B7RP-1-Fc may have therapeutic value in generating or enhancing anti-tumor activity in a clinical setting. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Modification of sPD1 with CRT induces potent anti-tumor immune responses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongze; Li, Zhiying; Tian, Huiqun; Wu, Wei; Liu, Chaoqi

    2015-12-01

    As a key factor for tumor occurrence and development, tumor cells escape immune surveillance and inhibit the body immune killer effect through negative signaling pathways. In this research, we designed and expressed the fusion protein CRT-sPD1 to block PD1/PDL1 negative signal pathway, indirectly bind CRT to the tumor cell surface and to increase the cell immunogenicity activity. Results from western blotting, flow cytometry (FCM) and ELISA showed that the cell lines that stably express CRT, PD1 and CRT-sPD1 protein were obtained and the transfected cellular supernatant contained PD1 and CRT-sPD1 could bind to PDL1 on the surface of EL4 cells. Vitro experiments indicated the secreted mCRT-sPD1 protein could bind to PDL1 and enhance lymphocyte proliferation and CTL activity. We also found that fusion protein CRT-sPD1 could activate and induce the immune system to kill the tumor cells, specifically inhibit the tumor growth and prolong the survival period in mouse tumor model. And all these suggested that CRT-sPD1 could be used as drug development and utilization of cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Selective inhibition of EZH2 by ZLD1039 blocks H3K27methylation and leads to potent anti-tumor activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuejiao; Gao, Tiantao; Wang, Ningyu; Feng, Qiang; You, Xinyu; Ye, Tinghong; Lei, Qian; Zhu, Yongxia; Xiong, Menghua; Xia, Yong; Yang, Fangfang; Shi, Yaojie; Wei, Yuquan; Zhang, Lidan; Yu, Luoting

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a candidate oncogenic driver due to its prevalent overexpression and aberrant repression of tumor suppressor genes in diverse cancers. Therefore, blocking EZH2 enzyme activity may present a valid therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers with EZH2 overexpression including breast cancers. Here, we described ZLD1039 a potent, highly selective, and orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of EZH2, which inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis. ZLD1039 considerably inhibited EZH2 methyltransferase activity with nanomolar potency, decreased global histone-3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation, and reactivated silenced tumor suppressors connected to increased survival of patients with breast cancer. Comparable to conditional silencing of EZH2, its inhibition by ZLD1039 decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis. Comparably, treatment of xenograft-bearing mice with ZLD1039 led to tumor growth regression and metastasis inhibition. These data confirmed the dependency of breast cancer progression on EZH2 activity and the usefulness of ZLD1039 as a promising treatment for breast cancer. PMID:26868841

  14. A Novel Sulindac Derivative That Does Not Inhibit Cyclooxygenases but Potently Inhibits Colon Tumor Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis with Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gary A.; Keeton, Adam B.; Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Whitt, Jason D.; Mathew, Bini; Thaiparambil, Jose; Coward, Lori; Gorman, Gregory; Li, Yonghe; Sani, Brahma; Hobrath, Judith V.; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y.; Reynolds, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as sulindac have shown promising antineoplastic activity, although toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis limits their use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the mechanism responsible for their antineoplastic activity may be COX independent. To selectively design out the COX inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide (SS), in silico modeling studies were done that revealed the crucial role of the carboxylate moiety for COX-1 and COX-2 binding. These studies prompted the synthesis of a series of SS derivatives with carboxylate modifications that were screened for tumor cell growth and COX inhibitory activity. A SS amide (SSA) with a N,N-dimethylethyl amine substitution was found to lack COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity, yet potently inhibit the growth of human colon tumor cell lines, HT-29, SW480, and HCT116 with IC50 values of 2 to 5 µmol/L compared with 73 to 85 µmol/L for SS. The mechanism of growth inhibition involved the suppression of DNA synthesis and apoptosis induction. Oral administration of SSA was well-tolerated in mice and generated plasma levels that exceeded its in vitro IC50 for tumor growth inhibition. In the human HT-29 colon tumor xenograft mouse model, SSA significantly inhibited tumor growth at a dosage of 250 mg/kg. Combined treatment of SSA with the chemotherapeutic drug, Camptosar, caused a more sustained suppression of tumor growth compared with Camptosar treatment alone. These results indicate that SSA has potential safety and efficacy advantages for colon cancer chemoprevention as well as utility for treating malignant disease if combined with chemotherapy. PMID:19470791

  15. A novel sulindac derivative that does not inhibit cyclooxygenases but potently inhibits colon tumor cell growth and induces apoptosis with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gary A; Keeton, Adam B; Tinsley, Heather N; Gary, Bernard D; Whitt, Jason D; Mathew, Bini; Thaiparambil, Jose; Coward, Lori; Gorman, Gregory; Li, Yonghe; Sani, Brahma; Hobrath, Judith V; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y; Reynolds, Robert C

    2009-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as sulindac have shown promising antineoplastic activity, although toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis limits their use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the mechanism responsible for their antineoplastic activity may be COX independent. To selectively design out the COX inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide (SS), in silico modeling studies were done that revealed the crucial role of the carboxylate moiety for COX-1 and COX-2 binding. These studies prompted the synthesis of a series of SS derivatives with carboxylate modifications that were screened for tumor cell growth and COX inhibitory activity. A SS amide (SSA) with a N,N-dimethylethyl amine substitution was found to lack COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity, yet potently inhibit the growth of human colon tumor cell lines, HT-29, SW480, and HCT116 with IC(50) values of 2 to 5 micromol/L compared with 73 to 85 micromol/L for SS. The mechanism of growth inhibition involved the suppression of DNA synthesis and apoptosis induction. Oral administration of SSA was well-tolerated in mice and generated plasma levels that exceeded its in vitro IC(50) for tumor growth inhibition. In the human HT-29 colon tumor xenograft mouse model, SSA significantly inhibited tumor growth at a dosage of 250 mg/kg. Combined treatment of SSA with the chemotherapeutic drug, Camptosar, caused a more sustained suppression of tumor growth compared with Camptosar treatment alone. These results indicate that SSA has potential safety and efficacy advantages for colon cancer chemoprevention as well as utility for treating malignant disease if combined with chemotherapy.

  16. Anti-CCR7 therapy exerts a potent anti-tumor activity in a xenograft model of human mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine receptor CCR7 mediates lymphoid dissemination of many cancers, including lymphomas and epithelial carcinomas, thus representing an attractive therapeutic target. Previous results have highlighted the potential of the anti-CCR7 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit migration in transwell assays. The present study aimed to evaluate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of an anti-CCR7 antibody in a xenografted human mantle cell lymphoma model. Methods NOD/SCID mice were either subcutaneously or intravenously inoculated with Granta-519 cells, a human cell line derived from a leukemic mantle cell lymphoma. The anti-CCR7 mAb treatment (3 × 200 μg) was started on day 2 or 7 to target lymphoma cells in either a peri-implantation or a post-implantation stage, respectively. Results The anti-CCR7 therapy significantly delayed the tumor appearance and also reduced the volumes of tumors in the subcutaneous model. Moreover, an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells was detected in mice treated with the anti-CCR7 mAb compared to the untreated animals. In addition, significantly reduced number of Granta-519 cells migrated from subcutaneous tumors to distant lymphoid organs, such as bone marrow and spleen in the anti-CCR7 treated mice. In the intravenous models, the anti-CCR7 mAb drastically increased survival of the mice. Accordingly, dissemination and infiltration of tumor cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including lungs and central nervous system, was almost abrogated. Conclusions The anti-CCR7 mAb exerts a potent anti-tumor activity and might represent an interesting therapeutic alternative to conventional therapies. PMID:24305507

  17. Local Salmonella immunostimulation recruits vaccine-specific CD8 T cells and increases regression of bladder tumor

    PubMed Central

    Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Hojeij, Rim; Reggi, Erica; Derré, Laurent; Chevalier, Mathieu F; Romero, Pedro; Jichlinski, Patrice; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of antitumoral responses can be increased using combinatorial vaccine strategies. We recently showed that vaccination could be optimized by local administration of diverse molecular or bacterial agents to target and augment antitumoral CD8 T cells in the genital mucosa (GM) and increase regression of cervical cancer in an animal model. Non muscle-invasive bladder cancer is another disease that is easily amenable to local therapies. In contrast to data obtained in the GM, in this study we show that intravesical (IVES) instillation of synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists only modestly induced recruitment of CD8 T cells to the bladder. However, IVES administration of Ty21a, a live bacterial vaccine against typhoid fever, was much more effective and increased the number of total and vaccine-specific CD8 T cells in the bladder approximately 10 fold. Comparison of chemokines induced in the bladder by either CpG (a TLR-9 agonist) or Ty21a highlighted the preferential increase in complement component 5a, CXCL5, CXCL2, CCL8, and CCL5 by Ty21a, suggesting their involvement in the attraction of T cells to the bladder. IVES treatment with Ty21a after vaccination also significantly increased tumor regression compared to vaccination alone, resulting in 90% survival in an orthotopic murine model of bladder cancer expressing a prototype tumor antigen. Our data demonstrate that combining vaccination with local immunostimulation may be an effective treatment strategy for different types of cancer and also highlight the great potential of the Ty21a vaccine, which is routinely used worldwide, in such combinatorial therapies. PMID:26140240

  18. Sipuleucel-T: Prototype for development of anti-tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Carballido, Estrella; Fishman, Mayer

    2011-04-01

    Prostate cancer immunotherapy officially debuted with the recent FDA approval of Sipuleucel-T. The novel trend of cancer immunotherapy relies on the identification of particular tumor-associated antigens, like prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP). Sipuleucel-T consists of autologous dendritic cells activated in vitro with recombinant fusion protein PA2024, PAP-linked to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Sipuleucel-T represents a prototype for the development of cancer vaccines. Preclinical and clinical data as well as landmark studies for the existing narrow chemotherapy alternatives and early immunotherapy trials will be discussed. The pivotal trial demonstrated a 4.1-month difference of median survival, but with no effect on time to progression in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant patients. Several immunologic effects were observed in the treated population, including antibody and T cell-specific activity to P2024 and PAP. With all new therapies the extent of clinical and objective benefits versus encountered limitations should be evaluated. This review highlights the events and decisions in the process of the development of Sipuleucel-T. We discuss how this successful immunotherapy outcome challenges us to use it as a starting point for variations to or try to amplify practical anticancer progress within the antitumor vaccine paradigm.

  19. Eradication of established murine tumors using a novel cell-free vaccine: dendritic cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, L; Regnault, A; Lozier, A; Wolfers, J; Flament, C; Tenza, D; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Raposo, G; Amigorena, S

    1998-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells with the unique capacity to induce primary and secondary immune responses in vivo. Here, we show that DCs secrete antigen presenting vesicles, called exosomes, which express functional Major Histocompatibility Complex class I and class II, and T-cell costimulatory molecules. Tumor peptide-pulsed DC-derived exosomes prime specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vivo and eradicate or suppress growth of established murine tumors in a T cell-dependent manner. Exosome-based cell-free vaccines represent an alternative to DC adoptive therapy for suppressing tumor growth.

  20. A tetravalent bispecific TandAb (CD19/CD3), AFM11, efficiently recruits T cells for the potent lysis of CD19+ tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Uwe; Duell, Johannes; Ellwanger, Kristina; Herbrecht, Carmen; Knackmuss, Stefan HJ; Fucek, Ivica; Eser, Markus; McAleese, Fionnuala; Molkenthin, Vera; Le Gall, Fabrice; Topp, Max; Little, Melvyn; Zhukovsky, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    To harness the potent tumor-killing capacity of T cells for the treatment of CD19+ malignancies, we constructed AFM11, a humanized tetravalent bispecific CD19/CD3 tandem diabody (TandAb) consisting solely of Fv domains. The molecule exhibits good manufacturability and stability properties. AFM11 has 2 binding sites for CD3 and 2 for CD19, an antigen that is expressed from early B cell development through differentiation into plasma cells, and is an attractive alternative to CD20 as a target for the development of therapeutic antibodies to treat B cell malignancies. Comparison of the binding and cytotoxicity of AFM11 with those of a tandem scFv bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) molecule targeting the same antigens revealed that AFM11 elicited more potent in vitro B cell lysis. Though possessing high affinity to CD3, the TandAb mediates serial-killing of CD19+ cells with little dependence of potency or efficacy upon effector:target ratio, unlike the BiTE. The advantage of the TandAb over the BiTE was most pronounced at lower effector:target ratios. AFM11 mediated strictly target-dependent T cell activation evidenced by CD25 and CD69 induction, proliferation, and cytokine release, notwithstanding bivalent CD3 engagement. In a NOD/scid xenograft model, AFM11 induced dose-dependent growth inhibition of Raji tumors in vivo, and radiolabeled TandAb exhibited excellent localization to tumor but not to normal tissue. After intravenous administration in mice, half-life ranged from 18.4 to 22.9 h. In a human ex vivo B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia study, AFM11 exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity in an autologous setting. Thus, AFM11 may represent a promising therapeutic for treatment of CD19+ malignancies with an advantageous safety risk profile and anticipated dosing regimen. PMID:25875246

  1. A tetravalent bispecific TandAb (CD19/CD3), AFM11, efficiently recruits T cells for the potent lysis of CD19(+) tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Uwe; Duell, Johannes; Ellwanger, Kristina; Herbrecht, Carmen; Knackmuss, Stefan Hj; Fucek, Ivica; Eser, Markus; McAleese, Fionnuala; Molkenthin, Vera; Gall, Fabrice Le; Topp, Max; Little, Melvyn; Zhukovsky, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    To harness the potent tumor-killing capacity of T cells for the treatment of CD19(+) malignancies, we constructed AFM11, a humanized tetravalent bispecific CD19/CD3 tandem diabody (TandAb) consisting solely of Fv domains. The molecule exhibits good manufacturability and stability properties. AFM11 has 2 binding sites for CD3 and 2 for CD19, an antigen that is expressed from early B cell development through differentiation into plasma cells, and is an attractive alternative to CD20 as a target for the development of therapeutic antibodies to treat B cell malignancies. Comparison of the binding and cytotoxicity of AFM11 with those of a tandem scFv bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) molecule targeting the same antigens revealed that AFM11 elicited more potent in vitro B cell lysis. Though possessing high affinity to CD3, the TandAb mediates serial-killing of CD19(+) cells with little dependence of potency or efficacy upon effector:target ratio, unlike the BiTE. The advantage of the TandAb over the BiTE was most pronounced at lower effector:target ratios. AFM11 mediated strictly target-dependent T cell activation evidenced by CD25 and CD69 induction, proliferation, and cytokine release, notwithstanding bivalent CD3 engagement. In a NOD/scid xenograft model, AFM11 induced dose-dependent growth inhibition of Raji tumors in vivo, and radiolabeled TandAb exhibited excellent localization to tumor but not to normal tissue. After intravenous administration in mice, half-life ranged from 18.4 to 22.9 h. In a human ex vivo B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia study, AFM11 exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity in an autologous setting. Thus, AFM11 may represent a promising therapeutic for treatment of CD19(+) malignancies with an advantageous safety risk profile and anticipated dosing regimen.

  2. Vaccination With Patient-Specific Tumor-Derived Antigen in First Remission Improves Disease-Free Survival in Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Stephen J.; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Gause, Barry L.; Janik, John E.; Muggia, Franco M.; Gockerman, Jon P.; Winter, Jane N.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; McGaughey, Dean S.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Chong, Elise A.; Reynolds, Craig W.; Berry, Donald A.; Santos, Carlos F.; Popa, Mihaela A.; McCord, Amy M.; Kwak, Larry W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Vaccination with hybridoma-derived autologous tumor immunoglobulin (Ig) idiotype (Id) conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and administered with granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces follicular lymphoma (FL) –specific immune responses. To determine the clinical benefit of this vaccine, we conducted a double-blind multicenter controlled phase III trial. Patients and Methods Treatment-naive patients with advanced stage FL achieving complete response (CR) or CR unconfirmed (CRu) after chemotherapy were randomly assigned two to one to receive either Id vaccine (Id-KLH + GM-CSF) or control (KLH + GM-CSF). Primary efficacy end points were disease-free survival (DFS) for all randomly assigned patients and DFS for randomly assigned patients receiving at least one dose of Id vaccine or control. Results Of 234 patients enrolled, 177 (81%) achieved CR/CRu after chemotherapy and were randomly assigned. For 177 randomly assigned patients, including 60 patients not vaccinated because of relapse (n = 55) or other reasons (n = 5), median DFS between Id-vaccine and control arms was 23.0 versus 20.6 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.16; P = .256). For 117 patients who received Id vaccine (n = 76) or control (n = 41), median DFS after randomization was 44.2 months for Id-vaccine arm versus 30.6 months for control arm (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.99; P = .047) at median follow-up of 56.6 months (range, 12.6 to 89.3 months). In an unplanned subgroup analysis, median DFS was significantly prolonged for patients receiving IgM-Id (52.9 v 28.7 months; P = .001) but not IgG-Id vaccine (35.1 v 32.4 months; P = .807) compared with isotype-matched control-treated patients. Conclusion Vaccination with patient-specific hybridoma-derived Id vaccine after chemotherapy-induced CR/CRu may prolong DFS in patients with FL. Vaccine isotype may affect clinical outcome and explain differing results between this and other

  3. Development of a successful antitumor therapeutic model combining in vivo dendritic cell vaccination with tumor irradiation and intratumoral GM-CSF delivery.

