Science.gov

Sample records for potential endogenous marker

  1. Identification of novel markers of alternative activation and potential endogenous PPARγ ligand production mechanisms in human IL-4 stimulated differentiating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Czimmerer, Zsolt; Varga, Tamas; Poliska, Szilard; Nemet, Istvan; Szanto, Attila; Nagy, Laszlo

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed global gene expression profiles of IL-4 induced alternatively activated as well as IFNγ+TNFα stimulated classically activated human monocyte derived macrophages and identified novel IL-4 regulated alternative activation marker genes including MS4A4A, SLA, CD180, and ENPP2. Transcription factor prediction analysis of IL-4 regulated genes suggested that the regulated genes are involved in a complex regulation of lipid metabolism, defense against cell metabolism derived reactive oxygen species, and basal expression of inflammation linked genes. Both an in silico transcription activation prediction as well as experimental data suggested the presence of alternative macrophage activation specific endogenous PPARγ ligand producing mechanisms. We found the induction of three enzymes whose activity can potentially generate endogenous PPARγ ligands in an IL-4 dependent manner. These are MAOA, ENPP2, and ALOX15 producing 5-methoxy-indole acetate, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and 13-hydroxyoctadienoic acid (13-HODE), and/or 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), respectively. Our data suggest that global gene expression profiling, combined with computational transcription activity prediction, can lead to identification of transcriptional networks that underpin cellular subtype specification.

  2. Endogenous versus exogenous markers of adult neurogenesis in canaries and other birds: Advantages and Disadvantages

    PubMed Central

    Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F.

    2014-01-01

    Although the existence of newborn neurons had originally been suggested, but not broadly accepted, based on studies in adult rodent brains, the presence of an active neurogenesis process in adult homoeothermic vertebrates was first firmly established in songbirds. Adult neurogenesis was initially studied with the tritiated thymidine technique, later replaced by the injection and detection of the marker of DNA replication 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). More recently, various endogenous markers were used to identify young neurons or cycling neuronal progenitors. We review here the respective advantages and pitfalls of these different approaches in birds, with specific reference to the microtubule-associated protein, doublecortin (DCX), that has been extensively used to identify young newly born neurons in adult brains. All these techniques of course have limitations. Exogenous markers label cells replicating their DNA only during a brief period and it is difficult to select injection doses that would exhaustively label all these cells without inducing DNA damage that will also result in some form of labeling during repair. On the other hand, specificity of endogenous markers is difficult to establish due to problems related to the specificity of antibodies (these problems can be, but are not always, addressed) and more importantly because it is difficult, if not impossible, to prove that a given marker exhaustively and specifically labels a given cell population. Despite these potential limitations, these endogenous markers and DCX staining in particular clearly represent a useful approach to the detailed study of neurogenesis especially when combined with other techniques such as BrdU. PMID:25131458

  3. Bacopa monnieri modulates endogenous cytoplasmic and mitochondrial oxidative markers in prepubertal mice brain.

    PubMed

    Shinomol, George K; Muralidhara

    2011-02-15

    Bacopa monnieri (BM) an herb, found throughout the Indian subcontinent in wet, damp and marshy areas is used in Ayurvedic system of medicine for improving intellect/memory, treatment of anxiety and neuropharmacological disorders. Although extensively given to children as a memory enhancer, no data exists on its ability to modulate neuronal oxidative stress in prepubertal animal models. Hence in this study, we examined if dietary intake of BM leaf powder has the propensity to modulate endogenous markers of oxidative stress, redox status (reduced GSH, thiol status), response of antioxidant defenses (enzymic), protein oxidation and cholinergic function in various brain regions of prepubertal (PP) mice. PP mice maintained on a BM-enriched diet (0.5 and 1%) for 4 weeks showed a significant diminution of basal oxidative markers (malondialdehyde levels, reactive species generation, hydroperoxide levels and protein carbonyls) in both cytoplasm and mitochondria of all brain regions. This was accompanied with enhanced reduced glutathione, thiol levels and elevated activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase). Significant reduction in the activity of acetyl cholinesterase enzyme in all brain regions suggested the potential of BM leaf powder to modulate cholinergic function. Further evidence that dietary intake of BM leaf powder confers the prepubertal brain with additional capacity to cope up with neurotoxic prooxidants was obtained by exposing cortical/cerebellar synaptosomes of normal and BM fed mice to 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA). While synaptosomes from control mice exhibited a concentration related lipid peroxidation and ROS generation, synaptosomes obtained from BM fed mice showed only a marginal induction at the highest concentration clearly suggesting their increased resistance to 3-NPA-induced oxidative stress. Collectively these data clearly indicate the potential of Bacopa monnieri to modulate endogenous markers of

  4. Potential Markers in Cardiac Hypertrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Fulgheri, Gabriele; Wicinski, Michal; Grzesk, Elzbieta; Odrowaz-Sypniewska, Grazyna; Grześk, Grzegorz; Darwish, Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed based on medical history of patient (symptoms and family history), physical examination, results of echocardiogram and in some situations additionally ECG or chest-X-ray results. Currently used non-invasive diagnostic methods, could be complemented by biochemical tests. In this review some emerging potential biomarkers such as: osteopontin, ST-2 receptor, osteoprotegerin, neopterin, urocortins, growth differentiation factor 15 and urotensin II are described. In current article human and non human investigations have been reviewed, since rat is most commonly used model in experimental cardiology and gives important foundations to clinical knowledge.

  5. Expression of endogenous retroviruses is negatively regulated by the pluripotency marker Rex1/Zfp42

    PubMed Central

    Guallar, D.; Pérez-Palacios, R.; Climent, M.; Martínez-Abadía, I.; Larraga, A.; Fernández-Juan, M.; Vallejo, C.; Muniesa, P.; Schoorlemmer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Rex1/Zfp42 is a Yy1-related zinc-finger protein whose expression is frequently used to identify pluripotent stem cells. We show that depletion of Rex1 levels notably affected self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in clonal assays, in the absence of evident differences in expression of marker genes for pluripotency or differentiation. By contrast, marked differences in expression of several endogenous retroviral elements (ERVs) were evident upon Rex1 depletion. We demonstrate association of REX1 to specific elements in chromatin-immunoprecipitation assays, most strongly to muERV-L and to a lower extent to IAP and musD elements. Rex1 regulates muERV-L expression in vivo, as we show altered levels upon transient gain-and-loss of Rex1 function in pre-implantation embryos. We also find REX1 can associate with the lysine-demethylase LSD1/KDM1A, suggesting they act in concert. Similar to REX1 binding to retrotransposable elements (REs) in ES cells, we also detected binding of the REX1 related proteins YY1 and YY2 to REs, although the binding preferences of the two proteins were slightly different. Altogether, we show that Rex1 regulates ERV expression in mouse ES cells and during pre-implantation development and suggest that Rex1 and its relatives have evolved as regulators of endogenous retroviral transcription. PMID:22844087

  6. Biological redundancy of endogenous GPCR ligands in the gut and the potential for endogenous functional selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Georgina L.; Canals, Meritxell; Poole, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals. PMID:25506328

  7. Surgical site markers: potential source of infection.

    PubMed

    Driessche, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Observing licensed independent practitioners mark surgical sites with all types of marking pens is a concern related to the potential spread of infections from patient to patient. The practice of using the same marking pen to mark a surgical site has been questioned as a source of cross contamination. A literature review was done on recent studies and best practice recommendations to determine whether marking pens can act as fomites for nosocomial infections. The review indicated that surgical site markers, ink pens, and aging permanent marking pens can be a source for cross-infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, other bacteria, fungus, or virus. The type of marking pens used and the act of using the same marking pen from patient to patient could contribute to nosocomial infections. The literature reviewed recommends a single time use of a surgical marking pen. Interventions to prevent cross contamination and postoperative surgical site infections are a major concern in the care of the orthopaedic patient. PMID:23168939

  8. Surgical site markers: potential source of infection.

    PubMed

    Driessche, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Observing licensed independent practitioners mark surgical sites with all types of marking pens is a concern related to the potential spread of infections from patient to patient. The practice of using the same marking pen to mark a surgical site has been questioned as a source of cross contamination. A literature review was done on recent studies and best practice recommendations to determine whether marking pens can act as fomites for nosocomial infections. The review indicated that surgical site markers, ink pens, and aging permanent marking pens can be a source for cross-infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, other bacteria, fungus, or virus. The type of marking pens used and the act of using the same marking pen from patient to patient could contribute to nosocomial infections. The literature reviewed recommends a single time use of a surgical marking pen. Interventions to prevent cross contamination and postoperative surgical site infections are a major concern in the care of the orthopaedic patient.

  9. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine; Eul, Bastian G.; Lang, Nico; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An Hanxiang; Rose, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas after IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.

  10. Discrepancy of neural response between exogenous and endogenous task switching: an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Maki; Toyomaki, Atsuhito; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kusumi, Ichiro; Murohashi, Harumitsu; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2012-08-01

    Task switching is a well-known cognitive paradigm to explore task-set reconfiguration processes such as rule shifting. In particular, endogenous task switching is thought to differ qualitatively from stimulus-triggered exogenous task switching. However, no previous study has examined the neural substrate of endogenous task switching. The purpose of the present study is to explore the differences between event-related potential responses to exogenous and endogenous rule switching at cue stimulus. We modified two patterns of cued switching tasks: exogenous (bottom-up) rule switching and endogenous (top-down) rule switching. In each task cue stimulus was configured to induce switching or maintaining rule. In exogenous switching tasks, late positive deflection was larger in the switch rule condition than in the maintain rule condition. However, in endogenous switching tasks late positive deflection was unexpectedly larger in the maintain-rule condition than in the switch-rule condition. These results indicate that exogenous rule switching is explicit stimulus-driven processes, whereas endogenous rule switching is implicitly parallel processes independent of external stimulus.

  11. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search. PMID:27416153

  12. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search.

  13. Use of Endogenous Retroviral Sequences (ERVs) and structural markers for retroviral phylogenetic inference and taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Jern, Patric; Sperber, Göran O; Blomberg, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviral sequences (ERVs) are integral parts of most eukaryotic genomes and vastly outnumber exogenous retroviruses (XRVs). ERVs with a relatively complete structure were retrieved from the genetic archives of humans and chickens, diametrically opposite representatives of vertebrate retroviruses (over 3300 proviruses), and analyzed, using a bioinformatic program, RetroTector©, developed by us. This rich source of proviral information, accumulated in a local database, and a collection of XRV sequences from the literature, allowed the reconstruction of a Pol based phylogenetic tree, more extensive than previously possible. The aim was to find traits useful for classification and evolutionary studies of retroviruses. Some of these traits have been used by others, but they are here tested in a wider context than before. Results In the ERV collection we found sequences similar to the XRV-based genera: alpha-, beta-, gamma-, epsilon- and spumaretroviruses. However, the occurrence of intermediates between them indicated an evolutionary continuum and suggested that taxonomic changes eventually will be necessary. No delta or lentivirus representatives were found among ERVs. Classification based on Pol similarity is congruent with a number of structural traits. Acquisition of dUTPase occurred three times in retroviral evolution. Loss of one or two NC zinc fingers appears to have occurred several times during evolution. Nucleotide biases have been described earlier for lenti-, delta- and betaretroviruses and were here confirmed in a larger context. Conclusion Pol similarities and other structural traits contribute to a better understanding of retroviral phylogeny. "Global" genomic properties useful in phylogenies are i.) translational strategy, ii.) number of Gag NC zinc finger motifs, iii.) presence of Pro N-terminal dUTPase (dUTPasePro), iv.) presence of Pro C-terminal G-patch and v.) presence of a GPY/F motif in the Pol integrase (IN) C

  14. Endogenous Voltage Potentials and the Microenvironment: Bioelectric Signals that Reveal, Induce and Normalize Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chernet, Brook; Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cancer may be a disease of geometry: a misregulation of the field of information that orchestrates individual cells’ activities towards normal anatomy. Recent work identified molecular mechanisms underlying a novel system of developmental control: bioelectric gradients. Endogenous spatio-temporal differences in resting potential of non-neural cells provide instructive cues for cell regulation and complex patterning during embryogenesis and regeneration. It is now appreciated that these cues are an important layer of the dysregulation of cell: cell interactions that leads to cancer. Abnormal depolarization of resting potential (Vmem) is a convenient marker for neoplasia and activates a metastatic phenotype in genetically-normal cells in vivo. Moreover, oncogene expression depolarizes cells that form tumor-like structures, but is unable to form tumors if this depolarization is artificially prevented by misexpression of hyperpolarizing ion channels. Vmem triggers metastatic behaviors at considerable distance, mediated by transcriptional and epigenetic effects of electrically-modulated flows of serotonin and butyrate. While in vivo data on voltages in carcinogenesis comes mainly from the amphibian model, unbiased genetic screens and network profiling in rodents and human tissues reveal several ion channel proteins as bona fide oncogene and promising targets for cancer drug development. However, we propose that a focus on specific channel genes is just the tip of the iceberg. Bioelectric state is determined by post-translational gating of ion channels, not only from genetically-specified complements of ion translocators. A better model is a statistical dynamics view of spatial Vmem gradients. Cancer may not originate at the single cell level, since gap junctional coupling results in multi-cellular physiological networks with multiple stable attractors in bioelectrical state space. New medical applications await a detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which organ

  15. Endogenous language control in Chinese-English switching: an event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen-Lan; Zhang, Jin-Xiang; Li, Ling

    2014-06-01

    The neural basis of language switching, especially endogenous language control, remains largely unclear. We used a cue-stimulus paradigm and measured behavioral indices and scalp event-related potentials to investigate the endogenous control of switching between Chinese and English. In the experiment, unbalanced Chinese (L1) - English (L2) speakers named pictures in L1 or L2 according to an auditory cue presented 700 ms (cue-stimulus interval) before the picture onset. The reaction time (RT) was longer in the switch condition and the switch cost (difference of RTs between switch and repeat conditions) of L1 (L2→L1) was greater than L2 (L1→L2). P2 component elicited by the cue onset showed the neural switch cost of L1 at the frontocentral regions, with a leftward distribution, but not the switch cost of L2. The greater switch cost of L1 in behavioral responses and neural activity suggests that the frontocentral areas play an important role in endogenous language control, and switching back to the native language might require more endogenous control.

  16. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. PMID:23205714

  17. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop.

  18. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) as an endogenous marker of chronic hypoxia in live human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Kaffer, Anja; Riedl, Susanne; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Published clinical studies provide conflicting data regarding the prognostic significance of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) overexpression as an endogenous marker of tumor hypoxia and its comparability with other methods of hypoxia detection. We performed a systematic analysis of CA IX protein levels under various in vitro conditions of tumor hypoxia in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma and FaDu human pharyngeal carcinoma cells. Because sorting of live CA IX positive cells from tumors provides a tool to study the radiosensitivity of chronically hypoxic cells, we modified and tested a CA IX flow cytometry protocol on mixed hypoxic/aerobic suspensions of HT 1080 and FaDu cells. Methods and materials: HT 1080 and FaDu cells were treated with up to 24 h of in vitro hypoxia and up to 96 h of reoxygenation. To test the effect of nonhypoxic stimuli, glucose and serum availability, pH and cell density were modified. CA IX protein was quantified in Western blots of whole-cell lysates. Mixed suspensions with known percentages of hypoxic cells were prepared for CA IX flow cytometry. The same mixtures were assayed for clonogenic survival after 10 Gy. Results: Hypoxia-induced CA IX protein expression was seen after >6 h at {<=}5% O{sub 2}, and protein was stable over 96 h of reoxygenation in both cell lines. Glucose deprivation abolished the hypoxic CA IX response, and high cell density caused CA IX induction under aerobic conditions. Measured percentages of CA IX-positive cells in mixtures closely reflected known percentages of hypoxic cells in HT 1080 and were associated with radioresistance of mixtures after 10 Gy. Conclusion: CA IX is a stable marker of current or previous chronic hypoxia but influenced by nonhypoxic stimuli. Except the time course of accumulation, all properties of this marker resembled our previous findings for hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. A modified flow cytometry protocol provided good separability of CA IX-negative and -positive cells in vitro

  19. Potential prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic markers for human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chia-Siu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer (GC) and its consequent mortality rate severely threaten human health. GC is frequently not diagnosed until a relatively advanced stage. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment. Thus, early screening and diagnosis are critical for improving prognoses in patients with GC. Gastroscopy with biopsy is an appropriate method capable of aiding the diagnosis of specific early GC tumor types; however, the stress caused by this method together with it being excessively expensive makes it difficult to use it as a routine method for screening for GC on a population basis. The currently used tumor marker assays for detecting GC are simple and rapid, but their use is limited by their low sensitivity and specificity. In recent years, several markers have been identified and tested for their clinical relevance in the management of GC. Here, we review the serum-based tumor markers for GC and their clinical significance, focusing on discoveries from microarray/proteomics research. We also review tissue-based GC tumor markers and their clinical application, focusing on discoveries from immunohistochemical research. This review provides a brief description of various tumor markers for the purposes of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics, and we include markers already in clinical practice and various forthcoming biomarkers. PMID:25320517

  20. Cystatin C: a new renal marker and its potential use in small animal medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghys, L; Paepe, D; Smets, P; Lefebvre, H; Delanghe, J; Daminet, S

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of chronic kidney disease is underestimated in both human and veterinary medicine. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered the gold standard for evaluating kidney function. However, GFR assessment is time-consuming and labor-intensive and therefore not routinely used in practice. The commonly used indirect GFR markers, serum creatinine (sCr) and urea, are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to detect early renal dysfunction. Serum cystatin C (sCysC), a proteinase inhibitor, has most of the properties required for an endogenous GFR marker. In human medicine, numerous studies have evaluated its potential use as a GFR marker in several populations. In veterinary medicine, this marker is gaining interest. The measurement is easy, which makes it an interesting parameter for clinical use. This review summarizes current knowledge about cystatin C (CysC) in humans, dogs, and cats, including its history, assays, relationship with GFR, and biological and clinical variations in both human and veterinary medicine. PMID:24814357

  1. A common molecular basis for exogenous and endogenous cannabinoid potentiation of glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Wu, Xiongwu; Li, Fuying; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Lovinger, David M; Zhang, Li

    2012-04-11

    Both exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids can allosterically modulate glycine receptors (GlyRs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of cannabinoid-GlyR interactions. Here we report that sustained incubation with the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) substantially increased the amplitude of glycine-activated current in both rat cultured spinal neurons and in HEK-293 cells expressing human α1, rat α2 and α3 GlyRs. While the α1 and α3 subunits were highly sensitive to AEA-induced potentiation, the α2 subunit was relatively insensitive to AEA. Switching a serine at 296 and 307 in the TM3 (transmembrane domain 3) of the α1 and α3 subunits with an alanine (A) at the equivalent position in the α2 subunit converted the α1/α3 AEA-sensitive receptors to sensitivity resembling that of α2. The S296 residue is also critical for exogenous cannabinoid-induced potentiation of I(Gly). The magnitude of AEA potentiation decreased with removal of either the hydroxyl or oxygen groups on AEA. While desoxy-AEA was significantly less efficacious in potentiating I(Gly), desoxy-AEA inhibited potentiation produced by both Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a major psychoactive component of marijuana, and AEA. Similarly, didesoxy-THC, a modified THC with removal of both hydroxyl/oxygen groups, did not affect I(Gly) when applied alone but inhibited the potentiation of I(Gly) induced by AEA and THC. These findings suggest that exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids potentiate GlyRs via a hydrogen bonding-like interaction. Such a specific interaction likely stems from a common molecular basis involving the S296 residue in the TM3 of the α1 and α3 subunits. PMID:22496565

  2. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with

  3. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1).

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-07-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with

  4. Volatile compounds as potential defective coffee beans' markers.

    PubMed

    Toci, Aline T; Farah, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Although Brazil is the largest raw coffee producer and exporter in the world, a large amount of its Arabica coffee production is considered inappropriate for exportation. This by-product of coffee industry is called PVA due to the presence of black (P), green (V) and sour (A) defective beans, which are known to contribute considerably for cup quality decrease. Data on the volatile composition of Brazilian defective coffee beans are scarce. In this study, we evaluated the volatile composition of defective coffee beans (two lots) compared to good quality beans from the respective lots. Potential defective beans' markers were identified. In the raw samples, 2-methylpyrazine and 2-furylmethanol acetate were identified only in black-immature beans and butyrolactone only in sour beans, while benzaldehyde and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine showed to be potential markers of defective beans in general. In the roasted PVA beans, pyrazine, 2,3-butanediol meso, 2-methyl-5-(1-propenyl)pyrazine, hexanoic acid, 4-ethyl-guayacol and isopropyl p-cresol sulfide also showed to be potential defective coffee beans' markers.

  5. Endogenous Gradients of Resting Potential Instructively Pattern Embryonic Neural Tissue via Notch Signaling and Regulation of Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vaibhav P.; Lemire, Joan M.; Paré, Jean-François; Lin, Gufa; Chen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical forces play important roles throughout embryogenesis, but the roles of spatial differences in cellular resting potentials during large-scale brain morphogenesis remain unknown. Here, we implicate endogenous bioelectricity as an instructive factor during brain patterning in Xenopus laevis. Early frog embryos exhibit a characteristic hyperpolarization of cells lining the neural tube; disruption of this spatial gradient of the transmembrane potential (Vmem) diminishes or eliminates the expression of early brain markers, and causes anatomical mispatterning of the brain, including absent or malformed regions. This effect is mediated by voltage-gated calcium signaling and gap-junctional communication. In addition to cell-autonomous effects, we show that hyperpolarization of transmembrane potential (Vmem) in ventral cells outside the brain induces upregulation of neural cell proliferation at long range. Misexpression of the constitutively active form of Notch, a suppressor of neural induction, impairs the normal hyperpolarization pattern and neural patterning; forced hyperpolarization by misexpression of specific ion channels rescues brain defects induced by activated Notch signaling. Strikingly, hyperpolarizing posterior or ventral cells induces the production of ectopic neural tissue considerably outside the neural field. The hyperpolarization signal also synergizes with canonical reprogramming factors (POU and HB4), directing undifferentiated cells toward neural fate in vivo. These data identify a new functional role for bioelectric signaling in brain patterning, reveal interactions between Vmem and key biochemical pathways (Notch and Ca2+ signaling) as the molecular mechanism by which spatial differences of Vmem regulate organogenesis of the vertebrate brain, and suggest voltage modulation as a tractable strategy for intervention in certain classes of birth defects. PMID:25762681

  6. Endogenous Small-Noncoding RNAs and Potential Functions in Desiccation Tolerance in Physcomitrella Patens.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Xiaoqin; Perroud, Pierre-François; He, Yikun; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhang, Weixiong

    2016-01-01

    Early land plants like moss Physcomitrella patens have developed remarkable drought tolerance. Phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) protects seeds during water stress by activating genes through transcription factors such as ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE (ABI3). Small noncoding RNA (sncRNA), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small-interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), are key gene regulators in eukaryotes, playing critical roles in stress tolerance in plants. Combining next-generation sequencing and computational analysis, we profiled and characterized sncRNA species from two ABI3 deletion mutants and the wild type P. patens that were subject to ABA treatment in dehydration and rehydration stages. Small RNA profiling using deep sequencing helped identify 22 novel miRNAs and 6 genomic loci producing trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) including TAS3a to TAS3e and TAS6. Data from degradome profiling showed that ABI3 genes (ABI3a/b/c) are potentially regulated by the plant-specific miR536 and that other ABA-relevant genes are regulated by miRNAs and ta-siRNAs. We also observed broad variations of miRNAs and ta-siRNAs expression across different stages, suggesting that they could potentially influence desiccation tolerance. This study provided evidence on the potential roles of sncRNA in mediating desiccation-responsive pathways in early land plants. PMID:27443635

  7. Endogenous Small-Noncoding RNAs and Potential Functions in Desiccation Tolerance in Physcomitrella Patens

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Xiaoqin; Perroud, Pierre-François; He, Yikun; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhang, Weixiong

    2016-01-01

    Early land plants like moss Physcomitrella patens have developed remarkable drought tolerance. Phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) protects seeds during water stress by activating genes through transcription factors such as ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE (ABI3). Small noncoding RNA (sncRNA), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small-interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), are key gene regulators in eukaryotes, playing critical roles in stress tolerance in plants. Combining next-generation sequencing and computational analysis, we profiled and characterized sncRNA species from two ABI3 deletion mutants and the wild type P. patens that were subject to ABA treatment in dehydration and rehydration stages. Small RNA profiling using deep sequencing helped identify 22 novel miRNAs and 6 genomic loci producing trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) including TAS3a to TAS3e and TAS6. Data from degradome profiling showed that ABI3 genes (ABI3a/b/c) are potentially regulated by the plant-specific miR536 and that other ABA-relevant genes are regulated by miRNAs and ta-siRNAs. We also observed broad variations of miRNAs and ta-siRNAs expression across different stages, suggesting that they could potentially influence desiccation tolerance. This study provided evidence on the potential roles of sncRNA in mediating desiccation-responsive pathways in early land plants. PMID:27443635

  8. Divergent and dynamic activity of endogenous retroviruses in burn patients and their inflammatory potential.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Rah, HyungChul; Green, Tajia; Lee, Young-Kwan; Lim, Debora; Nemzek, Jean; Wahl, Wendy; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2014-04-01

    Genes constitute ~3% of the human genome, whereas human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) represent ~8%. We examined post-burn HERV expression in patients' blood cells, and the inflammatory potentials of the burn-associated HERVs were evaluated. Buffy coat cells, collected at various time points from 11 patients, were screened for the expression of eight HERV families, and we identified their divergent expression profiles depending on patient, HERV, and time point. The population of expressed HERV sequences was patient-specific, suggesting HERVs' inherent genomic polymorphisms and/or differential expression potentials depending on characteristics of patients and courses of injury response. Some HERVs were shared among the patients, while the others were divergent. Interestingly, one burn-associated HERV gag gene from a patient's genome induced IL-6, IL-1β, Ptgs-2, and iNOS. These findings demonstrate that injury stressors initiate divergent HERV responses depending on patient, HERV, and disease course and implicate HERVs as genetic elements contributing to polymorphic injury pathophysiology.

  9. Methylation markers: a potential force driving cancer diagnostics forward.

    PubMed

    Khandige, Surabhi; Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; Kapettu, Satyamoorthy

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics, transcending genetics, genomics, and molecular biology, is now poised to be the avant-garde beacon of biological science. The rise of DNA methylation studies marks a new dawn in the field of epigenetics, which only a few decades ago was largely underestimated, but is now a dynamic area of research challenging and revising traditional paradigms of gene expression and behavior. Cancer research enjoys a major share of this attention to DNA methylation and it has been widely accepted for some time now that cancer is as much an epigenetic phenomenon as it is genetic. Epigenetic lesions and perturbations are acquired during the life of an individual and accumulate with aging and represent the flip side of the same coin that bears genetic mutations. Both events, either individually or in cooperation, result in the development and progression of cancer. Epigenetic research and the hunt for strong methylation markers has been ably mitigated by new and improved high throughput technology that has improved the efficacy and enabled the rapid progress of biomarker evaluation and validation. This review looks into some of the recent strides in biomarker research dealing exclusively with methylation markers and the potential key they may hold to the resilient door shut tight on cancer diagnostics and treatment.

  10. Cannabis sativa and the endogenous cannabinoid system: therapeutic potential for appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Farrimond, Jonathan A; Mercier, Marion S; Whalley, Benjamin J; Williams, Claire M

    2011-02-01

    The herb Cannabis sativa (C. sativa) has been used in China and on the Indian subcontinent for thousands of years as a medicine. However, since it was brought to the UK and then the rest of the western world in the late 19th century, its use has been a source of controversy. Indeed, its psychotropic side effects are well reported but only relatively recently has scientific endeavour begun to find valuable uses for either the whole plant or its individual components. Here, we discuss evidence describing the endocannabinoid system, its endogenous and exogenous ligands and their varied effects on feeding cycles and meal patterns. Furthermore we also critically consider the mounting evidence which suggests non-Δ(9) tetrahydrocannabinol phytocannabinoids play a vital role in C. sativa-induced feeding pattern changes. Indeed, given the wide range of phytocannabinoids present in C. sativa and their equally wide range of intra-, inter- and extra-cellular mechanisms of action, we demonstrate that non-Δ(9) tetrahydrocannabinol phytocannabinoids retain an important and, as yet, untapped clinical potential.

  11. Molecular bioelectricity: how endogenous voltage potentials control cell behavior and instruct pattern regulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    In addition to biochemical gradients and transcriptional networks, cell behavior is regulated by endogenous bioelectrical cues originating in the activity of ion channels and pumps, operating in a wide variety of cell types. Instructive signals mediated by changes in resting potential control proliferation, differentiation, cell shape, and apoptosis of stem, progenitor, and somatic cells. Of importance, however, cells are regulated not only by their own Vmem but also by the Vmem of their neighbors, forming networks via electrical synapses known as gap junctions. Spatiotemporal changes in Vmem distribution among nonneural somatic tissues regulate pattern formation and serve as signals that trigger limb regeneration, induce eye formation, set polarity of whole-body anatomical axes, and orchestrate craniofacial patterning. New tools for tracking and functionally altering Vmem gradients in vivo have identified novel roles for bioelectrical signaling and revealed the molecular pathways by which Vmem changes are transduced into cascades of downstream gene expression. Because channels and gap junctions are gated posttranslationally, bioelectrical networks have their own characteristic dynamics that do not reduce to molecular profiling of channel expression (although they couple functionally to transcriptional networks). The recent data provide an exciting opportunity to crack the bioelectric code, and learn to program cellular activity at the level of organs, not only cell types. The understanding of how patterning information is encoded in bioelectrical networks, which may require concepts from computational neuroscience, will have transformative implications for embryogenesis, regeneration, cancer, and synthetic bioengineering. PMID:25425556

  12. Molecular bioelectricity: how endogenous voltage potentials control cell behavior and instruct pattern regulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In addition to biochemical gradients and transcriptional networks, cell behavior is regulated by endogenous bioelectrical cues originating in the activity of ion channels and pumps, operating in a wide variety of cell types. Instructive signals mediated by changes in resting potential control proliferation, differentiation, cell shape, and apoptosis of stem, progenitor, and somatic cells. Of importance, however, cells are regulated not only by their own Vmem but also by the Vmem of their neighbors, forming networks via electrical synapses known as gap junctions. Spatiotemporal changes in Vmem distribution among nonneural somatic tissues regulate pattern formation and serve as signals that trigger limb regeneration, induce eye formation, set polarity of whole-body anatomical axes, and orchestrate craniofacial patterning. New tools for tracking and functionally altering Vmem gradients in vivo have identified novel roles for bioelectrical signaling and revealed the molecular pathways by which Vmem changes are transduced into cascades of downstream gene expression. Because channels and gap junctions are gated posttranslationally, bioelectrical networks have their own characteristic dynamics that do not reduce to molecular profiling of channel expression (although they couple functionally to transcriptional networks). The recent data provide an exciting opportunity to crack the bioelectric code, and learn to program cellular activity at the level of organs, not only cell types. The understanding of how patterning information is encoded in bioelectrical networks, which may require concepts from computational neuroscience, will have transformative implications for embryogenesis, regeneration, cancer, and synthetic bioengineering. PMID:25425556

  13. Dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses mediates factor-induced reprogramming and differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Mari; Tanabe, Koji; Sutou, Kenta; Teramoto, Ito; Sawamura, Yuka; Narita, Megumi; Nakamura, Michiko; Tokunaga, Yumie; Nakamura, Masahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-08-26

    Pluripotency can be induced in somatic cells by overexpressing transcription factors, including POU class 5 homeobox 1 (OCT3/4), sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-MYC). However, some induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exhibit defective differentiation and inappropriate maintenance of pluripotency features. Here we show that dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is important in the reprogramming process toward iPSCs, and in re-establishment of differentiation potential. During reprogramming, OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 transiently hyperactivated LTR7s--the long-terminal repeats of HERV type-H (HERV-H)--to levels much higher than in embryonic stem cells by direct occupation of LTR7 sites genome-wide. Knocking down LTR7s or long intergenic non-protein coding RNA, regulator of reprogramming (lincRNA-RoR), a HERV-H-driven long noncoding RNA, early in reprogramming markedly reduced the efficiency of iPSC generation. KLF4 and LTR7 expression decreased to levels comparable with embryonic stem cells once reprogramming was complete, but failure to resuppress KLF4 and LTR7s resulted in defective differentiation. We also observed defective differentiation and LTR7 activation when iPSCs had forced expression of KLF4. However, when aberrantly expressed KLF4 or LTR7s were suppressed in defective iPSCs, normal differentiation was restored. Thus, a major mechanism by which OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 promote human iPSC generation and reestablish potential for differentiation is by dynamically regulating HERV-H LTR7s.

  14. Protein-bound acrolein: Potential markers for oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Koji; Kanematsu, Masamichi; Sakai, Kensuke; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Hattori, Nobutaka; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyata, Toshio; Noguchi, Noriko; Niki, Etsuo; Osawa, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    Acrolein (CH2=CH—CHO) is known as a ubiquitous pollutant in the environment. Here we show that this notorious aldehyde is not just a pollutant, but also a lipid peroxidation product that could be ubiquitously generated in biological systems. Upon incubation with BSA, acrolein was rapidly incorporated into the protein and generated the protein-linked carbonyl derivative, a putative marker of oxidatively modified proteins under oxidative stress. To verify the presence of protein-bound acrolein in vivo, the mAb (mAb5F6) against the acrolein-modified keyhole limpet hemocyanin was raised. It was found that the acrolein-lysine adduct, Nɛ-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino)lysine, constitutes an epitope of the antibody. Immunohistochemical analysis of atherosclerotic lesions from a human aorta demonstrated that antigenic materials recognized by mAb5F6 indeed constituted the lesions, in which intense positivity was associated primarily with macrophage-derived foam cells and the thickening neointima of arterial walls. The observations that (i) oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein with Cu2+ generated the acrolein-low-density lipoprotein adducts and (ii) the iron-catalyzed oxidation of arachidonate in the presence of protein resulted in the formation of antigenic materials suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids are sources of acrolein that cause the production of protein-bound acrolein. These data suggest that the protein-bound acrolein represents potential markers of oxidative stress and long-term damage to protein in aging, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. PMID:9560197

  15. Gastrointestinal Endogenous Protein-Derived Bioactive Peptides: An in Vitro Study of Their Gut Modulatory Potential

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Lakshmi A.; Hayes, Maria; Mora, Leticia; Montoya, Carlos A.; Moughan, Paul J.; Rutherfurd, Shane M.

    2016-01-01

    A recently proposed paradigm suggests that, like their dietary counterparts, digestion of gastrointestinal endogenous proteins (GEP) may also produce bioactive peptides. With an aim to test this hypothesis, in vitro digests of four GEP namely; trypsin (TRYP), lysozyme (LYS), mucin (MUC), serum albumin (SA) and a dietary protein chicken albumin (CA) were screened for their angiotensin-I converting (ACE-I), renin, platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory (DPP-IV) and antioxidant potential following simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. Further, the resultant small intestinal digests were enriched to obtain peptides between 3–10 kDa in size. All in vitro digests of the four GEP were found to inhibit ACE-I compared to the positive control captopril when assayed at a concentration of 1 mg/mL, while the LYS < 3-kDa permeate fraction inhibited renin by 40% (±1.79%). The LYS < 10-kDa fraction inhibited PAF-AH by 39% (±4.34%), and the SA < 3-kDa fraction inhibited DPP-IV by 45% (±1.24%). The MUC < 3-kDa fraction had an ABTS-inhibition antioxidant activity of 150 (±24.79) µM trolox equivalent and the LYS < 10-kDa fraction inhibited 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) by 54% (±1.62%). Moreover, over 190 peptide-sequences were identified from the bioactive GEP fractions. The findings of the present study indicate that GEP are a significant source of bioactive peptides which may influence gut function. PMID:27043546

  16. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  17. High endogenous avidin binding activity: an inexpensive and readily available marker for the differential diagnosis of kidney neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Kazunori; Hu, Johnny; Pier, Thomas; Sebree, Linda; Huang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    It has been documented that some tissues, such as salivary gland, liver, cardiac and skeletal muscles and kidney, have high level endogenous biotin or endogenous avidin binding activity (EABA). Limited data is available on EABA in renal cell neoplasms. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed that included oncocytoma (n=30), chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (n=18), clear cell RCC (n=45), clear cell RCC with granular/eosinophilic (G/E) features (n=19), papillary RCC (n=21), papillary RCC with G/E features (n=29) and benign renal tissues (n=31). The TMA slides were stained with or without biotin blocker and analyzed using the automated cellular imaging system (ACIS(R)). Without biotin blocker, a high positive rate of EABA was found in oncocytoma (56/60, 93%) and normal renal tubules (46/60, 77%). A moderate positive rate of EABA was found in clear cell and papillary RCCs with G/E features (13/39, 33% and 19/55, 35%, respectively). Chromophobe RCC and RCC without G/E features had essentially no EABA. With biotin blocker, benign renal tissue and clear cell RCC were negative for EABA; but a significant number of renal oncocytoma (29/60, 48%) and a few papillary RCC with G/E features (5/52, 10%) remained positive for EABA. In conclusion, high EABA may be used to differentiate oncocytoma from chromophobe RCC, and the staining results must be interpreted with caution when avidin-biotin detection system is used in diagnosing renal neoplasms.

  18. Metabolic fate of endogenous molecular damage: Urinary glutathione conjugates of DNA-derived base propenals as markers of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jumpathong, Watthanachai; Chan, Wan; Taghizadeh, Koli; Babu, I. Ramesh; Dedon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Although mechanistically linked to disease, cellular molecules damaged by endogenous processes have not emerged as significant biomarkers of inflammation and disease risk, due in part to poor understanding of their pharmacokinetic fate from tissue to excretion. Here, we use systematic metabolite profiling to define the fate of a common DNA oxidation product, base propenals, to discover such a biomarker. Based on known chemical reactivity and metabolism in liver cell extracts, 15 candidate metabolites were identified for liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) quantification in urine and bile of rats treated with thymine propenal (Tp). Analysis of urine revealed three metabolites (6% of Tp dose): thymine propenoate and two mercapturate derivatives of glutathione conjugates. Bile contained an additional four metabolites (22% of Tp dose): cysteinylglycine and cysteine derivatives of glutathione adducts. A bis-mercapturate was observed in urine of untreated rats and increased approximately three- to fourfold following CCl4-induced oxidative stress or treatment with the DNA-cleaving antitumor agent, bleomycin. Systematic metabolite profiling thus provides evidence for a metabolized DNA damage product as a candidate biomarker of inflammation and oxidative stress in humans. PMID:26283391

  19. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  20. Reducing endogenous estrogen during prepuberal life does not affect boar libido or sperm fertilizing potential.

    PubMed

    Berger, Trish; Conley, Alan J

    2014-09-01

    Increasing sperm production per breeding male has economic significance with increasing use of artificial insemination. Manipulations to increase sperm production in livestock will only be useful if libido and sperm fertilizing capacity are not adversely affected. Reducing endogenous estrogens in the postnatal interval increases the number of Sertoli cells and hence testicular sperm production capacity. These experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of reducing endogenous estrogens on libido and sperm fertilizing capacity. Boars were treated with an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, to reduce testicular estrogen production between 1 and 6 weeks of age or between 11 and 16 weeks of age, and the littermates to these boars were treated with the canola oil vehicle. Letrozole treatment did not affect time to first mount at 22 weeks of age, regardless of whether the treatment occurred from 1 to 6 weeks of age (118 seconds vs. 233 seconds, SEM = 161 for letrozole-treated and vehicle-treated boars, respectively) or from 11 to 16 weeks of age (107 seconds vs. 67 seconds, SEM = 63 for letrozole-treated and vehicle-treated boars, respectively). Similarly, sperm fertilizing ability and in vivo fertility were equivalent in letrozole-treated boars and their vehicle-treated littermates. Surprisingly, the increase in Sertoli cell numbers observed in the letrozole-treated boars at 20 weeks of age (5.8 vs. 4.3 billion, SEM = 0.5; P < 0.05) was not maintained to 40 weeks of age in their letrozole-treated littermates. Reducing endogenous estrogen production neonatally or prepuberally had no detectable adverse effect on libido or sperm fertilizing capacity. PMID:24985358

  1. The Late Positive Potential: A Neurophysiological Marker for Emotion Regulation in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy A.; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Background: The ability to modulate emotional responses, or emotion regulation, is a key mechanism in the development of mood disruptions. Detection of a neural marker for emotion regulation thus has the potential to inform early detection and intervention for mood problems. One such neural marker may be the late positive potential (LPP), which is…

  2. Endogenous miRNA and target concentrations determine susceptibility to potential ceRNA competition.

    PubMed

    Bosson, Andrew D; Zamudio, Jesse R; Sharp, Phillip A

    2014-11-01

    Target competition (ceRNA crosstalk) within miRNA-regulated gene networks has been proposed to influence biological systems. To assess target competition, we characterize and quantitate miRNA networks in two cell types. Argonaute iCLIP reveals that hierarchical binding of high- to low-affinity miRNA targets is a key characteristic of in vivo activity. Quantification of cellular miRNA and mRNA/ncRNA target pool levels indicates that miRNA:target pool ratios and an affinity partitioned target pool accurately predict in vivo Ago binding profiles and miRNA susceptibility to target competition. Using single-cell reporters, we directly test predictions and estimate that ?3,000 additional high-affinity target sites can affect active miRNA families with low endogenous miRNA:target ratios, such as miR-92/25. In contrast, the highly expressed miR-294 and let-7 families are not susceptible to increases of nearly 10,000 sites. These results show differential susceptibility based on endogenous miRNA:target pool ratios and provide a physiological context for ceRNA competition in vivo.

  3. Endogenous miRNA and Target Concentrations Determine Susceptibility to Potential ceRNA Competition

    PubMed Central

    Bosson, Andrew D.; Zamudio, Jesse R.; Sharp, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Target competition (ceRNA crosstalk) within miRNA-regulated gene networks has been proposed to influence biological systems. To assess target competition, we characterize and quantitate miRNA networks in two cell types. Argonaute iCLIP reveals that hierarchical binding of high- to low-affinity miRNA targets is a key characteristic of in vivo activity. Quantification of cellular miRNA and mRNA/ncRNA target pool levels indicates that miRNA:target pool ratios and an affinity partitioned target pool accurately predict in vivo Ago binding profiles and miRNA susceptibility to target competition. Using single-cell reporters, we directly test predictions and estimate that ~3,000 additional high-affinity target sites can affect active miRNA families with low endogenous miRNA:target ratios, such as miR-92/25. In contrast, the highly expressed miR-294 and let-7 families are not susceptible to increases of nearly 10,000 sites. These results show differential susceptibility based on endogenous miRNA:target pool ratios and provide a physiological context for ceRNA competition in vivo. PMID:25449132

  4. Microvesicles: potential markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Lin; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Microvesicles (MVs, also known as microparticles) are small membranous structures that are released from platelets and cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microvesicles have been found in blood, urine, synovial fluid, extracellular spaces of solid organs, atherosclerotic plaques, tumors, and elsewhere. Here, we focus on new clinical and basic work that implicates MVs as markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction and hence novel contributors to cardiovascular and other diseases. Recent findings Advances in the detection of MVs and the use of cell type-specific markers to determine their origin have allowed studies that associated plasma concentrations of specific MVs with major types of endothelial dysfunction – namely, inappropriate or maladaptive vascular tone, leukocyte recruitment, and thrombosis. Recent investigations have highlighted microvesicular transport of key biologically active molecules besides tissue factor, such as ligands for pattern-recognition receptors, elements of the inflammasome, and morphogens. Microvesicles generated from human cells under different pathologic circumstances, e.g., during cholesterol loading or exposure to endotoxin, carry different subsets of these molecules and thereby alter endothelial function through several distinct, well-characterized molecular pathways. Summary Clinical and basic studies indicate that MVs may be novel markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction. This work has advanced our understanding of the development of cardiovascular and other diseases. Opportunites and obstacles to clinical applications are discussed. PMID:22248645

  5. A potential role for endogenous proteins as sacrificial sunscreens and antioxidants in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Sarah A; Watson, Rachel E B; Gibbs, Neil K; Costello, Patrick; Baldock, Clair; Weiss, Anthony S; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Sherratt, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure of the skin is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although both exogenous sunscreens and endogenous tissue components (including melanins and tryptophan-derived compounds) reduce UVR penetration, the role of endogenous proteins in absorbing environmental UV wavelengths is poorly defined. Having previously demonstrated that proteins which are rich in UVR-absorbing amino acid residues are readily degraded by broadband UVB-radiation (containing UVA, UVB and UVC wavelengths) here we hypothesised that UV chromophore (Cys, Trp and Tyr) content can predict the susceptibility of structural proteins in skin and the eye to damage by physiologically relevant doses (up to 15.4 J/cm(2)) of solar UVR (95% UVA, 5% UVB). We show that: i) purified suspensions of UV-chromophore-rich fibronectin dimers, fibrillin microfibrils and β- and γ-lens crystallins undergo solar simulated radiation (SSR)-induced aggregation and/or decomposition and ii) exposure to identical doses of SSR has minimal effect on the size or ultrastructure of UV chromophore-poor tropoelastin, collagen I, collagen VI microfibrils and α-crystallin. If UV chromophore content is a factor in determining protein stability in vivo, we would expect that the tissue distribution of Cys, Trp and Tyr-rich proteins would correlate with regional UVR exposure. From bioinformatic analysis of 244 key structural proteins we identified several biochemically distinct, yet UV chromophore-rich, protein families. The majority of these putative UV-absorbing proteins (including the late cornified envelope proteins, keratin associated proteins, elastic fibre-associated components and β- and γ-crystallins) are localised and/or particularly abundant in tissues that are exposed to the highest doses of environmental UVR, specifically the stratum corneum, hair, papillary dermis and lens. We therefore propose that UV chromophore-rich proteins are localised in regions of high UVR exposure

  6. A potential role for endogenous proteins as sacrificial sunscreens and antioxidants in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Sarah A; Watson, Rachel E B; Gibbs, Neil K; Costello, Patrick; Baldock, Clair; Weiss, Anthony S; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Sherratt, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure of the skin is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although both exogenous sunscreens and endogenous tissue components (including melanins and tryptophan-derived compounds) reduce UVR penetration, the role of endogenous proteins in absorbing environmental UV wavelengths is poorly defined. Having previously demonstrated that proteins which are rich in UVR-absorbing amino acid residues are readily degraded by broadband UVB-radiation (containing UVA, UVB and UVC wavelengths) here we hypothesised that UV chromophore (Cys, Trp and Tyr) content can predict the susceptibility of structural proteins in skin and the eye to damage by physiologically relevant doses (up to 15.4 J/cm(2)) of solar UVR (95% UVA, 5% UVB). We show that: i) purified suspensions of UV-chromophore-rich fibronectin dimers, fibrillin microfibrils and β- and γ-lens crystallins undergo solar simulated radiation (SSR)-induced aggregation and/or decomposition and ii) exposure to identical doses of SSR has minimal effect on the size or ultrastructure of UV chromophore-poor tropoelastin, collagen I, collagen VI microfibrils and α-crystallin. If UV chromophore content is a factor in determining protein stability in vivo, we would expect that the tissue distribution of Cys, Trp and Tyr-rich proteins would correlate with regional UVR exposure. From bioinformatic analysis of 244 key structural proteins we identified several biochemically distinct, yet UV chromophore-rich, protein families. The majority of these putative UV-absorbing proteins (including the late cornified envelope proteins, keratin associated proteins, elastic fibre-associated components and β- and γ-crystallins) are localised and/or particularly abundant in tissues that are exposed to the highest doses of environmental UVR, specifically the stratum corneum, hair, papillary dermis and lens. We therefore propose that UV chromophore-rich proteins are localised in regions of high UVR exposure

  7. A potential role for endogenous proteins as sacrificial sunscreens and antioxidants in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Sarah A.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Gibbs, Neil K.; Costello, Patrick; Baldock, Clair; Weiss, Anthony S.; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure of the skin is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although both exogenous sunscreens and endogenous tissue components (including melanins and tryptophan-derived compounds) reduce UVR penetration, the role of endogenous proteins in absorbing environmental UV wavelengths is poorly defined. Having previously demonstrated that proteins which are rich in UVR-absorbing amino acid residues are readily degraded by broadband UVB-radiation (containing UVA, UVB and UVC wavelengths) here we hypothesised that UV chromophore (Cys, Trp and Tyr) content can predict the susceptibility of structural proteins in skin and the eye to damage by physiologically relevant doses (up to 15.4 J/cm2) of solar UVR (95% UVA, 5% UVB). We show that: i) purified suspensions of UV-chromophore-rich fibronectin dimers, fibrillin microfibrils and β- and γ-lens crystallins undergo solar simulated radiation (SSR)-induced aggregation and/or decomposition and ii) exposure to identical doses of SSR has minimal effect on the size or ultrastructure of UV chromophore-poor tropoelastin, collagen I, collagen VI microfibrils and α-crystallin. If UV chromophore content is a factor in determining protein stability in vivo, we would expect that the tissue distribution of Cys, Trp and Tyr-rich proteins would correlate with regional UVR exposure. From bioinformatic analysis of 244 key structural proteins we identified several biochemically distinct, yet UV chromophore-rich, protein families. The majority of these putative UV-absorbing proteins (including the late cornified envelope proteins, keratin associated proteins, elastic fibre-associated components and β- and γ-crystallins) are localised and/or particularly abundant in tissues that are exposed to the highest doses of environmental UVR, specifically the stratum corneum, hair, papillary dermis and lens. We therefore propose that UV chromophore-rich proteins are localised in regions of high UVR exposure

  8. Advances in carcinogenic metal toxicity and potential molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system's ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  9. Advances in Carcinogenic Metal Toxicity and Potential Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system’s ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  10. The biotechnological potential of fibrinolytic enzymes in the dissolution of endogenous blood thrombi.

    PubMed

    Kotb, Essam

    2014-01-01

    Formation of endogenous thrombi in blood vessels is one of the leading causes of death in our modern life. According to data provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2000, heart diseases are responsible for 29% of the total mortality rate in the world. For this, a tremendous amount of research has been done in the area of prevention and treatment of these diseases. The classical therapy of these thrombi relies upon the use of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or even surgeries. Relatively recently, the fibrinolytic enzymes produced by microorganisms, snakes, earthworms, insects, plants, and other organisms are being successfully used in the treatment of blood clots, especially with regard to the direct dissolving action on fibrin in tandem with less cost and side effects in comparison with the first-generation thrombolytic agents, streptokinase and urokinase. Furthermore, recombinant DNA technology has succeeded in improving and decreasing the undesirable effects of the first generation of enzymes. Recombinant PAs or rt-PAs like alteplase, retelase, saruplase, tenecteplase, lanoteplase, and desmoteplase became available in the drug markets with advantages of less binding loci with PAI-1 to avoid degradation while providing faster and more complete reperfusion in a greater number of patients with less risk of bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage. This review is the first to cover all the natural and recombinant thrombolytic agents used in enzyme therapy.

  11. Endogenous viral sequences and their potential contribution to heritable virus resistance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Mette, M.F.; Kanno, T.; Aufsatz, W.; Jakowitsch, J.; van der Winden, J.; Matzke, M.A.; Matzke, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Tobacco endogenous pararetroviruses (TEPRVs) represent the first virus-derived repetitive sequence family found in plants. The sequence conservation of TEPRVs and the lack of an exogenous form of the virus suggest that TEPRVs serve a beneficial function, perhaps by furnishing virus resistance via homologous sequence interactions. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TEPRVs are methylated and negligibly transcribed. Moreover, transgenes driven by the TEPRV enhancer are silenced and methylated when introduced into tobacco, but remain active and unmethylated in non-host species devoid of sequences homologous to TEPRVs. In transgenic Arabidopsis, the TEPRV enhancer is active primarily in shoot meristems. This suggests that the virus giving rise to TEPRVs could infect germ cell precursors, a prerequisite for meiotically heritable insertions into host chromosomes. The copy number, organization and methylation of TEPRVs in tetraploid tobacco and one of its diploid ancestors, Nicotiana sylvestris, the presumed original host for the virus, have remained constant since polyploid formation. The remarkable conservation of these features in two independently evolving species further supports a role for TEPRVs in viral immunity. PMID:11823438

  12. Biomarker and competing endogenous RNA potential of tumor-specific long noncoding RNA in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Hai-Tao; Xu, Mu; Kuang, Ye; Han, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Ming-Qi; Yang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in the initiation and progression of cancers. However, their functions in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC) are not fully understood. Methods We analyzed the expression profiles of lncRNA, microRNA, and protein-coding RNA, along with the clinical information of 59 primary chRCC patients collected from The Cancer Genome Atlas database to identify lncRNA biomarkers for prognosis. We also constructed an lncRNA–microRNA–mRNA coexpression network (competitive endogenous RNAs network) by bioinformational approach. Results One hundred and forty-two lncRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between the cancer and normal tissues (fold change ≥1.5, P<0.001). Among them, 12 lncRNAs were also differentially expressed with the corresponding clinical characteristics (fold change ≥1.5, P<0.01). Besides, 7 lncRNAs (COL18A1-AS, BRE-AS1, SNHG7, TMEM51-AS1, C21orf62-AS1, LINC00336, and LINC00882) were identified to be significantly correlated with overall survival (log-rank P<0.05). A competitive endogenous RNA network in chRCC containing 16 lncRNAs, 18 miRNAs, and 168 protein-coding RNAs was constructed. Conclusion Our results identified specific lncRNAs associated with chRCC progression and prognosis, and presented competing endogenous RNA potential of lncRNAs in the tumor. PMID:27799788

  13. Potential diagnostic markers for disseminated intravascular coagulation of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Ito, Takashi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Jilma, Bernd; Brenner, Thorsten; Müller, Marcella C A; Juffermans, Nicole P; Thachil, Jecko

    2016-03-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired thrombo-haemorrhagic disorder which arises in clinical scenarios like sepsis, trauma and malignancies. The clinic-laboratory diagnosis of DIC is made in a patient who develops the combination of laboratory abnormalities in the appropriate clinical scenario. The most common laboratory parameters in this setting have been the clotting profile, platelet count, serum fibrinogen and fibrin degradation markers. These tests had the advantage that they could be performed easily and in most laboratories. However, with the better understanding of the pathophysiology of DIC, in recent years, more specific tests have been suggested to be useful in this setting. The newer tests can also prove to be useful in prognostication in DIC. In addition, they may provide assistance in the selection and monitoring of patients diagnosed with DIC.

  14. Stress protein synthesis, a potential toxicity marker in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Odberg-Ferragut, C; Espigares, M; Dive, D

    1991-06-01

    Various chemicals were tested in Escherichia coli for the ability to modify the cellular growth rate and to induce the synthesis of heat shock and stress proteins. The toxicity of chemicals as observed by modification of the growth rate depended on concentration and duration of treatment, except for thiram. In this last case, no modification was observed up to a concentration of 10 micrograms.ml-1. In contrast, all toxicants tested enhanced the synthesis of heat shock and stress proteins. The stress response was similar but not identical. Heat shock proteins and stress proteins appear to be a more sensitive toxicity marker than growth inhibition. Suggestions for the use of stress proteins as a practical bioassay are made.

  15. Identification of potential genetic markers for improved growth rate in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of genetic polymorphism associated with muscle growth would improve selection efficiency of channel catfish broodstock. Because faster growth is typically associated with increased food intake, factors involved in food intake regulation may serve as potential gene markers for selecti...

  16. Relationship among dietary estimates of net endogenous acid production, bone mineral density and biochemical markers of bone turnover in an Iranian general population.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Alireza; Larijani, Bagher; Nabipour, Iraj; Mohamadi, Mohamad Mehdi; Mirzaee, Kamran; Amiri, Zahra

    2009-11-01

    Chronic, low-grade metabolic acidosis due to Western diets may be a risk factor for osteoporosis. The severity can be determined in part by net endogenous acid production (NEAP). In a population-based study, a total of 1028 healthy men and women aged 20-72 years were evaluated for dietary intakes and NEAP estimates with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to determine BMD of the lumbar spine (L2-L4), distal third of radius, and proximal femur. Serum CrossLaps, degradation products of the C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen, and osteocalcin were measured by highly specific ELISA methods. Lower estimates of energy-adjusted rates of NEAP were associated with greater femoral neck BMD (p=0.01) in premenopausal women and with greater BMDs at the distal radius (p=0.001) and lumbar spine (p=0.04) in postmenopausal women. Compared with women in the highest quartile of the estimates of the energy-adjusted rates of NEAP, pre- and postmenopausal women in the lowest quartile had significantly greater means of osteocalcin [9.12 (SD+/-1.62) vs. 5.24 (SD+/-1.41) ng/ml, p=0.02 and 11.74 (SD+/-1.69) vs. 7.79 (SD+/-2.63) ng/ml, p=0.002, respectively]. Analysis by quartiles of the estimates of energy-adjusted rates of NEAP did not reveal a relationship between BMD and bone turnover markers in men. In conclusion, we found that a high energy-adjusted rate of NEAP was associated with a significantly lower BMD in women but not in men and the energy-adjusted rate of NEAP had a negative relationship with bone formation.

  17. A stable epoxide as a potential endogenous estrogen metabolite: Possible significance in breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Raeside, James I

    2016-06-01

    Epoxides as reactive intermediates of estrogen metabolism have been considered to be potential precursors of the 2- and 4-hydroxy, catechol estrogens and even to be mutagenic/carcinogenic agents themselves. The labile nature of the intermediates has made proof of their existence difficult in natural biological conditions. In our studies on estrogen metabolism in vitro, in various tissues from several laboratory and domestic species, there was chromatographic evidence of formation of a stable estrogen metabolite that could be seen after incubation with radiolabeled estrone, but not with unlabeled substrate. Investigation with acid treatment of the metabolite yielded material detected as 6-hydroxy-estrone-suggesting the presence of an additional oxygen atom in the molecule. An identification of the "unknown compound" has not yet been made but, with this evidence, the properties revealed so far can best be met by assuming the presence of 5,6-epoxy-estrone. The recent favorable reports on the role of 5α,6α-epoxy-cholesterol in breast cancer has led to the hypothesis that the formation of a similar, stable epoxide of an estrogen could potentially be a compound of interest. If a metabolic pathway from estrone to 6-hydroxy-estrone through a stable epoxide has indeed been observed, it would suggest that identifying and screening for the enzymes responsible for its production, as opposed to those generating the catecholestrogens, could provide valuable information in relation to breast cancer. The balance in production of estrogen epoxides could be a key factor in determining normal health or risk of tumor development. PMID:27142140

  18. IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL MARKERS OF THE SUN'S GIANT CONVECTIVE SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Leamon, Robert J.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2014-04-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are analyzed using a diagnostic known as the magnetic range of influence (MRoI). The MRoI is a measure of the length over which a photospheric magnetogram is balanced and so its application gives the user a sense of the connective length scales in the outer solar atmosphere. The MRoI maps and histograms inferred from the SDO/HMI magnetograms primarily exhibit four scales: a scale of a few megameters that can be associated with granulation, a scale of a few tens of megameters that can be associated with super-granulation, a scale of many hundreds to thousands of megameters that can be associated with coronal holes and active regions, and a hitherto unnoticed scale that ranges from 100 to 250 Mm. We infer that this final scale is an imprint of the (rotationally driven) giant convective scale on photospheric magnetism. This scale appears in MRoI maps as well-defined, spatially distributed concentrations that we have dubbed ''g-nodes''. Furthermore, using coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO, we see that the vicinity of these g-nodes appears to be a preferred location for the formation of extreme-ultraviolet (and likely X-Ray) brightpoints. These observations and straightforward diagnostics offer the potential of a near real-time mapping of the Sun's largest convective scale, a scale that possibly reaches to the very bottom of the convective zone.

  19. Alterations of field potentials in isotropic cardiomyocyte cell layers induced by multiple endogenous pacemakers under normal and hypothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Kienast, R; Stöger, M; Handler, M; Hanser, F; Baumgartner, C

    2014-10-01

    The use of autonomous contracting randomly grown cardiomyocyte monolayers cultivated on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) represents an accepted experimental setting for preclinical experimental research in the field of cardiac electrophysiology. A dominant pacemaker forces a monolayer to adhere to a regular and synchronized contraction. Randomly distributed multiple pacemakers interfere with this dominant center, resulting in more or less frequent changes of propagation direction. This study aims to characterize the impact of changing propagation directions at single electrodes of the MEA on the four intrinsic parameters of registered field potentials (FPs) FPrise, FPMIN, FPpre, and FPdur and conduction velocity (CV) under normal and hypothermal conditions. Primary cultures of chicken cardiomyocytes (n = 18) were plated directly onto MEAs and FPs were recorded in a temperature range between 37 and 29°C. The number and spatiotemporal distribution of biological and artificial pacemakers of each cell layer inside and outside of the MEA registration area were evaluated using an algorithm developed in-house. In almost every second myocardial cell layer, interfering autonomous pacemakers were detected at stable temperatures, showing random spatial distributions with similar beating rates. Additionally, a temperature-dependent change of the dominant pacemaker center was observed in n = 16 experiments. A significant spread-direction-dependent variation of CV, FPrise, FPMIN, and FPpre up to 14% could be measured between different endogenous pacemakers. In conclusion, based on our results, disregarding the spatial origin of excitation may lead to misinterpretations and erroneous conclusions of FP parameters in the verification of research hypotheses in cellular electrocardiology.

  20. ICAM1 Is a Potential Cancer Stem Cell Marker of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Ta; Wang, Po-Jen; Liou, Nia-Jhen; Lin, Pei-Shan; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Chang, Wei-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for about 90% of esophageal cancer diagnosed in Asian countries, with its incidence on the rise. Cancer stem cell (CSC; also known as tumor-initiating cells, TIC) is inherently resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation and associates with poor prognosis and therapy failure. Targeting therapy against cancer stem cell has emerged as a potential therapeutic approach to develop effective regimens. However, the suitable CSC marker of ESCC for identification and targeting is still limited. In this study, we screened the novel CSC membrane protein markers using two distinct stemness characteristics of cancer cell lines by a comparative approach. After the validation of RT-PCR, qPCR and western blot analyses, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) was identified as a potential CSC marker of ESCC. ICAM1 promotes cancer cell migration, invasion as well as increasing mesenchymal marker expression and attenuating epithelial marker expression. In addition, ICAM1 contributes to CSC properties, including sphere formation, drug resistance, and tumorigenesis in mouse xenotransplantation model. Based on the analysis of ICAM1-regulated proteins, we speculated that ICAM1 regulates CSC properties partly through an ICAM1-PTTG1IP-p53-DNMT1 pathway. Moreover, we observed that ICAM1 and CD44 could have a compensation effect on maintaining the stemness characteristics of ESCC, suggesting that the combination of multi-targeting therapies should be under serious consideration to acquire a more potent therapeutic effect on CSC of ESCC. PMID:26571024

  1. Characterization of phenotype markers and neuronotoxic potential of polarised primary microglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chhor, Vibol; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Oré, Marie-Virgine; Celador, Idoia Lara; Josserand, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Jacotot, Etienne; Hagberg, Henrik; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2013-01-01

    Microglia mediate multiple facets of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype is an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy but a comprehensive study of classical and more novel microglial phenotypic markers in vitro is lacking. The aim of this study was to outline the temporal expression of a battery of phenotype markers from polarised microglia to generate an in vitro tool for screening the immunomodulatory potential of novel compounds. We characterised expression of thirty-one macrophage/microglial phenotype markers in primary microglia over time (4, 12, 36, and 72 h), using RT-qPCR or multiplex protein assay. Firstly, we selected Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the strongest M1–M2 polarising stimuli, from six stimuli tested. At each time point, markers useful to identify that microglia were M1 included iNOS, Cox-2 and IL-6 and a loss of M2a markers. Markers useful for quantifying M2b-immunomodulatory microglia included, increased IL-1RA and SOCS3 and for M2a-repair and regeneration, included increased arginase-1, and a loss of the M1 and M2b markers were discriminatory. Additional markers were regulated at fewer time points, but are still likely important to monitor when assessing the immunomodulatory potential of novel therapies. Further, to facilitate identification of how novel immunomodulatory treatments alter the functional affects of microglia, we characterised how the soluble products from polarised microglia affected the type and rate of neuronal death; M1/2b induced increasing and M2a-induced decreasing neuronal loss. We also assessed any effects of prior activation state, to provide a way to identify how a novel compound may alter phenotype depending on the stage of injury/insult progression. We identified generally that a prior M1/2b reduced the ability of microglia to switch to

  2. The modulatory effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on endogenous antioxidant systems and inflammatory markers in an acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic mice model.

    PubMed

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Kura, Aminu Umar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Md Isa, Norhaszalina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    N-Acetyl-p-Aminophenol (APAP), also known as acetaminophen, is the most commonly used over-the counter analgesic and antipyretic medication. However, its overdose leads to both liver and kidney damage. APAP-induced toxicity is considered as one of the primary causes of acute liver failure; numerous scientific reports have focused majorly on APAP hepatotoxicity. Alternatively, not many works approach APAP nephrotoxicity focusing on both its mechanisms of action and therapeutic exploration. Moringa oleifera (MO) is pervasive in nature, is reported to possess a surplus amount of nutrients, and is enriched with several bioactive candidates including trace elements that act as curatives for various clinical conditions. In this study, we evaluated the nephro-protective potential of MO leaf extract against APAP nephrotoxicity in male Balb/c mice. A single-dose acute oral toxicity design was implemented in this study. Group 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a toxic dose of APAP (400 mg/kg of bw, i.p) and after an hour, these groups were administered with saline (10 mL/kg), silymarin-positive control (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), MO leaf extract (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), and MO leaf extract (200 mg/kg bw, i.p) respectively. Group 1 was administered saline (10 mL/kg) during both the sessions. APAP-treated mice exhibited a significant elevation of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium and chloride levels. A remarkable depletion of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, CAT and GSH-Px with elevated MDA levels has been observed in APAP treated kidney tissues. They also exhibited a significant rise in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine level in the kidney tissues. Disorganized glomerulus and dilated tubules with inflammatory cell infiltration were clearly observed in the histology of APAP treated mice kidneys. All these pathological changes were reversed in a dose-dependent manner after MO leaf extract treatment

  3. The modulatory effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on endogenous antioxidant systems and inflammatory markers in an acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic mice model

    PubMed Central

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Kura, Aminu Umar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Md. Isa, Norhaszalina

    2016-01-01

    N-Acetyl-p-Aminophenol (APAP), also known as acetaminophen, is the most commonly used over-the counter analgesic and antipyretic medication. However, its overdose leads to both liver and kidney damage. APAP-induced toxicity is considered as one of the primary causes of acute liver failure; numerous scientific reports have focused majorly on APAP hepatotoxicity. Alternatively, not many works approach APAP nephrotoxicity focusing on both its mechanisms of action and therapeutic exploration. Moringa oleifera (MO) is pervasive in nature, is reported to possess a surplus amount of nutrients, and is enriched with several bioactive candidates including trace elements that act as curatives for various clinical conditions. In this study, we evaluated the nephro-protective potential of MO leaf extract against APAP nephrotoxicity in male Balb/c mice. A single-dose acute oral toxicity design was implemented in this study. Group 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a toxic dose of APAP (400 mg/kg of bw, i.p) and after an hour, these groups were administered with saline (10 mL/kg), silymarin—positive control (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), MO leaf extract (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), and MO leaf extract (200 mg/kg bw, i.p) respectively. Group 1 was administered saline (10 mL/kg) during both the sessions. APAP-treated mice exhibited a significant elevation of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium and chloride levels. A remarkable depletion of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, CAT and GSH-Px with elevated MDA levels has been observed in APAP treated kidney tissues. They also exhibited a significant rise in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine level in the kidney tissues. Disorganized glomerulus and dilated tubules with inflammatory cell infiltration were clearly observed in the histology of APAP treated mice kidneys. All these pathological changes were reversed in a dose-dependent manner after MO leaf extract treatment

  4. The modulatory effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on endogenous antioxidant systems and inflammatory markers in an acetaminophen-induced nephrotoxic mice model.

    PubMed

    Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Kura, Aminu Umar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Md Isa, Norhaszalina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    N-Acetyl-p-Aminophenol (APAP), also known as acetaminophen, is the most commonly used over-the counter analgesic and antipyretic medication. However, its overdose leads to both liver and kidney damage. APAP-induced toxicity is considered as one of the primary causes of acute liver failure; numerous scientific reports have focused majorly on APAP hepatotoxicity. Alternatively, not many works approach APAP nephrotoxicity focusing on both its mechanisms of action and therapeutic exploration. Moringa oleifera (MO) is pervasive in nature, is reported to possess a surplus amount of nutrients, and is enriched with several bioactive candidates including trace elements that act as curatives for various clinical conditions. In this study, we evaluated the nephro-protective potential of MO leaf extract against APAP nephrotoxicity in male Balb/c mice. A single-dose acute oral toxicity design was implemented in this study. Group 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a toxic dose of APAP (400 mg/kg of bw, i.p) and after an hour, these groups were administered with saline (10 mL/kg), silymarin-positive control (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), MO leaf extract (100 mg/kg of bw, i.p), and MO leaf extract (200 mg/kg bw, i.p) respectively. Group 1 was administered saline (10 mL/kg) during both the sessions. APAP-treated mice exhibited a significant elevation of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium and chloride levels. A remarkable depletion of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, CAT and GSH-Px with elevated MDA levels has been observed in APAP treated kidney tissues. They also exhibited a significant rise in pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine level in the kidney tissues. Disorganized glomerulus and dilated tubules with inflammatory cell infiltration were clearly observed in the histology of APAP treated mice kidneys. All these pathological changes were reversed in a dose-dependent manner after MO leaf extract treatment

  5. Evaluation of endogenous allergens for the safety evaluation of genetically engineered food crops: review of potential risks, test methods, examples and relevance.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Richard E; Panda, Rakhi; Ariyarathna, Harsha

    2013-09-01

    The safety of food produced from genetically engineered (GE) crops is assessed for potential risks of food allergy on the basis of an international consensus guideline outlined by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (2003). The assessment focuses on evaluation of the potential allergenicity of the newly expressed protein(s) as the primary potential risk using a process that markedly limits risks to allergic consumers. However, Codex also recommended evaluating a second concern, potential increases in endogenous allergens of commonly allergenic food crops that might occur due to insertion of the gene. Unfortunately, potential risks and natural variation of endogenous allergens in non-GE varieties are not understood, and risks from increases have not been demonstrated. Because regulatory approvals in some countries are delayed due to increasing demands for measuring endogenous allergens, we present a review of the potential risks of food allergy, risk management for food allergy, and test methods that may be used in these evaluations. We also present new data from our laboratory studies on the variation of the allergenic lipid transfer protein in non-GE maize hybrids as well as data from two studies of endogenous allergen comparisons for three GE soybean lines, their nearest genetic soy lines, and other commercial lines. We conclude that scientifically based limits of acceptable variation cannot been established without an understanding of natural variation in non-GE crops. Furthermore, the risks from increased allergen expression are minimal as the risk management strategy for food allergy is for allergic individuals to avoid consuming any food containing their allergenic source, regardless of the crop variety.

  6. Evaluation of Colon Cancer – Specific Antigen 2 as a Potential Serum Marker for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Eddy S.; Schoen, Robert E.; Magheli, Ahmed; Sokoll, Lori J.; Chan, Daniel W.; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A blood test to detect colon cancer at a preventable stage would represent a major advancement. We have previously identified colon cancer – specific markers using focused proteomics analysis of nuclear structural proteins. Two of these markers, colon cancer – specific antigen (CCSA)-3 and CCSA-4, have been developed into blood-based markers that are able to distinguish individuals with colorectal cancer from those without. CCSA-2 is a distinct novel colon cancer marker identified using focused proteomics. Experimental Design Using an indirect ELISA on serum samples obtained from two institutions, we evaluated CCSA-2 as a serum-based colon cancer marker. A total of111serumsamples from individuals who underwent colonoscopy and were subsequently diagnosed as either being normal or having hyperplastic polyps, nonadvanced adenomas, advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer were evaluated. A diverse control population that consisted of 125 serum samples was also included in this study. Results Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CCSA-2. CCSA-2 at a cutoff of 10.8 µg/mL has overall specificity of 78.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 67.3–87.1%] and sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI, 85.8–99.5%) in separating individuals with advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer from normal, hyperplastic, and nonadvanced adenoma populations. The receiver operating characteristic curve for CCSA-2 has an area under the curve of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.83–0.95). Conclusion Our initial study shows that CCSA-2 is a potential serum-based marker for colon cancer detection with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:18316554

  7. Plasmodium falciparum kelch 13: a potential molecular marker for tackling artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Mita, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Although artemisinin combination therapies have been deployed as a first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in almost all endemic countries, artemisinin-resistant parasites have emerged and have gradually spread across the Greater Mekong subregions. There is growing concern that the resistant parasites may migrate to or emerge indigenously in sub-Saharan Africa, which might provoke a global increase in malaria-associated morbidity and mortality. Therefore, development of molecular markers that enable identification of artemisinin resistance with high sensitivity is urgently required to combat this issue. In 2014, a potential artemisinin-resistance responsible gene, Plasmodium falciparum kelch13, was discovered. Here, we review the genetic features of P. falciparum kelch13 and discuss its related resistant mechanisms and potential as a molecular marker.

  8. Sperm midpiece apoptotic markers: impact on fertilizing potential in in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Talarczyk-Desole, Joanna; Kotwicka, Małgorzata; Jendraszak, Magdalena; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Murawski, Marek; Jędrzejczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between apoptotic markers present in human spermatozoa, namely phosphatidylserine translocation (PST) from the inner to the outer layer of the cytomembrane and the active form of caspase-3 (c3) versus the fertilizing potential of male gametes in conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) models. A total of 116 male patients treated with their partners for infertility underwent basic semen analysis and an assessment of the presence of PST and the active c3 in sperm using flow cytometry. Forty patients underwent IVF, group A, while 76 patients underwent ICSI, group B. The fertilizing potential of the gametes was measured as the percentage of oocytes with pronuclei present after either procedure. PST and active c3 were identified in vital gametes, mainly in the midpiece area. Concentration, motility, morphology, and viability of spermatozoa strongly negatively correlated with both markers. In group A, a negative correlation between both markers and the success rate of conventional IVF was observed (r = -0.4, p = 0.04 for PST; r = -0.4, p = 0.02 for active c3, respectively). In group B, the success rate of ICSI did not correlate with either marker (r = -0.2, p = 0.85 for PST and r = 0.1, p = 0.51 for active c3). The two apoptotic markers localized in the sperm midpiece area may affect their function not only by decreasing basic andrologic parameters but also by reducing the probability of conception. Therefore, analysis of PST and active c3 in the sperm of patients undergoing infertility treatment should be recommended.

  9. Pert analysis of endogenous retroviruses induced from K-BALB mouse cells treated with 5-iododeoxyuridine: a potential strategy for detection of inducible retroviruses from vaccine cell substrates.

    PubMed

    Khan, A S; Sears, J F

    2001-01-01

    The activation of an endogenous, infectious retrovirus in a cell substrate that is used for the production of biologics is an important safety concern, especially in the case of live, viral vaccines, where there are minimal purification and inactivation steps in order to preserve high vaccine potency. Extensive analysis has been done to evaluate various chemical agents for the induction of endogenous retroviruses in murine and avian cells; however, similar studies have not been done with cells of other species, especially human and non-human primates, that are used in vaccine production. To develop a strategy for optimal induction and sensitive detection of endogenous, infectious retroviruses in currently used or potential vaccine cell substrates, we have initially investigated the use of a state-of-the-art, highly-sensitive, product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT) assay for evaluating the kinetics of retrovirus induction and replication in 5-iododeoxyuridine (IdU)-treated K-BALB mouse cells, where endogenous retrovirus activation has previously been described. In general, the overall kinetics of virus production were similar to those of previous studies in that two peaks of RT activity were seen on long-term culture of IdU-treated K-BALB cells; however, retrovirus activation was detected earlier under our induction conditions and with greater sensitivity using the PERT assay, where 1-10 virions were detected in 1 microl equivalent of the test sample, without concentration. Furthermore, the PERT activity corresponded to the presence of infectious, murine leukaemia viruses (MuLVs) induced from K-BALB cells. Based upon these results, a strategy is proposed using the PERT assay for detection of inducible, endogenous retroviruses in vaccine cell substrates.

  10. Evolutionary and geological factors controlling endogenic uranium mineralization and the potential for the discovery of new ore districts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkovtsev, G. A.; Miguta, A. K.; Shchetochkin, V. N.

    2015-03-01

    The exhaustion of known surface and near-surface high-grade uranium deposits poses the serious problem of prospecting and exploration of new large endogenic deposits. A comparison of large data sets for endogenic deposits from the world's major uranium districts allowed the authors to develop an evolutionary geological model of large-scale uranium ore genesis, which reflects the succession and nature of preore, ore-forming, and post-ore processes. The study reveals a combination of general (recurrent) factors controlling the formation of ore districts with large-scale uranium mineralization regardless of the genesis and timing of the mineralization. At the same time, these factors depend on the regional setting and can vary considerably among deposits of the same type localized in different tectonic blocks with different characteristics and structural evolution. In connection with this, the exploration of major genetic types of deposits requires the application of specified criteria. Along with the consideration of the evolutionary geological model of ore formation, the study discusses a variety of tectono-magmatic, mineralogical, geochemical, radiogeochemical, and physicochemical factors and indications in three uranium districts (the Streltsovskoe, Elkon, and Central Ukrainian districts), which can form the basis for further uranium prospecting and exploration. Using a combination of favorable prerequisite conditions the study compares the possibilities for the discovery of large endogenic uranium deposits in several regions of Russia.

  11. Molecular Markers of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Screening Tool of the Future?

    PubMed Central

    Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Abdul Kadir, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is among the leading causes of new onset blindness in adults. Effective treatment may delay the onset and progression of this disease provided it is diagnosed early. At present retinopathy can only be diagnosed via formal examination of the eye by a trained specialist, which limits the population that can be effectively screened. An easily accessible, reliable screening biomarker of diabetic retinopathy would be of tremendous benefit in detecting the population in need of further assessment and treatment. This review highlights specific biomarkers that show promise as screening markers to detect early diabetic retinopathy or even to detect patients at increased risk of DR at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. The pathobiology of DR is complex and multifactorial giving rise to a wide array of potential biomarkers. This review provides an overview of these pathways and looks at older markers such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), inflammatory markers, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as other newer proteins with a role in the pathogenesis of DR including neuroprotective factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF); SA100A12, pentraxin 3, brain natriuretic peptide, apelin 3, and chemerin as well as various metabolites such as lipoprotein A, folate, and homocysteine. We also consider the possible role of proteins identified through proteomics work whose levels are altered in the sera of patients with DR as screening markers though their role in pathophysiology remains to be characterized. The role of microRNA as a promising new screening marker is also discussed. PMID:27313539

  12. Reference ranges for urinary concentrations and ratios of endogenous steroids, which can be used as markers for steroid misuse, in a Caucasian population of athletes.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, Pieter; Van Eenoo, Peter; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Delbeke, Frans T

    2010-02-01

    The detection of misuse with naturally occurring steroids is a great challenge for doping control laboratories. Intake of natural anabolic steroids alters the steroid profile. Thus, screening for exogenous use of these steroids can be established by monitoring a range of endogenous steroids, which constitute the steroid profile, and evaluate their concentrations and ratios against reference ranges. Elevated values of the steroid profile constitute an atypical finding after which a confirmatory IRMS procedure is needed to unequivocally establish the exogenous origin of a natural steroid. However, the large inter-individual differences in urinary steroid concentrations and the recent availability of a whole range of natural steroids (e.g. dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione) which each exert a different effect on the monitored parameters in doping control complicate the interpretation of the current steroid profile. The screening of an extended steroid profile can provide additional parameters to support the atypical findings and can give specific information upon the steroids which have been administered. The natural concentrations of 29 endogenous steroids and 11 ratios in a predominantly Caucasian population of athletes were determined. The upper reference values at 97.5%, 99% and 99.9% levels were assessed for male (n=2027) and female (n=1004) populations. Monitoring minor metabolites and evaluation of concentration ratios with respect to their natural abundances could improve the interpretation of the steroid profile in doping analysis.

  13. Chromogranin A – unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  14. Endogenous boldenone-formation in cattle: alternative invertebrate organisms to elucidate the enzymatic pathway and the potential role of edible fungi on cattle's feed.

    PubMed

    Verheyden, K; Noppe, H; Zorn, H; Van Immerseel, F; Vanden Bussche, J; Wille, K; Bekaert, K; Janssen, C R; De Brabander, H F; Vanhaecke, L

    2010-04-01

    Although beta-boldenone (bBol) used to be a marker of illegal steroid administration in calves, its endogenous formation has recently been demonstrated in these vertebrates. However, research on the pathway leading to bBol remains scarce. This study shows the usefulness of in vivo invertebrate models as alternatives to vertebrate animal experiments, using Neomysis integer and Lucilia sericata. In accordance with vertebrates, androstenedione (AED) was the main metabolite of beta-testosterone (bT) produced by these invertebrates, and bBol was also frequently detected. Moreover, in vitro experiments using feed-borne fungi and microsomes were useful to perform the pathway from bT to bBol. Even the conversion of phytosterols into steroids was shown in vitro. Both in vivo and in vitro, the conversion of bT into bBol could be demonstrated in this study. Metabolism of phytosterols by feed-borne fungi may be of particular importance to explain the endogenous bBol-formation by cattle. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time the latter pathway is described in literature.

  15. Monitoring response to treatment in melanoma patients: potential of a serum glycomic marker.

    PubMed

    Selvan, Senthamil R; Dillman, Robert O; Fowler, Abner W; Carbonell, Denysha J; Ravindranath, Mepur H

    2008-03-15

    A mechanistic marker correlating with tumor progression and clinical response is useful for assessing therapeutic response and determining the course of therapy. Since serum-total-ganglioside (sTG) and antiganglioside-IgM antibody levels reflected tumor progression, the feasibility of utilizing sTG for assessing the response to immunotherapy of metastatic-melanoma was tested. Patients (n = 34) were immunized with dendritic cells cocultured with irradiated, IFN gamma-treated autologous tumor cells admixed with GM-CSF. Levels of sTG and antiganglioside-IgM antibody titers were measured in sera of vaccine recipients at 0, 4 and 24 weeks of treatment. Based on sTG-level, whether lower (L) or higher (H) than the mean + 1 SD of normal and healthy volunteers on weeks 0, 4 and 24, patients were categorized into cohorts-I (LLL, n = 16), II (HHL/HLL, n = 4), III (LLH/LHH/LHL, n = 7) and IV (HHH/HLH, n = 7). The cohorts were regrouped as sTG- downregulators (sTG-DR; n = 20) and upregulators (sTG-UR; n = 14). These two cohorts differed significantly in their overall (p < 0.012) and progression-free (p = 0.0001) survival post-treatment. 43% sTG-UR died within 39 months, with a median survival of 39 months, whereas 61% of the sTG-DR survived for 48 months. Both endogenous and vaccine-induced antiganglioside-IgM antibodies appeared to regulate sTG levels. Nonresponders had increased sTG with no or low IgM antibody response. The sTG level is regulated within 24 weeks post-treatment and therefore, may serve as an ideal biomarker for assessing therapeutic responses in patients. Clinical correlations of sTG indicate that sTG-downregulating therapy may be an effective treatment strategy for melanoma. PMID:17960619

  16. Crystal structure of human esterase D: a potential genetic marker of retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Li, Yang; Song, Gaojie; Zhang, David; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2009-07-10

    Retinoblastoma (RB), a carcinoma of the retina, is caused by mutations in the long arm of chromosome 13, band 13q14. The esterase D (ESD) gene maps at a similar location as the RB gene locus and therefore serves as a potential marker for the prognosis of retinoblastoma. Because very little is known about the structure and function of ESD, we determined the 3-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution using X-ray crystallography. ESD shows a single domain with an {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold. A number of insertions are observed in the canonical {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold. The active site is located in a positively charged, shallow cleft on the surface lined by a number of aromatic residues. Superimposition studies helped identify the typical catalytic triad residues -- Ser-153, His264, and Asp230 -- involved in catalysis. Mutagenesis of any of the catalytic triad residues to alanine abolished the enzyme activity. Backbone amides of Leu54 and Met150 are involved in the formation of the oxyanion hole. Interestingly, a M150A mutation increased the enzyme activity by 62%. The structure of human ESD determined in this study will aid the elucidation of the physiological role of the enzyme in the human body and will assist in the early diagnosis of retinoblastoma. Wu, D., Li, Y., Song, G., Zhang, D., Shaw, N., Liu, Z. J. Crystal structure of human esterase D: a potential genetic marker of retinoblastoma.

  17. Analysis of laser-microdissected prostate cancer tissues reveals potential tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Lindstrot, Andreas; Buettner, Reinhard; Wernert, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is a clinically heterogeneous and often multifocal disease with a clinical outcome difficult to predict. A deeper knowledge of the molecular basis of the disease may lead to a better prediction of prognosis. Therefore, in this study we investigated the molecular basis of PCA by identifying potential tumor markers in laser-microdisected PCA tissues. Among a group of PCA patients, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed to compare the expression of 70 genes. These genes were selected from the results of two microarrays which investigated the gene expression profile differences between moderately or poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma glands and the corresponding normal glands. Among the genes examined, CDKN2A, GATA3, CREBBP, ITGA2, NBL1 and TGM4 were down-regulated in the prostate carcinoma glands compared to the corresponding normal glands, whereas TFF3, TMPRSS2 and ERG were up-regulated. Our findings indicate that these genes may play roles as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in PCA, and may serve as potential tumor markers and novel therapeutic targets.

  18. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers: A potential resource for studies in plant molecular biology1

    PubMed Central

    Robarts, Daniel W. H.; Wolfe, Andrea D.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, many investigations in the field of plant biology have employed selectively neutral, multilocus, dominant markers such as inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to address hypotheses at lower taxonomic levels. More recently, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers have been developed, which are used to amplify coding regions of DNA with primers targeting open reading frames. These markers have proven to be robust and highly variable, on par with AFLP, and are attained through a significantly less technically demanding process. SRAP markers have been used primarily for agronomic and horticultural purposes, developing quantitative trait loci in advanced hybrids and assessing genetic diversity of large germplasm collections. Here, we suggest that SRAP markers should be employed for research addressing hypotheses in plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and beyond. We provide an overview of the SRAP literature to date, review descriptive statistics of SRAP markers in a subset of 171 publications, and present relevant case studies to demonstrate the applicability of SRAP markers to the diverse field of plant biology. Results of these selected works indicate that SRAP markers have the potential to enhance the current suite of molecular tools in a diversity of fields by providing an easy-to-use, highly variable marker with inherent biological significance. PMID:25202637

  19. Trehalose as an indicator of desiccation stress in Drosophila melanogaster larvae: A potential marker of anhydrobiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Thorat, Leena J.; Gaikwad, Sushama M.; Nath, Bimalendu B.

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report confirming anhydrobiosis in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis and accumulation in larvae that hydrolyzed on rehydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis in concert with the enzymes involved in trehalose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of trehalose hydrolysis in presence of a specific trehalase inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose proposed as a reliable marker for biomonitoring of climate change studies. -- Abstract: In the current scenario of global climate change, desiccation is considered as one of the major environmental stressors for the biota exposed to altered levels of ambient temperature and humidity. Drosophila melanogaster, a cosmopolitan terrestrial insect has been chosen as a humidity-sensitive bioindicator model for the present study since its habitat undergoes frequent stochastic and/or seasonally aggravated dehydration regimes. We report here for the first time the occurrence of anhydrobiosis in D. melanogaster larvae by subjecting them to desiccation stress under laboratory conditions. Larvae desiccated for ten hours at <5% relative humidity could enter anhydrobiosis and could revive upon rehydration followed by resumption of active metabolism. As revealed by FTIR and HPLC analyzes, our findings strongly indicated the synthesis and accumulation of trehalose in the desiccating larvae. Biochemical measurements pointed out the desiccation-responsive trehalose metabolic pathway that was found to be coordinated in concert with the enzymes trehalose 6-phosphate synthase and trehalase. Further, an inhibitor-based experimental approach using deoxynojirimycin, a specific trehalase inhibitor, demonstrated the pivotal role of trehalose in larval anhydrobiosis of D. melanogaster. We therefore propose trehalose as a potential marker for the assessment of anhydrobiosis in Drosophila. The present findings thus add

  20. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers.

  1. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers. PMID:27455559

  2. Differentially expressed genes in human peripheral blood as potential markers for statin response.

    PubMed

    Won, Hong-Hee; Kim, Suk Ran; Bang, Oh Young; Lee, Sang-Chol; Huh, Wooseong; Ko, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyung-Gun; McLeod, Howard L; O'Connell, Thomas M; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2012-02-01

    There is a considerable inter-individual variation in response to statin therapy and one third of patients do not meet their treatment goals. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes that might be involved in the effects of statin treatment and to suggest potential markers to guide statin therapy. Forty-six healthy Korean subjects received atorvastatin; their whole-genome expression profiles in peripheral blood were analyzed before and after atorvastatin administration in relation with changes in lipid profiles. The expression patterns of the differentially expressed genes were also compared with the data of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients and controls. Pairwise comparison analyses revealed differentially expressed genes involved in diverse biological processes and molecular functions related with immune responses. Atorvastain mainly affected antigen binding, immune or inflammatory response including interleukin pathways. Similar expression patterns of the genes were observed in patients with FH and controls. The Charcol-Leyden crystal (CLC), CCR2, CX3CR1, LRRN3, FOS, LDLR, HLA-DRB1, ERMN, and TCN1 genes were significantly associated with cholesterol levels or statin response. Interestingly, the CLC gene, which was significantly altered by atorvastatin administration and differentially expressed between FH patients and controls, showed much bigger change in high-responsive group than in low-responsive group. We identified differentially expressed genes that might be involved in mechanisms underlying the known pleiotropic effects of atorvastatin, baseline cholesterol levels, and drug response. Our findings suggest CLC as a new candidate marker for statin response, and further validation is needed.

  3. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients. PMID:27599779

  4. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-02-29

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo.

  5. Analysis of water soluble polysaccharides as a potential chemotaxonomic marker for landraces in Bixa orellana.

    PubMed

    Parimalan, Rangan; Mahendranath, Gondi; Giridhar, Parvatam

    2014-02-01

    Annatto tree (Bixa orellana L.) is native to Brazil and is now under cultivation in many parts of world for its reddish orange 'annatto' dye. There are three types of landraces in annatto and they are distinguished based on fruit shape i.e., ovate, conical and hemispherical, whose pigment yield differs. Since annatto pigment yield varies with landrace, it is necessary to characterize markers towards the identification of landraces. In this study, we characterized water soluble polysaccharides (WSP) of twigs from three landraces using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier-transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas liquid chromatography (GLC) for their potential use as chemotaxonomic markers to distinguish the landraces. GLC analysis on WSP showed hemispherical type contained 38% rhamnose, while conical and ovate types contained 17% and 34% glucose, respectively. Thus, glucose and rhamnose content of WSP could be used to distinguish the three landraces. Further, differences in calculated molecular weight as revealed by SEC (281.8, 151.3 and 79.4 kDa for conical, hemispherical and ovate types, respectively) could also be used to distinguish the three landraces. PMID:24791421

  6. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  7. Marine-continental tephra correlations (Pantelleria, Italy, and Ionian Basin): the potential for Mediterranean marker horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Palaeo-environmental records from marine and terrestrial archives in the Mediterranean show broad-scale and millennial-scale climatic changes. Synchronising these records requires robust chronological control which may be achieved using isochronous tephra marker horizons. These need to be widespread and sufficiently unique in chemistry to be distinguished from each other. Pantelleria volcano, Italy, satisfies these criteria, with eruptions blanketing the Mediterranean Sea and being distinct from every other volcano in the region. This peralkaline volcano is already well-known for its 46 ka marker horizon (Y-6) but there is potential for extending correlations further back in time. Until recently, correlations were limited by scarce onshore glass data and few sediment cores covering sufficiently long time periods to compare with Pantelleria's >200 ka explosive volcanic history. Building on recent work that has established a detailed onshore stratigraphy, glass data are presented from Pantelleria and site 964 of ODP leg 160 which is situated ~400 km downwind from the volcano. New correlations can be established and previous suggestions are discussed in the light of this new data, representing a significant step forward in confident marine-continental tephra correlations.

  8. Protein feeding promotes redistribution of endogenous glucose production to the kidney and potentiates its suppression by insulin.

    PubMed

    Pillot, Bruno; Soty, Maud; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Zitoun, Carine; Mithieux, Gilles

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess in rats the effect of protein feeding on the: 1) distribution of endogenous glucose production (EGP) among gluconeogenic organs, and 2) repercussion on the insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism. We used gene expression analyses, a combination of glucose tracer dilution and arteriovenous balance to quantify specific organ release, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps to assess EGP and glucose uptake. Protein feeding promoted a dramatic induction of the main regulatory gluconeogenic genes (glucose-6 phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) in the kidney, but not in the liver. As a consequence, the kidney glucose release was markedly increased, compared with rats fed a normal starch diet. Protein feeding ameliorated the suppression of EGP by insulin and the sparing of glycogen storage in the liver but had no effect on glucose uptake. Combined with the previously reported induction of gluconeogenesis in the small intestine, the present work strongly suggests that a redistribution of glucose production among gluconeogenic organs might occur upon protein feeding. This phenomenon is in keeping with the improvement of insulin sensitivity of EGP, most likely involving the hepatic site. These data shed a new light on the improvement of glucose tolerance, previously observed upon increasing the amount of protein in the diet, in type 2 diabetic patients.

  9. Corpus Callosum Pathology as a Potential Surrogate Marker of Cognitive Impairment in Diffuse Axonal Injury.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Shiho; Ueda, Keita; Sugihara, Genichi; Yassin, Walid; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is a major form of traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychological assessments and high-resolution structural MRI were conducted using T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. This study included 10 patients with diffuse axonal injury (all men, mean age 30.8±10.5 years) and 12 age- and sex-matched normal control participants. Patients with diffuse axonal injury had widespread volume reductions and lower fractional anisotropy in the corpus callosum (CC) compared with controls. Furthermore, cognitive processing speed was associated with reductions in white matter volume and fractional anisotropy in the CC. These findings suggest that CC pathology may be a potential surrogate marker of the cognitive deficits in these patients. PMID:26569151

  10. Endogenous Msx1 antisense transcript: in vivo and in vitro evidences, structure, and potential involvement in skeleton development in mammals.

    PubMed

    Blin-Wakkach, C; Lezot, F; Ghoul-Mazgar, S; Hotton, D; Monteiro, S; Teillaud, C; Pibouin, L; Orestes-Cardoso, S; Papagerakis, P; Macdougall, M; Robert, B; Berdal, A

    2001-06-19

    Msx1 is a key factor for the development of tooth and craniofacial skeleton and has been proposed to play a pivotal role in terminal cell differentiation. In this paper, we demonstrated the presence of an endogenous Msx1 antisense RNA (Msx1-AS RNA) in mice, rats, and humans. In situ analysis revealed that this RNA is expressed only in differentiated dental and bone cells with an inverse correlation with Msx1 protein. These in vivo data and overexpression of Msx1 sense and AS RNA in an odontoblastic cell line (MO6-G3) showed that the balance between the levels of the two Msx1 RNAs is related to the expression of Msx1 protein. To analyze the impact of this balance in the Msx-Dlx homeoprotein pathway, we analyzed the effect of Msx1, Msx2, and Dlx5 overexpression on proteins involved in skeletal differentiation. We showed that the Msx1-AS RNA is involved in crosstalk between the Msx-Dlx pathways because its expression was abolished by Dlx5. Msx1 was shown to down-regulate a master gene of skeletal cells differentiation, Cbfa1. All these data strongly suggest that the ratio between Msx1 sense and antisense RNAs is a very important factor in the control of skeletal terminal differentiation. Finally, the initiation site for Msx1-AS RNA transcription was located by primer extension in both mouse and human in an identical region, including a consensus TATA box, suggesting an evolutionary conservation of the AS RNA-mediated regulation of Msx1 gene expression.

  11. Rat oocyte tissue plasminogen activator is a catalytically efficient enzyme in the absence of fibrin. Endogenous potentiation of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bicsak, T A; Hsueh, A J

    1989-01-01

    Rat oocytes synthesize tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in response to stimuli which initiate meiotic maturation. Purified tPA exhibits optimal activity only in the presence of fibrin or fibrin substitutes. Because oocytes are not exposed to fibrin in situ, we investigated the possible stimulation of rat oocyte tPA activity by other endogenous factor(s). Oocytes were obtained from immature female rats which were induced to ovulate with gonadotropins. tPA activity was measured by the plasminogen-dependent cleavage of a chromogenic substrate. Measurements of kinetic parameters with Glu- or Lys-plasminogen revealed a Km for the rat oocyte enzyme of 1.3-2.1 microM compared with 23-24 microM for purified human tPA. Inclusion of the soluble fibrin substitute polylysine lowered the Km of human tPA by 30-fold (0.8 microM) but had no effect on the oocyte tPA Km. Polylysine had no significant effect on the Vmax values. The rate of plasminogen activation catalyzed by oocyte tPA was increased only 4.3-fold by fibrin while fibrin stimulated purified human tPA activity by 15.2-fold. After fractionation of oocyte extract by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, polylysine enhanced oocyte tPA activity as seen by casein zymography. tPA activity in the conditioned medium of a rat insulinoma cell line was also not stimulated with polylysine prior to fractionation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These data suggest that extravascular cells which elaborate tPA may produce stimulatory factor(s) which allow for full tPA activity at physiological concentrations of plasminogen in the absence of fibrin. PMID:2491854

  12. Endocrine markers for identifying prolificacy potential and predicting fetal number in goats.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Avijit; Pal, Saumen K; Chakraborty, Sandip; Hazorika, Mausumi; Pan, Subhransu; Majumdar, Debasis; Biswas, Chanchal K; Patra, Aditi; Mirmahmoudi, Rouhollah; Prakash, Bukkaaraya S

    2013-07-01

    Identifying prolificacy potential and determination of fetal number during pregnancy for proper care and management of the pregnant goats bearing multiple fetuses and achieving the benefits out of multiple births are essential for sustainable goat farming. Our objectives were (1) to examine prolificacy potential in goats by using pituitary response to gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge test, (2) to investigate hormonal profiles for the prediction of fetal number in pregnant goats and (3) to find out the most reliable timing of blood sampling for discriminating prolificacy trait and differentiating the goats bearing single, twin and triplet fetuses. In first experiment (GnRH challenge test), plasma FSH concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.01) among the goats belonging to triplet vs. twin vs. single kidding size groups after GnRH administration. Multivariate stepwise discriminant function analysis recognized that one blood sampling at 220min after GnRH administration can be used to distinguish prolificacy potential in goats. In second experiment, plasma progesterone levels were significantly higher (P<0.01) in goats bearing triplet vs. twin vs. single fetus between day 84 and 21 prior to parturition. Plasma estrone sulphate concentrations were found to be higher (P<0.05) in does bearing multiple fetuses than the does bearing single fetus between day 126 and 28 prior to parturition. A single blood sampling at day 63 prior to parturition was the most probable suitable time for discriminating kidding size by using plasma progesterone as marker. PMID:23787106

  13. Evaluation of Potential Clinical Surrogate Markers of a Trauma Induced Alteration of Clotting Factor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Payas, Arzu; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Wegner, Alexander; Kauther, Max Daniel; Lendemans, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify routinely available clinical surrogate markers for potential clotting factor alterations following multiple trauma. Methods. In 68 patients admitted directly from the scene of the accident, all soluble clotting factors were analyzed and clinical data was collected prospectively. Ten healthy subjects served as control group. Results. Patients showed reduced activities of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X and calcium levels (all P < 0.0001 to 0.01). Levels of hemoglobin and base deficit correlated moderately to highly with the activities of a number of clotting factors. Nonsurvivors and patients who needed preclinical intubation or hemostatic therapy showed significantly reduced factor activities at admission. In contrast, factor VIII activity was markedly elevated after injury in general (P < 0.0001), but reduced in nonsurvivors (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Multiple trauma causes an early reduction of the activities of nearly all soluble clotting factors in general. Initial hemoglobin and, with certain qualifications, base deficit levels demonstrated a potential value in detecting those underlying clotting factor deficiencies. Nevertheless, their role as triggers of a hemostatic therapy as well as the observed response of factor VIII to multiple trauma and also its potential prognostic value needs further evaluation. PMID:27433474

  14. G protein-coupled receptor signaling via Src kinase induces endogenous human transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) channel activation.

    PubMed

    Spehr, Jennifer; Gelis, Lian; Osterloh, Markus; Oberland, Sonja; Hatt, Hanns; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M

    2011-04-15

    Ca(2+) homeostasis plays a critical role in a variety of cellular processes. We showed previously that stimulation of the prostate-specific G protein-coupled receptor (PSGR) enhances cytosolic Ca(2+) and inhibits proliferation of prostate cells. Here, we analyzed the signaling mechanisms underlying the PSGR-mediated Ca(2+) increase. Using complementary molecular, biochemical, electrophysiological, and live-cell imaging techniques, we found that endogenous Ca(2+)-selective transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) channels are critically involved in the PSGR-induced Ca(2+) signal. Biophysical characterization of the current activated by PSGR stimulation revealed characteristic properties of TRPV6. The molecular identity of the involved channel was confirmed using RNA interference targeting TrpV6. TRPV6-mediated Ca(2+) influx depended on Src kinase activity. Src kinase activation occurred independently of G protein activation, presumably by direct interaction with PSGR. Taken together, we report that endogenous TRPV6 channels are activated downstream of a G protein-coupled receptor and present the first physiological characterization of these channels in situ. PMID:21349844

  15. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Montzka, Katrin; Lassonczyk, Nina; Tschöke, Beate; Neuss, Sabine; Führmann, Tobias; Franzen, Rachelle; Smeets, Ralf; Brook, Gary A; Wöltje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b) are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP) could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as well as contributing to the

  16. SMAD4 is a potential prognostic marker in human breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-nan; Xi, Yue; Callaghan, Michael U.; Fribley, Andrew; Moore-Smith, Lakisha; Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Pasche, Boris

    2014-01-01

    SMAD4 is a downstream mediator of transforming growth factor beta. While its tumor suppressor function has been investigated as a prognostic biomarker in several human malignancies, its role as a prognostic marker in breast carcinoma is still undefined. We investigated SMAD4 expression in breast carcinoma samples of different histologic grades to evaluate the association between SMAD4 and outcome in breast cancer. We also investigated the role of SMAD4 expression status in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells in responding to TGF-β stimulation. SMAD4 expression was assessed in 53 breast ductal carcinoma samples and in the surrounding normal tissue from 50 of the samples using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR. TGF-β-SMAD and non-SMAD signaling was assessed by Western blot in MDA-MB-468 cells with and without SMAD4 restoration. SMAD4 expression was reduced in ductal breast carcinoma as compared to surrounding uninvolved ductal breast epithelia (p <0.05). SMAD4 expression levels decreased from Grade 1 to Grade 3 ductal breast carcinoma as assessed by immunohistochemistry (p <0.05). Results were recapitulated by tissue array. In addition, immunohistochemistry results were further confirmed at the protein and mRNA level. We then found that non-SMAD MEK/MAPK signaling was significantly different between SMAD4 expressing MDA-MB-468 cells and SMAD4-null MDA-MB-468 cells. This is the first study indicating that SMAD4 plays a key role in shifting MAPK signaling. Further, we have demonstrated that SMAD4 has a potential role in the development of breast carcinoma and SMAD4 was a potential prognostic marker of breast carcinoma. Our findings further support the role of SMAD4 in breast carcinoma development. In addition, we observed an inverse relationship between SMAD4 levels and breast carcinoma histological grade. Our finding indicated that SMAD4 expression level in breast cancer cells played a role in responding non-SMAD signaling but not the canonic SMAD

  17. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 as an early potential diagnostic marker for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaeho; Lee, Hye-Ja; Song, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang Ick; Kim, Hyunyoung

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in individuals over 65 years old. However, to date, no useful early diagnostic markers for AD have been discovered. We examined the utility of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a potential biomarker for AD in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD, as well as in nondemented healthy controls. Plasma PAI-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in samples collected from 76 patients with MCI, 74 patients with AD, and 76 healthy controls. Our results show that plasma PAI-1 levels gradually increased as dementia progressed. The mean levels of plasma PAI-1 in patients with MCI and AD patients were significantly higher than those of in healthy controls. Consistently, neuropsychological examination (e.g., MMSE, CDR) also demonstrated significant correlations between the plasma PAI-1 levels and cognitive function. In conclusion, the level of plasma PAI-1 is a potential biomarker for the early detection and diagnosis of AD.

  18. Sustained attention deficits in relation to psychometrically identified schizotypy: evaluating a potential endophenotypic marker.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Diane C; Matts, Christie W; Rollmann, Elizabeth A

    2006-02-15

    Sustained attention deficits have been posited as a potential endophenotypic marker of vulnerability to schizophrenia. Prior studies have indicated that schizophrenia patients, their first-degree relatives, and psychosis-prone individuals, identified on the basis of measures of positive schizotypy, have demonstrated sustained attention deficits. To date, there have been no published reports of sustained attention deficits in individuals with negative schizotypy, as measured by the revised Social Anhedonia Scale. In this study, we examined sustained attention, measured with the CPT-Identical Pairs version, in 160 individuals with elevated scores on the Chapman Perceptual Aberration and/or Magical Ideation Scales, 96 individuals with elevated scales on the Social Anhedonia Scale, and 137 controls. Both psychosis-prone groups performed more poorly than the controls in terms of discrimination ability, as measured by d', though the groups did not differ in terms of either their reaction time or overall response criterion (lnbeta). These results provide evidence that both positive and negative aspects of schizotypy are associated with sustained attention deficits, as measured by the Continuous Performance Test. The findings add to the converging evidence indicating that sustained attention deficits are a potential endophenotypic indicator of a schizophrenia diathesis.

  19. Genetic variants in DNA repair genes as potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin chemotherapy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kap, E J; Seibold, P; Richter, S; Scherer, D; Habermann, N; Balavarca, Y; Jansen, L; Becker, N; Pfütze, K; Popanda, O; Hoffmeister, M; Ulrich, A; Benner, A; Ulrich, C M; Burwinkel, B; Brenner, H; Chang-Claude, J

    2015-12-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy exerts its effects through generating DNA damage. Hence, genetic variants in DNA repair pathways could modulate treatment response. We used a prospective cohort of 623 colorectal cancer patients with stage II-IV disease treated with adjuvant/palliative chemotherapy to comprehensively investigate 1727 genetic variants in the DNA repair pathways as potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associations with overall survival and recurrence-free survival were assessed using a Cox regression model. Pathway analysis was performed using the gamma method. Patients carrying variant alleles of rs3783819 (MNAT1) and rs1043953 (XPC) experienced a longer overall survival after treatment with oxaliplatin than patients who did not carry the variant allele, while the opposite association was found in patients who were not treated with oxaliplatin (false discovery rate-adjusted P-values for heterogeneity 0.0047 and 0.0237, respectively). The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway was found to be most likely associated with overall survival in patients who received oxaliplatin (P-value=0.002). Our data show that genetic variants in the NER pathway are potentially predictive of treatment response to oxaliplatin.

  20. Molecular markers and imaging tools to identify malignant potential in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Due to its rapidly rising incidence and high mortality, esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major public health concern, particularly in Western countries. The steps involved in the progression from its predisposing condition, gastroesophageal reflux disease, to its premalignant disorder, Barrett’s esophagus, and to cancer, are incompletely understood. Current screening and surveillance methods are limited by the lack of population-wide utility, incomplete sampling of standard biopsies, and subjectivity of evaluation. Advances in endoscopic ablation have raised the hope of effective therapy for eradication of high-risk Barrett’s lesions, but improvements are needed in determining when to apply this treatment and how to follow patients clinically. Researchers have evaluated numerous potential molecular biomarkers with the goal of detecting dysplasia, with varying degrees of success. The combination of biomarker panels with epidemiologic risk factors to yield clinical risk scoring systems is promising. New approaches to sample tissue may also be combined with these biomarkers for less invasive screening and surveillance. The development of novel endoscopic imaging tools in recent years has the potential to markedly improve detection of small foci of dysplasia in vivo. Current and future efforts will aim to determine the combination of markers and imaging modalities that will most effectively improve the rate of early detection of high-risk lesions in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25400987

  1. Gene expression profiling of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia reveals ADAMTS2 overexpression as a potential marker.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shang-Hui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) as an abnormal bone growth is one of the common fibro-osseous leasions (FOL) in oral and maxillofacial region, however, its etiology still remains unclear. Here, we performed gene expression profiling of FD using microarray analysis to explore the key molecule events in FD development, and develop potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets for FD. We found that 1,881 genes exhibited differential expression with more than two-fold changes in FD compared to normal bone tissues, including 1,200 upregulated genes and 681 downregulated genes. Pathway analysis indicated that obviously activated pathways are Ribosome and ECM-receptor interaction pathways; downregulated pathways are "Hepatitis C" and "cancer" signaling pathways. We further validated the expression of ADAMTS2, one of most differentiated expressed genes, by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 40 of FD cases. Results showed that ADAMTS2 was significantly overexpressed in FD tissues, but rarely expressed in normal bone tissues, suggesting that ADAMTS2 could be a potential biomarker for FD. Thus, this study uncovered differentially expressed candidate genes in FD, which provides pilot data for understanding FD pathogenesis, and developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and targeting of FD.

  2. Identification and evaluation of potential forensic marker proteins in vaginal fluid by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Igoh, Akihisa; Doi, Yusuke; Sakurada, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal fluid is one of the most common body fluids found at crime scenes. Discriminating vaginal fluid from other body fluids is important in forensic science; however, few potential protein markers have been reported to date. Proteomic methods for identifying protein markers have gained attention, although few reports have applied this technology to forensic protein markers. Therefore, to identify characteristic vaginal proteins, we examined various body fluids (nasal secretions, saliva, urine, semen, vaginal fluids, and sweat) using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting. We identified three components (average molecular mass values 17,237 ± 2, 18,063 ± 2, and 15,075 ± 1) detectable only in vaginal samples: two human small proline-rich protein 3 (SPRR3) isoforms and a human fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) with an acetylated (+42) N-terminal region lacking the initiator methionine residue (-131). Using ELISA, these yielded markedly high average values in vaginal fluids. The mass spectra of these proteins were not detected in infant saliva but were detected in the vaginal fluid throughout the menstrual cycle. The results of forensic analysis (detection limit, mixed body fluid samples, casework samples, and blind samples) suggest that these proteins are potential forensic markers. In conclusion, high SPRR3 and FABP5 expression levels, which may be used as potential markers for vaginal fluid identification in forensic science, were detected in vaginal fluids from healthy adults.

  3. Potentials and Limitations of Guiding Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Set-Up on Liver-Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderink, Wouter; Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Boer, Hans de; Levendag, Peter; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated the potentials and limitations of guiding liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) set-up on liver-implanted fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing compression-supported SBRT in a stereotactic body frame received fluoroscopy at treatment preparation and before each treatment fraction. In fluoroscopic videos we localized the markers and diaphragm tip at expiration and the spine (measurements on free-breathing and abdominal compression). Day-to-day displacements, rotations (markers only), and deformations were determined. Marker guidance was compared to conventional set-up strategies in treatment set-up simulations. Results: For compression, day-to-day motion of markers with respect to their centers of mass (COM) was {sigma} = 0.9 mm (random error SD), {Sigma} = 0.4 mm (systematic error SD), and <2.1 mm (maximum). Consequently, assuming that markers were closely surrounding spherical tumors, marker COM-guided set-up would have required safety margins of {approx}2 mm. Using marker COM as the gold standard, other set-up methods (using no correction, spine registration, and diaphragm tip craniocaudal registration) resulted in set-up errors of 1.4 mm < {sigma} < 2.8 mm, 2.6 mm < {Sigma} < 5.1 mm, and 6.3 mm < max < 12.4 mm. Day-to-day intermarker motion of <16.7%, 2.2% median, and rotations between 3.5{sup o} and 7.2{sup o} were observed. For markers not surrounding the tumor, e.g., 5 cm between respective COMs, these changes could effect residual tumor set-up errors up to 8.4 mm, 1.1 mm median (deformations), and 3.1 mm to 6.3 mm (rotations). Compression did not systematically contribute to deformations and rotations, since similar results were observed for free-breathing. Conclusions: If markers can be implanted near and around the tumor, residual set-up errors by marker guidance are small compared to those of conventional set-up methods, allowing high-precision tumor radiation set-up. However, substantial

  4. A hierarchy of event-related potential markers of auditory processing in disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Beukema, Steve; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Finoia, Paola; Kamau, Evelyn; Allanson, Judith; Chennu, Srivas; Gibson, Raechelle M; Pickard, John D; Owen, Adrian M; Cruse, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging of covert perceptual and cognitive processes can inform the diagnoses and prognoses of patients with disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states (VS;MCS). Here we report an event-related potential (ERP) paradigm for detecting a hierarchy of auditory processes in a group of healthy individuals and patients with disorders of consciousness. Simple cortical responses to sounds were observed in all 16 patients; 7/16 (44%) patients exhibited markers of the differential processing of speech and noise; and 1 patient produced evidence of the semantic processing of speech (i.e. the N400 effect). In several patients, the level of auditory processing that was evident from ERPs was higher than the abilities that were evident from behavioural assessment, indicating a greater sensitivity of ERPs in some cases. However, there were no differences in auditory processing between VS and MCS patient groups, indicating a lack of diagnostic specificity for this paradigm. Reliably detecting semantic processing by means of the N400 effect in passively listening single-subjects is a challenge. Multiple assessment methods are needed in order to fully characterise the abilities of patients with disorders of consciousness. PMID:27595064

  5. Assessment of volatile profile as potential marker of chilling injury of basil leaves during postharvest storage.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Rosaria; Pace, Bernardo; Cefola, Maria; Martignetti, Antonella; Stocchero, Matteo; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Giulio, Beatrice

    2016-12-15

    The volatile profile of three sweet basil cultivars, "Italico a foglia larga", "Cammeo" and "Italiano classico", packaged in air at 4 or 12°C until 9days, was monitored by solid phase microextraction with GC-MS. Chilling injury (CI) score and electrolyte leakage were also assessed. In total, 71 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified in the headspace of basil samples. A preliminary principal component analysis highlighted the dominant effect of the cultivar on VOCs profiles. Data analysis by post-transformation of projection to latent structures regression (ptPLS2) clarified the role played by time and temperature of storage. Temperature influenced the emission of volatiles during storage, with much lower total volatile emissions at 4°C compared to 12°C. Finally, a ptPLS2 regression model performed on VOCs and the two CI parameters allowed selection of 10 metabolites inversely correlated to both CI parameters, which can be considered potential markers of CI in basil leaves. PMID:27451192

  6. Gpnmb Is a Potential Marker for the Visceral Pathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aten, Jan; van Roomen, Cindy P. A. A.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Claessen, Nike; Alfonso, Pilar; Irún, Pilar; Giraldo, Pilar; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; van Eijk, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Impaired function of NPC1 or NPC2 lysosomal proteins leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol, the primary defect underlying Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease. In addition, glycosphingolipids (GSLs) accumulate in lysosomes as well. Intralysosomal lipid accumulation triggers the activation of a set of genes, including potential biomarkers. Transcript levels of Gpnmb have been shown to be elevated in various tissues of an NPC mouse model. We speculated that Gpnmb could serve as a marker for visceral lipid accumulation in NPC disease. We report that Gpnmb expression is increased at protein level in macrophages in the viscera of Npc1nih/nih mice. Interestingly, soluble Gpnmb was also found to be increased in murine and NPC patient plasma. Exposure of RAW264.7 macrophages to the NPC-phenotype-inducing drug U18666A also upregulated Gpnmb expression. Inhibition of GSL synthesis with the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor N-butyl-1-deoxynojirimycin prevented U18666A-induced Gpnmb induction and secretion. In summary, we show that Gpnmb is upregulated in NPC mice and patients, most likely due to GSL accumulation. PMID:26771826

  7. Gpnmb Is a Potential Marker for the Visceral Pathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    PubMed

    Marques, André R A; Gabriel, Tanit L; Aten, Jan; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Claessen, Nike; Alfonso, Pilar; Irún, Pilar; Giraldo, Pilar; Aerts, Johannes M F G; van Eijk, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Impaired function of NPC1 or NPC2 lysosomal proteins leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol, the primary defect underlying Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease. In addition, glycosphingolipids (GSLs) accumulate in lysosomes as well. Intralysosomal lipid accumulation triggers the activation of a set of genes, including potential biomarkers. Transcript levels of Gpnmb have been shown to be elevated in various tissues of an NPC mouse model. We speculated that Gpnmb could serve as a marker for visceral lipid accumulation in NPC disease. We report that Gpnmb expression is increased at protein level in macrophages in the viscera of Npc1nih/nih mice. Interestingly, soluble Gpnmb was also found to be increased in murine and NPC patient plasma. Exposure of RAW264.7 macrophages to the NPC-phenotype-inducing drug U18666A also upregulated Gpnmb expression. Inhibition of GSL synthesis with the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor N-butyl-1-deoxynojirimycin prevented U18666A-induced Gpnmb induction and secretion. In summary, we show that Gpnmb is upregulated in NPC mice and patients, most likely due to GSL accumulation. PMID:26771826

  8. Event-related potential markers of brain changes in preclinical familial Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Ally, B.A.; Celone, K.; McKeever, J.; Ruiz-Rizzo, A.L.; Lopera, F.; Stern, C.E.; Budson, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Event-related potentials (ERPs) can reflect differences in brain electrophysiology underlying cognitive functions in brain disorders such as dementia and mild cognitive impairment. To identify individuals at risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) we used high-density ERPs to examine brain physiology in young presymptomatic individuals (average age 34.2 years) who carry the E280A mutation in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene and will go on to develop AD around the age of 45. Methods: Twenty-one subjects from a Colombian population with familial AD participated: 10 presymptomatic subjects positive for the PSEN1 mutation (carriers) and 11 siblings without the mutation (controls). Subjects performed a visual recognition memory test while 128-channel ERPs were recorded. Results: Despite identical behavioral performance, PSEN1 mutation carriers showed less positivity in frontal regions and more positivity in occipital regions, compared to controls. These differences were more pronounced during the 200–300 msec period. Discriminant analysis at this time interval showed promising sensitivity (72.7%) and specificity (81.8%) of the ERP measures to predict the presence of AD pathology. Conclusions: Presymptomatic PSEN1 mutation carriers show changes in brain physiology that can be detected by high-density ERPs. The relative differences observed showing greater frontal positivity in controls and greater occipital positivity in carriers indicates that control subjects may use frontally mediated processes to distinguish between studied and unstudied visual items, whereas carriers appear to rely more upon perceptual details of the items to distinguish between them. These findings also demonstrate the potential usefulness of ERP brain correlates as preclinical markers of AD. PMID:21775732

  9. Vitamin D receptor expression is linked to potential markers of human thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Izkhakov, Elena; Somjen, Dalia; Sharon, Orli; Knoll, Esther; Aizic, Asaf; Fliss, Dan M; Limor, Rona; Stern, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Genes regulated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been screened as potential markers of malignant thyroid nodules. The mRNA expression levels of two of them, the ECM protein-1 (ECM1) and the type II transmembrane serine protease-4 (TMPRSS4), were shown to be an independent predictor of an existing thyroid carcinoma. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in epithelial cells of the normal thyroid gland, as well as in malignant dividing cells, which respond to the active metabolite of vitamin D by decreased proliferative activity in vitro. We evaluated the relationship between mRNA gene expressions of TMPRSS4, ECM1 and VDR in 21 papillary thyroid carcinoma samples and compared it to 21 normal thyroid tissues from the same patients. Gene expression was considered as up- or down-regulated if it varied by more or less than 2-fold in the cancer tissue relative to the normal thyroid tissue (Ca/N) from the same patient. We found an overall significant adjusted correlation between the mRNA expression ratio (ExR) of VDR and that of ECM1 in Ca/N thyroid tissue (R=0.648, P<0.001). There was a high ExR of VDR between Ca/N thyroid tissue from the same patient (3.06±2.9), which also exhibited a high Ca/N ExR of ECM1 and/or of TMPRSS4 (>2, P=0.05).The finding that increased VDR expression in human thyroid cancer cells is often linked to increased ECM1 and/or TPMRSS4 expression warrants further investigation into the potential role of vitamin D analogs in thyroid carcinoma.

  10. Global Gene Expression Profiling Reveals SPINK1 as a Potential Hepatocellular Carcinoma Marker

    PubMed Central

    Kutter, Claudia; Davies, Susan; Alexander, Graeme; Odom, Duncan T.

    2013-01-01

    potential as a diagnostic HCC marker and should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:23527199

  11. Stress produces aversion and potentiates cocaine reward by releasing endogenous dynorphins in the ventral striatum to locally stimulate serotonin reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Abigail G.; Messinger, Daniel I.; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Shankar, Haripriya; Gustin, Richard M.; Schattauer, Selena S.; Lemos, Julia C.; Chavkin, Nicholas W.; Hagan, Catherine E.; Neumaier, John F.; Chavkin, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system by repeated stress exposure or agonist treatment produces place aversion, social avoidance, and reinstatement of extinguished cocaine place preference behaviors by stimulation of p38α MAPK, which subsequently causes the translocation of the serotonin transporter (SERT, Slc6a4) to the synaptic terminals of serotonergic neurons. In the present study we extend those findings by showing that stress-induced potentiation of cocaine conditioned place preference occurred by a similar mechanism. In addition, SERT knockout mice did not show KOR-mediated aversion, and selective re-expression of SERT by lenti-viral injection into the dorsal raphe restored the prodepressive effects of KOR activation. Kinetic analysis of several neurotransporters demonstrated that repeated swim stress exposure selectively increased the Vmax but not Km of SERT without affecting dopamine transport or the high capacity, low affinity transporters. Although the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe project throughout the forebrain, a significant stress-induced increase in cell-surface SERT expression was only evident in the ventral striatum, and not in the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, or dorsal raphe. Stereotaxic microinjections of the long-lasting KOR antagonist norBNI demonstrated that local KOR activation in the nucleus accumbens, but not dorsal raphe, mediated this stress-induced increase in ventral striatal surface SERT expression. Together, these results support the hypothesis that stress-induced activation of the dynorphin/KOR system produces a transient increase in serotonin transport locally in the ventral striatum that may underlie some of the adverse consequences of stress exposure, including the potentiation of the rewarding effects of cocaine. PMID:23223282

  12. Oocytes express an endogenous red fluorescent protein in a stony coral, Euphyllia ancora: a potential involvement in coral oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shikina, Shinya; Chiu, Yi-Ling; Chung, Yi-Jou; Chen, Chieh-Jhen; Lee, Yan-Horn; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2016-01-01

    To date,the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying coral sexual reproduction remain largely unknown. We then performed a differential screen to identify genes related to oogenesis in the stony coral Euphyllia ancora. We identified a clone encoding a novel red fluorescent protein cDNA of E. ancora (named EaRFP). Microscopic observation and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that EaRFP is almost exclusively expressed in the ovary of the adult coral. The combination of the ovarian-cell separation method and the RT-PCR analysis revealed that the oocytes, but not the ovarian somatic cells, are the cells expressing EaRFP. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of EaRFP starts in the early stage of the oocyte and continues until the maturation period. Furthermore, recombinant EaRFP was shown to possess an H2O2 degradation activity. These results raise the possibility that EaRFP plays a role in protecting the oocytes from oxidative stress from the early to late stages of oogenesis. The present study provides not only the first evidence for the potential involvement of FPs in coral oogenesis but also an insight into a cellular strategy underlying coral sexual reproduction. PMID:27167722

  13. Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Potential Markers and Bioprocesses Altered in Bladder Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K.; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T.; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R.; Fischer, Steven M.; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J.; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z.; Terris, Martha K.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    While alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer (BCa), the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in BCa. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from BCa. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing BCa from controls, and also non-muscle from muscle-invasive BCa. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in BCa. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 promoters of BCa tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR, and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 BCa cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Further, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of BCa specimens compared to matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of BCa, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression. PMID:21990318

  14. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression. PMID:21990318

  15. LFA-1 expression on exocrine glands as a potential novel marker of malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Futagami-Mizoguchi, E; Yamada, A; Mizoguchi, A; Imai, Y; Yokoyama, M M

    1993-09-01

    The lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 has been found only on leukocytes and lymphoid tissues; however, the expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on nonhematopoietic cells has not been reported previously. In this study, immunohistochemical expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was examined on various tissues from 35 patients with malignant diseases and 36 patients with benign diseases including benign tumors. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was found on various exocrine tissues (eg, gastric glands, bronchial epithelium, alveolar epithelium, duodenal glands, bile ducts, pancreatic acini, and salivary glands) uninvolved by tumor in patients with malignant diseases. Localization of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was limited to the exocrine glands and differed from tissue-infiltrating leukocytes. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on exocrine tissues was confirmed in all 35 cases of malignant diseases that were examined. These included a wide spectrum of carcinomas and hematopoietic tumors. In contrast, none of the 36 cases with benign diseases examined expressed lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on their exocrine glands. These results indicate a strong correlation between lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 expression on exocrine glands and malignant disease. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on nonhematopoietic cells was further confirmed in nonhematopoietic cell lines. Two of 19 nonhematopoietic cell lines (MKN45 and PANC-1; exocrine gland cell lines) examined expressed lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on both cell surface and cytoplasm. These results suggested that immunohistochemically defined lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 molecules on nontumorous exocrine gland cells are a potential marker for the presence of malignant diseases.