    PubMed

    Driessens, Gregory; Nuttin, Lise; Gras, Alain; Maetens, Julie; Mievis, Stephane; Schoore, Marylène; Velu, Thierry; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Préat, Véronique; Bruyns, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    Vaccination of dendritic cells (DC) combined with GM-CSF secreting tumor cells has shown good therapeutic efficacy in several tumor models. Nevertheless, the engineering of GM-CSF secreting tumor cell line could represent a tedious step limiting its application for treatment in patients. We therefore developed in rats, an "all in vivo" strategy of combined vaccination using an in vivo local irradiation of the tumor as a source of tumor antigens for DC vaccines and an exogenous source of GM-CSF. We report here that supplying recombinant mGM-CSF by local injections or surgical implantation of osmotic pumps did not allow reproducing the therapeutic efficacy observed with in vitro prepared combined vaccines. To bypass this limitation possibly due to the short half-life of recombinant GM-CSF, we have generated adeno-associated virus coding for mGM-CSF and tested their efficacy to transduce tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo vaccines combining local irradiation and AAV2/1-mGM-CSF vectors showed high therapeutic efficacy allowing to cure 60% of the rats with pre-implanted tumors, as previously observed with in vitro prepared vaccines. Same efficacy has been observed with a second generation of vaccines combining DC, local tumor irradiation, and the controlled supply of recombinant mGM-CSF in poloxamer 407, a biocompatible thermoreversible hydrogel. By generating a successful "all in vivo" vaccination protocol combining tumor radiotherapy with DC vaccines and a straightforward supply of GM-CSF, we have developed a therapeutic strategy easily translatable to clinic that could become accessible to a much bigger number of cancer patients.

  4. A fully human chimeric antigen receptor with potent activity against cancer cells but reduced risk for off-tumor toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Song, De-Gang; Ye, Qunrui; Poussin, Mathilde; Liu, Lin; Figini, Mariangela; Powell, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells against antigen-expressing tumors in an HLA-independent manner. To date, various CARs have been constructed using mouse single chain antibody variable fragments (scFvs) of high affinity that are immunogenic in humans and have the potential to mediate “on-target” toxicity. Here, we developed and evaluated a fully human CAR comprised of the human C4 folate receptor-alpha (αFR)-specific scFv coupled to intracellular T cell signaling domains. Human T cells transduced to express the C4 CAR specifically secreted proinflammatory cytokine and exerted cytolytic functions when cultured with αFR-expressing tumors in vitro. Adoptive transfer of C4 CAR T cells mediated the regression of large, established human ovarian cancer in a xenogeneic mouse model. Relative to a murine MOv19 scFv-based αFR CAR, C4 CAR T cells mediated comparable cytotoxic tumor activity in vitro and in vivo but had lower affinity for αFR protein and exhibited reduced recognition of normal cells expressing low levels of αFR. Thus, T cells expressing a fully human CAR of intermediate affinity can efficiently kill antigen-expressing tumors in vitro and in vivo and may overcome issues of transgene immunogenicity and “on-target off-tumor” toxicity that plague trials utilizing CARs containing mouse-derived, high affinity scFvs. PMID:26101914

  5. STING activator c-di-GMP enhances the anti-tumor effects of peptide vaccines in melanoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zili; Celis, Esteban

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic vaccines to induce anti-tumor CD8 T cells have been used in clinical trials for advanced melanoma patients, but the clinical response rate and overall survival time have not improved much. We believe that these dismal outcomes are caused by inadequate number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells generated by most vaccines. In contrast, huge CD8 T cell responses readily occur during acute viral infections. High levels of type-I interferon (IFN-I) are produced during these infections, and this cytokine not only exhibits anti-viral activity but also promotes CD8 T cell responses. The studies described here were performed to determine whether promoting the production of IFN-I could enhance the potency of a peptide vaccine. We report that cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which activates the stimulator of interferon genes, potentiated the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of a peptide vaccine against mouse B16 melanoma. The synergistic effects of c-di-GMP required co-administration of costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody, the adjuvant poly-IC, and were mediated in part by IFN-I. These findings demonstrate that peptides representing CD8 T cell epitopes can be effective inducers of large CD8 T cell responses in vaccination strategies that mimic acute viral infections.

  6. [HPV DNA vaccines expressing recombinant CRT/HPV6bE7 fusion protein inhibit tumor growth and angiogenic activity].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Cheng, Hao; Zhao, Ke-Jia; Zhu, Ke-Jian; Zhang, Xing

    2007-11-01

    This paper was to study the angiogenic inhibitory effect and the potential antitumor effect of the constructed recombinant DNA vaccine CRT/HPV6bE7 in vivo. The C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated respectively with recombinant CRT/HPV6bE7 DNA plamids. The inhibitory effects on angiogenesis of generated vaccines in vivo were evaluated by a bFGF-induced angiogenesis assay using the Matrigel kit. To investigate the potential antitumor effect, the mean tumor weights, sizes and tumor appearing times were measured in C57BL/6 mice treated with HPV6bE7-expressing B16 cells. The results indicated that the recombinants CRT180/HPV6bE7 and CRT180 showed strong anti-angiogenic effects in bFGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, CRT180/HPV6bE7 and CRT180 DNA vaccines could significantly inhibit the tumor growth in tumor challenge experiment, and CRT180/HPV6bE7 was superior to other vaccines in delaying tumor formation time, limiting tumor size and weight in tumor protection experiment. In conclusion, recombinant CRT180/HPV6bE7 DNA could elicit a most efficient anti-angiogenic effect and inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with DNA vaccines. The antiangiogenic activity of CRT were suggested residing in a domain between CRT 120-180 aa.

  7. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mameri, Samir; Dong, Jihu; Salomé, Christophe; Chen, Wanyin; El-Habr, Elias A.; Bousson, Fanny; Sy, Mohamadou; Obszynski, Julie; Boh, Alexandre; Villa, Pascal; Assad Kahn, Suzana; Didier, Bruno; Bagnard, Dominique; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM), the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication. PMID:26270679

  8. Mitochondrial ASncmtRNA-1 and ASncmtRNA-2 as potent targets to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in the RenCa murine renal adenocarcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Borgna, Vincenzo; Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Verónica A.; Belmar, Sebastián; Araya, Mariela; Jeldes, Emanuel; Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Villota, Claudio; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Castillo, Octavio; Burzio, Luis O.

    2017-01-01

    Knockdown of antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptosis in several human and mouse tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for a selective therapy against different types of cancer. Here we show that in vitro knockdown of murine ASncmtRNAs induces apoptotic death of mouse renal adenocarcinoma RenCa cells, but not normal murine kidney epithelial cells. In a syngeneic subcutaneous RenCa model, treatment delayed and even reversed tumor growth. Since the subcutaneous model does not reflect the natural microenviroment of renal cancer, we used an orthotopic model of RenCa cells inoculated under the renal capsule. These studies showed inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. Direct metastasis assessment by tail vein injection of RenCa cells also showed a drastic reduction in lung metastatic nodules. In vivo treatment reduces survivin, N-cadherin and P-cadherin levels, providing a molecular basis for metastasis inhibition. In consequence, the treatment significantly enhanced mouse survival in these models. Our results suggest that the ASncmtRNAs could be potent and selective targets for therapy against human renal cell carcinoma. PMID:28620146

  9. Mitochondrial ASncmtRNA-1 and ASncmtRNA-2 as potent targets to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in the RenCa murine renal adenocarcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Borgna, Vincenzo; Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Verónica A; Belmar, Sebastián; Araya, Mariela; Jeldes, Emanuel; Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Villota, Claudio; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Castillo, Octavio; Burzio, Luis O

    2017-07-04

    Knockdown of antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptosis in several human and mouse tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for a selective therapy against different types of cancer. Here we show that in vitro knockdown of murine ASncmtRNAs induces apoptotic death of mouse renal adenocarcinoma RenCa cells, but not normal murine kidney epithelial cells. In a syngeneic subcutaneous RenCa model, treatment delayed and even reversed tumor growth. Since the subcutaneous model does not reflect the natural microenviroment of renal cancer, we used an orthotopic model of RenCa cells inoculated under the renal capsule. These studies showed inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. Direct metastasis assessment by tail vein injection of RenCa cells also showed a drastic reduction in lung metastatic nodules. In vivo treatment reduces survivin, N-cadherin and P-cadherin levels, providing a molecular basis for metastasis inhibition. In consequence, the treatment significantly enhanced mouse survival in these models. Our results suggest that the ASncmtRNAs could be potent and selective targets for therapy against human renal cell carcinoma.

  10. Potent suppressive activity of pheophytin a and b from the non-polyphenolic fraction of green tea (Camellia sinensis) against tumor promotion in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Higashi-Okai, K; Otani, S; Okai, Y

    1998-07-17

    Chlorophyll-related compounds pheophytin a and b have been recently identified as antigenotoxic substances in the non-polyphenolic fraction of green tea (Camellia sinensis), which suppressed umu C gene expression in tester bacteria induced by various genotoxins (Okai and Higashi-Okai, Cancer Lett. 118 (1997) 117-123). In the present study, the authors analyzed in vivo and in vitro effects of pheophytin a and b from the non-polyphenolic fraction of green tea on tumor promotion in mouse skin as follows. (1) When pheophytin a and b from green tea were topically applied prior to each treatment with a tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on BALB/c mouse skin initiated by 7,12 dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), they caused suppression in a dose-dependent fashion against skin tumorigenesis. (2) Pheophytin a and b exhibited significant suppressions against TPA-induced inflammatory reaction, such as edema formation, in BALB/c mouse ear skin in a dose-dependent manner. (3) Pheophytin a and b from green tea showed inhibitory effects against early induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in BALB/c mouse skin fibroblasts caused by TPA. These results suggest that pheophytin a and b from the non-polyphenolic fraction have potent suppressive activities against tumor promotion in mouse skin.

  11. Chemical Library Screening and Structure-Function Relationship Studies Identify Bisacodyl as a Potent and Selective Cytotoxic Agent Towards Quiescent Human Glioblastoma Tumor Stem-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeniou, Maria; Fève, Marie; Mameri, Samir; Dong, Jihu; Salomé, Christophe; Chen, Wanyin; El-Habr, Elias A; Bousson, Fanny; Sy, Mohamadou; Obszynski, Julie; Boh, Alexandre; Villa, Pascal; Assad Kahn, Suzana; Didier, Bruno; Bagnard, Dominique; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Haiech, Jacques; Hibert, Marcel; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells reside in hypoxic and slightly acidic tumor niches. Such microenvironments favor more aggressive undifferentiated phenotypes and a slow growing "quiescent state" which preserves them from chemotherapeutic agents that essentially target proliferating cells. Our objective was to identify compounds active on glioblastoma stem-like cells, including under conditions that mimick those found in vivo within this most severe and incurable form of brain malignancy. We screened the Prestwick Library to identify cytotoxic compounds towards glioblastoma stem-like cells, either in a proliferating state or in more slow-growing "quiescent" phenotype resulting from non-renewal of the culture medium in vitro. Compound effects were assessed by ATP-level determination using a cell-based assay. Twenty active molecules belonging to different pharmacological classes have thus been identified. Among those, the stimulant laxative drug bisacodyl was the sole to inhibit in a potent and specific manner the survival of quiescent glioblastoma stem-like cells. Subsequent structure-function relationship studies led to identification of 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl-2-pyridyl-methane (DDPM), the deacetylated form of bisacodyl, as the pharmacophore. To our knowledge, bisacodyl is currently the only known compound targeting glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells in their quiescent, more resistant state. Due to its known non-toxicity in humans, bisacodyl appears as a new potential anti-tumor agent that may, in association with classical chemotherapeutic compounds, participate in tumor eradication.

  12. A rationally designed combined treatment with an alphavirus-based cancer vaccine, sunitinib and low-dose tumor irradiation completely blocks tumor development.

    PubMed

    Draghiciu, Oana; Boerma, Annemarie; Hoogeboom, Baukje Nynke; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2015-10-01

    The clinical efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines remains limited. For effective immunotherapeutic responses in cancer patients, multimodal approaches capable of both inducing antitumor immune responses and bypassing tumor-mediated immune escape seem essential. Here, we report on a combination therapy comprising sunitinib (40 mg/kg), single low-dose (14 Gy) tumor irradiation and immunization with a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on a Semliki Forest virus vector encoding the oncoproteins E6 and E7 of human papillomavirus (SFVeE6,7). We previously demonstrated that either low-dose irradiation or sunitinib in single combination with SFVeE6,7 immunizations enhanced the intratumoral ratio of antitumor effector cells to myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). On the basis of these results we designed a triple treatment combinatorial regimen. The trimodal sunitinib, low-dose irradiation and SFVeE6,7 immunization therapy resulted in stronger intratumoral MDSC depletion than sunitinib alone. Concomitantly, the highest levels of intratumoral E7-specific CD8(+) T cells were attained after triple treatment. Approximately 75% of these cells were positive for the early activation marker CD69. The combination of sunitinib, low-dose tumor irradiation and SFVeE6,7 immunization dramatically changed the intratumoral immune compartment. Whereas control tumors contained 0.02 E7-specific CD8(+) T cells per MDSC, triple treatment tumors contained more than 200 E7-specific CD8(+) T cells per MDSC, a 10,000-fold increased ratio. As a result, the triple treatment strongly enhanced the immunotherapeutic antitumor effect, blocking tumor development altogether and leading to 100% tumor-free survival of tumor-bearing mice. This study demonstrates that this multimodal approach elicits superior antitumor effects and should be considered for clinical applications.

  13. Synergy of SOCS-1 Inhibition and Microbial-Based Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    AD ____________ __ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0292 TITLE: Synergy of SOCS-1 Inhibition and Microbial-Based Cancer Vaccines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Synergy of SOCS-1 Inhibition and Microbial-Based Cancer Vaccines Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81 XWH-12-1 -0292 Sc...growth or even complete eradication of the tumor. Vaccines capable of teaching the immune system to recognize cancer cells must be extremely potent

  14. Immune response to influenza vaccination in children treated with methotrexate or/and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Andreas; Sauvain, Marie-Josèphe; Aebi, Christoph; Otth, Margrit; Bolt, Isabel B

    2011-12-01

    In children treated with immunosuppressive medication such as methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors, additional immunizations are recommended because of increased susceptibility to infections. However, it is unclear if adequate antibody response to vaccinations can be established in children receiving methotrexate and/or TNF-α inhibitors. In a prospective open label study, we assessed seroprotection and seroconversion following influenza vaccination during 2 seasons (6 strains) in 36 children with autoimmune disease treated either with methotrexate (n=18), TNF-α inhibitors (n=10) or both (n=8) and a control group of 16 immunocompetent children. Influenza antibody titers were determined by hemagglutinin inhibition assay, before and 4-8 weeks after vaccination. Post-vaccination seroprotection (defined as a titer ≥1:40) did not significantly differ between immunosuppressed and immunocompetent subjects. Seroconversion, defined as the change from a nonprotective (< 1:40) to a protective titer (≥1:40) with at least a 4-fold titer increase, was less likely to occur in immunosuppressed patients, although no significant difference from the control group was established. Safety evaluation of vaccination showed no serious adverse events. Children receiving methotrexate and/or TNF-α inhibitors can be safely and effectively immunized against influenza, with a seroprotection after vaccination comparable to immunocompetent children.

  15. Cholera toxin, a potent inducer of epidermal hyperplasia but with no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, T.; Chida, K.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, Y.

    1986-05-29

    Intracutaneous injection of cholera toxin into mice induced epidermal hyperplasia to a greater extent than 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate. It also induced adenylate cyclase and through weakly, ornithine decarboxylase of the epidermis. Cholera toxin, however, showed no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis. In the single stage promotion, cholera toxin (50 ng) was injected once a week for 10 weeks into the skin of SENCAR mice initiated with 25 ..mu..g 7,12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene, but no tumors developed. In the two-stage promotion test, cholera toxin (10-100 ng) was injected for one or two weeks into the initiated skin and then mezerein (4 ..mu..g) was applied twice a week for 18 weeks, but the toxin did not increase incidence or numbers of papillomas.

  16. Tuning sensitivity of CAR to EGFR density limits recognition of normal tissue while maintaining potent anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Hillary G.; Hurton, Lenka V.; Najjar, Amer; Rushworth, David; Ang, Sonny; Olivares, Simon; Mi, Tiejuan; Switzer, Kirsten; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Heimberger, Amy B.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Many tumors over express tumor-associated antigens relative to normal tissue, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This limits targeting by human T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) due to potential for deleterious recognition of normal cells. We sought to generate CAR+ T cells capable of distinguishing malignant from normal cells based on the disparate density of EGFR expression by generating two CARs from monoclonal antibodies which differ in affinity. T cells with low affinity Nimo-CAR selectively targeted cells over-expressing EGFR, but exhibited diminished effector function as the density of EGFR decreased. In contrast, the activation of T cells bearing high affinity Cetux-CAR was not impacted by the density of EGFR. In summary, we describe the generation of CARs able to tune T-cell activity to the level of EGFR expression in which a CAR with reduced affinity enabled T cells to distinguish malignant from non-malignant cells. PMID:26330164

  17. 7-Aryl-triazolyl-substituted sulfocoumarins are potent, selective inhibitors of the tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, Alessio; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    Sulfocoumarins behave as interesting inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). Here, we report a new series of 7-substituted derivatives which were obtained by the click chemistry approach from 7-propargyloxy-sulfocoumarin and aryl azides incorporating halogens, hydroxy, methoxy and carboxyl moieties in their molecules. The new compounds were screened for the inhibition on four physiologically relevant human CA (hCA) isoforms, the cytosolic hCA I and II and the transmembrane tumor-associated hCA IX and XII. The new compounds did not inhibit the cytosolic isoforms but were low nanomolar inhibitors of the tumor-associated ones hCA IX and XII.

  18. Intratumoral delivery of vector mediated IL-2 in combination with vaccine results in enhanced T cell avidity and anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Garnett, Charlie T; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2007-12-01

    Systemic IL-2 is currently employed in the therapy of several tumor types, but at the price of often severe toxicities. Local vector mediated delivery of IL-2 at the tumor site may enhance local effector cell activity while reducing toxicity. To examine this, a model using CEA-transgenic mice bearing established CEA expressing tumors was employed. The vaccine regimen was a s.c. prime vaccination with recombinant vaccinia (rV) expressing transgenes for CEA and a triad of costimulatory molecules (TRICOM) followed by i.t. boosting with rF-CEA/TRICOM. The addition of intratumoral (i.t.) delivery of IL-2 via a recombinant fowlpox (rF) IL-2 vector greatly enhanced anti-tumor activity of a recombinant vaccine, resulting in complete tumor regression in 70-80% of mice. The anti-tumor activity was shown to be dependent on CD8(+) cells and NK1.1(+). Cellular immune assays revealed that the addition of rF-IL-2 to the vaccination therapy enhanced CEA-specific tetramer(+) cell numbers, cytokine release and CTL lysis of CEA(+) targets. Moreover, tumor-bearing mice vaccinated with the CEA/TRICOM displayed an antigen cascade, i.e., CD8(+) T cell responses to two other antigens expressed on the tumor and not the vaccine: wild-type p53 and endogenous retroviral antigen gp70. Mice receiving rF-IL-2 during vaccination demonstrated higher avidity CEA-specific, as well as higher avidity gp70-specific, CD8(+) T cells when compared with mice vaccinated without rF-IL-2. These studies demonstrate for the first time that the level and avidity of antigen specific CTL, as well as the therapeutic outcome can be improved with the use of i.t. rF-IL-2 with vaccine regimens.

  19. Interaction of acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521 with tumor response to photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Zhang, Wei; Saw, Kyi Min; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Bielawska, Alicja; Separovic, Duska

    2016-09-15

    Acid ceramidase has been identified as a promising target for cancer therapy. One of its most effective inhibitors, LCL521, was examined as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy (PDT) using mouse squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII model of head and neck cancer. Lethal effects of PDT, assessed by colony forming ability of in vitro treated SCCVII cells, were greatly enhanced when combined with 10 µM LCL521 treatment particularly when preceding PDT. When PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used to vaccinate SCCVII tumor-bearing mice (PDT vaccine protocol), adjuvant LCL521 treatment (75 mg/kg) resulted in a marked retardation of tumor growth. This effect can be attributed to the capacity of LCL521 to effectively restrict the activity of two main immunoregulatory cell populations (Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, MDSCs) that are known to hinder the efficacy of PDT vaccines. The therapeutic benefit with adjuvant LCL521 was also achieved with SCCVII tumors treated with standard PDT when using immunocompetent mice but not with immunodeficient hosts. The interaction of LCL521 with PDT-based antitumor mechanisms is dominated by immune system contribution that includes overriding the effects of immunoregulatory cells, but could also include a tacit contribution from boosting direct tumor cell kill. © 2016 UICC.

  20. Lipid Nanoparticle Assisted mRNA Delivery for Potent Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oberli, Matthias A; Reichmuth, Andreas M; Dorkin, J Robert; Mitchell, Michael J; Fenton, Owen S; Jaklenec, Ana; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2017-03-08

    The induction of a strong cytotoxic T cell response is an important prerequisite for successful immunotherapy against many viral diseases and tumors. Nucleotide vaccines, including mRNA vaccines with their intracellular antigen synthesis, have been shown to be potent activators of a cytotoxic immune response. The intracellular delivery of mRNA vaccines to the cytosol of antigen presenting immune cells is still not sufficiently well understood. Here, we report on the development of a lipid nanoparticle formulation for the delivery of mRNA vaccines to induce a cytotoxic CD 8 T cell response. We show transfection of dendritic cells, macrophages, and neutrophils. The efficacy of the vaccine was tested in an aggressive B16F10 melanoma model. We found a strong CD 8 T cell activation after a single immunization. Treatment of B16F10 melanoma tumors with lipid nanoparticles containing mRNA coding for the tumor-associated antigens gp100 and TRP2 resulted in tumor shrinkage and extended the overall survival of the treated mice. The immune response can be further increased by the incorporation of the adjuvant LPS. In conclusion, the lipid nanoparticle formulation presented here is a promising vector for mRNA vaccine delivery, one that is capable of inducing a strong cytotoxic T cell response. Further optimization, including the incorporation of different adjuvants, will likely enhance the potency of the vaccine.

  1. GTL001 and bivalent CyaA-based therapeutic vaccine strategies against human papillomavirus and other tumor-associated antigens induce effector and memory T-cell responses that inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Michaël; Momot, Marie; Goubier, Anne; Gonindard, Christophe; Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Misseri, Yolande; Bissery, Marie-Christine

    2017-03-13

    GTL001 is a bivalent therapeutic vaccine containing human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and HPV18 E7 proteins inserted in the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase (CyaA) vector intended to prevent cervical cancer in HPV-infected women with normal cervical cytology or mild abnormalities. To be effective, therapeutic cervical cancer vaccines should induce both a T cell-mediated effector response against HPV-infected cells and a robust CD8(+) T-cell memory response to prevent potential later infection. We examined the ability of GTL001 and related bivalent CyaA-based vaccines to induce, in parallel, effector and memory CD8(+) T-cell responses to both vaccine antigens. Intradermal vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with GTL001 adjuvanted with a TLR3 agonist (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid) or a TLR7 agonist (topical 5% imiquimod cream) induced strong HPV16 E7-specific T-cell responses capable of eradicating HPV16 E7-expressing tumors. Tumor-free mice also had antigen-specific memory T-cell responses that protected them against a subsequent challenge with HPV18 E7-expressing tumor cells. In addition, vaccination with bivalent vaccines containing CyaA-HPV16 E7 and CyaA fused to a tumor-associated antigen (melanoma-specific antigen A3, MAGEA3) or to a non-viral, non-tumor antigen (ovalbumin) eradicated HPV16 E7-expressing tumors and protected against a later challenge with MAGEA3- and ovalbumin-expressing tumor cells, respectively. These results show that CyaA-based bivalent vaccines such as GTL001 can induce both therapeutic and prophylactic anti-tumor T-cell responses. The CyaA platform can be adapted to different antigens and adjuvants, and therefore may be useful for developing other therapeutic vaccines.

  2. A Humanized Anti-CD22-Onconase Antibody-Drug Conjugate Mediates Highly Potent Destruction of Targeted Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Tobias; Mavratzas, Athanasios; Kiesgen, Stefan; Haase, Stephanie; Bötticher, Benedikt; Exner, Evelyn; Mier, Walter; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jäger, Dirk; Arndt, Michaela A. E.; Krauss, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have evolved as a new class of potent cancer therapeutics. We here report on the development of ADCs with specificity for the B-cell lineage specific (surface) antigen CD22 being expressed in the majority of hematological malignancies. As targeting moiety a previously generated humanized anti-CD22 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derivative from the monoclonal antibody RFB4 was reengineered into a humanized IgG1 antibody format (huRFB4). Onconase (ranpirnase), a clinically active pancreatic-type ribonuclease, was employed as cytotoxic payload moiety. Chemical conjugation via thiol-cleavable disulfide linkage retained full enzymatic activity and full binding affinity of the ADC. Development of sophisticated purification procedures using size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography allowed the separation of immunoconjugate species with stoichiometrically defined number of Onconase cargos. A minimum of two Onconase molecules per IgG was required for achieving significant in vitro cytotoxicity towards lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. Antibody-drug conjugates with an Onconase to antibody ratio of 3 : 1 exhibited an IC50 of 0.08 nM, corresponding to more than 18,400-fold increased cytotoxicity of the ADC when compared with unconjugated Onconase. These results justify further development of this ADC as a promising first-in-class compound for the treatment of CD22-positive malignancies. PMID:26605343

  3. Targeting the Genital Tract Mucosa with a Lipopeptide/Recombinant Adenovirus Prime/Boost Vaccine Induces Potent and Long-Lasting CD8+ T Cell Immunity Against Herpes: Importance of Myeloid Differentiation Factor 881

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuli; Dervillez, Xavier; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Badakhshan, Tina; Bettahi, Ilham; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Targeting the mucosal immune system of the genital tract (GT) with subunit vaccines failed to induce potent and durable local CD8+ T cell immunity, crucial for protection against many sexually transmitted viral (STV) pathogens, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) that causes genital herpes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential of a novel lipopeptide/adenovirus type 5 (Lipo/rAdv5) prime/boost mucosal vaccine for induction of CD8+ T cell immunity to protect the female genital tract from herpes. The lipopeptide and the rAdv5 vaccine express the immunodominant HSV-2 CD8+ T cell epitope (gB498-505) and both were delivered intravaginally (IVAG) in the progesterone-induced B6 mouse model of genital herpes. Compared to its homologous lipopeptide/lipopeptide (Lipo/Lipo); the Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost immunized mice: (i) developed potent and sustained HSV-specific CD8+ T cells, detected in both the GT draining nodes (GT-DLN) and in the vaginal mucosa (VM); (ii) had significantly lower virus titers; (iii) had decreased overt signs of genital herpes disease; and (iv) did not succumb to lethal infection (p < 0.005), following intravaginal HSV-2 challenge. Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells, producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 and exhibiting cytotoxic activity, were associated with protection (p < 0.005). The protective CD8+ T cell response was significantly compromised in the absence of the adaptor myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) (p = 0.0001). Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting the VM with a Lipo/rAdv5 prime/boost vaccine elicits a potent, MyD88-dependent, and long-lasting mucosal CD8+ T cell protective immunity against sexually transmitted herpes infection and disease. PMID:23018456

  4. Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Enhanced Enzymatic Inhibition Effects and Potent in vitro and in vivo Anti-tumor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yingjie; Chou, C. James; Inks, Elizabeth S.; Wang, Xuejian; Li, Xiaoguang; Hou, Jinning; Xu, Wenfang

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, a series of small molecules were designed and synthesized based on structural optimization. Significant improvement in the enzymatic inhibition activity of the synthesized compounds was discovered. Moreover, tested compounds have moderate preference for class I HDACs over HDAC6 proved by enzymatic selectivity assay. The in vitro anti-proliferation assay reveals that representative compounds can selectively inhibit the growth of the non-solid lymphomatous cells and leukemic cells such as U937, K562 and HL60 cell lines. In the in vivo anti-tumor assay, molecule D17 showed better performance than SAHA in inhibition of U937 tumor growth. The western blot analysis revealed that representative molecules can block the function of both class I HDACs and HDAC6. More importantly, our western blot results revealed that the levels of some oncogenic proteins (p-Akt in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway, c-Raf and p-Erk in the MAPK signal pathway) were dramatically down-regulated by our compounds in U937 cell line rather than MDA-MB-231 cells. This cellular mechanism difference might be an important reason why U937 cell line was more sensitive to our HDACs inhibitors than MDA-MB-231 cell line. PMID:24227760

  5. A DNA-binding Molecule Targeting the Adaptive Hypoxic Response in Multiple Myeloma has Potent Anti-tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mysore, Veena S.; Szablowski, Jerzy; Dervan, Peter B.; Frost, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is incurable and invariably becomes resistant to chemotherapy. Although the mechanisms remain unclear, hypoxic conditions in the bone marrow have been implicated in contributing to MM progression, angiogenesis, and resistance to chemotherapy. These effects occur via adaptive cellular responses mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs), and targeting HIFs can have anti-cancer effects in both solid and hematological malignancies. Here, it was found that in most myeloma cell lines tested, HIF1α, but not HIF2α expression was oxygen dependent and this could be explained by the differential expression of the regulatory prolyl-hydroxylase isoforms. The anti-MM effects of a sequence-specific DNA-binding pyrrole-imidazole polyamide (HIF-PA), that disrupts the HIF heterodimer from binding to its cognate DNA sequences, were also investigated. HIF-PA is cell permeable, localizes to the nuclei, and binds specific regions of DNA with an affinity comparable to that of HIF transcription factors. Most of the MM cells were resistant to hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, and HIF-PA treatment could overcome this resistance in vitro. Using xenograft models, it was determined that HIF-PA significantly decreased tumor volume and increased hypoxic and apoptotic regions within solid tumor nodules and the growth of myeloma cells engrafted in the bone marrow. This provides a rationale for targeting the adaptive cellular hypoxic response of the O2-dependent activation of HIFα using polyamides. PMID:26801054

  6. Co-administration of a DNA vaccine encoding the prostate specific membrane antigen and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides suppresses tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiaqiang; Zheng, Li; Chen, Qi; Li, Hua; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Hongguang

    2004-09-09

    BACKGROUND: Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well characterized prostate-specific tumor associated antigen. Its expression is elevated in prostate carcinoma, particularly in metastatic and recurrent lesions. These observations suggest that PSMA can be used as immune target to induce tumor cell-specific recognition by the host and, consequently tumor rejection. We utilized a DNA-based vaccine to specifically enhance PSMA expression. An immune modulator, such as CpG oligodeoxynucleotides which promote Th1-type immune responses was combined to increase the efficacy of tumor recognition and elimination. METHODS: A eukaryotic expression plasmid pCDNA3.1-PSMA encoding full-length PSMA was constructed. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with endotoxin-free pCDNA3.1-PSMA alone or in combination with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides by intramuscular injection. After 4 immunizations, PSMA specific antibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocyte reactivity were measured. Immunized C57BL/6 mice were also challenged subcutaneously with B16 cells transfected with PSMA to evaluate suppression of tumor growth. RESULTS: Vaccine-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes reactive with B16 cells expressing PSMA could be induced with this treatment schedule. Immune protection was observed in vaccinated mice as indicated by increased tumor growth in the control group (100%) compared with the groups vaccinated with DNA alone (66.7%) or DNA plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (50%) respectively. Average tumor volume was smaller in vaccinated groups and tumor-free survival time was prolonged by the vaccination. CONCLUSION: The current findings suggest that specific anti-tumor immune response can be induced by DNA vaccines expressing PSMA. In addition, the suppression of in vivo growth of tumor cells expressing PSMA was augmented by CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. This strategy may provide a new venue for the treatment of carcinoma of prostate after failure of standard therapy.

  7. Adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination induces tumor-specific immune responses in the majority of stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Bol, Kalijn F.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Westdorp, Harm; Textor, Johannes C.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Pots, Jeanne M.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A.; van Meeteren, Wilmy S. E. C.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Bonenkamp, Johannes J.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination to induce tumor-specific immunological responses in stage III melanoma patients. Experimental design: Retrospective analysis of stage III melanoma patients, vaccinated with autologous monocyte-derived DC loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAA) gp100 and tyrosinase after radical lymph node dissection. Skin-test infiltrating lymphocytes (SKILs) obtained from delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test biopsies were analyzed for the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells by tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes and by functional TAA-specific T cell assays, defined by peptide-recognition (T2 cells) and/or tumor-recognition (BLM and/or MEL624) with specific production of Th1 cytokines and no Th2 cytokines. Results: Ninety-seven patients were analyzed: 21 with stage IIIA, 34 with stage IIIB, and 42 had stage IIIC disease. Tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells were present in 68 patients (70%), and 24 of them showed a response against all 3 epitopes tested (gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377) at any point during vaccinations. A functional T cell response was found in 62 patients (64%). Rates of peptide-recognition of gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377 were 40%, 29%, and 45%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival of the whole study population were 23.0 mo and 36.8 mo, respectively. Conclusions: DC vaccination induces a functional TAA-specific T cell response in the majority of stage III melanoma patients, indicating it is more effective in stage III than in stage IV melanoma patients. Furthermore, performing multiple cycles of vaccinations enhances the chance of a broader immune response. PMID:27622047

  8. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... be spread from animals to people. For example, rabies is a serious, often fatal, disease that can ... animals to people. By vaccinating your pets for rabies, you are protecting your family as well as ...

  9. Genetic Vaccines to Potentiate the Effective CD103+DC-mediated Cross-priming of Anti-tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Guo; Liu, Zuqiang; Tian, Shenghe; Zhang, Jiying; Carey, Cara D.; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Storkus, Walter J.; Falo, Louis D.; You, Zhaoyang

    2015-01-01

    The development of effective cancer vaccines remains an urgent, but as yet unmet, clinical need. This deficiency is in part due to an incomplete understanding of how to best invoke dendritic cells (DC) that are crucial for the induction of tumor-specific CD8+T cells capable of mediating durable protective immunity. In this regard, elevated expression of the transcription factor X-box-binding protein (XBP1) in DC appears to play a decisive role in promoting the ability of DC to cross-present antigens (Ag) to CD8+T cells in the therapeutic setting. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding XBP1 and tumor Ag to skin DC resulted in increased IFN-α production by plasmacytoid DC (pDC) from skin/tumor draining lymph nodes (dLN) and the cross-priming of Ag-specific CD8+T cell responses associated with therapeutic benefit. Anti-tumor protection was dependent on cross-presenting Batf3+DC, pDC and CD8+T cells. CD103+DC from the skin/tumor dLN of the immunized mice appeared responsible for activation of Ag-specific naïve CD8+T cells, but were dependent on pDC for optimal effectiveness. Similarly, human XBP1 improved the capacity of human blood- and skin-derived DC to activate human T cells. These data support an important intrinsic role for XBP1 in DC for effective cross-priming and orchestration of Batf3+DC–pDC interactions, thereby enabling effective vaccine induction of protective anti-tumor immunity. PMID:25972487

  10. Development of potent autophagy inhibitors that sensitize oncogenic BRAF V600E mutant melanoma tumor cells to vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Megan L; Wang, Tong; Martin, Katie R; Kortus, Matthew G; Kauffman, Audra L; Trent, Jeffrey M; Gately, Stephen; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Autophagy is a dynamic cell survival mechanism by which a double-membrane vesicle, or autophagosome, sequesters portions of the cytosol for delivery to the lysosome for recycling. This process can be inhibited using the antimalarial agent chloroquine (CQ), which impairs lysosomal function and prevents autophagosome turnover. Despite its activity, CQ is a relatively inadequate inhibitor that requires high concentrations to disrupt autophagy, highlighting the need for improved small molecules. To address this, we screened a panel of antimalarial agents for autophagy inhibition and chemically synthesized a novel series of acridine and tetrahydroacridine derivatives. Structure-activity relationship studies of the acridine ring led to the discovery of VATG-027 as a potent autophagy inhibitor with a high cytotoxicity profile. In contrast, the tetrahydroacridine VATG-032 showed remarkably little cytotoxicity while still maintaining autophagy inhibition activity, suggesting that both compounds act as autophagy inhibitors with differential effects on cell viability. Further, knockdown of autophagy-related genes showed no effect on cell viability, demonstrating that the ability to inhibit autophagy is separate from the compound cytotoxicity profiles. Next, we determined that both inhibitors function through lysosomal deacidification mechanisms and ultimately disrupt autophagosome turnover. To evaluate the genetic context in which these lysosomotropic inhibitors may be effective, they were tested in patient-derived melanoma cell lines driven by oncogenic BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B). We discovered that both inhibitors sensitized melanoma cells to the BRAF V600E inhibitor vemurafenib. Overall, these autophagy inhibitors provide a means to effectively block autophagy and have the potential to sensitize mutant BRAF melanomas to first-line therapies.