  16. Identification of serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prolactin as potential tumor markers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Who-Whong; Ang, Soo Fan; Kumar, Rajneesh; Heah, Charmain; Utama, Andi; Tania, Navessa Padma; Li, Huihua; Tan, Sze Huey; Poo, Desmond; Choo, Su Pin; Chow, Wan Cheng; Tan, Chee Kiat; Toh, Han Chong

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of hepatocellullar carcinoma (HCC) remains a challenge. The current practice of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) measurement is inadequate. Here we utilized a proteomic approach to identify novel serum biomarkers for distinguishing HCC patients from non-cancer controls. We profiled the serum proteins in a group of 58 resectable HCC patients and 11 non-HCC chronic hepatitis B (HBV) carrier samples from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) using the RayBio® L-Series 507 Antibody Array and found 113 serum markers that were significantly modulated between HCC and control groups. Selected potential biomarkers from this list were quantified using a multiplex sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) array in an expanded SGH cohort (126 resectable HCC patients and 115 non-HCC chronic HBV carriers (NC group)), confirming that serum prolactin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly upregulated in HCC patients. This finding of serum MCP-1 elevation in HCC patients was validated in a separate cohort of serum samples from the Mochtar Riady Institute for Nanotechnology, Indonesia (98 resectable HCC, 101 chronic hepatitis B patients and 100 asymptomatic HBV/HCV carriers) by sandwich ELISA. MCP-1 and prolactin levels were found to correlate with AFP, while MCP-1 also correlated with disease stage. Subsequent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of AFP, prolactin and MCP-1 in the SGH cohort and comparing their area under the ROC curve (AUC) indicated that neither prolactin nor MCP-1 on their own performed better than AFP. However, the combination of AFP+MCP-1 (AUC, 0.974) had significantly superior discriminative ability than AFP alone (AUC, 0.942; p<0.001). In conclusion, prolactin and MCP-1 are overexpressed in HCC and are conveniently quantifiable in patients' sera by ELISA. MCP-1 appears to be a promising complementary biomarker for HCC diagnosis and this MCP-1+AFP model should be further evaluated as potential

  17. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  18. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects.

    PubMed

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic; Leese, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  19. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects

    PubMed Central

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  20. Potential of Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers for DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized tritordeums and their respective parents.

    PubMed

    Cabo, Sandra; Ferreira, Luciana; Carvalho, Ana; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Martín, António; Lima-Brito, José Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Hexaploid tritordeum (H(ch)H(ch)AABB; 2n = 42) results from the cross between Hordeum chilense (H(ch)H(ch); 2n = 14) and cultivated durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (AABB; 2n = 28). Morphologically, tritordeum resembles the wheat parent, showing promise for agriculture and wheat breeding. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) polymorphism is a recently developed technique that generates gene-targeted markers. Thus, we considered it interesting to evaluate its potential for the DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized hexaploid tritordeums and their respective parents. In this study, 60 SCoT primers were tested, and 18 and 19 of them revealed SCoT polymorphisms in the newly synthesized tritordeum lines HT27 and HT22, respectively, and their parents. An analysis of the presence/absence of bands among tritordeums and their parents revealed three types of polymorphic markers: (i) shared by tritordeums and one of their parents, (ii) exclusively amplified in tritordeums, and (iii) exclusively amplified in the parents. No polymorphism was detected among individuals of each parental species. Three SCoT markers were exclusively amplified in tritordeums of lines HT22 and HT27, being considered as polyploidization-induced rearrangements. About 70% of the SCoT markers of H. chilense origin were not transmitted to the allopolyploids of both lines, and most of the SCoTs scored in the newly synthesized allopolyploids originated from wheat, reinforcing the potential use of tritordeum as an alternative crop.

  1. MicroRNA 320a functions as a novel endogenous modulator of aquaporins 1 and 4 as well as a potential therapeutic target in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Lim, Kai Ying; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Swaminathan, Priyadharshni; Tan, Jun Rong; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2010-09-17

    Aquaporins facilitate efficient diffusion of water across cellular membranes, and water homeostasis is critically important in conditions such as cerebral edema. Changes in aquaporin 1 and 4 expression in the brain are associated with cerebral edema, and the lack of water channel modulators is often highlighted. Here we present evidence of an endogenous modulator of aquaporin 1 and 4. We identify miR-320a as a potential modulator of aquaporin 1 and 4 and explore the possibility of using miR-320a to alter the expression of aquaporin 1 and 4 in normal and ischemic conditions. We show that precursor miR-320a can function as an inhibitor, whereas anti-miR-320a can act as an activator of aquaporin 1 and 4 expressions. We have also shown that anti-miR-320a could bring about a reduction of infarct volume in cerebral ischemia with a concomitant increase in aquaporins 1 and 4 mRNA and protein expression.

  2. Multifunctional amaranth cystatin inhibits endogenous and digestive insect cysteine endopeptidases: A potential tool to prevent proteolysis and for the control of insect pests.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Silvia; Galván-Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Guerrero-Rangel, Armando; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, the amaranth cystatin was characterized. This cystatin is believed to provide protection from abiotic stress because its transcription is induced in response to heat, drought, and salinity. It has also been shown that recombinant amaranth cystatin inhibits bromelain, ficin, and cysteine endopeptidases from fungal sources and also inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi. In the present study, evidence is presented regarding the potential function of amaranth cystatin as a regulator of endogenous proteinases and insect digestive proteinases. During amaranth germination and seedling growth, different proteolytic profiles were observed at different pH levels in gelatin-containing SDS-PAGE. Most of the proteolytic enzymes detected at pH 4.5 were mainly inhibited by trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucyl amido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) and the purified recombinant amaranth cystatin. Furthermore, the recombinant amaranth cystatin was active against insect proteinases. In particular, the E-64-sensitive proteolytic digestive enzymes from Callosobruchus maculatus, Zabrotes subfasciatus, and Acanthoscelides obtectus were inhibited by the amaranth cystatin. Taken together, these results suggest multiple roles for cystatin in amaranth, specifically during germination and seedling growth and in the protection of A. hypochondriacus against insect predation. Amaranth cystatin represents a promising tool for diverse applications in the control of insect pest and for preventing undesirable proteolytic activity.

  3. Induction of long-term potentiation and depression is reflected by corresponding changes in secretion of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Aicardi, Giorgio; Argilli, Emanuela; Cappello, Silvia; Santi, Spartaco; Riccio, Massimo; Thoenen, Hans; Canossa, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophins play an important role in modulating activity-dependent neuronal plasticity. In particular, threshold levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are required to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) in acute hippocampal slices. Conversely, the administration of exogenous BDNF prevents the induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the visual cortex. A long-standing missing link in the analysis of this modulatory role of BDNF was the determination of the time-course of endogenous BDNF secretion in the same organotypic preparation in which LTP and LTD are elicited. Here, we fulfilled this requirement in slices of perirhinal cortex. Classical theta-burst stimulation patterns evoking LTP lasting >180 min elicited a large increase in BDNF secretion that persisted 5-12 min beyond the stimulation period. Weaker theta-burst stimulation patterns leading only to the initial phase of LTP (≈35 min) were accompanied by a smaller increase in BDNF secretion lasting <1 min. Sequestration of BDNF by TrkB-IgG receptor bodies prevented LTP. Low-frequency stimulations leading to LTD were accompanied by reductions in BDNF secretion that never lasted beyond the duration of the stimulation. PMID:15505222

  4. PDMS microwells for multi-parametric monitoring of single mitochondria on a large scale: a study of their individual membrane potential and endogenous NADH.

    PubMed

    Vajrala, Venkata Suresh; Suraniti, Emmanuel; Rigoulet, Michel; Devin, Anne; Sojic, Neso; Arbault, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Microwell arrays have been developed to monitor simultaneously, and on a large scale, multiple metabolic responses of single mitochondria. Wells of 50 to 1000 μm-diameter were prepared based on easy structuration of thin polydimethylsiloxane layers (PDMS; 100 μm thickness). Their surface treatment with oxygen plasma allowed the immobilization in situ and observation with time of populations of single isolated mitochondria. Their metabolic activities could be monitored individually by fluorescence microscopy under several activation/inhibition conditions. We measured the concomitant variations of two main metabolic parameters - the endogenous NADH level and the internal membrane potential difference Δψ owing to a cationic fluorescent probe (TMRM) - at energized, uncoupled and inhibited stages of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Microwell arrays allowed analyses on large populations, and consequently statistical studies with a single organelle resolution. Thus, we observed rapid individual polarizations and depolarizations of mitochondria following their supply with the energetic substrate, while an averaged global polarization (increase of TMRM fluorescence within mitochondria) and NADH increase were detected for the whole population. In addition, statistical correlation studies show that the NADH content of all mitochondria tends toward a metabolic limit and that their polarization-depolarization ability is ubiquitous. These results demonstrate that PDMS microwell platforms provide an innovative approach to better characterize the individual metabolic status of isolated mitochondria, possibly as a function of their cell or organ origin or in different physio-pathological situations. PMID:27384613

  5. Discovery and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Aflatoxin-Resistance: Evaluating Their Potential as Breeding Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilit...

  6. Synergistic effect of exogeneous and endogeneous electrostimulation on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Çakmak, Anıl S; Çakmak, Soner; White, James D; Raja, Waseem K; Kim, Kyungsook; Yiğit, Sezin; Kaplan, David L; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-04-01

    Bioelectrical regulation of bone fracture healing is important for many cellular events such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultivated on silk scaffolds in response to different modes of electrostimulation (e.g., exogeneous and/or endogeneous). Endogeneous electrophysiology was altered through the use of monensin (10 nM) and glibenclamide (10 μM), along with external electrostimulation (60 kHz; 100-500 mV). Monensin enhanced the expression of early osteogenic markers such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2). When exogeneous electrostimulation was combined with glibenclamide, more mature osteogenic marker upregulation based on bone sialoprotein expression (BSP) and mineralization was found. These results suggest the potential to exploit both exogeneous and endogeneous biophysical control of cell functions towards tissue-specific goals.

  7. Endogenously released ACh and exogenous nicotine differentially facilitate long-term potentiation induction in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice.

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, Sakura; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2012-05-01

    We examined the role of α7- and β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS), mimicking the brain's naturally occurring theta rhythm, induced robust LTP in hippocampal slices from α7 and β2 knockout mice. This suggests TBS is capable of inducing LTP without activation of α7- or β2-containing nAChRs. However, when weak TBS was applied, the modulatory effects of nicotinic receptors on LTP induction became visible. We showed that during weak TBS, activation of α7 nAChRs occurs by the release of ACh, contributing to LTP induction. Additionally, bath-application of nicotine activated β2-containing nAChRs to promote LTP induction. Despite predicted nicotine-induced desensitization, synaptically mediated activation of α7 nAChRs still occurs in the presence of nicotine and contributed to LTP induction. Optical recording of single-stimulation-evoked excitatory activity with a voltage-sensitive dye revealed enhanced excitatory activity in the presence of nicotine. This effect of nicotine was robust during high-frequency stimulation, and was accompanied by enhanced burst excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Nicotine-induced enhancement of excitatory activity was observed in slices from α7 knockout mice, but was absent in β2 knockout mice. These results suggest that the nicotine-induced enhancement of excitatory activity is mediated by β2-containing nAChRs, and is related to the nicotine-induced facilitation of LTP induction. Thus, our study demonstrates that the activation of α7- and β2-containing nAChRs differentially facilitates LTP induction via endogenously released ACh and exogenous nicotine, respectively, in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice.

  8. Geriatric forensics - Part 2 “Prevalence of elder abuse and their potential forensic markers among medical and dental patients”

    PubMed Central

    Mattoo, Khurshid A.; Garg, Rishabh; Kumar, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Context: This study is a continuation of the earlier studies and has been extended to investigate the potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Aims: To determine the prevalence of elder abuse in various outpatient departments (OPDs). To study the associated parameters related to the abuser and the abused. To determine the existence of potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Settings and Design: The subjects were randomly selected from the medical and the dental OPDs of the university. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and thirty two elderly subjects in the age range 40-60 years were interviewed using a questionnaire to determine the existence of elder abuse. The subjects were investigated and examined for weight, nutrition and hydration, vital signs, habits, existing visual and auditory capabilities, medications, disclosure of wills/deeds, signs of depression, and documented cleanliness. The mini-mental state examination, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Clock drawing test, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale were used to determine the potential forensic markers. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean values in percentage were determined by dividing the number of determined subjects by the total number of subjects for that parameter. Results: About 37% in medical and 41% in dental OPDs were found to have suffered from abuse, mostly in the age group 60-70 years. Females received more abuse and a combination of son and daughter-in-law constituted most abusers. Various potential markers of elder abuse and neglect investigated among the elder abuse victims included depression (89%), signs of improper feeding (83%), changes in personal hygiene (69%), need for medical/dental treatment (78%), medication misuse (67%), changes in wills/deeds (26%), decubiti (10%), bruises (17%), skin tears (27%), and confusion (23%). Conclusions: Elder abuse exists in one or more forms in both medical and dental OPDs among both males and females in all age groups. PMID:26816460

  9. DNA methylome profiling of maternal peripheral blood and placentas reveal potential fetal DNA markers for non-invasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Junyu; Li, Qiaoli; Zhou, Xinyao; Wang, Teng; Xu, Mingqing; Xia, Shihui; Xing, Qinghe; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Utilizing epigenetic (DNA methylation) differences to differentiate between maternal peripheral blood (PBL) and fetal (placental) DNA has been a promising strategy for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) have yet to be fully ascertained. In the present study, we performed genome-wide comparative methylome analysis between maternal PBL and placental DNA from pregnancies of first trimester by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assays. A total of 36 931 DMRs and 45 804 differentially methylated sites (DMSs) covering the whole genome, exclusive of the Y chromosome, were identified via MeDIP-Seq and Infinium 450k array, respectively, of which 3759 sites in 2188 regions were confirmed by both methods. Not only did we find the previously reported potential fetal DNA markers in our identified DMRs/DMSs but also we verified fully the identified DMRs/DMSs in the validation round by MassARRAY EpiTYPER. The screened potential fetal DNA markers may be used for NIPT on aneuploidies and other chromosomal diseases, such as cri du chat syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In addition, these potential markers may have application in the early diagnosis of placental dysfunction, such as pre-eclampsia. PMID:24996894

  10. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: Comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goethals, Laurence; Debucquoy, Annelies; Perneel, Christiaan; Geboes, Karel; Ectors, Nadine; De Schutter, Harlinde; Penninckx, Freddy; McBride, William H.; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin M. . E-mail: karin.haustermans@uzleuven.be

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intrinsic markers of hypoxia. Methods and Material: Twenty patients with an adenocarcinoma of the left colon and rectum treated by primary surgery were injected with pimonidazole and IdUrd. Serial sections of tumor biopsies were single stained for VEGF, EGFR, Ki67, and double stained for blood vessels in combination with either pimonidazole, IdUrd, or CA IX. Percentage of expression was scored as well as colocalization of pimonidazole with CA IX. Results: The median percentage of hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole staining, was 16.7% (range, 0-52.4%). The expression of pimonidazole correlated inversely with the total MVD and endothelial cord MVD (R = -0.55, p = 0.01; R = -0.47, p = 0.04). Good colocalization was found between pimonidazole and CA IX in only 30% of tumors, with no correlation overall between pimonidazole and CA IX, VEGF, or EGFR or between the different intrinsic markers. Cells around some vessels (0.08-11%) were negative for IdUrd but positive for Ki 67, which indicated their lack of perfusion at the time of injection. Conclusion: Chronic and acute hypoxic regions are present in colorectal tumors, as shown by pimonidazole and IdUrd staining. Only in a minority of tumors did an association exist between the areas stained by pimonidazole and those positive for CA IX. Pimonidazole also did not correlate with expression of other putative intrinsic hypoxia markers (VEGF, EGFR)

  11. Identification of innovative potential quality markers in rocket and melon fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Cavaiuolo, Marina; Cocetta, Giacomo; Bulgari, Roberta; Spinardi, Anna; Ferrante, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Ready-to-eat fresh cut produce are exposed to pre- and postharvest abiotic stresses during the production chain. Our work aimed to identify stress responsive genes as new molecular markers of quality that can be widely applied to leaves and fruits and easily determined at any stage of the production chain. Stress responsive genes associated with quality losses were isolated in rocket and melon fresh-cut produce and their expression levels analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) at different time points after harvest at 20 °C and 4 °C. qRT-PCR results were supported by correlation analysis with physiological and biochemical determinations evaluated at the same conditions such as chlorophyll a fluorescence indices, total, reducing sugars, sucrose, ethylene, ascorbic acid, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species. In both species the putative molecular markers increased their expression soon after harvest suggesting a possible use as novel and objective quality markers of fresh-cut produces.

  12. The Human Endogenous Protection System against Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Heme Is Overwhelmed in Preeclampsia and Provides Potential Biomarkers and Clinical Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Maria E.; Edström-Hägerwall, Anneli; Larsson, Irene; Jälmby, Maya; Hansson, Stefan R.; Åkerström, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) complicates 3–8% of all pregnancies and manifests clinically as hypertension and proteinuria in the second half of gestation. The pathogenesis of PE is not fully understood but recent studies have described the involvement of cell-free fetal hemoglobin (HbF). Hypothesizing that PE is associated with prolonged hemolysis we have studied the response of the cell-free Hb- and heme defense network. Thus, we have investigated the levels of cell-free HbF (both free, denoted HbF, and in complex with Hp, denoted Hp-HbF) as well as the major human endogenous Hb- and heme-scavenging systems: haptoglobin (Hp), hemopexin (Hpx), α1-microglobulin (A1M) and CD163 in plasma of PE women (n = 98) and women with normal pregnancies (n = 47) at term. A significant increase of the mean plasma HbF concentration was observed in women with PE. Plasma levels of Hp and Hpx were statistically significantly reduced, whereas the level of the extravascular heme- and radical scavenger A1M was significantly increased in plasma of women with PE. The Hpx levels significantly correlated with maternal blood pressure. Furthermore, HbF and the related scavenger proteins displayed a potential to be used as clinical biomarkers for more precise diagnosis of PE and are candidates as predictors of identifying pregnancies with increased risk of obstetrical complications. The results support that PE pathophysiology is associated with increased HbF-concentrations and an activation of the physiological Hb-heme defense systems. PMID:26368565

  13. MicroRNA Levels as Prognostic Markers for the Differentiation Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Donors.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Nicole; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Raiss, Christian C; Groen, Nathalie; Portalska, Karolina Janaeczek; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan; Post, Janine N; van Wijnen, Andre J; Karperien, Marcel

    2015-08-15

    The ability of human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages makes them a promising cell source for the use in tissue repair strategies. Since the differentiation potential of hMSCs differs between donors, it is necessary to establish biomarkers for the identification of donors with high differentiation potential. In this study, we show that microRNA (miRNA) expression levels are effective for distinguishing donors with high differentiation potential from low differentiation potential. Twenty hMSC donors were initially tested for marker expression and differentiation potential. In particular, the chondrogenic differentiation potential was evaluated on the basis of histological matrix formation, mRNA expression levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and quantitative glycosaminoglycan deposition. Three donors out of twenty were identified as donors with high chondrogenic potential, whereas nine showed moderate and eight showed low chondrogenic potential. Expression profiles of miRNAs involved in chondrogenesis and cartilage homeostasis were used for the distinction between high-performance hMSCs and low-performance hMSCs. Global mRNA expression profiles of the donors before the onset of chondrogenic differentiation revealed minor differences in gene expression between low and high chondrogenic performers. However, analysis of miRNA expression during a 7-day differentiation period identified miR-210 and miR-630 as positive regulators of chondrogenesis. In contrast, miR-181 and miR-34a, which are negative regulators of chondrogenesis, were upregulated during differentiation in low-performing donors. In conclusion, profiling of hMSC donors for a specific panel of miRNAs may have a prognostic value for selecting donors with high differentiation potential to improve hMSC-based strategies for tissue regeneration.

  14. Molecular and immunologic markers of kidney cancer-potential applications in predictive, preventive and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mickley, Amanda; Kovaleva, Olga; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gratchev, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Kidney cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies due to frequent late diagnosis (33 % or renal cell carcinoma are metastatic at diagnosis) and poor treatment options. There are two major subtypes of kidney cancer: renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and renal pelvis carcinoma. The risk factors for RCC, accounting for more than 90 % of all kidney cancers, are smoking, obesity, hypertension, misuse of pain medication, and some genetic diseases. The most common molecular markers of kidney cancer include mutations and epigenetic inactivation of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, genes of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CIAX). The role of epigenetic pathways, including DNA methylation and chromatin structure remodeling, was also demonstrated. Immunologic properties of RCC enable this type of tumor to escape immune response effectively. An important role in this process is played by tumor-associated macrophages that demonstrate mixed M1/M2 phenotype. In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular aspects for RCC development and current state of knowledge allowing personalized approaches for diagnostics and prognostic prediction of this disease. A set of macrophage markers is suggested for the analysis of the association of macrophage phenotype and disease prognosis. PMID:26500709

  15. Soluble mesothelin-related peptides (SMRP) - high stability of a potential tumor marker for mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel G; Taeger, Dirk; Pesch, Beate; Kraus, Thomas; Brüning, Thomas; Johnen, Georg

    2007-01-01

    SMRP (soluble mesothelin-related peptides) is a promising marker for detection of malignant mesotheliomas (MM) in serum that has not yet been validated in appropriate epidemiological studies. Field studies might not always provide optimal conditions for storage and transport of samples, and follow-up studies have to rely on sample integrity. Proper validation of the marker would require sufficient stability of the antigen and robustness of the assay. SMRP concentrations were evaluated in serum samples of 98 healthy donors, using the MESOMARK ELISA kit. The SMRP distribution in the healthy study population was determined and biological and pre-analytical variations were examined regarding their influence on SMRP concentrations. For diagnostic decisions a best statistical and unbiased cut-off between 1.5 and 1.6 nmol/L was determined (95th percentile). No age- or gender-specific differences could be observed. SMRP exhibits excellent stability regarding short-term storage, long-term storage, and repeated freeze/thaw cycles. Scientific studies as well as real life applications that employ SMRP would not be limited by sample stability issues.

  16. Discovery and characterization of proteins associated with aflatoxin-resistance: evaluating their potential as breeding markers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert L; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Warburton, Marilyn; Luo, Meng; Menkir, Abebe; Fakhoury, Ahmad; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-04-01

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilitate the transfer of resistance into commercially useful genetic backgrounds without transfer of unwanted traits. To accomplish this, research efforts have focused on the identification of kernel resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) including the employment of comparative proteomics to investigate closely-related maize lines that vary in aflatoxin accumulation. RAPs have been identified and several further characterized through physiological and biochemical investigations to determine their causal role in resistance and, therefore, their suitability as breeding markers. Three RAPs, a 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor, pathogenesis-related protein 10 and glyoxalase I are being investigated using RNAi gene silencing and plant transformation. Several resistant lines have been subjected to QTL mapping to identify loci associated with the aflatoxin-resistance phenotype. Results of proteome and characterization studies are discussed. PMID:22069617

  17. Statistical strategies to reveal potential vibrational markers for in vivo analysis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira Mendes, Thiago de; Pinto, Liliane Pereira; Santos, Laurita dos; Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of biological systems by spectroscopic techniques involves the evaluation of hundreds to thousands of variables. Hence, different statistical approaches are used to elucidate regions that discriminate classes of samples and to propose new vibrational markers for explaining various phenomena like disease monitoring, mechanisms of action of drugs, food, and so on. However, the technical statistics are not always widely discussed in applied sciences. In this context, this work presents a detailed discussion including the various steps necessary for proper statistical analysis. It includes univariate parametric and nonparametric tests, as well as multivariate unsupervised and supervised approaches. The main objective of this study is to promote proper understanding of the application of various statistical tools in these spectroscopic methods used for the analysis of biological samples. The discussion of these methods is performed on a set of in vivo confocal Raman spectra of human skin analysis that aims to identify skin aging markers. In the Appendix, a complete routine of data analysis is executed in a free software that can be used by the scientific community involved in these studies.

  18. Liver protein profiling in chronic hepatitis C: identification of potential predictive markers for interferon therapy outcome.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Ariel Basulto; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Iacono, Oreste Lo; Angeletti, Claudio; Corazzari, Marco; Daniele, Nicola; Testa, Angela; Pisa, Roberto; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Antonucci, Giorgio; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2012-02-01

    The current anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy, based on pegylated-interferon alpha and ribavirin, has limited success rate and is accompanied by several side effects. The aim of this study was to identify protein profiles in pretreatment liver biopsies of HCV patients correlating with the outcome of antiviral therapy. Cytosolic or membrane/organelle-enriched protein extracts from liver biopsies of eight HCV patients were analyzed by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Overall, this analysis identified 21 proteins whose expression levels correlate with therapy response. These factors are involved in interferon-mediated antiviral activity, stress response, and energy metabolism. Moreover, we found that post-translational modifications of dihydroxyacetone kinase were also associated with therapy outcome. Differential expression of the five best performing markers (STAT1, Mx1, DD4, DAK, and PD-ECGF) was confirmed by immunoblotting assays in an independent group of HCV patients. Finally, we showed that a prediction model based on the expression levels of these markers classifies responder and nonresponder patients with an accuracy of 85.7%. These results provide evidence that the analysis of pretreatment liver protein profiles is valuable for discriminating between responder and nonresponder HCV patients, and may contribute to reduce the number of nonresponder patients exposed to therapy-associated risks.

  19. Discovery and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Aflatoxin-Resistance: Evaluating Their Potential as Breeding Markers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert L.; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Warburton, Marilyn; Luo, Meng; Menkir, Abebe; Fakhoury, Ahmad; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilitate the transfer of resistance into commercially useful genetic backgrounds without transfer of unwanted traits. To accomplish this, research efforts have focused on the identification of kernel resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) including the employment of comparative proteomics to investigate closely-related maize lines that vary in aflatoxin accumulation. RAPs have been identified and several further characterized through physiological and biochemical investigations to determine their causal role in resistance and, therefore, their suitability as breeding markers. Three RAPs, a 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor, pathogenesis-related protein 10 and glyoxalase I are being investigated using RNAi gene silencing and plant transformation. Several resistant lines have been subjected to QTL mapping to identify loci associated with the aflatoxin-resistance phenotype. Results of proteome and characterization studies are discussed. PMID:22069617

  20. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. PMID:26820249

  1. [Polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence as a source of enhancement of the discrimination potential of the STR-markers].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Timoshenko, T V; Leonov, S N; Ivanov, P L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present pilot investigation was to reveal and to study polymorphism of nucleotide sequence in the alleles of STR loci of human autosomal DNA with special reference to the role of this phenomenon as a source of the differences between homonymous allelic variants. The secondary objection was to evaluate the possibility of using the data thus obtained for the enhancement of the informative value of the forensic medical genotyping of STR loci by means of identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for the purpose of extending their allelic spectrum. The methodological basis of the study was constituted by the comprehensive amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and amplified fragment sequence polymorphisms (AFSP) analysis of DNA with the use of the PLEX-ID^TM analytical mass-spectrometry platform (Abbot Molecular, USA). The study has demonstrated that polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence can be regarded as the possible source of enhancement of the discriminating potential of STR markers. It means that the analysis of polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence for genotyping AFLP-type markers of chromosomal DNA can considerably increase the effectiveness of their application as individualizing markers for the purpose of molecular genetic expertises.

  2. Ameliorative potential of Coccinia grandis extract on serum and liver marker enzymes and lipid profile in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumari, S.; Bhuvaneswari, P.; Rajeswari, P.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most severe metabolic pandemic of the 21st century, affecting essential biochemical activities in almost every cell in the body. Indian literatures have already mentioned herbal remediation for a number of human ailments. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of Coccinia grandis extract on serum and liver marker enzymes (ALP, AST, ALT and LDH) and lipid profile (total cholesterol, phospholipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids in serum and liver) in streptozotocin induced diabetic animals. The experimental animals were treated with methanolic extract of Coccinia grandis and the levels of marker enzymes and lipid profile were estimated. The ALP, AST, ALT and LDH levels were increased in diabetic rats and restored to near normal levels after administration of plant extract. The lipid profile increased in diabetic group and after the treatment with the plant extract the levels were reverted to near normal. Thus the methanolic extract of Coccinia grandis has a potent ability to restore the marker enzymes and the lipid profile was reverted to near normal levels. PMID:22736887

  3. [Polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence as a source of enhancement of the discrimination potential of the STR-markers].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Timoshenko, T V; Leonov, S N; Ivanov, P L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present pilot investigation was to reveal and to study polymorphism of nucleotide sequence in the alleles of STR loci of human autosomal DNA with special reference to the role of this phenomenon as a source of the differences between homonymous allelic variants. The secondary objection was to evaluate the possibility of using the data thus obtained for the enhancement of the informative value of the forensic medical genotyping of STR loci by means of identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for the purpose of extending their allelic spectrum. The methodological basis of the study was constituted by the comprehensive amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and amplified fragment sequence polymorphisms (AFSP) analysis of DNA with the use of the PLEX-ID^TM analytical mass-spectrometry platform (Abbot Molecular, USA). The study has demonstrated that polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence can be regarded as the possible source of enhancement of the discriminating potential of STR markers. It means that the analysis of polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence for genotyping AFLP-type markers of chromosomal DNA can considerably increase the effectiveness of their application as individualizing markers for the purpose of molecular genetic expertises. PMID:27500481

  4. MTHFR Gene Mutations: A Potential Marker of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2015-01-01

    Recent epigenome-wide association studies have confirmed the importance of epigenetic effects mediated by DNA methylation in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Metabolic folate pathways and methyl donor reactions facilitated by B-group vitamins may be critical in the pathogenesis of LOAD. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutations were studied in consecutive Alzheimer's Disease & Memory Clinic patients up to December 2014. DNA analyses of MTHFR-C667T and - A1298C homozygous and heterozygous polymorphisms in 93 consecutive elderly patients revealed high prevalence of MTHFR mutations (92.5%). Findings require confirmation in a larger series, but MTHFR mutations may become a LOAD marker, opening novel possibilities for prevention and treatment.

  5. Assessment of Four Molecular Markers as Potential DNA Barcodes for Red Algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H.; Hurtado, Anicia Q.

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment. PMID:23285223

  6. Assessment of four molecular markers as potential DNA barcodes for red algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H; Hurtado, Anicia Q

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment.

  7. Assessment of four molecular markers as potential DNA barcodes for red algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H; Hurtado, Anicia Q

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment. PMID:23285223

  8. Identification of MicroRNAs as Potential Prognostic Markers in Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Fabricio F.; Lulla, Rishi R.; Wang, Min; Sredni, Simone T.; Rajaram, Veena; de Fátima Bonaldo, Maria; Wang, Deli; Goldman, Stewart; Tomita, Tadanori; Soares, Marcelo B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We have examined expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in ependymomas to identify molecular markers of value for clinical management. miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that can block mRNA translation and affect mRNA stability. Changes in the expression of miRNAs have been correlated with many human cancers. Materials and Methods We have utilized TaqMan Low Density Arrays to evaluate the expression of 365 miRNAs in ependymomas and normal brain tissue. We first demonstrated the similarity of expression profiles of paired frozen tissue (FT) and paraffin-embedded specimens (FFPE). We compared the miRNA expression profiles of 34 FFPE ependymoma samples with 8 microdissected normal brain tissue specimens enriched for ependymal cells. miRNA expression profiles were then correlated with tumor location, histology and other clinicopathological features. Results We have identified miRNAs that are over-expressed in ependymomas, such as miR-135a and miR-17-5p, and down-regulated, such as miR-383 and miR-485-5p. We have also uncovered associations between expression of specific miRNAs which portend a worse prognosis. For example, we have identified a cluster of miRNAs on human chromosome 14q32 that is associated with time to relapse. We also found that miR-203 is an independent marker for relapse compared to the parameters that are currently used. Additionally, we have identified three miRNAs (let-7d, miR-596 and miR-367) that strongly correlate to overall survival. Conclusion We have identified miRNAs that are differentially expressed in ependymomas compared with normal ependymal tissue. We have also uncovered significant associations of miRNAs with clinical behavior. This is the first report of clinically relevant miRNAs in ependymomas. PMID:22053178

  9. Label-free visualization of collagen in submucosa as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jingting; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    The collagen signature in colorectal submucosa is changed due to remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the malignant process and plays an important role in noninvasive early detection of human colorectal cancer. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the changes of collagen in normal colorectal submucosa (NCS) and cancerous colorectal submucosa (CCS). What's more, the collagen content was quantitatively measured. It was found that in CCS the morphology of collagen becomes much looser and the collagen content is significantly reduced compared to NCS. These results suggest that MPM has the ability to provide collagen signature as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  10. The chloroplast DNA locus psbZ-trnfM as a potential barcode marker in Phoenix L. (Arecaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ballardini, Marco; Mercuri, Antonio; Littardi, Claudio; Abbas, Summar; Couderc, Marie; Ludeña, Bertha; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genus Phoenix (Arecaceae) comprises 14 species distributed from Cape Verde Islands to SE Asia. It includes the economically important species Phoenix dactylifera. The paucity of differential morphological and anatomical useful characters, and interspecific hybridization, make identification of Phoenix species difficult. In this context, the development of reliable DNA markers for species and hybrid identification would be of great utility. Previous studies identified a 12 bp polymorphic chloroplast minisatellite in the trnG (GCC)-trnfM (CAU) spacer, and showed its potential for species identification in Phoenix. In this work, in order to develop an efficient DNA barcode marker for Phoenix, a longer cpDNA region (700 bp) comprising the mentioned minisatellite, and located between the psbZ and trnfM (CAU) genes, was sequenced. One hundred and thirty-six individuals, representing all Phoenix species except P. andamanensis,were analysed. The minisatellite showed 2-7 repetitions of the 12 bp motif, with 1-3 out of seven haplotypes per species. Phoenix reclinata and P. canariensis had species-specific haplotypes. Additional polymorphisms were found in the flanking regions of the minisatellite, including substitutions, indels and homopolymers. All this information allowed us to identify unambiguously eight out of the 13 species, and overall 80% of the individuals sampled. Phoenix rupicola and P. theophrasti had the same haplotype, and so had P. atlantica, P. dactylifera, and P. sylvestris (the “date palm complex” sensu Pintaud et al. 2013). For these species, additional molecular markers will be required for their unambiguous identification. The psbZ-trnfM (CAU) region therefore could be considered as a good basis for the establishment of a DNA barcoding system in Phoenix, and is potentially useful for the identification of the female parent in Phoenix hybrids. PMID:24453552

  11. The chloroplast DNA locus psbZ-trnfM as a potential barcode marker in Phoenix L. (Arecaceae).

    PubMed

    Ballardini, Marco; Mercuri, Antonio; Littardi, Claudio; Abbas, Summar; Couderc, Marie; Ludeña, Bertha; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe

    2013-12-30

    The genus Phoenix (Arecaceae) comprises 14 species distributed from Cape Verde Islands to SE Asia. It includes the economically important species Phoenix dactylifera. The paucity of differential morphological and anatomical useful characters, and interspecific hybridization, make identification of Phoenix species difficult. In this context, the development of reliable DNA markers for species and hybrid identification would be of great utility. Previous studies identified a 12 bp polymorphic chloroplast minisatellite in the trnG (GCC)-trnfM (CAU) spacer, and showed its potential for species identification in Phoenix. In this work, in order to develop an efficient DNA barcode marker for Phoenix, a longer cpDNA region (700 bp) comprising the mentioned minisatellite, and located between the psbZ and trnfM (CAU) genes, was sequenced. One hundred and thirty-six individuals, representing all Phoenix species except P. andamanensis,were analysed. The minisatellite showed 2-7 repetitions of the 12 bp motif, with 1-3 out of seven haplotypes per species. Phoenix reclinata and P. canariensis had species-specific haplotypes. Additional polymorphisms were found in the flanking regions of the minisatellite, including substitutions, indels and homopolymers. All this information allowed us to identify unambiguously eight out of the 13 species, and overall 80% of the individuals sampled. Phoenix rupicola and P. theophrasti had the same haplotype, and so had P. atlantica, P. dactylifera, and P. sylvestris (the "date palm complex" sensu Pintaud et al. 2013). For these species, additional molecular markers will be required for their unambiguous identification. The psbZ-trnfM (CAU) region therefore could be considered as a good basis for the establishment of a DNA barcoding system in Phoenix, and is potentially useful for the identification of the female parent in Phoenix hybrids. PMID:24453552

  12. Investigating the potential of fluorescent fingerprint powders as a marker for blow fly larvae (Diptera: calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Rosati, Jennifer Y; Robinson, Scott D; Devine, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Four fluorescent fingerprint powders (RedWop(™) , GreenWop(™) , Basic Yellow(™) , and Yellow Powder(™) ) were evaluated as a marker for blow fly larvae. Administration methods included ingestion (high vs. low concentration) or topical. Ingestion of high concentrations of Basic Yellow(™) and RedWop(™) caused higher larval mortality. Basic Yellow(™) delayed development and adult emergence while RedWop(™) and Yellow Powder(™) had a significant effect on particular stages of development, however, emergence time was not altered. Optimal administration is through ingestion at low concentration levels (<10%) or topically, with GreenWop(™) demonstrating minimal adverse effects. Optimum wavelength for discrimination between powders was 450 nm. This research can aid in investigative training to increase visibility of larval and pupal blow flies. It can also be used in entomological studies to differentiate between larval blow flies (or other dipteran) species or individuals to further understand complex interactions and behavior during larval development.

  13. Mutations in p53 as potential molecular markers for human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Runnebaum, I.B.; Nagarajan, M.; Bowman, M.; Soto, D.; Sukumar, S. )

    1991-12-01

    Based on the high incidence of loss of heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p in the vicinity of the p53 locus in human breast tumors. The authors investigated the frequency and effects of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene in mammary neoplasia. They examined the p53 gene in 20 breast cancer cell lines and 59 primary breast tumors. Northern blot analysis, immunoprecipitation, and nucleotide sequencing analysis revealed aberrant mRNA expression, over-expression of protein, and point mutations in the p53 gene in 50% of the cell line tested. A multiplex PCR assay was developed to search for deletions in the p53 genomic locus. Multiplex PCR of genomic DNA showed that up to 36% of primary tumors contained aberrations in the p53 locus. Mutations in exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were found in 10 out of 59 (17%) of the primary tumors studied by single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. They conclude that, compared to amplification of HER2/NEU, MYC, or INT2 oncogene loci, p53 gene mutations and deletions are the most frequently observed genetic change in breast cancer related to a single gene. Correlated to disease status, p53 gene mutations could prove to be a valuable marker for diagnosis and/or prognosis of breast neoplasia.

  14. Cytochrome c as a Potentially Clinical Useful Marker of Mitochondrial and Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts derived from bacteria. Thus, they bear molecules, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that contains CpG DNA repeats and N-formyl peptides (FPs), found in bacteria. Upon cell necrosis or apoptosis, these molecules are released into the interstitial space and the circulation and recognized by the immune cells through the same receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leading to inflammation. Other mitochondrial molecules are not of bacterial origin, but they may serve as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) when due to cell injury are translocated into inappropriate compartments. There they are recognized by pattern recognition receptors of the immune cells. Cytochrome c is such a molecule. In this review, experimental and clinical data are presented that confirms cytochrome c release into the extracellular space in pathological conditions characterized by cell death. This indicates that serum cytochrome c, which can be easily measured, may be a clinically useful marker for diagnosing and assessing the severity of such pathological entities. Reasonably, detection of high cytochrome c level into the circulation means release of various other molecules that serves as DAMPs when found extracellularly, the mtDNA and FPs included. Finally, because the release of this universally found compound into the extracellular space makes cytochrome c an ideal molecule to play the role of a DAMP per se, the available experimental and clinical data that support such a role are provided. PMID:27489552

  15. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Sung; Kim, Hye Lim; Kim, Yeo Jin; Weon, Jong-Il; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hai Won; Seo, Young Rok

    2014-01-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual's genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction) is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke) and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation) is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk. PMID:25243052

  16. Fate of CL-20 in sandy soils: degradation products as potential markers of natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Monteil-Rivera, Fanny; Halasz, Annamaria; Manno, Dominic; Kuperman, Roman G; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is an emerging explosive that may replace the currently used explosives such as RDX and HMX, but little is known about its fate in soil. The present study was conducted to determine degradation products of CL-20 in two sandy soils under abiotic and biotic anaerobic conditions. Biotic degradation was prevalent in the slightly acidic VT soil, which contained a greater organic C content, while the slightly alkaline SAC soil favored hydrolysis. CL-20 degradation was accompanied by the formation of formate, glyoxal, nitrite, ammonium, and nitrous oxide. Biotic degradation of CL-20 occurred through the formation of its denitrohydrogenated derivative (m/z 393 Da) while hydrolysis occurred through the formation of a ring cleavage product (m/z 156 Da) that was tentatively identified as CH(2)=N-C(=N-NO(2))-CH=N-CHO or its isomer N(NO(2))=CH-CH=N-CO-CH=NH. Due to their chemical specificity, these two intermediates may be considered as markers of in situ attenuation of CL-20 in soil.

  17. Fate of CL-20 in sandy soils: degradation products as potential markers of natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Monteil-Rivera, Fanny; Halasz, Annamaria; Manno, Dominic; Kuperman, Roman G; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is an emerging explosive that may replace the currently used explosives such as RDX and HMX, but little is known about its fate in soil. The present study was conducted to determine degradation products of CL-20 in two sandy soils under abiotic and biotic anaerobic conditions. Biotic degradation was prevalent in the slightly acidic VT soil, which contained a greater organic C content, while the slightly alkaline SAC soil favored hydrolysis. CL-20 degradation was accompanied by the formation of formate, glyoxal, nitrite, ammonium, and nitrous oxide. Biotic degradation of CL-20 occurred through the formation of its denitrohydrogenated derivative (m/z 393 Da) while hydrolysis occurred through the formation of a ring cleavage product (m/z 156 Da) that was tentatively identified as CH(2)=N-C(=N-NO(2))-CH=N-CHO or its isomer N(NO(2))=CH-CH=N-CO-CH=NH. Due to their chemical specificity, these two intermediates may be considered as markers of in situ attenuation of CL-20 in soil. PMID:18801604

  18. Cytochrome c as a Potentially Clinical Useful Marker of Mitochondrial and Cellular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts derived from bacteria. Thus, they bear molecules, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that contains CpG DNA repeats and N-formyl peptides (FPs), found in bacteria. Upon cell necrosis or apoptosis, these molecules are released into the interstitial space and the circulation and recognized by the immune cells through the same receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leading to inflammation. Other mitochondrial molecules are not of bacterial origin, but they may serve as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) when due to cell injury are translocated into inappropriate compartments. There they are recognized by pattern recognition receptors of the immune cells. Cytochrome c is such a molecule. In this review, experimental and clinical data are presented that confirms cytochrome c release into the extracellular space in pathological conditions characterized by cell death. This indicates that serum cytochrome c, which can be easily measured, may be a clinically useful marker for diagnosing and assessing the severity of such pathological entities. Reasonably, detection of high cytochrome c level into the circulation means release of various other molecules that serves as DAMPs when found extracellularly, the mtDNA and FPs included. Finally, because the release of this universally found compound into the extracellular space makes cytochrome c an ideal molecule to play the role of a DAMP per se, the available experimental and clinical data that support such a role are provided. PMID:27489552

  19. Differential protein mapping of ovarian serous adenocarcinomas: identification of potential markers for distinct tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Wu, Rong; Cho, Kathleen R; Thomas, Dafydd G; Gossner, Gabrielle; Liu, J Rebecca; Giordano, Thomas J; Shedden, Kerby A; Misek, David E; Lubman, David M

    2009-03-01

    Ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) comprise over half of all ovarian carcinomas and account for the majority of ovarian cancer-related deaths. We used a 2-dimensional liquid-based protein mapping strategy to characterize global protein expression patterns in 19 OSC tumor samples from 15 different patients to facilitate molecular classification of tumor stage. Protein expression profiles were produced, using pI-based separation in the first dimension and hydrophobicity-based separation in the second dimension, over a pH range of 4.0-7.0. Hierarchical clustering was applied to protein maps to indicate the tumor interrelationships. The 19 tumor samples could be classified into two different groups, one group associated with low stage (Stage 1) tumors and the other group associated with high stage (Stages 3/4) tumors. Proteins that were differentially expressed in different groups were selected for identification by LTQ-ESI-MS/MS. Fourteen of the selected proteins were overexpressed in the low stage tumors; 46 of the proteins were overexpressed in the high stage tumors. These proteins are known to play an important role in cellular functions such as glycolysis, protein biosynthesis, and cytoskeleton rearrangement and may serve as markers associated with different stages of OSCs. To further confirm the stage-dependent protein identifications, Lamin A/C and Vimentin expression in ovarian serous carcinomas was assessed by immunohistochemistry using ovarian tumor tissue microarrays for 66 samples.

  20. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential markers of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vlagea, Alexandru; Gil, Antonio; Cuesta, Maria V; Arribas, Florencia; Diez, Jesús; Lavilla, Paz; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora

    2013-06-01

    The antiphospholipid antibodies present in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are directed at a number of phospholipid-binding proteins: β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin, and so on. Antibodies directed at β2GPI are accepted as a classification criterion for APS, while the presence of antiprothrombin antibodies is not. In the present article, we investigated the possible role of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as marker of APS on a cohort of 295 individuals with APS (95 primary APS and 45 secondary APS) and APS-related diseases. We found aPS/PT to be highly associated with venous thrombosis (immunoglobulin G [IgG] aPS/PT odds ratio [OR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97-13.92 and IgM aPS/PT OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.35-4.77) and obstetric abnormalities (IgG aPS/PT OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.04-5.43), but not with arterial thrombosis. A very high degree of concordance between the concentration of aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant activity was demonstrated. Therefore, we support the inclusion of aPS/PT determination as second-level assay to confirm APS classification.

  1. Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase may serve as a potential marker and therapeutic target for prostate cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    YIN, BO; YANG, YANG; ZHAO, ZHIQIANG; ZENG, YU; MOONEY, STEVEN M.; LI, MING; XU, XUEWEN; SONG, YONGSHENG; WU, BIN; YANG, ZHIBO

    2014-01-01

    The presence of arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) potentiates prostate cancer (PCa) progression and therefore may be a good therapeutic target and/or a potential diagnostic predictor for PCa. In this study, we examined the expression of 12-LOX in PCa stem cells (PCa SCs) to test if it can serve as a unique marker and therapeutic target for PCa SCs. To this end, we isolated the cancer stem cell-like side population (SP) cells from the human PCa cell line DU-145 by a flow cytometry-based SP technique. The isolated DU-145 SP cells comprised a small population of the DU-145 cells. The SP cells had an up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2) which enables these cells to efflux vital dyes and chemotherapeutic drugs. Furthermore, we detected a strong up-regulation of 12-LOX in these DU-145 SP cells compared to the parental DU-145 cells by RT-PCR and Western blot approaches. We also detected 12-LOX overexpression in PCa SCs in human PCa tissue samples by paraffin-section based immunofluorescent 4-channel confocal microscopy. However, no 12-LOX was detected in normal prostate epithelial SCs in normal prostate tissue samples. These multiple lines of evidence support the possibility that 12-LOX may serve as a unique marker and therapeutic target for PCa SCs. PMID:21225230

  2. In situ marker-based assessment of leaf trait evolutionary potential in a marginal European beech population.

    PubMed

    Bontemps, A; Lefèvre, F; Davi, H; Oddou-Muratorio, S

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary processes are expected to be crucial for the adaptation of natural populations to environmental changes. In particular, the capacity of rear edge populations to evolve in response to the species limiting conditions remains a major issue that requires to address their evolutionary potential. In situ quantitative genetic studies based on molecular markers offer the possibility to estimate evolutionary potentials manipulating neither the environment nor the individuals on which phenotypes are measured. The goal of this study was to estimate heritability and genetic correlations of a suite of leaf functional traits involved in climate adaptation for a natural population of the tree Fagus sylvatica, growing at the rear edge of the species range. Using two marker-based quantitative genetics approaches, we obtained consistent and significant estimates of heritability for leaf phenological (phenology of leaf flush), morphological (mass, area, ratio mass/area) and physiological (δ(13)C, nitrogen content) traits. Moreover, we found only one significant positive genetic correlation between leaf area and leaf mass, which likely reflected mechanical constraints. We conclude first that the studied population has considerable genetic diversity for important ecophysiological traits regarding drought adaptation and, second, that genetic correlations are not likely to impose strong genetic constraints to future population evolution. Our results bring important insights into the question of the capacity of rear edge populations to evolve. PMID:26679342

  3. The potential for a suite of isotope and chemical markers to differentiate sources of nitrate contamination: a review.

    PubMed

    Fenech, C; Rock, L; Nolan, K; Tobin, J; Morrissey, A

    2012-05-01

    Nitrate is naturally found within the environment as part of the nitrogen cycle. However, anthropogenic inputs have greatly increased nitrate loads within ground and surface waters. This has had a severe impact on aquatic ecosystems and has given rise to health considerations in humans and livestock. Therefore, the identification of nitrate sources is important in preserving water quality and achieving sustainability of our water resources. Nitrate sources can be determined based on the nitrate nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotopic compositions (δ(15)N, δ(18)O). However, sewage and manure have overlapping δ(15)N and δ(18)O values making their differentiation on this basis problematic. The specific differentiation between sources of faecal contamination is of particular importance, because the risk to humans is usually considered higher from human faecal contamination (sewage) than from animal faecal contamination. This review summarises the current state of knowledge in using isotope tracers to differentiate various nitrate sources and identifies potential chemical tracers for differentiating sewage and manure. In particular, an in depth review of the current state of knowledge regarding the necessary considerations in using chemical markers, such as pharmaceuticals and food additives, to differentiate sewage and manure sources of nitrate contamination will be given, through an understanding of their use, occurrence and fate, in order to identify the most suitable potential chemical markers.

  4. Gene Expression Changes in Developing Zebrafish as Potential Markers for Rapid Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sparse information exists on many chemicals to guide developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) risk assessments. As DNT testing using rodents is laborious and expensive, alternative species such as zebrafish are being adapted for toxicity screening. Assessing the DNT potential of chem...

  5. Inhibition of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma cell lines and xenografts restricts their growth, survival and angiogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Eric; Verrydt, Megan; Postenka, Carl O; Pardhan, Siddika; Willie, Chantalle J; Mazzola, Clarisse R; Hammers, Matthew D; Pluth, Michael D; Lobb, Ian; Power, Nicholas E; Chambers, Ann F; Leong, Hon S; Sener, Alp

    2015-09-15

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-deficiency, resulting in pseudohypoxic, angiogenic and glycolytic tumours. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously-produced gasotransmitter that accumulates under hypoxia and has been shown to be pro-angiogenic and cytoprotective in cancer. It was hypothesized that H2S levels are elevated in VHL-deficient ccRCC, contributing to survival, metabolism and angiogenesis. Using the H2S-specific probe MeRhoAz, it was found that H2S levels were higher in VHL-deficient ccRCC cell lines compared to cells with wild-type VHL. Inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes could reduce the proliferation, metabolism and survival of ccRCC cell lines, as determined by live-cell imaging, XTT/ATP assay, and flow cytometry respectively. Using the chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis model, it was found that systemic inhibition of endogenous H2S production was able to decrease vascularization of VHL-deficient ccRCC xenografts. Endogenous H2S production is an attractive new target in ccRCC due to its involvement in multiple aspects of disease.

  6. Inhibition of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma cell lines and xenografts restricts their growth, survival and angiogenic potential

    PubMed Central

    Sonke, Eric; Verrydt, Megan; Postenka, Carl O.; Pardhan, Siddika; Willie, Chantalle J.; Mazzola, Clarisse R.; Hammers, Matthew D.; Pluth, Michael D.; Lobb, Ian; Power, Nicholas E.; Chambers, Ann F.; Leong, Hon S.; Sener, Alp

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL)-deficiency, resulting in pseudohypoxic, angiogenic and glycolytic tumours. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously-produced gasotransmitter that accumulates under hypoxia and has been shown to be pro-angiogenic and cytoprotective in cancer. It was hypothesized that H2S levels are elevated in VHL-deficient ccRCC, contributing to survival, metabolism and angiogenesis. Using the H2S-specific probe MeRhoAz, it was found that H2S levels were higher in VHL-deficient ccRCC cell lines compared to cells with wild-type VHL. Inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes could reduce the proliferation, metabolism and survival of ccRCC cell lines, as determined by live-cell imaging, XTT/ATP assay, and flow cytometry respectively. Using the chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis model, it was found that systemic inhibition of endogenous H2S production was able to decrease vascularization of VHL-deficient ccRCC xenografts. Endogenous H2S production is an attractive new target in ccRCC due to its involvement in multiple aspects of disease. PMID:26068241

  7. Marker-Trait Association for Biomass Yield of Potential Bio-fuel Feedstock Miscanthus sinensis from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Gang; Huang, Linkai; Zhang, Xinquan; Taylor, Megan; Jiang, Yiwei; Yu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Xinchun; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    As a great potential bio-fuel feedstock, the genus Miscanthus has been widely studied around the world, especially Miscanthus × giganteus owing to its high biomass yield in Europe and North America. However, the narrow genetic basis and sterile characteristics of M. × giganteus have become a limitation for utilization and adaptation to extreme climate conditions. In this study, we focused on one of the progenitors of M. × giganteus, Miscanthus sinensis, which was originally distributed in East Asia with abundant genetic resources and comparable biomass yield potential to M. × giganteus in some areas. A collection of 138 individuals was selected for conducting a 3-year trial of biomass production and analyzed by using 104 pairs of SRAP, ISAP, and SSR primers for genetic diversity as well as marker-trait association. Significant differences in biomass yield and related traits were observed among individuals. Tiller number, fresh biomass yield per plant and dry biomass yield per plant had a high level of phenotypic variation among individuals and the coefficient of variation were all above 40% in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The majority of the traits had a significant correlation with the biomass yield except for the length and width of flag leaves. Plant height was a highly stable trait correlated with biomass yield. A total of 1059 discernible loci were detected by markers across individuals. The population structure (Q) and cluster analyses identified three subpopulations in the collection and family relative kinship (K) represented high gene flow among M. sinensis populations from Southwest China. Model testing identified that Q+K was the best model for describing the associations between the markers and traits, compared to the simple linear, Q or K model. Using the Q+K model, 12 significant associations (P < 0.001) were identified including four markers with plant height and one with biomass yield. Such associations would serve an efficient tool for an early

  8. Marker-Trait Association for Biomass Yield of Potential Bio-fuel Feedstock Miscanthus sinensis from Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Gang; Huang, Linkai; Zhang, Xinquan; Taylor, Megan; Jiang, Yiwei; Yu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Xinchun; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    As a great potential bio-fuel feedstock, the genus Miscanthus has been widely studied around the world, especially Miscanthus × giganteus owing to its high biomass yield in Europe and North America. However, the narrow genetic basis and sterile characteristics of M. × giganteus have become a limitation for utilization and adaptation to extreme climate conditions. In this study, we focused on one of the progenitors of M. × giganteus, Miscanthus sinensis, which was originally distributed in East Asia with abundant genetic resources and comparable biomass yield potential to M. × giganteus in some areas. A collection of 138 individuals was selected for conducting a 3-year trial of biomass production and analyzed by using 104 pairs of SRAP, ISAP, and SSR primers for genetic diversity as well as marker-trait association. Significant differences in biomass yield and related traits were observed among individuals. Tiller number, fresh biomass yield per plant and dry biomass yield per plant had a high level of phenotypic variation among individuals and the coefficient of variation were all above 40% in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The majority of the traits had a significant correlation with the biomass yield except for the length and width of flag leaves. Plant height was a highly stable trait correlated with biomass yield. A total of 1059 discernible loci were detected by markers across individuals. The population structure (Q) and cluster analyses identified three subpopulations in the collection and family relative kinship (K) represented high gene flow among M. sinensis populations from Southwest China. Model testing identified that Q+K was the best model for describing the associations between the markers and traits, compared to the simple linear, Q or K model. Using the Q+K model, 12 significant associations (P < 0.001) were identified including four markers with plant height and one with biomass yield. Such associations would serve an efficient tool for an early

  9. Arm Swing as a Potential New Prodromal Marker of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirelman, Anat; Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Thaler, Avner; Giladi-Yacobi, Eytan; Gurevich, Tanya; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Raymond, Deborah; Doan, Nancy; Bressman, Susan B.; Marder, Karen S.; Alcalay, Roy N.; Rao, Ashwini K.; Berg, Daniela; Brockmann, Kathrin; Aasly, Jan; Waro, Bjørg Johanne; Tolosa, Eduardo; Vilas, Dolores; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Giladi, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reduced arm swing is a well-known clinical feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD), often observed early in the course of the disease. We hypothesized that subtle changes in arm swing and axial rotation may also be detectable in the prodromal phase. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the LRRK2-G2019S mutation, arm swing, and axial rotation in healthy nonmanifesting carriers and noncarriers of the G2019S mutation and in patients with PD. Methods A total of 380 participants (186 healthy nonmanifesting controls and 194 PD patients) from 6 clinical sites underwent gait analysis while wearing synchronized 3-axis body-fixed sensors on the lower back and bilateral wrists. Participants walked for 1 minute under the following 2 conditions: (1) usual walking and (2) dual-task walking. Arm swing amplitudes, asymmetry, variability, and smoothness were calculated for both arms along with measures of axial rotation. Results A total of 122 nonmanifesting participants and 67 PD patients were carriers of the G2019S mutation. Nonmanifesting mutation carriers walked with greater arm swing asymmetry and variability and lower axial rotation smoothness under the dual task condition when compared with noncarriers (P < .04). In the nonmanifesting mutation carriers, arm swing asymmetry was associated with gait variability under dual task (P = .003). PD carriers showed greater asymmetry and variability of movement than PD noncarriers, even after controlling for disease severity (P < .009). Conclusions The G2019S mutation is associated with increased asymmetry and variability among nonmanifesting participants and patients with PD. Prospective studies should determine if arm swing asymmetry and axial rotation smoothness may be used as motor markers of prodromal PD. PMID:27430880

  10. The potential of microRNAs as biofluid markers of neurodegenerative diseases--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Danborg, Pia B; Simonsen, Anja H; Waldemar, Gunhild; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are biological molecules transcribed from non-protein coding regions of the genome, participating in regulating cellular processes. MiRNAs in biofluids may possess neurodegenerative disease biomarker potential for screening tests, differential diagnosis and disease progression monitoring. This systematic review clarifies biomarker potential of miRNAs detected in biofluids of neurodegenerative disease patients. Thirty-three and ten miRNAs displayed significant expression between patients with multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, compared to healthy controls in minimum two studies. Thirty-eight miRNAs showed biomarker potential by distinguishing significantly between minimum two diseases. Summarized data directs future research towards discovering new biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Potential for Metabolomics-Based Markers of Exposure:Encouraging Evidence from Studies using Model Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic techniques (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) have the potential to significantly improve the way chemical risk is managed in the 21st century. Indeed, a significant amount of research has been devoted to the use of these techniques to screen chemicals for h...

  12. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster genome: abundance, distribution, and potential for marker development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Qi, Haigang; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are a ubiquitous component of the eukaryote genome and constitute one of the most popular sources of molecular markers for genetic studies. However, no data are currently available regarding microsatellites across the entire genome in oysters, despite their importance to the aquaculture industry. We present the first genome-wide investigation of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas by analysis of the complete genome, resequencing, and expression data. The Pacific oyster genome is rich in microsatellites. A total of 604 653 repeats were identified, in average of one locus per 815 base pairs (bp). A total of 12 836 genes had coding repeats, and 7 332 were expressed normally, including genes with a wide range of molecular functions. Compared with 20 different species of animals, microsatellites in the oyster genome typically exhibited 1) an intermediate overall frequency; 2) relatively uniform contents of (A)n and (C)n repeats and abundant long (C)n repeats (≥24 bp); 3) large average length of (AG)n repeats; and 4) scarcity of trinucleotide repeats. The microsatellite-flanking regions exhibited a high degree of polymorphism with a heterozygosity rate of around 2.0%, but there was no correlation between heterozygosity and microsatellite abundance. A total of 19 462 polymorphic microsatellites were discovered, and dinucleotide repeats were the most active, with over 26% of loci found to harbor allelic variations. In all, 7 451 loci with high potential for marker development were identified. Better knowledge of the microsatellites in the oyster genome will provide information for the future design of a wide range of molecular markers and contribute to further advancements in the field of oyster genetics, particularly for molecular-based selection and breeding.

  13. Behavior of the polycyclic musks HHCB and AHTN in lakes, two potential anthropogenic markers for domestic wastewater in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Buerge, Ignaz J; Buser, Hans-Rudolf; Müller, Markus D; Poiger, Thomas

    2003-12-15

    The synthetic polycyclic musks HHCB and AHTN are potential chemical markers for domestic wastewater contamination of surface waters. Understanding their environmental behavior is important to evaluate their suitability as markers. This study focuses on the quantification of the processes that lead to an elimination in lakes. Rate constants for all relevant processes were estimated based on laboratory studies and models previously described. In lake Zurich, during winter time, both compounds are eliminated primarily by outflowing water and due to losses to the atmosphere. In summer, direct photolysis represents the predominant elimination process for AHTN in the epilimnion of lake Zurich (quantum yield, 0.12), whereas for HHCB, photochemical degradation is still negligible. HHCB and AHTN were then measured in effluents of Swiss wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), in remote and anthropogenically influenced Swiss surface waters, and in Mediterranean seawater using an analytical procedure based on SPE and GC-MS-SIM with D6-HHCB as internal standard (LODs for natural waters, 2 and 1 ng/L, respectively). In winter, concentrations of HHCB and AHTN in lakes (<2-47 and <1-18 ng/L, respectively) correlated with the anthropogenic burden by domestic wastewater (ratio population per water throughflow), demonstrating the suitability of these compounds as quantitative, source-specific markers. In summer, however, no such correlations were observed. Vertical concentration profiles in lake Zurich indicated significant losses in the epilimnion during summer, mainly for AHTN, and could be rationalized with a lake modeling program (MASASlight), considering measured, average loads from WWTP effluents (0.80 +/- 0.22 and 0.32 +/- 0.11 mg person(-1) d(-1) for HHCB and AHTN, respectively) and the estimated rate constants for elimination processes.

  14. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c–d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors. PMID:26999178

  15. Biochemical markers and somatosensory evoked potentials in patients after cardiac arrest: the role of neurological outcome scores.