  11. [State of the art about new therapeutic vaccines in prostate cancer: dendritic cells, engineered tumor cells and recombinant virus].

    PubMed

    Eymard, Jean-Christophe; Gervais, Alban; Jarcau, Rosana; Bernard, Jacky

    2007-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for prostate cancer were initially reported as limited with low immunological responses and uncertain clinical benefit. Recently, new methods become available, such preparations of well-characterized autologous dendritic cells, and use of gene therapy tools to increase whole-tumor cells or host tissue immunogenicity. These are able to enhance and diversify therapeutic options. Indeed, several vaccinal approaches are being investigated, including optimized mature dendritic cells, allogeneic genetically modified tumor cells, or viral vectors. Due to the description of immunological and clinical responses, large phase III randomized trials are now conducted. After summarizing the mechanistic basis for these approaches, this review describes the experience with the most recent and promising clinical studies and introduces short-term perspectives that could lead to improvement in healthcare offer for prostate cancer patients.

  12. Escherichia coli-based production of a tumor idiotype antibody fragment--tetanus toxin fragment C fusion protein vaccine for B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kedar G; Ng, Patrick P; Levy, Shoshana; Levy, Ronald; Swartz, James R

    2011-01-01

    The unique immunoglobulin idiotype expressed on the surface of B lymphoma cells can be used as an effective antigen in tumor-specific vaccines when fused to immunostimulatory proteins and cytokines. A DNA vaccine encoding for an idiotype antibody single chain Fv (scFv) fragment fused to the Tetanus Toxin Fragment C (TTFrC) has been shown to induce protective anti-tumor responses. Protein-based strategies may be more desirable since they provide greater control over dosage, duration of exposure, and in vivo distribution of the vaccine. However, production of fusion protein vaccines containing complex disulfide bonded idiotype antibodies and antibody-derived fragments is challenging. We use an Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis platform as well as high-level expression of E. coli inclusion bodies followed by refolding for the rapid generation of an antibody fragment - TTFrC fusion protein vaccine. Vaccine proteins produced using both methods were shown to elicit anti-tumor humoral responses as well as protect from tumor challenge in an established B cell lymphoma mouse model. The development of technologies for the rapid production of effective patient-specific tumor idiotype-based fusion protein vaccines provides opportunities for clinical application. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effect of U-995, a potent shark cartilage-derived angiogenesis inhibitor, on anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activities.

    PubMed

    Sheu, J R; Fu, C C; Tsai, M L; Chung, W J

    1998-01-01

    A potent angiogenesis inhibitor, U-995, has been purified from the cartilage of the blue shark (Prionace glauca). U-995 is composed of two single peptides with molecular mass of 10 and 14 kDa, respectively. U-995 was designed to study human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) migration and proliferation in vitro and angiogenesis induced by TNF alpha in chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Furthermore, we determined the ability of U-995 to inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis. U-995 (15 and 30 micrograms/ml) markedly inhibited HUVEC migration and, at 15-50 micrograms/ml produced a dose-dependent decline in [3H]-thymidine incorporation. 30 and 50 micrograms/ml of U-995, when added to TNF alpha-induced angiogenesis caused discontinuous and disrupted blood vessels. Moreover, U-995 (30 micrograms/ml) markedly prevented collagenase-induced collagenolysis. In addition, when 200 micrograms U-995 was injected i.p. into mice it suppressed sarcoma-180 cell growth and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cell metastasis in vivo. These results suggest that the anti-angiogenic effects of U-995 may be be due to interference with the proliferation and migration of HUVECs as well as inhibition of collagenolysis, thereby leading to inhibition of both angiogenesis and tumor cell growth.

  14. Novel 4-arylaminoquinazoline derivatives with (E)-propen-1-yl moiety as potent EGFR inhibitors with enhanced antiproliferative activities against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Yaling; Liu, Juan; Wang, Weijia; Li, Xiabing; Zhao, Lijun; Wang, Wei; Li, Baolin

    2017-09-29

    A series of novel 4-anilinoquinazoline derivatives with (E)-propen-1-yl moiety were designed, synthesized and evaluated for biological activities in vitro. Most compounds exhibited highly antiproliferative activities against all tested tumor cell lines including A431, A549, NCI-H1975 and SW480 cells. Especially, compound 6e not only presented strong antiproliferative activities against the tested four tumor cell lines (IC50 of 1.35, 8.83, 5.53 and 6.08 μM, respectively) which expressed wild type or L858R/T790M double mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but also showed potent inhibitory activity against wild type EGFR (IC50 = 20.72 nM). The result of molecular docking with EGFR suggested the binding mode of 6e was similar to gefitinib, but different from lapatinib. Additionally, western blot analysis showed that 6e inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream signaling proteins in lung cancer cells. The work could be very useful starting point for developing a new series of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting EGFR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulatory T Cells, a Potent Immunoregulatory Target for CAM Researchers: Modulating Tumor Immunity, Autoimmunity and Alloreactive Immunity (III)

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Aristo; Erde, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are the major arbiter of immune responses, mediating actions through the suppression of inflammatory and destructive immune reactions. Inappropriate Treg cell frequency or functionality potentiates the pathogenesis of myriad diseases with ranging magnitudes of severity. Lack of suppressive capability hinders restraint on immune responses involved in autoimmunity and alloreactivity, while excessive suppressive capacity effectively blocks processes necessary for tumor destruction. Although the etiology of dysfunctional Treg cell populations is under debate, the ramifications, and their mechanisms, are increasingly brought to light in the medical community. Methods that compensate for aberrant immune regulation may not address the underlying complications; however, they hold promise for the alleviation of debilitating immune system-related disorders. The dominant immunoregulatory nature of Treg cells, coupled with recent mechanistic knowledge of natural immunomodulatory compounds, highlights the importance of Treg cells to practitioners and researchers of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). PMID:16951715

  16. Panobinostat (LBH589): a potent pan-deacetylase inhibitor with promising activity against hematologic and solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Prince, H Miles; Bishton, Mark J; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2009-06-01

    The deacetylase inhibitors are a structurally diverse class of targeted antineoplastic agents that have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo preclinical activity in a wide range of malignancies. Based on this preclinical activity, several deacetylase inhibitors have undergone rapid clinical development in recent years. Among these, the deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat is one of the most widely studied, with extensive pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and dose-finding data available across a wide variety of hematologic and solid tumors. Furthermore, panobinostat has demonstrated favorable clinical activity against various hematologic malignancies, most notably lymphomas and myeloid malignancies in Phase I and II studies. In this article, we discuss the preclinical data on panobinostat and emerging data from Phase I and II studies in cancer patients.

  17. Design, Immune Responses and Anti-Tumor Potential of an HPV16 E6E7 Multi-Epitope Vaccine.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Liliane Maria Fernandes; Morale, Mirian Galliote; Chaves, Agatha A Muniz; Cavalher, Aline Marques; Lopes, Aline Soriano; Diniz, Mariana de Oliveira; Schanoski, Alessandra Soares; de Melo, Robson Lopes; Ferreira, Luís Carlos de Souza; de Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Demasi, Marilene; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common type of cancer among women worldwide and infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPVs) types represents the major risk factor for the etiopathogenesis of the disease. HPV-16 is the most frequently identified HPV type in cervical lesions and expression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins is required for the uncontrolled cellular proliferation. In the present study we report the design and experimental testing of a recombinant multi-epitope protein containing immunogenic epitopes of HPV-16 E6 and E7. Tumor preventive assays, based on the engraftment of TC-1 cells in mice, showed that the E6E7 multi-epitope protein induced a full preventive anti-tumor protection in wild-type mice, as well as in mice deficient in expression of CD4+ T cells and TLR4 receptor. Nonetheless, no anti-tumor protection was observed in mice deficient in CD8+ T cells. Also, the vaccine promoted high activation of E6/E7-specific T cells and in a therapeutic-approach, E6E7 protein conferred full anti-tumor protection in mice. These results show a potential use of this E6E7 multi-epitope antigen as a new and promising antigen for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against tumors induced by HPV.

  18. Influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccination by a skin targeted, dry coated, densely packed microprojection array (Nanopatch) induces potent antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Germain J P; Zhang, Jin; Ng, Hwee-Ing; Haigh, Oscar L; Yukiko, Sally R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-09-10

    DNA vaccines have many advantages such as thermostability and the ease and rapidity of manufacture; for example, in an influenza pandemic situation where rapid production of vaccine is essential. However, immunogenicity of DNA vaccines was shown to be poor in humans unless large doses of DNA are used. If a highly efficacious DNA vaccine delivery system could be identified, then DNA vaccines have the potential to displace protein vaccines. In this study, we show in a C57BL/6 mouse model, that the Nanopatch, a microprojection array of high density (>21,000 projections/cm(2)), could be used to deliver influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccine to skin, to generate enhanced antigen specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses compared to the conventional intramuscular (IM) delivery by the needle and syringe. Antigen specific antibody was measured using ELISA assays of mice vaccinated with a DNA plasmid containing the nucleoprotein gene of influenza type A/WSN/33 (H1N1). Antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses were measured ex-vivo in splenocytes of mice using IFN-γ ELISPOT assays. These results and our previous antibody and CD4(+) T cell results using the Nanopatch delivered HSV DNA vaccine indicate that the Nanopatch is an effective delivery system of general utility that could potentially be used in humans to increase the potency of the DNA vaccines.

  19. Heat shock protein vaccination and directed IL-2 therapy amplify tumor immunity rapidly following bone marrow transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Robert G.; Dee, Michael J.; Malek, Thomas R.; Podack, Eckhard R.; Levy, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor relapse is the primary cause of mortality in patients with hematologic cancers following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Vaccination early after HSCT can exploit both the state of lymphopenia and minimal residual disease for generating antitumor immunity. Here, multiple vaccinations using lymphoma cells engineered to secrete heat shock protein fusion gp96-Ig within 2 weeks of T cell-replete syngeneic HSCT led to cross-presentation and increased survival of lymphoma-bearing mice. To enhance vaccine efficacy, interleukin (IL)-2 was directed to predominantly memory phenotype CD8+ T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells via administration bound to anti-IL-2 monoclonal antibody clone S4B6 (IL-2S4B6). Combination therapy with gp96-Ig vaccination and coordinated infusions of IL-2S4B6 resulted in marked prolongation of survival, which directly correlated with ∼500% increase in effector CD8+ T-cell numbers. Notably, this dual regimen elicited large increases in both donor CD8+ T and NK cells, but not CD4+ T lymphocytes; the former 2 populations are essential for both vaccine efficacy and protection against opportunistic infections after HSCT. Indeed, IL-2S4B6-treated HSCT recipients infected with Listeria monocytogenes exhibited decreased bacterial levels. These preclinical studies validate a new strategy particularly well suited to the post-HSCT environment, which may augment adaptive and innate immune function in patients with malignant disease receiving autologous HSCT. PMID:24687086

  20. TARP vaccination is associated with slowing in PSA velocity and decreasing tumor growth rates in patients with Stage D0 prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren V; Fojo, Antonio; Roberson, Brenda D; Hughes, Meghan S B; Dahut, William; Gulley, James L; Madan, Ravi A; Arlen, Philip M; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F; Castiello, Luciano; Trepel, Jane B; Lee, Min-Jung; Parnes, Howard L; Steinberg, Seth M; Terabe, Masaki; Wilkerson, Julia; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2016-08-01

    T-cell receptor alternate reading frame protein (TARP) is a 58-residue protein over-expressed in prostate and breast cancer. We investigated TARP peptide vaccination's impact on the rise in PSA (expressed as Slope Log(PSA) or PSA Doubling Time (PSADT)), validated tumor growth measures, and tumor growth rate in men with Stage D0 prostate cancer. HLA-A*0201 positive men were randomized to receive epitope-enhanced (29-37-9V) and wild-type (27-35) TARP peptides administered as a Montanide/GM-CSF peptide emulsion or as an autologous peptide-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine every 3 weeks for a total of five vaccinations with an optional 6th dose of vaccine at 36 weeks based on immune response or PSADT criteria with a booster dose of vaccine for all patients at 48 and 96 weeks. 41 patients enrolled with median on-study duration of 75 weeks at the time of this analysis. Seventy-two percent of patients reaching 24 weeks and 74% reaching 48 weeks had a decreased Slope Log(PSA) compared to their pre-vaccination baseline (p = 0.0012 and p = 0.0004 for comparison of overall changes in Slope Log(PSA), respectively). TARP vaccination also resulted in a 50% decrease in median tumor growth rate (g): pre-vaccine g = 0.0042/day, post-vaccine g = 0.0021/day (p = 0.003). 80% of subjects exhibited new vaccine-induced TARP-specific IFNγ ELISPOT responses but they did not correlate with decreases in Slope Log(PSA). Thus, vaccination with TARP peptides resulted in significant slowing in PSA velocity and reduction in tumor growth rate in a majority of patients with PSA biochemical recurrence.

  1. Oncolytic viruses as therapeutic cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are tumor-selective, multi-mechanistic antitumor agents. They kill infected cancer and associated endothelial cells via direct oncolysis, and uninfected cells via tumor vasculature targeting and bystander effect. Multimodal immunogenic cell death (ICD) together with autophagy often induced by OVs not only presents potent danger signals to dendritic cells but also efficiently cross-present tumor-associated antigens from cancer cells to dendritic cells to T cells to induce adaptive antitumor immunity. With this favorable immune backdrop, genetic engineering of OVs and rational combinations further potentiate OVs as cancer vaccines. OVs armed with GM-CSF (such as T-VEC and Pexa-Vec) or other immunostimulatory genes, induce potent anti-tumor immunity in both animal models and human patients. Combination with other immunotherapy regimens improve overall therapeutic efficacy. Coadministration with a HDAC inhibitor inhibits innate immunity transiently to promote infection and spread of OVs, and significantly enhances anti-tumor immunity and improves the therapeutic index. Local administration or OV mediated-expression of ligands for Toll-like receptors can rescue the function of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells inhibited by the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and thus enhances the antitumor effect. Combination with cyclophosphamide further induces ICD, depletes Treg, and thus potentiates antitumor immunity. In summary, OVs properly armed or in rational combinations are potent therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:24020520

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Some New Bis-Pyrazolyl-Thiazoles Incorporating the Thiophene Moiety as Potent Anti-Tumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gomha, Sobhi M.; Edrees, Mastoura M.; Altalbawy, Farag M. A.

    2016-01-01

    A new series of 1,4-bis(1-(5-(aryldiazenyl)thiazol-2-yl)-5-(thiophen-2-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)benzenes 3a–i were synthesized via reaction of 5,5′-(1,4-phenylene)bis(3-(thiophen-2-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide) (1) with hydrazonoyl halides 2a–i. In addition, reaction of 1 with ethyl chloroacetate afforded bis-thiazolone derivative 8 as the end product. Reaction of compound 8 with methyl glyoxalate gave bis-thiazolone derivative 10. The structures of the newly synthesized compounds were established on the basis of spectroscopic evidences and their alternative syntheses. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-tumor activities against hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell lines, and the results revealed promising activities of compounds 3g, 5e, 3e, 10, 5f, 3i, and 3f with IC50 equal 1.37 ± 0.15, 1.41 ± 0.17, 1.62 ± 0.20, 1.86 ± 0.20, 1.93 ± 0.08, 2.03 ± 0.25, and 2.09 ± 0.19 μM, respectively. PMID:27618013

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor Type α , a Potent Inhibitor of Endothelial Cell Growth in vitro, is Angiogenic in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frater-Schroder, Marijke; Risau, Werner; Hallmann, Rupert; Gautschi, Peter; Bohlen, Peter

    1987-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor type α (TNF-α ) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Basal cell growth (in the absence of exogenously added growth factor) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-stimulated cell proliferation are inhibited in a dose-dependent manner from 0.1 to 10 ng/ml with half-maximal inhibition occurring at 0.5-1.0 ng of TNF-α per ml. Bovine aortic and brain capillary endothelial and smooth muscle cells are similarly affected. TNF-α is a noncompetitive antagonist of FGF-stimulated cell proliferation. Its action on endothelial cells is reversible and noncytotoxic. Surprisingly, TNF-α does not seem to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation in vivo. In the rabbit cornea, even a high dose of TNF-α (10 μ g) does not suppress angiogenesis induced by basic FGF. On the contrary, in this model system TNF-α stimulates neovascularization. The inflammatory response that is seen in the cornea after TNF-α implantation suggests that the angiogenic properties of this agent may be a consequence of leukocyte infiltration.

  4. Specific medicinal plant polysaccharides effectively enhance the potency of a DC-based vaccine against mouse mammary tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei Ting; Lai, Tzung Hsien; Chyan, Yau Jan; Yin, Shu Yi; Chen, Yung Hsiang; Wei, Wen Chi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines are a newly emerging immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment and prevention of cancer, but major challenges still remain particularly with respect to clinical efficacy. Engineering and optimization of adjuvant formulations for DC-based vaccines is one strategy through which more efficacious treatments may be obtained. In this study, we developed a new ex vivo approach for DC vaccine preparation. We evaluated two highly purified mixed polysaccharide fractions from the root of Astragalus membranaceus and Codonopsis pilosulae, named Am and Cp, for their use in enhancing the efficiency of a DC-based cancer vaccine against metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma in mice. Mixed lymphocyte reaction showed all Am-, Cp- and [Am+Cp]-treated DCs enhanced mouse CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation. [Am+Cp]-treated DCs exhibited the strongest anti-4T1 metastasis activity in test mice. Treatments with Am, Cp and [Am+Cp] also resulted in augmented expression of CD40, CD80 and CD86 markers in test DCs. Bioinformatics analysis of the cytokine array data from treated DCs identified that [Am+Cp] is efficacious in activation of specific immune functions via mediating the expression of cytokines/chemokines involved in the recruitment and differentiation of defined immune cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that Am and Cp are composed mainly of polysaccharides containing a high level (70-95%) glucose residues, but few or no (< 1%) mannose residues. In summary, our findings suggest that the specific plant polysaccharides Am and Cp extracted from traditional Chinese medicines can be effectively used instead of bacterial LPS as a potent adjuvant in the formulation of a DC-based vaccine for cancer immunotherapies.