    PubMed

    Rana, Obaida R; Saygili, Erol; Schiefer, Johannes; Marx, Nikolaus; Schauerte, Patrick

    2011-06-15

    Biochemical markers, e.g. NSE or S100B, and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) are considered promising candidates for neurological prognostic predictors in patients after cardiac arrest (CA). The Utstein Templates recommend the use of the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories (GP-CPC) to divide patients according to their neurological outcome. However, several studies investigating biochemical markers and SSEP are based on the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). We noticed that many studies failed to exclude patients who died without certified brain damage from patients classified as poor outcome, instead including all patients who died into this category. Therefore, we summarized the published NSE cut-off values and the derived sensitivity and specificity to predict poor outcome of those studies which only included patients with certified brain death in GOS-1 or GP-CPC-5 (group A) vs. those studies which did not differentiate between death from any cause or death due to primary brain damage (group B). On average, mean NSE cut-off values and sensitivity were higher (56 ± 35 ng/ml, 56 ± 18%) in group A than in group B (41 ± 17 ng/ml, 44 ± 25%), respectively. The specificity remained equally high in both groups. In analogy, the average sensitivity of SSEP to predict poor outcome was higher in group A (76 ± 11%) than in group B (50 ± 15%), while the specificity was similar in both groups. Conclusively, inclusion of deaths without certified brain damage after CA in neurological outcome studies will lead to underestimation of the prognostic power of biochemical or electrophysiological markers for brain damage. A modified GOS and GP-CPC score might help to avoid this bias.

  16. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers.

    PubMed

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-03-17

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c-d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors.

  17. Transgelin: a potentially useful diagnostic marker differentially expressed in triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Deepthi; Kimler, Bruce F; Nothnick, Warren B; Davis, Marilyn K; Fan, Fang; Tawfik, Ossama

    2015-06-01

    Triple negative (TN) (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR] and HER2-) are highly aggressive, rapidly growing, hormone-unresponsive tumors diagnosed at later stage that affect younger women with shorter overall survival. Most TN tumors are of the basal type. For the remainder, identification of target markers for effective treatment strategies remains a challenge. Transgelin (TGLN) is a 22-kd actin-binding protein of the calponin family. It is one of the earliest markers of smooth muscle differentiation. TGLN has been shown to have important biologic activities including regulating muscle fiber contractility, cell migration, and tumor suppression. We examined TGLN expression in the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. TGLN expression was examined as a function of tumor size, grade, histologic type, lymph node status, patients' age and overall survival, ER, PR, HER2, and Ki-67 in 101 tumors that included 35 luminal A, 28 luminal B, 4 HER2, and 34 TN types. TGLN positivity (defined as 2+ or 3+) was associated with more aggressive tumors (10% of grade I/II tumors were TGLN+ versus 53% of grade III tumors; P < .001), high Ki-67 count, and low ER and PR expression (P < .001) but not with tumor size, age, or lymph node metastasis. TN (n = 34) tumors were 7.7 times more likely to be TGLN+ than non-TN (n = 67) tumors (77% versus 10%, respectively; P < .001). TGLN may be an excellent diagnostic marker of TN tumors and could be useful in stratification of patients. TGLN may also prove a potential target for future treatment strategies.

  18. Objective markers of drug effects on brain function from recordings of scalp potential in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Boeijinga, Peter H.

    2002-01-01

    In order to stress the importance of P300 responses in drug development, we describe the spatiotemporal characteristics of this objective, evoked event-related potential. These brain activations reflect mnemonic function, in which limbic structures play a role. It is demonstrated that a pharmacological challenge concerning, for example, the cholinergic system in young healthy volunteers induces modifications in P300 reminiscent of the aging brain. We use this type of observation to build a model in which it can be verified whether the deterioration can be counteracted by treatment with “cognition-enhancing” drugs. If we accept the extrapolation of the pharmacological effects to symptomatology, scalp potential analysis offers an appropriate tool for the study of drug interactions in early proof-of-concept models. PMID:22033496

  19. Potential Use of Salivary Markers for Longitudinal Monitoring of Inflammatory Immune Responses to Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, Johan; Sandalova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination, designed to trigger a protective immune response against infection, is a trigger for mild inflammatory responses. Vaccination studies can address the question of inflammation initiation, levels, and resolution as well as its regulation for respective studied pathogens. Such studies largely based on analyzing the blood components including specific antibodies and cytokines were usually constrained by number of participants and volume of collected blood sample. Hence, blood-based studies may not be able to cover the full dynamic range of inflammation responses induced by vaccination. In this review, the potential of using saliva in addition to blood for studying the kinetics of inflammatory response studies was assessed. Saliva sampling is noninvasive and has a great potential to be used for studies aimed at analysing the magnitude, time course, and variance in immune responses, including inflammation after vaccination. Based on a literature survey of inflammatory biomarkers that can be determined in saliva and an analysis of how these biomarkers could help to understand the mechanisms and dynamics of immune reactivity and inflammation, we propose that the saliva-based approach might have potential to add substantial value to clinical studies, particularly in vulnerable populations such as infants, toddlers, and ill individuals. PMID:27022211

  20. Identification of species-specific nuclear insertions of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas and their potential as population genetic markers

    PubMed Central

    Clark Nicholas, Jonathan; Wildschutte Julia, Vera Halo; DiMattio, Kelly; Jensen-Seaman, Michael Ignatius; Anthony, Nicola Mary

    2014-01-01

    The first hyper-variable region (HV1) of the mitochondrial control region (MCR) has been widely used as a molecular tool in population genetics, but inadvertent amplification of nuclear translocated copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas has compromised the use of mitochondrial DNA in population genetic studies. At least three putative classes (I, II, III) of gorilla-specific HV1 MCR numts have been uncovered over the past decade. However, the number, size and location of numt loci in gorillas and other apes are completely unknown. Furthermore, little work to date has assessed the utility of numts as candidate population genetic markers. In the present study, we screened Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic libraries in the chimpanzee and gorilla to compare patterns of mitochondrial-wide insertion in both taxa. We conducted an intensive BLAST search for numts in the gorilla genome and compared the prevalence of numt loci originating from the MCR with other great ape taxa. Additional gorilla-specific MCR numts were retrieved either through BAC library screens or using an anchored-PCR (A-PCR) amplification using genomic DNA from five unrelated gorillas. Locus-specific primers were designed to identify numt insertional polymorphisms and evaluate their potential as population genetic markers. Mitochondrial-wide surveys of chimpanzee and gorilla BACs showed that the number of numts does not differ between these two taxa. However, MCR numts are more abundant in chimpanzees than in other great apes. We identified and mapped 67 putative gorilla-specific numts, including two that contain the entire HV1 domain, cluster with sequences from two numt classes (I, IIb) and will likely co-amplify with mitochondrial sequences using most published HV1 primers. However, phylogenetic analysis coupled with post-hoc analysis of mitochondrial variation can successfully differentiate nuclear sequences. Insertional polymorphisms were evident in three out of five numts

  1. Identification of species-specific nuclear insertions of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas and their potential as population genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Soto-Calderón, Iván Darío; Clark, Nicholas Jonathan; Wildschutte, Julia Vera Halo; DiMattio, Kelly; Jensen-Seaman, Michael Ignatius; Anthony, Nicola Mary

    2014-12-01

    The first hyper-variable region (HV1) of the mitochondrial control region (MCR) has been widely used as a molecular tool in population genetics, but inadvertent amplification of nuclear translocated copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas has compromised the use of mitochondrial DNA in population genetic studies. At least three putative classes (I, II, III) of gorilla-specific HV1 MCR numts have been uncovered over the past decade. However, the number, size and location of numt loci in gorillas and other apes are completely unknown. Furthermore, little work to date has assessed the utility of numts as candidate population genetic markers. In the present study, we screened Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic libraries in the chimpanzee and gorilla to compare patterns of mitochondrial-wide insertion in both taxa. We conducted an intensive BLAST search for numts in the gorilla genome and compared the prevalence of numt loci originating from the MCR with other great ape taxa. Additional gorilla-specific MCR numts were retrieved either through BAC library screens or using an anchored-PCR (A-PCR) amplification using genomic DNA from five unrelated gorillas. Locus-specific primers were designed to identify numt insertional polymorphisms and evaluate their potential as population genetic markers. Mitochondrial-wide surveys of chimpanzee and gorilla BACs showed that the number of numts does not differ between these two taxa. However, MCR numts are more abundant in chimpanzees than in other great apes. We identified and mapped 67 putative gorilla-specific numts, including two that contain the entire HV1 domain, cluster with sequences from two numt classes (I, IIb) and will likely co-amplify with mitochondrial sequences using most published HV1 primers. However, phylogenetic analysis coupled with post-hoc analysis of mitochondrial variation can successfully differentiate nuclear sequences. Insertional polymorphisms were evident in three out of five numts

  2. Mitosis Is a Source of Potential Markers for Screening and Survival and Therapeutic Targets in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Ana María; Alfaro, Ana; Roman-Basaure, Edgar; Guardado-Estrada, Mariano; Palma, Ícela; Serralde, Cyntia; Medina, Ingrid; Juárez, Eligia; Bermúdez, Miriam; Márquez, Edna; Borges-Ibáñez, Manuel; Muñoz-Cortez, Sergio; Alcántara-Vázquez, Avissai; Alonso, Patricia; Curiel-Valdez, José; Kofman, Susana; Villegas, Nicolas; Berumen, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The effect of preventive human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on the reduction of the cervical cancer (CC) burden will not be known for 30 years. Therefore, it’s still necessary to improve the procedures for CC screening and treatment. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize cellular targets that could be considered potential markers for screening or therapeutic targets. A pyramidal strategy was used. Initially the expression of 8,638 genes was compared between 43 HPV16-positive CCs and 12 healthy cervical epitheliums using microarrays. A total of 997 genes were deregulated, and 21 genes that showed the greatest deregulation were validated using qRT-PCR. The 6 most upregulated genes (CCNB2, CDC20, PRC1, SYCP2, NUSAP1, CDKN3) belong to the mitosis pathway. They were further explored in 29 low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN1) and 21 high-grade CIN (CIN2/3) to investigate whether they could differentiate CC and CIN2/3 (CIN2+) from CIN1 and controls. CCNB2, PRC1, and SYCP2 were mostly associated with CC and CDC20, NUSAP1, and CDKN3 were also associated with CIN2/3. The sensitivity and specificity of CDKN3 and NUSAP1 to detect CIN2+ was approximately 90%. The proteins encoded by all 6 genes were shown upregulated in CC by immunohistochemistry. The association of these markers with survival was investigated in 42 CC patients followed up for at least 42 months. Only CDKN3 was associated with poor survival and it was independent from clinical stage (HR = 5.9, 95%CI = 1.4–23.8, p = 0.01). CDKN3 and NUSAP1 may be potential targets for the development of screening methods. Nevertheless, further studies with larger samples are needed to define the optimal sensitivity and specificity. Inhibition of mitosis is a well-known strategy to combat cancers. Therefore, CDKN3 may be not only a screening and survival marker but a potential therapeutic target in CC. However, whether it’s indispensable for tumor growth remains to be

  3. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals.

  4. SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation as a potential bio-marker for myeloproliferative neoplasms associated with mutant JAK2 kinases

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Joanne; Suessmuth, Yvonne; Scott, Linda M.; Nahlik, Krystyna; McMullin, Mary Frances; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Green, Anthony R.; Johnston, James A.

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 V617F, identified in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, tyrosine phosphorylates SOCS3 and escapes its inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that the JAK2 exon 12 mutants described in a subset of V617F-negative MPN cases, also stabilize tyrosine phosphorylated SOCS3. SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation was also observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and granulocytes isolated from patients with JAK2 H538QK539L or JAK2 F537-K539delinsL mutations. JAK kinase inhibitors, which effectively inhibited the proliferation of cells expressing V617F or K539L, also caused a dose-dependent reduction in both mutant JAK2 and SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation. We propose, therefore, that SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation may be a novel bio-marker of myeloproliferative neoplasms resulting from a JAK2 mutation and a potential reporter of effective JAK2 inhibitor therapy currently in clinical development. PMID:19229050

  5. A diagnostic molecular marker for zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and potentially co-occurring bivalves: mitochondrial COI.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B S; Black, M; Sanjur, O; Gustafson, R; Lutz, R A; Vrijenhoek, R C

    1996-03-01

    We report diagnostic differences in the nucleotide sequences of a 710-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) from the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and potentially co-occurring bivalves: the quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis); the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea), the dark false mussel (Mytilopsis leucophaeata), and the wedge clam (Rangia cuneata). The COI sequence of the deep-water "profunda" phenotype of the quagga mussel was nearly identical to that of shallow-water quagga mussels. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in this portion of COI produced species-specific differences in fragment numbers and sizes that could be used as diagnostic markers to distinguish the free-living larvae produced by these bivalves.

  6. Mathematically combined half-cell reduction potentials of low-molecular-weight thiols as markers of seed ageing.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Colville, Louise; Pritchard, Hugh W; Pearce, Stephen R; Kranner, Ilse

    2011-09-01

    The half-cell reduction potential of the glutathione disulphide (GSSG)/glutathione (GSH) redox couple appears to correlate with cell viability and has been proposed to be a marker of seed viability and ageing. This study investigated the relationship between seed viability and the individual half-cell reduction potentials (E(i)s) of four low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols in Lathyrus pratensis seeds subjected to artificial ageing: GSH, cysteine (Cys), cysteinyl-glycine (Cys-Gly) and γ-glutamyl-cysteine (γ-Glu-Cys). The standard redox potential of γ-Glu-Cys was previously unknown and was experimentally determined. The E(i)s were mathematically combined to define a LMW thiol-disulphide based redox environment (E(thiol-disulphide)). Loss of seed viability correlated with a shift in E(thiol-disulphide) towards more positive values, with a LD(50) value of -0.90 ± 0.093 mV M (mean ± SD). The mathematical definition of E(thiol-disulphide) is envisaged as a step towards the definition of the overall cellular redox environment, which will need to include all known redox-couples.

  7. Potential of carotenoids in aquatic yeasts as a phylogenetically reliable marker and natural colorant for aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Ishida, Masami; Urano, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Apart from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, pink colony-forming yeasts have not been examined as a pigmentation source in captive animals. In this study, aquatic yeasts were screened with a view to abundances of carotenoids. Phylogenetic analyses of these caroetnoid-rich yeasts based on large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (LSU rDNA) partial sequences showed that all belonged to the order Sporidiobolales. Both the qualitative and the quantitative differences in carotenoids between the yeasts appeared to be consistent with their phylogenetic affiliations. This information might be useful in the selection of pigment-rich yeasts containing specific carotenoids from a large number of strains. We also found, for the first time, the potential of a pigment-rich Rhodotorula strain as a colorant for aquaculture. The integuments of tilapia and carp fed the alkali-treated cells of strain Rhodotorula dairenensis Sag 17 were pigmented after 3 months of cultivation. The fish integuments retained the yeast carotenes shortly after the start of feeding, and were converted to the fish-specific xanthophylls in vivo. PMID:21897034

  8. Blood DNA methylation markers in potentially identified Chinese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongying; Yan, Haixiu; Zhang, Jinshu

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether blood DNA methylation is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for Chinese patients, we used genome-wide DNA methylation detection to access the blood samples of Chinese patients by Illumina Human methylation 450K arrays. Sixty potentially gene locis which had different methylated levels significantly among tumor and adjacent normal tissues would be tested in this study. A previous study was conducted in China communities and followed with 7 years. The DNA from white blood cells (WBC) from 192 patients with HCC and 215 matched controls were assayed in this study. The χ2 test was used to measure data to categorize variables and t -test was used to evaluate the different characteristics among groups. Besides, odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI was calculated for matching factors by conditional logistic regression models. We found that high methylation in WNK2 was related to increased risk of HCC, and high methylation in TPO were related to decreased risk of HCC. In our multivariable conditional logistic regression models, these results all exist. Those findings support the methylated changes of WNK2 and TPO may become a new detection index for HCC patients in clinical laboratory. However, the results should be replicated in additional prospective studies with lager samples. PMID:27592479

  9. Endosialin expression in soft tissue sarcoma as a potential marker of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Thway, Khin; Robertson, David; Jones, Robin L; Selfe, Joanna; Shipley, Janet; Fisher, Cyril; Isacke, Clare M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Soft tissue sarcomas are a group of neoplasms with differentiation towards mesenchymal tissue, many of which are aggressive and chemotherapy resistant. Histology and immunoprofiles often overlap with neoplasms of other lineages, and establishing an accurate histopathological diagnosis is crucial for correct management, and therapeutic stratification. The endosialin cell surface glycoprotein is predominantly expressed by stromal fibroblasts and pericytes in epithelial neoplasms; however, tumour cell expression has been reported in small series of sarcomas. Methods: We assessed endosialin expression by immunohistochemistry in a large set of 514 human soft tissue sarcomas. Results: Tumour cell endosialin expression was seen in 89% of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas (104/117), 77% adult fibrosarcomas/spindle cell sarcomas (20/26), 62% synovial sarcomas (37/60), 51% leiomyosarcomas (94/185) and 31% rhabdomyosarcomas (39/126). Conclusions: Endosialin immunohistochemistry has potential to distinguish undifferentiated and poorly differentiated sarcomas from other poorly differentiated, non-mesenchymal neoplasms. A Phase II trial randomising patients with advanced sarcomas to receive chemotherapy with/without an endosialin therapeutic antibody has recently completed enrolment. Endosialin expression could be used to select patients for such clinical trials. Based on our results, patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma may be particularly suitable for such a therapeutic approach. PMID:27434038

  10. Gene expression screening of salivary gland neoplasms: molecular markers of potential histogenetic and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Shin-Ichiro; Kim, Hyung-Woo; Weber, Randal S; Lee, Jack J; Kies, Merril; Luna, Mario A; Batsakis, John G; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2004-08-01

    Salivary gland neoplasms comprise phenotypically and biologically diverse lesions of uncertain histogenesis. The molecular events associated with their development and clinicopathological heterogeneity remain unknown. To reveal these events, we performed microarray expression analysis using a nylon-filter membrane platform on 18 primary lesions representing the most common benign and malignant types. Our study identified a small set of genes that are differentially altered between normal salivary gland tissues and benign and malignant tumors. Of the 5000 genes arrayed, 136 genes were differentially expressed by normal tissue, benign tumors, and various malignant neoplasms. Hierarchical clustering analysis differentiated between adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) and other malignant subtypes. Non-ACC specimens manifested overlapping patterns of gene expression within and between tumors. Most of the differentially expressed genes share functional similarities with members of the adhesion, proliferation, and signal transduction pathways. Our study identified: 1) a set of genes that differentiate normal tissue from tumor specimens, 2) genes that differentiate pleomorphic adenoma and ACCs from other malignant salivary gland neoplasms, and 3) different patterns of expression between ACCs arising from major and minor salivary gland sites. The differentially expressed genes provide new information on potential genetic events of biological significance in future studies of salivary gland tumorigenesis.

  11. Suprabasin, a novel epidermal differentiation marker and potential cornified envelope precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon Tae; Lim, Susan E; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Morasso, Maria I

    2002-11-22

    The suprabasin gene is a novel gene expressed in mouse and human differentiating keratinocytes. We identified a partial cDNA encoding suprabasin using a suppression subtractive hybridization method between the proliferative basal and differentiating suprabasal populations of the mouse epidermis. A 3' gene-specific probe hybridized to transcripts of 0.7- and 2.2-kb pairs on Northern blots with specific detection in differentiated keratinocytes of stratified epithelia. The mouse gene was mapped to chromosome 7 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This region is syntenic to human chromosome band 19q13.1, which contained the only region in the data bases with homology to the mouse suprabasin sequence. During embryonic mouse development, suprabasin mRNA was detected at day 15.5, coinciding with epidermal stratification. Suprabasin was detected in the suprabasal layers of the epithelia in the tongue, stomach, and epidermis. Differentiation of cultured primary epidermal keratinocytes with 0.12 mm Ca(2+) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment resulted in the induction of suprabasin. The 2.2-kb cDNA transcript encodes a protein of 72 kDa with a predicted isoelectric point of 6.85. The translated sequence has an amino-terminal domain, a central domain composed of repeats rich in glycine and alanine, and a carboxyl-terminal domain. The alternatively spliced 0.7-kb transcript encodes a smaller protein that shares the NH(2)- and COOH-terminal regions but lacks the repeat domain region. Cross-linking experiments indicate that suprabasin is a substrate for transglutaminase 2 and 3 activity. Altogether, these results indicate that the suprabasin protein potentially plays a role in the process of epidermal differentiation. PMID:12228223

  12. A Preclinical Study of Laryngeal Motor-Evoked Potentials as a Marker Vagus Nerve Activation.

    PubMed

    Grimonprez, Annelies; Raedt, Robrecht; De Taeye, Leen; Larsen, Lars Emil; Delbeke, Jean; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for refractory epilepsy and depression. Previous studies using invasive recording electrodes showed that VNS induces laryngeal motor-evoked potentials (LMEPs) through the co-activation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and subsequent contractions of the laryngeal muscles. The present study investigates the feasibility of recording LMEPs in chronically VNS-implanted rats, using a minimally-invasive technique, to assess effective current delivery to the nerve and to determine optimal VNS output currents for vagal fiber activation. Three weeks after VNS electrode implantation, signals were recorded using an electromyography (EMG) electrode in the proximity of the laryngeal muscles and a reference electrode on the skull. The VNS output current was gradually ramped up from 0.1 to 1.0 mA in 0.1 mA steps. In 13/27 rats, typical LMEPs were recorded at low VNS output currents (median 0.3 mA, IQR 0.2-0.3 mA). In 11/27 rats, significantly higher output currents were required to evoke electrophysiological responses (median 0.7 mA, IQR 0.5-0.7 mA, p < 0.001). The latencies of these responses deviated significantly from LMEPs (p < 0.05). In 3/27 rats, no electrophysiological responses to simulation were recorded. Minimally invasive LMEP recordings are feasible to assess effective current delivery to the vagus nerve. Furthermore, our results suggest that low output currents are sufficient to activate vagal fibers.

  13. Tissue microarray-based study of hepatocellular carcinoma validating SPIB as potential clinical prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Yueh-Min; Huang, Yen-Chi; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Lin, Liang-In; Lu, Jeng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the prognostic significance of SPIB protein overexpression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of SPIB expression in human HCC in order to determine possible correlations between SPIB expression and clinicopathological findings. The expression of SPIB proteins was detected using immunohistochemical staining in commercial multiple-tissue microarrays as a means of examining expression profiles in patients. Using online biomarker validation tool SurvExpress, we focused on the correlation between SPIB overexpression and survival as well as relapse-free survival (RFS). Results show that SPIB protein expression levels were significantly higher in colon, liver, and stomach tumors than in non-tumor tissues (p<0.05). SPIB overexpression in patients with HCC was also significantly higher than that of the normal samples (p<0.001). Among patients with liver disease, SPIB protein expression levels differ significantly according to the stage of liver disease, specifically between stages I, II, and III of HCC (p<0.05). SPIB expression was also shown to be significantly correlated with age (p=0.046) and histological grade (p=0.027). Furthermore, the SurvExpress analysis suggested that high SPIB and KI-67 mRNA expression were significantly associated with the poor survival of patients with HCC (p<0.05). Our results indicate that cross-talk in the expression of SPIB and KI-67 may be associated with poor prognosis and may potentially serve as a clinical prognostic indicator of HCC. This is the first time that such an association has been reported. PMID:26610895

  14. Predictive value of bovine follicular components as markers of oocyte developmental potential.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Satoko; Bender, Katrin; Fahey, Alan G; Mamo, Solomon; Brennan, Lorraine; Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2014-01-01

    The follicle is a unique micro-environment within which the oocyte can develop and mature to a fertilisable gamete. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a panel of follicular parameters, including intrafollicular steroid and metabolomic profiles and theca, granulosa and cumulus cell candidate gene mRNA abundance, to predict the potential of bovine oocytes to develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro. Individual follicles were dissected from abattoir ovaries, carefully ruptured under a stereomicroscope and the oocyte was recovered and individually processed through in vitro maturation, fertilisation and culture. The mean (±s.e.m.) follicular concentrations of testosterone (62.8±4.8 ngmL(-1)), progesterone (616.8±31.9 ngmL(-1)) and oestradiol (14.4±2.4 ngmL(-1)) were not different (P>0.05) between oocytes that formed (competent) or failed to form (incompetent) blastocysts. Principal-component analysis of the quantified aqueous metabolites in follicular fluid showed differences between oocytes that formed blastocysts and oocytes that degenerated; l-alanine, glycine and l-glutamate were positively correlated and urea was negatively correlated with blastocyst formation. Follicular fluid associated with competent oocytes was significantly lower in palmitic acid (P=0.023) and total fatty acids (P=0.031) and significantly higher in linolenic acid (P=0.036) than follicular fluid from incompetent oocytes. Significantly higher (P<0.05) transcript abundance of LHCGR in granulosa cells, ESR1 and VCAN in thecal cells and TNFAIP6 in cumulus cells was associated with competent compared with incompetent oocytes.

  15. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M.

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid.

  16. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid.

  17. Diffusion imaging changes in grey matter in Alzheimer's disease: a potential marker of early neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Weston, Philip S J; Simpson, Ivor J A; Ryan, Natalie S; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is recognized to have a long presymptomatic period, during which there is progressive accumulation of molecular pathology, followed by inexorable neuronal damage. The ability to identify presymptomatic individuals with evidence of neurodegenerative change, to stage their disease, and to track progressive changes will be important for early diagnosis and for prevention trials. Despite recent advances, particularly in magnetic resonance imaging, our ability to identify early neurodegenerative changes reliably is limited. The development of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, which is sensitive to microstructural changes not visible with conventional volumetric techniques, has led to a number of diffusion imaging studies in AD; these have largely focused on white matter changes. However, in AD cerebral grey matter is affected very early, with pathological studies suggesting that grey matter changes predate those in white matter. In this article we review the growing number of studies that assess grey matter diffusivity changes in AD. Although use of the technique is still at a relatively early stage, results so far have been promising. Initial studies identified changes in diffusion measures in the hippocampi of patients with mild cognitive impairment, which predated macroscopic volume loss, with positive predictive value for progression to AD dementia. More recent studies have identified abnormalities in multiple neocortical areas (particularly the posterior cingulate) at various stages of disease progression. Studies of patients who carry genetic mutations predisposing to autosomal dominant familial AD have shown cortical and subcortical grey matter diffusivity changes several years before the expected onset of the first clinical symptoms. The technique is not without potential methodological difficulties, especially relating to partial volume effects, although recent advances appear to be reducing such issues. Going forward

  18. Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15) is a potential marker of radiation response and radiation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Benedek, Anett; Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated the importance of GDF-15 (secreted cytokine belonging to the TGF-β superfamily) in low and high dose radiation-induced cellular responses. A telomerase immortalized human fibroblast cell line (F11hT) was used in the experiments. A lentiviral system encoding small hairpin RNAs (shRNA) was used to establish GDF-15 silenced cells. Secreted GDF-15 levels were measured in culture medium by ELISA. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The experiments demonstrated that in irradiated human fibroblasts GDF-15 expression increased with dose starting from 100mGy. Elevated GDF-15 expression was not detected in bystander cells. The potential role of GDF-15 in radiation response was investigated by silencing GDF-15 in immortalized human fibroblasts with five different shRNA encoded in lentiviral vectors. Cell lines with considerably reduced GDF-15 levels presented increased radiation sensitivity, while a cell line with elevated GDF-15 was more radiation resistant than wild type cells. We have investigated how the reduced GDF-15 levels alter the response of several known radiation inducible genes. In F11hT-shGDF-15 cells the basal expression level of CDKN1A was unaltered relative to F11hT cells, while GADD45A and TGF-β1 mRNA levels were slightly higher, and TP53INP1 was considerably reduced. The radiation-induced expression of TP53INP1 was lower in the silenced than in wild type fibroblast cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that radiation-induced early G2/M arrest was abrogated in GDF-15 silenced cells. Moreover, radiation-induced bystander effect was less pronounced in GDF-15 silenced fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results suggest that GDF-15 works as a radiation inducible radiation resistance increasing factor in normal human fibroblast cells, acts by regulating the radiation-induced transcription of several genes and might serve as a radiation-induced early biomarker in exposed cells. PMID:26520384

  19. Genetic Structure and Inferences on Potential Source Areas for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) Based on Mitochondrial and Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Kerdelhué, Carole; Ye, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) is mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical Asia and in the Pacific region. Despite its economic importance, very few studies have addressed the question of the wide genetic structure and potential source area of this species. This pilot study attempts to infer the native region of this pest and its colonization pathways in Asia. Combining mitochondrial and microsatellite markers, we evaluated the level of genetic diversity, genetic structure, and the gene flow among fly populations collected across Southeast Asia and China. A complex and significant genetic structure corresponding to the geographic pattern was found with both types of molecular markers. However, the genetic structure found was rather weak in both cases, and no pattern of isolation by distance was identified. Multiple long-distance dispersal events and miscellaneous host selection by this species may explain the results. These complex patterns may have been influenced by human-mediated transportation of the pest from one area to another and the complex topography of the study region. For both mitochondrial and microsatellite data, no signs of bottleneck or founder events could be identified. Nonetheless, maximal genetic diversity was observed in Myanmar, Vietnam and Guangdong (China) and asymmetric migration patterns were found. These results provide indirect evidence that the tropical regions of Southeast Asia and southern coast of China may be considered as the native range of the species and the population expansion is northward. Yunnan (China) is a contact zone that has been colonized from different sources. Regions along the southern coast of Vietnam and China probably served to colonize mainly the southern region of China. Southern coastal regions of China may also have colonized central parts of China and of central Yunnan. PMID:22615898

  20. Genetic structure and inferences on potential source areas for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) based on mitochondrial and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Kerdelhué, Carole; Ye, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) is mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical Asia and in the Pacific region. Despite its economic importance, very few studies have addressed the question of the wide genetic structure and potential source area of this species. This pilot study attempts to infer the native region of this pest and its colonization pathways in Asia. Combining mitochondrial and microsatellite markers, we evaluated the level of genetic diversity, genetic structure, and the gene flow among fly populations collected across Southeast Asia and China. A complex and significant genetic structure corresponding to the geographic pattern was found with both types of molecular markers. However, the genetic structure found was rather weak in both cases, and no pattern of isolation by distance was identified. Multiple long-distance dispersal events and miscellaneous host selection by this species may explain the results. These complex patterns may have been influenced by human-mediated transportation of the pest from one area to another and the complex topography of the study region. For both mitochondrial and microsatellite data, no signs of bottleneck or founder events could be identified. Nonetheless, maximal genetic diversity was observed in Myanmar, Vietnam and Guangdong (China) and asymmetric migration patterns were found. These results provide indirect evidence that the tropical regions of Southeast Asia and southern coast of China may be considered as the native range of the species and the population expansion is northward. Yunnan (China) is a contact zone that has been colonized from different sources. Regions along the southern coast of Vietnam and China probably served to colonize mainly the southern region of China. Southern coastal regions of China may also have colonized central parts of China and of central Yunnan. PMID:22615898

  1. Association between Mutation and Expression of TP53 as a Potential Prognostic Marker of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Park, Kyunghee; Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Eunjin; Cho, Eun Yoon; Lee, Kwang Hee; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose TP53, the most frequently mutated gene in breast cancer, is more frequently altered in HER2-enriched and basal-like breast cancer. However, no studies have clarified the role of TP53 status as a prognostic and predictive marker of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Materials and Methods We performed p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC), nCounter mRNA expression assay, and DNA sequencing to determine the relationship between TP53 alteration and clinical outcomes of TNBC patients. Results Seventy-seven of 174 TNBC patients were found to harbor a TP53 mutation. Patients with missense mutations showed high protein expression in contrast to patients with deletion mutations (positivity of IHC: wild type vs. missense vs. deletion mutation, 53.6% vs. 89.8% vs. 25.0%, respectively; p < 0.001). TP53 mRNA expression was influenced by mutation status (mRNA expression [median]: wild type vs. missense vs. deletion mutation, 207.36± 132.73 vs. 339.61±143.21 vs. 99.53±99.57, respectively; p < 0.001). According to survival analysis, neither class of mutation nor protein or mRNA expression status had any impact on patient prognosis. In subgroup analysis, low mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis in patients with a TP53 missense mutation (5-year distant recurrence-free survival [5Y DRFS]: low vs. high, 50.0% vs. 87.8%; p=0.009), while high mRNA expression with a TP53 deletion mutation indicated poor prognosis (5Y DRFS: low vs. high, 91.7% vs. 75.0%; p=0.316). Conclusion Association between TP53 mutation and expression indicates a potential prognostic marker of TNBC; hence both DNA sequencing and mRNA expression analysis may be required to predict the prognosis of TNBC patients. PMID:26910472

  2. Evaluation of a 3A-truncated foot-and-mouth disease virus in pigs for its potential as a marker vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of cloven-hoofed animals in the world. The disease can be effectively controlled by vaccination of susceptible animals with the conventional inactivated vaccine. However, one major concern of the inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) vaccine is that it does not allow serological discrimination between infected and vaccinated animals, and therefore interferes with serologic surveillance and the epidemiology of disease. A marker vaccine has proven to be of great value in disease eradication and control programs. In this study, we constructed a marker FMDV containing a deletion of residues 93 to 143 in the nonstructural protein 3A using a recently developed FMDV infectious cDNA clone. The marker virus, r-HN/3A93–143, had similar growth kinetics as the wild type virus in culture cell and caused a symptomatic infection in pigs. Pigs immunized with chemically inactivated marker vaccine were fully protected from the wild type virus challenge, and the potency of this marker vaccine was 10 PD50 (50% pig protective dose) per dose, indicating it could be an efficacious vaccine against FMDV. In addition, we developed a blocking ELISA targeted to the deleted epitope that could clearly differentiate animals infected with the marker virus from those infected with the wild type virus. These results indicate that a marker FMDV vaccine can be potentially developed by deleting an immunodominant epitope in NSP 3A. PMID:24885414

  3. Proteomics of stress responses in wheat and barley—search for potential protein markers of stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Prášil, Ilja T.

    2014-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum; T. durum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) agricultural production is severely limited by various abiotic and biotic stress factors. Proteins are directly involved in plant stress response so it is important to study proteome changes under various stress conditions. Generally, both abiotic and biotic stress factors induce profound alterations in protein network covering signaling, energy metabolism (glycolysis, Krebs cycle, ATP biosynthesis, photosynthesis), storage proteins, protein metabolism, several other biosynthetic pathways (e.g., S-adenosylmethionine metabolism, lignin metabolism), transport proteins, proteins involved in protein folding and chaperone activities, other protective proteins (LEA, PR proteins), ROS scavenging enzymes as well as proteins affecting regulation of plant growth and development. Proteins which have been reported to reveal significant differences in their relative abundance or posttranslational modifications between wheat, barley or related species genotypes under stress conditions are listed and their potential role in underlying the differential stress response is discussed. In conclusion, potential future roles of the results of proteomic studies in practical applications such as breeding for an enhanced stress tolerance and the possibilities to test and use protein markers in the breeding are suggested. PMID:25566285

  4. Stroma derived COL6A3 is a potential prognosis marker of colorectal carcinoma revealed by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents the third most common cancer in males and second in females worldwide. Here, we performed a quantitative 8-plex iTRAQ proteomics analysis of the secreted proteins from five colonic fibroblast cultures and three colon cancer epithelial cell lines. We identified 1114 proteins at 0% FDR, including 587 potential secreted proteins. We further recognized 116 fibroblast-enriched proteins which were significantly associated with cell movement, angiogenesis, proliferation and wound healing, and 44 epithelial cell-enriched proteins. By interrogation of Oncomine database, we found that 20 and 8 fibroblast-enriched proteins were up- and downregulated in CRC, respectively. Western blots confirmed the fibroblast-specific secretion of filamin C, COL6A3, COL4A1 and spondin-2. Upregulated mRNA and stroma expression of COL6A3 in CRC, which were revealed by Oncomine analyses and tissue-microarray-immunohistochemistry, indicated poor prognosis. COL6A3 expression was significantly associated with Dukes stage, T stage, stage, recurrence and smoking status. Circulating plasma COL6A3 in CRC patients was upregulated significantly comparing with healthy peoples. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that COL6A3 has better predictive performance for CRC with an area under the curve of 0.885 and the best sensitivity/specificity of 92.9%/81.3%. Thus we demonstrated that COL6A3 was a potential diagnosis and prognosis marker of CRC. PMID:26338966

  5. Microsatellite markers for the endangered Roanoke logperch, Percina rex (Percidae) and their potential utility for other darter species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, D.J.; Roberts, J.H.; Angermeier, P.L.; Hallerman, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Roanoke logperch (Percina rex Jordan and Evermann), an endangered fish, occurs in only six watersheds in the Roanoke and Chowan river drainages of Virginia, USA. The species' population genetic structure is poorly known. We developed 16 microsatellite markers that were reliably scorable and polymorphic P. rex. Markers were also screened in seven other darter species of the genus Percina. Most markers exhibited successful amplification and polymorphism in several species. These markers may therefore prove useful for population genetic studies in other darters, a diverse but highly imperiled group. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  6. The Endogenous Exposome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Mutlu, Esra; Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard; Bodnar, Wanda; Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Moeller, Benjamin; Lu, Kun; Swenberg, James

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the Exposome, is a compilation of diseases and one’s lifetime exposure to chemicals, whether the exposure comes from environmental, dietary, or occupational exposures; or endogenous chemicals that are formed from normal metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, infections, and other natural metabolic processes such as alteration of the gut microbiome. In this review, we have focused on the Endogenous Exposome, the DNA damage that arises from the production of endogenous electrophilic molecules in our cells. It provides quantitative data on endogenous DNA damage and its relationship to mutagenesis, with emphasis on when exogenous chemical exposures that produce identical DNA adducts to those arising from normal metabolism cause significant increases in total identical DNA adducts. We have utilized stable isotope labeled chemical exposures of animals and cells, so that accurate relationships between endogenous and exogenous exposures can be determined. Advances in mass spectrometry have vastly increased both the sensitivity and accuracy of such studies. Furthermore, we have clear evidence of which sources of exposure drive low dose biology that results in mutations and disease. These data provide much needed information to impact quantitative risk assessments, in the hope of moving towards the use of science, rather than default assumptions. PMID:24767943

  7. Microsatellite Markers of Willow Species and Characterization of 11 Polymorphic Microsatellites for Salix eriocephala (Salicaceae), a Potential Native Species for Biomass Production in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Pitre, Frédéric E; Brouillet, Luc; Labrecque, Michel

    2013-03-27

    Biomass produced from dedicated plantations constitutes a source of renewable energy and is expected to play an important role in several countries in the coming decades. The cultivation of woody crops such as willows therefore raises several environmental issues. In North America, several native willows are potentially interesting for biomass producers. Willow trees are diverse but few species used for environmental applications have been the object of molecular genetic studies. Based on the sequenced poplar genome, 24 microsatellite markers were assayed on five native North American willow species: Salix amygdaloides, S. discolor, S. eriocephala, S. interior and S. nigra. Polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to characterize the allele data on the shrub Salix eriocephala, a North American species with economic potential. Eleven markers amplified and confirmed the potential of this species. Analysis of samples from six populations in eastern Canada showed that all markers were variable as well as polymorphic in at least one population. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 1 to 9 (mean 2.95) and showed that these microsatellite markers can be used to assess genetic diversity of North American willow species.

  8. Microsatellite Markers of Willow Species and Characterization of 11 Polymorphic Microsatellites for Salix eriocephala (Salicaceae), a Potential Native Species for Biomass Production in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Pitre, Frédéric E.; Brouillet, Luc; Labrecque, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Biomass produced from dedicated plantations constitutes a source of renewable energy and is expected to play an important role in several countries in the coming decades. The cultivation of woody crops such as willows therefore raises several environmental issues. In North America, several native willows are potentially interesting for biomass producers. Willow trees are diverse but few species used for environmental applications have been the object of molecular genetic studies. Based on the sequenced poplar genome, 24 microsatellite markers were assayed on five native North American willow species: Salix amygdaloides, S. discolor, S. eriocephala, S. interior and S. nigra. Polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to characterize the allele data on the shrub Salix eriocephala, a North American species with economic potential. Eleven markers amplified and confirmed the potential of this species. Analysis of samples from six populations in eastern Canada showed that all markers were variable as well as polymorphic in at least one population. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 1 to 9 (mean 2.95) and showed that these microsatellite markers can be used to assess genetic diversity of North American willow species. PMID:27137372

  9. Investigation and Sensory Characterization of 1,4-Cineole: A Potential Aromatic Marker of Australian Cabernet Sauvignon Wine.

    PubMed

    Antalick, Guillaume; Tempère, Sophie; Šuklje, Katja; Blackman, John W; Deloire, Alain; de Revel, Gilles; Schmidtke, Leigh M

    2015-10-21

    This work reports the quantitation and sensory characterization of 1,4-cineole in red wine for the first time. A headspace-solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) method was developed to quantitate 1,4-cineole and 1,8-cineole in 104 commercial Australian red wines. 1,4-Cineole was detected in all of the wines analyzed, with concentrations ranging from 0.023 to 1.6 μg/L. An important varietal effect was observed, with concentrations of 1,4-cineole in Cabernet Sauvignon wines (mean of 0.6 ± 0.3 μg/L) significantly higher than in Shiraz (0.07 ± 0.04 μg/L) and Pinot Noir (0.2 ± 0.2 μg/L) wines. Regional variations of both cineole isomer concentrations have been measured between wines originating from different Australian regions. Sensory studies demonstrated that the addition of 0.54 μg/L 1,4-cineole in a Cabernet Sauvignon wine, to produce a final concentration of 0.63 μg/L, was perceived significantly by a sensory panel (p < 0.05). Descriptive analyses revealed that 1,4-cineole and 1,8-cineole may contribute to the hay, dried herbs, and blackcurrant aromas reported in Australian Cabernet Sauvignon wines and may be potential markers of regional typicality of these wines.

  10. CD146 is a novel marker for highly tumorigenic cells and a potential therapeutic target in malignant rhabdoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    Nodomi, S; Umeda, K; Saida, S; Kinehara, T; Hamabata, T; Daifu, T; Kato, I; Hiramatsu, H; Watanabe, K-i; Kuwahara, Y; Iehara, T; Adachi, S; Konishi, E; Nakahata, T; Hosoi, H; Heike, T

    2016-01-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a rare, highly aggressive pediatric malignancy that primarily develops during infancy and early childhood. Despite the existing standard of intensive multimodal therapy, the prognosis of patients with MRT is dismal; therefore, a greater understanding of the biology of this disease is required to establish novel therapies. In this study, we identified a highly tumorigenic sub-population in MRT, based on the expression of CD146 (also known as melanoma cell adhesion molecule), a cell adhesion molecule expressed by neural crest cells and various derivatives. CD146+ cells isolated from four MRT cell lines by cell sorting exhibited enhanced self-renewal and invasive potential in vitro. In a xenograft model using immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid IL-2Rγ-null mice, purified CD146+ cells obtained from MRT cell lines or a primary tumor exhibited the exclusive ability to form tumors in vivo. Blocking of CD146-related mechanisms, either by short hairpin RNA knockdown or treatment with a polyclonal antibody against CD146, effectively suppressed tumor growth of MRT cells both in vitro and in vivo via induction of apoptosis by inactivating Akt. Furthermore, CD146 positivity in immunohistological analysis of 11 MRT patient samples was associated with poor patient outcomes. These results suggest that CD146 defines a distinct sub-population in MRT with high tumorigenic capacity and that this marker represents a promising therapeutic target. PMID:27041577

  11. Identification of potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis of gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Jian; Xu, Lixiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE) genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DE genes identified in the meta-analysis. Three microarray datasets (26 cases and 29 controls in total) were collected for meta-analysis. 905 consistently DE genes were identified in ankylosing spondylitis, among which 482 genes were upregulated and 423 genes were downregulated. The upregulated gene with the smallest combined rank product (RP) was GNG11 (combined RP=299.64). The downregulated gene with the smallest combined RP was S100P (combined RP=335.94). In the gene ontology (GO) analysis, the most significantly enriched GO term was "immune system process" (P=3.46×10(-26)). The most significant pathway identified in the pathway analysis was antigen processing and presentation (P=8.40×10(-5)). The consistently DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and biological pathways associated with those DE genes identified provide valuable information for studying the pathophysiology of ankylosing spondylitis.

  12. Trisomy 8 Acute Myeloid Leukemia Analysis Reveals New Insights of DNA Methylome with Identification of HHEX as Potential Diagnostic Marker

    PubMed Central

    Saied, Marwa H; Marzec, Jacek; Khalid, Sabah; Smith, Paul; Molloy, Gael; Young, Bryan D

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy 8 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the commonest numerical aberration in AML. Here we present a global analysis of trisomy 8 AML using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-seq). The study is based on three diagnostic trisomy 8 AML and their parallel relapse status in addition to nine non-trisomic AML and four normal bone marrows (NBMs). In contrast to non-trisomic DNA samples, trisomy 8 AML showed a characteristic DNA methylation distribution pattern because an increase in the frequency of the hypermethylation signals in chromosome 8 was associated with an increase in the hypomethylation signals in the rest of the chromosomes. Chromosome 8 hypermethylation signals were found mainly in the CpG island (CGI) shores and interspersed repeats. Validating the most significant differentially methylated CGI (P = 7.88 × 10−11) identified in trisomy 8 AML demonstrated a specific core region within the gene body of HHEX, which was significantly correlated with HHEX expression in both diagnostic and relapse trisomy 8 AMLs. Overall, the existence of extra chromosome 8 was associated with a global impact on the DNA methylation distribution with identification of HHEX gene methylation as a potential diagnostic marker for trisomy 8 AML. PMID:25674022

  13. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-12-08

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia.

  14. A Potential Epigenetic Marker Mediating Serum Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels Contributes to the Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Keat Wei, Loo; Sutherland, Heidi; Au, Anthony; Camilleri, Emily; Haupt, Larisa M.; Gan, Siew Hua; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a multifactorial disease that may be associated with aberrant DNA methylation profiles. We investigated epigenetic dysregulation for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene among ischemic stroke patients. Cases and controls were recruited after obtaining signed written informed consents following a screening process against the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Serum vitamin profiles (folate, vitamin B12, and homocysteine) were determined using immunoassays. Methylation profiles for CpGs A and B in the MTHFR gene were determined using a bisulfite-pyrosequencing method. Methylation of MTHFR significantly increased the susceptibility risk for ischemic stroke. In particular, CpG A outperformed CpG B in mediating serum folate and vitamin B12 levels to increase ischemic stroke susceptibility risks by 4.73-fold. However, both CpGs A and B were not associated with serum homocysteine levels or ischemic stroke severity. CpG A is a potential epigenetic marker in mediating serum folate and vitamin B12 to contribute to ischemic stroke. PMID:25705649

  15. CA153 in Breast Secretions as a Potential Molecular Marker for Diagnosing Breast Cancer: A Meta Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fang; Zhu, Shengbo; Yang, Renqi; Huang, Yiyong; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Hong; Yang, Jianqing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many studies have reported that carbohydrate antigen 153 (CA153) in breast secretions (BS) can discriminate breast cancer (BC) patients from healthy individuals, indicating CA153 in BS as a potential index for BC. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the actual diagnostic value of CA153 in BS. Methods Related papers were obtained from Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, Ovid, Sciverse, the Cochrane library, Chinese Biomedical literature Database (CBM), Technology of Chongqing (VIP), Wan Fang Data, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). Pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of CA153 in BS for BC diagnosis were analyzed with the random effect model. SROC and the area under the curve (AUC) were applied to assess overall diagnostic efficiency. Results This meta-analysis included five studies with a total of 329 BC patients and 381 healthy subjects. For CA153 in BS, the summary sensitivity, specificity, and DOR to diagnose BC were 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57∼0.68), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.78∼0.86), and 9.18 (95% CI: 4.22∼19.95), respectively. Furthermore, the AUC of BS CA153 in the diagnosis of BC was 0.8614. Conclusions CA153 in BS is a valuable molecular marker in diagnosing BC and should be applied in standard clinical practices of BC screening upon confirmation of our findings in a larger prospective study. PMID:27636552

  16. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  17. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  18. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo anti-tumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone). Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse) was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 μg, 35 μg, and 52.5 μg per animal) were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom) and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. PMID:27799739

  19. Enhanced gastric retention of solid resin beads as a marker for emetic potential of agents in rats.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kentaro; Takagi, Kan; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Whereas nausea and emesis are burdensome side effects that lead to poor treatment compliance especially in chemotherapy, it is difficult to predict the emetic potential of agents in rats and mice because rodents do not vomit. We examined the effect of emetics on gastric retention and role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)3 receptor in chemotherapeutic-induced enhancement of gastric retention in rats. The gastric retention of solid material was determined using resin beads, which were suitable to beads made with metals or glasses in size, hardness and weight. Each rat was orally given distilled water (0.5 ml/rat) containing 40 resin beads via a plastic feeding tube. The stomach was removed at 1 hr post-dose and cut along the greater curvature under carbon dioxide anesthesia. Beads were given immediately after administration of the drugs except with cisplatin, when there was a 1 hr delay. Cancer chemotherapeutics including cisplatin(0.1-3 mg/kg i.v.) and doxorubicin(0.3-10 mg/kg i.v.) and a nauseant, copper sulfate(1-30 mg/kg p.o.) enhanced gastric retention of beads. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently antagonized the enhanced gastric retention by cisplatin and doxorubicin. The copper sulfate-induced enhancement was also reversed by ondansetron. Our results suggest that 5-HT3 receptors mediate the cancer chemotherapeutic-enhanced gastric retention of solid material in rats. This implicates that the gastric retention of solid material is a useful marker to predict the potential of compounds to induce nausea and/or emesis in non-vomiting rodents. PMID:22687994

  20. Modelling reveals endogenous osmotic adaptation of storage tissue water potential as an important driver determining different stem diameter variation patterns in the mangrove species Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa

    PubMed Central

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W.; Guyot, Adrien; Hubeau, Michiel; De Swaef, Tom; Lockington, David A.; Steppe, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Background Stem diameter variations are mainly determined by the radial water transport between xylem and storage tissues. This radial transport results from the water potential difference between these tissues, which is influenced by both hydraulic and carbon related processes. Measurements have shown that when subjected to the same environmental conditions, the co-occurring mangrove species Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa unexpectedly show a totally different pattern in daily stem diameter variation. Methods Using in situ measurements of stem diameter variation, stem water potential and sap flow, a mechanistic flow and storage model based on the cohesion–tension theory was applied to assess the differences in osmotic storage water potential between Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa. Key results Both species, subjected to the same environmental conditions, showed a resembling daily pattern in simulated osmotic storage water potential. However, the osmotic storage water potential of R. stylosa started to decrease slightly after that of A. marina in the morning and increased again slightly later in the evening. This small shift in osmotic storage water potential likely underlaid the marked differences in daily stem diameter variation pattern between the two species. Conclusions The results show that in addition to environmental dynamics, endogenous changes in the osmotic storage water potential must be taken into account in order to accurately predict stem diameter variations, and hence growth. PMID:24534674

  1. Ameliorative potential of gingerol: Promising modulation of inflammatory factors and lipid marker enzymes expressions in HFD induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Brahma Naidu, Parim; Uddandrao, V V Sathibabu; Ravindar Naik, Ramavat; Suresh, Pothani; Meriga, Balaji; Begum, Mustapha Shabana; Pandiyan, Rajesh; Saravanan, Ganapathy

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, generally linked to hyperlipidemia, has been occurring of late with distressing alarm and has now become a global phenomenon casting a huge economic burden on the health care system of countries around the world. The present study investigated the effects of gingerol over 30 days on the changes in HFD-induced obese rats in marker enzymes of lipid metabolism such as fatty-acid synthase (FAS), Acetyl CoA Carboxylase (ACC), Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase-1(CPT-1), HMG co-A Reductase (HMGR), Lecithin Choline Acyl Transferase (LCAT) and Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL) and inflammatory markers (TNF-α and IL-6). The rats were treated orally with gingerol (75 mg kg(-1)) once daily for 30 days with a lorcaserin-treated group (10 mg kg(-1)) included for comparison. Changes in body weight, glucose, insulin resistance and expressions of lipid marker enzymes and inflammatory markers in tissues were observed in experimental rats. The administration of gingerol resulted in a significant reduction in body weight gain, glucose and insulin levels, and insulin resistance, which altered the activity, expressions of lipid marker enzymes and inflammatory markers. It showed that gingerol had significantly altered these parameters when compared with HFD control rats. This study confirms that gingerol prevents HFD-induced hyperlipidemia by modulating the expression of enzymes important to cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26493465

  2. Expression level of chromodomain Y (CDY): potential marker for prediction of sperm recovery in non-obstructive azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Heydarian, Neda; Favaedi, Raha; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: The availability of testis specific genes will be of help in choosing the most promising biomarkers for the detection of testicular sperm retrieval in patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Testis specific chromodomain protein Y 1 (CDY1) is a histone acetyltransferase which concentrates in the round spermatid nucleus, where histone hyperacetylation occurs and causes the replacement of histones by the sperm-specific DNA packaging proteins, TNPs and PRMs. Objective: The aim was to evaluate CDY1 gene as a marker for predicting of successful sperm retrieval in NOA patients. Materials and Methods: This research was conducted on 29 patients with NOA who had undergone testicular sperm extraction (TESE) procedure. NOA patients were subdivided into patients with successful sperm retrieval (NOA+, n=12) and patients with unsuccessful sperm retrieval (NOA-, n=17). Relative expression of CDY1 gene and chromatin incorporation of CDY1 protein were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and ELISA assay, respectively. Results: Quantification of mRNA relative expression and incorporation of CDY1 protein in chromatin showed significant lower expressions and protein levels of CDY1 in testis tissues of NOA- in comparison to NOA+ group. Conclusion: The findings in this study demonstrated a correlation between the low levels of CDY1 function and unsuccessful sperm recovery in the testicular tissues of NOA- compared to NOA+ patients. Therefore, it can be reasonable to consider CDY1 as a potential biomarker for predicting the presence of spermatozoa, although the claim needs more samples to be confirmed. PMID:27525321

  3. Myc Promoter-Binding Protein-1 (MBP-1) Is a Novel Potential Prognostic Marker in Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Flavia; Mazzarella, Claudia; Sbacchi, Silvia; Roz, Elena; Lupo, Carmelo; Perconti, Giovanni; Giallongo, Agata; Migliorini, Paola; Marrazzo, Antonio; Feo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Background Alpha-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the formation of phosphoenolpyruvate in the cell cytoplasm. α-Enolase and the predominantly nuclear Myc promoter-binding protein-1 (MBP-1) originate from a single gene through the alternative use of translational starting sites. MBP-1 binds to the P2 c-myc promoter and competes with TATA-box binding protein (TBP) to suppress gene transcription. Although several studies have shown an antiproliferative effect of MBP-1 overexpression on several human cancer cells, to date detailed observations of α-enolase and MBP-1 relative expression in primary tumors versus normal tissues and their correlation with clinicopathological features have not been undertaken. Methodology and Findings We analyzed α-enolase and MBP-1 expression in normal breast epithelium and primary invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC) from 177 patients by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, using highly specific anti-α-enolase monoclonal antibodies. A significant increase in the expression of cytoplasmic α-enolase was observed in 98% of the tumors analysed, compared to normal tissues. Nuclear MBP-1 was found in almost all the normal tissues while its expression was retained in only 35% of the tumors. Statistically significant associations were observed among the nuclear expression of MBP-1 and ErbB2 status, Ki-67 expression, node status and tumor grade. Furthermore MBP-1 expression was associated with good survival of patients with IDC. Conclusions MBP-1 functions in repressing c-myc gene expression and the results presented indicate that the loss of nuclear MBP-1 expression in a large number of IDC may be a critical step in the development and progression of breast cancer and a predictor of adverse outcome. Nuclear MBP-1 appears to be a novel and valuable histochemical marker with potential prognostic value in breast cancer. PMID:20886042

  4. Harnessing endogenous stem/progenitor cells for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang H.; Lee, Francis Y.; Tarafder, Solaiman; Kao, Kristy; Jun, Yena; Yang, Guodong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Current stem cell–based strategies for tissue regeneration involve ex vivo manipulation of these cells to confer features of the desired progenitor population. Recently, the concept that endogenous stem/progenitor cells could be used for regenerating tissues has emerged as a promising approach that potentially overcomes the obstacles related to cell transplantation. Here we applied this strategy for the regeneration of injured tendons in a rat model. First, we identified a rare fraction of tendon cells that was positive for the known tendon stem cell marker CD146 and exhibited clonogenic capacity, as well as multilineage differentiation ability. These tendon-resident CD146+ stem/progenitor cells were selectively enriched by connective tissue growth factor delivery (CTGF delivery) in the early phase of tendon healing, followed by tenogenic differentiation in the later phase. The time-controlled proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells by CTGF delivery successfully led to tendon regeneration with densely aligned collagen fibers, normal level of cellularity, and functional restoration. Using siRNA knockdown to evaluate factors involved in tendon generation, we demonstrated that the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates CTGF-induced proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells. Together, our findings support the use of endogenous stem/progenitor cells as a strategy for tendon regeneration without cell transplantation and suggest this approach warrants exploration in other tissues. PMID:26053662

  5. Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a promising target for cholangiocarcinoma treatment and bile LCN2 level is a potential cholangiocarcinoma diagnostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Wu, Ren-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Juang, Horng-Heng; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating disease due to resistance to traditional chemotherapies and radiotherapies. New therapeutic strategies against CCA are urgently needed. This study investigated the role of lipocalin-2 (LCN2) in human cholangiocarcinoma as a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. So far, the role of LCN2 in cancer is still controversial and studies regarding the role of LCN2 in CCA are limited. LCN2 knockdown inhibited CCA cell growth in vitro and in vivo through induction of cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phases and decreased metastatic potential due to repression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Overexpression of LCN2 in CCA cells increased cell metastatic potential. We showed for the first time that the N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) and NDRG2, known as tumor suppressor genes, are negatively regulated by LCN2 in CCA cells. LCN2 concentration in bile was higher in patients with CCA than that in patients with gallstones, with a cutoff value of 20.08 ng/ml making this a potential diagnostic marker. Higher LCN2 expression was associated with worse survival in patients with CCA. LCN2 is a promising target for CCA treatment and bile LCN2 level is a potential diagnostic marker for CCA. PMID:27782193

  6. Development of simple sequence repeat markers in persimmon (Diospyros L.) and their potential use in related species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Jing, Z B; Ruan, X F; Cheng, J M

    2015-01-30

    Persimmon (Diospyros L.) is an economically important fruit in the world, and it has been recognized as a healthy nutrient supply for human consumption. In this study, 14 microsatellite markers were developed from an AG/TC and AC/TG-enriched genomic library of Chinese persimmon Mopanshi. Twelve polymorphic markers were selected in 4 related species; these markers showed transferability to the 4 related persimmon species. In addition, 10 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to detect the genetic diversity among 51 persimmon accessions from China, Japan, and Korea. A total of 57 polymorphic bands with an average of 5.7 bands per primer pair were observed. According to cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis, all persimmon accessions could be divided into 4 groups. A close relationship existed between D. kaki and D. oleifera, and D. glaucifolia and D. lotus. Jinzaoshi could be considered a separate species of persimmon. These new SSR markers provide tools for evaluating genetic relatedness among different persimmon species.

  7. Usefulness of field potential as a marker of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, and endpoint analysis of embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Naoteru; Deguchi, Jiro; Yamada, Toru; Funabashi, Hitoshi; Seki, Takaki

    2010-12-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a validated method and a useful screening tool for drug discovery. EST requires microscopic observation of beating cells to be considered cardiomyocytes as an endpoint assay. However, this procedure is time-consuming and limits the throughput performance. Instead of microscopic observation, we previously established a novel assay method based on cardiac field potential as an endpoint. However, cardiac specificity of this field potential is not yet clarified, because beating cells have not been rigorously evaluated as skeletal or cardiomyocyte. Here, we investigated the relationships between field potential, beating, and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) expression, selected as a cardiomyocyte-specific marker, and evaluated suitability of the field potential as a marker for cardiomyocyte in vehicle or 5-fluorouracil treated embryo bodies. Embryoid bodies of mouse embryonic stem cells (D3) were differentiated in a chamber with multi-electrode array for 5 days, and field potential and beating were measured at the end of differentiation. In addition, these chambers were immunohistochemically stained with anti-cTnT antibody, and the correlation between field potential, beating, and cTnT expression was examined. These results indicated the area of field potential or beating mainly coincided with that of cTnT expression. 5-fluorouracil treatment decreased not only the number of field potential detecting electrodes and beating area, but also cTnT expression, and the area of these parameters was also nearly identical. These results indicate that field potential can be used as a suitable cardiac differentiation marker, and can be a promising parameter of EST.

  8. Summary of impact markers and potential impact mechanisms for the YDB impact event at 12.9 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Schultz, P. H.; Wittke, J. H.; West, A.; Kennett, J.; Kennett, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Until the announcements of a possible impact event (Firestone et al. 2007; Kennett et al., 2009a; 2009b) at the beginning of the Younger Dryas (YD) around 12.9 ka, the KT impact layer (KTB) that resulted from the Chicxulub impact at 65 mya was the only geological boundary layer known to contain coeval peaks in various impact markers, including diamonds. Here, we compare impact markers from the KTB, YD boundary layer (YDB), and the 1908 Tunguska airburst layer (TAL). First order markers, related to impact and biomass burning, include: magnetic spherules, carbon spherules, nanodiamonds (cubic and lonsdaleite), iridium anomalies, charcoal, fullerenes (with high 3He to 4He ratio), grape-like soot, and widespread extinctions. Observations and analytical data for the YDB are consistent with all of the KTB markers, while the last three markers are unknown or inconclusive for the Tunguska layer. Selected markers for cratering events, e.g, Chicxulub, are: a visible crater, shocked minerals, impact breccia, and microtektites. None of these are known for the YD event or Tunguska. The discussion here is limited to possible origins of the impact markers and not with impact consequences (climate change, extinctions, etc.). Several origins may account for impact materials in the YDB: (1) An extraordinary accretion of micrometeorites (Pinter and Ishman, 2008). However, this is inconsistent with YDB carbon spherule compositions, including the large concentrations of nanodiamonds found embedded in those carbon spherules. (2) Oblique impact(s) into the Laurentide Ice Sheet. This model is consistent with the lack of a visible crater and apparent lack of cratering markers (above), and yet also provides for shock production of the many cubic nanodiamonds and lonsdaleite found in the YDB. (3) Impact-induced aerial burst. e.g, Boslough and Crawford (2007); Shuvalov (2008). The lack of high shock pressures in an aerial detonation does not necessarily preclude the formation of cubic and

  9. Proteomic analysis allows for early detection of potential markers of metabolic impairment in very young obese children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Apo A1 (IR vs. non-IR). Assays routinely used in the clinical setting (ELISA/kinetic nephelometry), only partially confirmed the changes observed by proteomic analysis (ApoA1 and haptoglobin). Conclusion Proteomic analysis can allow for the identification of potential new candidate biomarkers as a complement to routinely used assays to detect initial changes in serum markers of inflammation and lipid metabolism impairment in young obese children. PMID:24949022

  10. Monoclonal antibodies raised to paraffin wax embedded archival tissue; feasibility study of their potential to detect novel antigenic markers.

    PubMed

    Moran, E; Larkin, A; Cleary, I; Barnes, C; Kennedy, S M; Kelehan, P; Clynes, M

    1998-10-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of using archival paraffin wax embedded tissue to generate monoclonal antibodies is described. Specifically, monoclonal antibodies were raised to paraffin wax embedded normal human kidney tissue to test the possibility of producing antibodies to such tissue samples prior to attempting generation of antibodies to valuable archival tissue. Multiple sections (10 x 5 microm) were pooled and dewaxed as for immunohistochemical procedures and combined with Freund's adjuvant for immunization of BALB/c mice in vivo. Immunized spleen cells were fused with SP2 myeloma cells and subsequent clones screened on paraffin wax embedded normal human kidney sections, a range of cell lines and normal mouse tissue. Supernatants from 11 wells (from a total of 90 wells screened) showed different staining patterns on sections of paraffin wax embedded kidney. One clone, 1/11C, (isotype IgG1) which exhibited strong staining on all kidney tubules by immunohistochemical studies (glomeruli interstitium and vessels were unstained) and identified a band at 52 kDa on immunoblots of dewaxed kidney tissue (as used for immunogen) was chosen for further characterization. Immunoblotting of five mammalian cell lines showed differential expression of this 52 kDa band (distinct expression on 3/5, weak expression on 2/5 cell lines) whereas, all cell lines displayed a band at 44 kDa and a third band at 70 kDa was observed on 2/5 cell lines. In mouse tissue extracts, the 52 kDa band was identified in kidney tissue only (not in the lung, liver or spleen) with the 44 kDa and 70 kDa bands weakly expressed in all tissues. This preliminary investigation of a novel approach to identifying possible new antigenic markers or producing monoclonal antibodies which react better to known antigens on sections of paraffin wax embedded tissue showed that this method is feasible. The need to have a comprehensive screening system in place and the ability to identify potentially useful

  11. Short-term Effects of Air Temperature on Blood Markers of Coagulation and Inflammation in Potentially Susceptible Individuals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives: Changes in air temperature are associated with an increase in cardiovascular events, but the role of pro-coagulant and pro-inflammatory blood markers is still poorly understood. We investigated the association between air temperature and fibrinogen, plasminogen act...

  12. Acylcarnitines as markers of exercise-associated fuel partitioning, xenometabolism, and potential signals to muscle afferent neurons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With insulin-resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus, mismatches between mitochondrial fatty acid fuel delivery and oxidative phosphorylation/tricarboxylic acid cycle activity may contribute to inordinate accumulation of short- or medium-chain acylcarnitine fatty acid derivatives (markers of incomple...

  13. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  14. Endogeneity in prison risk classification.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Lauren O'Neill; Bierie, David M; Stock, Amber

    2013-10-01

    Security designation tools are a key feature of all prisons in the United States, intended as objective measures of risk that funnel inmates into security levels-to prison environments varying in degree of intrusiveness, restriction, dangerousness, and cost. These tools are mostly (if not all) validated by measuring inmates on a set of characteristics, using scores from summations of that information to assign inmates to prisons of varying security level, and then observing whether inmates assumed more risky did in fact offend more. That approach leaves open the possibility of endogeneity--that the harsher prisons are themselves bringing about higher misconduct and thus biasing coefficients assessing individual risk. The current study assesses this potential bias by following an entry cohort of inmates to more than 100 facilities in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and exploiting the substantial variation in classification scores within a given prison that derive from systematic overrides of security-level designations for reasons not associated with risk of misconduct. By estimating pooled models of misconduct along with prison-fixed effects specifications, the data show that a portion of the predictive accuracy thought associated with the risk-designation tool used in BOP was a function of facility-level contamination (endogeneity).

  15. Investigation of potential non-HLA rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a European cohort increases the evidence for nine markers

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Darren; Flynn, Edward; Mbarek, Hamdi; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornelis, François; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Goulielmos, George; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Johansen, Julia S; Ørnbjerg, Lykke M; Hetland, Merete Lund; Klareskog, Lars; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Worthington, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic factors have a substantial role in determining development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and are likely to account for 50–60% of disease susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies have identified non-human leucocyte antigen RA susceptibility loci which associate with RA with low-to-moderate risk. Objectives To investigate recently identified RA susceptibility markers using cohorts from six European countries, and perform a meta-analysis including previously published results. Methods 3311 DNA samples were collected from patients from six countries (UK, Germany, France, Greece, Sweden and Denmark). Genotype data or DNA samples for 3709 controls were collected from four countries (not Sweden or Denmark). Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using Sequenom MassArray technology. Samples with a >95% success rate and only those SNPs with a genotype success rate of >95% were included in the analysis. Scandinavian patient data were pooled and previously published Swedish control data were accessed as a comparison group. Meta-analysis was used to combine results from this study with all previously published data. Results After quality control, 3209 patients and 3692 controls were included in the study. Eight markers (ie, rs1160542 (AFF3), rs1678542 (KIF5A), rs2476601 (PTPN22), rs3087243 (CTLA4), rs4810485 (CD40), rs5029937 (6q23), rs10760130 (TRAF1/C5) and rs7574865 (STAT4)) were significantly associated with RA by meta-analysis. All 18 markers were associated with RA when previously published studies were incorporated in the analysis. Data from this study increased the significance for association with RA and nine markers. Conclusions In a large European RA cohort further evidence for the association of 18 markers with RA development has been obtained. PMID:20498205

  16. [Endogenous venous thrombolysis].

    PubMed

    Porembskaya, O Ya; Khmelniker, S M; Shaidakov, E V

    2015-01-01

    Widely incorporated into vascular surgery pharmacological thrombolysis in treatment for deep vain thrombosis is fraught with a series of unsolved problems requiring further consideration. In spite of aggressive nature of treatment in a series of cases pharmacological thrombolysis sometimes turns out ineffective. Along with it, the results of experimental studies suggest a possibility of accelerating resorption of thrombotic masses and inhibiting remodelling of the venous wall by means of influencing effector cells of endogenous thrombolysis. A detailed study of the mechanisms of thrombolysis would make it possible to formulate strict criteria for carrying out pharmacological thrombolysis and to increase its efficacy. PMID:26355926

  17. Proteomics of Genetically Engineered Mouse Mammary Tumors Identifies Fatty Acid Metabolism Members as Potential Predictive Markers for Cisplatin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Warmoes, Marc; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Xu, Guotai; Sampadi, Bharath K.; Pham, Thang V.; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Boven, Epie; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to various signatures that predict the prognosis of breast cancer patients, markers that predict chemotherapy response are still elusive. To detect such predictive biomarkers, we investigated early changes in protein expression using two mouse models for distinct breast cancer subtypes who have a differential knock-out status for the breast cancer 1, early onset (Brca1) gene. The proteome of cisplatin-sensitive BRCA1-deficient mammary tumors was compared with that of cisplatin-resistant mammary tumors resembling pleomorphic invasive lobular carcinoma. The analyses were performed 24 h after administration of the maximum tolerable dose of cisplatin. At this time point, drug-sensitive BRCA1-deficient tumors showed DNA damage, but cells were largely viable. By applying paired statistics and quantitative filtering, we identified highly discriminatory markers for the sensitive and resistant model. Proteins up-regulated in the sensitive model are involved in centrosome organization, chromosome condensation, homology-directed DNA repair, and nucleotide metabolism. Major discriminatory markers that were up-regulated in the resistant model were predominantly involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty-acid synthase. Specific inhibition of fatty-acid synthase sensitized resistant cells to cisplatin. Our data suggest that exploring the functional link between the DNA damage response and cancer metabolism shortly after the initial treatment may be a useful strategy to predict the efficacy of cisplatin. PMID:23397111

  18. Negative regulatory element associated with potentially functional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats of endogenous murine leukemia virus-related proviral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Ch'ang, L Y; Yang, W K; Myer, F E; Yang, D M

    1989-01-01

    Three series of recombinant DNA clones were constructed, with the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a quantitative indicator, to examine the activities of promoter and enhancer sequence elements in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences isolated from the mouse genome. Transient CAT expression was determined in mouse NIH 3T3, human HT1080, and mink CCL64 cultured cells transfected with the LTR-CAT constructs. The 700-base-pair (bp) LTRs of three polytropic MuLV-related proviral clones and the 750-bp LTRs of four modified polytropic proviral clones, in complete structures either with or without the adjacent downstream sequences, all showed very little or negligible activities for CAT expression, while ecotropic MuLV LTRs were highly active. The MuLV-related LTRs were divided into three portions and examined separately. The 3' portion of the MuLV-related LTRs that contains the CCAAC and TATAA boxes was found to be a functional promoter, being about one-half to one-third as active as the corresponding portion of ecotropic MuLV LTRs. A MboI-Bg/II fragment, representing the distinct 190- to 200-bp inserted segment in the middle, was found to be a potential enhancer, especially when examined in combination with the simian virus 40 promoter in CCL64 cells. A PstI-MboI fragment of the 5' portion, which contains the protein-binding motifs of the enhancer segment as well as the upstream LTR sequences, showed moderate enhancer activities in CCL6 cells but was virtually inactive in NIH 3T3 cells and HT1080 cells; addition of this fragment to the ecotropic LTR-CAT constructs depressed CAT expression. Further analyses using chimeric LTR constructs located the presence of a strong negative regulatory element within the region containing the 5' portion of the enhancer and the immediate upstream sequences in the MuLV-related LTRs. Images PMID:2542587

  19. Comparative Correlation Structure of Colon Cancer Locus Specific Methylation: Characterisation of Patient Profiles and Potential Markers across 3 Array-Based Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Barat, Ana; Ruskin, Heather J.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal DNA-methylation is well known to play an important role in cancer onset and development, and colon cancer is no exception to this rule. Recent years have seen the increased use of large-scale technologies, (such as methylation microarray assays or specific sequencing of methylated DNA), to determine whole genome profiles of CpG island methylation in tissue samples. Comprehensive study of methylation array data from transcriptome high-throughput platforms permits determination of gene methylation markers, important for cancer profiling. Here, three large-scale methylation datasets for colon cancer have been compared to determine locus-specific methylation agreement. These data are from the GEO database, where colon cancer and apparently healthy adjacent tissues are represented by sample sizes 125 and 29 respectively in the first dataset, 24 of each in the second and 118 of each in the third. Several data analysis techniques have been employed, including Clustering, Discriminant Principal Component Analysis, Discriminant Analysis and ROC curves, in order (i) to obtain a better insight on the locus-specific concomitant methylation structures for these diverse data and (ii) to determine a robust potential marker set for indicative screening, drawn from all data taken together. The extent of the agreement between the analysed datasets is reported. Further, potential screening methylation markers, for which methylation profiles are consistent across tissue samples and several datasets, are highlighted and discussed. PMID:26185542

  20. Expanded metabolomics approach to profiling endogenous carbohydrates in the serum of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Li, Li; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We applied hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to the quantitative analysis of serum from 58 women, including ovarian cancer patients, ovarian benign tumor patients, and healthy controls. All of these ovarian cancer and ovarian benign tumor patients have elevated cancer antigen 125, which makes them clinically difficult to differentiate the malignant from the benign. All of the 16 endogenous carbohydrates were quantitatively detected in the human sera, of which, eight endogenous carbohydrates were significantly different (P-value < 0.05) between the ovarian cancer and healthy control. According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, arabitol was the most potentially specific biomarker for discriminating ovarian cancer from healthy control, having an area under the curve of 0.911. A panel of metabolite markers composed of maltose, maltotriose, raffinose, and mannitol was selected, which was able to discriminate the ovarian cancer from the benign ovarian tumor counterparts, with an area under concentration-time curve value of 0.832. Endogenous carbohydrates in the expanded metabolomics approach after the global metabolic profiling are characterized and are potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  1. Marker development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  2. [Genetics of endogenous psychoses].

    PubMed

    Zerbin-Rüdin, E

    1979-01-01

    As the endogeneous psychoses do not show a Mendelian mode of inheritance, empirical risk figures have to be calculated. They are heterogeneous and nurture as well as nature have a share in the manifestation of illness. The genetic basis of the schizophrenias is demonstrated by twin and adoption studies. The concordance rate in monozygotic twins is four times the rate in dizygotic twins. Schizophrenia is to be found in the biological families of schizophrenic adoptees but not in the adoptive families. However, despite their genetic identity, monozygotic twins do not show 100% concordance but 60% only. Nongenetic factors must be considered. Obviously they are nonspecific and vary between individuals. The same principles apply to the affective psychoses. At present research is most interested in the problem of heterogeneity. Do pure depressive and manic-depressive disease form one genetic entity, or two different ones, or have they in common part of their genetic basis? Some remarks on genetic counselling are made.

  3. Spleen-specific isoforms of Pax5 and Ataxin-7 as potential proteomic markers of lymphoma-affected spleen.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Brij; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2015-04-01

    The splenomegaly, enlargement of spleen, has been observed in several diseases. It has been intended to evaluate histochemical alterations, spleen-specific enzymatic and proteomic markers during splenomegaly, and lympho-proliferative disorders from spleen of mice bearing Dalton's lymphoma. The higher expression of c-fos, c-jun, and MAPK testifies proliferation of lymphocytes. The lower expression of Pax5, higher expression of CD3, and the presence of additional form of Zap-70 suggest hypertrophy of follicles and splenomegaly influenced by weak B-cell receptor-mediated signaling, but activated T-cell receptor-mediated signaling. Simultaneously, lower levels of SOD, NDR2, and MIB2 and higher expression levels of Ataxin-7 and LDH also suggest impact of stress either as a cause or effect of cell proliferation. Spleen-specific isoform of Pax5, NDR2, MIB2, and Ataxin-7 can be considered as spleen-specific unique molecular markers for the evaluation of splenomegaly and lympho-proliferative disorders.

  4. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  5. Molecular characterization of oilseed rape accessions collected from multi continents for exploitation of potential heterotic group through SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Younas, Muhammad; Xiao, Yingjie; Cai, Dongfang; Yang, Wei; Ye, Wei; Wu, Jiangsheng; Liu, Kede

    2012-05-01

    Evaluation of the genetic diversity in conventional and modern rapeseed cultivars is essential for conservation, management and utilization of these genetic resources for high yielding hybrid production. The objective of this research was to evaluate a collection of 86 oilseed rape cultivars with 188 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to assess the genetic variability, heterotic group identity and relationships within and between the groups identified among the genotypes. A total of 631 alleles at 188 SSR markers were detected including 53 and 84 unique and private alleles respectively, which indicated great richness and uniqueness of genetic variation in these selected cultivars. The mean number of alleles per locus was 3.3 and the average polymorphic information content was 0.35 for all microsatellite loci. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean clustering and principal component analysis consistently divided all the cultivars into four distinct groups (I, II, III and IV) which largely coincided with their geographical distributions. The Chinese origin cultivars are predominantly assembled in Group II and showed wide genetic base because of its high allelic abundance at SSR loci while most of the exotic cultivars grouped into Group I and were highly distinct owing to the abundant private and unique alleles. The highest genetic distance was found between Group I and IV, which mainly comprised of exotic and newly synthesized yellow seeded (1728-1 and G1087) breeding lines, respectively. Our study provides important insights into further utilization of exotic Brassica napus accessions in Chinese rapeseed breeding and vice versa.

  6. Transition-Metal-Mediated Release of Nitric Oxide (NO) from S-Nitroso-N-acetyl-d-penicillamine (SNAP): Potential Applications for Endogenous Release of NO at the Surface of Stents Via Corrosion Products.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Connor W; Guillory, Roger J; Goldman, Jeremy; Frost, Megan C

    2016-04-27

    Nitric oxide (NO), identified over the last several decades in many physiological processes and pathways as both a beneficial and detrimental signaling molecule, has been the subject of extensive research. Physiologically, NO is transported by a class of donors known as S-nitrosothiols. Both endogenous and synthetic S-nitrosothiols have been reported to release NO during interactions with certain transition metals, primarily Cu(2+) and Fe(2+). Ag(+) and Hg(2+) have also been identified, although these metals are not abundantly present in physiological systems. Here, we evaluate Pt(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) for their ability to generate NO from S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d-penicillamine (SNAP) under physiological pH conditions. Specifically, we report NO generation from RSNOs initiated by three transition metal ions; Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), which have not been previously reported to generate NO. Additionally, preliminary in vivo evidence of zinc wires implanted in the rat arterial wall and circulating blood is presented which demonstrated inhibited thrombus formation after 6 months. One potentially useful application of these metal ions capable of generating NO from RSNOs is their use in the fabrication of biodegradable metallic stents capable of generating NO at the stent-blood interface, thereby reducing stent-related thrombosis and restenosis.

  7. Identification of potential marker genes for Trichoderma harzianum strains with high antagonistic potential against Rhizoctonia solani by a rapid subtraction hybridization approach.

    PubMed

    Scherm, Barbara; Schmoll, Monika; Balmas, Virgilio; Kubicek, Christian P; Migheli, Quirico

    2009-02-01

    A rapid subtraction hybridization approach was used to isolate genes differentially expressed during mycelial contact between Trichoderma harzianum (Hypocrea lixii) and Rhizoctonia solani, and could serve as marker genes for selection of superior biocontrol strains. Putatively positive clones were evaluated by transcription analysis during mycelial contact with R. solani versus growth on glucose, and for their differential transcription between two strains with either strong or poor biocontrol capability before, at, and after contact with R. solani. Besides four clones, which had similarity to putative but as yet uncharacterized proteins, they comprised ribosomal proteins, proteins involved in transcriptional switch and regulation, amino acid and energy catabolism, multidrug resistance, and degradation of proteins and glucans. Transcription of three clones was evaluated in five T. harzianum strains under confrontation conditions with R. solani. Two clones-acetyl-xylane esterase AXE1 and endoglucanase Cel61b-showed significant upregulation during in vivo confrontation of a T. harzianum strain that successively demonstrated a very high antagonistic capability towards R. solani, while expression was progressively lower in a series of T. harzianum strains with intermediate to poor antagonistic activity. These clones are promising candidates for use as markers in the screening of improved T. harzianum biocontrol strains.

  8. Genetic expression of adipose derived stem cell and smooth muscle cell markers to monitor differentiation potential following low intensity laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of cell types that could potentially be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been shown to induce a significant increase in cell viability and proliferation. Growth factors such as retinoic acid (RA) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) play important roles in the differentiation of cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILI in combination with growth factors could induce the differentiation of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The study used primary and continuous ADSC cell lines and a SMC line (SKUT-1) as control. Cells were co-cultured directly at a ratio of 1:1 using established methods, with and without growth factors and then exposed to LILI at 5 J/cm2 using a 636 nm diode laser. The cellular morphology, viability and proliferation of the co-cultures were assessed over a period of one week. The study also monitored the expression of cell specific markers over the same period of time. Genetic expression of the markers for both adipose derived stem cells (β1 Integrin and Thymidine 1) and smooth muscle cells (Heavy Myosin Chain) was monitored using flow cytometry. Cell viability and proliferation increased significantly in the co-cultured groups that were exposed to laser alone, as well as in combination with growth factors. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the expression of stem cell markers in the ADSCs over time. The results indicate that LILI in combination with growth factors not only increases the viability and proliferation of co-cultured cells but also decreases the expression of ADSC stem cell markers. This could indicate the possible differentiation of ADSCs into SMCs.

  9. DNA Barcoding in the Cycadales: Testing the Potential of Proposed Barcoding Markers for Species Identification of Cycads

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Chodon; Little, Damon P.; Stevenson, Dennis Wm.; Specht, Chelsea D.

    2007-01-01

    Barcodes are short segments of DNA that can be used to uniquely identify an unknown specimen to species, particularly when diagnostic morphological features are absent. These sequences could offer a new forensic tool in plant and animal conservation—especially for endangered species such as members of the Cycadales. Ideally, barcodes could be used to positively identify illegally obtained material even in cases where diagnostic features have been purposefully removed or to release confiscated organisms into the proper breeding population. In order to be useful, a DNA barcode sequence must not only easily PCR amplify with universal or near-universal reaction conditions and primers, but also contain enough variation to generate unique identifiers at either the species or population levels. Chloroplast regions suggested by the Plant Working Group of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBoL), and two alternatives, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic spacer and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nrITS), were tested for their utility in generating unique identifiers for members of the Cycadales. Ease of amplification and sequence generation with universal primers and reaction conditions was determined for each of the seven proposed markers. While none of the proposed markers provided unique identifiers for all species tested, nrITS showed the most promise in terms of variability, although sequencing difficulties remain a drawback. We suggest a workflow for DNA barcoding, including database generation and management, which will ultimately be necessary if we are to succeed in establishing a universal DNA barcode for plants. PMID:17987130

  10. MEK2 is a prognostic marker and potential chemo-sensitizing target for glioma patients undergoing temozolomide treatment.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Yao, Maojin; Zhang, Wenhao; Tao, Bangbao; Liu, Feili; Li, Shu; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Chenran; Meng, Yicheng; Li, Yuxin; Hu, Guohan; Luo, Chun; Zong, Hui; Lu, Yicheng

    2016-09-01

    Although temozolomide (TMZ) is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for glioblastoma, it is often non-curative due to drug resistance. To overcome the resistance of glioblastoma cells to TMZ, it is imperative to identify prognostic markers for outcome prediction and to develop chemo-sensitizing agents. Here, the gene expression profiles of TMZ-resistant and TMZ-sensitive samples were compared by microarray analysis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was upregulated specifically in resistant glioma cells but not in sensitive tumor cells or non-tumor tissues. Moreover, a comprehensive analysis of patient data revealed that the increased level of MEK2 expression correlated well with the advancement of glioma grade and worse prognosis in response to TMZ treatment. Furthermore, reducing the level of MEK2 in U251 glioma cell lines or xenografted glioma models through shRNA-mediated gene knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced the sensitivity of cells toward TMZ treatment. Further analysis of tumor samples from glioma patients by real-time PCR indicated that an increased MEK2 expression level was closely associated with the activation of many drug resistance genes. Finally, these resistance genes were downregulated after MEK2 was silenced in vitro, suggesting that the mechanism of MEK2-induced chemo-resistance could be mediated by the transcriptional activation of these resistance genes. Collectively, our data indicated that the expression level of MEK2 could serve as a prognostic marker for glioma chemotherapy and that MEK2 antagonists can be used as chemo-sensitizers to enhance the treatment efficacy of TMZ.

  11. MEK2 is a prognostic marker and potential chemo-sensitizing target for glioma patients undergoing temozolomide treatment

    PubMed Central

    He, Hua; Yao, Maojin; Zhang, Wenhao; Tao, Bangbao; Liu, Feili; Li, Shu; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Chenran; Meng, Yicheng; Li, Yuxin; Hu, Guohan; Luo, Chun; Zong, Hui; Lu, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    Although temozolomide (TMZ) is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for glioblastoma, it is often non-curative due to drug resistance. To overcome the resistance of glioblastoma cells to TMZ, it is imperative to identify prognostic markers for outcome prediction and to develop chemo-sensitizing agents. Here, the gene expression profiles of TMZ-resistant and TMZ-sensitive samples were compared by microarray analysis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was upregulated specifically in resistant glioma cells but not in sensitive tumor cells or non-tumor tissues. Moreover, a comprehensive analysis of patient data revealed that the increased level of MEK2 expression correlated well with the advancement of glioma grade and worse prognosis in response to TMZ treatment. Furthermore, reducing the level of MEK2 in U251 glioma cell lines or xenografted glioma models through shRNA-mediated gene knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced the sensitivity of cells toward TMZ treatment. Further analysis of tumor samples from glioma patients by real-time PCR indicated that an increased MEK2 expression level was closely associated with the activation of many drug resistance genes. Finally, these resistance genes were downregulated after MEK2 was silenced in vitro, suggesting that the mechanism of MEK2-induced chemo-resistance could be mediated by the transcriptional activation of these resistance genes. Collectively, our data indicated that the expression level of MEK2 could serve as a prognostic marker for glioma chemotherapy and that MEK2 antagonists can be used as chemo-sensitizers to enhance the treatment efficacy of TMZ. PMID:26189368

  12. DNA barcoding in the cycadales: testing the potential of proposed barcoding markers for species identification of cycads.

    PubMed

    Sass, Chodon; Little, Damon P; Stevenson, Dennis Wm; Specht, Chelsea D

    2007-01-01

    Barcodes are short segments of DNA that can be used to uniquely identify an unknown specimen to species, particularly when diagnostic morphological features are absent. These sequences could offer a new forensic tool in plant and animal conservation-especially for endangered species such as members of the Cycadales. Ideally, barcodes could be used to positively identify illegally obtained material even in cases where diagnostic features have been purposefully removed or to release confiscated organisms into the proper breeding population. In order to be useful, a DNA barcode sequence must not only easily PCR amplify with universal or near-universal reaction conditions and primers, but also contain enough variation to generate unique identifiers at either the species or population levels. Chloroplast regions suggested by the Plant Working Group of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBoL), and two alternatives, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic spacer and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nrITS), were tested for their utility in generating unique identifiers for members of the Cycadales. Ease of amplification and sequence generation with universal primers and reaction conditions was determined for each of the seven proposed markers. While none of the proposed markers provided unique identifiers for all species tested, nrITS showed the most promise in terms of variability, although sequencing difficulties remain a drawback. We suggest a workflow for DNA barcoding, including database generation and management, which will ultimately be necessary if we are to succeed in establishing a universal DNA barcode for plants. PMID:17987130

  13. DNA barcoding in the cycadales: testing the potential of proposed barcoding markers for species identification of cycads.

    PubMed

    Sass, Chodon; Little, Damon P; Stevenson, Dennis Wm; Specht, Chelsea D

    2007-11-07

    Barcodes are short segments of DNA that can be used to uniquely identify an unknown specimen to species, particularly when diagnostic morphological features are absent. These sequences could offer a new forensic tool in plant and animal conservation-especially for endangered species such as members of the Cycadales. Ideally, barcodes could be used to positively identify illegally obtained material even in cases where diagnostic features have been purposefully removed or to release confiscated organisms into the proper breeding population. In order to be useful, a DNA barcode sequence must not only easily PCR amplify with universal or near-universal reaction conditions and primers, but also contain enough variation to generate unique identifiers at either the species or population levels. Chloroplast regions suggested by the Plant Working Group of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBoL), and two alternatives, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic spacer and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nrITS), were tested for their utility in generating unique identifiers for members of the Cycadales. Ease of amplification and sequence generation with universal primers and reaction conditions was determined for each of the seven proposed markers. While none of the proposed markers provided unique identifiers for all species tested, nrITS showed the most promise in terms of variability, although sequencing difficulties remain a drawback. We suggest a workflow for DNA barcoding, including database generation and management, which will ultimately be necessary if we are to succeed in establishing a universal DNA barcode for plants.

  14. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  15. Endogenous allergen upregulation: transgenic vs. traditionally bred crops.

    PubMed

    Herman, Rod A; Ladics, Gregory S

    2011-10-01

    The safety assessment for transgenic food crops currently includes an evaluation of the endogenous allergy potential (via serum IgE screening) when the non-transgenic counterpart is a commonly allergenic food. The value of this analysis in the safety assessment of transgenic crops, especially with reference to recent requests to quantify individual allergen concentrations in raw commodities, is examined. We conclude that the likelihood of upregulating an endogenous allergen due to transgenesis is no greater than from traditional breeding which has a history of safety and is largely unregulated. The potential consequences of upregulating an endogenous allergen are also unclear.

  16. [Matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous regulators in squamous cervical carcinoma (review of the own data)].

    PubMed

    Solovуeva, N I; Timoshenko, O S; Gureeva, T A; Kugaevskaya, E V

    2015-01-01

    Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous regulators has been investigated in squamous cervical carcinoma (SCC). The study included (i) immortalized fibroblasts (IF) and three clones of fibroblasts transformed by oncogene E7 HPV-16 (TF); (ii) cell lines associated with HPV-16 and HPV-18; (iii) tumor tissue samples from patients with SCC, associated with gene E7 HPV-16. Transfection of fibroblasts with the E7 HPV16 oncogen was accompanied by induction of collagenase (MMP-1, MMP-14) and gelatinase (MMP-9) gene expression and the increase in catalytic activity of these MMP, while gelatinase MMP-2 expression remained unchanged. Expression of MMP-9 was found only inTF. MMP-9 may serve as a TF marker. In TF expression mRNA TIMP-1 was decreased. The level of free endogenous inhibitors in TF was significantly lower then the level in IF. Expression MMP correlated with the tumorigenic potential of TF. Invasive potential of cell lines associated with HPV18 (HeLa and S4-1) was more pronounced than that of cell lines associated with HPV16 (SiHa and Caski). The cell lines differed substantially in the level of expression of MMPI and their endogenous regulators. In most cell lines mRNA levels of collagenases MMP-1 and MMP-14 and the activator (uPA) increased, while gelatinase MMP-2 mRNA and tissue inhibitors mRNAs changed insignificantly. MMP-9 expression in cell lines was not detected. Results of studies on these cell lines suggest existence of an imbalance in the system enzyme/inhibitor/activator, that increases destructive potential of these cells. The study of expression of MMP and their endogenous regulators performed using SCC tumor samples associated with HPV16 has shown that the invasive and metastatic potentials of tumor tissue in SCC is obviously determined by the increase of expression of collagenases MMP-1, MT1-MMP and gelatinase MMP-9, decreased expression of inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2), and to a lesser extent to increased expression of

  17. Endogenous opioidergic dysregulation of pain in fibromyalgia: a PET and fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Schrepf, Andrew; Harper, Daniel E; Harte, Steven E; Wang, Heng; Ichesco, Eric; Hampson, Johnson P; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Clauw, Daniel J; Harris, Richard E

    2016-10-01

    Endogenous opioid system dysfunction potentially contributes to chronic pain in fibromyalgia (FM), but it is unknown if this dysfunction is related to established neurobiological markers of hyperalgesia. We previously reported that µ-opioid receptor (MOR) availability was reduced in patients with FM as compared with healthy controls in several pain-processing brain regions. In the present study, we compared pain-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging with endogenous MOR binding and clinical pain ratings in female opioid-naive patients with FM (n = 18) using whole-brain analyses and regions of interest from our previous research. Within antinociceptive brain regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and multiple regions of the anterior cingulate cortex (all r > 0.67; all P < 0.02), reduced MOR availability was associated with decreased pain-evoked neural activity. Additionally, reduced MOR availability was associated with lower brain activation in the nucleus accumbens (r = 0.47, P = 0.050). In many of these regions, pain-evoked activity and MOR binding potential were also associated with lower clinical affective pain ratings. These findings are the first to link endogenous opioid system tone to regional pain-evoked brain activity in a clinical pain population. Our data suggest that dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system in FM could lead to less excitation in antinociceptive brain regions by incoming noxious stimulation, resulting in the hyperalgesia and allodynia commonly observed in this population. We propose a conceptual model of affective pain dysregulation in FM.

  18. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  19. Prolactin-induced protein as a potential therapy response marker of adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jablonska, Karolina; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzenna; Stasiolek, Mariusz; Pula, Bartosz; Olbromski, Mateusz; Gomulkiewicz, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Rys, Janusz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Ong, Siew Hwa; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Many studies are dedicated to exploring the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-resistance in breast cancer (BC). Some of them are focused on searching for candidate genes responsible for this process. The aim of this study was typing the candidate genes associated with the response to standard chemotherapy in the case of invasive ductal carcinoma. Frozen material from 28 biopsies obtained from IDC patients with different responses to chemotherapy were examined using gene expression microarray, Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot (WB). Based on the microarray results, further analysis of candidate gene expression was evaluated in 120 IDC cases by RT-PCR and in 224 IDC cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The results were correlated with clinical outcome and molecular subtype of the BC. Gene expression microarray revealed Prolactin-Induced Peptide (PIP) as a single gene differentially expressed in BC therapy responder or non-responder patients (p <0.05). The level of PIP expression was significantly higher in the BC therapy responder group than in the non-responder group at mRNA (p=0.0092) and protein level (p=0.0256). Expression of PIP mRNA was the highest in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) BC cases (p=0.0254) and it was the lowest in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (p=0.0336). Higher PIP mRNA expression was characterized by significantly longer disease free survival (DFS, p=0.0093), as well as metastasis free survival (MFS, p=0.0144). Additionally, PIP mRNA and PIP protein expression levels were significantly higher in luminal A than in other molecular subtypes and TNBC. Moreover significantly higher PIP expression was observed in G1, G2 vs. G3 cases (p=0.0027 and p=0.0013, respectively). Microarray analysis characterized PIP gene as a candidate for BC standard chemotherapy response marker. Analysis of clinical data suggests that PIP may be a good prognostic and predictive marker in IDC patients. Higher levels of PIP were related to longer DFS and MFS

  20. Construction of chimeric bovine viral diarrhea viruses containing glycoprotein E rns of heterologous pestiviruses and evaluation of the chimeras as potential marker vaccines against BVDV.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yugang; Yuan, Ying; Ankenbauer, Robert G; Nelson, Lynn D; Witte, Steven B; Jackson, James A; Welch, Siao-Kun W

    2012-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections are enzootic in the cattle population and continue to cause significant economic losses to the beef and dairy industries worldwide. Extent of the damages has stimulated increasing interest in control programs directed at eradicating BVDV infections. Use of a BVDV marker vaccine would facilitate eradication efforts as a negatively marked vaccine would enable differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). We describe here the construction of three chimeric BVDVs containing glycoprotein E(rns) of heterologous pestiviruses and the evaluation of the chimera viruses as potential marker vaccines against BVDV infections. Chimeric NADL/G-E(rns), NADL/R-E(rns), and NADL/P-E(rns) were constructed by replacing the E(rns) gene of the full-length BVDV (NADL strain) genome with the E(rns) genes of giraffe (G-E(rns)), reindeer (R-E(rns)), or pronghorn antelope (P-E(rns)) pestiviruses, respectively. Each chimeric NADL virus was viable and infectious in RD 420 (bovine testicular) and BK-6 (bovine kidney) cells. By immunohistochemistry assays, NADL/G-E(rns) and NADL/R-E(rns) chimeric viruses reacted to BVDV E(rns) specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 15C5, whereas the NADL/P-E(rns) chimeric virus did not. In an animal vaccination study, inactivated vaccines made from two chimeric viruses and the wild type NADL BVDV induced similar neutralizing antibody responses. NADL/P-E(rns)-vaccinated animals were distinguished from animals vaccinated with the wild type virus by means of a companion serological DIVA assay. These results show that chimeric NADL/P-E(rns) virus containing the E(rns) gene of pronghorn antelope pestivirus could be a potential marker vaccine candidate for use in a BVDV control and eradication program. PMID:22521286

  1. Mutation at embB Codon 306, a Potential Marker for the Identification of Multidrug Resistance Associated with Ethambutol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Juárez-Eusebio, Dulce María; Almaraz-Velasco, Raquel; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Laniado-Laborin, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Ethambutol inhibits arabinogalactan and lipoarabinomannan biosynthesis in mycobacteria. The occurrence of mutations in embB codon 306 in ethambutol-susceptible isolates and their absence in resistant isolates has raised questions regarding the utility of this codon as a potential marker for resistance against ethambutol. The characterization of mutations on embB 306 will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to this drug; therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between embB 306 mutations and first-line drug resistance profiles in tuberculosis isolates. We sequenced the region surrounding the embB 306 codon in 175 tuberculosis clinical isolates, divided according to drug sensitivity, in three groups: 110 were resistant to at least one first-line drug, of which 61 were resistant to ethambutol (EMBr), 49 were sensitive to ethambutol (EMBs) but were resistant to another drug, and 65 were pansensitive isolates (Ps). The associations between embB 306 mutations and phenotypic resistance to all first-line drugs were determined, and their validity and safety as a diagnostic marker were assessed. One of the Ps isolates (1/65), one of the EMBs isolates (1/49), and 20 of the EMBr isolates (20/61) presented with an embB 306 mutation. Four different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at embB 306 were associated with simultaneous resistance to ethambutol, isoniazid, and rifampin (odds ratio [OR], 17.7; confidence interval [CI], 5.6 to 56.1) and showed a positive predictive value of 82%, with a specificity of 97% for diagnosing multidrug resistance associated with ethambutol, indicating its potential as a molecular marker for several drugs. PMID:26124153

  2. The first mitochondrial genome of Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Veneroida: Mactridae) from Guangxi (China) and potential molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Meng, Xueping; Tian, Mei; Yan, Binlun; Cheng, Hanliang; Lu, Wei; Chai, Yuling

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Coelomactra antiquata (Guangxi, in China, GX) was determined. It is 16 801 bp in length and is the first representative from this province. The mitochondrial genome encodes 35 genes, including 12 PCGs, two ribosomal RNA, and 21 transfer RNA genes. Atp8 and trnSer(UCN) genes are missing, compared with the typical gene content of animal mitochondrial genomes. Three (cob, nad1, nad4, and nad6) of the 12 PCGs in the mitochondrial genome initiate with the ATA, while other PCGs start with ATG. Two PCGs (atp6 and nad4L) end with incomplete stop codons (T-), and the remaining ones have complete stop codons (TAA or TAG). The largest non-coding region of the C. antiquata (GX) contains one section of tandem repeats (5 × 99 bp). Among all PCGs and rRNAs, the nad5 gene contains the maximum polymorphic sites (430), followed by nad4 (261) and cox2 (240). Two ribosomal RNA genes (srRNA and lrRNA) and cox1 are most conservative. The proportions of polymorphic sites in six genes (nad4, nad2, nad6, nad5, cox2, and nad3) are more than 20% (ranging from 20.25% to 25.21%). These high variable genes can be used as molecular markers in the population genetic analysis of the species.

  3. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cancer procoagulant and its potential as a new tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Cross, B A

    1990-10-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a Mr 68,000 cysteine proteinase that initiates blood coagulation and is expressed by a variety of malignant cells but not by normally differentiated cells. Polyclonal immunoglobulin G and monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibodies were developed to purified CP and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to analyze the antigen in human serum samples. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine whether or not the analysis of CP in the serum might be a useful tumor marker. Pure CP was added to normal serum to establish a quantitative standard curve; the correlation coefficient of seven standard curves was 0.99. The upper limit of the normal range was established with 46 normal sera (mean +/- 2 SD = 0.57 microgram/ml). A total of 128 blinded serum samples were analyzed: 54 were from cancer patients (29 with gastrointestinal cancer, 22 with lung cancer, and three with urogenital cancer); 20 were from benign disease patients; and 54 were from normal individuals. All of the 13 early stage cancers were greater than 0.57 microgram/ml (positive), 31 of 41 (76%) of the late stage cancers were positive; overall, 44 of the 54 cancers (81%) were positive. Forty-nine of 54 (91%) of the normal sera and 16 of 20 (80%) of the benign disease sera were negative. Overall, the assay had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 88%.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection.

    PubMed

    Tweedy, Joshua; Spyrou, Maria Alexandra; Pearson, Max; Lassner, Dirk; Kuhl, Uwe; Gompels, Ursula A

    2016-01-15

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated "CiHHV-6A/B". These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, implying functional non-defective genomes. To further define the relationship between HHV-6A and CiHHV-6A we used next-generation sequencing to characterize genomes from three CiHHV-6A cardiac patients. Comparisons to known exogenous HHV-6A showed CiHHV-6A genomes formed a separate clade; including all 85 non-interrupted genes and necessary cis-acting signals for reactivation as infectious virus. Greater single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density was defined in 16 genes and the direct repeats (DR) terminal regions. Using these SNPs, deep sequencing analyses demonstrated superinfection with exogenous HHV-6A in two of the CiHHV-6A patients with recurrent cardiac disease. Characterisation of the integration sites in twelve patients identified the human chromosome 17p subtelomere as a prevalent site, which had specific repeat structures and phylogenetically related CiHHV-6A coding sequences indicating common ancestral origins. Overall CiHHV-6A genomes were similar, but distinct from known exogenous HHV-6A virus, and have the capacity to reactivate as emerging virus infections.

  5. A mixture of oleic, erucic and conjugated linoleic acids modulates cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory markers and improve somatosensorial evoked potential in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy female carriers.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Marco; Bizzarri, Carla; Petroni, Anna; Carta, Gianfranca; Cordeddu, Lina; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Vollono, Catello; De Pasquale, Loredana; Blasevich, Milena; Banni, Sebastiano

    2012-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a rare inherited demyelinating disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, mainly hexacosanoic acid (26:0), due to a mutation of the gene encoding for a peroxisomal membrane protein. The only available, and partially effective, therapeutic treatment consists of dietary intake of a 4:1 mixture of triolein and trierucin, called Lorenzo's oil (LO), targeted to inhibit the elongation of docosanoic acid (22:0) to 26:0. In this study we tested whether, besides inhibiting elongation, an enhancement of peroxisomal beta oxidation induced by conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), will improve somatosensory evoked potentials and modify inflammatory markers in adrenoleukodystrophy females carriers. We enrolled five heterozygous women. They received a mixture of LO (40 g/day) with CLA (5 g/day) for 2 months. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by the means of plasma levels of 26:0, 26:0/22:0 ratio, modification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory markers and somatosensory evoked potentials. Changes of fatty acid profile, and in particular CLA incorporation, were also evaluated in CSF and plasma. The results showed that CLA promptly passes the blood brain barrier and the mixture was able to lower both 26:0 and 26:0/22:0 ratio in plasma. The mixture improved somatosensory evoked potentials, which were previously found unchanged or worsened with dietary LO alone, and reduced IL-6 levels in CSF in three out of five patients. Our data suggest that the synergic activity of CLA and LO, by enhancing peroxisomal beta-oxidation and preventing 26:0 formation, improves the somatosensory evoked potentials and reduces neuroinflammation.

  6. Postural sway in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a potential marker of prodromal Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tuan-Zhi; Xu, Guang-Jun; Zhou, Guang-An; Wang, Jing-Ru; Chan, Piu; Du, Yi-Feng

    2014-04-22

    There is compelling evidence that postural instability occurs at very early clinical stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), making it tempting to speculate that changes in postural sway may even occur at a prodromal phase. Studies estimate that approximately half of patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) will eventually develop PD, so RBD may be an indicator of prodromal PD. This study was undertaken to investigate postural sway and its relation to stereopsis function in patients with RBD. We examined 24 patients with polysomnography-confirmed RBD and 23 healthy, sex-and age-matched control subjects. Postural sway was measured with an accelerometer at the center of mass at the lower spine. Subjects were asked to stand quietly for 30s under two usual conditions (eyes open and eyes closed) and three challenging conditions (eyes open with dual task, eyes closed with dual task, and tandem standing). Stereopsis was assessed using the Titmus fly test. RBD patients showed an increased variability of trunk acceleration and a decrease of smoothness of sway, compared to control subjects. These differences reached significance in the challenging conditions. RBD patients demonstrated significant impairment in stereopsis. There were statistically significant correlations between log seconds of arc of the Titmus test and some sway parameters within the RBD group. RBD patients with abnormal stereopsis showed a significant increase of JERK values compared to patients with normal stereopsis in the challenging conditions. Our results indicate that idiopathic RBD patients, especially with abnormal stereopsis, have subtle signs of postural instability under challenging conditions. Postural sway performance may serve as a biological marker for prodromal PD.

  7. Alpha-enolase as a potential cancer prognostic marker promotes cell growth, migration, and invasion in glioma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The success of using glycolytic inhibitors for cancer treatment relies on better understanding the roles of each frequently deregulated glycolytic genes in cancer. This report analyzed the involvement of a key glycolytic enzyme, alpha-enolase (ENO1), in tumor progression and prognosis of human glioma. Methods ENO1 expression levels were examined in glioma tissues and normal brain (NB) tissues. The molecular mechanisms of ENO1 expression and its effects on cell growth, migration and invasion were also explored by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, Transwell chamber assay, Boyden chamber assay, Western blot and in vivo tumorigenesis in nude mice. Results ENO1 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in glioma tissues compared to NB. In addition, increased ENO1 was associated disease progression in glioma samples. Knocking down ENO1 expression not only significantly decreased cell proliferation, but also markedly inhibited cell migration and invasion as well as in vivo tumorigenesis. Mechanistic analyses revealed that Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, pRb, and NF-κB were downregulated after stable ENO1 knockdown in glioma U251 and U87 cells. Conversely, knockdown of ENO1 resulted in restoration of E-cadherin expression and suppression of mesenchymal cell markers, such as Vimentin, Snail, N-Cadherin, β-Catenin and Slug. Furthermore, ENO1 suppression inactivated PI3K/Akt pathway regulating the cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) progression. Conclusion Overexpression of ENO1 is associated with glioma progression. Knockdown of ENO1 expression led to suppressed cell growth, migration and invasion progression by inactivating the PI3K/Akt pathway in glioma cells. PMID:24650096

  8. Assessment in Higher Education: The Potential for a Community of Practice to Improve Inter-Marker Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Ian P.; Joyce, John; Hassall, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    The design, delivery and assessment of a complete educational scheme, such as a degree programme or a professional qualification course, is a complex matter. Maintaining alignment between the stated aims of the curriculum and the scoring of student achievement is an overarching concern. The potential for drift across individual aspects of an…

  9. Identification of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) as a potential marker of impaired growth in the newborn piglet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between the circulating levels of the acute phase proteins haptoglobin (HP) and alpha 1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) and growth potential in neonatal pigs. In runts, the circulating level of AGP, but not HP in serum of newborn piglets was higher...

  10. Spatial variation in fatty acid trophic markers in albacore tuna from the southwestern Pacific Ocean-A potential 'tropicalization' signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Christopher C.; Pethybridge, Heidi; Young, Jock W.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2015-03-01

    Signature fatty acids were used to explore trophic variations in albacore and skipjack tuna sampled from the southwestern Pacific Ocean. There were clear spatial differences in fatty acid profiles between albacore sampled in the Coral (tropical zone centered at ~20°S) and Tasman (temperate zone centered at ~42°S) Seas; however, few differences were observed in fatty acid profiles of albacore sampled off Tasmania and New Zealand. Fatty acid signatures of the Tasman Sea samples reflected a food web based more on diatoms and included: 20:5ω3 (EPA), 18:1ω7, 22:1ω11, 18:2ω6, 18:4ω3, 18:3ω3, and 20:4ω3. In contrast, albacore from the Coral Sea had a distinct fatty acid signature which included 20:4ω6, 22:5ω6, 17:0, 22:4ω6, 24:0, and 17:1. Multivariate analyses revealed the importance of 22:6ω3 (DHA) in Coral Sea-caught albacore which also had a DHA/EPA ratio more than twice that in all other groups suggesting a greater dinoflagellate contribution and/or a higher trophic position. Fatty acid markers indicative of krill consumption were significantly higher in temperate-caught albacore although skipjack were closest in fatty acid composition to krill. These results were likely due to differences at the base of the food web in these two seas suggesting that signature fatty acids can be used as indicators of ecosystem change: in this case the gradual 'tropicalization' of the eastern seaboard of Australia through the southward extension of the East Australian Current. Our findings also indicate comparatively lower concentrations of healthful ω3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular the content of DHA and EPA, in the tropical samples. This suggests that tropicalization could adversely affect the dietary intake of albacore and other marine predators in the region. Such changes are readily detectable by fatty acid analysis.

  11. Endogenous Metabolism of Azotobacter agilis

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, J. M.; Charba, J. F.; Foust, W. N.

    1966-01-01

    Sobek, J. M. (University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette), J. F. Charba, and W. N. Foust. Endogenous metabolism of Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:687–695. 1966—Ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, cellular carbohydrate, and the cold trichloroacetic acid and acidic alcohol fractions of the cell do not appear to function as endogenous reserves for Azotobacter agilis. The immediate endogenous reserve of cells grown on glucose, acetate, or succinate was poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB). Viability of the cells during starvation was dependent upon the initial levels of PHB and the growth substrate. Cells with high initial PHB levels survived longer than cells with lower levels. Cells from succinate-grown cultures had lower PHB levels than cells from glucose-grown cultures, but were capable of maintaining their viability longer. Cellular protein may also serve as a secondary endogenous reserve substrate for this organism. PMID:5922542

  12. Polychlorinated biphenyl exposure, diabetes and endogenous hormones: a cross-sectional study in men previously employed at a capacitor manufacturing plant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have shown associations of diabetes and endogenous hormones with exposure to a wide variety of organochlorines. We have previously reported positive associations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and inverse associations of selected steroid hormones with diabetes in postmenopausal women previously employed in a capacitor manufacturing plant. Methods This paper examines associations of PCBs with diabetes and endogenous hormones in 63 men previously employed at the same plant who in 1996 underwent surveys of their exposure and medical history and collection of bloods and urine for measurements of PCBs, lipids, liver function, hematologic markers and endogenous hormones. Results PCB exposure was positively associated with diabetes and age and inversely associated with thyroid stimulating hormone and triiodothyronine-uptake. History of diabetes was significantly related to total PCBs and all PCB functional groupings, but not to quarters worked and job score, after control for potential confounders. None of the exposures were related to insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in non-diabetic men. Conclusions Associations of PCBs with specific endogenous hormones differ in some respects from previous findings in postmenopausal women employed at the capacitor plant. Results from this study, however, do confirm previous reports relating PCB exposure to diabetes and suggest that these associations are not mediated by measured endogenous hormones. PMID:22931295

  13. Mechanisms of the harmful effects of bacterial semen infection on ejaculated human spermatozoa: potential inflammatory markers in semen.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Monika; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The invasion of the male reproductive tract by microorganisms, and its subsequent consequences for sperm fertilizing potential, has been intensely discussed. The role of the bacteria that are responsible for the colonization and contamination of the male urogenital tract, rather than its infection, in diminished sperm parameters raises the most controversy. There are numerous premises suggesting that bacterial semen infection is associated with male infertility. However, the molecular mechanism by which the fertility is affected is complex and multifactorial, and still presents a puzzle. Some authors have suggested that direct interactions between bacteria and human spermatozoa facilitate sperm immobilization, affect sperm morphology, and thus weaken the ability of sperm to fertilize. On the other hand, the massive infiltration of activated leukocytes into the inflammatory site may be associated with impairment of sperm fertilizing potential, due to oxidative, apoptotic, and immune processes. This review presents current research trends and aims to summarize the present knowledge of semen inflammation and causative bacterial agents in the male urogenital tract, with its consequence on seminological parameters, and male fertility status. PMID:26306512

  14. RAPD and SCAR markers as potential tools for detection of milk origin in dairy products: Adulterant sheep breeds in Serra da Estrela cheese production.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Joana T; Ribeiro, Tânia I B; Rocha, João B; Nunes, João; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2016-11-15

    Serra da Estrela Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese is the most famous Portuguese cheese and has a high commercial value. However, the adulteration of production with cheaper/lower-quality milks from non-autochthones ovine breeds compromises the quality of the final product and undervalues the original PDO cheese. A Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was developed for efficient detection of adulterant breeds in milk mixtures used for fraudulent production of this cheese. Furthermore, Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) markers were designed envisioning the detection of milk adulteration in processed dairy foods. The RAPD-SCAR technique is here described, for the first time, to be potentially useful for detection of milk origin in dairy products. In this sense, our findings will play an important role on the valorization of Serra da Estrela cheese, as well as on other high-quality dairy products prone to adulteration, contributing to the further development of the dairy industry. PMID:27283677

  15. Isolation and RNA gel blot analysis of genes that could serve as potential molecular markers for leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Ito, M; Nishida, I; Watanabe, A

    2001-02-01

    Nine cDNAs, representing genes in which the transcripts accumulated in senescent leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, were isolated by differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) and the genes were designated yellow-leaf-specific gene 1 to 9 (YLS1-YLS9). Sequence analysis revealed that none of the YLS genes, except YLS6, had been reported as senescence-up-regulated genes. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that the transcripts of YLS3 accumulated at the highest level at an early senescence stage, whereas the transcripts from the other YLS genes reached their maximum levels in late senescence stages. Transcripts of YLS genes showed various accumulation patterns under natural senescence, and under artificial senescence induced by darkness, ethylene or ABA. These expression characteristics of YLS genes will be useful as potential molecular markers, which will enhance our understanding of natural and artificial senescence processes.

  16. RAPD and SCAR markers as potential tools for detection of milk origin in dairy products: Adulterant sheep breeds in Serra da Estrela cheese production.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Joana T; Ribeiro, Tânia I B; Rocha, João B; Nunes, João; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2016-11-15

    Serra da Estrela Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese is the most famous Portuguese cheese and has a high commercial value. However, the adulteration of production with cheaper/lower-quality milks from non-autochthones ovine breeds compromises the quality of the final product and undervalues the original PDO cheese. A Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was developed for efficient detection of adulterant breeds in milk mixtures used for fraudulent production of this cheese. Furthermore, Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) markers were designed envisioning the detection of milk adulteration in processed dairy foods. The RAPD-SCAR technique is here described, for the first time, to be potentially useful for detection of milk origin in dairy products. In this sense, our findings will play an important role on the valorization of Serra da Estrela cheese, as well as on other high-quality dairy products prone to adulteration, contributing to the further development of the dairy industry.

  17. A selectable bifunctional beta-galactosidase::phleomycin-resistance fusion protein as a potential marker for eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Baron, M; Reynes, J P; Stassi, D; Tiraby, G

    1992-05-15

    The Sh ble gene, conferring phleomycin resistance (PhR), was fused in frame to both the 3' and 5' ends of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene. The bifunctionality of the resulting 130-kDa hybrid proteins was demonstrated in E. coli and in the fungus, Tolypocladium geodes. PhR transformants of both organisms could be selected for. All transformants from E. coli and most from T. geodes displayed beta Gal activity. In the fungal host, higher transformation frequencies and greater levels of beta Gal activity were observed in clones harboring the lacZ::Sh ble fusion, as compared to the Sh ble::lacZ configuration. This system appears to be a potentially useful tool for the direct selection of transformants, and the evaluation of gene expression and regulation in a wide variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts.

  18. Gene Expression Changes in Phosphorus Deficient Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Leaves and the Potential for Diagnostic Gene Expression Markers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John P.; Broadley, Martin R.; Bowen, Helen C.; Spracklen, William P.; Hayden, Rory M.; White, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background There are compelling economic and environmental reasons to reduce our reliance on inorganic phosphate (Pi) fertilisers. Better management of Pi fertiliser applications is one option to improve the efficiency of Pi fertiliser use, whilst maintaining crop yields. Application rates of Pi fertilisers are traditionally determined from analyses of soil or plant tissues. Alternatively, diagnostic genes with altered expression under Pi limiting conditions that suggest a physiological requirement for Pi fertilisation, could be used to manage Pifertiliser applications, and might be more precise than indirect measurements of soil or tissue samples. Results We grew potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants hydroponically, under glasshouse conditions, to control their nutrient status accurately. Samples of total leaf RNA taken periodically after Pi was removed from the nutrient solution were labelled and hybridised to potato oligonucleotide arrays. A total of 1,659 genes were significantly differentially expressed following Pi withdrawal. These included genes that encode proteins involved in lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism, characteristic of Pi deficient leaves and included potential novel roles for genes encoding patatin like proteins in potatoes. The array data were analysed using a support vector machine algorithm to identify groups of genes that could predict the Pi status of the crop. These groups of diagnostic genes were tested using field grown potatoes that had either been fertilised or unfertilised. A group of 200 genes could correctly predict the Pi status of field grown potatoes. Conclusions This paper provides a proof-of-concept demonstration for using microarrays and class prediction tools to predict the Pi status of a field grown potato crop. There is potential to develop this technology for other biotic and abiotic stresses in field grown crops. Ultimately, a better understanding of crop stresses may improve our management of the crop, improving

  19. A review of transcriptome studies combined with data mining reveals novel potential markers of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Melaiu, Ombretta; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Melissari, Erika; Di Russo, Manuela; Bonotti, Alessandra; Bruno, Rossella; Foddis, Rudy; Gemignani, Federica; Pellegrini, Silvia; Landi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a cancer of the serosal pleural cavities, is one of the most aggressive human tumors. In order to identify genes crucial for the onset and progression of MPM, we performed an extensive literature review focused on transcriptome studies (RTS). In this kind of studies a great number of transcripts are analyzed without formulating any a priori hypothesis, thus preventing any bias coming from previously established knowledge that could lead to an over-representation of specific genes. Each study was thoroughly analyzed paying particular attention to: (i) the employed microarray platform, (ii) the number and type of samples, (iii) the fold-change, and (iv) the statistical significance of deregulated genes. We also performed data mining (DM) on MPM using three different tools (Coremine, SNPs3D, and GeneProspector). Results from RTS and DM were compared in order to restrict the number of genes potentially deregulated in MPM. Our main requirement for a gene to be a "mesothelioma gene" (MG) is to be reproducibly deregulated among independent studies and confirmed by DM. A list of MGs was thus produced, including PTGS2, BIRC5, ASS1, JUNB, MCM2, AURKA, FGF2, MKI67, CAV1, SFRP1, CCNB1, CDK4, and MSLN that might represent potential novel biomarkers or therapeutic targets for MPM. Moreover, it was found a sub-group of MGs including ASS1, JUNB, PTGS2, EEF2, SULF1, TOP2A, AURKA, BIRC5, CAV1, IFITM1, PCNA, and PKM2 that could explain, at least in part, the mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, one first-line chemotherapeutic drug used for the disease. Finally, the pathway analysis showed that co-regulation networks related to the cross-talk between MPM and its micro-environment, in particular involving the adhesion molecules, integrins, and cytokines, might have an important role in MPM. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the role played by these genes in MPM.

  20. ENDOGENOUS RESPIRATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, H. H.

    1962-01-01

    Ramsey, H. H. (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.). Endogenous respiration of Staphylococcus aureus. J. Bacteriol. 83:507–514. 1962.—The endogenous respiration of Staphylococcus aureus is dependent upon the medium used to grow the cell suspension. Within wide ranges, the concentration of glucose in the medium has no effect upon subsequent endogenous respiration of the cells, but the concentration of amino acids in the medium, within certain limits, has a very marked effect. The total carbohydrate content of the cells does not decrease during endogenous respiration. As endogenous respiration proceeds, ammonia appears in the supernatant, and the concentration of glutamic acid in the free amino acid pool decreases. Organisms grown in the presence of labeled glutamic acid liberate labeled CO2 when allowed to respire without added substrate. The principal source of this CO2 is the free glutamate in the metabolic pool; its liberation is not suppressed by exogenous glucose or glutamate. With totally labeled cells, the free pool undergoes a rapid, but not total, depletion and remains at a low level for a long time. Activity of the protein fraction declines with time and shows the largest net decrease of all fractions. Exogenous glucose does not inhibit the release of labeled CO2 by totally labeled cells. Other amino acids in the free pool which can serve as endogenous substrates are aspartic acid and, to much lesser extents, glycine and alanine. The results indicate that both free amino acids and cellular protein may serve as endogenous substrates of S. aureus. PMID:14490204

  1. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Opening Releases Endogenous Acetylcholine, which Contributes to Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Induced by Mild Hypothermia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat but Not Wistar-Kyoto Rat Arteries.