  5. Specific Medicinal Plant Polysaccharides Effectively Enhance the Potency of a DC-Based Vaccine against Mouse Mammary Tumor Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei Ting; Lai, Tzung Hsien; Chyan, Yau Jan; Yin, Shu Yi; Chen, Yung Hsiang; Wei, Wen Chi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines are a newly emerging immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment and prevention of cancer, but major challenges still remain particularly with respect to clinical efficacy. Engineering and optimization of adjuvant formulations for DC-based vaccines is one strategy through which more efficacious treatments may be obtained. In this study, we developed a new ex vivo approach for DC vaccine preparation. We evaluated two highly purified mixed polysaccharide fractions from the root of Astragalus membranaceus and Codonopsis pilosulae, named Am and Cp, for their use in enhancing the efficiency of a DC-based cancer vaccine against metastasis of 4T1 mammary carcinoma in mice. Mixed lymphocyte reaction showed all Am-, Cp- and [Am+Cp]-treated DCs enhanced mouse CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation. [Am+Cp]-treated DCs exhibited the strongest anti-4T1 metastasis activity in test mice. Treatments with Am, Cp and [Am+Cp] also resulted in augmented expression of CD40, CD80 and CD86 markers in test DCs. Bioinformatics analysis of the cytokine array data from treated DCs identified that [Am+Cp] is efficacious in activation of specific immune functions via mediating the expression of cytokines/chemokines involved in the recruitment and differentiation of defined immune cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that Am and Cp are composed mainly of polysaccharides containing a high level (70–95%) glucose residues, but few or no (< 1%) mannose residues. In summary, our findings suggest that the specific plant polysaccharides Am and Cp extracted from traditional Chinese medicines can be effectively used instead of bacterial LPS as a potent adjuvant in the formulation of a DC-based vaccine for cancer immunotherapies. PMID:25825910

  6. Transmembrane tumor necrosis factor is a potent inducer of colitis even in the absence of its secreted form.

    PubMed

    Corazza, Nadia; Brunner, Thomas; Buri, Caroline; Rihs, Silvia; Imboden, Martin A; Seibold, Inge; Mueller, Christoph

    2004-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is cleaved proteolytically from a 26-kilodalton transmembrane precursor protein into secreted 17-kilodalton monomers. Transmembrane (tm) and secreted trimeric TNF are biologically active and may mediate distinct activities. We assessed the consequences of a complete inhibition of TNF processing on the course of colitis in recombination activating gene (RAG)2 -/- mice on transfer of CD4 CD45RB hi T cells. TNF -/- mice, transgenic for a noncleavable mutant TNF gene, were used as donors of CD4 T cells, and, on a RAG2 -/- background, also as recipients. Kinetics of disease development were compared in the absence of TNF, in the absence of secreted TNF, and in the presence of secreted and tmTNF. The analysis at the end of the observation period included the histopathologic assessment of the intestine and the localization of TNF and interferon gamma (IFNgamma)-expressing cells. The complete prevention of TNF secretion in tmTNF transgenic RAG2 -/- mice neither prevented nor delayed disease induction by transferred transgenic for a noncleavable transmembrane mutant of mouse TNF (tmTNF tg) CD4 CD45RB hi T cells. tmTNF expression by transferred CD4 T cells, however, was not required for disease induction because severe colitis and weight loss also were observed in tmTNF RAG2 -/- recipients of TNF -/- CD4 CD45RB hi T cells. In the presence of tmTNF, the absence of secreted TNF did not affect frequency and distribution of TNF and interferon-gamma messenger RNA (mRNA)-expressing cells. These results indicate that specific inhibitors of TNF processing are not appropriate for modulating the pro-inflammatory and disease-inducing effects of TNF in chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestine.

  7. Mucosal vaccination with a live recombinant rhinovirus followed by intradermal DNA administration elicits potent and protective HIV-specific immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Wesselingh, Steve; Suhrbier, Andreas; Gowans, Eric J.; Grubor-Bauk, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal immunity is deemed crucial to control sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Herein we report the efficacy of a mucosal HIV vaccine strategy comprising intranasal (IN) vaccination with a cocktail of live recombinant human rhinoviruses (HRVs) encoding overlapping fragments of HIV Gag and full length Tat (rHRV-Gag/Tat) followed by intradermal (ID) vaccination with DNA vaccines encoding HIV Gag and Tat (pVAX-Gag-Tat). This heterologous prime-boost strategy will be referred to hereafter as rHRV-DNA. As a control, IN vaccination with wild type (wt)-HRV-A1 followed by a single ID dose of pVAX (wt-HRV-A1/pVAX vaccination) was included. rHRV-DNA vaccination elicited superior multi-functional CD8+T cell responses in lymphocytes harvested from mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens, and higher titres of Tat-specific antibodies in blood and vaginal lavages, and reduced the viral load more effectively after challenge with EcoHIV, a murine HIV challenge model, in peritoneal macrophages, splenocytes and blood compared compared with wt-HRV-A1/pVAX vaccination or administration of 3 ID doses of pVAX-Gag-Tat (3X pVAX-Gag-Tat vaccination). These data provide the first evidence that a rHRV-DNA vaccination regimen can induce HIV-specific immune responses in the gut, vaginal mucosa and systemically, and supports further testing of this regimen in the development of an effective mucosally-targeted HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:27853256

  8. Tumor endothelial marker 8 expression levels in dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines are related to clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Venanzi, Franco Maria; Petrini, Massimiliano; Fiammenghi, Laura; Bolli, Elisabetta; Granato, Anna Maria; Ridolfi, Laura; Gabrielli, Federica; Barucca, Alessandra; Concetti, Antonio; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Riccobon, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that tumor endothelial markers (TEMs 1-9) are up modulated in immunosuppressive, pro-angiogenic dendritic cells (DCs) found in tumor microenvironments. We recently reported that monocyte-derived DCs used for vaccination trials may accumulate high levels of TEM8 gene transcripts. Here, we investigate whether TEM8 expression in DC preparations represents a specific tumor-associated change of potential clinical relevance. TEM8 expression at the mRNA and protein level was evaluated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and cytofluorimetric analysis in human clinical grade DCs utilized for the therapeutic vaccination of 17 advanced cancer patients (13 melanoma and 4 renal cell carcinoma). The analyses revealed that DCs from patients markedly differ in their ability to up-modulate TEM8. Indeed, mDCs from eight non-progressing patients [median overall survival (OS) = 32 months, all positive to the delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH)], had similar TEM8 mRNA expression levels [mDCs vs. immature iDCs; mean fold increase (mfi) = 1.97] to those found in healthy donors (mfi = 2.7). Conversely, mDCs from nine progressing patients (OS < 5 months, all but one with negative DTH) showed an increase in TEM8 mRNA levels (mfi = 12.88, p = 0.0018). The present observations suggest that TEM8 expression levels in DC-based therapeutic vaccines would allow the selection of a subgroup of patients who are most likely to benefit from therapeutic vaccination.

  9. Galactosylated liposome as a dendritic cell-targeted mucosal vaccine for inducing protective anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping-Lun; Lin, Hung-Jun; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Wen-Yu; Lin, Shen-Fu; Chien, Mei-Yin; Liang, Pi-Hui; Huang, Yi-You; Liu, Der-Zen

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces contain specialized dendritic cells (DCs) that are able to recognize foreign pathogens and mount protective immunity. We previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of targeted galactosylated liposomes can elicit mucosal and systemic antibody responses. In the present study, we assessed whether galactosylated liposomes could act as an effective DC-targeted mucosal vaccine that would be capable of inducing systemic anti-tumor immunity as well as antibody responses. We show that targeted galactosylated liposomes effectively facilitated antigen uptake by DCs beyond that mediated by unmodified liposomes both in vitro and in vivo. Targeted galactosylated liposomes induced higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines than unmodified liposomes in vitro. C57BL/6 mice thrice immunized intranasally with ovalbumin (OVA)-encapsulated galactosylated liposomes produced high levels of OVA-specific IgG antibodies in their serum. Spleen cells from mice receiving galactosylated liposomes were restimulated with OVA and showed significantly augmented levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, intranasal administration of OVA-encapsulated beta-galactosylated liposomes resulted in complete protection against EG7 tumor challenge in C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, these results indicate that nasal administration of a galactosylated liposome vaccine mediates the development of an effective immunity against tumors and might be useful for further clinical anti-tumoral applications.

  10. A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing a single tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell epitope delays tumor growth in a murine model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Kouiavskaia, Diana V; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Botto, Sara; Alexander, Richard B; Jarvis, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly immunogenic virus that results in a persistent, life-long infection in the host typically with no ill effects. Certain unique features of CMV, including its capacity to actively replicate in the presence of strong host CMV-specific immunity, may give CMV an advantage compared with other virus-based vaccine delivery platforms. In the present study, we tested the utility of mouse CMV (mCMV)-based vaccines expressing human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer immunotherapy in double-transgenic mice expressing PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2bxPSA F1 mice). We assessed the capacity of 2 mCMV-based vectors to induce PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses and affect the growth of PSA-expressing Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate tumors (TRAMP-PSA). In the absence of tumor challenge, immunization with mCMV vectors expressing either a H2-D(b)-restricted epitope PSA(65-73) (mCMV/PSA(65-73)) or the full-length gene for PSA (mCMV/PSA(FL)) induced comparable levels of CD8 T-cell responses that increased (inflated) with time. Upon challenge with TRAMP-PSA tumor cells, animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(65-73) had delay of tumor growth and increased PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses, whereas animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(FL) showed progressive tumor growth and no increase in number of splenic PSA(65-73)-specific T cells. The data show that a prototype CMV-based prostate cancer vaccine can induce an effective antitumor immune response in a "humanized" double-transgenic mouse model. The observation that mCMV/PSA(FL) is not effective against TRAMP-PSA is consistent with our previous findings that HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted immune responses to PSA are associated with suppression of effective CD8 T-cell responses to TRAMP-PSA tumors.

  11. Humanized Affinity-matured Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 Has Potent Antitumor Activity and Binds to FG Loop of Tumor Antigen B7-H3.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Cheng, Ming; Zhao, Qi; Goldgur, Yehuda; Cheal, Sarah M; Guo, Hong-fen; Larson, Steven M; Cheung, Nai-kong V

    2015-12-11

    B7-H3 (CD276) is both an inhibitory ligand for natural killer cells and T cells and a tumor antigen that is widely expressed among human solid tumors. Anti-B7-H3 mouse monoclonal antibody 8H9 has been successfully used for radioimmunotherapy for patients with B7-H3(+) tumors. We present the humanization, affinity maturation, and epitope mapping of 8H9 based on structure determination, modeling, and yeast display methods. The crystal structure of ch8H9 Fab fragment was solved to 2.5-Å resolution and used as a template for humanization. By displaying the humanized 8H9 single chain Fv (scFv) on the surface of yeast, the affinity was matured by sequential random mutagenesis and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Six mutations (three in the complementarity-determining region and three in the framework regions) were identified and incorporated into an affinity-matured humanized 8H9 construct (hu8H9-6m) and an affinity-matured chimeric 8H9 construct (ch8H9-6m). The hu8H9-6m scFv had a 160-fold improvement in affinity (0.9 nm KD) compared with parental hu8H9 scFv (144 nm KD). The IgG formats of ch8H9-6m and hu8H9-6m (nanomolar to subnanomolar KD) had 2-9-fold enhancements in affinity compared with their parental forms, potent in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (0.1-0.3 μg/ml EC50), and high tumor uptake in mouse xenografts. Based on in silico docking studies and experimental validation, the molecular epitope of 8H9 was determined to be dependent on the FG loop of B7-H3, a region critical to its function in immunologic blockade and unique among anti-B7-H3 antibodies published to date. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. A lentiviral vector-based therapeutic vaccine encoding Ag85B-Rv3425 potently increases resistance to acute tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Feifei; Xu, Ying; Wang, Honghai; Hu, Yong; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W

    2015-08-01

    Few treatment options for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB call attention to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for TB. Therapeutic vaccines are promising candidates because they can induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses, which play an important role in the elimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). In this study, a novel lentiviral vector therapeutic vaccine for delivering MTB-specific fusion protein Ag85B-Rv3425 was constructed. Results showed that one single-injection of this recombinant lentivirus vaccine could trigger antigen-specific Th1-type immune responses in mice. More importantly, mice with acute infection benefited a lot from a single-dose administration of this vaccine by markedly reduced MTB burdens in lungs and spleens as well as attenuated lesions in lungs compared with untreated mice. These results displayed good prospects of this novel vaccine for the immunotherapy of TB.

  13. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Measles vaccination: Targeted and non-targeted benefits CDC reports: 2-dose regimen of chickenpox vaccine is a success Positive preliminary results from the CAPiTA study Seasonal flu vaccine associate with reduced stroke risk HPV vaccine shown to halve cervical abnormalities Global prize for mobile mast vaccine storage project Developmental pathway of potent HIV-neutralizing antibodies Burkholderia vaccine: US Dep of Defense collaborates with Bavarian Nordic

  14. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, a potent adjuvant for polarization to Th-17 pattern: an experience on HIV-1 vaccine model.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Mehdi; Tajik, Amir Hossein; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Rahimi, Roghieh; Adibzadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Moozarmpour, Hamid Reza; Beikverdi, Mohammad Sadegh; Olfat, Soophie; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Choopani, Mohammad; Kameli, Morteza; Hartoonian, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Cytokines are mediators for polarization of immune response in vaccines. Studies show that co-immunization of DNA vaccines with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can increase immune responses. Here, experimental mice were immunized with HIV-1tat/pol/gag/env DNA vaccine with GM-CSF and boosted with recombinant vaccine. Lymphocyte proliferation with Brdu and CTL activity, IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-17 cytokines, total antibody, and IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were assessed with ELISA. Results show that GM-CSF as adjuvant in DNA immunization significantly increased lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ cytokines, but CTL response was tiny increased. Also GM-CSF as adjuvant decreased IL-4 cytokine vs mere vaccine group. IL-17 in the group that immunized with mixture of DNA vaccine/GM-CSF was significantly increased vs DNA vaccine group. Result of total antibody shows that GM-CSF increased antibody response in which both IgG1 and IgG2a increased. Overall, results confirmed the beneficial effect of GM-CSF as adjuvant to increase vaccine immunogenicity. The hallmark result of this study was to increase IL-17 cytokine with DNA vaccine/GM-CSF immunized group. This study for the first time provides the evidence of the potency of GM-CSF in the induction of IL-17 in response to a vaccine, which is important for control of infection such as HIV-1. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Combined Allogeneic Tumor Cell Vaccination and Systemic Interleukin 12 Prevents Mammary Carcinogenesis in HER-2/neu Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Patrizia; Nicoletti, Giordano; De Giovanni, Carla; Landuzzi, Lorena; Di Carlo, Emma; Cavallo, Federica; Pupa, Serenella M.; Rossi, Ilaria; Colombo, Mario P.; Ricci, Cinzia; Astolfi, Annalisa; Musiani, Piero; Forni, Guido; Lollini, Pier-Luigi

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic Balb/c mice expressing the transforming rat HER-2/neu oncogene develop early and multifocal mammary carcinomas. Within the first 5 months of life the tissue-specific expression of HER-2/neu causes a progression in all their 10 mammary glands from atypical hyperplasia to invasive carcinoma. It was previously observed that chronic administration of interleukin (IL)-12 increased tumor latency, but every mouse eventually succumbed to multiple carcinomas. A significant improvement in tumor prevention was sought by administering allogeneic mammary carcinoma cells expressing HER-2/neu combined with systemic IL-12. This treatment reduced tumor incidence by 90% and more than doubled mouse lifetime. For the maximum prevention p185neu antigen must be expressed by allogeneic cells. IL-12 treatment strongly increased the cell vaccine efficacy. The mammary glands of mice receiving the combined treatment displayed a markedly reduced epithelial cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and HER-2/neu expression, while the few hyperplastic foci were heavily infiltrated by granulocytes, macrophages, and CD8+ lymphocytes. Specific anti–HER-2/neu antibodies were produced and a nonpolarized activation of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IL-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ were evident. A central role for IFN-γ in the preventive effect was proven by the lack of efficacy of vaccination in IFN-γ gene knockout HER-2/neu transgenic Balb/c mice. A possible requirement for IFN-γ is related to its effect on antibody production, in particular on IgG2a and IgG2b subclasses, that were not induced in IFN-γ knockout HER-2/neu mice. In conclusion, our data show that an allogeneic HER-2/neu–expressing cell vaccine combined with IL-12 systemic treatment can prevent the onset of genetically determined tumors. PMID:11696586

  16. Novel and potent anti-tumor and anti-metastatic di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones demonstrate marked differences in pharmacology between the first and second generation lead agents

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, Vit; Stariat, Jan; Cermanova, Jolana; Potuckova, Eliska; Chladek, Jaroslav; Roh, Jaroslav; Bures, Jan; Jansova, Hana; Prusa, Petr; Sterba, Martin; Micuda, Stanislav; Simunek, Tomas; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Richardson, Des R.; Kovarikova, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-pyridyl)ketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) and di(2-pyridyl)ketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (DpC) are novel, highly potent and selective anti-tumor and anti-metastatic drugs. Despite their structural similarity, these agents differ in their efficacy and toxicity in-vivo. Considering this, a comparison of their pharmacokinetic and pharmaco/toxico-dynamic properties was conducted to reveal if these factors are involved in their differential activity. Both compounds were administered to Wistar rats intravenously (2 mg/kg) and their metabolism and disposition were studied using UHPLC-MS/MS. The cytotoxicity of both thiosemicarbazones and their metabolites was also examined using MCF-7, HL-60 and HCT116 tumor cells and 3T3 fibroblasts and H9c2 cardiac myoblasts. Their intracellular iron-binding ability was characterized by the Calcein-AM assay and their iron mobilization efficacy was evaluated. In contrast to DpC, Dp44mT undergoes rapid demethylation in-vivo, which may be related to its markedly faster elimination (T1/2 = 1.7 h for Dp44mT vs. 10.7 h for DpC) and lower exposure. Incubation of these compounds with cancer cells or cardiac myoblasts did not result in any significant metabolism in-vitro. The metabolism of Dp44mT in-vivo resulted in decreased anti-cancer activity and toxicity. In conclusion, marked differences in the pharmacology of Dp44mT and DpC were observed and highlight the favorable pharmacokinetics of DpC for cancer treatment. PMID:26623727

  17. Novel and potent anti-tumor and anti-metastatic di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones demonstrate marked differences in pharmacology between the first and second generation lead agents.