    PubMed

    Zou, Q; Leung, S W S; Vanhoutte, P M

    2015-08-01

    Mild hypothermia causes endothelium-dependent relaxations, which are reduced by the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. The present study investigated whether endothelial endogenous acetylcholine contributes to these relaxations. Aortic rings of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were contracted with prostaglandin F2 α and exposed to progressive mild hypothermia (from 37 to 31°C). Hypothermia induced endothelium-dependent, Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-sensitive relaxations, which were reduced by atropine, but not by mecamylamine, in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. The responses in SHR aortae were also reduced by acetylcholinesterase (the enzyme responsible for acetylcholine degradation), bromoacetylcholine (inhibitor of acetylcholine synthesis), hemicholinium-3 (inhibitor of choline uptake), and vesamicol (inhibitor of acetylcholine release). The mild hypothermia-induced relaxations in both SHR and WKY rat aortae were inhibited by AMTB [N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-[(3-methylphenyl)methoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethyl)-benzamide; the transient receptor potential (TRP) M8 inhibitor]; only those in SHR aortae were inhibited by HC-067047 [2-methyl-1-[3-(4-morpholinyl)propyl]-5-phenyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide; TRPV4 antagonist] while those in WKY rat aortae were reduced by HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide; TRPA1 antagonist]. The endothelial uptake of extracellular choline and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate was enhanced by mild hypothermia and inhibited by HC-067047 in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. Compared with WKY rats, the SHR preparations expressed similar levels of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase, but a lesser amount of vesicular acetylcholine transporter, located mainly in the endothelium. Thus, mild hypothermia causes nitric oxide-dependent relaxations by opening TRPA1 channels in WKY rat aortae

  2. Organic anion transporting polypeptides expressed in pancreatic cancer may serve as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for early stage adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Amanda; Apte, Udayan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides (OATPs) are expressed in various epithelial tissues in the body. Because they can be expressed in cancers and because they can transport anticancer drugs, OATPs could be potential targets for cancer therapy. Therefore we examined their expression in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. Methods Expression of all eleven human OATPs was measured at the mRNA level and OATPs with highest expression were characterized at the protein level. Results Transcripts of SLCO1B3, SLCO2A1, SLCO3A1 and SLCO4A1 were detected in all the tested pancreatic tissues. OATP1B3, OATP2A1, OATP3A1 and OATP4A1 protein expression was confirmed in these tissues and expression of all four transporters increased in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared to normal pancreas. OATP1B3 expression was highest in pancreatic hyperplasia and stage one adenocarcinomas compared to stage two and three adenocarcinomas. Conclusion OATP1B3, OATP2A1, OATP3A1 and OATP4A1 are up-regulated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and could potentially be used to target anticancer drugs to pancreatic cancer. Additionally, because expression of OATP1B3 is highest in pancreatitis and stage one adenocarcinoma, which leads to pancreatic cancer, OATP1B3 is a potential marker to diagnose patients with early stage pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:23307416

  3. Lateral Ventricular Cerebrospinal Fluid Diffusivity as a Potential Neuroimaging Marker of Brain Temperature in Multiple Sclerosis: A Hypothesis and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Khader M.; Lincoln, John A.; Nelson, Flavia M.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2014-01-01

    In this retrospective study we tested the hypothesis that the net effect of impaired electrical conduction and therefore increased heat dissipation in multiple sclerosis (MS) results in elevated lateral ventricular (LV) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffusivity as a measure of brain temperature estimated in vivo using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used validated DTI-based segmentation methods to obtain normalized LV-CSF volume and its corresponding CSF diffusivity in 108 MS patients and 103 healthy controls in the age range of 21-63 years. The LV CSF diffusivity was ~2% higher in MS compared to controls that corresponds to a temperature rise of ~1 °C that could not be explained by changes in the CSF viscosity due to altered CSF protein content in MS. The LV diffusivity decreased with age in healthy controls (r=−0.29; p=0.003), but not in MS (r=0.15; p=0.11), possibly related to MS pathology. Age-adjusted LV diffusivity increased with lesion load (r=0.518; p=1x10−8). Our data suggest that the total brain lesion load is the primary contributor to the increase in LV CSF diffusivity in MS. These findings suggest that LV diffusivity is a potential in vivo biomarker of the mismatch between heat generation and dissipation in MS. We also discuss limitations and possible confounders. PMID:25485790

  4. Lateral ventricular cerebrospinal fluid diffusivity as a potential neuroimaging marker of brain temperature in multiple sclerosis: a hypothesis and implications.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Khader M; Lincoln, John A; Nelson, Flavia M; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2015-04-01

    In this retrospective study we tested the hypothesis that the net effect of impaired electrical conduction and therefore increased heat dissipation in multiple sclerosis (MS) results in elevated lateral ventricular (LV) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffusivity as a measure of brain temperature estimated in vivo using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used validated DTI-based segmentation methods to obtain normalized LV-CSF volume and its corresponding CSF diffusivity in 108 MS patients and 103 healthy controls in the age range of 21-63 years. The LV CSF diffusivity was ~2% higher in MS compared to controls that correspond to a temperature rise of ~1°C that could not be explained by changes in the CSF viscosity due to altered CSF protein content in MS. The LV diffusivity decreased with age in healthy controls (r=-0.29; p=0.003), but not in MS (r=0.15; p=0.11), possibly related to MS pathology. Age-adjusted LV diffusivity increased with lesion load (r=0.518; p=1×10(-8)). Our data suggest that the total brain lesion load is the primary contributor to the increase in LV CSF diffusivity in MS. These findings suggest that LV diffusivity is a potential in vivo biomarker of the mismatch between heat generation and dissipation in MS. We also discuss limitations and possible confounders. PMID:25485790

  5. Comparative genotyping of Clostridium thermocellum strains isolated from biogas plants: genetic markers and characterization of cellulolytic potential.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Daniela E; Zverlov, Vladimir V; Liebl, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Wolfgang H

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is among the most prevalent of known anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria. In this study, genetic and phenotypic variations among C. thermocellum strains isolated from different biogas plants were determined and different genotyping methods were evaluated on these isolates. At least two C. thermocellum strains were isolated independently from each of nine different biogas plants via enrichment on cellulose. Various DNA-based genotyping methods such as ribotyping, RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) and VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) were applied to these isolates. One novel approach - the amplification of unknown target sequences between copies of a previously discovered Random Inserted Mobile Element (RIME) - was also tested. The genotyping method with the highest discriminatory power was found to be the amplification of the sequences between the insertion elements, where isolates from each biogas plant yielded a different band pattern. Cellulolytic potentials, optimal growth conditions and substrate spectra of all isolates were characterized to help identify phenotypic variations. Irrespective of the genotyping method used, the isolates from each individual biogas plant always exhibited identical patterns. This is suggestive of a single C. thermocellum strain exhibiting dominance in each biogas plant. The genotypic groups reflect the results of the physiological characterization of the isolates like substrate diversity and cellulase activity. Conversely, strains isolated across a range of biogas plants differed in their genotyping results and physiological properties. Both strains isolated from one biogas plant had the best specific cellulose-degrading properties and might therefore achieve superior substrate utilization yields in biogas fermenters.

  6. Potential Markers of Aggressive Behavior: The Fear of Other Persons' Laughter and Its Overlaps with Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Schulter, Günter; Freudenthaler, H. Harald; Hofer, Ellen; Pichler, Natascha; Papousek, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence suggested that some outbreaks of aggression and violence may be related to a fear of being laughed at and ridiculed. The present study examined the potential association of the fear of other persons' laughter (gelotophobia) with emotion-related deficits predisposing for aggression, anger and aggression proneness, and its overlaps with relevant mental disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings Gelotophobic individuals were compared to a non-phobic control group with respect to emotion regulation skills and strategies, alexithymia, anger proneness, and aggressive behavior. Social phobia was diagnosed using the Structural Clinical Interview (SCID-I) for DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition). Additionally, the SCID-II modules for Cluster A Personality Disorders, which includes schizoid, paranoid, and schizotypal personality disorder were administered to all participants. The findings show that gelotophobia is associated with deficits in the typical handling of an individual's own affective states, greater anger proneness and more aggressive behavior according to self-report as compared to non-phobic individuals. 80% of the subjects in the gelotophobia group had an additional diagnosis of social phobia and/or Cluster A personality disorder. The additional diagnoses did not predict additional variance of anger or aggressive behavior as compared to gelotophobia alone. Conclusions/Significance Features related to aggression and violence that are inherent in mental disorders such as social phobia and Cluster A personality disorders may be particularly evident in the symptom of fear of other persons' laughter. PMID:22675438

  7. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Emily G.; Kotze, Helen L.; Allwood, J. William; Dunn, Warwick B.; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments. PMID:26508589

  8. Posttraumatic knee osteoarthritis following anterior cruciate ligament injury: Potential biochemical mediators of degenerative alteration and specific biochemical markers

    PubMed Central

    LI, HONG; CHEN, CHEN; CHEN, SHIYI

    2015-01-01

    As a common injury, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is unable to heal itself naturally, which possibly increases knee instability, accelerates the risk of joint degeneration and leads to knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the ACL-injured knee. Thus, ACL reconstruction using an autograft or allograft tendon is proposed to maintain the biomechanical stability of the knee joint. However, previous studies demonstrate that surgical management of ACL reconstruction failed to abrogate the development of OA completely, indicating that biochemical disturbance is responsible for the osteoarthritic changes observed following ACL injury. Inflammatory mediators are elevated subsequent to ACL injury or rupture, inducing matrix metalloproteinase production, proteoglycan degradation, collagen destruction, chondrocyte necrosis and lubricin loss. These potential biochemical mediators may aid in the development of effective biological management to reduce the onset of future posttraumatic OA. Furthermore, during the degenerative process of cartilage, there are a number of cartilage-specific biomarkers, which play a critical step in the loss of structural and functional integrity of cartilage. The present review illustrates several specific biomarkers in the ACL-injured knee joint, which may provide effective diagnostic and prognostic tools for investigating cartilage degenerative progression and future posttraumatic OA of ACL-injured patients. PMID:25798238

  9. Intervarietal variations in various oxidative stress markers and antioxidant potential of finger millet (Eleusine coracana) subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Bartwal, Arti; Pande, Anjali; Sharma, Priyadarshini; Arora, Sandeep

    2016-07-01

    Drought is a major form of abiotic stress leading to lower crop productivity. Experiment was carried out for selecting the most tolerant genotype among six different genotypes of finger millet under drought stress. Seeds of six finger millet genotypes were sown in pots and grown for 35 days. After this period, drought was induced by withholding watering for stressed plants while control plants were watered regularly for comparison. Among all six different varieties of finger millet screened (PR202, PES400, PRM6107, VL283, VL328 and VL149) under varying intensities of drought stress,PRM6107 and PR202 showed highest stress tolerance by limiting excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through activation of ROS scavenging antioxidative enzymes. A 200% increase in ascorbate content was recorded in PRM6107 and PR202, while in other varieties limited increase in ascorbate content was observed. Maximum decrease in chlorophyll content was observed in VL328 (83%) while least drop was observed in VL149 (65%). Relative water content indicated that PR202 was able to retain maximum water content under stress, as it recorded least drop in relative water content (55%), contributing to its better survival under stress. In conclusion finger millet genotypes PRM6107 and PR202 possessed maximum drought tolerance potential and thus may be used for allele mining of drought tolerant genes, which can further be employed for the development of more drought stress tolerant staple crops using biotechnological approach.

  10. Intervarietal variations in various oxidative stress markers and antioxidant potential of finger millet (Eleusine coracana) subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Bartwal, Arti; Pande, Anjali; Sharma, Priyadarshini; Arora, Sandeep

    2016-07-01

    Drought is a major form of abiotic stress leading to lower crop productivity. Experiment was carried out for selecting the most tolerant genotype among six different genotypes of finger millet under drought stress. Seeds of six finger millet genotypes were sown in pots and grown for 35 days. After this period, drought was induced by withholding watering for stressed plants while control plants were watered regularly for comparison. Among all six different varieties of finger millet screened (PR202, PES400, PRM6107, VL283, VL328 and VL149) under varying intensities of drought stress,PRM6107 and PR202 showed highest stress tolerance by limiting excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through activation of ROS scavenging antioxidative enzymes. A 200% increase in ascorbate content was recorded in PRM6107 and PR202, while in other varieties limited increase in ascorbate content was observed. Maximum decrease in chlorophyll content was observed in VL328 (83%) while least drop was observed in VL149 (65%). Relative water content indicated that PR202 was able to retain maximum water content under stress, as it recorded least drop in relative water content (55%), contributing to its better survival under stress. In conclusion finger millet genotypes PRM6107 and PR202 possessed maximum drought tolerance potential and thus may be used for allele mining of drought tolerant genes, which can further be employed for the development of more drought stress tolerant staple crops using biotechnological approach. PMID:27498495

  11. Comparative study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains to identify potential marker genes correlated to desiccation stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Capece, Angela; Votta, Sonia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The most diffused formulation of starter for winemaking is active dry yeast (ADY). ADYs production process is essentially characterized by air-drying stress, a combination of several stresses, including thermal, hyperosmotic and oxidative and cell capacity to counteract such multiple stresses will determine its survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying cell stress response to desiccation have been mostly studied in laboratory and commercial yeast strains, but a growing interest is currently developing for indigenous yeast strains which represent a valuable and alternative source of genetic and molecular biodiversity to be exploited. In this work, a comparative study of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae indigenous wine strains, previously selected for their technological traits, has been carried out to identify potentially relevant genes involved in desiccation stress tolerance. Cell viability was evaluated along desiccation treatment and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR before and during the stress. Our data show that the observed differences in individual strain sensitivity to desiccation stress could be associated to specific gene expression over time. In particular, either the basal or the stress-induced mRNA levels of certain genes, such as HSP12, SSA3, TPS1, TPS2, CTT1 and SOD1, result tightly correlated to the strain survival advantage. This study provides a reliable and sensitive method to predict desiccation stress tolerance of indigenous wine yeast strains which could be preliminary to biotechnological applications.

  12. Comparative study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains to identify potential marker genes correlated to desiccation stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Capece, Angela; Votta, Sonia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The most diffused formulation of starter for winemaking is active dry yeast (ADY). ADYs production process is essentially characterized by air-drying stress, a combination of several stresses, including thermal, hyperosmotic and oxidative and cell capacity to counteract such multiple stresses will determine its survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying cell stress response to desiccation have been mostly studied in laboratory and commercial yeast strains, but a growing interest is currently developing for indigenous yeast strains which represent a valuable and alternative source of genetic and molecular biodiversity to be exploited. In this work, a comparative study of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae indigenous wine strains, previously selected for their technological traits, has been carried out to identify potentially relevant genes involved in desiccation stress tolerance. Cell viability was evaluated along desiccation treatment and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR before and during the stress. Our data show that the observed differences in individual strain sensitivity to desiccation stress could be associated to specific gene expression over time. In particular, either the basal or the stress-induced mRNA levels of certain genes, such as HSP12, SSA3, TPS1, TPS2, CTT1 and SOD1, result tightly correlated to the strain survival advantage. This study provides a reliable and sensitive method to predict desiccation stress tolerance of indigenous wine yeast strains which could be preliminary to biotechnological applications. PMID:26882930

  13. Semaphorin 3A - a marker for disease activity and a potential putative disease-modifying treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Vadasz, Z; Toubi, E

    2012-10-01

    Semaphorin 3A (sema3A) and neuropilin-1 (NP-1) play a regulatory role in immune responses and have a demonstrated effect on the course of collagen-induced arthritis. Sema3A was also found to be involved in other immune-mediated diseases, e.g. psoriasis and allergic rhinitis. In this review we concentrated on the involvement of sema3A and NP-1 in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and on the specific effect of sema3A on the auto-reactive properties of B cells in SLE patients. We demonstrated the expression of sema3A in renal biopsies from lupus glomerulonephritis patients. This expression was found to be inversely correlated with proteinuria and kidney function tests. Sema3A serum levels in SLE patients were found to be significantly lower than in RA patients (disease control) and lower yet than in normal individuals. Altered serum sema3A levels were found to be in inverse correlation with SLE disease activity, mainly with renal damage and the presence of anti-cardiolipin antibodies. The expression of both sema3A and NP-1 on B cells from SLE patients was significantly different in comparison with normal healthy individuals. Finally, we demonstrated that when sema3A was co-cultured with CpG-ODN-stimulated memory B cells of SLE patients, their TLR-9 expression was significantly reduced by almost 50% (p = 0.001). These findings, along with the observation of sema3A being reduced in SLE patients in correlation with disease severity and autoimmunity, and memory B cells being beneficially responsive to sema3A, suggest this regulatory molecule may be considered as a potential therapy for SLE. Such focused therapies will help in achieving the maintenance of self-tolerance and alter pro-inflammatory status in lupus.

  14. Surrogate markers for cerebral blood flow correlate with [¹⁸F]-fallypride binding potential at dopamine D(2/3) receptors in human striatum.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Paul; Xiong, Guoming; la Fougère, Christian; Rominger, Axel; Bartenstein, Peter; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Piel, Markus; Rösch, Frank; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with the high affinity dopamine D(2/3) receptor ligand [¹⁸F]-fallypride affords estimates of the binding potential (BP(ND) ) in extra-striatal regions of low receptor abundance, but the sufficient recording time for accurate measurements in striatum has been called into question. We have earlier argued that transient equilibrium measurements are obtained in striatum with [¹⁸F]-fallypride PET recordings of 3 h duration, which may be the practical limit for clinical investigations without interrupted scanning. However, the high extraction fraction of [¹⁸F]-fallypride predicts flow-dependence of tracer delivery to brain, which may be a source of variance of the apparent BP(ND) in regions of high binding. To test this prediction, we conducted a retrospective analysis of [¹⁸F]-fallypride PET data from a group of 50 healthy volunteers (age 18-58 years [mean ± SD: 32.6 ± 10.6), who had participated in clinical studies without arterial input measurements. We used the initial 120-s integral (AUC) of the venous confluence (VC) as a surrogate marker for cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tested for correlations between regional estimates of BP(ND) calculated by the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) and the individual VC-AUC. The magnitude of BP(ND) in a high binding region (putamen), but not in a low binding region (thalamus) correlated positively with VC-AUC, suggesting that approximately 9% of the variance in the [¹⁸F]-fallypride BP(ND) in putamen can be attributed to individual differences in this surrogate marker for CBF, a contribution equal in magnitude to the effects of age on BP(ND) in putamen of the present healthy control group. PMID:23239525

  15. A Label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring Workflow Identifies a Subset of Pregnancy Specific Glycoproteins as Potential Predictive Markers of Early-onset Pre-eclampsia*

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Richard T.; Fisher, Christal; Westwood, Melissa; North, Robyn; Baker, Philip N.; Walker, Michael J.; Williamson, Andrew; Whetton, Anthony D.; Lin, Wanchang; McCowan, Lesley; Roberts, Claire T.; Cooper, Garth J. S.; Unwin, Richard D.; Myers, Jenny E.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious complication of pregnancy with potentially life threatening consequences for both mother and baby. Presently there is no test with the required performance to predict which healthy first-time mothers will go on to develop PE. The high specificity, sensitivity, and multiplexed nature of selected reaction monitoring holds great potential as a tool for the verification and validation of putative candidate biomarkersfor disease states. Realization of this potential involves establishing a high throughput, cost effective, reproducible sample preparation workflow. We have developed a semi-automated HPLC-based sample preparation workflow before a label-free selected reaction monitoring approach. This workflow has been applied to the search for novel predictive biomarkers for PE. To discover novel candidate biomarkers for PE, we used isobaric tagging to identify several potential biomarker proteins in plasma obtained at 15 weeks gestation from nulliparous women who later developed PE compared with pregnant women who remained healthy. Such a study generates a number of “candidate” biomarkers that require further testing in larger patient cohorts. As proof-of-principle, two of these proteins were taken forward for verification in a 100 women (58 PE, 42 controls) using label-free SRM. We obtained reproducible protein quantitation across the 100 samples and demonstrated significant changes in protein levels, even with as little as 20% change in protein concentration. The SRM data correlated with a commercial ELISA, suggesting that this is a robust workflow suitable for rapid, affordable, label-free verification of which candidate biomarkers should be taken forward for thorough investigation. A subset of pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) had value as novel predictive markers for PE. PMID:23897580

  16. Collagen-graft mixed cellulose esters membrane maintains undifferentiated morphology and markers of potential pluripotency in feeder-free culture of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lotfalah Moradi, Sadegh; Hajishafieeha, Zahra; Nojedehi, Shahrzad; Dinarvand, Vida; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Roy, Ram V; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are unique and unlimited clinical sources of stem cell therapy for the regenerative medicine. Feeder layer preparation is an important step for iPSCs production, which is expensive, time-consuming and requires conversance. In the present study, we investigated the maintenance of pluripotency, and stemness of the iPSCs through feeder-free culture on a collagen-grafted Mixed Cellulose Esters membrane (MCE-COL) after three passages during twelve days. Results have demonstrated that the iPSCs cultured on MCE-COL membrane had a fine, typical undifferentiated morphology, increased proliferation rate and significant multi-lineage differentiation potential. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and pluripotency associated gene markers expression further confirmed that iPSCs cultured on the surface of MCE-COL had more ALP positive colonies and enhanced expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and ALP in comparison with MCE and control groups. Since MCE-COL membrane has three dimensional structure and bioactivity, it has the potential for usage in the feeder-free culture of iPSCs, and could be a suitable candidate to use as a feeder layer in stem cells preparation. PMID:27449919

  17. Astemizole-based anticancer therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and Eag1 channels as potential early-stage markers of HCC.

    PubMed

    de Guadalupe Chávez-López, María; Pérez-Carreón, Julio Isael; Zuñiga-García, Violeta; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis A; Caro-Sánchez, Claudia Haydee; Acuña-Macías, Isabel; Gariglio, Patricio; Hernández-Gallegos, Elizabeth; Chiliquinga, Andrea Jazmín; Camacho, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has very poor prognosis. Astemizole has gained great interest as a potential anticancer drug because it targets several proteins involved in cancer including the Eag1 (ether à-go-go-1) potassium channel that is overexpressed in human HCC. Eag1 channels are regulated by cancer etiological factors and have been proposed as early tumor markers. Here, we found that HepG2 and HuH-7 HCC cells displayed Eag1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression, determined by real-time RT-PCR and immunochemistry, respectively. Astemizole inhibited human HCC cell proliferation (assessed by metabolic activity assay) and induced apoptosis (studied with flow cytometry) in both cell lines. The subcellular Eag1 protein localization was modified by astemizole in the HepG2 cells. The treatment with astemizole prevented diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced rat HCC development in vivo (followed by studying γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activity). The Eag1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in most DEN-treated groups but decreased after astemizole treatment. GGT activity was decreased by astemizole. The Eag1 protein was detected in cirrhotic and dysplastic rat livers. Astemizole might have clinical utility for HCC prevention and treatment, and Eag1 channels may be potential early HCC biomarkers. These data provide significant basis to include astemizole in HCC clinical trials. PMID:25783527

  18. A novel vector for lactic acid bacteria that uses a bile salt hydrolase gene as a potential food-grade selection marker.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sheng; Zhai, Zhengyuan; Wang, Guohong; An, Haoran; Luo, Yunbo; Hao, Yanling

    2011-03-10

    A novel vector pM4aB for lactic acid bacterial was developed using a bile salt hydrolase gene from Lactobacillus plantarum as a potential food-grade selection marker. The 3.0-kb pM4aB consisted of the replicon of Lactobacillus plasmid pM4, a multiple cloning site and the bsh gene, which was constructed by elimination of a 5.5-kb non-food-grade DNA fragment from an 8.5-kb intermediate vector pBEmpM4aB. For electroporation into Lactobacillus paracasei X9, a high transformation efficiency of 4.0±1.0×10(4) CFU/μg plasmid DNA was yielded with 0.1% (wt/vol) glycodeoxycholic acid sodium selection. A high segregation stability of the vector was also observed as only 0.1% plasmid was lost after 50 generations of growth without selection pressure. The application potential of pM4aB was further confirmed by expression of a catalase gene from Lactobacillus sakei in L. paracasei. These results revealed that the novel vector pM4aB constructed in this study would be a useful tool for genetic modification of the industrially important LAB.

  19. Markers of vulnerability in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Prelipceanu, D

    2009-01-01

    Vulnerability in schizophrenia is an integrative concept, which tries to explain the development of schizophrenia as an interaction between different individual susceptibility factors and environmental risk factors. Vulnerability markers used in genetic studies include biochemical indicators, neuroanatomical, neurophysiologic, and cognitive abnormalities. Among those, the most extensive studied markers were: evoked potentials, smooth pursuit eye movements, and attentional deficits. Some of the potential indicators presented in this paper satisfy most of the criteria necessary for a vulnerability marker, but none meets all of them. Nevertheless, they represent important markers of risk to schizophrenia. Key words: vulnerability, evoked potentials, eye movements, attentional deficits PMID:20108534

  20. [Antibodies to endogenous bioregulators and their association with age and sex in chronic pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Myagkova, M A; Petrochenko, S N; Morozova, V S; Moseikin, I A; Shypitsin, V V; Polyvyanaya, O Yu

    2013-01-01

    Authors studied changes in the levels of antibodies to endogenous bioregulators (Ab) to Β-endorphin, orphanin, serotonin, dopamine and angiotensin in 36 healthy people and 109 patients with dorsopathy with chronic pain syndrome. The association of these immunological indicators with age and sex was found. It has been concluded that the levels of Ab to endogenous bioregulators may be considered as a marker of algic system pathology that does not depend on age and is sex-related.

  1. [Antibodies to endogenous bioregulators and their association with age and sex in chronic pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Myagkova, M A; Petrochenko, S N; Morozova, V S; Moseikin, I A; Shypitsin, V V; Polyvyanaya, O Yu

    2013-01-01

    Authors studied changes in the levels of antibodies to endogenous bioregulators (Ab) to Β-endorphin, orphanin, serotonin, dopamine and angiotensin in 36 healthy people and 109 patients with dorsopathy with chronic pain syndrome. The association of these immunological indicators with age and sex was found. It has been concluded that the levels of Ab to endogenous bioregulators may be considered as a marker of algic system pathology that does not depend on age and is sex-related. PMID:23739439

  2. Grave Markers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMuro, Ted

    1985-01-01

    Junior high school students studied the cultural uses, symbolic meanings, and general physical forms of tombs and tombstones and then used basic slab building techniques to construct large clay grave markers. (RM)

  3. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  4. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  5. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  6. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Lars; Faissner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system (CNS) requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation. In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged CNS lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C (TN-C). Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section. PMID:25191223

  7. Some newer marker phytoconstituents in methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaves and evaluation of its immunomodulatory and splenocytes proliferation potential in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jayanthi, M.; Garg, Satish K.; Yadav, Prashant; Bhatia, A. K.; Goel, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was undertaken to unravel the newer marker phytoconstituents in methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaves (MOLE) and evaluation of its immunomodulatory and splenocytes proliferation potential in rats. Materials and Methods: Hot methanolic extract of MOLE was subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Immunomodulatory potential was studied in four groups of rats following administration of MOLE at 62.5 and 125 mg/kg for 21 days, followed by immunization with Salmonella typhimurium “O” antigen and antibody titer determined using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Total lymphocytes and T- and B-lymphocytes count were determined in control and after MOLE administration (62.5 and 125 mg/kg) to rats for 42 days. Splenocytes (2 × 106 spleen cells/ml) from MOLE treated rats were harvested and stimulated using concanavalin A and optical density (OD) and stimulation index were determined. Splenocytes from healthy control rats were also collected and treated in vitro with different concentrations of MOLE (5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 µg/ml) and concanavalin A to determine effect of MOLE on OD and stimulation index. Results: GC-MS analysis revealed presence of 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid ethyl ester, 6-octadecenoic acid, cis-vaccenic acid and 2-octyl-cyclopropaneoctanal in MOLE. MOLE at 125 mg/kg increased the antibody titer by 50%. Although there was slight decline in lymphocytes count (total, B- and T-lymphocytes) in MOLE treated rats, percentage of T-lymphocytes was increased nonsignificantly. Ex vivo and in vitro studies revealed marked increase in OD and stimulation index indicating MOLE-induced splenocytes proliferation. Conclusion: GC-MS study revealed four new compounds in MOLE apart from promising its immunomodulatory potential based on humoral immune response, percentage increase in T-lymphocytes count, and induction of splenocytes proliferation. PMID:26600641

  8. Genome-Wide Computational Analysis of Musa Microsatellites: Classification, Cross-Taxon Transferability, Functional Annotation, Association with Transposons & miRNAs, and Genetic Marker Potential

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Liu, Yuxuan; Li, Chunyu; Sheng, Ou; Mayer, Christoph; Yi, Ganjun

    2015-01-01

    The development of organized, informative, robust, user-friendly, and freely accessible molecular markers is imperative to the Musa marker assisted breeding program. Although several hundred SSR markers have already been developed, the number of informative, robust, and freely accessible Musa markers remains inadequate for some breeding applications. In view of this issue, we surveyed SSRs in four different data sets, developed large-scale non-redundant highly informative therapeutic SSR markers, and classified them according to their attributes, as well as analyzed their cross-taxon transferability and utility for the genetic study of Musa and its relatives. A high SSR frequency (177 per Mbp) was found in the Musa genome. AT-rich dinucleotide repeats are predominant, and trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant in transcribed regions. A significant number of Musa SSRs are associated with pre-miRNAs, and 83% of these SSRs are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic SSR markers. Overall, 74% of the SSR markers were polymorphic, and 94% were transferable to at least one Musa spp. Two hundred forty-three markers generated a total of 1047 alleles, with 2-8 alleles each and an average of 4.38 alleles per locus. The PIC values ranged from 0.31 to 0.89 and averaged 0.71. We report the largest set of non-redundant, polymorphic, new SSR markers to be developed in Musa. These additional markers could be a valuable resource for marker-assisted breeding, genetic diversity and genomic studies of Musa and related species. PMID:26121637

  9. Genome-Wide Computational Analysis of Musa Microsatellites: Classification, Cross-Taxon Transferability, Functional Annotation, Association with Transposons & miRNAs, and Genetic Marker Potential.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Liu, Yuxuan; Li, Chunyu; Sheng, Ou; Mayer, Christoph; Yi, Ganjun

    2015-01-01

    The development of organized, informative, robust, user-friendly, and freely accessible molecular markers is imperative to the Musa marker assisted breeding program. Although several hundred SSR markers have already been developed, the number of informative, robust, and freely accessible Musa markers remains inadequate for some breeding applications. In view of this issue, we surveyed SSRs in four different data sets, developed large-scale non-redundant highly informative therapeutic SSR markers, and classified them according to their attributes, as well as analyzed their cross-taxon transferability and utility for the genetic study of Musa and its relatives. A high SSR frequency (177 per Mbp) was found in the Musa genome. AT-rich dinucleotide repeats are predominant, and trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant in transcribed regions. A significant number of Musa SSRs are associated with pre-miRNAs, and 83% of these SSRs are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic SSR markers. Overall, 74% of the SSR markers were polymorphic, and 94% were transferable to at least one Musa spp. Two hundred forty-three markers generated a total of 1047 alleles, with 2-8 alleles each and an average of 4.38 alleles per locus. The PIC values ranged from 0.31 to 0.89 and averaged 0.71. We report the largest set of non-redundant, polymorphic, new SSR markers to be developed in Musa. These additional markers could be a valuable resource for marker-assisted breeding, genetic diversity and genomic studies of Musa and related species.

  10. Marker imputation in barley association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping requires higher marker density than linkage mapping, potentially leading to more missing marker data and to higher genotyping costs. In human genetics, methods exist to impute missing marker data and whole markers that were typed in a reference panel but not in the experimental d...

  11. Regulation of the potential marker for intestinal cells, Bmi1, by β-catenin and the zinc finger protein KLF4: implications for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianxin; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wen; Colon, Deannon; Shi, Jiandang; Napier, Dana; Rychahou, Piotr; Lu, Wange; Lee, Eun Y; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark; Liu, Chunming

    2012-02-01

    B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (Bmi1) is a Polycomb Group (PcG) protein important in gene silencing. It is a component of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), which is required to maintain the transcriptionally repressive state of many genes. Bmi1 was initially identified as an oncogene that regulates cell proliferation and transformation, and is important in hematopoiesis and the development of nervous systems. Recently, it was reported that Bmi1 is a potential marker for intestinal stem cells. Because Wnt signaling plays a key role in intestinal stem cells, we analyzed the effects of Wnt signaling on Bmi1 expression. We found that Wnt signaling indeed regulates the expression of Bmi1 in colon cancer cells. In addition, the expression of Bmi1 in human colon cancers is significantly associated with nuclear β-catenin, a hallmark for the activated Wnt signaling. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc finger protein highly expressed in the gut and skin. We recently found that KLF4 cross-talks with Wnt/β-catenin in regulating intestinal homeostasis. We demonstrated that KLF4 directly inhibits the expression of Bmi1 in colon cancer cells. We also found that Bmi1 regulates histone ubiquitination and is required for colon cancer proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Our findings further suggest that Bmi1 is an attractive target for cancer therapeutics.

  12. Effect of management (organic vs conventional) on volatile profiles of six plum cultivars (Prunus salicina Lindl.). A chemometric approach for varietal classification and determination of potential markers.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, F J; Moreno-Rojas, J M; Arroyo, F; Daza, A; Ruiz-Moreno, M J

    2016-05-15

    The volatile profiles of six plum cultivars ('Laetitia', 'Primetime', 'Sapphire', 'Showtime', 'Songold' and 'Souvenir') produced under two management systems (conventional and organic) and harvested in two consecutive years were obtained by HS-SPME-GC-MS. Twenty-five metabolites were determined, five of which (pentanal, (E)-2-heptenal, 1-octanol, eucalyptol and 2-pentylfuran) are reported for the first time in Prunus salicina Lindl. Hexanal stood out as a major volatile compound affected by the management system. In addition, partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) achieved an effective classification of genotypes based on their volatile profiles. A high classification accuracy model was obtained with a sensitivity of 97.9% and a specificity of 99.6%. Furthermore, the application of a dual criterion, based on a method of variable selection, VIP (variable importance in projection) and the results of a univariate analysis (ANOVA), allowed the identification of potential volatile markers in 'Primetime', 'Showtime' and 'Souvenir' genotypes (cultivars not characterised to date).

  13. Glycomics and Disease Markers

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun Joo; Kronewitter, Scott R.; de Leoz, Maria Lorna A.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Glycomics is the comprehensive study of all glycans expressed in biological systems. The biosynthesis of glycan relies on a number of highly competitive processes involving glycosyl transferase. Glycosylation is therefore highly sensitive to the biochemical environment and has been implicated in many diseases including cancer. Recently, interest in profiling the glycome has increased due to the potential of glycans for disease markers. In this regard, mass spectrometry is emerging as a powerful technique for profiling the glycome. Global glycan profiling of human serum based on mass spectrometry has already led to several potentially promising markers for several types of cancer and diseases. PMID:19775929

  14. The role of BRAF V600E mutation as a potential marker for prognostic stratification of papillary thyroid carcinoma: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Mahdi; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Bahar, Mostafa Mehrabi; Arabi, Azadeh; Yadollahi, Mona; Ghafari, Azar; Taghehchian, Negin; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Papillary carcinoma is the most prevalent malignancy of thyroid gland, and its incidence has been recently increased. The BRAF(V600E) mutation is the most frequent genetic alteration in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The role of BRAF(V600E) mutation as a potential prognostic factor has been controversially reported in different studies, with short-term follow-up. In this study, we evaluated the role of BRAF(V600E) mutation as a potential marker for prognostic stratification of patients with PTC in long-term follow-up. We studied 69 PTC patients with a mean follow-up period of 63.9 months (median: 60 m). The BRAF(V600E) mutation was analyzed by PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism and sequencing. The correlation between the presence or absence of the BRAF(V600E) mutation, clinicopathological features and prognosis of PTC patients were studied. The BRAF(V600E) mutation was found in 28 of 69 (40.6%) PTC patients, and it was significantly more frequent in older patients (p < 0.001), in advanced tumor stages (p = 0.006) and in patients with history of radiation exposure (p = 0.037). Incomplete response to treatment in PTC patients was significantly correlated with certain clinicopathological characteristics (follow-up time, distant metastases, advanced stage, first thyroglobulin (fTg) level, history of reoperation and external radiotherapy and delay in iodine therapy) but it was not related to the presence of BRAF(V600E) mutation. Prevalence of BRAF(V600E) mutation was 40.6% in patients with papillary thyroid cancer in northeast of Iran. The BRAF(V600E) mutation was associated with older age and advanced tumor stage but was not correlated with incomplete response during follow-up.

  15. ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics reveals apolipoprotein A-I and transferrin as potential serum markers in CA19-9 negative pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Zhao, Guo-Chao; Wang, Dan-Song; Lou, Wen-Hui; Jin, Da-Yong

    2016-08-01

    Currently the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) relies on CA19-9 and radiological means, whereas some patients do not have elevated levels of CA19-9 secondary to pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify potential serum biomarkers for CA19-9 negative PDAC.A total of 114 serum samples were collected from 3 groups: CA19-9 negative PDAC patients (n = 34), CA19-9 positive PDAC patients (n = 44), and healthy volunteers (n = 36), whereas the first 12 samples from each group were used for isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Thereafter, candidate biomarkers were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the rest specimens.Using the iTRAQ approach, a total of 5 proteins were identified as significantly different between CA19-9 negative PDAC patients and healthy subjects according to our defined criteria. Apolipoprotein A-I (APOA-I) and transferrin (TF) were selected to validate the proteomic results by ELISA in a further 78 serum specimens. It revealed that TF significantly correlated with the degree of histological differentiation (P = 0.042), and univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that TF is an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, 0.302; 95% confidence interval, 0.118-0.774; P = 0.013) of patients with PDAC after curative surgery.ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics revealed that APOA-I and TF may be potential CA19-9 negative PDAC serum markers.

  16. ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics reveals apolipoprotein A-I and transferrin as potential serum markers in CA19-9 negative pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Zhao, Guo-Chao; Wang, Dan-Song; Lou, Wen-Hui; Jin, Da-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) relies on CA19-9 and radiological means, whereas some patients do not have elevated levels of CA19-9 secondary to pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify potential serum biomarkers for CA19-9 negative PDAC. A total of 114 serum samples were collected from 3 groups: CA19-9 negative PDAC patients (n = 34), CA19-9 positive PDAC patients (n = 44), and healthy volunteers (n = 36), whereas the first 12 samples from each group were used for isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Thereafter, candidate biomarkers were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the rest specimens. Using the iTRAQ approach, a total of 5 proteins were identified as significantly different between CA19-9 negative PDAC patients and healthy subjects according to our defined criteria. Apolipoprotein A-I (APOA-I) and transferrin (TF) were selected to validate the proteomic results by ELISA in a further 78 serum specimens. It revealed that TF significantly correlated with the degree of histological differentiation (P = 0.042), and univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that TF is an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, 0.302; 95% confidence interval, 0.118–0.774; P = 0.013) of patients with PDAC after curative surgery. ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics revealed that APOA-I and TF may be potential CA19-9 negative PDAC serum markers. PMID:27495108

  17. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. PMID:26818266

  18. Salivary changes and dental caries as potential oral markers of autoimmune salivary gland dysfunction in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Bardow, Allan; Nauntofte, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    Background the classification criteria for primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) include a number of oral components. In this study we evaluated if salivary flow and composition as well as dental caries are oral markers of disease severity in pSS. Methods in 20 patients fulfilling the American-European Consensus criteria for pSS and 20 age-matched healthy controls whole and parotid saliva flow rates and composition, measures of oral dryness, scores of decayed, missing and filled tooth surfaces (DMFS), periodontal indices, oral hygiene, and dietary habits were examined. Results in pSS, salivary flow rates, pH, and buffer capacities were lower, and DMFS, salivary sodium and chloride concentrations higher than in the healthy controls. DMFS also correlated inversely to salivary flow rates and positively to oral dryness. Apart from slightly increased gingival index, and more frequent dental visits in pSS, the periodontal condition, oral hygiene or sugar intake did not differ between these two groups. In pSS, findings were correlated to labial salivary gland focus score (FS) and presence of serum-autoantibodies to SSA/SSB (AB). The patients having both presence of AB and the highest FS (>2) also had the highest salivary sodium and chloride concentrations, the lowest salivary phosphate concentrations, lowest salivary flow rates, and highest DMFS compared to those with normal salivary concentrations of sodium and chloride at a given flow rate. Conclusion the salivary changes observed in some pSS patients reflect impaired ductal salt reabsorption, but unaffected acinar transport mechanisms, despite low salivary secretion. Our results suggest that changes in salivary flow and composition as well as dental caries may serve as potential markers of the extent of autoimmune-mediated salivary gland dysfunction in pSS. The study also indicates that the ductal epithelium is functionally affected in some pSS patients, which calls for future pathophysiological studies on the mechanisms

  19. Skeletal Fragility in Endogenous Hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Delgado, Adriano; Maffezzoni, Filippo; Formenti, Annamaria; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal fragility is a frequent complication of endogenous hypercortisolism, and fragility fractures may be the first clinical manifestation of the disease. Fractures involve more frequently the vertebrae and may occur in 30-50% of the patients exposed to glucocorticoid excess, in close relationship with severity and duration of hypercortisolism. Although improvement of bone mineral density was reported after resolution of hypercortisolism, there are patients with persistently high fracture risk after the cure of hypercortisolism, and other patients in whom the resolution of hypercortisolism may take a long time, implying a multistep therapeutic approach. Since vertebral fractures tend to occur early during the natural history of disease, a skeletal-specific approach should be undertaken in these patients; however, the cost-effectiveness of this approach is still largely unknown since data on effectiveness and safety of bone-active drugs in endogenous hypercortisolism are scarce. PMID:27210111

  20. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2013.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the thirty-sixth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2013 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior, and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia; stress and social status; tolerance and dependence; learning and memory; eating and drinking; alcohol and drugs of abuse; sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology; mental illness and mood; seizures and neurologic disorders; electrical-related activity and neurophysiology; general activity and locomotion; gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions; cardiovascular responses; respiration and thermoregulation; and immunological responses.

  1. Endogenous respiration of Polyporus sulphureus

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.M.W.; Siehr, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty percent of the dry weight of the basidiomycete Polyporus sulphureus is triterpenoid acid. The endogenous respiratory quotient of this organism is 0.8 indicating that the triterpenoid is being used as an endogenous storage material. Monosaccharides did not seem to be utilized as exogenous substrates but Krebs-cycle intermediates stimulated oxygen uptake. Pyruvic acid inhibited oxygen uptake. Studies with /sup 14/C-labeled glucose indicated that 27% of the glucose was metabolized by way of glycolysis. The hexose-monophosphate pathway was the major metabolic path for the utilization of glucose. Despite the fact that P. sulphureus is associated with brown rot, its carbon metabolism suggests that it utilizes substances associated with the degradation of lignin more readily than it does glucose.

  2. Isolated group B streptococcal endogenous endophthalmitis simulating retinoblastoma or persistent fetal vasculature in a healthy full-term infant.

    PubMed

    McCourt, Emily A; Hink, Eric M; Durairaj, Vikram D; Oliver, Scott C N

    2010-08-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a potentially devastating neonatal pathogen that most commonly causes meningitis, sepsis, and pneumonia. It is also a very rare cause of endogenous endophthalmitis. We present the second case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by GBS in a healthy newborn and the first case of endogenous endophthalmitis by GBS in a newborn mimicking retinoblastoma and resulting in enucleation. PMID:20637664

  3. Potential Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) and Inter-retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) Markers for Evaluation of Genetic Diversity and Conservation of Wild Pistacia Species Population.

    PubMed

    Sorkheh, Karim; Amirbakhtiar, Nazanin; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-08-01

    Wild pistachio species is important species in forests regions Iran and provide protection wind and soil erosion. Even though cultivation and utilization of Pistacia are fully exploited, the evolutionary history of the Pistacia genus and the relationships among the species and accessions is still not well understood. Two molecular marker strategies, SCoT and IRAP markers were analyzed for assessment of 50 accessions of this species accumulated from diverse geographical areas of Iran. A thorough of 115 bands were amplified using eight IRAP primers, of which 104 (90.4 %) have been polymorphic, and 246 polymorphic bands (68.7 %) had been located in 358 bands amplified by way of forty-four SCoT primers. Average PIC for IRAP and SCoT markers became 0.32 and 0.48, respectively. This is exposed that SCoT markers have been extra informative than IRAP for the assessment of variety among pistachio accessions. Primarily based on the two extraordinary molecular markers, cluster evaluation revealed that the 50 accessions taken for the evaluation may be divided into three distinct clusters. Those results recommend that the performance of SCoT and IRAP markers was highly the equal in fingerprinting of accessions. The results affirmed a low genetic differentiation among populations, indicating the opportunity of gene drift most of the studied populations. These findings might render striking information in breeding management strategies for genetic conservation and cultivar improvement. PMID:27056191

  4. Levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in gingival crevicular fluid as potential markers of inflammation in patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt Doğan, Şeyma; Öngöz Dede, Figen; Ballı, Umut; Sertoğlu, Erdim

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine the levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to evaluate GCF vaspin and omentin-1 levels after non-surgical periodontal therapy. The study included 60 subjects: 15 systemically and periodontally healthy individuals, 15 periodontally healthy patients with T2DM, 15 systemically healthy patients with CP, and 15 patients with both CP and T2DM. GCF and clinical periodontal parameters were examined at the baseline and 6 weeks after periodontal therapy. Levels of vaspin, omentin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured by ELISA, and their relative ratios were calculated. GCF vaspin and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in the CP groups than in the periodontally healthy groups (P < 0.008) and decreased after therapy in the former (P < 0.025). GCF omentin-1 levels were significantly lower in the CP groups than in the periodontally healthy groups (P < 0.008) and increased after therapy in the former (P < 0.05). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the total amount of vaspin and TNF-α, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), clinical attachment level and gingival index, whereas the level of omentin-1 was negatively correlated with these parameters in all groups (P < 0.05). We found that non-surgical periodontal therapy influenced the GCF levels of both vaspin and omentin-1 in the CP groups. Our results suggest that the levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in GCF could have potential application as inflammatory markers of diabetes, periodontal disease and treatment outcome. (J Oral Sci 58, 379-389, 2016). PMID:27665978

  5. Endogenous zinc in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jae-Yong

    2005-10-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized.

  6. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  7. SNIPER peptide-mediated degradation of endogenous proteins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuelai; Wang, Yu Tian

    2015-03-02

    Rapid and reversible methods for altering the function of endogenous proteins are not only indispensable tools for probing complex biological systems, but may potentially drive the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of human diseases. Genetic approaches have provided insights into protein function, but are limited in speed, reversibility and spatiotemporal control. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a peptide-based method (SNIPER: Selective Native Protein Eradication) to degrade any given endogenous protein at the post-translational level by harnessing chaperone-mediated autophagy, a major intracellular protein degradation pathway. This unit presents a typical strategy in the design and validation of a protein-knockdown peptide.

  8. The Search for Endogenous Activators of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linh P.; Bradfield, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    In its simplest aspect, this review is an attempt to describe the major ligand classes of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). A grander objective is to provide models that may help define the physiological activator or “endogenous ligand” of the AHR. We begin by presenting evidence that supports a developmental function for the AHR. This is followed by proposing mechanisms by which an endogenous ligand and consequent AHR activation might be important during normal physiology and development. With this background, we then present a survey of the known xenobiotic, endogenous, dietary and “un-conventional” activators of the AHR. When possible, this includes information about their induction potency, receptor binding affinity and potential for exposure. Because of the essential function of the AHR in embryonic development, we discuss the candidacy of each of these compounds as physiologically important activators. PMID:18076143

  9. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  10. Strategies for endogenous spinal cord repair: HPMA hydrogel to recruit migrating endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Oregel, Karlos; Wiggins, Laurent; Valera, Remelyn; Bosnoyan, Kathrin; Agbo, Chioma; Awosika, Oluwole; Zhao, Paul M; de Vellis, Jean; Woerly, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Injury to the spinal cord disrupts ascending and descending axonal pathways and causes tissue damage with a subsequent limited cellular regeneration. Successful treatment would encompass the restoration of the cytoarchitecture, homeostasis and function all in dear need. Transplantation-based treatments using exogenous cells are the most favoured approach. Yet, with the advent of the stem cell concept and continuous progress in the field it became clear that the endogenous potential for repair is greater than previously thought. As an alternative to neural grafting, we and other researchers have aimed at understanding what are the elements needed for a successful repair with self progenitors that would give rise to the cell types needed to restore function of the central nervous system. Some studies involve both scaffolds and cell grafts. Here we describe studies on spinal cord repair using what we call "endogenous tissue engineering for regenerative medicine". The approach involves a hydrogel that mimics the natural milieu where endogenous pre-existing and newly formed cells populate the gel progressively allowing for the integration of CNS self populations leading to a successful recovery of function. Highlight aspects learned from this type of studies are that: Endogenous reconstruction of the injured spinal cord is possible by using the adequate support. The contribution of nestin-expressing progenitors to spinal cord regeneration is continuous and substantial both, in the reconstructed segment as well as, along the distal and caudal segments of the reconstructed spinal cord. Most of these cells appear to have been in a quiescent state until the injury occurred and only a small fraction of these neural progenitors was produced via cell proliferation. The hydrogel combined with exercise was necessary and sufficient to restore locomotor function in cats that underwent spinal transaction followed by reconstructive surgery. This recovery of function was first seen

  11. Development of new microsatellite markers for Salvia officinalis L. and its potential use in conservation-genetic studies of narrow endemic Salvia brachyodon Vandas.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, Ivan; Satovic, Zlatko; Jakse, Jernej; Javornik, Branka; Greguraš, Danijela; Jug-Dujaković, Marija; Liber, Zlatko

    2012-01-01

    Nine new microsatellite markers (SSR) were isolated from Salvia officinalis L. A total of 125 alleles, with 8 to 21 alleles per locus, were detected in a natural population from the east Adriatic coast. The observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, and polymorphic information content ranged from 0.46 to 0.83, 0.73 to 0.93 and 0.70 to 0.92, respectively. New microsatellite markers, as well as previously published markers, were tested for cross-amplification in Salvia brachyodon Vandas, a narrow endemic species known to be present in only two localities on the Balkan Peninsula. Out of 30 microsatellite markers tested on the natural S. brachyodon population, 15 were successfully amplified. To obtain evidence of recent bottleneck events in the populations of both species, observed genetic diversity (H(E)) was compared to the expected genetic diversity at mutation-drift equilibrium (H(EQ)) and calculated from the observed number of alleles using a two-phased mutation model (TPM). Recent bottleneck events were detected only in the S. brachyodon population. This result suggests the need to reconsider the current threat category of this endemic species.

  12. Marker vaccine potential of foot-and-mouth disease virus with large deletion in the non-structural proteins 3A and 3B.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Jitendra K; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Ranjan, Rajeev; Sharma, Gaurav K; Misri, Jyoti; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious, economically important disease of transboundary importance. Regular vaccination with chemically inactivated FMD vaccine is the major means of controlling the disease in endemic countries like India. However, the traditional inactivated vaccines may sometimes contain traces of FMD viral (FMDV) non-structural protein (NSP), therefore, interfering with the NSP-based serological discrimination between infected and vaccinated animals. The availability of marker vaccine for differentiating FMD infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) would be crucial for the control and subsequent eradication of FMD in India. In this study, we constructed a negative marker FMDV serotype O virus (vaccine strain O IND R2/1975), containing dual deletions of amino acid residues 93-143 and 10-37 in the non-structural proteins 3A and 3B, respectively through reverse genetics approach. The negative marker virus exhibited similar growth kinetics and plaque morphology in cell culture as compared to the wild type virus. In addition, we also developed and evaluated an indirect ELISA (I-ELISA) targeted to the deleted 3AB NSP region (truncated 3AB) which could be used as a companion differential diagnostic assay. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the truncated 3AB I-ELISA were found to be 95.5% and 96%, respectively. The results from this study suggest that the availability negative marker virus and companion diagnostic assay could open a promising new avenue for the application of DIVA compatible marker vaccine for the control of FMD in India.

  13. Marker vaccine potential of foot-and-mouth disease virus with large deletion in the non-structural proteins 3A and 3B.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Jitendra K; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Ranjan, Rajeev; Sharma, Gaurav K; Misri, Jyoti; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious, economically important disease of transboundary importance. Regular vaccination with chemically inactivated FMD vaccine is the major means of controlling the disease in endemic countries like India. However, the traditional inactivated vaccines may sometimes contain traces of FMD viral (FMDV) non-structural protein (NSP), therefore, interfering with the NSP-based serological discrimination between infected and vaccinated animals. The availability of marker vaccine for differentiating FMD infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) would be crucial for the control and subsequent eradication of FMD in India. In this study, we constructed a negative marker FMDV serotype O virus (vaccine strain O IND R2/1975), containing dual deletions of amino acid residues 93-143 and 10-37 in the non-structural proteins 3A and 3B, respectively through reverse genetics approach. The negative marker virus exhibited similar growth kinetics and plaque morphology in cell culture as compared to the wild type virus. In addition, we also developed and evaluated an indirect ELISA (I-ELISA) targeted to the deleted 3AB NSP region (truncated 3AB) which could be used as a companion differential diagnostic assay. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the truncated 3AB I-ELISA were found to be 95.5% and 96%, respectively. The results from this study suggest that the availability negative marker virus and companion diagnostic assay could open a promising new avenue for the application of DIVA compatible marker vaccine for the control of FMD in India. PMID:26260689

  14. The discovery of endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robin A

    2006-01-01

    When endogenous retroviruses (ERV) were discovered in the late 1960s, the Mendelian inheritance of retroviral genomes by their hosts was an entirely new concept. Indeed Howard M Temin's DNA provirus hypothesis enunciated in 1964 was not generally accepted, and reverse transcriptase was yet to be discovered. Nonetheless, the evidence that we accrued in the pre-molecular era has stood the test of time, and our hypothesis on ERV, which one reviewer described as 'impossible', proved to be correct. Here I recount some of the key observations in birds and mammals that led to the discovery of ERV, and comment on their evolution, cross-species dispersion, and what remains to be elucidated. PMID:17018135

  15. Endogenous Retroviruses and Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Yuri; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Humans share about 99% of their genomic DNA with chimpanzees and bonobos; thus, the differences between these species are unlikely to be in gene content but could be caused by inherited changes in regulatory systems. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise ∼ 5% of the human genome. The LTRs of ERVs contain many regulatory sequences, such as promoters, enhancers, polyadenylation signals and factor-binding sites. Thus, they can influence the expression of nearby human genes. All known human-specific LTRs belong to the HERV-K (human ERV) family, the most active family in the human genome. It is likely that some of these ERVs could have integrated into regulatory regions of the human genome, and therefore could have had an impact on the expression of adjacent genes, which have consequently contributed to human evolution. This review discusses possible functional consequences of ERV integration in active coding regions. PMID:18629260

  16. Endogenous cardiotonic steroids in chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kolmakova, Elena V.; Haller, Steven T.; Kennedy, David J.; Isachkina, Alina N.; Budny, George V.; Frolova, Elena V.; Piecha, Grzegorz; Nikitina, Elena R.; Malhotra, Deepak; Fedorova, Olga V.; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Previous reports demonstrated that digitalis-like cardiotonic steroids (CTS) contribute to the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. The goal of the present study was to define the nature of CTS in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in partially nephrectomized (PNx) rats. Methods. In patients with CKD and in healthy controls, we determined plasma levels of marinobufagenin (MBG) and endogenous ouabain (EO) and erythrocyte Na/K-ATPase activity in the absence and in the presence of 3E9 anti-MBG monoclonal antibody (mAb) and Digibind. Levels of MBG and EO were also determined in sham-operated Sprague–Dawley rats and in rats following 4 weeks of PNx. Results. In 25 patients with CKD plasma, MBG but not EO was increased (0.86 ± 0.07 versus 0.28 ± 0.02 nmol/L, P < 0.01) and erythrocyte Na/K-ATPase was inhibited (1.24 ± 0.10 versus 2.80 ± 0.09 μmol Pi/mL/h, P < 0.01) as compared to that in 19 healthy subjects. Ex vivo, 3E9 mAb restored Na/K-ATPase in erythrocytes from patients with CKD but did not affect Na/K-ATPase from control subjects. Following chromatographic fractionation of uremic versus normal plasma, a competitive immunoassay based on anti-MBG mAb detected a 3-fold increase in the level of endogenous material having retention time similar to that seen with MBG. A similar pattern of CTS changes was observed in uremic rats. As compared to sham-operated animals, PNx rats exhibited 3-fold elevated levels of MBG but not that of EO. Conclusions. In chronic renal failure, elevated levels of a bufadienolide CTS, MBG, contribute to Na/K-ATPase inhibition and may represent a potential target for therapy. PMID:21292813

  17. Confirmation of the potential usefulness of two human beta globin pseudogene markers to estimate gene flows to and from sub-Saharan Africans.

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, Bianca Maria; Pompei, Fiorenza; Relucenti, Michela; Lum, J Koji; Simporé, Jacques; Spedini, Gabriella; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Pardo, Miguel G

    2002-04-01

    Two polymorphic sites, -107 and -100 with respect to the "cap" site of the human beta globin pseudogene, recently discovered in our laboratory, turned out to have an ethnically complementary distribution. The first site is polymorphic in Europeans, North Africans, Indians (Hindu), and Oriental Asians, and monomorphic in sub-Saharan Africans. Conversely, the second site is polymorphic in sub-Saharan African populations and monomorphic in the aforementioned populations. Here we report the gene frequencies of these two polymorphic sites in nine additional populations (Egyptians, Spaniards, Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Africans from Togo and from Benin, and Pygmies), confirming their ethnospecificity and, through the analysis of these two markers in Oromo and Amhara of Ethiopia (two mixed populations), their usefulness in genetic admixture studies. Moreover, we studied another marker polymorphic in sub-Saharan African populations only, a TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism located in the same region as the present markers, demonstrating the absence of linkage disequilibrium between it and the -100 site, so that we can exclude that the information they provide is redundant.

  18. A PCR marker linked to a THCA synthase polymorphism is a reliable tool to discriminate potentially THC-rich plants of Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Staginnus, Christina; Zörntlein, Siegfried; de Meijer, Etienne

    2014-07-01

    Neither absolute THC content nor morphology allows the unequivocal discrimination of fiber cultivars and drug strains of Cannabis sativa L. unequivocally. However, the CBD/THC ratio remains constant throughout the plant's life cycle, is independent of environmental factors, and considered to be controlled by a single locus (B) with two codominant alleles (B(T) and B(D)). The homozygous B(T)/B(T) genotype underlies the THC-predominant phenotype, B(D)/B(D) is CBD predominant, and an intermediate phenotype is induced by the heterozygous state (B(T)/B(D)). Using PCR-based markers in two segregating populations, we proved that the THCA synthase gene represents the postulated B locus and that specific sequence polymorphisms are absolutely linked either to the THC-predominant or the THC-intermediate chemotype. The absolute linkage provides an excellent reliability of the marker signal in forensic casework. For validation, the species-specific marker system was applied to a large number of casework samples and fiber hemp cultivars.

  19. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  20. Endogenous timing factors in bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwinner, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Several species of warbler birds were observed in an effort to determine what initiates and terminates migration. Environmental and endogenous timing mechanisms were analyzed. The results indicate that endogenous stimuli are dominant factors for bird migration especially for long distances. It was concluded that environmental factors act as an assist mechanism.

  1. Population aging and endogenous economic growth.

    PubMed

    Prettner, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the consequences of population aging for long-run economic growth perspectives. Our framework incorporates endogenous growth models and semi-endogenous growth models as special cases. We show that (1) increases in longevity have a positive impact on per capita output growth, (2) decreases in fertility have a negative impact on per capita output growth, (3) the positive longevity effect dominates the negative fertility effect in case of the endogenous growth framework, and (4) population aging fosters long-run growth in the endogenous growth framework, while its effect depends on the relative change between fertility and mortality in the semi-endogenous growth framework.Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00148-012-0441-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  2. [Endogenous ethanol in the blood and tissues of rats with hypobaric hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Iu A; Ostrovskiĭ, Iu M; Satanovskaia, V I; Liopo, A V; Velichko, M G; Abakumov, G Z

    1989-01-01

    Albino male rats weighing 160-180 g were used to study the effect of short-term hypobaric hypoxia (ascent in an altitude chamber to 2500 m and 5000 m for 1 hr) on endogenous ethanol measured in blood, brain and liver; simultaneously enzymes responsible for ethanol and acetaldehyde metabolism were determined. Endogenous ethanol in blood and tissues was found to be a very sensitive marker of hypoxia which was not correlated with lactate, pyruvate, lipid peroxidation or 11-hydroxycorticosteroids. The latter parameters varied in response to severe hypoxia.

  3. Integrin β4 and vinculin contained in exosomes are potential markers for progression of prostate cancer associated with taxane-resistance.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kyojiro; Fujita, Yasunori; Kato, Taku; Mizutani, Kosuke; Kameyama, Koji; Tsumoto, Hiroki; Miura, Yuri; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-07-01

    Treatment with taxanes for castration-resistant prostate cancer often leads to the development of resistance. It has been recently demonstrated that exosomes present in the body fluids contain proteins and RNAs in the cells from which they are derived and could serve as a diagnostic marker for various diseases. In the present study, we aimed to identify proteins contained in exosomes that could be markers for progression and taxane-resistance of prostate cancer. Exosomes were isolated by differential centrifugation from the culture medium of taxane-resistant human prostate cancer PC-3 cells (PC-3R) and their parental PC-3 cells. Isolated exosomes were subjected to iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. Exosomes were also isolated from the culture medium by using anti-CD9 antibody-conjugated magnetic beads. Protein expression was knocked down by siRNA transfection followed by analysis of the silencing effects. Proteomic analysis showed that integrin β4 (ITGB4) and vinculin (VCL) were upregulated in exosomes derived from PC-3R cells compared to PC-3 cells. The elevation of ITGB4 and VCL was confirmed in exosomes captured by anti-CD9 antibody from the culture medium of PC-3R cells. Silencing of ITGB4 and VCL expression did not affect proliferation and taxane-resistance of PC-3R cells, but ITGB4 knockdown attenuated both cell migration and invasion and VCL knockdown reduced invasion. Our results suggest that ITGB4 and VCL in exosomes could be useful markers for progression of prostate cancer associated with taxane-resistance, providing the basis for development of an exosome-based diagnostic system.

  4. A potential species-specific molecular marker suggests interspecific hybridization between sibling species Littorina arcana and L. saxatilis (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda) in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Natalia A; Gracheva, Yulia A; Backeljau, Thierry; Granovitch, Andrey I

    2009-12-01

    Three sister species of rough periwinkles, viz. Littorina saxatilis (Olivi 1792), L. arcana (Hannaford Ellis 1978) and L. compressa (Jeffreys 1865) from the Barents Sea (Russia), the White Sea (Russia) and the Norwegian Sea (Norway) were studied. The identification of two sibling species L. saxatilis and L. arcana is often difficult as both species have extremely similar shell morphology and reproductive systems. Only mature females can be unambiguously distinguished, with a jelly gland present in female L. arcana, but which is replaced by a brood pouch containing developing embryos in L. saxatilis. No clear-cut diagnostic features have been found to discriminate between males or juveniles of the two species. The very first diagnostic DNA marker (DNA fragment A2.8, 271 bp length) for L. arcana and L. saxatilis separation was developed. The marker was derived from apparently species-specific L. arcana DNA fragments obtained via Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. This fragment was cloned and sequenced, whereupon specific primers were designed and the amplification was surveyed in a large number of morphologically well-identified females of both species. Subsequently, the specific DNA marker was used for the identification of male L. arcana and partners in copulating pairs. In this way, we obtained evidence of possible interspecific hybridization between the sibling species L. arcana and L. saxatilis living in sympatry in natural populations: the presence of A2.8 fragment in 12% of morphologically well identified L. saxatilis females and its absence in 14% of morphologically well identified L. arcana females. The A2.8 fragment never amplified in L. saxatilis from sites without L. arcana. The A2.8 fragment did not amplify in L. compressa, not even in microsympatric populations, and we did not observe interspecific copulations between L. arcana and L. compressa.