    PubMed

    Sestak, Vit; Stariat, Jan; Cermanova, Jolana; Potuckova, Eliska; Chladek, Jaroslav; Roh, Jaroslav; Bures, Jan; Jansova, Hana; Prusa, Petr; Sterba, Martin; Micuda, Stanislav; Simunek, Tomas; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R; Kovarikova, Petra

    2015-12-15

    Di(2-pyridyl)ketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) and di(2-pyridyl)ketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (DpC) are novel, highly potent and selective anti-tumor and anti-metastatic drugs. Despite their structural similarity, these agents differ in their efficacy and toxicity in-vivo. Considering this, a comparison of their pharmacokinetic and pharmaco/toxico-dynamic properties was conducted to reveal if these factors are involved in their differential activity. Both compounds were administered to Wistar rats intravenously (2 mg/kg) and their metabolism and disposition were studied using UHPLC-MS/MS. The cytotoxicity of both thiosemicarbazones and their metabolites was also examined using MCF-7, HL-60 and HCT116 tumor cells and 3T3 fibroblasts and H9c2 cardiac myoblasts. Their intracellular iron-binding ability was characterized by the Calcein-AM assay and their iron mobilization efficacy was evaluated. In contrast to DpC, Dp44mT undergoes rapid demethylation in-vivo, which may be related to its markedly faster elimination (T1/2 = 1.7 h for Dp44mT vs. 10.7 h for DpC) and lower exposure. Incubation of these compounds with cancer cells or cardiac myoblasts did not result in any significant metabolism in-vitro. The metabolism of Dp44mT in-vivo resulted in decreased anti-cancer activity and toxicity. In conclusion, marked differences in the pharmacology of Dp44mT and DpC were observed and highlight the favorable pharmacokinetics of DpC for cancer treatment.

  18. Vaccine Therapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Adults With Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-19

    Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Long-term administration of Wilms tumor-1 peptide vaccine in combination with gemcitabine causes severe local skin inflammation at injection sites.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Atsuko; Morita-Hoshi, Yuriko; Kaida, Miho; Wakeda, Takako; Yamaki, Yuni; Kojima, Yasushi; Ueno, Hideki; Kondo, Shunsuke; Morizane, Chigusa; Ikeda, Masafumi; Okusaka, Takuji; Heike, Yuji

    2010-12-01

    The skin toxicity of vaccine therapy at injection sites is generally limited to Grades 1-2 due to the nature of their function. We experienced two cases of severe and prolonged local adverse effects in 25 patients following a Phase I study of gemcitabine and Wilms tumor-1 peptide vaccine mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant for inoperable pancreatic or biliary tract cancer. These patients requested to continue the treatment after the study period; however, in the course of compassionate use, they developed unacceptable local skin reactions and terminated their vaccine treatment. One patient (human leukocyte antigen, A0201, 3 mg) developed Grade 3 ulceration at the 10th vaccination and another (human leukocyte antigen, A2402, 1 mg) developed Grade 2 indulation and fibrosis at the 16th vaccination. Skin toxicity occurred at 6.4-8.4 months and continued for several months after the final vaccination during gemcitabine treatment. In these cases, activation or induction of Wilms tumor-1-specific T lymphocytes was not apparent in the peripheral blood despite their severe local reactions. Therefore, we need to monitor patients for late-onset, severe and long-lasting skin reactions at injection sites in Wilms tumor-1 cancer vaccine therapy, particularly for combination treatment with gemcitabine.

  20. A TLR9 agonist enhances the anti-tumor immunity of peptide and lipopeptide vaccines via different mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ying-Chyi; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2015-01-01

    The toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonists CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) have been recognized as promising adjuvants for vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. However, the role of TLR9 signaling in the regulation of antigen uptake and presentation is not well understood. Therefore, to investigate the effects of TLR9 signaling, this study used synthetic peptides (IDG) and lipopeptides (lipoIDG), which are internalized by dendritic cells (DCs) via endocytosis-dependent and endocytosis-independent pathways, respectively. Our data demonstrated that the internalization of lipoIDG and IDG by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was not enhanced in the presence of CpG ODNs; however, CpG ODNs prolonged the co-localization of IDG with CpG ODNs in early endosomes. Surprisingly, CpG ODNs enhanced CD8+ T cell responses, and the anti-tumor effects of IDG immunization were stronger than those of lipoIDG immunization. LipoIDG admixed with CpG ODNs induced low levels of CD8+ T cells and partially inhibit tumor growth. Our findings suggest that CpG ODNs increase the retention of antigens in early endosomes, which is important for eliciting anti-tumor immunity. These results will facilitate the application of CpG adjuvants in the design of different vaccines. PMID:26215533

  1. Recombinant heat shock protein 70 functional peptide and alpha-fetoprotein epitope peptide vaccine elicits specific anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Qiao-Xia; Lin, Huan-Ping; Xu, Bing; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and serves as a target for immunotherapy. However, current treatments targeting AFP are not reproducible and do not provide complete protection against cancer. This issue may be solved by developing novel therapeutic vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity that could effectively target AFP-expressing tumors. In this study, we report construction of a therapeutic peptide vaccine by linking heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) functional peptide to the AFP epitope to obtain HSP70-P/AFP-P. This novel peptide was administered into BALB/c mice to observe the effects. Quantification of AFP-specific CD8 + T cells that secrete IFN-γ in these mice via ELISPOT revealed the synergistic effects of HSP70-P/AFP-P with increased numbers of AFP-specific CD8 + T cells. Similarly, ELISA analysis showed increased granzyme B and perforin released by natural killer cells. Moreover, in vitro cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assays and in vivo tumor preventive experiments clearly showed the higher antitumor effects of HSP70-P/AFP-P against AFP-expressing tumors. These results show that treatment of BALB/c mice with HSP70-P/AFP-P induced stronger T-cells responses and improved protective immunity. Our data suggest that HSP70-P/AFP-P may be used as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of AFP-expressing cancers. PMID:27713135

  2. A Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) DNA Vaccine Delivered Using a Spring-powered Jet Injector Elicits a Potent Neutralizing Antibody
Response in Rabbits and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kwilas, Steve; Kishimori, Jennifer M.; Josleyn, Matthew; Jerke, Kurt; Ballantyne, John; Royals, Michael; Hooper, Jay W.

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) cause most of the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in North and South America, respectively. The chances of a patient surviving HPS are only two in three. Previously, we demonstrated that SNV and ANDV DNA vaccines encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals, and (for ANDV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs). In those studies, the vaccines were delivered by gene gun or muscle electroporation. Here, we tested whether a combined SNV/ANDV DNA vaccine (HPS DNA vaccine) could be delivered effectively using a disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI) system (PharmaJet, Inc). PharmaJet intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) needle-free devices are FDA 510(k)-cleared, simple to use, and do not require electricity or pressurized gas. First, we tested the SNV DNA vaccine delivered by PharmaJet IM or ID devices in rabbits and NHPs. Both IM and ID devices produced high-titer anti-SNV neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits and NHPs. However, the ID device required at least two vaccinations in NHP to detect neutralizing antibodies in most animals, whereas all animals vaccinated once with the IM device seroconverted. Because the IM device was more effective in NHP, the Stratis® (PharmaJet IM device) was selected for follow-up studies. We evaluated the HPS DNA vaccine delivered using Stratis® and found that it produced high-titer anti-SNV and anti-ANDV neutralizing antibodies in rabbits (n=8/group) as measured by a classic plaque reduction neutralization test and a new pseudovirion neutralization assay. We were interested in determining if the differences between DSJI delivery (e.g., high-velocity liquid penetration through tissue) and other methods of vaccine injection, such as needle/syringe, might result in a more immunogenic DNA vaccine. To accomplish this, we compared the HPS DNA vaccine delivered by DSJI versus needle/syringe in NHPs (n=8/group). We found that

  3. A hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) DNA vaccine delivered using a spring-powered jet injector elicits a potent neutralizing antibody response in rabbits and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kwilas, Steve; Kishimori, Jennifer M; Josleyn, Matthew; Jerke, Kurt; Ballantyne, John; Royals, Michael; Hooper, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) cause most of the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in North and South America, respectively. The chances of a patient surviving HPS are only two in three. Previously, we demonstrated that SNV and ANDV DNA vaccines encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals, and (for ANDV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs). In those studies, the vaccines were delivered by gene gun or muscle electroporation. Here, we tested whether a combined SNV/ANDV DNA vaccine (HPS DNA vaccine) could be delivered effectively using a disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI) system (PharmaJet, Inc). PharmaJet intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) needle-free devices are FDA 510(k)-cleared, simple to use, and do not require electricity or pressurized gas. First, we tested the SNV DNA vaccine delivered by PharmaJet IM or ID devices in rabbits and NHPs. Both IM and ID devices produced high-titer anti-SNV neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits and NHPs. However, the ID device required at least two vaccinations in NHP to detect neutralizing antibodies in most animals, whereas all animals vaccinated once with the IM device seroconverted. Because the IM device was more effective in NHP, the Stratis(®) (PharmaJet IM device) was selected for follow-up studies. We evaluated the HPS DNA vaccine delivered using Stratis(®) and found that it produced high-titer anti-SNV and anti-ANDV neutralizing antibodies in rabbits (n=8/group) as measured by a classic plaque reduction neutralization test and a new pseudovirion neutralization assay. We were interested in determining if the differences between DSJI delivery (e.g., high-velocity liquid penetration through tissue) and other methods of vaccine injection, such as needle/syringe, might result in a more immunogenic DNA vaccine. To accomplish this, we compared the HPS DNA vaccine delivered by DSJI versus needle/syringe in NHPs (n=8/group). We found

  4. Phenotypic and Functional Maturation of Tumor Antigen-Reactive CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Patients Undergoing Multiple Course Peptide Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Successful immunotherapy with peptide vaccines depends on the in vivo generation of sufficient numbers of anti-tumor T cells with appropriate phenotypic and functional characteristics to mediate tumor destruction. Herein, we report the induction of high frequencies of circulating CD8+ T cells (4.8% to 38.1%) directed against the native gp100:209-217 peptide derived from the gp100 melanoma-melanocyte tumor antigen in five HLA-A*0201 patients at high risk of recurrence of melanoma after multiple courses of immunization with modified gp100:209-217(210M) peptide in IFA. Longitudinal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) analysis revealed a phenotypic shift of native peptide-specific CD8+ T cells from an early effector to an effector memory (CD27- CD28- CD62L- CD45RO+) phenotype with repeated immunizations and functional maturation that correlated with gp100:209-217 peptide-specific T-cell precursor frequencies. Postimmunization PBMC exhibited direct ex vivo recognition of melanoma cell lines in ELISPOT analysis, showed lytic capability against peptide-pulsed target cells, and proliferated in response to native peptide stimulation. One year after final immunization, circulating vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells persisted in patients’ PBMC with a maintained effector memory phenotype. The results herein demonstrate the efficacy of a multiple course peptide-immunization strategy for the generation of high frequencies of tumor antigen-specific T cells in vivo, and further show that continued peptide immunization results in the escalating generation of functionally mature, tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:14676632

  5. Anti-tumor immune response correlates with neurological symptoms in a dog with spontaneous astrocytoma treated by gene and vaccine therapy.

    PubMed

    Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Grogan, Patrick T; Seiler, Charlie; Goulart, Michelle; Santacruz, Karen S; Carlson, Cathy; Chen, Wei; Olin, Mike R; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G; Haines, Stephen J; Ohlfest, John R

    2010-04-26

    Gene therapy and vaccination have been tested in malignant glioma patients with modest, albeit encouraging results. The combination of these therapies has demonstrated synergistic efficacy in murine models but has not been reported in large animals. Gemistocytic astrocytoma (GemA) is a low-grade glioma that typically progresses to lethal malignancy despite conventional therapies. Until now there has been no useful animal model of GemA. Here we report the treatment of a dog with spontaneous GemA using the combination of surgery, intracavitary adenoviral interferon gamma (IFNgamma) gene transfer, and vaccination with glioma cell lysates mixed with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Surgical tumor debulking and delivery of Ad-IFNgamma into the resection cavity were performed. Autologous tumor cells grew slowly in culture, necessitating vaccination with allogeneic tumor lysate in four of the five vaccinations. Transient left-sided blindness and hemiparesis occurred following the fourth and fifth vaccinations. These neurological symptoms correlated with a peak in the levels of tumor-reactive IgG and CD8(+) T cells measured in the blood. All symptoms resolved and this dog remains tumor-free over 450 days following surgery. This case report preliminarily demonstrates the feasibility of treating dogs with spontaneous glioma using immune-based therapy and warrants further study using this therapeutic approach. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lohmueller, Jason J.; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M.; Tucker, Meghan A.; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M.; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D.; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1+ target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  7. Mucosal Administration of CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide Elicits Strong CC and CXC Chemokine Responses in the Vagina and Serves as a Potent Th1-Tilting Adjuvant for Recombinant gD2 Protein Vaccination against Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Tengvall, Sara; Lundqvist, Annika; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2006-01-01

    Although sexually transmitted pathogens are capable of inducing pathogen-specific immune responses, vaginal administration of nonreplicating antigens elicits only weak, nondisseminating immune responses. The present study was undertaken to examine the potential of CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN) for induction of chemokine responses in the genital tract mucosa and also as a vaginal adjuvant in combination with glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) for induction of antigen-specific immune responses. We found that a single intravaginal administration of CpG ODN in mice stimulates a rapid and potent response of CC chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-1β, and RANTES as well as of CXC chemokines MIP-2 and IP-10 in the vagina and/or the genital lymph nodes. Importantly, intravaginal vaccination with recombinant gD2 in combination with CpG ODN gave rise to a strong antigen-specific Th1-like immune response in the genital lymph nodes as well as the spleens of the vaccinated mice. Further, such an immunization scheme conferred both systemic and mucosal immunoglobulin G antibody responses as well as protection against an otherwise lethal vaginal challenge with HSV-2. These results illustrate the potential of CpG ODN for induction of potent chemokine responses in the genital tract and also as a vaginal adjuvant for generation of Th1-type mucosal and systemic immune responses towards a nonreplicating antigen derived from a sexually transmitted pathogen. These data have implications for the development of a mucosal vaccine against genital herpes and possibly other sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:16699008

  8. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide1826 combined with radioresistant cancer cell vaccine confers significant antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, X B; Xing, N; Zhang, Q; Yuan, S J; Chen, W; Qiao, T K

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a hot issue in cancer research over the years and tumor cell vaccine is one of the increasing number of studies. Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), synthetic oligonucleotides containing a cytosine-phosphate-guanine(CpG) motif, was shown to enhance immune responses to a wide variety of antigens. In this study, we generated the radioresistant Lewis lung cancer cell by repeated X-ray radiation and inactivated it as a whole tumor cell vaccine to enhance the immunogenicity of tumor cell vaccine. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 and then inoculated with autologous Lewis lung cancer (LLC) to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The results showed that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 could significantly inhibit tumor growth, increased survival of the mice and with 20% of the mice surviving tumor free in vivo compared with the unimmunized mice bearing LLC tumor. A significant increase of apoptosis was also observed in the tumor prophylactically immunized with vaccine of inactivated radioresistant tumor cell plus CpG ODN1826. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α) and lower levels of interleukin-10(IL-10) concentration in serum. Furthermore, the results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was probably depended on the decreased level of programmed death ligand-1(PD-L1) which plays an important role in the negative regulation of immune response by the inhibition of tumor antigen-specific T cell activation. These findings clearly demonstrated that the radioresistant tumor cell vaccine combined with CpG ODN1826 as an appropriate adjuvant could induce effective antitumor immunity in vivo.

  9. A truncated receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV spike protein potently inhibits MERS-CoV infection and induces strong neutralizing antibody responses: implication for developing therapeutics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Du, Lanying; Kou, Zhihua; Ma, Cuiqing; Tao, Xinrong; Wang, Lili; Zhao, Guangyu; Chen, Yaoqing; Yu, Fei; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-01

    An emerging respiratory infectious disease with high mortality, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), is caused by a novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV). It was first reported in 2012 in Saudi Arabia and has now spread to eight countries. Development of effective therapeutics and vaccines is crucial to save lives and halt the spread of MERS-CoV. Here, we show that a recombinant protein containing a 212-amino acid fragment (residues 377-588) in the truncated receptor-binding domain (RBD: residues 367-606) of MERS-CoV spike (S) protein fused with human IgG Fc fragment (S377-588-Fc) is highly expressed in the culture supernatant of transfected 293T cells. The purified S377-588-Fc protein efficiently binds to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), the receptor of MERS-CoV, and potently inhibited MERS-CoV infection, suggesting its potential to be further developed as a therapeutic modality for treating MERS-CoV infection and saving the patients' lives. The recombinant S377-588-Fc is able to induce in the vaccinated mice strong MERS-CoV S-specific antibodies, which blocks the binding of RBD to DPP4 receptor and effectively neutralizes MERS-CoV infection. These findings indicate that this truncated RBD protein shows promise for further development as an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of MERS-CoV infection.

  10. Production and dosimetric aspects of the potent Auger emitter {sup 58m}Co for targeted radionuclide therapy of small tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thisgaard, H.; Elema, D.R.; Jensen, M.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Based on theoretical calculations, the Auger emitter {sup 58m}Co has been identified as a potent nuclide for targeted radionuclide therapy of small tumors. During the production of this isotope, the coproduction of the long-lived ground state {sup 58g}Co is unfortunately unavoidable, as is ingrowth of the ground state following the isomeric decay of {sup 58m}Co. The impact of {sup 58g}Co as a {beta}{sup +}- and {gamma}-emitting impurity should be included in the dosimetric analysis. The purpose of this study was to investigate this critical part of dosimetry based on experimentally determined production yields of {sup 58m}Co and {sup 58g}Co using a low-energy cyclotron. Also, the cellular S-values for {sup 58m}Co have been calculated and are presented here for the first time. Methods: {sup 58m}Co was produced via the {sup 58}Fe(p,n){sup 58m}Co nuclear reaction on highly enriched {sup 58}Fe metal. In addition, radiochemical separations of produced radio-cobalt from {sup nat}Fe target material were performed. The theoretical subcellular dosimetry calculations for {sup 58m}Co and {sup 58g}Co were performed using the MIRD formalism, and the impact of the increasing ground state impurity on the tumor-to-normal-tissue dose ratios (TND) per disintegration as a function of time after end of bombardment (EOB) was calculated. Results: 192 {+-} 8 MBq of {sup 58m}Co was produced in the irradiation corresponding to a production yield of 10.7 MBq/{mu}Ah. The activity of {sup 58g}Co was measured to be 0.85% {+-} 0.04% of the produced {sup 58m}Co activity at EOB. The radio-cobalt yields in the rapid separations were measured to be >97% with no detectable iron contaminations in the cobalt fractions. Due to the unavoidable coproduction and ingrowth of the long-lived ground state {sup 58g}Co, the TND and the potency of the {sup 58m}Co decrease with time after EOB. If a future treatment with a {sup 58m}Co labeled compound is not initiated before, e.g., 21 h after EOB, the

  11. Effects of tumor vaccine expressing Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor and interleukin-18 fusion on cancer cells and its possible application for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Rok; Park, Young Kyu; Shin, Boo Ahn; Park, Hae-Ryoung

    2017-01-01

    To access antitumor effects of a combined Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-18 (IL-18), cDNA fusion of murine GM-CSF and mature IL-18 (GMIL-18) was constructed and transfected in mammalian cells. GMIL-18 fusion protein was highly secreted and displayed bifunctional activities, possessing immune response initiation and cytokine roles, including IFN-γ induction in mouse splenocytes and increased proliferation of GM-CSF-dependent cells, M-NSF-60. The GMIL-18 secreting tumor vaccine was generated and it strongly stimulated differentiation of dendrite cells (DCs) and effusive CD8(+) and CD4(+) cell infiltration into tumor mice. Moreover, growth of CT26 mouse colon cancer cells was significantly retarded by GMIL-18 (CT26GMIL-18), but not by CT26GM-CSF- or CT26IL-18. The efficiency of prophylactic vaccination was greater than that of therapeutic vaccination in terms of tumor size and its inhibitory role in proliferation. In micrometastasis analysis of tumor models, γ-ray irradiated GMIL-18 tumor vaccine showed a smaller number of liver-meta tumor nodules in mouse liver cells. We concluded that bifunctional GMIL-18 fusion protein could be applied as an immune therapy for cancer treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vaccinia viruses: vaccines against smallpox and vectors against infectious diseases and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stephen R; Dolin, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Less than 200 years after its introduction, widespread use of vaccinia virus (VACV) as a smallpox vaccine has eradicated variola virus. Along with the remarkable success of the vaccination program, frequent and sometimes severe adverse reactions to VACV were encountered. After eradication, VACV has been reserved for select populations who might be at significant risk for orthopoxvirus infections. Events over the past decade have renewed concerns over the potential use of variola virus as a biological weapon. Accordingly, interest in VACV and attenuated derivatives has increased, both as vaccines against smallpox and as vectors for other vaccines. This article will focus on new developments in the field of orthopoxvirus immunization and will highlight recent advances in the use of vaccinia viruses as vectors for infectious diseases and malignancies. PMID:21854314

  13. Clinical Implications of Co-Inhibitory Molecule Expression in the Tumor Microenvironment for DC Vaccination: A Game of Stop and Go

    PubMed Central

    Vasaturo, Angela; Di Blasio, Stefania; Peeters, Deborah G. A.; de Koning, Coco C. H.; de Vries, Jolanda M.; Figdor, Carl G.; Hato, Stanleyson V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of therapeutic dendritic cell (DC) vaccines in cancer immunotherapy is to activate cytotoxic T cells to recognize and attack the tumor. T cell activation requires the interaction of the T cell receptor with a cognate major-histocompatibility complex-peptide complex. Although initiated by antigen engagement, it is the complex balance between co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signals on DCs that results in T cell activation or tolerance. Even when already activated, tumor-specific T cells can be neutralized by the expression of co-inhibitory molecules on tumor cells. These and other immunosuppressive cues in the tumor microenvironment are major factors currently hampering the application of DC vaccination. In this review, we discuss recent data regarding the essential and complex role of co-inhibitory molecules in regulating the immune response within the tumor microenvironment. In particular, possible therapeutic intervention strategies aimed at reversing or neutralizing suppressive networks within the tumor microenvironment will be emphasized. Importantly, blocking co-inhibitory molecule signaling, often referred to as immune checkpoint blockade, does not necessarily lead to an effective activation of tumor-specific T cells. Therefore, combination of checkpoint blockade with other immune potentiating therapeutic strategies, such as DC vaccination, might serve as a synergistic combination, capable of reversing effector T cells immunosuppression while at the same time increasing the efficacy of T cell-mediated immunotherapies. This will ultimately result in long-term anti-tumor immunity. PMID:24348481

  14. A Feasibility Study of Cyclophosphamide, Trastuzumab, and an Allogeneic GM-CSF-secreting Breast Tumor Vaccine for HER-2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G; Gupta, R; Petrik, S; Laiko, M; Leatherman, JM; Asquith, JM; Daphtary, MM; Garrett-Mayer, E; Davidson, NE; Hirt, K; Berg, M; Uram, JN; Dauses, T; Fetting, J; Duus, EM; Atay-Rosenthal, S; Ye, X; Wolff, AC; Stearns, V; Jaffee, EM; Emens, LA

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-secreting tumor vaccines are bioactive, but limited by disease burden and immune tolerance. Cyclophosphamide (CY) augments vaccine activity in tolerant neu mice and metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. HER-2-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAb) enhance vaccine activity in neu mice. We hypothesized that CY-modulated vaccination with HER-2-specific MAb safely induces relevant HER-2-specific immunity in neu mice and HER-2+ MBC patients. Adding both CY and the HER-2-specific MAb 7.16.4 to vaccination maximized HER-2-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity and tumor-free survival in neu transgenic mice. We therefore conducted a single arm feasibility study of CY, an allogeneic HER-2+ GM-CSF-secreting breast tumor vaccine, and weekly trastuzumab in 20 HER-2+ MBC patients. Primary clinical trial objectives were safety and clinical benefit (CB), in which CB represents complete response+partial response+stable disease. Secondary study objectives were to assess HER-2-specific T-cell responses by delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and intracellular cytokine staining. Subjects received three monthly vaccinations, with a boost 6-8 months from trial entry. This combination immunotherapy was safe, with CB rates at 6 months and 1 year of 55% (95% CI:32-77%, p=0.013) and 40% (95% CI:19-64%) respectively. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 7 (95% CI:4-16) and 42 months (95% CI:22-70) respectively. Increased HER-2-specific DTH developed in 7/20 subjects (of whom 4 had CB (95% CI:18-90)), with a trend toward longer PFS and OS in DTH responders. Polyfunctional HER-2-specific CD8+ T cells progressively expanded across vaccination cycles. Further investigation of CY-modulated vaccination with trastuzumab is warranted. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00399529) PMID:25116755

  15. Silencing of Foxp3 enhances the antitumor efficacy of GM-CSF genetically modified tumor cell vaccine against B16 melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Antonio; Sendra, Luis; Noé, Verónica; Ciudad, Carles J; Dasí, Francisco; Hervas, David; Herrero, María José; Aliño, Salvador F

    2017-01-01

    The antitumor response after therapeutic vaccination has a limited effect and seems to be related to the presence of T regulatory cells (Treg), which express the immunoregulatory molecules CTLA4 and Foxp3. The blockage of CTLA4 using antibodies has shown an effective antitumor response conducing to the approval of the human anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab by the US Food and Drug Administration. On the other hand, Foxp3 is crucial for Treg development. For this reason, it is an attractive target for cancer treatment. This study aims to evaluate whether combining therapeutic vaccination with CTLA4 or Foxp3 gene silencing enhances the antitumor response. First, the “in vitro” cell entrance and gene silencing efficacy of two tools, 2′-O-methyl phosphorotioate-modified oligonucleotides (2′-OMe-PS-ASOs) and polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs), were evaluated in EL4 cells and cultured primary lymphocytes. Following B16 tumor transplant, C57BL6 mice were vaccinated with irradiated B16 tumor cells engineered to produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and were intraperitoneally treated with CTLA4 and Foxp3 2′-OMe-PS-ASO before and after vaccination. Tumor growth, mice survival, and CTLA4 and Foxp3 expression in blood cells were measured. The following results were obtained: 1) only 2′-OMe-PS-ASO reached gene silencing efficacy “in vitro”; 2) an improved survival effect was achieved combining both therapeutic vaccine and Foxp3 antisense or CTLA4 antisense oligonucleotides (50% and 20%, respectively); 3) The blood CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ (Treg) and CD4+CTLA4+ cell counts were higher in mice that developed tumor on the day of sacrifice. Our data showed that tumor cell vaccine combined with Foxp3 or CTLA4 gene silencing can increase the efficacy of therapeutic antitumor vaccination. PMID:28176947

  16. Gene silencing of TGF-β1 enhances antitumor immunity induced with a dendritic cell vaccine by reducing tumor-associated regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Helen; Galvin, Karen C; Higgins, Sarah C; Mills, Kingston H G

    2012-03-01

    Active immunotherapy and cancer vaccines that promote host antitumor immune responses promise to be effective and less toxic alternatives to current cytotoxic drugs for the treatment of cancer. However, the success of tumor immunotherapeutics and vaccines is dependent on identifying approaches for circumventing the immunosuppressive effects of regulatory T (Treg) cells induced by the growing tumor and by immunotherapeutic molecules, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Here, we show that tumors secrete high concentrations of active TGF-β1, a cytokine that can convert naive T cells into Foxp3+ Treg cells. Silencing TGF-β1 mRNA using small interfering RNA (siRNA) in tumor cells inhibited active TGF-β1 production in vitro and restrained their growth in vivo. Prophylactic but not therapeutic administration of TGF-β1 siRNA reduced the growth of CT26 tumors in vivo. Furthermore, suppressing TGF-β1 expression at the site of a tumor, using siRNA before, during and after therapeutic administration of a TLR-activated antigen-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine significantly reduced the growth of B16 melanoma in mice. The protective effect of co-administering TGF-β1 siRNA with the DC vaccine was associated with suppression of CD25+ Foxp3+ and CD25+ IL-10+ T cells and enhancement of tumor infiltrating CD4 and CD8 T cells. Our findings suggest that transient suppression of TGF-β1 may be a promising approach for enhancing the efficacy of tumor vaccines in humans.

  17. Phase I clinical trial of a five-peptide cancer vaccine combined with cyclophosphamide in advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Murahashi, Mutsunori; Hijikata, Yasuki; Yamada, Kazunari; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Kishimoto, Junji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Marumoto, Tomotoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Fujii, Hiroshi; Okano, Shinji; Morita, Masaru; Baba, Eishi; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masao; Akashi, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2016-05-01

    We designed a phase I trial to investigate the safety, immune responses and clinical benefits of a five-peptide cancer vaccine in combination with chemotherapy. Study subjects were patients positive for HLA-A2402 with locally advanced, metastatic, and/or recurrent gastrointestinal, lung or cervical cancer. Eighteen patients including nine cases of colorectal cancer were treated with escalating doses of cyclophosphamide 4days before vaccination. Five HLA-A2402-restricted, tumor-associated antigen (TAA) epitope peptides from KOC1, TTK, URLC10, DEPDC1 and MPHOSPH1 were injected weekly for 4weeks. Treatment was well tolerated without any adverse events above grade 3. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes showed that the number of regulatory T cells dropped from baseline after administration of cyclophosphamide and confirmed that TAA-specific T cell responses were associated significantly with longer overall survival. This phase I clinical trial demonstrated safety and promising immune responses that correlated with vaccine-induced T-cell responses. Therefore, this approach warrants further clinical studies.

  18. Chemical Castration of melanoma patients does not increase the frequency of tumor-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells after peptide vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Vence, Luis; Wang, Chiyu; Pappu, Himabindu; Anson, Ryan; Patel, Tejal A.; Miller, Priscilla; Bassett, Roland; Lizee, Gregory; Overwijk, Willem W.; Komanduri, Krishna; Benjamin, Cara; Alvarado, Gladys; Patel, Sapna P.; Kim, Kevin; Papadopoulos, Nicholas E.; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Homsi, Jade; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Boyd, Richard; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Hwu, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Peptide vaccination against tumor associated antigens (TAA) remains one of the most common methods of immunization in cancer vaccine clinical trials. While peptide vaccination has been reported to increase circulating antigen-specific T-cells, they have had limited clinical efficacy and there is a necessity to increase their capacity to generate strong anti-tumor responses. We sought to improve the clinical efficacy of peptide-based vaccines in cancer immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma using a LHRH-agonist (Leuprolide) as adjuvant. Seventy HLA-A*0201+ Stage IIb-IV melanoma patients were vaccinated with class I HLA-A*0201-restricted gp100209-2M peptide and stratified for HLA-DP4 restriction. HLA-DP4+ patients were also vaccinated with class II HLA-DP4-restricted MAGE-3243-258 peptide. Patients from both groups were randomized to receive 2 doses of Leuprolide or not. Here we report the increase in PBMC TREC levels at week 24 after peptide vaccination which was independent of the Leuprolide treatment. This change was mirrored by a small increase in the TREC-enriched CD8+CD45RA+RO−CD27+CD103+, but not the TREC-enriched CD4+CD45RA+RO−CD31+ T cell population. Serum concentration of two important factors for thymopoiesis was measured: IGF-1 levels were not changed, while a moderate increase in IL-7 levels was noted in the sera of all patients 6 weeks after vaccination. Increased expression of CD127 (IL-7 receptor alpha) at week 24, compared to baseline, was only seen in the CD8+CD45RA+RO−CD27+CD103+ T cell population. Our results suggest that Leuprolide has no effect on thymic output when used as peptide vaccine adjuvant, but IFA-based peptide vaccination may unexpectedly affect the thymus by increasing thymic output of new T cells. PMID:23603862

  19. DNA vaccines: an historical perspective and view to the future.

    PubMed

    Liu, Margaret A

    2011-01-01

    This review provides a detailed look at the attributes and immunologic mechanisms of plasmid DNA vaccines and their utility as laboratory tools as well as potential human vaccines. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccines in a variety of preclinical models is used to illustrate how they differ from traditional vaccines in novel ways due to the in situ antigen production and the ease with which they are constructed. The ability to make new DNA vaccines without needing to handle a virulent pathogen or to adapt the pathogen for manufacturing purposes demonstrates the potential value of this vaccine technology for use against emerging and epidemic pathogens. Similarly, personalized anti-tumor DNA vaccines can also readily be made from a biopsy. Because DNA vaccines bias the T-helper (Th) cell response to a Th1 phenotype, DNA vaccines are also under development for vaccines against allergy and autoimmune diseases. The licensure of four animal health products, including two prophylactic vaccines against infectious diseases, one immunotherapy for cancer, and one gene therapy delivery of a hormone for a food animal, provides evidence of the efficacy of DNA vaccines in multiple species including horses and pigs. The size of these target animals provides evidence that the somewhat disappointing immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in a number of human clinical trials is not due simply to the larger mass of humans compared with most laboratory animals. The insights gained from the mechanisms of protection in the animal vaccines, the advances in the delivery and expression technologies for increasing the potency of DNA vaccines, and encouragingly potent human immune responses in certain clinical trials, provide insights for future efforts to develop DNA vaccines into a broadly useful vaccine and immunotherapy platform with applications for human and animal health.

  20. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  1. Co-transfection gene delivery of dendritic cells induced effective lymph node targeting and anti-tumor vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhe; Ruan, Gui-Xin; Yao, Xing-Lei; Li, Li-Ming; Hu, Ying; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2013-06-01

    Successful genetically engineered Dendritic Cell (DC) can enhance DC's antigen presentation and lymph node migration. The present study aims to genetically engineer a DC using an efficient non-viral gene delivery vector to induce a highly efficient antigen presentation and lymph node targeting in vivo. Spermine-dextran (SD), a cationic polysaccharide vector, was used to prepare a gene delivery system for DC engineering. Transfection efficiency, nuclear trafficking, and safety of the SD/DNA complex were evaluated. A vaccine prepared by engineering DC with SD/gp100, a plasmid encoding melanoma-associated antigen, was injected subcutaneously into mice to evaluate the tumor suppression. The migration of the engineered DCs was also evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SD/DNA complex has a better transfection behavior in vitro than commercially purchased reagents. The DC vaccine co-transfected with plasmid coding CCR7, a chemokine receptor essential for DC migration, and plasmid coding gp100 displayed superior tumor suppression than that with plasmid coding gp100 alone. Migration assay demonstrated that DC transfected with SD/CCR7 can promote DC migration capacity. The study is the first to report the application of nonviral vector SD to co-transfect DC with gp100 and CCR7-coding plasmid to induce both the capacity of antigen presentation and lymph node targeting.

  2. Programming tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T cells in vitro obviates the requirement for in vivo vaccination.

    PubMed

    Klebanoff, Christopher A; Yu, Zhiya; Hwang, Leroy N; Palmer, Douglas C; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2009-08-27

    Naive and memory CD8(+) T cells can undergo programmed activation and expansion in response to a short T-cell receptor stimulus, but the extent to which in vitro programming can qualitatively substitute for an in vivo antigen stimulation remains unknown. We show that self-/tumor-reactive effector memory CD8(+) T cells (T(EM)) programmed in vitro either with peptide-pulsed antigen-presenting cells or plate-bound anti-CD3/anti-CD28 embark on a highly stereotyped response of in vivo clonal expansion and tumor destruction nearly identical to that of vaccine-stimulated T(EM) cells. This programmed response was associated with an interval of antigen-independent interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) release that facilitated the dynamic expression of the major histocompatibility complex class I restriction element H-2D(b) on responding tumor cells, leading to recognition and subsequent tumor lysis. Delaying cell transfer for more than 24 hours after stimulation or infusion of cells deficient in IFN-gamma entirely abrogated the benefit of the programmed response, whereas transfer of cells unable to respond to IFN-gamma had no detriment to antitumor immunity. These findings extend the phenomenon of a programmable effector response to memory CD8(+) T cells and have major implications for the design of current adoptive-cell transfer trials.