  5. New horizons for newborn brain protection: enhancing endogenous neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Hassell, K Jane; Ezzati, Mojgan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Hausenloy, Derek J; Robertson, Nicola J

    2015-11-01

    Intrapartum-related events are the third leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide and result in one million neurodisabled survivors each year. Infants exposed to a perinatal insult typically present with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The contribution of pure hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) to NE has been debated; over the last decade, the sensitising effect of inflammation in the aetiology of NE and neurodisability is recognised. Therapeutic hypothermia is standard care for NE in high-income countries; however, its benefit in encephalopathic babies with sepsis or in those born following chorioamnionitis is unclear. It is now recognised that the phases of brain injury extend into a tertiary phase, which lasts for weeks to years after the initial insult and opens up new possibilities for therapy.There has been a recent focus on understanding endogenous neuroprotection and how to boost it or to supplement its effectors therapeutically once damage to the brain has occurred as in NE. In this review, we focus on strategies that can augment the body's own endogenous neuroprotection. We discuss in particular remote ischaemic postconditioning whereby endogenous brain tolerance can be activated through hypoxia/reperfusion stimuli started immediately after the index hypoxic-ischaemic insult. Therapeutic hypothermia, melatonin, erythropoietin and cannabinoids are examples of ways we can supplement the endogenous response to HI to obtain its full neuroprotective potential. Achieving the correct balance of interventions at the correct time in relation to the nature and stage of injury will be a significant challenge in the next decade. PMID:26063194

  6. New horizons for newborn brain protection: enhancing endogenous neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, K Jane; Ezzati, Mojgan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Hausenloy, Derek J; Robertson, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Intrapartum-related events are the third leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide and result in one million neurodisabled survivors each year. Infants exposed to a perinatal insult typically present with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The contribution of pure hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) to NE has been debated; over the last decade, the sensitising effect of inflammation in the aetiology of NE and neurodisability is recognised. Therapeutic hypothermia is standard care for NE in high-income countries; however, its benefit in encephalopathic babies with sepsis or in those born following chorioamnionitis is unclear. It is now recognised that the phases of brain injury extend into a tertiary phase, which lasts for weeks to years after the initial insult and opens up new possibilities for therapy. There has been a recent focus on understanding endogenous neuroprotection and how to boost it or to supplement its effectors therapeutically once damage to the brain has occurred as in NE. In this review, we focus on strategies that can augment the body's own endogenous neuroprotection. We discuss in particular remote ischaemic postconditioning whereby endogenous brain tolerance can be activated through hypoxia/reperfusion stimuli started immediately after the index hypoxic-ischaemic insult. Therapeutic hypothermia, melatonin, erythropoietin and cannabinoids are examples of ways we can supplement the endogenous response to HI to obtain its full neuroprotective potential. Achieving the correct balance of interventions at the correct time in relation to the nature and stage of injury will be a significant challenge in the next decade. PMID:26063194

  7. A fragment of the LG3 peptide of endorepellin is present in the urine of physically active mining workers: a potential marker of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Parker, Tony J; Sampson, Dayle L; Broszczak, Daniel; Chng, Yee L; Carter, Shea L; Leavesley, David I; Parker, Anthony W; Upton, Zee

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker analysis has been implemented in sports research in an attempt to monitor the effects of exertion and fatigue in athletes. This study proposed that while such biomarkers may be useful for monitoring injury risk in workers, proteomic approaches might also be utilised to identify novel exertion or injury markers. We found that urinary urea and cortisol levels were significantly elevated in mining workers following a 12 hour overnight shift. These levels failed to return to baseline over 24 h in the more active maintenance crew compared to truck drivers (operators) suggesting a lack of recovery between shifts. Use of a SELDI-TOF MS approach to detect novel exertion or injury markers revealed a spectral feature which was associated with workers in both work categories who were engaged in higher levels of physical activity. This feature was identified as the LG3 peptide, a C-terminal fragment of the anti-angiogenic/anti-tumourigenic protein endorepellin. This finding suggests that urinary LG3 peptide may be a biomarker of physical activity. It is also possible that the activity mediated release of LG3/endorepellin into the circulation may represent a biological mechanism for the known inverse association between physical activity and cancer risk/survival.

  8. Eosinophil Granule Proteins ECP and EPX as Markers for a Potential Early-Stage Inflammatory Lesion in Female Genital Schistosomiasis (FGS)

    PubMed Central

    Randrianasolo, Bodo Sahondra; Ravoniarimbinina, Pascaline; Ravaoalimalala, Vololomboahangy Elisabeth; Leutscher, Peter; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke; Vennervald, Birgitte Jyding

    2014-01-01

    Background Genital granulomas induced by Schistosoma haematobium eggs can manifest as different lesion types visible by colposcopy; rubbery papules (RP), homogenous sandy patches (HSP) and grainy sandy patches (GSP). Pronounced tissue eosinophilia is a candidate marker for active S. haematobium pathology, as viable schistosome egg granulomas often are eosinophil rich. Here it was investigated whether eosinophil granule proteins ECP (eosinophil cationic protein) and EPX (eosinophil protein-X) in urine and genital lavage can be used as markers for active FGS lesions. Methods Uro-genital samples from 118 Malagasy women were analysed for ECP and EPX by standard sandwich avidin/biotin amplified ELISA. Principal findings The women with RP lesions had significantly higher levels of ECP and EPX in both lavage and urine. Furthermore, women with RP lesions were significantly younger than those with GSP. This could indicate that RP lesions might be more recently established and thus represent an earlier inflammatory lesion stage. Conclusion ECP in genital lavage might be a future tool aiding the identification of FGS pathology at a stage where reversibility remains a possibility following praziquantel treatment. PMID:25033206

  9. Myelin regeneration in multiple sclerosis: targeting endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Fancy, Stephen P J; Zhao, Chao; Rowitch, David H; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J M

    2011-10-01

    Regeneration of myelin sheaths (remyelination) after central nervous system demyelination is important to restore saltatory conduction and to prevent axonal loss. In multiple sclerosis, the insufficiency of remyelination leads to the irreversible degeneration of axons and correlated clinical decline. Therefore, a regenerative strategy to encourage remyelination may protect axons and improve symptoms in multiple sclerosis. We highlight recent studies on factors that influence endogenous remyelination and potential promising pharmacological targets that may be considered for enhancing central nervous system remyelination.

  10. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  11. Suppression and restoration of primordial germ cell marker gene expression in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, using knockdown constructs regulated by copper transport protein gene promoters: Potential for reversible transgenic sterilization.

    PubMed

    Su, Baofeng; Shang, Mei; Grewe, Peter M; Patil, Jawahar G; Peatman, Eric; Perera, Dayan A; Cheng, Qi; Li, Chao; Weng, Chia-Chen; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhanjiang; Dunham, Rex A

    2015-12-01

    Complementary DNA overexpression and short hairpin RNA interference approaches were evaluated for decreasing expression of primordial germ cell (PGC) marker genes and thereby sterilizing channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, by delivering knockdown constructs driven by a constitutive promoter from yeast and a copper transport protein gene into fish embryos by electroporation. Two PGC marker genes, nanos and dead end, were the target knockdown genes, and their expressions, along with that of an off-target gene, vasa, were evaluated temporally using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Copper sulfate was evaluated as a repressor compound. Some of the constructs knocked down PGC marker gene expression, and some of the constructs were partially repressed by application of 0.1-ppm copper sulfate. When the rate of sexual maturity was compared for three-year-old broodfish that had been exposed to the sterilizing constructs during embryologic development and controls that had not been exposed, several treatments had reduced sexual maturity for the exposed fish. Of two promoter systems evaluated, the one which had been designed to be less sensitive to copper generally was more effective at achieving sterilization and more responsive to repression. Knockdown constructs based on 3' nanos short hairpin RNA interference appeared to result in the best repression and restoration of normal sexual maturity. We conclude that these copper-based systems exhibited good potential for repressible transgenic sterilization. Optimization of this system could allow environmentally safe application of transgenic technology and might be applicable to other applications for aquatic organisms. PMID:26341409

  12. The Emsian - Eifelian (Lower - Middle Devonian) boundary occurs in a 100-kyr eccentricity maximum: A potentially useful secondary marker for the GSSP section (Wetteldorf Richtschnitt, Germany).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vleeschouwer, D.; Makarona, C.; Linnemann, U.; Königshof, P.; Claeys, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    A Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) of a stage is chosen such that it can be accurately correlated with widely separated sections. To make such correlation, one can use the primary marker (usually the first appearance of a species). However, more often than not, secondary markers of chemo-, magneto-, cyclo- or biostratigraphic nature prove useful in establishing accurate and precise correlations. The GSSP for the Emsian - Eifelian stage boundary is exposed in the Wetteldorf Richtschnitt, in the Eifel Hill in Germany. The Emsian-Eifelian boundary is defined by the first occurrence of the conodont Polygnathus costatus partitus (Ziegler and Klapper, 1985). However, no secondary markers are currently available for this GSSP section. Our aim is to construct a cyclostratigraphic framework for this GSSP section, and thus to facilitate future correlations. Therefore, we collected 4-cm spaced elemental data of an 8.65 m thick interval, using a Bruker Tracer handheld XRF. We complemented our data with previously-published magnetic susceptibility (MS) data (Ellwood et al., 2006). A strong anti-correlation exists between the calcium-iron ratio (Ca/Fe) and the MS data. These variations mainly reflect the lithological variability between carbonate-poor mud- and siltstones and argillaceous limestone beds or calcareous sandstones. These proxies, as well as Ti/Al and K/Al, reflect strong 0.5 - 1 m periodicity. However, the orbital calibration of this dominant periodicity is challenged by the few time constraints available for the studied section. To circumvent this problem, we apply the evolutive average spectral misfit method (eASM; Meyers and Sageman, 2007) to the 4 different proxy records. This method tests the null hypothesis of no orbital signal and provides an estimate of sedimentation rate throughout the section. For all proxies, the eASM method provides similar results and we use the obtained sedimentation rates to convert stratigraphic height into time

  13. Novel genomic microsatellite markers for genetic population and diversity studies of tropical scalloped spiny lobster (Panulirus homarus) and their potential application in related Panulirus species.

    PubMed

    Delghandi, M; Goddard, S; Jerry, D R; Dao, H T; Al Hinai, M S N; Al-Amry, W; Al-Marzouqi, A

    2016-01-01

    Fourteen polymorphic microsatellites with perfect di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats were identified for Panulirus homarus using Roche 454 whole-genome sequencing method. Microsatellites were efficiently co-amplified in four multiplexes and a singleplex, providing consistent and easily interpretable genotypes. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 11 with the observed and expected heterozygosity ranging between 0.000-0.532 and 0.031-0.836, respectively. A significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for majority of the loci, probably due to homozygote excess. Genetic linkage disequilibrium analysis between all the possible pairs of the loci showed significant departure from the null hypothesis in the loci pairs Pho-G11-Pho-G33 and Pho-G33-Pho-G57. High success in primer cross-species amplification of these microsatellite markers indicates their utility for genetic studies of different Panulirus species.

  14. Testing the Potential of Proposed DNA Barcoding Markers in Nezara virudula and Nezara antennata When Geographic Variation and Closely Related Species Were Considered

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Liu, Qiang; Xi, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Gengping; Zhao, Yanni; Bu, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    The COI gene as the core of the DNA barcoding system for animals has received significant attention. The observed wide overlap between intra- and interspecific sequence variability has led researchers to envisage the primary COI-based method. The sequences of 16S rDNA, COI, and Cyt b genes of Nezara virudula (L.) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) from 13 countries and the same sequences of N. antennata Scott were chosen as molecular markers to analyze the intra- and interspecific relationships between the closely related species in this study. The results support that Cyt b gene may be a good candidate alongside COI, when the combined factors of geographic variation and closely related species are taken into account. PMID:25373226

  15. Novel genomic microsatellite markers for genetic population and diversity studies of tropical scalloped spiny lobster (Panulirus homarus) and their potential application in related Panulirus species.

    PubMed

    Delghandi, M; Goddard, S; Jerry, D R; Dao, H T; Al Hinai, M S N; Al-Amry, W; Al-Marzouqi, A

    2016-01-01

    Fourteen polymorphic microsatellites with perfect di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats were identified for Panulirus homarus using Roche 454 whole-genome sequencing method. Microsatellites were efficiently co-amplified in four multiplexes and a singleplex, providing consistent and easily interpretable genotypes. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 11 with the observed and expected heterozygosity ranging between 0.000-0.532 and 0.031-0.836, respectively. A significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for majority of the loci, probably due to homozygote excess. Genetic linkage disequilibrium analysis between all the possible pairs of the loci showed significant departure from the null hypothesis in the loci pairs Pho-G11-Pho-G33 and Pho-G33-Pho-G57. High success in primer cross-species amplification of these microsatellite markers indicates their utility for genetic studies of different Panulirus species. PMID:27173289

  16. Retinal photodamage by endogenous and xenobiotic agents.

    PubMed

    Wielgus, Albert R; Roberts, Joan E

    2012-01-01

    The human eye is constantly exposed to sunlight and artificial lighting. Light transmission through the eye is fundamental to its unique biological functions of directing vision and circadian rhythm and therefore light absorbed by the eye must be benign. However, exposure to the very intense ambient radiation can pose a hazard particularly if the recipient is over 40 years of age. There are age-related changes in the endogenous (natural) chromophores (lipofuscin, A2E and all-trans-retinal derivatives) in the human retina that makes it more susceptible to visible light damage. Intense visible light sources that do not filter short blue visible light (400-440 nm) used for phototherapy of circadian imbalance (i.e. seasonal affective disorder) increase the risk for age-related light damage to the retina. Moreover, many drugs, dietary supplements, nanoparticles and diagnostic dyes (xenobiotics) absorb ocular light and have the potential to induce photodamage to the retina, leading to transient or permanent blinding disorders. This article will review the underlying reasons why visible light in general and short blue visible light in particular dramatically raises the risk of photodamage to the human retina.

  17. Methylation Markers for the Identification of Body Fluids and Tissues from Forensic Trace Evidence.

    PubMed

    Forat, Sophia; Huettel, Bruno; Reinhardt, Richard; Fimmers, Rolf; Haidl, Gerhard; Denschlag, Dominik; Olek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The identification of body fluids is an essential tool for clarifying the course of events at a criminal site. The analytical problem is the fact that the biological material has been very often exposed to detrimental exogenous influences. Thereby, the molecular substrates used for the identification of the traces may become degraded. So far, most protocols utilize cell specific proteins or RNAs. Instead of measuring these more sensitive compounds this paper describes the application of the differential DNA-methylation. As a result of two genome wide screenings with the Illumina HumanMethylation BeadChips 27 and 450k we identified 150 candidate loci revealing differential methylation with regard to the body fluids venous blood, menstrual blood, vaginal fluid, saliva and sperm. Among them we selected 9 loci as the most promising markers. For the final determination of the methylation degree we applied the SNuPE-method. Because the degree of methylation might be modified by various endogenous and exogenous factors, we tested each marker with approximately 100 samples of each target fluid in a validation study. The stability of the detection procedure is proved in various simulated forensic surroundings according to standardized conditions. We studied the potential influence of 12 relatively common tumors on the methylation of the 9 markers. For this purpose the target fluids of 34 patients have been analysed. Only the cervix carcinoma might have an remarkable effect because impairing the signal of both vaginal markers. Using the Illumina MiSeq device we tested the potential influence of cis acting sequence variants on the methylation degree of the 9 markers in the specific body fluid DNA of 50 individuals. For 4 marker loci we observed such an influence either by sole SNPs or haplotypes. The identification of each target fluid is possible in arbitrary mixtures with the remaining four body fluids. The sensitivity of the individual body fluid tests is in the same range

  18. Methylation Markers for the Identification of Body Fluids and Tissues from Forensic Trace Evidence.

    PubMed

    Forat, Sophia; Huettel, Bruno; Reinhardt, Richard; Fimmers, Rolf; Haidl, Gerhard; Denschlag, Dominik; Olek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The identification of body fluids is an essential tool for clarifying the course of events at a criminal site. The analytical problem is the fact that the biological material has been very often exposed to detrimental exogenous influences. Thereby, the molecular substrates used for the identification of the traces may become degraded. So far, most protocols utilize cell specific proteins or RNAs. Instead of measuring these more sensitive compounds this paper describes the application of the differential DNA-methylation. As a result of two genome wide screenings with the Illumina HumanMethylation BeadChips 27 and 450k we identified 150 candidate loci revealing differential methylation with regard to the body fluids venous blood, menstrual blood, vaginal fluid, saliva and sperm. Among them we selected 9 loci as the most promising markers. For the final determination of the methylation degree we applied the SNuPE-method. Because the degree of methylation might be modified by various endogenous and exogenous factors, we tested each marker with approximately 100 samples of each target fluid in a validation study. The stability of the detection procedure is proved in various simulated forensic surroundings according to standardized conditions. We studied the potential influence of 12 relatively common tumors on the methylation of the 9 markers. For this purpose the target fluids of 34 patients have been analysed. Only the cervix carcinoma might have an remarkable effect because impairing the signal of both vaginal markers. Using the Illumina MiSeq device we tested the potential influence of cis acting sequence variants on the methylation degree of the 9 markers in the specific body fluid DNA of 50 individuals. For 4 marker loci we observed such an influence either by sole SNPs or haplotypes. The identification of each target fluid is possible in arbitrary mixtures with the remaining four body fluids. The sensitivity of the individual body fluid tests is in the same range

  19. Methylation Markers for the Identification of Body Fluids and Tissues from Forensic Trace Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Forat, Sophia; Huettel, Bruno; Reinhardt, Richard; Fimmers, Rolf; Haidl, Gerhard; Denschlag, Dominik; Olek, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The identification of body fluids is an essential tool for clarifying the course of events at a criminal site. The analytical problem is the fact that the biological material has been very often exposed to detrimental exogenous influences. Thereby, the molecular substrates used for the identification of the traces may become degraded. So far, most protocols utilize cell specific proteins or RNAs. Instead of measuring these more sensitive compounds this paper describes the application of the differential DNA-methylation. As a result of two genome wide screenings with the Illumina HumanMethylation BeadChips 27 and 450k we identified 150 candidate loci revealing differential methylation with regard to the body fluids venous blood, menstrual blood, vaginal fluid, saliva and sperm. Among them we selected 9 loci as the most promising markers. For the final determination of the methylation degree we applied the SNuPE-method. Because the degree of methylation might be modified by various endogenous and exogenous factors, we tested each marker with approximately 100 samples of each target fluid in a validation study. The stability of the detection procedure is proved in various simulated forensic surroundings according to standardized conditions. We studied the potential influence of 12 relatively common tumors on the methylation of the 9 markers. For this purpose the target fluids of 34 patients have been analysed. Only the cervix carcinoma might have an remarkable effect because impairing the signal of both vaginal markers. Using the Illumina MiSeq device we tested the potential influence of cis acting sequence variants on the methylation degree of the 9 markers in the specific body fluid DNA of 50 individuals. For 4 marker loci we observed such an influence either by sole SNPs or haplotypes. The identification of each target fluid is possible in arbitrary mixtures with the remaining four body fluids. The sensitivity of the individual body fluid tests is in the same range

  20. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, p<0.05). Logistic regression including all texture features yielded an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.76. Addition of age at menarche, ethnicity, contraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  1. [Evaluation of the endogenous intoxication syndrome in food toxic infections].

    PubMed

    Marzhokhova, M Iu; Zhelikhazheva, Zh M

    2009-01-01

    To study the endogenous intoxication syndrome in patients with food toxic infections is essential in revealing the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this disease. For this, the authors measured the level of low and average molecular weight, as well as their protein component--oligopeptides in plasma, red blood cells, and urine in the course of the disease. There were increased levels of the study parameters, which depended on the stage and degree of a pathological process. The determination of the level of low and average molecular weight and oligopeptides in plasma, red blood cells, and urine may serve as a marker of the intoxication syndrome; the level of the study parameters may be used as additional criteria for the severity of the process, the prediction of disease development and comorbidity, and as a criterion for recovery completeness.

  2. Short communication: Effect of commercial or depurinized milk diet on plasma advanced oxidation protein products, cardiovascular markers, and bone marrow CD34+ stem cell potential in rat experimental hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Gordana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Jevtovic, Tatjana; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Veljkovic, Andrej; Kocic, Hristina; Stojanovic, Svetlana; Jovanovic, Aneta; Jovanovic, Jelena; Zivkovic, Petar

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular repair and myocardial contractility may be improved by migration of bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) and their delivery to the site of injury, a process known as BMSC homing. The aim of our study was to examine the dietary effect of a newly patented depurinized milk (DP) that is almost free of uric acid and purine and pyrimidine compounds compared with a standard commercial 1.5% fat UHT milk diet or allopurinol therapy in rat experimental hyperuricemia. Bone marrow stem cell potential (BMCD34(+), CD34-postive bone marrow cells), plasma oxidative stress parameters [advanced oxidation protein products, AOPP) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)], myocardial damage markers [creatine phosphokinase (CPK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)], plasma cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were investigated. The DP milk diet significantly increased the number of BMCD34(+) stem cells compared with commercial UHT milk. Allopurinol given alone also increased the number of BMCD34(+). Hyperuricemia caused a significant increase in all plasma enzyme markers for myocardial damage (CPK, LDH, and AST). A cardioprotective effect was achieved with allopurinol but almost equally with DP milk and more than with commercial milk. Regarding plasma AOPP, TBARS, and cholesterol levels, the most effective treatment was DP milk. In conclusion, the protective role of a milk diet on cardiovascular function may be enhanced through the new depurinized milk diet, which may improve cardiovascular system function via increased bone marrow stem cell regenerative potential, decreased plasma oxidative stress parameters, and decreased levels of myocardial damage markers and cholesterol. New dairy technology strategies focused on eliminating harmful milk compounds should be completely nontoxic. Novel milk products should be tested for their ability to improve tissue repair and function.

  3. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  4. sTREM2 cerebrospinal fluid levels are a potential biomarker for microglia activity in early-stage Alzheimer's disease and associate with neuronal injury markers.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Kleinberger, Gernot; Araque Caballero, Miguel Ángel; Brendel, Matthias; Rominger, Axel; Alcolea, Daniel; Fortea, Juan; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Antonell, Anna; Rami, Lorena; Molinuevo, José L; Brosseron, Frederic; Traschütz, Andreas; Heneka, Michael T; Struyfs, Hanne; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Crispin, Alexander; Ewers, Michael; Haass, Christian

    2016-01-01

    TREM2 is an innate immune receptor expressed on the surface of microglia. Loss-of-function mutations of TREM2 are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TREM2 is a type-1 protein with an ectodomain that is proteolytically cleaved and released into the extracellular space as a soluble variant (sTREM2), which can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this cross-sectional multicenter study, we investigated whether CSF levels of sTREM2 are changed during the clinical course of AD, and in cognitively normal individuals with suspected non-AD pathology (SNAP). CSF sTREM2 levels were higher in mild cognitive impairment due to AD than in all other AD groups and controls. SNAP individuals also had significantly increased CSF sTREM2 compared to controls. Moreover, increased CSF sTREM2 levels were associated with higher CSF total tau and phospho-tau181P, which are markers of neuronal degeneration and tau pathology. Our data demonstrate that CSF sTREM2 levels are increased in the early symptomatic phase of AD, probably reflecting a corresponding change of the microglia activation status in response to neuronal degeneration. PMID:26941262

  5. Gangliosides as a potential new class of stem cell markers: the case of GD1a in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bergante, Sonia; Torretta, Enrica; Creo, Pasquale; Sessarego, Nadia; Papini, Nadia; Piccoli, Marco; Fania, Chiara; Cirillo, Federica; Conforti, Erika; Ghiroldi, Andrea; Tringali, Cristina; Venerando, Bruno; Ibatici, Adalberto; Gelfi, Cecilia; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi

    2014-03-01

    Owing to their exposure on the cell surface and the possibility of being directly recognized with specific antibodies, glycosphingolipids have aroused great interest in the field of stem cell biology. In the search for specific markers of the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) toward osteoblasts, we studied their glycosphingolipid pattern, with particular attention to gangliosides. After lipid extraction and fractionation, gangliosides, metabolically (3)H-labeled in the sphingosine moiety, were separated by high-performance TLC and chemically characterized by MALDI MS. Upon induction of osteogenic differentiation, a 3-fold increase of ganglioside GD1a was observed. Therefore, the hypothesis of GD1a involvement in hBMSCs commitment toward the osteogenic phenotype was tested by comparison of the osteogenic propensity of GD1a-highly expressing versus GD1a-low expressing hBMSCs and direct addition of GD1a in the differentiation medium. It was found that either the high expression of GD1a in hBMSCs or the addition of GD1a in the differentiation medium favored osteogenesis, providing a remarkable increase of alkaline phosphatase. It was also observed that ganglioside GD2, although detectable in hBMSCs by immunohistochemistry with an anti-GD2 antibody, could not be recognized by chemical analysis, likely reflecting a case, not uncommon, of molecular mimicry.

  6. Authentication of Punica granatum L.: Development of SCAR markers for the detection of 10 fruits potentially used in economically motivated adulteration.

    PubMed

    Marieschi, Matteo; Torelli, Anna; Beghé, Deborah; Bruni, Renato

    2016-07-01

    The large commercial success of pomegranate increase the likelihood of economically motivated adulteration (EMA), which has been gradually spotted with the undeclared addition of anthocyanin-rich plants or cheaper fruit juices used as bulking and diluting agents. A method based on Sequence-Characterized Amplified Regions (SCARs) was developed to detect the presence of Aristotelia chilensis, Aronia melanocarpa, Dioscorea alata, Euterpe oleracea, Malus×domestica, Morus nigra, Sambucus nigra, Vaccinium macrocarpon, Vaccinium myrtillus, Vitis vinifera as bulking agents in Punica granatum. The method enabled the unequivocal detection of up to 1% of each adulterant, allowing the preemptive rejection of suspect samples. The recourse to such method may reduce the number of samples to be subjected to further phytochemical analyses when multiple batches have to be evaluated in a short time. Vice versa, it allows the cross-check of suspect batches previously tested only for their anthocyanin profile. The dimension of the amplicons is suitable for the analysis of degraded DNA obtained from stored and processed commercial material. Proper SCAR markers may represent a fast, sensitive, reliable and low-cost screening method for the authentication of processed commercial pomegranate material. PMID:26920316

  7. Strong larvicidal potential of Artemisia annua leaf extract against malaria (Anopheles stephensi Liston) and dengue (Aedes aegypti L.) vectors and bioassay-driven isolation of the marker compounds.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kapoor, Himanshi; Chopra, Madhu; Kumar, Kaushal; Agrawal, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Malaria and dengue are the two most important vector-borne human diseases caused by mosquito vectors Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti, respectively. Of the various strategies adopted for eliminating these diseases, controlling of vectors through herbs has been reckoned as one of the important measures for preventing their resurgence. Artemisia annua leaf chloroform extract when tried against larvae of A. stephensi and A. aegypti has shown a strong larvicidal activity against both of these vectors, their respective LC50 and LC90 values being 0.84 and 4.91 ppm for A. stephensi and 0.67 and 5.84 ppm for A. aegypti. The crude extract when separated through column chromatography using petroleum ether-ethyl acetate gradient (0-100%) yielded 76 fractions which were pooled into three different active fractions A, B and C on the basis of same or nearly similar R f values. The aforesaid pooled fractions when assayed against the larvae of A. stephensi too reported a strong larvicidal activity. The respective marker compound purified from the individual fractions A, B and C, were Artemisinin, Arteannuin B and Artemisinic acid, as confirmed and characterized through FT-IR and NMR. This is our first report of strong mortality of A. annua leaf chloroform extract against vectors of two deadly diseases. This technology can be scaled up for commercial exploitation. PMID:24158647

  8. Valine-Resistance, a Potential Marker in Plant Cell Genetics. I. Distinction between Two Types of Valine-Resistant Tobacco Mutants Isolated from Protoplast-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bourgin, J. P.; Goujaud, J.; Missonier, C.; Pethe, C.

    1985-01-01

    In previous experiments, seven lines of valine-resistant plants were regenerated from protoplast-derived haploid tobacco mesophyll cells which had been UV mutagenized and submitted to selection by toxic concentrations of valine. In this study we described the transmission of valine-resistance to progeny and a preliminary phenotypical and biochemical characterization of the resistant plants.—Two types were thus distinguished among the seven mutant lines. Valine-resistance of the mutants of the first type (three lines) was transmitted as a single Mendelian dominant character (Vr1), whereas valine-resistance of the second type (four lines) was transmitted as a digenic recessive character (vr2 and vr3). Allelism tests revealed that the four recessive mutant lines yielded resistant progeny when intercrossed and, therefore, bear recessive mutant alleles at the same two unlinked loci.—When cultured at a density of 100 cell/ml, protoplast-derived cells of mutants of the first type had a low level of resistance to valine, whereas protoplast-derived cells of mutants of the second type displayed a high level of resistance to valine and to other amino acids.—According to the results of 14C-labelled amino acid uptake experiments, the amino acid resistance of mutants of the second type, but not valine-resistance of the first type, could be accounted for by reduced uptake of several amino acids. Possible uses of valine-resistance as a marker in plant cell genetics are discussed. PMID:17246252

  9. Authentication of Punica granatum L.: Development of SCAR markers for the detection of 10 fruits potentially used in economically motivated adulteration.

    PubMed

    Marieschi, Matteo; Torelli, Anna; Beghé, Deborah; Bruni, Renato

    2016-07-01

    The large commercial success of pomegranate increase the likelihood of economically motivated adulteration (EMA), which has been gradually spotted with the undeclared addition of anthocyanin-rich plants or cheaper fruit juices used as bulking and diluting agents. A method based on Sequence-Characterized Amplified Regions (SCARs) was developed to detect the presence of Aristotelia chilensis, Aronia melanocarpa, Dioscorea alata, Euterpe oleracea, Malus×domestica, Morus nigra, Sambucus nigra, Vaccinium macrocarpon, Vaccinium myrtillus, Vitis vinifera as bulking agents in Punica granatum. The method enabled the unequivocal detection of up to 1% of each adulterant, allowing the preemptive rejection of suspect samples. The recourse to such method may reduce the number of samples to be subjected to further phytochemical analyses when multiple batches have to be evaluated in a short time. Vice versa, it allows the cross-check of suspect batches previously tested only for their anthocyanin profile. The dimension of the amplicons is suitable for the analysis of degraded DNA obtained from stored and processed commercial material. Proper SCAR markers may represent a fast, sensitive, reliable and low-cost screening method for the authentication of processed commercial pomegranate material.

  10. Gangliosides as a potential new class of stem cell markers: the case of GD1a in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Bergante, Sonia; Torretta, Enrica; Creo, Pasquale; Sessarego, Nadia; Papini, Nadia; Piccoli, Marco; Fania, Chiara; Cirillo, Federica; Conforti, Erika; Ghiroldi, Andrea; Tringali, Cristina; Venerando, Bruno; Ibatici, Adalberto; Gelfi, Cecilia; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Owing to their exposure on the cell surface and the possibility of being directly recognized with specific antibodies, glycosphingolipids have aroused great interest in the field of stem cell biology. In the search for specific markers of the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) toward osteoblasts, we studied their glycosphingolipid pattern, with particular attention to gangliosides. After lipid extraction and fractionation, gangliosides, metabolically 3H-labeled in the sphingosine moiety, were separated by high-performance TLC and chemically characterized by MALDI MS. Upon induction of osteogenic differentiation, a 3-fold increase of ganglioside GD1a was observed. Therefore, the hypothesis of GD1a involvement in hBMSCs commitment toward the osteogenic phenotype was tested by comparison of the osteogenic propensity of GD1a-highly expressing versus GD1a-low expressing hBMSCs and direct addition of GD1a in the differentiation medium. It was found that either the high expression of GD1a in hBMSCs or the addition of GD1a in the differentiation medium favored osteogenesis, providing a remarkable increase of alkaline phosphatase. It was also observed that ganglioside GD2, although detectable in hBMSCs by immunohistochemistry with an anti-GD2 antibody, could not be recognized by chemical analysis, likely reflecting a case, not uncommon, of molecular mimicry. PMID:24449473

  11. Expression of SCGB1C1 gene as a potential marker of susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections in elite athletes – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Malczewska-Lenczowska, J; Bik-Multanowski, M

    2016-01-01

    High levels of exercise in athletes result in temporary immunosuppression, which could increase the susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. Understanding of immunological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon could enable optimization of training schemes for elite athletes and avoidance of infection-related episodes of absence during sports championships. The aim of this study was to detect genes that may be responsible for modulation of individual susceptibility to infections. The blood and saliva samples were collected from 10 healthy, medically examined kayakers (4 females and 6 males) aged 24.7 ± 2.3 years. All samples were taken in the morning, after overnight fasting, in a seated position. The ELISA method was used to determine the levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and interleukin 5 (IL-5). Whole genome expression in blood was assessed using microarrays. The study did not reveal any significant correlation between genome expression and sIgA concentration. However, low expression of a gene involved in protection against the common cold – secretoglobin 1C1 (SCGB1C1) – was detected in athletes with high IL-5 concentrations (corrected p = 0.00065; fold change = 3.17). Our results suggest that blood expression of the SCGB1C1 gene might be a marker of susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections in athletes. PMID:27274102

  12. Taenia saginata metacestode antigenic fractions obtained by ion-exchange chromatography: potential source of immunodominant markers applicable in the immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Daniela da Silva; Gonzaga, Henrique Tomaz; Ribeiro, Vanessa da Silva; da Cunha, Jair Pereira; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to fractionate and partially characterize fractions obtained from the total saline extract (SE) of Taenia saginata metacestodes after ion-exchange procedure in carboxymethyl sepharose (CM) and diethylaminoethyl sepharose (DEAE) resins, as a source of antigenic markers applicable in the immunodiagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NCC). For IgG detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting, 140 serum samples were analyzed: 45 from patients with NCC (G1), 50 from patients with other parasitic infections (G2), and 45 from healthy individuals. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), area under curve (AUC), and likelihood ratios (LR) were calculated. CM S2 and DEAE S2 fractions provided high diagnostic values (Se 88.8% and 93.4%; Sp 93.7% and 92.6%; AUC 0.965 and 0.987; LR+ 14.07 and 12.67; LR- 0.11 and 0.07, respectively). In conclusion, CM S2 and DEAE S2 fractions are important sources of specific peptides, with high efficiency to diagnose NCC.

  13. Expression of SCGB1C1 gene as a potential marker of susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections in elite athletes - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Orysiak, J; Malczewska-Lenczowska, J; Bik-Multanowski, M

    2016-06-01

    High levels of exercise in athletes result in temporary immunosuppression, which could increase the susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. Understanding of immunological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon could enable optimization of training schemes for elite athletes and avoidance of infection-related episodes of absence during sports championships. The aim of this study was to detect genes that may be responsible for modulation of individual susceptibility to infections. The blood and saliva samples were collected from 10 healthy, medically examined kayakers (4 females and 6 males) aged 24.7 ± 2.3 years. All samples were taken in the morning, after overnight fasting, in a seated position. The ELISA method was used to determine the levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and interleukin 5 (IL-5). Whole genome expression in blood was assessed using microarrays. The study did not reveal any significant correlation between genome expression and sIgA concentration. However, low expression of a gene involved in protection against the common cold - secretoglobin 1C1 (SCGB1C1) - was detected in athletes with high IL-5 concentrations (corrected p = 0.00065; fold change = 3.17). Our results suggest that blood expression of the SCGB1C1 gene might be a marker of susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections in athletes. PMID:27274102

  14. Combinations of Polymorphic Markers of Chemokine Genes, Their Receptors and Acute Phase Protein Genes As Potential Predictors of Coronary Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nasibullin, T.R.; Yagafarova, L.F.; Yagafarov, I.R.; Timasheva, Y.R.; Erdman, V.V.; Tuktarova, I.A.; Mustafina, O.E.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the main factor in the development of coronary heart diseases (CHD), is an inflammatory response to endothelial layer damage in the arterial bed. We have analyzed the association between CHD and the polymorphic markers of genes that control the synthesis of proteins involved in the processes of adhesion and chemotaxis of immunocompetent cells: rs1024611 (–2518A>G, CCL2 gene), rs1799864 (V64I, CCR2 gene), rs3732378 (T280M, CX3CR1 gene), rs1136743 (A70V, SAA1 gene), and rs1205 (2042C>T, CRP gene) in 217 patients with CHD and 250 controls. Using the Monte Carlo method and Markov chains (APSampler), we revealed a combination of alleles/genotypes associated with both a reduced and increased risk of CHD. The most significant alleles/genotypes areSAA1*T/T+CRP*C+CX3CR1*G/A (Pperm = 0.0056, OR = 0.07 95%CI 0.009–0.55),SAA1*T+CRP*T+CCR2*G/A+CX3CR1*G (Pperm = 0.0063, OR = 14.58 95%CI 1.88–113.04), SAA1*T+CCR2*A+CCL2* G/G (Pperm = 0.0351, OR = 10.77 95%CI 1.35–85.74). PMID:27099791

  15. Expression of the Matrix Metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and Tissue Inhibitor 3 as Potential Molecular Markers in Advanced Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background. During progression of gastric cancer (GC), degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs): changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. Objective. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG) and GC. Methods. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (CT) values, as very high (CT ≤ 25), high (CT = 26–30), moderate (CT = 31–35), low (CT = 36–39), or not detected (CT = 40). Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. Results. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. Conclusions. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC. PMID:24669030

  16. Twenty-four-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor Heart Rate: A Potential Marker for Gestational Hypertension in at-Risk Women

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Corenthian J.; Dodson, William C.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Repke, John T.; Legro, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively correlated the 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM) to conventional sphygmomanometer blood pressure measurements (CSM) in women at risk for gestational hypertensive disorders (GHTNDs) and identified predictive factors from ABPM for GHTND. We analyzed 73 women with ≥1 risk factor for developing a GHTND. Using both the CSM and ABPM, the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were measured for 24 hours during three periods (14 to 24 weeks; 24 to 32 weeks; and 33 weeks to delivery). Correlation between the CSM and ABPM lessened as pregnancy progressed. Seventeen (25%) of women developed a GHTND. MAP variability increased in the GHTND group versus those without a GHTND. The odds of developing a GHTND increased 1.5 times for every 1 beat per minute increase in the ABPM 24-hour HR at visit 1 and reversed by visit 3. In women at risk for a GHTND, CSM and ABPM correlate less well as pregnancy advances. HR changes in at-risk women may be a marker for the development of a GHTND and may reflect increased sympathetic activity and/or decreased baroreceptor sensitivity. PMID:22147639

  17. Evaluation of genetic fidelity among micropropagated plants of Gloriosa superba L. using DNA-based markers--a potential medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kuldeep; Aggarwal, Ashok; Singh, Narender

    2013-09-01

    Malabar glory lily (Gloriosa superba L.) is a medicinally potent plant species used for the production of alkaloid colchicine. With ever increasing demand, there is a pressing need to conserve it through biotechnological approaches. A large number of complete plantlets were obtained by direct regeneration from the non-dormant tuber explants on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2.0 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP)+0.5 mg/l α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Large number of plants can be produced in vitro under aseptic conditions, but there is always a danger of producing somaclonal variants by tissue culture technology. Thus, the genetic stability of micropropagated clones was evaluated using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis. During the study a total of 80 (50 RAPD and 30 ISSR) primers were screened, out of which 10 RAPD and 7 ISSR primers produced a total of 98 (49 RAPD and 49 ISSR) clear, distinct and reproducible amplicons. The amplification products of the regenerated plants showed similar banding patterns to that of the mother plant thus demonstrating the homogeneity of the micropropagated plants. This is the first report that evaluates the use of genetic markers to establish genetic fidelity of micropropagated G. superba using RAPD and ISSR, which can be successfully applied for the mass multiplication, germplasm conservation and further genetic transformation assays for colchicine production to meet the ever increasing demand of this medicinally potent plant for industrial and pharmaceutical uses.

  18. Use of an endogenous plasmid locus for stable in trans complementation in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Kasumba, Irene N; Bestor, Aaron; Tilly, Kit; Rosa, Patricia A

    2015-02-01

    Targeted mutagenesis and complementation are important tools for studying genes of unknown function in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. A standard method of complementation is reintroduction of a wild-type copy of the targeted gene on a shuttle vector. However, shuttle vectors are present at higher copy numbers than B. burgdorferi plasmids and are potentially unstable in the absence of selection, thereby complicating analyses in the mouse-tick infectious cycle. B. burgdorferi has over 20 plasmids, with some, such as linear plasmid 25 (lp25), carrying genes required by the spirochete in vivo but relatively unstable during in vitro cultivation. We propose that complementation on an endogenous plasmid such as lp25 would overcome the copy number and in vivo stability issues of shuttle vectors. In addition, insertion of a selectable marker on lp25 could ensure its stable maintenance by spirochetes in culture. Here, we describe the construction of a multipurpose allelic-exchange vector containing a multiple-cloning site and either of two selectable markers. This suicide vector directs insertion of the complementing gene into the bbe02 locus, a site on lp25 that was previously shown to be nonessential during both in vitro and in vivo growth. We demonstrate the functional utility of this strategy by restoring infectivity to an ospC mutant through complementation at this site on lp25 and stable maintenance of the ospC gene throughout mouse infection. We conclude that this represents a convenient and widely applicable method for stable gene complementation in B. burgdorferi.

  19. Pleural and pericardial effusion: a potential ultrasonographic marker for the prenatal differential diagnosis between congenital diaphragmatic eventration and congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Jeanty, C; Nien, JK; Espinoza, J; Kusanovic, JP; Goncalves, LF; Qureshi, F; Jacques, S; Lee, W; Romero, R

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether or not the presence of pleural and/or pericardial effusion can be used prenatally as an ultrasonographic marker for the differential diagnosis between diaphragmatic eventration and diaphragmatic hernia. Methods We present two case reports of non-isolated diaphragmatic eventration associated with pleural and/or pericardial effusion. Additionally, we reviewed the literature for all cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and diaphragmatic eventration that met the following criteria: (1) prenatal diagnosis of a diaphragmatic defect and (2) definitive diagnosis by autopsy or surgery. The frequencies of pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, and hydrops were compared between the two conditions using the Fisher’s exact test. A subanalysis was conducted of cases with isolated diaphragmatic defects (i.e. diaphragmatic defects not associated with hydrops and other major structural or chromosomal anomalies). Results A higher proportion of fetuses with diaphragmatic eventration had associated pleural and pericardial effusions compared with fetuses with diaphragmatic hernia (58% (7/12) vs. 3.7% (14/382), respectively, P < 0.001). This observation remained true when only cases of diaphragmatic defects not associated with hydrops and other major structural or chromosomal anomalies were compared (29% (2/7) with eventration vs. 2.2% (4/178) with CDH, P < 0.02). Conclusions The presence of pleural and/or pericardial effusion in patients with diaphragmatic defects should raise the possibility of a congenital diaphragmatic eventration. This information is clinically important for management and counseling because the prognosis and treatment for CDH and congenital diaphragmatic eventration are different. PMID:17366518

  20. Identification of growth stage molecular markers in Trichoderma sp. 'atroviride type B' and their potential application in monitoring fungal growth and development in soil.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio; Steyaert, Johanna; Nieto-Jacobo, Maria Fernanda; Holyoake, Andrew; Braithwaite, Mark; Stewart, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Several members of the genus Trichoderma are biocontrol agents of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens. The effectiveness of biocontrol agents depends heavily on how they perform in the complex field environment. Therefore, the ability to monitor and track Trichoderma within the environment is essential to understanding biocontrol efficacy. The objectives of this work were to: (a) identify key genes involved in Trichoderma sp. 'atroviride type B' morphogenesis; (b) develop a robust RNA isolation method from soil; and (c) develop molecular marker assays for characterizing morphogenesis whilst in the soil environment. Four cDNA libraries corresponding to conidia, germination, vegetative growth and conidiogenesis were created, and the genes identified by sequencing. Stage specificity of the different genes was confirmed by either Northern blot or quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis using RNA from the four stages. con10, a conidial-specific gene, was observed in conidia, as well as one gene also involved in subsequent stages of germination (L-lactate/malate dehydrogenase encoding gene). The germination stage revealed high expression rates of genes involved in amino acid and protein biosynthesis, while in the vegetative-growth stage, genes involved in differentiation, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase similar to Kpp7 from Ustilago maydis and the orthologue to stuA from Aspergillus nidulans, were preferentially expressed. Genes involved in cell-wall synthesis were expressed during conidiogenesis. We standardized total RNA isolation from Trichoderma sp. 'atroviride type B' growing in soil and then examined the expression profiles of selected genes using qRT-PCR. The results suggested that the relative expression patterns were cyclic and not accumulative.

  1. Dynamic equilibrium of endogenous selenium nanoparticles in selenite-exposed cancer cells: a deep insight into the interaction between endogenous SeNPs and proteins.

    PubMed

    Bao, Peng; Chen, Song-Can; Xiao, Ke-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Elemental selenium (Se) was recently found to exist as endogenous nanoparticles (i.e., SeNPs) in selenite-exposed cancer cells. By sequestrating critical intracellular proteins, SeNPs appear capable of giving rise to multiple cytotoxicity mechanisms including inhibition of glycolysis, glycolysis-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, microtubule depolymerization and inhibition of autophagy. In this work, we reveal a dynamic equilibrium of endogenous SeNP assembly and disassembly in selenite-exposed H157 cells. Endogenous SeNPs are observed both in the cytoplasm and in organelles. There is an increase in endogenous SeNPs between 24 h and 36 h, and a decrease between 36 h and 72 h according to transmission electron microscopy results and UV-Vis measurements. These observations imply that elemental Se in SeNPs could be oxidized back into selenite by scavenging superoxide radicals and ultimately re-reduced into selenide; then the assembly and disassembly of SeNPs proceed simultaneously with the sequestration and release of SeNP high-affinity proteins. There is also a possibility that the reduction of elemental Se to selenide pathway may lie in selenite-exposed cancer cells, which results in the assembly and disassembly of endogenous SeNPs. Genome-wide expression analysis results show that endogenous SeNPs significantly altered the expression of 504 genes, compared to the control. The endogenous SeNPs induced mitochondrial impairment and decreasing of the annexin A2 level can lead to inhibition of cancer cell invasion and migration. This dynamic flux of endogenous SeNPs amplifies their cytotoxic potential in cancer cells, thus provide a starting point to design more efficient intracellular self-assembling systems for overcoming multidrug resistance. PMID:26456389

  2. Potential traceable markers of organic matter in organic and conventional dairy manure using ultraviolet–visible and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic dairy (OD) production is drawing increasing attention because of public concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the potential environmental impacts of conventional dairy (CD) systems. However, very limited information is available on how organic farming practices affect the chemical ...

  3. Effect of process parameters upon the dopamine and lipid peroxidation activity of selected MIG welding fumes as a marker of potential neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hudson, N J; Evans, A T; Yeung, C K; Hewitt, P J

    2001-04-01

    There is growing concern over the neurotoxic effects of chronic occupational exposure to metal fume produced by welding. Elevated iron and manganese levels in the brain have been linked to an increase in lipid peroxidation, dopamine depletion and predisposition to the development of a Parkinson's type condition in advanced cases. Chemical and toxicological analysis of selected welding fumes, generated by model processes, were used in order to evaluate their potential to release solutes that promote oxidation of dopamine and peroxidation of brain lipids in cell free assays. This study compared the effect of shield gas, electrode type and voltage/currect upon the dopamine and brain lipid peroxidation potential of selected welding fume, obtained from metal inert gas (MIG) welding systems. Overall, fume extracts were found to enhance dopamine oxidation and inhibit lipid peroxidation. Significant differences were also found in the oxidising potential of fume generated under differing process conditions; it may therefore be possible to determine the potential neurotoxicity of fumes using this system.

  4. Endogenous opioids: The downside of opposing stress

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Rita J.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Our dynamic environment regularly exposes us to potentially life-threatening challenges or stressors. To answer these challenges and maintain homeostasis, the stress response, an innate coordinated engagement of central and peripheral neural systems is initiated. Although essential for survival, the inappropriate initiation of the stress response or its continuation after the stressor is terminated has pathological consequences that have been linked to diverse neuropsychiatric and medical diseases. Substantial individual variability exists in the pathological consequences of stressors. A theme of this Special Issue is that elucidating the basis of individual differences in resilience or its flipside, vulnerability, will greatly advance our ability to prevent and treat stress-related diseases. This can be approached by studying individual differences in “pro-stress” mediators such as corticosteroids or the hypothalamic orchestrator of the stress response, corticotropin-releasing factor. More recently, the recognition of endogenous neuromodulators with “anti-stress” activity that have opposing actions or that restrain stress-response systems suggests additional bases for individual differences in stress pathology. These “anti-stress” neuromodulators offer alternative strategies for manipulating the stress response and its pathological consequences. This review uses the major brain norepinephrine system as a model stress-response system to demonstrate how co-regulation by opposing pro-stress (corticotropin-releasing factor) and anti-stress (enkephalin) neuromodulators must be fine-tuned to produce an adaptive response to stress. The clinical consequences of tipping this fine-tuned balance in the direction of either the pro- or anti-stress systems are emphasized. Finally, that each system provides multiple points at which individual differences could confer stress vulnerability or resilience is discussed. PMID:25506603

  5. Characterization of the ceruloplasmin gene and its potential role as an indirect marker for selection to Aeromonas hydrophila resistance in rohu, Labeo rohita.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, P K; Das, Sweta; Mahapatra, Kanta Das; Saha, Jatindra Nath; Baranski, Matthew; Ødegård, Jørgen; Robinson, Nicholas

    2013-05-01

    Ceruloplasmin is an acute phase protein found to be activated by the host immune system during stress conditions. The ceruloplasmin gene has been reported in several teleosts and here we characterize the gene and test its association with resistance to Aeromonas hydrophila in rohu, Labeo rohita. A ceruloplasmin mRNA sequence of 3355 base pairs (bp) was derived (GenBank ID: JX010736). The coding sequence (CDS) comprised of 3276 bp that coded for 1092 amino acids. Alignment results showed the greatest similarity with zebrafish followed by channel catfish sequence, and a phylogenetic tree constructed on the basis of amino acid sequences showed that rohu shares a common clade with these two species. In the ontogeny study, the expression of ceruloplasmin was detected at 9 h post-fertilization onwards, and a strong level of expression was detected at 24 h (38-fold) and 15 days (34-fold) post-fertilization. The ceruloplasmin transcripts were evident in liver, spleen, stomach and heart. Expression was undetectable in gill, brain, eye, skin, muscle, intestine, anterior and posterior kidney tissues. Expression of ceruloplasmin after A. hydrophila infection was up-regulated 6 h post-challenge and was modulated until 15 days post-challenge. The level of ceruloplasmin was also compared in rohu selectively bred for higher growth and disease resistance. The gene showed a 4.58-fold higher level of expression in resistant line over susceptible line rohu selected based on family challenge test survival to A. hydrophila. Serum ceruloplasmin levels in three year classes of rohu selected for higher growth showed a positive correlation (0.49 ± 1.11) with survival against challenge with A. hydrophila. The estimated heritability was also found to be quite high (0.50 ± 0.22) for this parameter. Thus, ceruloplasmin could be one of the useful marker traits for selection against A. hydrophila resistance in fish.

  6. Determination of endogenous faecal phosphorus loss in goats.

    PubMed

    Tayo, Grace Oluwatoyin; Tang, Shao Xun; Tan, Zhi Liang; Sun, Zhi Hong; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuan She; Han, Xue Feng

    2009-04-01

    Four black Liuyang wether goats were fed with corn stover and concentrate formulated to contain four levels of dietary phosphorus (P), including 0.129, 0.140, 0.162 and 0.180% of P. In a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment the endogenous faecal P loss was determined by the regression technique and the substitution method. Treatment effects on faecal and urinary P output, apparent P digestibility and P retention, and saliva P secretion were not significant. A linear relationship was observed between apparent faecal digestible P (Y, g/kg DMI) and P intake (X, g/kg DMI), which was described by the equation: Y = 0.4799 X -0.9209, r2 = 0.9869, (p < 0.05). The true P digestibility determined by the regression technique and the substitution method amounted to 48.0 and 48.9%, respectively; the recorded endogenous faecal P losses were 0.92 and 0.93 g/kg DMI, respectively. The study demonstrated the potential of the regression method as well as the substitution method for estimation of true P digestibility and endogenous faecal P losses in goats.

  7. Endogenous Cardiotonic Steroids: Physiology, Pharmacology, and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagrov, Alexei Y.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Fedorova, Olga V.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous cardiotonic steroids (CTS), also called digitalis-like factors, have been postulated to play important roles in health and disease for nearly half a century. Recent discoveries, which include the specific identification of endogenous cardenolide (endogenous ouabain) and bufadienolide (marinobufagenin) CTS in humans along with the delineation of an alternative mechanism by which CTS can signal through the Na+/K+-ATPase, have increased the interest in this field substantially. Although CTS were first considered important in the regulation of renal sodium transport and arterial pressure, more recent work implicates these hormones in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and fibrosis, the modulation of immunity and of carbohydrate metabolism, and the control of various central nervous functions and even behavior. This review focuses on the physiological interactions between CTS and other regulatory systems that may be important in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension, preeclampsia, end-stage renal disease, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. Based on our increasing understanding of the regulation of CTS as well as the molecular mechanisms of these hormone increases, we also discuss potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:19325075

  8. Drawing a fine line on endogenous retroelement activity

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Diaz, Nathaly; Friedli, Marc; Trono, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroelements (EREs) are essential motors of evolution yet require careful control to prevent genomic catastrophes, notably during the vulnerable phases of epigenetic reprogramming that occur immediately after fertilization and in germ cells. Accordingly, a variety of mechanisms restrict these mobile genetic units. Previous studies have revealed the importance of KRAB-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) and their cofactor, KAP1, in the early embryonic silencing of endogenous retroviruses and so-called SVAs, but the implication of this transcriptional repression system in the control of LINE-1, the only known active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome, was thought to be marginal. Two recent studies straighten the record by revealing that the KRAB/KAP system is key to the control of L1 in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and go further in demonstrating that DNA methylation and KRAB/KAP1-induced repression contribute to this process in an evolutionally dynamic fashion. These results shed light on the delicate equilibrium between higher vertebrates and endogenous retroelements, which are not just genetic invaders calling for strict control but rather a constantly renewed and nicely exploitable source of evolutionary potential. PMID:26442176

  9. Endogenous Protease Nexin-1 Protects against Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin’s endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1−/− mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  10. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-08-14

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection.

  11. Endogenous protease nexin-1 protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mirante, Osvaldo; Price, Melanie; Puentes, Wilfredo; Castillo, Ximena; Benakis, Corinne; Thevenet, Jonathan; Monard, Denis; Hirt, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC), leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin's endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1), in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1(-/-) mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection. PMID:23949634

  12. Circulating Plasma Levels of MicroRNA-21 and MicroRNA-221 Are Potential Diagnostic Markers for Primary Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kemeny, Nancy; Kingham, T. Peter; Allen, Peter J.; D’Angelica, Michael I.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Betel, Doron; Klimstra, David; Jarnagin, William R.; Ventura, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potential biomarkers in various malignancies. We aim to characterize miRNA expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and identify circulating plasma miRNAs with potential diagnostic and prognostic utility. Methods Using deep-sequencing techniques, miRNA expression between tumor samples and non-neoplastic liver parenchyma were compared. Overexpressed miRNAs were measured in plasma from an independent cohort of patients with cholangiocarcinoma using RT-qPCR and compared with that healthy volunteers. The discriminatory ability of the evaluated plasma miRNAs between patients and controls was evaluated with receiving operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results Small RNAs from 12 ICC and 11 tumor-free liver samples were evaluated. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using the miRNA expression data showed clear grouping of ICC vs. non-neoplastic liver parenchyma. We identified 134 down-regulated and 128 upregulated miRNAs. Based on overexpression and high fold-change, miR21, miR200b, miR221, and miR34c were measured in plasma from an independent cohort of patients with ICC (n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 7). Significant overexpression of miR-21 and miR-221 was found in plasma from ICC patients. Furthermore, circulating miR-21 demonstrated a high discriminatory ability between patients with ICC and healthy controls (AUC: 0.94). Conclusion Among the differentially expressed miRNAs in ICC, miR-21 and miR-221 are overexpressed and detectable in the circulation. Plasma expression levels of these miRNAs, particularly miR-21, accurately differentiates patients with ICC from healthy controls and could potentially serve as adjuncts in diagnosis. Prospective validation and comparison with other hepatobiliary malignancies is required to establish their potential role as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27685844

  13. [Laboratory markers of melanoma progression].

    PubMed

    Bánfalvi, Teodóra; Edesné, Mariann B; Gergye, Mária; Udvarhelyi, Nóra; Orosz, Zsolt; Gilde, Katalin; Kremmer, Tibor; Ottó, Szabolcs; Tímár, József

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular tumour markers may have potential role in the follow-up of patients with malignant melanoma, in therapy monitoring and in prediction of prognosis. In our article circulating tumour markers in melanoma (melanoma inhibitory activity, lipid bound sialic acid, neuron specific enolase, TA90 immune complex, S-100B protein, 5-S-cysteinyldopa, tyrosinase, cytokines, metalloproteinases, LDH) were reviewed. Among laboratory melanoma markers the S-100B protein is the most investigated. S-100B protein has high specificity, appropriate sensitivity and proved to be significant prognostic factor independent from stages. High serum values are associated with shorter survival. However, before S-100B monitoring immunohistochemistry for the detection of S-100B is required. In the case of malignant melanomas with low expression serum S-100B monitoring may not be sensitive enough to follow disease progression. Although the serum concentration of 5-S-cysteinyldopa did not prove to be independent prognostic factor in our previous studies comprising the highest patient number in the literature, the marker was suggested for therapy monitoring. The survival analysis indicated that the elevated 5-S-cysteinyldopa level predicts shorter survival. In spite of the calculated low correlation between the two markers, parallel elevation of S-100B protein and 5-S-cysteinyldopa indicated shorter survival. On the basis of the literature LDH is the most appropriate tumour marker in stage IV to predict prognosis, but its sensitivity and specificity could not achieve that of S-100B protein. S-100B and LDH proved to be similarly reliable in respect to the clinical outcome. Determination of serum concentration of MIA and tyrosinase are also reliable markers in malignant melanoma. The other investigated markers are not well known yet or do not provide useful information to the clinicians. PMID:12704461

  14. Overview of endogenous and synthetic melanocortin peptides.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K R; Todorovic, A; Proneth, B; Haskell-Luevano, C

    2006-01-01

    The melanocortin system consists of five seven-transmembrane spanning G-protein coupled (GPCRs) receptors (MC1R-MC5R), the endogenous agonists a-, B- and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and the endogenous antagonists Agouti and Agouti-related protein (AGRP). Melanocortin agonists are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and weight omeostasis in mammals. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) have been performed on the endogenous melanocortin receptor agonists and antagonists that have identified ligand amino acid residues implicated as important for receptor binding and stimulation. Knowledge of putative ligand-receptor interactions may help to design molecules as therapeutic agents for the treatment of physiological diseases. PMID:16914082

  15. Analysis of the Human Endogenous Coregulator Complexome

    PubMed Central

    Malovannaya, Anna; Lanz, Rainer B.; Jung, Sung Yun; Bulynko, Yaroslava; Le, Nguyen T.; Chan, Doug W.; Ding, Chen; Shi, Yi; Yucer, Nur; Krenciute, Giedre; Kim, Beom-Jun; Li, Chunshu; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; O’Malley, Bert W.; Qin, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Summary Elucidation of endogenous cellular protein-protein interactions and their networks is most desirable for biological studies. Here we report our study of endogenous human coregulator protein complex networks obtained from integrative mass spectrometry-based analysis of 3,290 affinity purifications. By preserving weak protein interactions during complex isolation and utilizing high levels of reciprocity in the large dataset we identified many unreported protein associations, such as a transcriptional network formed by ZMYND8, ZNF687 and ZNF592. Furthermore, our work revealed a tiered interplay within networks that share common proteins, providing a conceptual organization of a cellular proteome composed of minimal endogenous modules (MEMOs), functional uniCOREs and regulatory complex-complex interaction networks (CCIs). This resource will effectively fill a void in linking correlative genomic studies with an understanding of transcriptional regulatory protein functions within the proteome for formulation and testing of new hypotheses. PMID:21620140

  16. Endogenous RNAi pathways in C. elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Billi, Allison C; Fischer, Sylvia E J; Kim, John K

    2014-01-01

    In addition to several hundred microRNAs, C. elegans produces thousands of other small RNAs targeting coding genes, pseudogenes, transposons, and other noncoding RNAs. Here we review what is currently known about these endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), providing an overview of their biogenesis, their associated protein factors, and their effects on mRNA dynamics and chromatin structure. Additionally, we describe how the molecular actions of these classes of endogenous small RNAs connect to their physiological roles in the organism. PMID:24816713

  17. Animal spirits, competitive markets, and endogenous growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses a simple model with an endogenous discount rate and linear technology to investigate whether a competitive equilibrium has a higher balanced growth path (BGP) than the social planning solution and whether the BGP is determinate or indeterminate. The implications are as follows. To start with, people with an instinct to compare themselves with others possess an endogenous discount rate. In turn, this instinct affects the economic growth rate in a competitive market economy. The competitive market economy also sometimes achieves higher economic growth than a social planning economy. However, the outcomes of market economy occasionally fluctuate because of the presence of the self-fulfilling prophecy or animal spirits.

  18. Serological markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuna, Andrea Tešija

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract with two main distinguishable entities, Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) is a diagnosis that covers the “grey” zone of diagnostic uncertainty between UC and CD. Current diagnosis of IBD relies on the clinical, endoscopic, radiological, histological and biochemical features, but this approach has shortcomings especially in cases of overlapping symptoms of CD and UC. The need for a diagnostic tool that would improve the conventional methods in IBD diagnosis directed the search towards potential immunological markers, since an aberrant immune response against microbial or endogenous antigens in a genetically susceptible host seems to be implicated in IBD pathogenesis. The spectrum of antibodies to different microbial antigens and autoantibodies associated with IBD is rapidly expanding. Most of these antibodies are associated with CD like anti-glycan antibodies: anti-Saccharomices cerevisiae (ASCA) and the recently described anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-chitobioside (ACCA), anti-mannobioside (AMCA), anti-laminarin (anti-L) and anti-chitin (anti-C) antibodies; in addition to other antibodies that target microbial antigens: anti-outer membrane porin C (anti-OmpC), anti-Cbir1 flagellin and anti-I2 antibody. Also, autoantibodies targeting the exocrine pancreas (PAB) were shown to be highly specific for CD. In contrast, UC has been associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (pANCA) and antibodies against goblet cells (GAB). Current evidence suggests that serologic panels of multiple antibodies are useful in differential diagnosis of CD versus UC and can be a valuable aid in stratifying patients according to disease phenotype and risk of complications. PMID:23457764

  19. Serological markers of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kuna, Andrea Tesija

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a heterogeneous group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract with two main distinguishable entities, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD-unclassified (IBD-U) is a diagnosis that covers the "grey" zone of diagnostic uncertainty between UC and CD. Current diagnosis of IBD relies on the clinical, endoscopic, radiological, histological and biochemical features, but this approach has shortcomings especially in cases of overlapping symptoms of CD and UC. The need for a diagnostic tool that would improve the conventional methods in IBD diagnosis directed the search towards potential immunological markers, since an aberrant immune response against microbial or endogenous antigens in a genetically susceptible host seems to be implicated in IBD pathogenesis. The spectrum of antibodies to different microbial antigens and autoantibodies associated with IBD is rapidly expanding. Most of these antibodies are associated with CD like anti-glycan antibodies: anti-Saccharomices cerevisiae (ASCA) and the recently described anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-chitobioside (ACCA), anti-mannobioside (AMCA), anti-laminarin (anti-L) and anti-chitin (anti-C) antibodies; in addition to other antibodies that target microbial antigens: anti-outer membrane porin C (anti-OmpC), anti-Cbir1 flagellin and anti-12 antibody. Also, autoantibodies targeting the exocrine pancreas (PAB) were shown to be highly specific for CD. In contrast, UC has been associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (pANCA) and antibodies against goblet cells (GAB). Current evidence suggests that serologic panels of multiple antibodies are useful in differential diagnosis of CD versus UC and can be a valuable aid in stratifying patients according to disease phenotype and risk of complications.

  20. Gene and protein patterns of potential prion-related markers in the central nervous system of clinical and preclinical infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Filali, Hicham; Vidal, Enric; Bolea, Rosa; Márquez, Mercedes; Marco, Paola; Vargas, Antonia; Pumarola, Martí; Martin-Burriel, Inmaculada; Badiola, Juan J

    2013-03-11

    The molecular pathogenic mechanisms of prion diseases are far from clear. Genomic analyses have revealed genetic biomarkers potentially involved in prion neuropathology in naturally scrapie-infected sheep, a good animal model of infectious prionopathies. However, these biomarkers must be validated in independent studies at different stages of the disease. The gene and protein expression profiles and protein distribution of six potential genetic biomarkers (i.e., CAPN6, COL1A2, COL3A1, GALA1, MT2A and MTNR1B) are presented here for both the early and terminal stages of scrapie in five different brain regions. Gene transcription changes were confirmed in the medulla oblongata, and the expression profiles were generally similar in other central nervous system regions. The changes were more substantial in clinical animals compared to preclinical animals. The expression of the CAPN6 protein increased in the spinal cord and cerebellum of the clinical and preclinical brains. The distribution of the GALA1 was identified in glial cells from the cerebellum of scrapie-infected animals, GALA1 protein expression was increased in clinical animals in the majority of regions, and the increase of MT2A was in agreement with previous reports. The downregulation of MTNR1B was especially marked in the Purkinje cells. Finally, although collagen genes were downregulated the protein immunostaining did not reveal significant changes between the scrapie-infected and control animals. In conclusion, this study of gene transcription and protein expression and distribution confirm CAPN6, GALA1, MTNR1B and MT2A as potential targets for further prion disease research.

  1. Gene and protein patterns of potential prion-related markers in the central nervous system of clinical and preclinical infected sheep

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The molecular pathogenic mechanisms of prion diseases are far from clear. Genomic analyses have revealed genetic biomarkers potentially involved in prion neuropathology in naturally scrapie-infected sheep, a good animal model of infectious prionopathies. However, these biomarkers must be validated in independent studies at different stages of the disease. The gene and protein expression profiles and protein distribution of six potential genetic biomarkers (i.e., CAPN6, COL1A2, COL3A1, GALA1, MT2A and MTNR1B) are presented here for both the early and terminal stages of scrapie in five different brain regions. Gene transcription changes were confirmed in the medulla oblongata, and the expression profiles were generally similar in other central nervous system regions. The changes were more substantial in clinical animals compared to preclinical animals. The expression of the CAPN6 protein increased in the spinal cord and cerebellum of the clinical and preclinical brains. The distribution of the GALA1 was identified in glial cells from the cerebellum of scrapie-infected animals, GALA1 protein expression was increased in clinical animals in the majority of regions, and the increase of MT2A was in agreement with previous reports. The downregulation of MTNR1B was especially marked in the Purkinje cells. Finally, although collagen genes were downregulated the protein immunostaining did not reveal significant changes between the scrapie-infected and control animals. In conclusion, this study of gene transcription and protein expression and distribution confirm CAPN6, GALA1, MTNR1B and MT2A as potential targets for further prion disease research. PMID:23497022

  2. Red wine polyphenolics reduce the expression of inflammation markers in human colon-derived CCD-18Co myofibroblast cells: potential role of microRNA-126.

    PubMed

    Angel-Morales, Gabriela; Noratto, Giuliana; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne

    2012-07-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation is an established risk factor for colon cancer. Polyphenolic compounds from fruit and vegetables have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in several cell lines and tissues. However, their anti-inflammatory mechanisms, involving microRNAs in the regulation of inflammation, have not been extensively investigated. The goal of this research was to assess the chemopreventive potential of polyphenolics extracted from red wine made with Lenoir grapes (Vitis aestivalis hybrid) in human colon-derived CCD-18Co myofibroblasts cells, and to assess the potential involvement of microRNA-126 (miR-126) in the underlying mechanisms. The results show that the polyphenolic red wine extract (WE) decreased mRNA expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory mediators NF-kB, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and PECAM-1 by 1.95-, 1.98-, 1.52-, and 1.84-fold respectively, in a dose dependent manner (0-100 μg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE) mL(-1)) down to 0.80-, 0.79-, 0.66-, and 0.68-fold in DMSO-treated control cells not challenged with LPS, respectively. Correspondingly, miR-126, which has a target region within the 3'-UTR of VCAM-1 mRNA, was increased 2.79-fold by the WE at 100 μg GAE mL(-1). The potential role of miR-126 was confirmed by transfecting cells with a specific miR-126-antagomir, as-miR-126. Transfection with as-miR-126 down-regulated miR-126 to 0.71-fold in the control cells and up-regulated mRNA levels of NF-kB, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and PECAM-1 to 1.80-, 1.49-, 2.30-, and 1.95-fold of controls, respectively. WE at 100 μg GAE mL(-1) partially reversed the effects of the as-miR-126 to 1.02-, 1.01-, 1.04-, and 1.05-fold, for mRNA levels of NF-kB, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and PECAM-1 respectively. This indicates the potential role of miR-126 in the anti-inflammatory properties of polyphenolics from red wine in CCD-18Co myofibroblasts cells. PMID:22572890

  3. Genotoxicity of 2-alkylcyclobutanones, markers for an irradiation treatment in fat-containing food—Part I: cyto- and genotoxic potential of 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delincée, Henry; Soika, Christiane; Horvatovich, Péter; Rechkemmer, Gerhard; Marchioni, Eric

    2002-03-01

    Previous experiments had indicated a slight genotoxic potential both in rat and in human colon cells of a sample of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone, a compound formed by irradiation of food containing palmitic acid in its triglycerides. Up to date, there is no evidence that 2-alkylcyclobutanones occur in non-irradiated foodstuffs, consequently it is prudent to test several members of the class of 2-alkylcyclobutanones which are produced by treatment of fat-containing food with ionising radiation. In this work, 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (derived from stearic acid) has been tested for its cytotoxic and genotoxic potential. Human colon tumor cell lines, i.e. HT 29 and HT 29 clone 19A, were employed as models for in vitro experiments for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests. Cytotoxicity was measured by tetrazolium salt reduction assays (MTT and WST-1) and genotoxicity by determining DNA damage using the Comet Assay. Neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic effects were induced by 2-TCB in HT 29 or HT 29 cl 19A cells at an incubation time of 30 min at 37°C, not even at the highest concentration (400 μM) tested. After prolonged incubation times (1-2 days) at higher concentrations (>50 μM) cytotoxicity did, however, appear. Studies on other 2-alkylcyclobutanones are in progress.

  4. Potential role of nuclear PD-L1 expression in cell-surface vimentin positive circulating tumor cells as a prognostic marker in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Batth, Izhar Singh; Brownlee, Zachary; Rojas, Christina; Meng, Qing H.; Kopetz, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, determining their prognostic role in cancer patients undergoing treatment is a challenge. We evaluated the prognostic value of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in CTCs in colorectal and prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 30 metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTCs were isolated from the samples using magnetic separation with the cell-surface vimentin(CSV)-specific 84-1 monoclonal antibody that detects epithelial-mesenchymal transitioned (EMT) CTCs. CTCs were enumerated and analyzed for PD-L1 expression using confocal microscopy. PD-L1 expression was detectable in CTCs and was localized in the membrane and/or cytoplasm and nucleus. CTC detection alone was not associated with poor progression-free or overall survival in colorectal cancer or prostate cancer patients, but nuclear PD-L1 (nPD-L1) expression in these patients was significantly associated with short survival durations. These results demonstrated that nPD-L1 has potential as a clinically relevant prognostic biomarker for colorectal and prostate cancer. Our data thus suggested that use of CTC-based models of cancer for risk assessment can improve the standard cancer staging criteria and supported the incorporation of nPD-L1 expression detection in CTCs detection in such models. PMID:27363678

  5. Endogenous Protease Activation of ENaC

    PubMed Central

    Adebamiro, Adedotun; Cheng, Yi; Johnson, John P.; Bridges, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous serine proteases have been reported to control the reabsorption of Na+ by kidney- and lung-derived epithelial cells via stimulation of electrogenic Na+ transport mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). In this study we investigated the effects of aprotinin on ENaC single channel properties using transepithelial fluctuation analysis in the amphibian kidney epithelium, A6. Aprotinin caused a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition (84 ± 10.5%) in the amiloride-sensitive sodium transport (INa) with a time constant of 18 min and half maximal inhibition constant of 1 μM. Analysis of amiloride analogue blocker–induced fluctuations in INa showed linear rate–concentration plots with identical blocker on and off rates in control and aprotinin-inhibited conditions. Verification of open-block kinetics allowed for the use of a pulse protocol method (Helman, S.I., X. Liu, K. Baldwin, B.L. Blazer-Yost, and W.J. Els. 1998. Am. J. Physiol. 274:C947–C957) to study the same cells under different conditions as well as the reversibility of the aprotinin effect on single channel properties. Aprotinin caused reversible changes in all three single channel properties but only the change in the number of open channels was consistent with the inhibition of INa. A 50% decrease in INa was accompanied by 50% increases in the single channel current and open probability but an 80% decrease in the number of open channels. Washout of aprotinin led to a time-dependent restoration of INa as well as the single channel properties to the control, pre-aprotinin, values. We conclude that protease regulation of INa is mediated by changes in the number of open channels in the apical membrane. The increase in the single channel current caused by protease inhibition can be explained by a hyperpolarization of the apical membrane potential as active Na+ channels are retrieved. The paradoxical increase in channel open probability caused by protease inhibition will require further

  6. Endogenous 3, 4- Dihydroxyphenylalanine and Dopaquinone Modifications on Protein Tyrosine: links to mitochondrially derived oxidative stress via hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chen, Baowei; Chin, Mark H.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Petritis, Brianne O.; Camp, David G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Desmond J.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2010-06-02

    Oxidative modifications of protein tyrosines have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Among these modifications, elevations in levels of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a major product of hydroxyl radical addition to tyrosine, has been observed in a number of pathologies. Here we report the first global proteome survey of endogenous site-specific modifications, i.e, DOPA and its further oxidation product dopaquinone (DQ) in mouse brain and heart tissues. Results from LC-MS/MS analyses included 203 and 71 DOPA-modified tyrosine sites identified from brain and heart, respectively, with a false discovery rate of ~1%; while only a few nitrotyrosine containing peptides, a more commonly studied marker of oxidative stress, were detectable, suggesting the much higher abundance for DOPA modification as compared with tyrosine nitration. Moreover, 57 and 29 DQ modified peptides were observed from brain and heart, respectively; nearly half of these peptides were also observed with DOPA modification on the same sites. For both tissues, these modifications are preferentially found in mitochondrial proteins with metal-binding properties, consistent with metal catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation from mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These modifications also link to a number of mitochondria-associated and other signaling pathways. Furthermore, many of the modification sites were common sites of previously reported tyrosine phosphorylation suggesting potential disruption of signaling pathways. Structural aspects of DOPA-modified tyrosine sequences are distinct from those of nitrotyrosines suggesting that each type of modifications provides a marker for different in vivo reactive chemistries and can be used to predict sensitive protein targets. Collectively, the results suggest that these modifications are linked with mitochondrially-derived oxidative stress, and may serve as sensitive markers for disease pathologies.

  7. HOXA13 is a potential GBM diagnostic marker and promotes glioma invasion by activating the Wnt and TGF-β pathways

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Ran; Han, Lei; Wang, Qixue; Wei, Jianwei; Chen, Luyue; Zhang, Jianning; Kang, Chunsheng; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox (HOX) genes, including HOXA13, are involved in human cancer. We found that HOXA13 expression was associated with glioma grade and prognosis. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that most of the HOXA13-associated genes were enriched in cancer-related signaling pathways and mainly involved in the regulation of transcription. We transfected four glioma cell lines with Lenti-si HOXA13. HOXA13 increased cell proliferation and invasion and inhibited apoptosis. HOXA13 decreased β-catenin, phospho-SMAD2, and phospho-SMAD3 in the nucleus and increased phospho-β-catenin in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, downregulation of HOXA13 in orthotopic tumors decreased tumor growth. We suggest that HOXA13 promotes glioma progression in part via Wnt- and TGF-β-induced EMT and is a potential diagnostic biomarker for glioblastoma and an independent prognostic factor in high-grade glioma. PMID:26356815

  8. A Novel Dried Blood Spot-LCMS Method for the Quantification of Methotrexate Polyglutamates as a Potential Marker for Methotrexate Use in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hawwa, Ahmed F.; AlBawab, AbdelQader; Rooney, Madeleine; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Beresford, Michael W.; McElnay, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Development and validation of a selective and sensitive LCMS method for the determination of methotrexate polyglutamates in dried blood spots (DBS). Methods DBS samples [spiked or patient samples] were prepared by applying blood to Guthrie cards which was then dried at room temperature. The method utilised 6-mm disks punched from the DBS samples (equivalent to approximately 12 µl of whole blood). The simple treatment procedure was based on protein precipitation using perchloric acid followed by solid phase extraction using MAX cartridges. The extracted sample was chromatographed using a reversed phase system involving an Atlantis T3-C18 column (3 µm, 2.1×150 mm) preceded by Atlantis guard column of matching chemistry. Analytes were subjected to LCMS analysis using positive electrospray ionization. Key Results The method was linear over the range 5–400 nmol/L. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.6 and 5 nmol/L for individual polyglutamates and 1.5 and 4.5 nmol/L for total polyglutamates, respectively. The method has been applied successfully to the determination of DBS finger-prick samples from 47 paediatric patients and results confirmed with concentrations measured in matched RBC samples using conventional HPLC-UV technique. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance The methodology has a potential for application in a range of clinical studies (e.g. pharmacokinetic evaluations or medication adherence assessment) since it is minimally invasive and easy to perform, potentially allowing parents to take blood samples at home. The feasibility of using DBS sampling can be of major value for future clinical trials or clinical care in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24587116

  9. Endogenous Bioactive Lipids and the Regulation of Conventional Outflow Facility

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhou; Woodward, David F.; Stamer, W. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Summary Perturbation of paracrine signaling within the human conventional outflow pathway influences tissue homeostasis and outflow function. For example, exogenous introduction of the bioactive lipids, sphingosine-1-phosphate, anandamide or prostaglandin F2α, to conventional outflow tissues alters the rate of drainage of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork, and into Schlemm’s canal. This review summarizes recent data that characterizes endogenous bioactive lipids, their receptors and associated signaling partners in the conventional outflow tract. We also discuss the potential of targeting such signaling pathways as a strategy for the development of therapeutics to treat ocular hypertension and glaucoma. PMID:19381354

  10. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  11. Shedding "UV" light on endogenous opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Bonci, Antonello

    2014-06-19

    Excessive sun tanning can result in addictive behavior. In this issue of Cell, Fell et al. utilize a combination of behavioral pharmacology and transgenic mice to demonstrate that chronic UV light exposure recruits p53 signaling in keratinocytes, subsequently increasing β-endorphin signaling at opioid receptors, and produces an endogenous opioid-dependent state.

  12. Biochemical and physiological aspects of endogenous androgens.

    PubMed

    Kicman, Andrew T

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to give a synopsis of the major aspects concerning the biochemistry of endogenous androgens, supplemented with several facets of physiology, particularly with respect to testosterone. Testosterone continues to be the most common adverse finding declared by World Anti-Doping Agency accredited laboratories, such samples having an augmented testosterone to epitestosterone ratio. Knowledge regarding the precursors and metabolism of endogenous testosterone is therefore fundamental to understanding many of the issues concerning doping with testosterone and its prohormones, including the detection of their administration. Further, adverse findings for nandrolone are frequent, but this steroid and 19-norandrostenedione are also produced endogenously, an appealing hypothesis being that they are minor by-products of the aromatization of androgens. At sports tribunals pertaining to adverse analytical findings of natural androgen administration, experts often raise issues that concern some aspect of steroid biochemistry and physiology. Salient topics included within this review are the origins and interconversion of endogenous androgens, the biosynthesis of testosterone and epitestosterone, the mechanism of aromatization, the molecular biology of the androgen receptor, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, disturbances to this axis by anabolic steroid administration, the transport (binding) of androgens in blood, and briefly the metabolism and excretion of androgens.

  13. Shedding "UV" light on endogenous opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Tejeda, Hugo A; Bonci, Antonello

    2014-06-19

    Excessive sun tanning can result in addictive behavior. In this issue of Cell, Fell et al. utilize a combination of behavioral pharmacology and transgenic mice to demonstrate that chronic UV light exposure recruits p53 signaling in keratinocytes, subsequently increasing β-endorphin signaling at opioid receptors, and produces an endogenous opioid-dependent state. PMID:24949960

  14. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR. PMID:24882143

  15. Characterization of Endogenous Ethanol in the Mammal.

    PubMed

    McManus, I R; Contag, A O; Olson, R E

    1960-01-01

    Ethanol has been isolated from the tissues of several animal species in amounts ranging from 23 to 145 micromole/100 gm of tissue. Intestinal bacterial flora appear to be excluded as a source of this ethanol. Radioactivity from pyruvate-2-C(14) appeared in ethanol after incubation with liver slices; this finding indicates an endogenous synthesis.

  16. Essays on Policy Evaluation with Endogenous Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, experimental and quasi-experimental methods have been favored by researchers in empirical economics, as they provide unbiased causal estimates. However, when implementing a program, it is often not possible to randomly assign subjects to treatment, leading to a possible endogeneity bias. This dissertation consists of two…

  17. Combined experimental and in silico approaches for exploring antiperoxidative potential of structurally diverse classes of antioxidants on docetaxel-induced lipid peroxidation using 4-HNE as the model marker.

    PubMed

    Roy, Partha Pratim; Ray, Sarbani Dey; Ray, Supratim

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present work was tantamount to explain the antiperoxidative potential and structural requirements of twenty-eight structurally diverse classes of antioxidants on docetaxel-induced lipid peroxidation. Both experimental and computational approaches were taken to the work. The experiments were performed in vitro and goat liver was used as a source of lipid. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal was used as model marker for estimation of docetaxel-lipid interaction. The computational portion of the work was limited to QSAR analysis of those antioxidants for better understanding of the structural requirements of antioxidants on docetaxel-lipid interaction. The study was done with freely online available 2D descriptors available on PaDEL (open source). Stepwise regression analysis was used as chemometric tool. The experimental study showed the lipid peroxidation induction capacity of docetaxel. It was also noted that all twenty-eight antioxidants had the ability to suppress the lipid peroxidation. But among them butylated hydroxyl toluene showed the highest potential (-20.5%) and flavone showing lowest potential (-0.8%) to suppress the docetaxel-induced lipid peroxidation. The computational study indicates the importance of topology of the whole molecules, topological distances among atoms within a molecule and specific fragment pattern present in a molecule required for inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  18. Metabolomics evaluation of hydroxyproline as a potential marker of melamine and cyanuric acid nephrotoxicity in male and female Fischer F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Laura K; Sun, Jinchun; Pence, Lisa M; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Beger, Richard D

    2012-11-01

    Following kidney failure in domesticated pets in the US and kidney issues requiring hospitalization with some deaths in children in China, investigators determined the cause was adulteration of pet foods and baby formula with melamine. It has since been noted that exposure of rats to melamine and cyanuric acid forms melamine cyanurate crystals in the kidney leading to acute nephrotoxicity. This metabolomics study aimed to identify biomarkers of melamine and cyanuric acid-induced renal injury. Male and female Fischer 344 rats were fed a diet fortified with varying doses of melamine and cyanuric acid for 28 days. Analysis of urinary amino acids showed hydroxyproline was increased in both sexes in a manner consistent with the clinical chemistry and histopathology data; most prominent when total urine output was taken into account. Furthermore, rats with the highest levels of urinary hydroxyproline were the only rats that exhibited fibrosis within the kidney. Clinical chemistry and histopathology indicated male rats were slightly more affected than female rats following dosing with the 120 and 180 ppm formulations; hydroxyproline excretion also supports this finding. Hydroxyproline may be a noninvasive urinary biomarker for detection of acute kidney injury potentially associated with kidney fibrosis.

  19. Identification of FGF19 as a prognostic marker and potential driver gene of lung squamous cell carcinomas in Chinese smoking patients

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Weiliang; Li, Ziming; Niu, Xiaomin; Ji, Wenxiang; Yuan, Hong; Xu, Qiang; Luo, Qingquan; Zhang, Jie; Lu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive genomic characterizations of lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) have been performed, but the differences between smokers (S-LSCC) and never smokers (NS-LSCC) are not clear, as NS-LSCC could be considered as a different disease from S-LSCC. In this study we delineated genomic alterations in a cohort of 21 NS-LSCC and 16 S-LSCC patients, and identified common gene mutations and amplifications as previously reported. Inclusion of more NS-LSCC patients enabled us to identify unreported S-LSCC- or NS-LSCC-specific alterations. Importantly, an amplification region containing FGF19, FGF3, FGF4 and CCND1 was found five-times more frequent in S-LSCC than in NS-LSCC. Amplification of FGF19 was validated in independent LSCC samples. Furthermore, FGF19 stimulated LSCC cell growth in vitro. These data implicate FGF19 as a potential driver gene in LSCC with clinic characteristics as smoking. PMID:26943773

  20. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  1. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  2. Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase as a marker for the proliferative potential of melanocyte-lineage cells in the human skin.

    PubMed

    Shimanuki, Miwa; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Suzuki, Tamio; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2012-08-01

    Melanocytes in the human epidermis actively produce and secrete various substances, thereby contributing to the maintenance of the skin homeostasis. Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) that catalyzes the formation of prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2) ) may be one of such secreted molecules. Once secreted, L-PGDS functions as a transporter for lipophilic ligands, including all-trans retinoic acid (RA). L-PGDS, therefore, may possess pleiotropic functions in the skin through PGD(2) and RA. We aimed to identify the cell types that express L-PGDS in human skin and to explore the role of L-PGDS in the growth potential of melanocyte-lineage cells. Immunohistochemical analysis for L-PGDS expression was performed with the tissue sections that were prepared from five malignant melanomas, six nevus cell nevi and one Spitz nevus. Normal skin tissues adjacent to the excised melanoma tissues were also analyzed. L-PGDS is expressed in epidermal melanocytes but its expression is undetectable in keratinocytes. Moreover, L-PGDS is undetectable in most benign nevus cells, which may reflect the marginally accelerated proliferation of nevus cells. In contrast, L-PGDS is overexpressed in malignant melanomas, although the frequency of L-PGDS-positive cells was variable (15-50%), depending on the specimens. Lastly, RNA interference analysis against human L-PGDS was performed with short interfering RNA. Knockdown of L-PGDS expression with short interfering RNA in cultured cells suggests that L-PGDS may restrict cell proliferation through RA. In conclusion, L-PGDS expression may contribute to the restricted proliferation of epidermal melanocytes, but conversely its overexpression may reflect the dysregulated proliferation of melanoma cells.

  3. Event-related potential (ERP) markers of melodic processing: The N2 component is modulated by structural complexity, not by melodic 'meaningfulness'.

    PubMed

    Minati, L; Salvatoni, L; Rosazza, C; Pietrocini, E; Visani, E; Panzica, F; Scaioli, V; Avanzini, G; Franceschetti, S

    2010-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the event-related potential (ERP) evoked by a note shows substantial differences depending on whether the note is part of a melodic context or presented in an unstructured repetition. In particular, the N2 component has been found to have considerably increased latency and a more frontal topography for notes presented in a melody. An open question is whether such effect is related to the 'meaningfulness' of a note sequence, that is due to the formation of abstract melodic entities, rather than more simply an indicator of cognitive load associated with processing a structurally-complex sequence as opposed to an unstructured repetition. In this study, we addressed this issue by recording ERPs from 10 healthy non-musicians listening to eight one-part unfamiliar tonal melodies and eight sequences of random notes. The two stimuli were matched for distribution of pitch, intervals and note duration as well as for entropy of the time-series of pitch and duration. While tonal melodies were rated more meaningful (p<0.001) and pleasant (p<0.001) by all participants, no effects were found for the N2 component amplitude (p> or =0.8) and latency (p=0.2). Combined with previous findings, this indicates that the N2 evoked by each individual note responds to the structural complexity of the note sequence, i.e., to the presence of pitch and duration changes, but not to higher-level processing related to the formation of abstract melodic entities. In contrast, we found that the amplitude of the P2 component was marginally (p=0.04) elevated for random notes as compared to tonal melodies. This may be related to attentional modulation, or more specifically to associative components of auditory processing. PMID:20600678

  4. Relationship between endogenous 3-methylhistidine excretion and body composition.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, H C; Mendez, J; Buskirk, E R; Cohn, S H

    1981-03-01

    Fourteen healthy men (aged 20-30 yr) consumed two isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets in the sequence of a 4-day meat diet (MD) followed by a 7-day meal-free diet (MFD). Urinary 3-methylhistidine (3MH) excretion during the MD (513 +/- 21 mumol . day-1, mean +/- SE) was significantly higher (P less than 0.01) than day 3 of the MFD (230 +/- 10 mumol . day-1), after which the mean daily 3MH output was constant with a mean coefficient of variation of 4.5%. There was no change in fat-free body mass (FFBM) determined by densitometry at the start (62.3 +/- 1.8 kg) and the end (62.2 +/- 1.9 kg) of the 11-day dietary period. Mean muscle mass (MM) calculated from measurements of total-body potassium and nitrogen was 23.4 +/- 1.3 kg. Endogenous 3MH excretion was related more closely to MM (r = 0.91, P less than 0.001) than to FFBM measured by densitometry (r = 0.81, P less than 0.001). Only a low correlation coefficient (r = 0.33, P less than 0.05) was observed between 3MH and the nonmuscle component of FFBM. Urinary creatinine output also was correlated significantly with 3MH (r = 0.87; P less than 0.001) and MM (r = 0.79; P less than 0.01). It is concluded that because endogenous 3MH is significantly related to MM in man, it can be used as a marker to study in vivo total-body muscle protein degradation provided that the necessary dietary restrictions are observed.

  5. [Effect of female sex steroids on levels of endogenous ethanol].

    PubMed

    Garber, M R; Kovalenko, A E

    1988-01-01

    The authors presented the results of a study of the effect of female sex steroids on the level of endogenous ethanol. The time course of endogenous ethanol during the menstrual cycle was investigated. The concentration of endogenous ethanol was compared in the groups of women receiving and not receiving hormonal contraceptives. An increase in sex steroids during the menstrual cycle was accompanied by a decrease in the level of endogenous ethanol. The use of hormonal contraceptives caused an increase in the background concentration of endogenous ethanol. A possible effect of endogenous and exogenous female sex steroids on different levels of regulation of ethanol metabolism was assumed.

  6. Biased Agonism of Endogenous Opioid Peptides at the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Georgina L; Lane, J Robert; Coudrat, Thomas; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell

    2015-08-01

    Biased agonism is having a major impact on modern drug discovery, and describes the ability of distinct G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands to activate different cell signaling pathways, and to result in different physiologic outcomes. To date, most studies of biased agonism have focused on synthetic molecules targeting various GPCRs; however, many of these receptors have multiple endogenous ligands, suggesting that "natural" bias may be an unappreciated feature of these GPCRs. The μ-opioid receptor (MOP) is activated by numerous endogenous opioid peptides, remains an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain, and exhibits biased agonism in response to synthetic opiates. The aim of this study was to rigorously assess the potential for biased agonism in the actions of endogenous opioids at the MOP in a common cellular background, and compare these to the effects of the agonist d-Ala2-N-MePhe4-Gly-ol enkephalin (DAMGO). We investigated activation of G proteins, inhibition of cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 phosphorylation, β-arrestin 1/2 recruitment, and MOP trafficking, and applied a novel analytical method to quantify biased agonism. Although many endogenous opioids displayed signaling profiles similar to that of DAMGO, α-neoendorphin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, and the putatively endogenous peptide endomorphin-1 displayed particularly distinct bias profiles. These may represent examples of natural bias if it can be shown that they have different signaling properties and physiologic effects in vivo compared with other endogenous opioids. Understanding how endogenous opioids control physiologic processes through biased agonism can reveal vital information required to enable the design of biased opioids with improved pharmacological profiles and treat diseases involving dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system. PMID:26013541

  7. The endogenous fluorescence of fibroblast in collagen gels as indicator of stiffness of the extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Ortega-Martinez, A.; Franco, W.

    2016-03-01

    The stiffness or rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell response. Established mechanical tests to measure stiffness, such as indentation and tensile tests, are invasive and destructive to the sample. Endogenous or native molecules to cells and ECM components, like tryptophan and cross-links of collagen, display fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light. Most likely, the concentration of these endogenous fluorophores changes as the stiffness of the ECM changes. In this work we investigate the endogenous fluorescence of collagen gels containing fibroblasts as a non-invasive non-destructive method to measure stiffness of the ECM. Human fibroblast cells were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen (50,000 cells/ml). This construct is a simple model of tissue contraction. During contraction, changes in the excitation-emission matrix (a fluorescence map in the 240-520/290-530 nm range) of constructs were measured with a spectrofluoremeter, and changes in stiffness were measured with a standard indentation test over 16 days. Results show that a progressive increase in fluorescence of the 290/340 nm excitation-emission pair correlates with a progressive increase in stiffness (r=0.9, α=0.5). The fluorescence of this excitation-emission pair is ascribed to tryptophan and variations in the fluorescence of this pair correlate with cellular proliferation. In this tissue model, the endogenous functional fluorescence of proliferating fibroblast cells is a biomechanical marker of stiffness of the ECM.

  8. Cellular responses to endogenous electrochemical gradients in morphological development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.

    1996-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields give vectorial direction to morphological development in Zea mays (sweet corn) in response to gravity. Endogenous electrical fields are important because of their ability to influence: (1) intercellular organization and development through their effects on the membrane potential, (2) direct effects such as electrophoresis of membrane components, and (3) both intracellular and extracellular transport of charged compounds. Their primary influence is in providing a vectorial dimension to the progression of one physiological state to another. Gravity perception and transduction in the mesocotyl of vascular plants is a complex interplay of electrical and chemical gradients which ultimately provide the driving force for the resulting growth curvature called gravitropism. Among the earliest events in gravitropism are changes in impedance, voltage, and conductance between the vascular stele and the growth tissues, the cortex, in the mesocotyl of corn shoots. In response to gravistimulation: (1) a potential develops which is vectorial and of sufficient magnitude to be a driving force for transport between the vascular stele and cortex, (2) the ionic conductance changes within seconds showing altered transport between the tissues, and (3) the impedance shows a transient biphasic response which indicates that the mobility of charges is altered following gravistimulation and is possibly the triggering event for the cascade of actions which leads to growth curvature.

  9. Endogenous cannabinoid system as a modulator of food intake.

    PubMed

    Cota, D; Marsicano, G; Lutz, B; Vicennati, V; Stalla, G K; Pasquali, R; Pagotto, U

    2003-03-01

    The ability of Cannabis sativa (marijuana) to increase hunger has been noticed for centuries, although intensive research on its molecular mode of action started only after the characterization of its main psychoactive component Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the late 1960s. Despite the public concern related to the abuse of marijuana and its derivatives, scientific studies have pointed to the therapeutic potentials of cannabinoid compounds and have highlighted their ability to stimulate appetite, especially for sweet and palatable food. Later, the discovery of specific receptors and their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) suggested the existence of an endogenous cannabinoid system, providing a physiological basis for biological effects induced by marijuana and other cannabinoids. Epidemiological reports describing the appetite-stimulating properties of cannabinoids and the recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cannabinoid action have proposed a central role of the cannabinoid system in obesity. The aim of this review is to provide an extensive overview on the role of this neuromodulatory system in feeding behavior by summarizing the most relevant data obtained from human and animal studies and by elucidating the interactions of the cannabinoid system with the most important neuronal networks and metabolic pathways involved in the control of food intake. Finally, a critical evaluation of future potential therapeutical applications of cannabinoid antagonists in the therapy of obesity and eating disorders will be discussed.

  10. Cellular responses to endogenous electrochemical gradients in morphological development.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, M F

    1996-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields give vectorial direction to morphological development in Zea mays (sweet corn) in response to gravity. Endogenous electrical fields are important because of their ability to influence: 1) intercellular organization and development through their effects on the membrane potential, 2) direct effects such as electrophoresis of membrane components, and 3) both intracellular and extracellular transport of charged compounds. Their primary influence is in providing a vectorial dimension to the progression of one physiological state to another. Gravity perception and transduction in the mesocotyl of vascular plants is a complex interplay of electrical and chemical gradients which ultimately provide the driving force for the resulting growth curvature called gravitropism. Among the earliest events in gravitropism are changes in impedance, voltage, and conductance between the vascular stele and the growth tissues, the cortex, in the mesocotyl of corn shoots. In response to gravistimulation: 1) a potential develops which is vectorial and of sufficient magnitude to be a driving force for transport between the vascular stele and cortex, 2) the ionic conductance changes within seconds showing altered transport between the tissues, and 3) the impedance shows a transient biphasic response which indicates that the mobility of charges is altered following gravistimulation and is possibly the triggering event for the cascade of actions which leads to growth curvature. PMID:11538627

  11. Cellular responses to endogenous electrochemical gradients in morphological development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrosiers, M. F.

    Endogenous electric fields give vectorial direction to morphological development in Zea mays (sweet corn) in response to gravity. Endogenous electrical fields are important because of their ability to influence: 1) intercellular organization and development through their effects on the membrane potential, 2) direct effects such as electrophoresis of membrane components, and 3) both intracellular and extracellular transport of charged compounds. Their primary influence is in providing a vectorial dimension to the progression of one physiological state to another. Gravity perception and transduction in the mesocotyl of vascular plants is a complex interplay of electrical and chemical gradients which ultimately provide the driving force for the resulting growth curvature called gravitropism. Among the earliest events in gravitropism are changes in impedance, voltage, and conductance between the vascular stele and the growth tissues, the cortex, in the mesocotyl of corn shoots. In response to gravistimulation: 1) a potential develops which is vectorial and of sufficient magnitude to be a driving force for transport between the vascular stele and cortex, 2) the ionic conductance changes within seconds showing altered transport between the tissues, and 3) the impedance shows a transient biphasic response which indicates that the mobility of charges is altered following gravistimulation and is possibly the triggering event for the cascade of actions which leads to growth curvature.

  12. Development of a Large Set of Microsatellite Markers in Zapote Mamey (Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) H.E. Moore & Stearn) and Their Potential Use in the Study of the Species.

    PubMed

    Arias, Renée S; Martínez-Castillo, Jaime; Sobolev, Victor S; Blancarte-Jasso, Nasib H; Simpson, Sheron A; Ballard, Linda L; Duke, Mary V; Liu, Xiaofen F; Irish, Brian M; Scheffler, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Pouteria sapota is known for its edible fruits that contain unique carotenoids, as well as for its fungitoxic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activity. However, its genetics is mostly unknown, including aspects about its genetic diversity and domestication process. We did high-throughput sequencing of microsatellite-enriched libraries of P. sapota, generated 5223 contig DNA sequences, 1.8 Mbp, developed 368 microsatellites markers and tested them on 29 individuals from 10 populations (seven wild, three cultivated) from Mexico, its putative domestication center. Gene ontology BLAST analysis of the DNA sequences containing microsatellites showed potential association to physiological functions. Genetic diversity was slightly higher in cultivated than in the wild gene pool (HE = 0.41 and HE = 0.35, respectively), although modified Garza-Williamson Index and Bottleneck software showed evidence for a reduction in genetic diversity for the cultivated one. Neighbor Joining, 3D Principal Coordinates Analysis and assignment tests grouped most individuals according to their geographic origin but no clear separation was observed between wild or cultivated gene pools due to, perhaps, the existence of several admixed populations. The developed microsatellites have a great potential in genetic population and domestication studies of P. sapota but additional sampling will be necessary to better understand how the domestication process has impacted the genetic diversity of this fruit crop. PMID:26111173

  13. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue. PMID:27526128

  14. [Concentration of endogenous ethanol and alcoholic motivation].

    PubMed

    Burov, Iu V; Treskov, V G; Kampov-Polevoĭ, A B; Kovalenko, A E; Rodionov, A P

    1983-11-01

    Trials with patients suffering from stage II chronic alcoholism and normal test subjects as well as experiments made on male C57BL mice (with genetically determined alcoholic motivation) and CBA mice (with genetically determined alcoholic aversion) and random-bred male rats with different levels of initial alcoholic motivation have shown the presence of reverse proportional dependence between blood plasma endogenous ethanol and alcoholic motivation.

  15. HERVd: database of human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Paces, Jan; Pavlícek, Adam; Paces, Václav

    2002-01-01

    The human endogenous retroviruses database (HERVd) is maintained at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, and is accessible via the World Wide Web at http://herv.img.cas.cz. The HERVd provides complex information on and analysis of retroviral elements found in the human genome. It can be used for searches of individual HERV families, identification of HERV parts, graphical output of HERV structures, comparison of HERVs and identification of retrovirus integration sites.

  16. Endogenous Retroviruses in the Genomics Era.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Welkin E

    2015-11-01

    Endogenous retroviruses comprise millions of discrete genetic loci distributed within the genomes of extant vertebrates. These sequences, which are clearly related to exogenous retroviruses, represent retroviral infections of the deep past, and their abundance suggests that retroviruses were a near-constant presence throughout the evolutionary history of modern vertebrates. Endogenous retroviruses contribute in myriad ways to the evolution of host genomes, as mutagens and as sources of genetic novelty (both coding and regulatory) to be acted upon by the twin engines of random genetic drift and natural selection. Importantly, the richness and complexity of endogenous retrovirus data can be used to understand how viruses spread and adapt on evolutionary timescales by combining population genetics and evolutionary theory with a detailed understanding of retrovirus biology (gleaned from the study of extant retroviruses). In addition to revealing the impact of viruses on organismal evolution, such studies can help us better understand, by looking back in time, how life-history traits, as well as ecological and geological events, influence the movement of viruses within and between populations. PMID:26958910

  17. Endogenous growth of persistently active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Peter; Oppenheimer, Clive; Stevenson, David

    1993-12-01

    LAVA lakes and active strombolian vents have persisted at some volcanoes for periods exceeding the historic record. They liberate prodigious amounts of volatiles and thermal energy but erupt little lava, a paradox that raises questions about how volcanoes grow. Although long-lasting surface manifestations can be sustained by convective exchange of magma with deeper reservoirs, residence times of magmas beneath several basaltic volcanoes are & sim10-100 years1,2, indicating that where surface activity continues for more than 100-1,000 years, the reservoirs are replenished by new magma. Endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano (Hawaii) through dyke intrusion and cumulate formation is a well-understood consequence of the steady supply of mantle-derived magma3,4. As we show here, inferred heat losses from the Halemaumau lava lake indicate a period of dominantly endogenous growth of Kilauea volcano during the nineteenth century. Moreover, heat losses and degassing rates for several other volcanoes, including Stromboli, also indicate cryptic influxes of magma that far exceed visible effluxes of lavas. We propose that persistent activity at Stromboli, and at other volcanoes in different tectonic settings, is evidence of endogenous growth, involving processes similar to those at Kilauea.

  18. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  19. Endogenous Viral Elements in Animal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Integration into the nuclear genome of germ line cells can lead to vertical inheritance of retroviral genes as host alleles. For other viruses, germ line integration has only rarely been documented. Nonetheless, we identified endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from ten non-retroviral families by systematic in silico screening of animal genomes, including the first endogenous representatives of double-stranded RNA, reverse-transcribing DNA, and segmented RNA viruses, and the first endogenous DNA viruses in mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic and genomic analysis of EVEs across multiple host species revealed novel information about the origin and evolution of diverse virus groups. Furthermore, several of the elements identified here encode intact open reading frames or are expressed as mRNA. For one element in the primate lineage, we provide statistically robust evidence for exaptation. Our findings establish that genetic material derived from all known viral genome types and replication strategies can enter the animal germ line, greatly broadening the scope of paleovirological studies and indicating a more significant evolutionary role for gene flow from virus to animal genomes than has previously been recognized. PMID:21124940

  20. Endogenous coresidence and program incidence: South Africa's Old Age Pension.

    PubMed

    Hamoudi, Amar; Thomas, Duncan

    2014-07-01

    We investigate whether living arrangements respond to an arguably exogenous shift in the distribution of power in family economic decision-making. In the early 1990s, the South African Old Age Pension was expanded to cover most black South Africans above a sex-specific age cut-off resulting in a substantial increase in the income of older South Africans and potentially their say in the economic decisions of their families. Beneficiaries of the program are more likely to coreside with adults who have less human capital as measured by height and education. Since height and education are fixed for adults, this cannot be an effect of the pension income but reflects selective changes in living arrangements resulting from the pension. The findings highlight the endogeneity of living arrangements and illustrate the potential value of moving beyond theory and data that are confined to a spatially determined definition of the household.

  1. The nutritional significance of endogenous N-losses along the gastro-intestinal tract of farm animals.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, S; Schulze, H; Van Bruchem, J; Huisman, J

    1995-01-01

    In animal production, endogenous protein losses associated with the digestion process are important losses, but difficult to measure. Measuring methods include feeding N-free diets, regression techniques based on amino acid profiles, and separating feed protein and endogenous protein by markers like homoarginine, hydrolysed casein or stable isotopes like 15N. Endogenous losses arise from saliva, digestive enzymes, bile, shedded epithelial cells and mucins and may be extra stimulated by the presence in feeds of antinutritional factors (ANF) such as lectins, trypsin inhibitors (TI), tannins and fibre. The impact of such factors may differ between non-ruminants and ruminants. The magnitude of the effect of the different factors is quantified and some of the consequences for protein deposition and nitrogen losses to the environment are discussed. PMID:8526736

  2. Interchromosomal gene conversion at an endogenous human cell locus.

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, P J; Neuwirth, E A; Grosovsky, A J

    2001-01-01

    To examine the relationship between gene conversion and reciprocal exchange at an endogenous chromosomal locus, we developed a reversion assay in a thymidine kinase deficient mutant, TX545, derived from the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Selectable revertants of TX545 can be generated through interchromosomal gene conversion at the site of inactivating mutations on each tk allele or by reciprocal exchange that alters the linkage relationships of inactivating polymorphisms within the tk locus. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at intragenic polymorphisms and flanking microsatellite markers was used to initially evaluate allelotypes in TK(+) revertants for patterns associated with either gene conversion or crossing over. The linkage pattern in a subset of convertants was then unambiguously established, even in the event of prereplicative recombinational exchanges, by haplotype analysis of flanking microsatellite loci in tk(-/-) LOH mutants collected from the tk(+/-) parental convertant. Some (7/38; 18%) revertants were attributable to easily discriminated nonrecombinational mechanisms, including suppressor mutations within the tk coding sequence. However, all revertants classified as a recombinational event (28/38; 74%) were attributed to localized gene conversion, representing a highly significant preference (P < 0.0001) over gene conversion with associated reciprocal exchange, which was never observed. PMID:11404339

  3. [Correlations between endogenous intoxication and excessive body weight].

    PubMed

    Abylaĭuly, Zh; Oshakbaev, K P; Kozhabekova, B N; Erdesova, G E; Imantaeva, G M; Uberbaeva, G K

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze correlations between endogenous intoxication (EI) and lipid peroxidation (LP) indices in patients with cardiovascular and endocrine diseases and healthy individuals, taking into account the presence of excessive body weight (EBW), as well as to compare EI and LP indices in practically healthy people with and without excessive body weight (EBW). The subjects were 165 people, including 36 healthy individuals and 129 patients with cardiovascular and endocrine disease. The healthy ones were divided into two groups: 20 with and 16 without EBW. To evaluate the degree of EI, the concentration of middle-molecular-weight peptides (MMWP) was measured by the method offered by N. I. Gabrielyan et al. in 1984. To evaluate LP processes, serum levels of the secondary LP product, malonic dialdehyde, and two antioxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, were measured. The results show that treatment aimed at LP suppression is not appropriate; it should be aimed at the cause of LP activation instead, which is the increase of MMWP level due to EBW. LP activation significantly correlates with increase of MMWP blood level (p < 0.05). EBW worsens EI and activates LP in healthy people, thus being a stress factor to the organism. Increased MMWP level and LP activation in healthy individuals with EBW may be a premorbid diagnostic marker.

  4. HIV infection reveals widespread expansion of novel centromeric human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Kaplan, Mark H; He, Shirley; Contreras-Galindo, Angie C; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J; Kappes, Ferdinand; Dube, Derek; Chan, Susana M; Robinson, Dan; Meng, Fan; Dai, Manhong; Gitlin, Scott D; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Omenn, Gilbert S; Markovitz, David M

    2013-09-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) make up 8% of the human genome. The HERV-K (HML-2) family is the most recent group of these viruses to have inserted into the genome, and we have detected the activation of HERV-K (HML-2) proviruses in the blood of patients with HIV-1 infection. We report that HIV-1 infection activates expression of a novel HERV-K (HML-2) provirus, termed K111, present in multiple copies in the centromeres of chromosomes throughout the human genome yet not annotated in the most recent human genome assembly. Infection with HIV-1 or stimulation with the HIV-1 Tat protein leads to the activation of K111 proviruses. K111 is present as a single copy in the genome of the chimpanzee, yet K111 is not found in the genomes of other primates. Remarkably, K111 proviruses appear in the genomes of the extinct Neanderthal and Denisovan, while modern humans have at least 100 K111 proviruses spread across the centromeres of 15 chromosomes. Our studies suggest that the progenitor K111 integrated before the Homo-Pan divergence and expanded in copy number during the evolution of hominins, perhaps by recombination. The expansion of K111 provides sequence evidence suggesting that recombination between the centromeres of various chromosomes took place during the evolution of humans. K111 proviruses show significant sequence variations in each individual centromere, which may serve as markers in future efforts to annotate human centromere sequences. Further, this work is an example of the potential to discover previously unknown genomic sequences through the analysis of nucleic acids found in the blood of patients.

  5. Human neuromelanin: an endogenous microglial activator for dopaminergic neuron death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zecca, Luigi; Wilson, Belinda; Ren, RW; Wang, Yong-jun; Wang, Xiao-min; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that neuroinflammation caused by over-activation of microglial in the substantia nigra is critical in the pathogenesis of dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Increasing data demonstrates that environmental factors such as rotenone, paraquat play pivotal roles in the death of dopaminergic neurons. Here, potential role and mechanism of neuromelanin (NM), a major endogenous component in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra, on microglial activation and associated dopaminergic neurotoxicity were investigated. Using multiple well-established primary mesencephalic cultures, we tested whether human NM (HNM) could activate microglia, thereby provoking dopaminergic neurodegeneration. The results demonstrated that in primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures, HNM caused dopaminergic neuronal damage characterized by the decreased dopamine uptake and reduced numbers and shorted dendrites of dopaminergic neurons. HNM-induced degeneration was relatively selective to dopaminergic neurons since the other types of neurons determined by either gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake and total neuronal numbers after staining showed smaller decrease. We demonstrated that HNM produced modest dopaminergic neurotoxicity in neuron-enriched cultures; in contrast, much greater neurotoxicity was observed in the presence of microglia. HNM-induced microglial activation was shown by morphological changes and production of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors. These results suggest that HNM, once released from damaged dopaminergic neurons, can be an potent endogenous activator involved in the reactivation of microglia, which may mediate disease progression. Thus, inhibition of reactive microglia can be a useful strategy for PD therapy. PMID:23276965

  6. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  7. The role of endogenous H2S in cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Nini; Gouliaev, Anja; Aalling, Mathilde; Simonsen, Ulf

    2011-09-01

    Recent research has shown that the endogenous gas hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule of considerable biological potential and has been suggested to be involved in a vast number of physiological processes. In the vascular system, H2S is synthesized from cysteine by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in smooth muscle cells (SMC) and 3- mercaptopyruvate sulfuresterase (3MST) and CSE in the endothelial cells. In pulmonary and systemic arteries, H2S induces relaxation and/or contraction dependent on the concentration of H2S, type of vessel and species. H2S relaxes SMC through a direct effect on KATP-channels or Kv-channels causing hyperpolarization and closure of voltage-dependent Ca2+-channels followed by a reduction in intracellular calcium. H2S also relaxes SMC through the release of endothelium- derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) and nitric oxide (NO) from the endothelium. H2S contracts SMC through a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) availability by reacting with NO forming a nitrosothiol compound and through an inhibitory effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) as well as a reduction in SMC cyclic AMP concentration. Evidence supports a role for H2S in oxygen sensing. Furthermore, reduced endogenous H2S production may also play a role in ischemic heart diseases and hypertension, and treatment with H2S donors and cysteine analogues may be beneficial in treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Silent no more: Endogenous small RNA pathways promote gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wedeles, Christopher J; Wu, Monica Z; Claycomb, Julie M

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous small RNA pathways related to RNA interference (RNAi) play a well-documented role in protecting host genomes from the invasion of foreign nucleic acids. In C. elegans, the PIWI type Argonaute, PRG-1, through an association with 21U-RNAs, mediates a genome surveillance process by constantly scanning the genome for potentially deleterious invading elements. Upon recognition of foreign nucleic acids, PRG-1 initiates a cascade of cytoplasmic and nuclear events that results in heritable epigenetic silencing of these transcripts and their coding genomic loci. If the PRG-1/21U-RNA genome surveillance pathway has the capacity to target most of the C. elegans transcriptome, what mechanisms exist to protect endogenous transcripts from being silenced by this pathway? In this commentary, we discuss three recent publications that implicate the CSR-1 small RNA pathway in the heritable activation of germline transcripts, propose a model as to why not all epialleles behave similarly, and touch on the practical implications of these findings.

  9. Why do cannabinoid receptors have more than one endogenous ligand?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system was revealed following the understanding of the mechanism of action of marijuana's major psychotropic principle, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and includes two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors), their endogenous ligands (the endocannabinoids, the best studied of which are anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)), and the proteins that regulate the levels and activity of these receptors and ligands. However, other minor lipid metabolites different from, but chemically similar to, anandamide and 2-AG have also been suggested to act as endocannabinoids. Thus, unlike most other GPCRs, cannabinoid receptors appear to have more than one endogenous agonist, and it has been often wondered what could be the physiological meaning of this peculiarity. In 1999, it was proposed that anandamide might also activate other targets, and in particular the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels. Over the last decade, this interaction has been shown to occur both in peripheral tissues and brain, during both physiological and pathological conditions. TRPV1 channels can be activated also by another less abundant endocannabinoid, N-arachidonoyldopamine, but not by 2-AG, and have been proposed by some authors to act as ionotropic endocannabinoid receptors. This article will discuss the latest discoveries on this subject, and discuss, among others, how anandamide and 2-AG differential actions at TRPV1 and cannabinoid receptors contribute to making this signalling system a versatile tool available to organisms to fine-tune homeostasis. PMID:23108541

  10. Endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity increases in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Charron, Giselle; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Laux, Alexis; Berthet, Amandine; Porras, Gregory; Canron, Marie-Hélène; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Li, Qin; Qin, Chuan; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Giros, Bruno; Delalande, François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Vital, Anne; Goumon, Yannick; Bezard, Erwan

    2011-08-01

    Morphine is endogenously synthesized in the central nervous system and endogenous dopamine is thought to be necessary for endogenous morphine formation. As Parkinson's disease results from the loss of dopamine and is associated with central pain, we considered how endogenous morphine is regulated in the untreated and l-DOPA-treated parkinsonian brain. However, as the cellular origin and overall distribution of endogenous morphine remains obscure in the pathological adult brain, we first characterized the distribution of endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactive cells in the rat striatum. We then studied changes in the endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity of medium spiny neurons in normal, Parkinson's disease-like and l-DOPA-treated Parkinson's disease-like conditions in experimental (rat and monkey) and human Parkinson's disease. Our results reveal an unexpected dramatic upregulation of neuronal endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity and levels in experimental and human Parkinson's disease, only partially normalized by l-DOPA treatment. Our data suggest that endogenous morphine formation is more complex than originally proposed and that the parkinsonian brain experiences a dramatic upregulation of endogenous morphine immunoreactivity. The functional consequences of such endogenous morphine upregulation are as yet unknown, but based upon the current knowledge of morphine signalling, we hypothesize that it is involved in fatigue, depression and pain symptoms experienced by patients with Parkinson's disease.

  11. Meninges harbor cells expressing neural precursor markers during development and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bifari, Francesco; Berton, Valeria; Pino, Annachiara; Kusalo, Marijana; Malpeli, Giorgio; Di Chio, Marzia; Bersan, Emanuela; Amato, Eliana; Scarpa, Aldo; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido; Decimo, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Brain and skull developments are tightly synchronized, allowing the cranial bones to dynamically adapt to the brain shape. At the brain-skull interface, meninges produce the trophic signals necessary for normal corticogenesis and bone development. Meninges harbor different cell populations, including cells forming the endosteum of the cranial vault. Recently, we and other groups have described the presence in meninges of a cell population endowed with neural differentiation potential in vitro and, after transplantation, in vivo. However, whether meninges may be a niche for neural progenitor cells during embryonic development and in adulthood remains to be determined. In this work we provide the first description of the distribution of neural precursor markers in rat meninges during development up to adulthood. We conclude that meninges share common properties with the classical neural stem cell niche, as they: (i) are a highly proliferating tissue; (ii) host cells expressing neural precursor markers such as nestin, vimentin, Sox2 and doublecortin; and (iii) are enriched in extracellular matrix components (e.g., fractones) known to bind and concentrate growth factors. This study underlines the importance of meninges as a potential niche for endogenous precursor cells during development and in adulthood.

  12. Endogenous formation of morphine in human cells.

    PubMed

    Poeaknapo, Chotima; Schmidt, Jürgen; Brandsch, Matthias; Dräger, Birgit; Zenk, Meinhart H

    2004-09-28

    Morphine is a plant (opium poppy)-derived alkaloid and one of the strongest known analgesic compounds. Studies from several laboratories have suggested that animal and human tissue or fluids contain trace amounts of morphine. Its origin in mammals has been believed to be of dietary origin. Here, we address the question of whether morphine is of endogenous origin or derived from exogenous sources. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids present in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and human pancreas carcinoma cells (DAN-G) were identified by GC/tandem MS (MS/MS) as norlaudanosoline (DAN-G), reticuline (DAN-G and SH-SY5Y), and morphine (10 nM, SH-SY5Y). The stereochemistry of reticuline was determined to be 1-(S). Growth of the SH-SY5Y cell line in the presence of (18)O(2) led to the [(18)O]-labeled morphine that had the molecular weight 4 mass units higher than if grown in (16)O(2), indicating the presence of two atoms of (18)O per molecule of morphine. Growth of DAN-G cells in an (18)O(2) atmosphere yielded norlaudanosoline and (S)-reticuline, both labeled at only two of the four oxygen atoms. This result clearly demonstrates that all three alkaloids are of biosynthetic origin and suggests that norlaudanosoline and (S)-reticuline are endogenous precursors of morphine. Feeding of [ring-(13)C(6)]-tyramine, [1-(13)C, N-(13)CH(3)]-(S)-reticuline and [N-CD(3)]-thebaine to the neuroblastoma cells led each to the position-specific labeling of morphine, as established by GC/MS/MS. Without doubt, human cells can produce the alkaloid morphine. The studies presented here serve as a platform for the exploration of the function of "endogenous morphine" in the neurosciences and immunosciences.

  13. Endogenous Synthesis of Coenzyme Q in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tran, UyenPhuong C.; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2007-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) functions in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and serves as a lipophilic antioxidant. There is increasing interest in the use of Q as a nutritional supplement. Although the physiological significance of Q is extensively investigated in eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to human, the eukaryotic Q biosynthesis pathway is best characterized in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. At least ten genes (COQ1-COQ10) have been shown to be required for Q biosynthesis and function in respiration. This review highlights recent knowledge about the endogenous synthesis of Q in eukaryotes, with emphasis on S. cerevisiae as a model system. PMID:17482885

  14. Human endogenous retroviruses: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robin A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of proviral DNA into host chromosomal DNA as an obligatory step in the replication cycle of retroviruses is a natural event of genetic recombination between virus and host. When integration occurs in cells of the germ line, it results in mendelian inheritance of viral sequences that we call endogenous retroviruses (ERV) and HERV for humans. HERVs and host often establish a symbiotic relationship, especially in the placenta and in pluripotent embryonic stem cells, but HERVs occasionally have deleterious consequences for the host. This special issue of APMIS features the fascinating relationships between HERV and humans in health and disease. PMID:26818257

  15. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling at inhibitory interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Younts, Thomas J.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our understanding of how endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) signal at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). This review discusses how eCBs regulate inhibitory interneurons, their synapses, and the networks in which they are embedded. eCB signaling plays a pivotal role in brain physiology by means of their synaptic signal transduction, spatiotemporal signaling profile, routing of information through inhibitory microcircuits, and experience-dependent plasticity. Understanding the normal processes underlying eCB signaling is beginning to shed light on how their dysregulation contributes to disease. PMID:24650503

  16. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    PubMed

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27492052

  17. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    PubMed

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Commercial Phaseolus vulgaris extract (starch stopper) increases ileal endogenous amino acid and crude protein losses in the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Deglaire, A; Moughan, P J; Bos, C; Tome, D

    2006-07-12

    The effect of a commercial Phaseolus vulgaris extract (PVE, starch stopper) on ileal and fecal endogenous protein losses was studied. Growing rats were fed for 14 days a protein-free diet containing PVE at a nutritional concentration of 0% (PF1), 0.4% (PF2), or 1.1% PVE (PF3) or 1.1% autoclaved PVE (PF4). An indigestible marker (TiO(2)) was included in each diet. Ileal endogenous amino acid (AA) losses were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in PF3 (20% higher than in PF1), except for Pro, Gly, Ala, and His. Endogenous ileal N losses were 22% higher in PF3 than in PF1. Endogenous fecal AA and N losses were all significantly higher (P < 0.05) in PF3. Starch digestibility ( approximately 100%), food intake (single daily meal, d10-23), and body weight loss were not significantly different among the groups. PVE, at 1.1% of the diet, not only was ineffective in reducing starch digestibility but also led to increased ileal endogenous N losses, possibly due to the antinutritional factors (trypsin inhibitor, lectin) present in the PVE. PMID:16819935

  19. Modeling old-age wealth with endogenous early-life outcomes: The case of Mexico.

    PubMed

    DeGraff, Deborah S; Wong, Rebeca

    2014-04-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on the life course and aging by examining the association between early-life outcomes and late-life well being, using data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Empirical research in this area has been challenged by the potential endogeneity of the early-life outcomes of interest, an issue which most studies ignore or downplay. Our contribution takes two forms: (1) we examine in detail the potential importance of two key life-cycle outcomes, age at marriage (a measure of family formation) and years of educational attainment (a measure of human capital investment) for old-age wealth, and (2) we illustrate the empirical value of past context variables that could help model the association between early-life outcomes and late-life well being. Our illustrative approach, matching macro-level historical policy and census variables to individual records to use as instruments in modeling the endogeneity of early-life behaviors, yields a statistically identified two-stage model of old-age wealth with minimum bias. We use simulations to show that the results for the model of wealth in old age are meaningfully different when comparing the approach that accounts for endogeneity with an approach that assumes exogeneity of early-life outcomes. Furthermore, our results suggest that in the Mexican case, models which ignore the potential endogeneity of early-life outcomes are likely to under-estimate the effects of such variables on old-age wealth.

  20. Modeling old-age wealth with endogenous early-life outcomes: The case of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    DeGraff, Deborah S.; Wong, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on the life course and aging by examining the association between early-life outcomes and late-life well being, using data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Empirical research in this area has been challenged by the potential endogeneity of the early-life outcomes of interest, an issue which most studies ignore or downplay. Our contribution takes two forms: (1) we examine in detail the potential importance of two key life-cycle outcomes, age at marriage (a measure of family formation) and years of educational attainment (a measure of human capital investment) for old-age wealth, and (2) we illustrate the empirical value of past context variables that could help model the association between early-life outcomes and late-life well being. Our illustrative approach, matching macro-level historical policy and census variables to individual records to use as instruments in modeling the endogeneity of early-life behaviors, yields a statistically identified two-stage model of old-age wealth with minimum bias. We use simulations to show that the results for the model of wealth in old age are meaningfully different when comparing the approach that accounts for endogeneity with an approach that assumes exogeneity of early-life outcomes. Furthermore, our results suggest that in the Mexican case, models which ignore the potential endogeneity of early-life outcomes are likely to under-estimate the effects of such variables on old-age wealth. PMID:25170434

  1. Study of the endogenous steroid profile of male athletes from the Brazilian National Soccer Championship 2009.

    PubMed

    Nicolich, Rebecca S; Padilha, Monica C; de Aquino Neto, Francisco R

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the endogenous profile of androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) may be interpreted as markers of doping. The objective of this study was to evaluate the endogenous profile of AAS in male athletes of the 2009 Brazilian National Soccer Championship, in normal conditions, particularly in the light of the revision of World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) Technical Document on the Interpretation of Endogenous AAS in athletes for doping control drafted in that year, as well as comparing these results to profiles already published in the literature. The upper limit of the 95% central reference interval of the following parameters for the studied population were estimated to be significantly higher than WADA's criteria, with a confidence of 90%: DHEA (about 2.3 times higher), Adiol (1.2 times higher), Bdiol (2.7 times higher), and Adiol/E (6 times higher). These findings seem to imply that WADA's criteria proposed in 2009 for DHEA, Adiol, Bdiol, and Adiol/E may not have been applicable to the studied population. Moreover, their comparison to previously published studies pointed to the need to evaluate in detail the appropriateness of adopting these criteria as universal, since there seems to be variations among different populations of athletes.

  2. Biological markers in reproductive epidemiology: prospects and precautions

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Z.; Hatch, M.

    1987-10-01

    We begin by defining ''biological markers'' for the purposes of the present review, distinguishing markers from other types of information, such as subject reports or conventional clinical data. We find the distinctions to be hazy. Next, from the standpoint of epidemiologists, we set out circumstances in which exposure markers might be needed, suggesting requirements for useful markers. We give two instances (lead, PCB), drawn from studies of female reproduction, where the use of exposure markers is compared to environmental or anamnestic data. Effect markers are considered in turn. It is argued that their usefulness (if they are to be more informative than exposure markers) depends on their sensitivity and specificity in relation to the disease outcome. Also, their timeliness, and the use that can be made of the gain in time, for individuals and populations is discussed. In this context, we consider markers of events before and around fertilization; more specifically, we consider those events that precede the clinical marker of the first missed period. In returning to the potential uses of biological markers in discovering or interpreting female reproductive disorders that might be owed to environmental causes, we compare markers of the pre- and peri-implantation phases with markers of the postimplantation phase, drawing on experience with studies of chromosome anomaly in spontaneous abortion. Finally, we suggest other sensitive reproductive processes for which biological markers might usefully be developed. 30 references.

  3. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs.

    PubMed

    Aimone, Jason A; Iannaccone, Laurence R; Makowsky, Michael D; Rubin, Jared

    2013-10-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game-one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  4. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, Jason A.; Iannaccone, Laurence R.; Makowsky, Michael D.; Rubin, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game—one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  5. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue. PMID:27292833

  6. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Joel J.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi, and is an important structural molecule. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin, however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology. PMID:25772447

  7. Pare