  3. Modeling protective anti-tumor immunity via preventative cancer vaccines using a hybrid agent-based and delay differential equation approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter S; Lee, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    A next generation approach to cancer envisions developing preventative vaccinations to stimulate a person's immune cells, particularly cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), to eliminate incipient tumors before clinical detection. The purpose of our study is to quantitatively assess whether such an approach would be feasible, and if so, how many anti-cancer CTLs would have to be primed against tumor antigen to provide significant protection. To understand the relevant dynamics, we develop a two-compartment model of tumor-immune interactions at the tumor site and the draining lymph node. We model interactions at the tumor site using an agent-based model (ABM) and dynamics in the lymph node using a system of delay differential equations (DDEs). We combine the models into a hybrid ABM-DDE system and investigate dynamics over a wide range of parameters, including cell proliferation rates, tumor antigenicity, CTL recruitment times, and initial memory CTL populations. Our results indicate that an anti-cancer memory CTL pool of 3% or less can successfully eradicate a tumor population over a wide range of model parameters, implying that a vaccination approach is feasible. In addition, sensitivity analysis of our model reveals conditions that will result in rapid tumor destruction, oscillation, and polynomial rather than exponential decline in the tumor population due to tumor geometry.

  4. A Fusion Protein of HCMV IE1 exon4 and IE2 exon5 Stimulates Potent Cellular Immunity in an MVA Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Zhou, W; Srivastava, T; La Rosa, C; Mandarino, A; Forman, SJ; Zaia, JA; Britt, WJ; Diamond, DJ

    2008-01-01

    A therapeutic CMV vaccine incorporating an antigenic repertoire capable of eliciting a cellular immune response has yet to be successfully implemented for patients who already have acquired an infection. To address this problem, we have developed a vaccine candidate derived from modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) that expresses three immunodominant antigens (pp65, IE1, IE2) from CMV. The novelty of this vaccine is the fusion of two adjacent exons from the immediate-early region of CMV, their successful expression in MVA, and robust immunogenicity in both primary and memory response models. Evaluation of the immunogenicity of the viral vaccine in mouse models shows that it can stimulate primary immunity against all three antigens in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Evaluation of human PBMC from healthy CMV-positive donors or patients within 6 months of receiving hematopoietic cell transplant shows robust stimulation of existing CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subsets. PMID:18538366

  5. Live, attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines elicit potent resistance against a challenge with a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 chimeric virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, R; Siemon, C; Czajak, S C; Desrosiers, R C; Martin, M A

    1997-01-01

    Three rhesus macaques, previously immunized with SIVdelta3 or SIVdelta2, each an attenuated derivative of SIVmac239, and two naive monkeys were challenged with 30,000 50% tissue culture infective doses of SHIV, an SIV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) chimeric virus bearing the dual-tropic envelope of HIV-1DH12. By several criteria, including virus isolation, serological assays, and PCR (both DNA and reverse transcriptase), SHIV levels were reduced to barely detectable levels in the circulating blood of vaccinated animals. The resistant SIV-vaccinated macaques had no preexisting neutralizing antibodies directed against SHIV, nor did they produce neutralizing antibodies at any time over a 14-month observation period following SHIV challenge. Interestingly, SIV sequences, derived from the vaccine, could be amplified from numerous tissue samples collected at the conclusion of the experiment, 60 weeks postchallenge, but SHIV-specific sequences (viz., HIV-1 env) could not. These results demonstrate that live attenuated SIV vaccines provide strong long-term protection even against challenge strains with highly divergent envelope sequences. PMID:9343164

  6. A fusion protein of HCMV IE1 exon4 and IE2 exon5 stimulates potent cellular immunity in an MVA vaccine vector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Zhou, W.; Srivastava, T.; La Rosa, C.; Mandarino, A.; Forman, S.J.; Zaia, J.A.; Britt, W.J.; Diamond, D.J.

    2008-08-01

    A therapeutic CMV vaccine incorporating an antigenic repertoire capable of eliciting a cellular immune response has yet to be successfully implemented for patients who already have acquired an infection. To address this problem, we have developed a vaccine candidate derived from modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) that expresses three immunodominant antigens (pp65, IE1, IE2) from CMV. The novelty of this vaccine is the fusion of two adjacent exons from the immediate-early region of CMV, their successful expression in MVA, and robust immunogenicity in both primary and memory response models. Evaluation of the immunogenicity of the viral vaccine in mouse models shows that it can stimulate primary immunity against all three antigens in both the CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell subsets. Evaluation of human PBMC from healthy CMV-positive donors or patients within 6 months of receiving hematopoietic cell transplant shows robust stimulation of existing CMV-specific CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell subsets.

  7. Langerin negative dendritic cells promote potent CD8+ T-cell priming by skin delivery of live adenovirus vaccine microneedle arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bachy, Veronique; Hervouet, Catherine; Becker, Pablo D.; Chorro, Laurent; Carlin, Leo M.; Herath, Shanthi; Papagatsias, Timos; Barbaroux, Jean-Baptiste; Oh, Sea-Jin; Benlahrech, Adel; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Dickson, George; Patterson, Steven; Kwon, Sung-Yun; Geissmann, Frederic; Klavinskis, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Stabilization of virus protein structure and nucleic acid integrity is challenging yet essential to preserve the transcriptional competence of live recombinant viral vaccine vectors in the absence of a cold chain. When coupled with needle-free skin delivery, such a platform would address an unmet need in global vaccine coverage against HIV and other global pathogens. Herein, we show that a simple dissolvable microneedle array (MA) delivery system preserves the immunogenicity of vaccines encoded by live recombinant human adenovirus type 5 (rAdHu5). Specifically, dried rAdHu5 MA immunization induced CD8+ T-cell expansion and multifunctional cytokine responses equipotent with conventional injectable routes of immunization. Intravital imaging demonstrated MA cargo distributed both in the epidermis and dermis, with acquisition by CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) in the dermis. The MA immunizing properties were attributable to CD11c+ MHCIIhi CD8αneg epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAMneg) CD11b+ langerin (Lang; CD207)neg DCs, but neither Langerhans cells nor Lang+ DCs were required for CD8+ T-cell priming. This study demonstrates an important technical advance for viral vaccine vectors progressing to the clinic and provides insights into the mechanism of CD8+ T-cell priming by live rAdHu5 MAs. PMID:23386724

  8. A Genetically Modified attenuated Listeria Vaccine Expressing HPV16 E7 Kill Tumor Cells in Direct and Antigen-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yan Yan; Tan, Wei Jun; Duan, Fei Fei; Pan, Zhi Ming; Chen, Xiang; Yin, Yue Lan; Jiao, Xin An

    2017-01-01

    Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes, LM) induces specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses, and has been identified as a promising cancer vaccine vector. Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, with human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly type 16, being the main etiological factor. The therapeutic HPV vaccines are urgently needed. The E7 protein of HPV is necessary for maintaining malignancy in tumor cells. Here, a genetically modified attenuated LM expressing HPV16 E7 protein was constructed. Intraperitoneal vaccination of LM4Δhly::E7 significantly reduced tumor size and even resulted in complete regression of established tumors in a murine model of cervical cancer. We provided evidence that recombinant LM strains could enter the tumor tissue and induce non-specific tumor cell death, probably via activation of reactive oxygen species and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. LM4Δhly::E7 effectively triggered a strong antigen-specific cellular immunity in tumor-bearing mice, and elicited significant infiltration of T cells in the intratumoral milieu. In summary, these data showed LM4Δhly::E7 to be effective in a cervical cancer model and LM4Δhly::E7 induced an antitumor effect by antigen-specific cellular immune responses and direct killing of tumor cells, indicating a potential application against cervical cancer. PMID:28706878

  9. CTLA-4 blockade enhances the therapeutic effect of an attenuated poxvirus vaccine targeting p53 in an established murine tumor model.

    PubMed

    Espenschied, Jonathan; Lamont, Jeffrey; Longmate, Jeff; Pendas, Solange; Wang, Zhongde; Diamond, Don J; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I

    2003-03-15

    p53 is overexpressed by half of all cancers, and is an attractive target for a vaccine approach to immunotherapy. p53 overexpression is frequently the result of point mutations, which leaves the majority of the protein in its wild-type form. Therefore, the majority of p53 sequence is wild type, making it a self-protein for which tolerance plays a role in limiting immune responses. To overcome tolerance to p53, we have expressed wild-type murine p53 in the nonpathogenic attenuated poxvirus, modified vaccinia virus Ankara (recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing wild-type murine p53 (rMVAp53)). Mice immunized with rMVAp53 vaccine developed vigorous p53-specific CTL responses. rMVAp53 vaccine was evaluated for its ability to inhibit the outgrowth of the syngeneic murine sarcoma Meth A, which overexpresses mutant p53. Mice were inoculated with a lethal dose (5 x 10(5) cells injected s.c.) of Meth A tumor cells and vaccinated by i.p. injection 3 days later with 5 x 10(7) PFU of rMVAp53. The majority of mice remained tumor free and resistant to rechallenge with Meth A tumor cells. We wished to determine whether rMVAp53 immunization could effect the rejection of an established, palpable Meth A tumor. In subsequent experiments, mice were injected with 10(6) Meth A tumor cells, and treated 6 days later with anti-CTLA-4 Ab (9H10) and rMVAp53. The majority of treated mice had complete tumor regression along with lasting tumor immunity. In vivo Ab depletion confirmed that the antitumor effect was primarily CD8 and to a lesser extent CD4 dependent. These experiments demonstrate the potential of a novel cell-free vaccine targeting p53 in malignancy.

  10. Naloxone/alum mixture a potent adjuvant for HIV-1 vaccine: induction of cellular and poly-isotypic humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Velashjerdi Farahani, Sima; Reza Aghasadeghi, Mohammad; Memarnejadian, Arash; Faezi, Sobhan; Shahosseini, Zahra; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    In the present study we used a fusion peptide from HIV-1 p24 and Nef as vaccine model and adjuvant activity of Naloxone/alum mixture was evaluated in a peptide vaccine model. HIV-1 p24-Nef fusion peptide was synthesized. Female BALB/c mice were divided into five groups. The first group immunized subcutaneously with the p24-Nef fusion peptide adjuvanted with Naloxone/alum mixture and boosted with same protocol. The second was immunized with fusion peptide adjuvanted in alum. The control groups were injected with NLX (Group 3), Alum (Group 4), or PBS (Groups 5) under the same conditions. To determine the type of induced immune response, sera and splenocytes were analyzed by commercial ELISA method for total IgG and isotypes and cytokine secretion (IL-4 & IFN-γ), respectively. We have also used the ELISPOT assay to monitor changes in the frequency of IFN-γ-producing T cells. The proliferation of T cells was assessed using Brdu method and T-cell cytotoxicity was assessed with CFSE method. Immunization of mice with HIV-1 p24-Nef fusion peptide formulated in Naloxone/alum mixture significantly increased lymphocyte proliferation and shifted cytokine responses toward Th1 profile compared to all other groups. Analysis of humoral immune responses revealed that administration of HIV-1 p24-Nef fusion peptide with Naloxone/alum mixture significantly increased specific IgG responses and also increased IgG1,IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3, and IgM vs. alum-adjuvanted vaccine groups. Naloxone/alum mixture as an adjuvant could improve cellular and humoral immune response for HIV vaccine model and this adjuvant maybe useful for HIV vaccine model in human clinical trial.

  11. Radiation therapy combined with Listeria monocytogenes-based cancer vaccine synergize to enhance tumor control in the B16 melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Joanne YH; Brockstedt, Dirk G; Lord, Edith M; Gerber, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Conceptually, the immune system may profoundly influence the efficacy of radiation therapy. Compelling evidence has recently emerged revealing the capacity of local radiation therapy (RT) to induce antitumor immune responses and sparked interest in combining RT with immunotherapy to promote tumor-specific immunity. A Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-based cancer vaccine engineered to express tumor-associated antigen has been shown to effectively retard tumor growth by cell-mediated immune mechanisms. We hypothesized that combining RT and Lm vaccine will result in synergistic effects that enhance tumor control. Collectively, our data demonstrate that combination therapy significantly delayed B16 melanoma tumor growth by a mechanism partly dependent on CD8+ T cells. Radiotherapy and Lm vaccine each induce different aspects of antitumor immunity, resulting in an overall increase in intratumoral numbers of activated T cells, antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and levels of effector molecules, such as interferon γ (IFNγ) and granzyme B. Thus, radiation and Lm vaccine combination therapy is a promising new strategy for the treatment of malignant disease, and further understanding of the mechanisms that underlie efficacy is required to optimize the dosage and schedule for administering the two treatments. PMID:25083327

  12. Gp96-Ig/Costimulator (OX40L, ICOSL, or 4-1BBL) Combination Vaccine Improves T-cell Priming and Enhances Immunity, Memory, and Tumor Elimination.

    PubMed

    Fromm, George; de Silva, Suresh; Giffin, Louise; Xu, Xin; Rose, Jason; Schreiber, Taylor H

    2016-09-02

    T-cell costimulation typically occurs in a defined microenvironment that is not recapitulated by agonistic antibody therapy. To deliver such stimulation under more favorable conditions, we investigated whether an allogeneic cell-based vaccine that secreted Fc-OX40L, Fc-ICOSL, or Fc-4-1BBL would activate and expand T cells comparably with systemically administered agonist antibodies. Among these costimulators, locally secreted Fc-OX40L provided superior priming of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, compared with combinations with OX40 antibodies or vaccine alone. Vaccine-expressed Fc-OX40L also stimulated IFNγ, TNFα, granzyme B, and IL2 by antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells similarly to OX40 antibodies, without off-target consequences such as proinflammatory cytokine induction. Vaccine-secreted Fc-OX40L increased CD127(+)KLRG-1(-) memory precursor cells during the contraction phase, resulting in improved proliferation upon secondary antigen challenge, as compared with OX40 antibody. A cell-based vaccine cosecreting gp96-Ig and Fc-OX40L led to even more pronounced tumor control, complete tumor rejection, and increased tumor antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, including in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, as compared with combinations of gp96-Ig vaccine and OX40 antibodies, in mice with established melanoma or colorectal carcinoma. These data suggest that local modulation of the vaccine microenvironment has unexpected advantages over systemic costimulation with agonistic antibodies, which may simplify the clinical translation of such combination immunotherapies into humans. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 766-78. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Generation of autologous tumor-specific T cells for adoptive transfer based on vaccination, in vitro restimulation and CD3/CD28 dynabead-induced T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Gang, Anne Ortved; Donia, Marco; Thor Straten, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of in vitro expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has been shown to exert therapeutic efficacy in melanoma patients. We aimed to develop an ACT protocol based on tumor-specific T cells isolated from peripheral blood and in vitro expanded by Dynabeads® ClinExVivo™CD3/CD28. We show here that the addition of an in vitro restimulation step with relevant peptides prior to bead expansion dramatically increased the proportion of tumor-specific T cells in PBMC-cultures. Importantly, peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) as well as allogeneic tumor lysate-pulsed DCs from the DC vaccine preparation could be used with comparable efficiency to peptides for in vitro restimulation, to increase the tumor-specific T-cell response. Furthermore, we tested the use of different ratios and different types of Dynabeads® CD3/CD28 and CD3/CD28/CD137 T-cell expander, for optimized expansion of tumor-specific T cells. A ratio of 1:3 of Dynabeads® CD3/CD28 T-cell expander to T cells resulted in the maximum number of tumor-specific T cells. The addition of CD137 did not improve functionality or fold expansion. Both T-cell expansion systems could generate tumor-specific T cells that were both cytotoxic and effective cytokine producers upon antigen recognition. Dynabeads®-expanded T-cell cultures shows phenotypical characteristics of memory T cells with potential to migrate and expand in vivo. In addition, they possess longer telomeres compared to TIL cultures. Taken together, we demonstrate that in vitro restimulation of tumor-specific T cells prior to bead expansion is necessary to achieve high numbers of tumor-specific T cells. This is effective and easily applicable in combination with DC vaccination, by use of vaccine-generated DCs, either pulsed with peptide or tumor-lysate.

  14. Unique potential of 4-1BB agonist antibody to promote durable regression of HPV+ tumors when combined with an E6/E7 peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Galvan, Gloria; Haria, Dhwani; Ai, Midan; Allison, James P; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Curran, Michael A

    2015-09-22

    Antibody modulation of T-cell coinhibitory (e.g., CTLA-4) or costimulatory (e.g., 4-1BB) receptors promotes clinical responses to a variety of cancers. Therapeutic cancer vaccination, in contrast, has produced limited clinical benefit and no curative therapies. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of human papilloma virus (HPV) drive the majority of genital cancers, and many oropharyngeal tumors. We discovered 15-19 amino acid peptides from HPV-16 E6/E7 for which induction of T-cell immunity correlates with disease-free survival in patients treated for high-grade cervical neoplasia. We report here that intranasal vaccination with these peptides and the adjuvant alpha-galactosylceramide elicits systemic and mucosal T-cell responses leading to reduced HPV(+) TC-1 tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice. We hypothesized that the inability of these T cells to fully reject established tumors resulted from suppression in the tumor microenvironment which could be ameliorated through checkpoint modulation. Combining this E6/E7 peptide vaccine with checkpoint blockade produced only modest benefit; however, coadministration with a 4-1BB agonist antibody promoted durable regression of established genital TC-1 tumors. Relative to other therapies tested, this combination of vaccine and α4-1BB promoted the highest CD8(+) versus regulatory FoxP3(+) T-cell ratios, elicited 2- to 5-fold higher infiltration by E7-specific CTL, and evoked higher densities of highly cytotoxic TcEO (T cytotoxic Eomesodermin) CD8 (>70-fold) and ThEO (T helper Eomesodermin) CD4 (>17-fold) T cells. These findings have immediate clinical relevance both in terms of the direct clinical utility of the vaccine studied and in illustrating the potential of 4-1BB antibody to convert therapeutic E6/E7 vaccines already in clinical trials into curative therapies.

  15. The live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine</