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Sample records for potential energy minimization

  1. Hierarchical particle swarm optimizer for minimizing the non-convex potential energy of molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ngaam J; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2014-11-01

    The stable conformation of a molecule is greatly important to uncover the secret of its properties and functions. Generally, the conformation of a molecule will be the most stable when it is of the minimum potential energy. Accordingly, the determination of the conformation can be solved in the optimization framework. It is, however, not an easy task to achieve the only conformation with the lowest energy among all the potential ones because of the high complexity of the energy landscape and the exponential computation increasing with molecular size. In this paper, we develop a hierarchical and heterogeneous particle swarm optimizer (HHPSO) to deal with the problem in the minimization of the potential energy. The proposed method is evaluated over a scalable simplified molecular potential energy function with up to 200 degrees of freedom and a realistic energy function of pseudo-ethane molecule. The experimental results are compared with other six PSO variants and four genetic algorithms. The results show HHPSO is significantly better than the compared PSOs with p-value less than 0.01277 over molecular potential energy function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential pollution prevention and waste minimization for Department of Energy operations

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.; Ischay, C.; Kennicott, M.; Pemberton, S.; Tull, D.

    1995-10-01

    With the tightening of budgets and limited resources, it is important to ensure operations are carried out in a cost-effective and productive manner. Implementing an effective Pollution Prevention strategy can help to reduce the costs of waste management and prevent harmful releases to the environment. This document provides an estimate of the Department of Energy`s waste reduction potential from the implementation of Pollution Prevention opportunities. A team of Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention professionals was formed to collect the data and make the estimates. The report includes a list of specific reduction opportunities for various waste generating operations and waste types. A generic set of recommendations to achieve these reduction opportunities is also provided as well as a general discussion of the approach and assumptions made for each waste generating operation.

  3. A non-minimally coupled potential for inflation and dark energy after Planck 2015: a comprehensive study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshaghi, Mehdi; Zarei, Moslem; Riazi, Nematollah; Kiasatpour, Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    In this work we introduce a new plateau-like inflationary model including a quadratic scalar potential coupled non-minimally to gravity. This potential has a dominant constant energy density at early times which can realize successful inflation. It also includes an infinitesimal non-zero term V0 responsible for explaining dark energy which causing the universe to expand accelerating at the late time. We show that this model predicts small tensor-to-scalar ratio of the order of r≈ 0.01 which is fully consistent with Planck constraints. Using the lower and upper bounds on reheating temperature, we provide additional constraints on the non-minimal coupling parameter ξ of the model. We also study the preheating stage predicted by this kind of potentials using numerical calculations.

  4. A non-minimally coupled potential for inflation and dark energy after Planck 2015: a comprehensive study

    SciTech Connect

    Eshaghi, Mehdi; Kiasatpour, Ahmad; Zarei, Moslem; Riazi, Nematollah E-mail: m.zarei@cc.iut.ac.ir E-mail: akiasat@sci.ui.ac.ir

    2015-11-01

    In this work we introduce a new plateau-like inflationary model including a quadratic scalar potential coupled non-minimally to gravity. This potential has a dominant constant energy density at early times which can realize successful inflation. It also includes an infinitesimal non-zero term V{sub 0} responsible for explaining dark energy which causing the universe to expand accelerating at the late time. We show that this model predicts small tensor-to-scalar ratio of the order of r≈ 0.01 which is fully consistent with Planck constraints. Using the lower and upper bounds on reheating temperature, we provide additional constraints on the non-minimal coupling parameter ξ of the model. We also study the preheating stage predicted by this kind of potentials using numerical calculations.

  5. Maximizing cellulosic ethanol potentials by minimizing wastewater generation and energy consumption: Competing with corn ethanol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Bao, Jie

    2017-08-21

    Energy consumption and wastewater generation in cellulosic ethanol production are among the determinant factors on overall cost and technology penetration into fuel ethanol industry. This study analyzed the energy consumption and wastewater generation by the new biorefining process technology, dry acid pretreatment and biodetoxification (DryPB), as well as by the current mainstream technologies. DryPB minimizes the steam consumption to 8.63GJ and wastewater generation to 7.71tons in the core steps of biorefining process for production of one metric ton of ethanol, close to 7.83GJ and 8.33tons in corn ethanol production, respectively. The relatively higher electricity consumption is compensated by large electricity surplus from lignin residue combustion. The minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) by DryPB is below $2/gal and falls into the range of corn ethanol production cost. The work indicates that the technical and economical gap between cellulosic ethanol and corn ethanol has been almost filled up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein structure prediction and potential energy landscape analysis using continuous global minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.A.; Phillips, A.T.; Rosen, J.B.

    1997-12-01

    Proteins require specific three-dimensional conformations to function properly. These {open_quotes}native{close_quotes} conformations result primarily from intramolecular interactions between the atoms in the macromolecule, and also intermolecular interactions between the macromolecule and the surrounding solvent. Although the folding process can be quite complex, the instructions guiding this process are specified by the one-dimensional primary sequence of the protein or nucleic acid: external factors, such as helper (chaperone) proteins, present at the time of folding have no effect on the final state of the protein. Many denatured proteins spontaneously refold into functional conformations once denaturing conditions are removed. Indeed, the existence of a unique native conformation, in which residues distant in sequence but close in proximity exhibit a densely packed hydrophobic core, suggests that this three-dimensional structure is largely encoded within the sequential arrangement of these specific amino acids. In any case, the native structure is often the conformation at the global minimum energy. In addition to the unique native (minimum energy) structure, other less stable structures exist as well, each with a corresponding potential energy. These structures, in conjunction with the native structure, make up an energy landscape that can be used to characterize various aspects of the protein structure. 22 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Minimization of a free-energy-like potential for non-equilibrium flow systems at steady state

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines a new formulation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, which gives a conditional derivation of the ‘maximum entropy production’ (MEP) principle for flow and/or chemical reaction systems at steady state. The analysis uses a dimensionless potential function ϕst for non-equilibrium systems, analogous to the free energy concept of equilibrium thermodynamics. Spontaneous reductions in ϕst arise from increases in the ‘flux entropy’ of the system—a measure of the variability of the fluxes—or in the local entropy production; conditionally, depending on the behaviour of the flux entropy, the formulation reduces to the MEP principle. The inferred steady state is also shown to exhibit high variability in its instantaneous fluxes and rates, consistent with the observed behaviour of turbulent fluid flow, heat convection and biological systems; one consequence is the coexistence of energy producers and consumers in ecological systems. The different paths for attaining steady state are also classified. PMID:20368250

  8. Free Energy Computations by Minimization of Kullback-Leibler Divergence: An Efficient Adaptive Biasing Potential Method for Sparse Representations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-14

    The Journal of Chemical Physics , 112(23):10350–10357, 2000. [8] E. Cancès, F. Legoll, and G...Darve and A. Pohorille. Calculating free energies using average force. The Journal of Chemical Physics , 115(20):9169, 2001. [17] E. Darve, D...D. J. Wales. The double-funnel energy landscape of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. The Journal of Chemical Physics , 110(14):6896–6906, 1999.

  9. Simulating granular materials by energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijgsman, D.; Luding, S.

    2016-11-01

    Discrete element methods are extremely helpful in understanding the complex behaviors of granular media, as they give valuable insight into all internal variables of the system. In this paper, a novel discrete element method for performing simulations of granular media is presented, based on the minimization of the potential energy in the system. Contrary to most discrete element methods (i.e., soft-particle method, event-driven method, and non-smooth contact dynamics), the system does not evolve by (approximately) integrating Newtons equations of motion in time, but rather by searching for mechanical equilibrium solutions for the positions of all particles in the system, which is mathematically equivalent to locally minimizing the potential energy. The new method allows for the rapid creation of jammed initial conditions (to be used for further studies) and for the simulation of quasi-static deformation problems. The major advantage of the new method is that it allows for truly static deformations. The system does not evolve with time, but rather with the externally applied strain or load, so that there is no kinetic energy in the system, in contrast to other quasi-static methods. The performance of the algorithm for both types of applications of the method is tested. Therefore we look at the required number of iterations, for the system to converge to a stable solution. For each single iteration, the required computational effort scales linearly with the number of particles. During the process of creating initial conditions, the required number of iterations for two-dimensional systems scales with the square root of the number of particles in the system. The required number of iterations increases for systems closer to the jamming packing fraction. For a quasi-static pure shear deformation simulation, the results of the new method are validated by regular soft-particle dynamics simulations. The energy minimization algorithm is able to capture the evolution of the

  10. Data clustering and visualization via energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.

    2011-09-01

    We discuss a stochastic method for configurational energy minimization, with applications to high-dimensional data clustering and visualization. Also, we demonstrate numerically the ability of the method to capture meaningful biological information from cancer-related microarray data, and to differentiate between different leukemia cancer subtypes.

  11. Exploration, novelty, surprise, and free energy minimization.

    PubMed

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; Fitzgerald, Thomas; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments under the free energy principle that introduce a normative perspective on classical economic (utilitarian) decision-making based on (active) Bayesian inference. It has been suggested that the free energy principle precludes novelty and complexity, because it assumes that biological systems-like ourselves-try to minimize the long-term average of surprise to maintain their homeostasis. However, recent formulations show that minimizing surprise leads naturally to concepts such as exploration and novelty bonuses. In this approach, agents infer a policy that minimizes surprise by minimizing the difference (or relative entropy) between likely and desired outcomes, which involves both pursuing the goal-state that has the highest expected utility (often termed "exploitation") and visiting a number of different goal-states ("exploration"). Crucially, the opportunity to visit new states increases the value of the current state. Casting decision-making problems within a variational framework, therefore, predicts that our behavior is governed by both the entropy and expected utility of future states. This dissolves any dialectic between minimizing surprise and exploration or novelty seeking.

  12. Direct energy functional minimization under orthogonality constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Valéry; VandeVondele, Joost; Hutter, Jürg; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2008-02-01

    The direct energy functional minimization problem in electronic structure theory, where the single-particle orbitals are optimized under the constraint of orthogonality, is explored. We present an orbital transformation based on an efficient expansion of the inverse factorization of the overlap matrix that keeps orbitals orthonormal. The orbital transformation maps the orthogonality constrained energy functional to an approximate unconstrained functional, which is correct to some order in a neighborhood of an orthogonal but approximate solution. A conjugate gradient scheme can then be used to find the ground state orbitals from the minimization of a sequence of transformed unconstrained electronic energy functionals. The technique provides an efficient, robust, and numerically stable approach to direct total energy minimization in first principles electronic structure theory based on tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or density functional theory. For sparse problems, where both the orbitals and the effective single-particle Hamiltonians have sparse matrix representations, the effort scales linearly with the number of basis functions N in each iteration. For problems where only the overlap and Hamiltonian matrices are sparse the computational cost scales as O(M2N ), where M is the number of occupied orbitals. We report a single point density functional energy calculation of a DNA decamer hydrated with 4003 water molecules under periodic boundary conditions. The DNA fragment containing a cis-syn thymine dimer is composed of 634 atoms and the whole system contains a total of 12 661 atoms and 103 333 spherical Gaussian basis functions.

  13. Convex Lower Bounds for Free Energy Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan

    We construct lower bounds on free energy with convex relaxations from the nonlinear minimization over probabilities to linear programs over expectation values. Finite-temperature expectation values are further resolved into distributions over energy. A superset of valid expectation values is delineated by an incomplete set of linear constraints. Free energy bounds can be improved systematically by adding constraints, which also increases their computational cost. We compute several free energy bounds of increasing accuracy for the triangular-lattice Ising model to assess the utility of this method. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Energy minimization for self-organized structure formation and actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofod, Guggi; Wirges, Werner; Paajanen, Mika; Bauer, Siegfried

    2007-02-01

    An approach for creating complex structures with embedded actuation in planar manufacturing steps is presented. Self-organization and energy minimization are central to this approach, illustrated with a model based on minimization of the hyperelastic free energy strain function of a stretched elastomer and the bending elastic energy of a plastic frame. A tulip-shaped gripper structure illustrates the technological potential of the approach. Advantages are simplicity of manufacture, complexity of final structures, and the ease with which any electroactive material can be exploited as means of actuation.

  15. Smooth GERBS, orthogonal systems and energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechevsky, Lubomir T.; Zanaty, Peter

    2013-12-01

    New results are obtained in three mutually related directions of the rapidly developing theory of generalized expo-rational B-splines (GERBS) [7, 6]: closed-form computability of C∞-smooth GERBS in terms of elementary and special functions, Hermite interpolation and least-squares best approximation via smooth GERBS, energy minimizing properties of smooth GERBS similar to those of the classical cubic polynomial B-splines.

  16. Smooth GERBS, orthogonal systems and energy minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dechevsky, Lubomir T. E-mail: pza@hin.no; Zanaty, Peter E-mail: pza@hin.no

    2013-12-18

    New results are obtained in three mutually related directions of the rapidly developing theory of generalized expo-rational B-splines (GERBS) [7, 6]: closed-form computability of C{sup ∞}-smooth GERBS in terms of elementary and special functions, Hermite interpolation and least-squares best approximation via smooth GERBS, energy minimizing properties of smooth GERBS similar to those of the classical cubic polynomial B-splines.

  17. Nonlinear transient analysis via energy minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.; Knight, N. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The formulation basis for nonlinear transient analysis of finite element models of structures using energy minimization is provided. Geometric and material nonlinearities are included. The development is restricted to simple one and two dimensional finite elements which are regarded as being the basic elements for modeling full aircraft-like structures under crash conditions. The results indicate the effectiveness of the technique as a viable tool for this purpose.

  18. Competition between potential energy minimization and number of contact points in two-dimension granular materials exhibiting Brazil-nut effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viridi, Sparisoma; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Widayani, Novitrian

    2015-09-01

    The granular materials phenomenon known as Brazil-nut effect is discussed in this work, where its grain configurations are constructed artificially as time-independent using 2-d disks. Single intruder with 2.6 cm diameter is introduced to granular bed consisted of 1.3 cm diameter disks. Each created configuration is designed similar to observed one in experiments and simulations. Potential energy and number of contact points between grains are observed between initial and final configurations. Contactopy parameter change is also discussed. As comparison results from real experiment and simulation are also presented.

  19. Minimizing Reheat Energy Use in Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Frenze, David; Mathew, Paul; Morehead, Michael; Sartor, Dale; Starr Jr., William

    2005-11-29

    HVAC systems that are designed without properly accounting for equipment load variation across laboratory spaces in a facility can significantly increase simultaneous heating and cooling, particularly for systems that use zone reheat for temperature control. This best practice guide describes the problem of simultaneous heating and cooling resulting from load variations, and presents several technological and design process strategies to minimize it. This guide is one in a series created by the Laboratories for the 21st century ('Labs21') program, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and facilities managers, these guides provide information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  20. A stable, rapidly converging conjugate gradient method for energy minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Watowich, S.J.; Meyer, E.S.; Hagstrom, R.; Josephs, R.

    1989-01-01

    We apply Shanno's conjugate gradient algorithm to the problem of minimizing the potential energy function associated with molecular mechanical calculations. Shanno's algorithm is stable with respect to roundoff errors and inexact line searches and converges rapidly to a minimum. Equally important, this algorithm can improve the rate of convergence to a minimum by a factor of 5 relative to Fletcher-Reeves or Polak-Ribiere minimizers when used within the molecular mechanics package AMBER. Comparable improvements are found for a limited number of simulations when the Polak-Ribiere direction vector is incorporated into the Shanno algorithm. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Wormholes minimally violating the null energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Martín-Moruno, Prado

    2014-11-01

    We consider novel wormhole solutions supported by a matter content that minimally violates the null energy condition. More specifically, we consider an equation of state in which the sum of the energy density and radial pressure is proportional to a constant with a value smaller than that of the inverse area characterising the system, i.e., the area of the wormhole mouth. This approach is motivated by a recently proposed cosmological event, denoted "the little sibling of the big rip", where the Hubble rate and the scale factor blow up but the cosmic derivative of the Hubble rate does not [1]. By using the cut-and-paste approach, we match interior spherically symmetric wormhole solutions to an exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and analyse the stability of the thin-shell to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations around static solutions, by choosing suitable properties for the exotic material residing on the junction interface radius. Furthermore, we also consider an inhomogeneous generalization of the equation of state considered above and analyse the respective stability regions. In particular, we obtain a specific wormhole solution with an asymptotic behaviour corresponding to a global monopole.

  2. Wormholes minimally violating the null energy condition

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Lobo, Francisco S N; Martín-Moruno, Prado E-mail: fslobo@fc.ul.pt

    2014-11-01

    We consider novel wormhole solutions supported by a matter content that minimally violates the null energy condition. More specifically, we consider an equation of state in which the sum of the energy density and radial pressure is proportional to a constant with a value smaller than that of the inverse area characterising the system, i.e., the area of the wormhole mouth. This approach is motivated by a recently proposed cosmological event, denoted {sup t}he little sibling of the big rip{sup ,} where the Hubble rate and the scale factor blow up but the cosmic derivative of the Hubble rate does not [1]. By using the cut-and-paste approach, we match interior spherically symmetric wormhole solutions to an exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and analyse the stability of the thin-shell to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations around static solutions, by choosing suitable properties for the exotic material residing on the junction interface radius. Furthermore, we also consider an inhomogeneous generalization of the equation of state considered above and analyse the respective stability regions. In particular, we obtain a specific wormhole solution with an asymptotic behaviour corresponding to a global monopole.

  3. Locating gravitational potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2017-01-01

    Where does gravitational potential energy reside when a ball is in the air? The perfectly correct answer is that it is located in the ball-Earth system. Still, mechanical energy conservation problems are routinely solved by assigning a potential energy to the ball alone. Provided here is a proof that such an assignment introduces only an entirely undetectable error.

  4. Effects of Coulomb-like potential on γ-rigid prolate nuclei considering minimal length formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohammadi, M.; Hassanabadi, H.; Sobhani, H.

    2016-10-01

    We determine the energy eigenvalues and eigenstates of the Bohr Hamiltonian for γ-rigid prolate nuclei with the Coulomb-like potential in minimal length formalism. We first show corresponding Hamiltonian of γ-rigid prolate nuclei then investigate the effects of minimal length parameter in energy levels and obtain the transition rates. Ordinary results are recovered for the vanishing minimal length parameter and for the clarity of our results, some instructive graphs have been prepared.

  5. A strategy to find minimal energy nanocluster structures.

    PubMed

    Rogan, José; Varas, Alejandro; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro; Kiwi, Miguel

    2013-11-05

    An unbiased strategy to search for the global and local minimal energy structures of free standing nanoclusters is presented. Our objectives are twofold: to find a diverse set of low lying local minima, as well as the global minimum. To do so, we use massively the fast inertial relaxation engine algorithm as an efficient local minimizer. This procedure turns out to be quite efficient to reach the global minimum, and also most of the local minima. We test the method with the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, for which an abundant literature does exist, and obtain novel results, which include a new local minimum for LJ13 , 10 new local minima for LJ14 , and thousands of new local minima for 15≤N≤65. Insights on how to choose the initial configurations, analyzing the effectiveness of the method in reaching low-energy structures, including the global minimum, are developed as a function of the number of atoms of the cluster. Also, a novel characterization of the potential energy surface, analyzing properties of the local minima basins, is provided. The procedure constitutes a promising tool to generate a diverse set of cluster conformations, both two- and three-dimensional, that can be used as an input for refinement by means of ab initio methods.

  6. Minimal Bending Energies of Bilayer Polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2010-11-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on bilayer polyhedra composed of amphiphilic molecules, we study the elastic bending energies of bilayer vesicles forming polyhedral shapes. Allowing for segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges of polyhedra, we find that bilayer polyhedra can indeed have lower bending energies than spherical bilayer vesicles. However, our analysis also implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the snub dodecahedron, rather than the icosahedron, generally represents the energetically favorable shape of bilayer polyhedra.

  7. Minimal Bending Energies of Bilayer Polyhedra

    PubMed Central

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on bilayer polyhedra composed of amphiphilic molecules, we study the elastic bending energies of bilayer vesicles forming polyhedral shapes. Allowing for segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges of polyhedra, we find that bilayer polyhedra can indeed have lower bending energies than spherical bilayer vesicles. However, our analysis also implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the snub dodecahedron, rather than the icosahedron, generally represents the energetically favorable shape of bilayer polyhedra. PMID:21231425

  8. Does osteoderm growth follow energy minimization principles?

    PubMed

    Sensale, Sebastián; Jones, Washington; Blanco, R Ernesto

    2014-08-01

    Although the growth and development of tissues and organs of extinct species cannot be directly observed, their fossils can record and preserve evidence of these mechanisms. It is generally accepted that bone architecture is the result of genetically based biomechanical constraints, but what about osteoderms? In this article, the influence of physical constraints on cranial osteoderms growth is assessed. Comparisons among lepidosaurs, synapsids, and archosaurs are performed; according to these analyses, lepidosaur osteoderms growth is predicted to be less energy demanding than that of synapsids and archosaurs. Obtained results also show that, from an energetic viewpoint, ankylosaurid osteoderms growth resembles more that of mammals than the one of reptilians, adding evidence to debate whether dinosaurs were hot or cold blooded. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Computational ligand design by free energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Nikolay P.; Dean, Philip M.

    1999-10-01

    We present a computational method for de novo ligand design based on simulated annealing optimization of an empirical free energy function which has been derived from regression analysis of protein-ligand complexes. Structures are built by joining together molecular fragments from the Available Chemicals Directory. The algorithm navigates through the space of molecular structures, conformations and rigid-body transformations. The diversity of the generated structures can range from completely de novo to products of a combinatorial synthetic reaction scheme and docking of single molecules. The synthetic feasibility of the proposed molecules is considered by the incorporation of penalty terms to reduce undesirable connectivity and chemical features. Test results for tripsin are presented.

  10. Potentials for food waste minimization and effects on potential biogas production through anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Schott, Anna Bernstad Saraiva; Vukicevic, Sanita; Bohn, Irene; Andersson, Tova

    2013-08-01

    Several treatment alternatives for food waste can result in both energy and nutrient recovery, and thereby potential environmental benefits. However, according to the European Union waste management hierarchy, waste prevention should be the prioritized strategy to decrease the environmental burdens from all solid waste management. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the potential for food waste minimization among Swedish households through an investigation of the amount of avoidable food waste currently disposed of. A further aim was to investigate the effect on the national biogas production potential through anaerobic digestion of food waste, considering minimization potentials. A method for waste composition analyses of household food waste, where a differentiation between avoidable and unavoidable food waste is made, was used in a total of 24 waste composition analyses of household waste from Swedish residential areas. The total household food waste generation reached 3.4 kg (household and week)(-1), on average, of which 34% is avoidable. The theoretical methane (CH4) potential in unavoidable food waste reached 442 Ndm(3) (kg VS)(-1) or 128 Nm(3) tonne(-1) wet waste, while the measured (mesophilic CH4 batch tests) CH4 production reached 399 Ndm(3) (kg VS)(-1), which is lower than several previous assessments of CH4 production from household food waste. According to this study the combination of a decrease in food waste generation-in case of successful minimization-and decreased CH4 production from unavoidable food waste will thus result in lower total potential energy recovery from household food waste through anaerobic digestion CH4 potential than previously stated.

  11. Energy Minimization on Manifolds for Docking Flexible Molecules.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hanieh; Zarbafian, Shahrooz; Villar, Elizabeth; Mottarella, Scott; Beglov, Dmitri; Vajda, Sandor; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch; Vakili, Pirooz; Kozakov, Dima

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, we extend a recently introduced rigid body minimization algorithm, defined on manifolds, to the problem of minimizing the energy of interacting flexible molecules. The goal is to integrate moving the ligand in six dimensional rotational/translational space with internal rotations around rotatable bonds within the two molecules. We show that adding rotational degrees of freedom to the rigid moves of the ligand results in an overall optimization search space that is a manifold to which our manifold optimization approach can be extended. The effectiveness of the method is shown for three different docking problems of increasing complexity. First, we minimize the energy of fragment-size ligands with a single rotatable bond as part of a protein mapping method developed for the identification of binding hot spots. Second, we consider energy minimization for docking a flexible ligand to a rigid protein receptor, an approach frequently used in existing methods. In the third problem, we account for flexibility in both the ligand and the receptor. Results show that minimization using the manifold optimization algorithm is substantially more efficient than minimization using a traditional all-atom optimization algorithm while producing solutions of comparable quality. In addition to the specific problems considered, the method is general enough to be used in a large class of applications such as docking multidomain proteins with flexible hinges. The code is available under open source license (at http://cluspro.bu.edu/Code/Code_Rigtree.tar) and with minimal effort can be incorporated into any molecular modeling package.

  12. Tracking particles with large displacements using energy minimization.

    PubMed

    Boltyanskiy, Rostislav; Merrill, Jason W; Dufresne, Eric R

    2017-03-15

    We describe a method to track particles undergoing large displacements. Starting with a list of particle positions sampled at different time points, we assign particle identities by minimizing the sum across all particles of the trace of the square of the strain tensor. This method of tracking corresponds to minimizing the stored energy in an elastic solid or the dissipated energy in a viscous fluid. Our energy-minimizing approach extends the advantages of particle tracking to situations where particle imaging velocimetry and digital imaging correlation are typically required. This approach is much more reliable than the standard squared-displacement minimizing approach for spatially-correlated displacements that are larger than the typical interparticle spacing. Thus, it is suitable for particles embedded in a material undergoing large deformations. On the other hand, squared-displacement minimization is more effective for particles undergoing uncorrelated random motion. In the ESI, we include a flexible MATLAB particle tracker that implements either approach with a robust optimal assignment algorithm. This implementation returns an estimation of the strain tensor for each particle, in addition to its identification.

  13. Energy minimization on manifolds for docking flexible molecules

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Hanieh; Zarbafian, Shahrooz; Villar, Elizabeth; Mottarella, Scott; Beglov, Dmitri; Vajda, Sandor; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.; Vakili, Pirooz; Kozakov, Dima

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we extend a recently introduced rigid body minimization algorithm, defined on manifolds, to the problem of minimizing the energy of interacting flexible molecules. The goal is to integrate moving the ligand in six dimensional rotational/translational space with internal rotations around rotatable bonds within the two molecules. We show that adding rotational degrees of freedom to the rigid moves of the ligand results in an overall optimization search space that is a manifold to which our manifold optimization approach can be extended. The effectiveness of the method is shown for three different docking problems of increasing complexity. First we minimize the energy of fragment-size ligands with a single rotatable bond as part of a protein mapping method developed for the identification of binding hot spots. Second, we consider energy minimization for docking a flexible ligand to a rigid protein receptor, an approach frequently used in existing methods. In the third problem we account for flexibility in both the ligand and the receptor. Results show that minimization using the manifold optimization algorithm is substantially more efficient than minimization using a traditional all-atom optimization algorithm while producing solutions of comparable quality. In addition to the specific problems considered, the method is general enough to be used in a large class of applications such as docking multidomain proteins with flexible hinges. The code is available under open source license (at http://cluspro.bu.edu/Code/Code_Rigtree.tar), and with minimal effort can be incorporated into any molecular modeling package. PMID:26478722

  14. Energy minimization methods applied to riboswitches: a perspective and challenges.

    PubMed

    Barash, Danny; Gabdank, Idan

    2010-01-01

    Energy minimization methods for RNA secondary structure prediction have been used extensively for studying a variety of biological systems. Here, we demonstrate their applicability in riboswitch studies, exemplified in both the expression platform and aptamer domains. In the expression platform domain, energy minimization methods can be used to predict in silico a unique point mutation positioned in the non-conserved region of the TPP riboswitch that will transform it from a termination to an anti-termination state, thus backing the prediction experimentally. Furthermore, a successive prediction can be made for a compensatory mutation that is positioned over half the sequence length of the riboswitch from the original mutation and that completely overturns the anti-termination effect of the original mutation. This approach can be used to computationally predict rational modifications in riboswitches for both research and practical applications. In the aptamer domain, energy minimization methods can be used when attempting to detect a novel purine riboswitch in eukaryotes based on the consensus sequence and structure of the bacterial guanine binding aptamer. In the process, some interesting candidates are identified, and although they are attractive enough to be tested experimentally, they are not detectable by sequence based methods alone. These brief examples represent the important lessons to be learned as to the strengths and limitations of energy minimization methods. In light of our growing knowledge in the energy minimization field, future challenges can be advanced for the rational design of known riboswitches and the detection of novel riboswitches. Unlike analyses of specific cases, it is stressed that all the results described here are predictive in scope with direct applicability and an attempt to validate the predictions experimentally.

  15. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  16. AMG by element agglomeration and constrained energy minimization interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, T V; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-02-17

    This paper studies AMG (algebraic multigrid) methods that utilize energy minimization construction of the interpolation matrices locally, in the setting of element agglomeration AMG. The coarsening in element agglomeration AMG is done by agglomerating fine-grid elements, with coarse element matrices defined by a local Galerkin procedure applied to the matrix assembled from the individual fine-grid element matrices. This local Galerkin procedure involves only the coarse basis restricted to the agglomerated element. To construct the coarse basis, one exploits previously proposed constraint energy minimization procedures now applied to the local matrix. The constraints are that a given set of vectors should be interpolated exactly, not only globally, but also locally on every agglomerated element. The paper provides algorithmic details, as well as a convergence result based on a ''local-to-global'' energy bound of the resulting multiple-vector fitting AMG interpolation mappings. A particular implementation of the method is illustrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  17. Principal component analysis of minimal excitatory postsynaptic potentials.

    PubMed

    Astrelin, A V; Sokolov, M V; Behnisch, T; Reymann, K G; Voronin, L L

    1998-02-20

    'Minimal' excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are often recorded from central neurones, specifically for quantal analysis. However the EPSPs may emerge from activation of several fibres or transmission sites so that formal quantal analysis may give false results. Here we extended application of the principal component analysis (PCA) to minimal EPSPs. We tested a PCA algorithm and a new graphical 'alignment' procedure against both simulated data and hippocampal EPSPs. Minimal EPSPs were recorded before and up to 3.5 h following induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 neurones. In 29 out of 45 EPSPs, two (N=22) or three (N=7) components were detected which differed in latencies, rise time (Trise) or both. The detected differences ranged from 0.6 to 7.8 ms for the latency and from 1.6-9 ms for Trise. Different components behaved differently following LTP induction. Cases were found when one component was potentiated immediately after tetanus whereas the other with a delay of 15-60 min. The immediately potentiated component could decline in 1-2 h so that the two components contributed differently into early (< 1 h) LTP1 and later (1-4 h) LTP2 phases. The noise deconvolution techniques was applied to both conventional EPSP amplitudes and scores of separate components. Cases are illustrated when quantal size (upsilon) estimated from the EPSP amplitudes increased whereas upsilon estimated from the component scores was stable during LTP1. Analysis of component scores could show apparent double-fold increases in upsilon which are interpreted as reflections of synchronized quantal releases. In general, the results demonstrate PCA applicability to separate EPSPs into different components and its usefulness for precise analysis of synaptic transmission.

  18. Active minimization of energy density in three-dimensional enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to further investigate and develop a novel approach for actively controlling the sound field in enclosures that is based on the acoustic energy density. Typically the acoustic field in an enclosure has been controlled by minimizing the sum of the squared pressures from several microphones distributed throughout the enclosure. The approach investigated in this study involved minimizing the acoustic energy density at the sensor locations, rather than the squared pressure. Research previous to this study in a simple one-dimensional enclosure showed that improved global attenuation of the acoustic field is often obtained by minimizing the energy density, rather than the pressure. The current study built on the previous research by extending the method of controlling the acoustic energy density to three-dimensional enclosures. The study was intended to help establish if improved control can still be expected in a more general enclosure. The study was designed to be both analytical/numerical and experimental in nature.

  19. Active minimization of energy density in three-dimensional enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to further investigate and develop a novel approach for actively controlling the sound field in enclosures. Typically the acoustic field in an enclosure has been controlled by minimizing the sum of the squared pressures from several microphones distributed throughout the enclosure. The approach being investigated in this project involves minimizing the acoustic energy density at the sensor locations, rather than the squared pressure. Previous research in a simple one-dimensional enclosure showed that improved global attenuation of the acoustic field is often obtained by minimizing the energy density, rather than the pressure. The current project builds on the previous research by extending the method of controlling the acoustic energy density to three-dimensional enclosures. The results will establish if improved control can still be expected in a more general enclosure. Pending successful results, the method could be applied to control problems such as attenuating the acoustic noise in an aircraft fuselage, an automobile cabin, or other general enclosures. The research project was set up as a two-year project designed to achieve both numerical and experimental results. The primary focus of the first year of research (now being completed) was on the analytical/numerical modeling of the method of controlling the acoustic energy density. During the second year, the research focuses on experimental verification of the approach and extending our understanding of the method.

  20. Running non-minimal inflation with stabilized inflaton potential

    DOE PAGES

    Okada, Nobuchika; Raut, Digesh

    2017-04-18

    In the context of the Higgs model involving gauge and Yukawa interactions with the spontaneous gauge symmetry breaking, we consider λφ4 inflation with non- minimal gravitational coupling, where the Higgs field is identified as the inflaton. Since the inflaton quartic coupling is very small, once quantum corrections through the gauge and Yukawa interactions are taken into account, the inflaton effective potential most likely becomes unstable. Furthermore, in order to avoid this problem, we need to impose stability conditions on the effective inflaton potential, which lead to not only non-trivial relations amongst the particle mass spectrum of the model, but alsomore » correlations between the inflationary predictions and the mass spectrum. For reasons of concrete discussion, we investigate the minimal B - L extension of the standard model with identification of the B - L Higgs field as the inflaton. The stability conditions for the inflaton effective potential fix the mass ratio amongst the B - L gauge boson, the right-handed neutrinos and the inflaton. This mass ratio also correlates with the inflationary predictions. So, if the B - L gauge boson and the right-handed neutrinos are discovered in the future, their observed mass ratio provides constraints on the inflationary predictions.« less

  1. Strain energy minimization in SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnet winding

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M.

    1990-09-24

    Differential geometry provides a natural family of coordinate systems, the Frenet frame, in which to specify the geometric properties of magnet winding. By a modification of the Euler-Bernoulli thin rod model, the strain energy is defined with respect to this frame. Then it is minimized by a direct method from the calculus of variations. The mathematics, its implementation in a computer program, and some analysis of an SSC dipole by the program will be described. 16 refs.

  2. On minimal energy dipole moment distributions in regular polygonal agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Adriano Possebon; Cunha, Francisco Ricardo; Ceniceros, Hector Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Static, regular polygonal and close-packed clusters of spherical magnetic particles and their energy-minimizing magnetic moments are investigated in a two-dimensional setting. This study focuses on a simple particle system which is solely described by the dipole-dipole interaction energy, both without and in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. For a regular polygonal structure of n sides with n ≥ 3 , and in the absence of an external field, it is proved rigorously that the magnetic moments given by the roots of unity, i.e. tangential to the polygon, are a minimizer of the dipole-dipole interaction energy. Also, for zero external field, new multiple local minima are discovered for the regular polygonal agglomerates. The number of found local extrema is proportional to [ n / 2 ] and these critical points are characterized by the presence of a pair of magnetic moments with a large deviation from the tangential configuration and whose particles are at least three diameters apart. The changes induced by an in-plane external magnetic field on the minimal energy, tangential configurations are investigated numerically. The two critical fields, which correspond to a crossover with the linear chain minimal energy and with the break-up of the agglomerate, respectively are examined in detail. In particular, the numerical results are compared directly with the asymptotic formulas of Danilov et al. (2012) [23] and a remarkable agreement is found even for moderate to large fields. Finally, three examples of close-packed structures are investigated: a triangle, a centered hexagon, and a 19-particle close packed cluster. The numerical study reveals novel, illuminating characteristics of these compact clusters often seen in ferrofluids. The centered hexagon is energetically favorable to the regular hexagon and the minimal energy for the larger 19-particle cluster is even lower than that of the close packed hexagon. In addition, this larger close packed agglomerate has two

  3. Minimal model for short-time diffusion in periodic potentials.

    PubMed

    Emary, Clive; Gernert, Robert; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a single, overdamped colloidal particle, which is driven by a constant force through a one-dimensional periodic potential. We focus on systems with large barrier heights where the lowest-order cumulants of the density field, that is, average position and the mean-squared displacement, show nontrivial (nondiffusive) short-time behavior characterized by the appearance of plateaus. We demonstrate that this "cage-like" dynamics can be well described by a discretized master equation model involving two states (related to two positions) within each potential valley. Nontrivial predictions of our approach include analytic expressions for the plateau heights and an estimate of the "de-caging time" obtained from the study of deviations from Gaussian behavior. The simplicity of our approach means that it offers a minimal model to describe the short-time behavior of systems with hindered dynamics.

  4. Energy minimization mechanisms of semi-coherent interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, J.; Misra, Amit

    2014-07-14

    In this article, we discussed energy minimization mechanisms of semi-coherent interfaces based on atomistic simulations and dislocation theory. For example, of (111) interfaces between two face centered cubic (FCC) crystals, interface comprises of two stable structures (normal FCC stacking structure and intrinsic stacking fault structure), misfit dislocations, and misfit dislocation intersections or nodes (corresponding to the high energy stacking fault (HESF) structure). According to atomistic simulations of four interfaces, we found that (1) greater spacing between misfit dislocations and/or larger slopes of generalized stacking fault energy at the stable interface structures leads to a narrower dislocation core and a higher state of coherency in the stable interfaces; (2) the HESF region is relaxed by the relative rotation and dilation/compression of the two crystals at the node. The crystal rotation is responsible for the spiral feature at the vicinity of a node and the dilation/compression is responsible for the creation of the free volume at a node; (3) the spiral feature is gradually frail and the free volume decreases with decreasing misfit dislocation spacing, which corresponds to an increase in lattice mismatch and/or a decrease in lattice rotation. Finally, the analysis method and energy minimization mechanisms explored in FCC (111) semi-coherent interfaces are also applicable for other semi-coherent interfaces.

  5. Solubility curves and nucleation rates from molecular dynamics for polymorph prediction - moving beyond lattice energy minimization.

    PubMed

    Parks, Conor; Koswara, Andy; DeVilbiss, Frank; Tung, Hsien-Hsin; Nere, Nandkishor K; Bordawekar, Shailendra; Nagy, Zoltan K; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2017-02-15

    Current polymorph prediction methods, known as lattice energy minimization, seek to determine the crystal lattice with the lowest potential energy, rendering it unable to predict solvent dependent metastable form crystallization. Facilitated by embarrassingly parallel, multiple replica, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we report on a new method concerned with predicting crystal structures using the kinetics and solubility of the low energy polymorphs predicted by lattice energy minimization. The proposed molecular dynamics simulation methodology provides several new predictions to the field of crystallization. (1) The methodology is shown to correctly predict the kinetic preference for β-glycine nucleation in water relative to α- and γ-glycine. (2) Analysis of nanocrystal melting temperatures show γ- nanocrystals have melting temperatures up to 20 K lower than either α- or β-glycine. This provides a striking explanation of how an energetically unstable classical nucleation theory (CNT) transition state complex leads to kinetic inaccessibility of γ-glycine in water, despite being the thermodynamically preferred polymorph predicted by lattice energy minimization. (3) The methodology also predicts polymorph-specific solubility curves, where the α-glycine solubility curve is reproduced to within 19% error, over a 45 K temperature range, using nothing but atomistic-level information provided from nucleation simulations. (4) Finally, the methodology produces the correct solubility ranking of β- > α-glycine. In this work, we demonstrate how the methodology supplements lattice energy minimization with molecular dynamics nucleation simulations to give the correct polymorph prediction, at different length scales, when lattice energy minimization alone would incorrectly predict the formation of γ-glycine in water from the ranking of lattice energies. Thus, lattice energy minimization optimization algorithms are supplemented with the necessary solvent

  6. Five dimensional spherically symmetric minimally interacting holographic dark energy model in Brans-Dicke theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. R. K.; Raju, P.; Sobhanbabu, K.

    2016-04-01

    Five dimensional spherically symmetric space-time filled with two minimally interacting fields; matter and holographic dark energy components is investigated in a scalar tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Brans and Dicke (Phys. Rev. 124:925, 1961). To obtain a determinate solution of the highly non-linear field equations we have used (i) a relation between metric potentials and (ii) an equation of state which represents disordered radiation in five dimensional universe. The solution obtained represents a minimally interacting and radiating holographic dark energy model in five dimensional universe. Some physical and Kinematical properties of the model are, also, studied.

  7. QoS-constrained Energy Minimization in Multiuser Multicarrier Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qing; Ivrlač, Michel T.; Nossek, Josef A.

    In this paper the QoS-constrained resource allocation problem in multicarrier systems is considered. Within the established cross-layer framework, parameters for subchannel assignment, adaptive modulation and coding, and ARQ/HARQ protocols are jointly optimized. Instead of the conventional transmit power minimization, the total energy consumption for the successful transmissions of all information bits is set as the optimization goal. The nonconvex primal problem is solved by using Lagrange dual decomposition and the ellipsoid method. Numerical results indicate that the recovered primal solution is well acceptable in performance, and efficient in terms of computational effort.

  8. Energy minimization in medical image analysis: Methodologies and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Xie, Xianghua

    2016-02-01

    Energy minimization is of particular interest in medical image analysis. In the past two decades, a variety of optimization schemes have been developed. In this paper, we present a comprehensive survey of the state-of-the-art optimization approaches. These algorithms are mainly classified into two categories: continuous method and discrete method. The former includes Newton-Raphson method, gradient descent method, conjugate gradient method, proximal gradient method, coordinate descent method, and genetic algorithm-based method, while the latter covers graph cuts method, belief propagation method, tree-reweighted message passing method, linear programming method, maximum margin learning method, simulated annealing method, and iterated conditional modes method. We also discuss the minimal surface method, primal-dual method, and the multi-objective optimization method. In addition, we review several comparative studies that evaluate the performance of different minimization techniques in terms of accuracy, efficiency, or complexity. These optimization techniques are widely used in many medical applications, for example, image segmentation, registration, reconstruction, motion tracking, and compressed sensing. We thus give an overview on those applications as well.

  9. Outage Probability Minimization for Energy Harvesting Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Jing, Tao; Huo, Yan; Jiang, Kaiwei

    2017-01-24

    The incorporation of cognitive radio (CR) capability in wireless sensor networks yields a promising network paradigm known as CR sensor networks (CRSNs), which is able to provide spectrum efficient data communication. However, due to the high energy consumption results from spectrum sensing, as well as subsequent data transmission, the energy supply for the conventional sensor nodes powered by batteries is regarded as a severe bottleneck for sustainable operation. The energy harvesting technique, which gathers energy from the ambient environment, is regarded as a promising solution to perpetually power-up energy-limited devices with a continual source of energy. Therefore, applying the energy harvesting (EH) technique in CRSNs is able to facilitate the self-sustainability of the energy-limited sensors. The primary concern of this study is to design sensing-transmission policies to minimize the long-term outage probability of EH-powered CR sensor nodes. We formulate this problem as an infinite-horizon discounted Markov decision process and propose an ϵ-optimal sensing-transmission (ST) policy through using the value iteration algorithm. ϵ is the error bound between the ST policy and the optimal policy, which can be pre-defined according to the actual need. Moreover, for a special case that the signal-to-noise (SNR) power ratio is sufficiently high, we present an efficient transmission (ET) policy and prove that the ET policy achieves the same performance with the ST policy. Finally, extensive simulations are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed policies and the impaction of various network parameters.

  10. Outage Probability Minimization for Energy Harvesting Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Jing, Tao; Huo, Yan; Jiang, Kaiwei

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of cognitive radio (CR) capability in wireless sensor networks yields a promising network paradigm known as CR sensor networks (CRSNs), which is able to provide spectrum efficient data communication. However, due to the high energy consumption results from spectrum sensing, as well as subsequent data transmission, the energy supply for the conventional sensor nodes powered by batteries is regarded as a severe bottleneck for sustainable operation. The energy harvesting technique, which gathers energy from the ambient environment, is regarded as a promising solution to perpetually power-up energy-limited devices with a continual source of energy. Therefore, applying the energy harvesting (EH) technique in CRSNs is able to facilitate the self-sustainability of the energy-limited sensors. The primary concern of this study is to design sensing-transmission policies to minimize the long-term outage probability of EH-powered CR sensor nodes. We formulate this problem as an infinite-horizon discounted Markov decision process and propose an ϵ-optimal sensing-transmission (ST) policy through using the value iteration algorithm. ϵ is the error bound between the ST policy and the optimal policy, which can be pre-defined according to the actual need. Moreover, for a special case that the signal-to-noise (SNR) power ratio is sufficiently high, we present an efficient transmission (ET) policy and prove that the ET policy achieves the same performance with the ST policy. Finally, extensive simulations are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed policies and the impaction of various network parameters. PMID:28125023

  11. Minimal resistance training improves daily energy expenditure and fat oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Erik P.; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Smith, Bryan K; Honas, Jeff; LeCheminant, James D.; Bailey, Bruce W.; Jacobsen, Dennis J.; Washburn, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term resistance training (RT) may result in a chronic increase in 24-hour energy expenditure (EE) and fat oxidation to a level sufficient to assist in maintaining energy balance and prevent weight gain. However, the impact of a minimal RT program on these parameters in an overweight college age population, a group at high risk for developing obesity, is unknown. Purpose We aimed to evaluate the effect of 6-months of supervised minimal RT in previously sedentary, overweight (mean±SEM, BMI=27.7±0.5kg/m2) young adults (21.0±0.5yrs) on 24-hr EE, resting metabolic rate (RMR), sleep metabolic rate (SMR) and substrate oxidation using whole room indirect calorimetry 72-h after the last RT session. Methods Participants were randomized to RT (1 set, 3 d/wk, 3–6 repetition maximum, 9 exercises) (N=22) or control (C, N=17) groups and completed all assessments at baseline and 6 months. Results There was a significant (P<0.05) increase in 24-hr EE in the RT (527 ± 220kJ/d) and C (270 ± 168kJ/d) groups, however, the difference between groups was not significant (P=0.30). Twenty-four hour fat oxidation (g/day) was not altered after RT, however; reductions in RQ assessed during both rest (P<0.05) and sleep (P<0.05) suggested increased fat oxidation in RT compared with C during these periods. SMR (8.4±8.6%) and RMR (7.4±8.7%) increased significantly in RT (P<0.001) but not in C, resulting in significant (P<0.001) between group differences for SMR with a trend for significant (P=0.07) between group differences for RMR. Conclusion A minimal RT program that required little time to complete (11 min per session) resulted in a chronic increase in energy expenditure. This adaptation in energy expenditure may have a favorable impact on energy balance and fat oxidation sufficient to assist with the prevention of obesity in sedentary, overweight young adults, a group at high risk for developing obesity. PMID:19346974

  12. Minimal resistance training improves daily energy expenditure and fat oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Erik P; Donnelly, Joseph E; Smith, Bryan K; Honas, Jeff; Lecheminant, James D; Bailey, Bruce W; Jacobsen, Dennis J; Washburn, Richard A

    2009-05-01

    Long-term resistance training (RT) may result in a chronic increase in 24-h energy expenditure (EE) and fat oxidation to a level sufficient to assist in maintaining energy balance and preventing weight gain. However, the impact of a minimal RT program on these parameters in an overweight college-aged population, a group at high risk for developing obesity, is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the effect of 6 months of supervised minimal RT in previously sedentary, overweight (mean +/- SEM, BMI = 27.7 +/- 0.5 kg x m(-2)) young adults (21.0 +/- 0.5 yr) on 24-h EE, resting metabolic rate (RMR), sleep metabolic rate (SMR), and substrate oxidation using whole-room indirect calorimetry 72 h after the last RT session. Participants were randomized to RT (one set, 3 d x wk(-1), three to six repetition maximums, nine exercises; N = 22) or control (C, N = 17) groups and completed all assessments at baseline and at 6 months. There was a significant (P < 0.05) increase in 24-h EE in the RT (527 +/- 220 kJ x d(-1)) and C (270 +/- 168 kJ x d(-1)) groups; however, the difference between groups was not significant (P = 0.30). Twenty-four hours of fat oxidation (g x d(-1)) was not altered after RT; however, reductions in RT assessed during both rest (P < 0.05) and sleep (P < 0.05) suggested increased fat oxidation in RT compared with C during these periods. SMR (8.4 +/- 8.6%) and RMR (7.4 +/- 8.7%) increased significantly in RT (P < 0.001) but not in C, resulting in significant (P < 0.001) between-group differences for SMR with a trend for significant (P = 0.07) between-group differences for RMR. A minimal RT program that required little time to complete (11min per session) resulted in a chronic increase in energy expenditure. This adaptation in energy expenditure may have a favorable impact on energy balance and fat oxidation sufficient to assist with the prevention of obesity in sedentary, overweight young adults, a group at high risk for developing obesity.

  13. Multi-Target Tracking by Discrete-Continuous Energy Minimization.

    PubMed

    Milan, Anton; Schindler, Konrad; Roth, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    The task of tracking multiple targets is often addressed with the so-called tracking-by-detection paradigm, where the first step is to obtain a set of target hypotheses for each frame independently. Tracking can then be regarded as solving two separate, but tightly coupled problems. The first is to carry out data association, i.e., to determine the origin of each of the available observations. The second problem is to reconstruct the actual trajectories that describe the spatio-temporal motion pattern of each individual target. The former is inherently a discrete problem, while the latter should intuitively be modeled in continuous space. Having to deal with an unknown number of targets, complex dependencies, and physical constraints, both are challenging tasks on their own and thus most previous work focuses on one of these subproblems. Here, we present a multi-target tracking approach that explicitly models both tasks as minimization of a unified discrete-continuous energy function. Trajectory properties are captured through global label costs, a recent concept from multi-model fitting, which we introduce to tracking. Specifically, label costs describe physical properties of individual tracks, e.g., linear and angular dynamics, or entry and exit points. We further introduce pairwise label costs to describe mutual interactions between targets in order to avoid collisions. By choosing appropriate forms for the individual energy components, powerful discrete optimization techniques can be leveraged to address data association, while the shapes of individual trajectories are updated by gradient-based continuous energy minimization. The proposed method achieves state-of-the-art results on diverse benchmark sequences.

  14. Free-energy minimization and the dark-room problem.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl; Thornton, Christopher; Clark, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of an important new fundamental theory of brain function. This theory brings information-theoretic, Bayesian, neuroscientific, and machine learning approaches into a single framework whose overarching principle is the minimization of surprise (or, equivalently, the maximization of expectation). The most comprehensive such treatment is the "free-energy minimization" formulation due to Karl Friston (see e.g., Friston and Stephan, 2007; Friston, 2010a,b - see also Fiorillo, 2010; Thornton, 2010). A recurrent puzzle raised by critics of these models is that biological systems do not seem to avoid surprises. We do not simply seek a dark, unchanging chamber, and stay there. This is the "Dark-Room Problem." Here, we describe the problem and further unpack the issues to which it speaks. Using the same format as the prolog of Eddington's Space, Time, and Gravitation (Eddington, 1920) we present our discussion as a conversation between: an information theorist (Thornton), a physicist (Friston), and a philosopher (Clark).

  15. Minimization of the vibration energy of thin-plate structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inoue, Katsumi; Townsend, Dennis P.; Coy, John J.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization method is proposed to reduce the vibration of thin plate structures. The method is based on a finite element shell analysis, a modal analysis, and a structural optimization method. In the finite element analysis, a triangular shell element with 18 dof is used. In the optimization, the overall vibration energy of the structure is adopted as the objective function, and it is minimized at the given exciting frequency by varying the thickness of the elements. The technique of modal analysis is used to derive the sensitivity of the vibration energy with respect to the design variables. The sensitivity is represented by the sensitivities of both eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The optimum value is computed by the gradient projection method and a unidimensional search procedure under the constraint condition of constant weight. A computer code, based on the proposed method, is developed and is applied to design problems using a beam and a plate as test cases. It is confirmed that the vibration energy is reduced at the given exciting frequency. For the beam excited by a frequency slightly less than the fundamental natural frequency, the optimized shape is close to the beam of uniform strength.

  16. Optimization of quantum Monte Carlo wave functions by energy minimization.

    PubMed

    Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C J

    2007-02-28

    We study three wave function optimization methods based on energy minimization in a variational Monte Carlo framework: the Newton, linear, and perturbative methods. In the Newton method, the parameter variations are calculated from the energy gradient and Hessian, using a reduced variance statistical estimator for the latter. In the linear method, the parameter variations are found by diagonalizing a nonsymmetric estimator of the Hamiltonian matrix in the space spanned by the wave function and its derivatives with respect to the parameters, making use of a strong zero-variance principle. In the less computationally expensive perturbative method, the parameter variations are calculated by approximately solving the generalized eigenvalue equation of the linear method by a nonorthogonal perturbation theory. These general methods are illustrated here by the optimization of wave functions consisting of a Jastrow factor multiplied by an expansion in configuration state functions (CSFs) for the C2 molecule, including both valence and core electrons in the calculation. The Newton and linear methods are very efficient for the optimization of the Jastrow, CSF, and orbital parameters. The perturbative method is a good alternative for the optimization of just the CSF and orbital parameters. Although the optimization is performed at the variational Monte Carlo level, we observe for the C2 molecule studied here, and for other systems we have studied, that as more parameters in the trial wave functions are optimized, the diffusion Monte Carlo total energy improves monotonically, implying that the nodal hypersurface also improves monotonically.

  17. Optimization of quantum Monte Carlo wave functions by energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C. J.

    2007-02-01

    We study three wave function optimization methods based on energy minimization in a variational Monte Carlo framework: the Newton, linear, and perturbative methods. In the Newton method, the parameter variations are calculated from the energy gradient and Hessian, using a reduced variance statistical estimator for the latter. In the linear method, the parameter variations are found by diagonalizing a nonsymmetric estimator of the Hamiltonian matrix in the space spanned by the wave function and its derivatives with respect to the parameters, making use of a strong zero-variance principle. In the less computationally expensive perturbative method, the parameter variations are calculated by approximately solving the generalized eigenvalue equation of the linear method by a nonorthogonal perturbation theory. These general methods are illustrated here by the optimization of wave functions consisting of a Jastrow factor multiplied by an expansion in configuration state functions (CSFs) for the C2 molecule, including both valence and core electrons in the calculation. The Newton and linear methods are very efficient for the optimization of the Jastrow, CSF, and orbital parameters. The perturbative method is a good alternative for the optimization of just the CSF and orbital parameters. Although the optimization is performed at the variational Monte Carlo level, we observe for the C2 molecule studied here, and for other systems we have studied, that as more parameters in the trial wave functions are optimized, the diffusion Monte Carlo total energy improves monotonically, implying that the nodal hypersurface also improves monotonically.

  18. Accurate NMR structures through minimization of an extended hybrid energy.

    PubMed

    Nilges, Michael; Bernard, Aymeric; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Malliavin, Thérèse; Habeck, Michael; Rieping, Wolfgang

    2008-09-10

    The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X-ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications-for example, in homology modeling.

  19. LHC Physics Potential versus Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u{bar d}, and qq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes.

  20. Energy potential of geothermal energy in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, M.; Kaltschmitt, M.

    2000-06-01

    The use of terrestrial heat could fulfill certain energy demands. For the evaluation of the possibilities in the energy system of Germany, the available potentials are one of the most important criteria. Within this context, in the past only the available resources and the reserves have been discussed. But these data have hardly practical relevance for the energy-political and energy-economic discussions, since they do not consider the conditions in the corresponding energy system. In this article, therefore, explanations additional to the overall existing amount of heat in underground portions are shown, which could be used also from a technical point of view. In addition, the demand-side restrictions are considered and the share of the available heat is pointed out which can be used within the energy system of Germany. The explanations show that consideration of the demand side is necessary to make relevant statements. The investigations also make clear that terrestrial heat will never be able to cover more than just a part of the energy demand for warmth in Germany.

  1. Energy levels of one-dimensional systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardo, Reginald Christian S. Esguerra, Jose Perico H.

    2016-10-15

    The standard approach to calculating the energy levels for quantum systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation is to solve an eigenvalue problem involving a fourth- or higher-order differential equation in quasiposition space. It is shown that the problem can be reformulated so that the energy levels of these systems can be obtained by solving only a second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation. Through this formulation the energy levels are calculated for the following potentials: particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, Pöschl–Teller well, Gaussian well, and double-Gaussian well. For the particle in a box, the second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation is a second-order differential equation with constant coefficients. For the harmonic oscillator, Pöschl–Teller well, Gaussian well, and double-Gaussian well, a method that involves using Wronskians has been used to solve the second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation. It is observed for all of these quantum systems that the introduction of a nonzero minimal length uncertainty induces a positive shift in the energy levels. It is shown that the calculation of energy levels in systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation is not limited to a small number of problems like particle in a box and the harmonic oscillator but can be extended to a wider class of problems involving potentials such as the Pöschl–Teller and Gaussian wells.

  2. Energy levels of one-dimensional systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, Reginald Christian S.; Esguerra, Jose Perico H.

    2016-10-01

    The standard approach to calculating the energy levels for quantum systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation is to solve an eigenvalue problem involving a fourth- or higher-order differential equation in quasiposition space. It is shown that the problem can be reformulated so that the energy levels of these systems can be obtained by solving only a second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation. Through this formulation the energy levels are calculated for the following potentials: particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, Pöschl-Teller well, Gaussian well, and double-Gaussian well. For the particle in a box, the second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation is a second-order differential equation with constant coefficients. For the harmonic oscillator, Pöschl-Teller well, Gaussian well, and double-Gaussian well, a method that involves using Wronskians has been used to solve the second-order quasiposition eigenvalue equation. It is observed for all of these quantum systems that the introduction of a nonzero minimal length uncertainty induces a positive shift in the energy levels. It is shown that the calculation of energy levels in systems satisfying the minimal length uncertainty relation is not limited to a small number of problems like particle in a box and the harmonic oscillator but can be extended to a wider class of problems involving potentials such as the Pöschl-Teller and Gaussian wells.

  3. Energy minimization strategies and renewable energy utilization for desalination: a review.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Arun; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Oppenheimer, Joan; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2011-02-01

    Energy is a significant cost in the economics of desalinating waters, but water scarcity is driving the rapid expansion in global installed capacity of desalination facilities. Conventional fossil fuels have been utilized as their main energy source, but recent concerns over greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have promoted global development and implementation of energy minimization strategies and cleaner energy supplies. In this paper, a comprehensive review of energy minimization strategies for membrane-based desalination processes and utilization of lower GHG emission renewable energy resources is presented. The review covers the utilization of energy efficient design, high efficiency pumping, energy recovery devices, advanced membrane materials (nanocomposite, nanotube, and biomimetic), innovative technologies (forward osmosis, ion concentration polarization, and capacitive deionization), and renewable energy resources (solar, wind, and geothermal). Utilization of energy efficient design combined with high efficiency pumping and energy recovery devices have proven effective in full-scale applications. Integration of advanced membrane materials and innovative technologies for desalination show promise but lack long-term operational data. Implementation of renewable energy resources depends upon geography-specific abundance, a feasible means of handling renewable energy power intermittency, and solving technological and economic scale-up and permitting issues.

  4. Minimization of Gibbs free energy in compositional reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Trungenstein, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    This paper describes the formulation of vapor-liquid phase equilibrium as a linearly constrained minimization problem. It also describes a second minimization problem designed to test for local phase stability. Vectorized unconstrained minimization techniques can be used to solve this pair of constrained minimization problems. The methods of this paper are applied to liquid-vapor equilibria for mixtures both far from and near to the phase boundary. Significant improvements over the standard successive substitution algorithm are demonstrated.

  5. Relativity, potential energy, and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2016-11-01

    This paper is an exploration of the concept of energy, illuminated by the transformative insights of the special theory of relativity. Focusing on potential energy (PE), it will be shown that PE as presently defined is in conflict with the tenets of special relativity. Even though PE remains an indispensable theoretical device its actual physicality is questionable. Moreover its ontological status is quite different from that of both kinetic energy and mass, a significant point that is not widely appreciated. We will establish that PE is a theoretical concept as opposed to an empirical one; it is a descriptor of mass-energy without a detectable physical presence of its own. PE is a measure of energy stored, it is not the energy stored.

  6. Five dimensional minimally interacting holographic dark energy model in Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. R. K.; Anitha, S.; Umadevi, S.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate five dimensional space-time filled with minimally interacting dark matter and holographic dark energy in Brans-Dicke (Phys. Rev. 124:925, 1961) scalar-tensor theory of gravitation. The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained using (i) special law of variation for Hubble's parameter that yields constant value of deceleration parameter and (ii) a relation between metric potentials. The physical and geometrical aspects of the model are also discussed.

  7. Free-Energy Minimization and the Dark-Room Problem

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl; Thornton, Christopher; Clark, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of an important new fundamental theory of brain function. This theory brings information-theoretic, Bayesian, neuroscientific, and machine learning approaches into a single framework whose overarching principle is the minimization of surprise (or, equivalently, the maximization of expectation). The most comprehensive such treatment is the “free-energy minimization” formulation due to Karl Friston (see e.g., Friston and Stephan, 2007; Friston, 2010a,b – see also Fiorillo, 2010; Thornton, 2010). A recurrent puzzle raised by critics of these models is that biological systems do not seem to avoid surprises. We do not simply seek a dark, unchanging chamber, and stay there. This is the “Dark-Room Problem.” Here, we describe the problem and further unpack the issues to which it speaks. Using the same format as the prolog of Eddington’s Space, Time, and Gravitation (Eddington, 1920) we present our discussion as a conversation between: an information theorist (Thornton), a physicist (Friston), and a philosopher (Clark). PMID:22586414

  8. Minimizing the water and air impacts of unconventional energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional energy generates income and, done well, can reduce air pollution compared to other fossil fuels and even water use compared to fossil fuels and nuclear energy. Alternatively, it could slow the adoption of renewables and, done poorly, release toxic chemicals into water and air. Based on research to date, some primary threats to water resources come from surface spills, wastewater disposal, and drinking-water contamination through poor well integrity. For air resources, an increase in volatile organic compounds and air toxics locally is a potential health threat, but the switch from coal to natural gas for electricity generation will reduce sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, and particulate pollution regionally. Critical needs for future research include data for 1) estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) of unconventional hydrocarbons; 2) the potential for further reductions of water requirements and chemical toxicity; 3) whether unconventional resource development alters the frequency of well-integrity failures; 4) potential contamination of surface and ground waters from drilling and spills; and 5) the consequences of greenhouse gases and air pollution on ecosystems and human health.

  9. Level-Set Minimization of Potential Controlled Hadwiger Valuations for Molecular Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo; Wang, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    A level-set method is developed for the numerical minimization of a class of Had-wiger valuations with a potential on a set of three-dimensional bodies. Such valuations are linear combinations of the volume, surface area, and surface integral of mean curvature. The potential increases rapidly as the body shrinks beyond a critical size. The combination of the Hadwiger valuation and the potential is the mean-field free-energy functional of the solvation of non-polar molecules in the recently developed variational implicit-solvent model. This functional of surfaces is minimized by the level-set evolution in the steepest decent of the free energy. The normal velocity of this surface evolution consists of both the mean and Gaussian curvatures, and a lower-order, “forcing” term arising from the potential. The forward Euler method is used to discretize the time derivative with a dynamic time stepping that satisfies a CFL condition. The normal velocity is decomposed into two parts. The first part consists of both the mean and Gaussian curvature terms. It is of parabolic type with parameter correction, and is discretized by central differencing. The second part has all the lower-order terms. It is of hyperbolic type, and is discretized by an upwinding scheme. New techniques of local level-set method and numerical integration are developed. Numerical tests demonstrate a second-order convergence of the method. Examples of application to the modeling of molecular solvation are presented. PMID:22323839

  10. Fast Energy Minimization of large Polymers Using Constrained Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Todd D. Plantenga

    1998-10-01

    A new computational technique is described that uses distance constraints to calculate empirical potential energy minima of partially rigid molecules. A constrained minimuzation algorithm that works entirely in Cartesian coordinates is used. The algorithm does not obey the constraints until convergence, a feature that reduces ill-conditioning and allows constrained local minima to be computed more quickly than unconstrained minima. Computational speedup exceeds the 3-fold factor commonly obtained in constained molecular dynamics simulations, where the constraints must be strictly obeyed at all times.

  11. Assessment of Triton Potential Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friar, J. L.; Payne, G. L.

    1995-12-01

    An assessment is made of the dominant features contributing to the triton potential energy, with the objective of understanding qualitatively their origins and sensitivities. Relativistic effects, short-range repulsion, and OPEP dominance are discussed. A determination of the importance of various regions of nucleon-nucleon separation is made numerically.

  12. Energies of Screened Coulomb Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    This article shows that, by applying the Hellman-Feynman theorem alone to screened Coulomb potentials, the first four coefficients in the energy series in powers of the perturbation parameter can be obtained from the unperturbed Coulomb system. (Author/HM)

  13. Analysis of Potential Energy Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, G. M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Introduces different methodological strategies in analyzing potential energy surfaces (PES) used in chemical reactivity studies. Discusses the theory of PES and gives examples to be used for student work. Provides procedures for calculating normal coordinates and vibrational properties of an activated complex. (ML)

  14. Analysis of Potential Energy Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, G. M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Introduces different methodological strategies in analyzing potential energy surfaces (PES) used in chemical reactivity studies. Discusses the theory of PES and gives examples to be used for student work. Provides procedures for calculating normal coordinates and vibrational properties of an activated complex. (ML)

  15. Noise Suppression for Dual-Energy CT through Entropy Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In dual energy CT (DECT), noise amplification during signal decomposition significantly limits the utility of basis material images. Since clinically relevant objects typically contain a limited number of different materials, we propose an Image-domain Decomposition method through Entropy Minimization (IDEM) for noise suppression in DECT. Pixels of decomposed images are first linearly transformed into 2D clusters of data points, which are highly asymmetric due to strong signal correlation. An optimal axis is identified in the 2D space via numerical search such that the projection of data clusters onto the axis has minimum entropy. Noise suppression is performed on each image pixel by estimating the center-of-mass value of each data cluster along the direction perpendicular to the projection axis. The IDEM method is distinct from other noise suppression techniques in that it does not suppress pixel noise by reducing spatial variation between neighboring pixels. As supported by studies on Catphan©600 and anthropomorphic head phantoms, this feature endows our algorithm with a unique capability of reducing noise standard deviation on DECT decomposed images by approximately one order of magnitude while preserving spatial resolution and image noise power spectra (NPS). Compared with a filtering method and recently developed iterative method at the same level of noise suppression, the IDEM algorithm obtains high-resolution images with less artifacts. It also maintains accuracy of electron density measurements with less than 2% bias error. The IDEM method effectively suppresses noise of DECT for quantitative use, with appealing features on preservation of image spatial resolution and NPS. PMID:25955585

  16. Noise Suppression for Dual-Energy CT Through Entropy Minimization.

    PubMed

    Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2015-11-01

    In dual energy CT (DECT), noise amplification during signal decomposition significantly limits the utility of basis material images. Since clinically relevant objects typically contain a limited number of different materials, we propose an Image-domain Decomposition method through Entropy Minimization (IDEM) for noise suppression in DECT. Pixels of decomposed images are first linearly transformed into 2D clusters of data points, which are highly asymmetric due to strong signal correlation. An optimal axis is identified in the 2D space via numerical search such that the projection of data clusters onto the axis has minimum entropy. Noise suppression is performed on each image pixel by estimating the center-of-mass value of each data cluster along the direction perpendicular to the projection axis. The IDEM method is distinct from other noise suppression techniques in that it does not suppress pixel noise by reducing spatial variation between neighboring pixels. As supported by studies on Catphan©600 and anthropomorphic head phantoms, this feature endows our algorithm with a unique capability of reducing noise standard deviation on DECT decomposed images by approximately one order of magnitude while preserving spatial resolution and image noise power spectra (NPS). Compared with a filtering method and recently developed iterative method at the same level of noise suppression, the IDEM algorithm obtains high-resolution images with less artifacts. It also maintains accuracy of electron density measurements with less than 2% bias error. The IDEM method effectively suppresses noise of DECT for quantitative use, with appealing features on preservation of image spatial resolution and NPS.

  17. California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

  18. Examining the Potential of Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-09-01

    This outreach document goes to potential partners for NREL's Renewable Energy Potential Initiative, which will explore the long-term potential of Renewable Energy to meet a substantial share of U.S. energy needs.

  19. The potential of renewable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

  20. Energy minimization versus pseudo force technique for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of using minimization techniques for the solution of nonlinear structural analysis problems is discussed and demonstrated by comparison with the conventional pseudo force technique. The comparison involves nonlinear problems with a relatively few degrees of freedom. A survey of the state-of-the-art of algorithms for unconstrained minimization reveals that extension of the technique to large scale nonlinear systems is possible.

  1. Smart HVAC Control in IoT: Energy Consumption Minimization with User Comfort Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Verikoukis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Smart grid is one of the main applications of the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm. Within this context, this paper addresses the efficient energy consumption management of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in smart grids with variable energy price. To that end, first, we propose an energy scheduling method that minimizes the energy consumption cost for a particular time interval, taking into account the energy price and a set of comfort constraints, that is, a range of temperatures according to user's preferences for a given room. Then, we propose an energy scheduler where the user may select to relax the temperature constraints to save more energy. Moreover, thanks to the IoT paradigm, the user may interact remotely with the HVAC control system. In particular, the user may decide remotely the temperature of comfort, while the temperature and energy consumption information is sent through Internet and displayed at the end user's device. The proposed algorithms have been implemented in a real testbed, highlighting the potential gains that can be achieved in terms of both energy and cost. PMID:25054163

  2. Smart HVAC control in IoT: energy consumption minimization with user comfort constraints.

    PubMed

    Serra, Jordi; Pubill, David; Antonopoulos, Angelos; Verikoukis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Smart grid is one of the main applications of the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm. Within this context, this paper addresses the efficient energy consumption management of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in smart grids with variable energy price. To that end, first, we propose an energy scheduling method that minimizes the energy consumption cost for a particular time interval, taking into account the energy price and a set of comfort constraints, that is, a range of temperatures according to user's preferences for a given room. Then, we propose an energy scheduler where the user may select to relax the temperature constraints to save more energy. Moreover, thanks to the IoT paradigm, the user may interact remotely with the HVAC control system. In particular, the user may decide remotely the temperature of comfort, while the temperature and energy consumption information is sent through Internet and displayed at the end user's device. The proposed algorithms have been implemented in a real testbed, highlighting the potential gains that can be achieved in terms of both energy and cost.

  3. Energy-efficient ECG compression on wireless biosensors via minimal coherence sensing and weighted ℓ₁ minimization reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Gu, Zhenghui; Yu, Zhu Liang; Li, Yuanqing

    2015-03-01

    Low energy consumption is crucial for body area networks (BANs). In BAN-enabled ECG monitoring, the continuous monitoring entails the need of the sensor nodes to transmit a huge data to the sink node, which leads to excessive energy consumption. To reduce airtime over energy-hungry wireless links, this paper presents an energy-efficient compressed sensing (CS)-based approach for on-node ECG compression. At first, an algorithm called minimal mutual coherence pursuit is proposed to construct sparse binary measurement matrices, which can be used to encode the ECG signals with superior performance and extremely low complexity. Second, in order to minimize the data rate required for faithful reconstruction, a weighted ℓ1 minimization model is derived by exploring the multisource prior knowledge in wavelet domain. Experimental results on MIT-BIH arrhythmia database reveals that the proposed approach can obtain higher compression ratio than the state-of-the-art CS-based methods. Together with its low encoding complexity, our approach can achieve significant energy saving in both encoding process and wireless transmission.

  4. Diuretic potential of energy drinks.

    PubMed

    Riesenhuber, A; Boehm, M; Posch, M; Aufricht, C

    2006-07-01

    Recent literature suggests that both caffeine and taurine can induce diuresis and natriuresis in rat and man. Although they act via different cellular mechanisms, their diuretic actions might be additive. This is of considerable interest, as several commercially available energy drinks contain both substances. In this study we examined the possible diuretic effects of caffeine and taurine in a cross-over-design in which 12 healthy male volunteers received each of 4 different test drinks (750 ml of energy drink containing 240 mg caffeine and 3 g taurine, the three other test drinks either lacked caffeine, taurine or both) after restraining from fluids for 12 h. Mixed model analyses demonstrated that urinary output and natriuresis were significantly increased by caffeine (mean differences 243 ml and 27 mmol; both p < 0.001) and that there were no such effects of taurine (mean differences 59 ml and -4 mmol). Additionally, urinary osmolarity at baseline was significantly related to the urinary output (p < 0.001). Urine osmolarity values at baseline and in the 6 h urine collection did not differ significantly between treatments. Taken together, our study demonstrates that diuretic and natriuretic effects of the tested energy drink were largely mediated by caffeine. Taurine played no significant role in the fluid balance in moderately dehydrated healthy young consumers. Consequently, the diuretic potential of energy drinks will not differ significantly from other caffeine containing beverages.

  5. Potential energy surface of cyclooctatetraene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, José L.; Castaño, Obis; Morreale, Antonio; Palmeiro, Raul; Gomperts, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the cyclooctatetraene (COT) molecule. Seven COT structures are located on the singlet ground state potential energy surface. Four of them, which present D2d (tub), Cs (bicyclo[4.2.0]octa-2,4,7-triene or BOT), C2h (chair) and D4 (crown) symmetries are stable species, and the other three are transition state structures showing Cs, D4h, and D8h symmetry. We discuss the symmetry of wave functions for these stationary points. Geometries, energies, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of these structures, and energy gaps between singlet-triplet states and low-lying singlets are presented. For the planar D4h and D8h structures, Jahn-Teller and tunneling effects have also been discussed. Ring inversion, bond shifting and valence isomerization reactive channels from the tub COT conformer are discussed from the point of view of the corresponding transition state structures. Where possible, in order to lend support to this theoretical information comparisons with recent transition state spectroscopy data are made.

  6. Monte Carlo-Minimization and Monte Carlo Recursion Approaches to Structure and Free Energy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenqin

    1990-08-01

    Biological systems are intrinsically "complex", involving many degrees of freedom, heterogeneity, and strong interactions among components. For the simplest of biological substances, e.g., biomolecules, which obey the laws of thermodynamics, we may attempt a statistical mechanical investigational approach. Even for these simplest many -body systems, assuming microscopic interactions are completely known, current computational methods in characterizing the overall structure and free energy face the fundamental challenge of an exponential amount of computation, with the rise in the number of degrees of freedom. As an attempt to surmount such problems, two computational procedures, the Monte Carlo-minimization and Monte Carlo recursion methods, have been developed as general approaches to the determination of structure and free energy of a complex thermodynamic system. We describe, in Chapter 2, the Monte Carlo-minimization method, which attempts to simulate natural protein folding processes and to overcome the multiple-minima problem. The Monte Carlo-minimization procedure has been applied to a pentapeptide, Met-enkephalin, leading consistently to the lowest energy structure, which is most likely to be the global minimum structure for Met-enkephalin in the absence of water, given the ECEPP energy parameters. In Chapter 3 of this thesis, we develop a Monte Carlo recursion method to compute the free energy of a given physical system with known interactions, which has been applied to a 32-particle Lennard-Jones fluid. In Chapter 4, we describe an efficient implementation of the recursion procedure, for the computation of the free energy of liquid water, with both MCY and TIP4P potential parameters for water. As a further demonstration of the power of the recursion method for calculating free energy, a general formalism of cluster formation from monatomic vapor is developed in Chapter 5. The Gibbs free energy of constrained clusters can be computed efficiently using the

  7. Experiences in autotuning matrix multiplication for energy minimization on GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Anzt, Hartwig; Haugen, Blake; Kurzak, Jakub; Luszczek, Piotr; Dongarra, Jack

    2015-05-20

    In this study, we report extensive results and analysis of autotuning the computationally intensive graphics processing units kernel for dense matrix–matrix multiplication in double precision. In contrast to traditional autotuning and/or optimization for runtime performance only, we also take the energy efficiency into account. For kernels achieving equal performance, we show significant differences in their energy balance. We also identify the memory throughput as the most influential metric that trades off performance and energy efficiency. Finally, as a result, the performance optimal case ends up not being the most efficient kernel in overall resource use.

  8. Guided energy-minimizing model for segmentation of vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binias, Bartosz

    2016-06-01

    Active contours or snakes, are a group of image segmentation methods based on the idea of energy-minimizng curves. In this paper classical snake model with added Balloon Force is modified, granting it the capability of performing object segmentation task on data with unlimited number of channels. Thanks to introduction of novel component, named the Guiding Energy, into the classical active contour energy functional, the method is now capable of focusing on the objects which posses a specified features provided to the model.

  9. Sculpting proteins interactively: continual energy minimization embedded in a graphical modeling system.

    PubMed

    Surles, M C; Richardson, J S; Richardson, D C; Brooks, F P

    1994-02-01

    We describe a new paradigm for modeling proteins in interactive computer graphics systems--continual maintenance of a physically valid representation, combined with direct user control and visualization. This is achieved by a fast algorithm for energy minimization, capable of real-time performance on all atoms of a small protein, plus graphically specified user tugs. The modeling system, called Sculpt, rigidly constrains bond lengths, bond angles, and planar groups (similar to existing interactive modeling programs), while it applies elastic restraints to minimize the potential energy due to torsions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals and electrostatic interactions (similar to existing batch minimization programs), and user-specified springs. The graphical interface can show bad and/or favorable contacts, and individual energy terms can be turned on or off to determine their effects and interactions. Sculpt finds a local minimum of the total energy that satisfies all the constraints using an augmented Lagrange-multiplier method; calculation time increases only linearly with the number of atoms because the matrix of constraint gradients is sparse and banded. On a 100-MHz MIPS R4000 processor (Silicon Graphics Indigo), Sculpt achieves 11 updates per second on a 20-residue fragment and 2 updates per second on an 80-residue protein, using all atoms except non-H-bonding hydrogens, and without electrostatic interactions. Applications of Sculpt are described: to reverse the direction of bundle packing in a designed 4-helix bundle protein, to fold up a 2-stranded beta-ribbon into an approximate beta-barrel, and to design the sequence and conformation of a 30-residue peptide that mimics one partner of a protein subunit interaction. Computer models that are both interactive and physically realistic (within the limitations of a given force field) have 2 significant advantages: (1) they make feasible the modeling of very large changes (such as needed for de novo design), and

  10. Sculpting proteins interactively: continual energy minimization embedded in a graphical modeling system.

    PubMed Central

    Surles, M. C.; Richardson, J. S.; Richardson, D. C.; Brooks, F. P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a new paradigm for modeling proteins in interactive computer graphics systems--continual maintenance of a physically valid representation, combined with direct user control and visualization. This is achieved by a fast algorithm for energy minimization, capable of real-time performance on all atoms of a small protein, plus graphically specified user tugs. The modeling system, called Sculpt, rigidly constrains bond lengths, bond angles, and planar groups (similar to existing interactive modeling programs), while it applies elastic restraints to minimize the potential energy due to torsions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals and electrostatic interactions (similar to existing batch minimization programs), and user-specified springs. The graphical interface can show bad and/or favorable contacts, and individual energy terms can be turned on or off to determine their effects and interactions. Sculpt finds a local minimum of the total energy that satisfies all the constraints using an augmented Lagrange-multiplier method; calculation time increases only linearly with the number of atoms because the matrix of constraint gradients is sparse and banded. On a 100-MHz MIPS R4000 processor (Silicon Graphics Indigo), Sculpt achieves 11 updates per second on a 20-residue fragment and 2 updates per second on an 80-residue protein, using all atoms except non-H-bonding hydrogens, and without electrostatic interactions. Applications of Sculpt are described: to reverse the direction of bundle packing in a designed 4-helix bundle protein, to fold up a 2-stranded beta-ribbon into an approximate beta-barrel, and to design the sequence and conformation of a 30-residue peptide that mimics one partner of a protein subunit interaction. Computer models that are both interactive and physically realistic (within the limitations of a given force field) have 2 significant advantages: (1) they make feasible the modeling of very large changes (such as needed for de novo design), and

  11. Drivers of Bacterial Maintenance and Minimal Energy Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Kempes, Christopher P.; van Bodegom, Peter M.; Wolpert, David; Libby, Eric; Amend, Jan; Hoehler, Tori

    2017-01-01

    Microbes maintain themselves through a variety of processes. Several of these processes can be reduced or shut down entirely when resource availability declines. In pure culture conditions with ample substrate supply, a relationship between the maximum growth rate and the energy invested in maintenance has been reported widely. However, at the other end of the resources spectrum, bacteria are so extremely limited by energy that no growth occurs and metabolism is constrained to the most essential functions only. These minimum energy requirements have been called the basal power requirement. While seemingly different from each other, both aspects are likely components of a continuum of regulated maintenance processes. Here, we analyze cross-species tradeoffs in cellular physiology over the range of bacterial size and energy expenditure and determine the contributions to maintenance metabolism at each point along the size-energy spectrum. Furthermore, by exploring the simplest bacteria within this framework– which are most affected by maintenance constraints– we uncover which processes become most limiting. For the smallest species, maintenance metabolism converges on total metabolism, where we predict that maintenance is dominated by the repair of proteins. For larger species the relative costs of protein repair decrease and maintenance metabolism is predicted to be dominated by the repair of RNA components. These results provide new insights into which processes are likely to be regulated in environments that are extremely limited by energy. PMID:28197128

  12. Drivers of Bacterial Maintenance and Minimal Energy Requirements.

    PubMed

    Kempes, Christopher P; van Bodegom, Peter M; Wolpert, David; Libby, Eric; Amend, Jan; Hoehler, Tori

    2017-01-01

    Microbes maintain themselves through a variety of processes. Several of these processes can be reduced or shut down entirely when resource availability declines. In pure culture conditions with ample substrate supply, a relationship between the maximum growth rate and the energy invested in maintenance has been reported widely. However, at the other end of the resources spectrum, bacteria are so extremely limited by energy that no growth occurs and metabolism is constrained to the most essential functions only. These minimum energy requirements have been called the basal power requirement. While seemingly different from each other, both aspects are likely components of a continuum of regulated maintenance processes. Here, we analyze cross-species tradeoffs in cellular physiology over the range of bacterial size and energy expenditure and determine the contributions to maintenance metabolism at each point along the size-energy spectrum. Furthermore, by exploring the simplest bacteria within this framework- which are most affected by maintenance constraints- we uncover which processes become most limiting. For the smallest species, maintenance metabolism converges on total metabolism, where we predict that maintenance is dominated by the repair of proteins. For larger species the relative costs of protein repair decrease and maintenance metabolism is predicted to be dominated by the repair of RNA components. These results provide new insights into which processes are likely to be regulated in environments that are extremely limited by energy.

  13. Discretized energy minimization in a wave guide with point sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Propst, G.

    1994-01-01

    An anti-noise problem on a finite time interval is solved by minimization of a quadratic functional on the Hilbert space of square integrable controls. To this end, the one-dimensional wave equation with point sources and pointwise reflecting boundary conditions is decomposed into a system for the two propagating components of waves. Wellposedness of this system is proved for a class of data that includes piecewise linear initial conditions and piecewise constant forcing functions. It is shown that for such data the optimal piecewise constant control is the solution of a sparse linear system. Methods for its computational treatment are presented as well as examples of their applicability. The convergence of discrete approximations to the general optimization problem is demonstrated by finite element methods.

  14. Beam-energy-spread minimization using cell-timing optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C. R.; Ekdahl, C.; Schulze, M.

    2012-04-01

    Beam energy spread, and related beam motion, increase the difficulty in tuning for multipulse radiographic experiments at the dual-axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility’s axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). In this article, we describe an optimization method to reduce the energy spread by adjusting the timing of the cell voltages (both unloaded and loaded), either advancing or retarding, such that the injector voltage and summed cell voltages in the LIA result in a flatter energy profile. We developed a nonlinear optimization routine which accepts as inputs the 74 cell-voltage, injector voltage, and beam current waveforms. It optimizes cell timing per user-selected groups of cells and outputs timing adjustments, one for each of the selected groups. To verify the theory, we acquired and present data for both unloaded and loaded cell-timing optimizations. For the unloaded cells, the preoptimization baseline energy spread was reduced by 34% and 31% for two shots as compared to baseline. For the loaded-cell case, the measured energy spread was reduced by 49% compared to baseline.

  15. Charge and energy minimization in electrical/magnetic stimulation of nervous tissue.

    PubMed

    Jezernik, Saso; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Morari, Manfred

    2010-08-01

    In this work we address the problem of stimulating nervous tissue with the minimal necessary energy at reduced/minimal charge. Charge minimization is related to a valid safety concern (avoidance and reduction of stimulation-induced tissue and electrode damage). Energy minimization plays a role in battery-driven electrical or magnetic stimulation systems (increased lifetime, repetition rates, reduction of power requirements, thermal management). Extensive new theoretical results are derived by employing an optimal control theory framework. These results include derivation of the optimal electrical stimulation waveform for a mixed energy/charge minimization problem, derivation of the charge-balanced energy-minimal electrical stimulation waveform, solutions of a pure charge minimization problem with and without a constraint on the stimulation amplitude, and derivation of the energy-minimal magnetic stimulation waveform. Depending on the set stimulus pulse duration, energy and charge reductions of up to 80% are deemed possible. Results are verified in simulations with an active, mammalian-like nerve fiber model.

  16. Probing gravitational non-minimal coupling with dark energy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Wu, Yi-Peng

    2017-03-01

    We investigate observational constraints on a specific one-parameter extension to the minimal quintessence model, where the quintessence field acquires a quadratic coupling to the scalar curvature through a coupling constant ξ . The value of ξ is highly suppressed in typical tracker models if the late-time cosmic acceleration is driven at some field values near the Planck scale. We test ξ in a second class of models in which the field value today becomes a free model parameter. We use the combined data from type-Ia supernovae, cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations and matter power spectrum, to weak lensing measurements and find a best-fit value ξ {>}0.289 where ξ = 0 is excluded outside the 95% confidence region. The effective gravitational constant G_eff subject to the hint of a non-zero ξ is constrained to -0.003< 1- G_eff/G < 0.033 at the same confidence level on cosmological scales, and it can be narrowed down to 1- G_eff/G < 2.2 × 10^{-5} when combining with Solar System tests.

  17. [Possible changes in energy-minimizer mechanisms of locomotion due to chronic low back pain - a literature review].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Alberito Rodrigo; Andrade, Alexandro; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    One goal of the locomotion is to move the body in the space at the most economical way possible. However, little is known about the mechanical and energetic aspects of locomotion that are affected by low back pain. And in case of occurring some damage, little is known about how the mechanical and energetic characteristics of the locomotion are manifested in functional activities, especially with respect to the energy-minimizer mechanisms during locomotion. This study aimed: a) to describe the main energy-minimizer mechanisms of locomotion; b) to check if there are signs of damage on the mechanical and energetic characteristics of the locomotion due to chronic low back pain (CLBP) which may endanger the energy-minimizer mechanisms. This study is characterized as a narrative literature review. The main theory that explains the minimization of energy expenditure during the locomotion is the inverted pendulum mechanism, by which the energy-minimizer mechanism converts kinetic energy into potential energy of the center of mass and vice-versa during the step. This mechanism is strongly influenced by spatio-temporal gait (locomotion) parameters such as step length and preferred walking speed, which, in turn, may be severely altered in patients with chronic low back pain. However, much remains to be understood about the effects of chronic low back pain on the individual's ability to practice an economic locomotion, because functional impairment may compromise the mechanical and energetic characteristics of this type of gait, making it more costly. Thus, there are indications that such changes may compromise the functional energy-minimizer mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Geothermal Energy: Tapping the Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Ground source geothermal energy enables one to tap into the earth's stored renewable energy for heating and cooling facilities. Proper application of ground-source geothermal technology can have a dramatic impact on the efficiency and financial performance of building energy utilization (30%+). At the same time, using this alternative energy…

  19. Minimization of the energy costs for operating magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Ilyas A. H.; Gale, E.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2015-03-01

    Increasing prospects of utilizing the STT-MRAM calls for the re-assessment of the overall energy (power) cost of operating magnetic tunnel junctions and related elements. This motivates our design, nanofabrication and characterization of simple tri-layer magnetic tunnel junctions which show measurable decrease in the operating energy cost. The MTJs we report about rely on nanoengineering interfaces between the insulating and magnetic layers in such a way that the area of the hysteresis loops can be controlled in one or both magnetic layers. Our TMR coefficient ranges from 45% to 130%, depending on the MTJ layer materials, and can be anticipated to be further increased. We also report the study of the TMR dependence on the RA product, as an important interface parameter. Lastly, we present an analysis of MTJ parameters affected by our approach and a perspective on further improvements, focusing on the device design parameters relevant for the integration of this type of MTJs. This work is supported by the SRC-ATIC Grant 2012-VJ-2335. A part of this work is being performed at Cornell University CNF, a member of NNIN. We thank CNF staff for the support.

  20. Spinning gas clouds: III. Solutions of minimal energy with precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffet, B.

    2003-05-01

    We consider the model of rotating and expanding gas cloud originally proposed by Ovsiannikov (1956 Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 111 47) and Dyson (1968 J. Math. Mech. 18 91). Under the restricting assumptions of an adiabatic index gamma = 5/3 and of vorticity-free motion, this has been shown (Gaffet 2001 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 34 2097) to be a Liouville integrable Hamiltonian system. In the present work, we consider the precessing solutions where the cloud does not retain a fixed rotation axis. Choosing for definiteness a particular set of constants of motion (which corresponds to a minimum of the energy), we show that a separation of variables occurs, and that the equations of motion are reducible to the form of a Riccati equation, whose integration merely involves an elliptic integral.

  1. Energy restriction and potential energy restriction mimetics.

    PubMed

    Nikolai, Sibylle; Pallauf, Kathrin; Huebbe, Patricia; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    Energy restriction (ER; also known as caloric restriction) is the only nutritional intervention that has repeatedly been shown to increase lifespan in model organisms and may delay ageing in humans. In the present review we discuss current scientific literature on ER and its molecular, metabolic and hormonal effects. Moreover, criteria for the classification of substances that might induce positive ER-like changes without having to reduce energy intake are summarised. Additionally, the putative ER mimetics (ERM) 2-deoxy-d-glucose, metformin, rapamycin, resveratrol, spermidine and lipoic acid and their suggested molecular targets are discussed. While there are reports on these ERM candidates that describe lifespan extension in model organisms, data on longevity-inducing effects in higher organisms such as mice remain controversial or are missing. Furthermore, some of these candidates produce detrimental side effects such as immunosuppression or lactic acidosis, or have not been tested for safety in long-term studies. Up to now, there are no known ERM that could be recommended without limitations for use in humans.

  2. Minimal energy interpolation of repeat orbit ground-track gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    If satellites of gravity-field missions are in an repeat orbit, their ground tracks do not sample the surface of the Earth uniformly, but leave large gaps. Usually, these gaps are interpolated by the representation of the gravitational field by surface spherical harmonics. Since surface spherical harmonics are algebraic/trigonometric polynomials, this interpolation tends to oscillate. This contribution starts from the observation, that the gravitational field is best known along the ground tracks. Therefore, a reasonable interpolation strategy should fulfill two requirements: i) Reproduce the measured values along the satellite tracks. ii) Be as smooth as possible between the satellite tracks. The concept of smoothness will be understood as the bending energy of an elastic membrane attached to the measured values along the satellite tracks. It will be shown, that such an interpolation is the solution of a boundary value problem for the biharmonic equation. A finite difference approximation for the biharmonic equation is developed and numerically tested. The biharmonic interpolation turns out to be more reasonable than the Gaussian smoothed spherical harmonics solution.

  3. Optimum fuel loads in migratory birds: distinguishing between time and energy minimization

    PubMed

    Hedenstrom; Alerstam

    1997-12-07

    By combining the potential flight range of fuel with different migration policies, the optimum departure fuel load for migratory birds can be calculated. We evaluate the optimum departure fuel loads associated with minimization of three different currencies: (1) overall time of migration, (2) energy cost of transport and (3) total energy coast of migration. Predicted departure loads are highest for (1), lowest for (2) and intermediate for (3). Further, currencies (1) and (3) show departure loads dependent on the fuel accumulation rate at stopovers, while (2) is not affected by variation in the rate of fuel accumulation. Furthermore, fuel loads optimized with respect to currency (3) will differ depending on the size (body mass) of the bird and the energy density of the fuel. We review ecological situations in which the various currencies may apply, and suggest how a combination of stopover decisions and observations of flight speed may be used to decide among the three cases of migration policies. Finally, we calculate that the total energy cost of migration is roughly divided between flight and stopover as 1:2. The total time of migration is similarly divided between flight and stopover as 1:7, probably with a relatively longer stopover time in larger species. Hence, we may expect strong selection pressures to optimize the fuel accumulation strategies during stopover episodes.Copyright 1997 Academic Press Limited Copyright 1997 Academic Press Limited

  4. Mass minimization of a discrete regenerative fuel cell (RFC) system for on-board energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojin; Xiao, Yu; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    RFC combined with solar photovoltaic (PV) array is the advanced technologic solution for on-board energy storage, e.g. land, sky, stratosphere and aerospace applications, due to its potential of achieving high specific energy. This paper focuses on mass modeling and calculation for a RFC system consisting of discrete electrochemical cell stacks (fuel cell and electrolyzer), together with fuel storage, a PV array, and a radiator. A nonlinear constrained optimization procedure is used to minimize the entire system mass, as well as to study the effect of operating conditions (e.g. current densities of fuel cell and electrolyzer) on the system mass. According to the state-of-the-art specific power of both electrochemical stacks, an energy storage system has been designed for the conditions of stratosphere applications and a rated power output of 12 kW. The calculation results show that the optimization of the current density of both stacks is of importance in designing the light weight on-board energy system.

  5. On global minimizers of repulsive–attractive power-law interaction energies

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, José Antonio; Chipot, Michel; Huang, Yanghong

    2014-01-01

    We consider the minimization of the repulsive–attractive power-law interaction energies that occur in many biological and physical situations. We show the existence of global minimizers in the discrete setting and obtain bounds for their supports independently of the number of Dirac deltas in a certain range of exponents. These global discrete minimizers correspond to the stable spatial profiles of flock patterns in swarming models. Global minimizers of the continuum problem are obtained by compactness. We also illustrate our results through numerical simulations. PMID:25288810

  6. Potential of renewable and alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V.; Pogharnitskaya, O.; Rostovshchikova, A.; Matveenko, I.

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with application potential of clean alternative renewable energy sources. By means of system analysis the forecast for consumption of electrical energy in Tomsk Oblast as well as main energy sources of existing energy system have been studied up to 2018. Engineering potential of renewable and alternative energy sources is evaluated. Besides, ranking in the order of their efficiency descending is performed. It is concluded that Tomsk Oblast has high potential of alternative and renewable energy sources, among which the most promising development perspective is implementation of gasification stations to save fuel consumed by diesel power stations as well as building wind-power plants.

  7. Automated classification of multispectral MR images using unsupervised constrained energy minimization based on fuzzy logic.

    PubMed

    Lin, Geng-Cheng; Wang, Chuin-Mu; Wang, Wen-June; Sun, Sheng-Yih

    2010-06-01

    Constrained energy minimization (CEM) has proven highly effective for hyperspectral (or multispectral) target detection and classification. It requires a complete knowledge of the desired target signature in images. This work presents "Unsupervised CEM (UCEM)," a novel approach to automatically target detection and classification in multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images. The UCEM involves two processes, namely, target generation process (TGP) and CEM. The TGP is a fuzzy-set process that generates a set of potential targets from unknown information and then applies these targets to be desired targets in CEM. Finally, two sets of images, namely, computer-generated phantom images and real MR images, are used in the experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of UCEM. Experimental results demonstrate that UCEM segments a multispectral MR image much more effectively than either Functional MRI of the Brain's (FMRIB's) automated segmentation tool or fuzzy C-means does.

  8. Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies is provided to assist state officials, regulators, legislators, and others in implementing the recommendations of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency.

  9. Stabilized quasi-Newton optimization of noisy potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bastian; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Roy, Shantanu; Goedecker, Stefan; Goedecker Group Team

    Optimizations of atomic positions belong to the most frequently performed tasks in electronic structure calculations. Many simulations like global minimum searches or the identification of chemical reaction pathways can require the computation of hundreds or thousands of minimizations or saddle points. To automatize these tasks, optimization algorithms must not only be efficient but also very reliable. Unfortunately, computational noise in forces and energies is inherent to electronic structure codes. This computational noise poses a severe problem to the stability of efficient optimization methods like the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno algorithm. In this talk a recently published technique that allows to obtain significant curvature information of noisy potential energy surfaces is presented. This technique was used to construct both, a stabilized quasi-Newton minimization method and a stabilized quasi-Newton saddle finding approach. With the help of benchmarks both the minimizer and the saddle finding approach were demonstrated to be superior to comparable existing methods.

  10. Stabilized quasi-Newton optimization of noisy potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bastian; Alireza Ghasemi, S.; Roy, Shantanu; Goedecker, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Optimizations of atomic positions belong to the most commonly performed tasks in electronic structure calculations. Many simulations like global minimum searches or characterizations of chemical reactions require performing hundreds or thousands of minimizations or saddle computations. To automatize these tasks, optimization algorithms must not only be efficient but also very reliable. Unfortunately, computational noise in forces and energies is inherent to electronic structure codes. This computational noise poses a severe problem to the stability of efficient optimization methods like the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno algorithm. We here present a technique that allows obtaining significant curvature information of noisy potential energy surfaces. We use this technique to construct both, a stabilized quasi-Newton minimization method and a stabilized quasi-Newton saddle finding approach. We demonstrate with the help of benchmarks that both the minimizer and the saddle finding approach are superior to comparable existing methods.

  11. Stabilized quasi-Newton optimization of noisy potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Bastian; Goedecker, Stefan; Alireza Ghasemi, S.; Roy, Shantanu

    2015-01-21

    Optimizations of atomic positions belong to the most commonly performed tasks in electronic structure calculations. Many simulations like global minimum searches or characterizations of chemical reactions require performing hundreds or thousands of minimizations or saddle computations. To automatize these tasks, optimization algorithms must not only be efficient but also very reliable. Unfortunately, computational noise in forces and energies is inherent to electronic structure codes. This computational noise poses a severe problem to the stability of efficient optimization methods like the limited-memory Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno algorithm. We here present a technique that allows obtaining significant curvature information of noisy potential energy surfaces. We use this technique to construct both, a stabilized quasi-Newton minimization method and a stabilized quasi-Newton saddle finding approach. We demonstrate with the help of benchmarks that both the minimizer and the saddle finding approach are superior to comparable existing methods.

  12. Crystal Engineering on Industrial Diaryl Pigments Using Lattice Energy Minimizations and X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt,M.; Dinnebier, R.; Kalkhof, H.

    2007-01-01

    Diaryl azo pigments play an important role as yellow pigments for printing inks, with an annual pigment production of more than 50,000 t. The crystal structures of Pigment Yellow 12 (PY12), Pigment Yellow 13 (PY13), Pigment Yellow 14 (PY14), and Pigment Yellow 83 (PY83) were determined from X-ray powder data using lattice energy minimizations and subsequent Rietveld refinements. Details of the lattice energy minimization procedure and of the development of a torsion potential for the biphenyl fragment are given. The Rietveld refinements were carried out using rigid bodies, or constraints. It was also possible to refine all atomic positions individually without any constraint or restraint, even for PY12 having 44 independent non-hydrogen atoms per asymmetric unit. For PY14 (23 independent non-hydrogen atoms), additionally all atomic isotropic temperature factors could be refined individually. PY12 crystallized in a herringbone arrangement with twisted biaryl fragments. PY13 and PY14 formed a layer structure of planar molecules. PY83 showed a herringbone structure with planar molecules. According to quantum mechanical calculations, the twisting of the biaryl fragment results in a lower color strength of the pigments, whereas changes in the substitution pattern have almost no influence on the color strength of a single molecule. Hence, the experimentally observed lower color strength of PY12 in comparison with that of PY13 and PY83 can be explained as a pure packing effect. Further lattice energy calculations explained that the four investigated pigments crystallize in three different structures because these structures are the energetically most favorable ones for each compound. For example, for PY13, PY14, or PY83, a PY12-analogous crystal structure would lead to considerably poorer lattice energies and lower densities. In contrast, lattice energy calculations revealed that PY12 could adopt a PY13-type structure with only slightly poorer energy. This structure was

  13. An Energy-Minimizing Mesh for the Schröodinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary H.; Wilkins, John W.

    1989-08-01

    A formula is derived which gives the optimum placement of mesh points in the sense of minimizing the error in energy for a given number of degrees of freedom. The wave function is assumed to be given in a finite difference or finite element representation with polynomial completeness to an arbitrary but fixed degree. The result depends explicitly on the wave function, the kinetic energy operator, and the degree of polynomial completeness for the representation but does not depend explicitly on the potential, even in the presence of a Coulomb singularity. The optimum mesh predicted here for the hydrogen atom is compared to the widely used Herman-Skillman mesh. A 1-dimensional example is given in which the calculated error in energy displays a sharp minimum at the predicted optimal mesh density. The critical role of reproducing the analytic structure of the solution is illustrated with an additional example in one dimension. The hydrogen is wave function is considered as a 3-dimensional problem, and an optimal mesh density is calculated. A singular mesh density is required to account for the cusp while retaining the convergence properties of the basis set. A few percent of the available degrees of freedom are devoted to the description of the wave function cusp in the optimal mesh.

  14. A comparative study of energy minimization methods for Markov random fields with smoothness-based priors.

    PubMed

    Szeliski, Richard; Zabih, Ramin; Scharstein, Daniel; Veksler, Olga; Kolmogorov, Vladimir; Agarwala, Aseem; Tappen, Marshall; Rother, Carsten

    2008-06-01

    Among the most exciting advances in early vision has been the development of efficient energy minimization algorithms for pixel-labeling tasks such as depth or texture computation. It has been known for decades that such problems can be elegantly expressed as Markov random fields, yet the resulting energy minimization problems have been widely viewed as intractable. Recently, algorithms such as graph cuts and loopy belief propagation (LBP) have proven to be very powerful: for example, such methods form the basis for almost all the top-performing stereo methods. However, the tradeoffs among different energy minimization algorithms are still not well understood. In this paper we describe a set of energy minimization benchmarks and use them to compare the solution quality and running time of several common energy minimization algorithms. We investigate three promising recent methods graph cuts, LBP, and tree-reweighted message passing in addition to the well-known older iterated conditional modes (ICM) algorithm. Our benchmark problems are drawn from published energy functions used for stereo, image stitching, interactive segmentation, and denoising. We also provide a general-purpose software interface that allows vision researchers to easily switch between optimization methods. Benchmarks, code, images, and results are available at http://vision.middlebury.edu/MRF/.

  15. Electron-electron correlations in square-well quantum dots: direct energy minimization approach.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hidekazu; Hirose, Kikuji

    2011-04-01

    Electron-electron correlations in two-dimensional square-well quantum dots are investigated using the direct energy minimization scheme. Searches for groundstate charges and spin configurations are performed with varying the sizes of dots and the number of electrons. For a two-electron system, a standout difference between the configurations with and without counting correlation energy is demonstrated. The emergence and melting of Wigner-molecule-like structures arising from the interplay between the kinetic energy and Coulombic interaction energy are described. Electron-electron correlation energies and addition energy spectra are calculated, and special electron numbers related to peculiar effects of the square well are extracted.

  16. Free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures and computational RNA design.

    PubMed

    Churkin, Alexander; Weinbrand, Lina; Barash, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Determining the RNA secondary structure from sequence data by computational predictions is a long-standing problem. Its solution has been approached in two distinctive ways. If a multiple sequence alignment of a collection of homologous sequences is available, the comparative method uses phylogeny to determine conserved base pairs that are more likely to form as a result of billions of years of evolution than by chance. In the case of single sequences, recursive algorithms that compute free energy structures by using empirically derived energy parameters have been developed. This latter approach of RNA folding prediction by energy minimization is widely used to predict RNA secondary structure from sequence. For a significant number of RNA molecules, the secondary structure of the RNA molecule is indicative of its function and its computational prediction by minimizing its free energy is important for its functional analysis. A general method for free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures is dynamic programming, although other optimization methods have been developed as well along with empirically derived energy parameters. In this chapter, we introduce and illustrate by examples the approach of free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures.

  17. Energy potential of modern landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Bogner, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Methane produced by refuse decomposition in a sanitary landfill can be recovered for commercial use. Landfill methane is currently under-utilized, with commercial recovery at only a small percentage of US landfills. New federal regulations mandating control of landfill gas migration and atmospheric emissions are providing impetus to methane recovery schemes as a means of recovering costs for increased environmental control. The benefits of landfill methane recovery include utilization of an inexpensive renewable energy resource, removal of explosive gas mixtures from the subsurface, and mitigation of observed historic increases in atmospheric methane. Increased commercial interest in landfill methane recovery is dependent on the final form of Clean Air Act amendments pertaining to gaseous emissions from landfills; market shifts in natural gas prices; financial incentives for development of renewable energy resources; and support for applied research and development to develop techniques for increased control of the gas generation process in situ. This paper will discuss the controls on methane generation in landfills. In addition, it will address how landfill regulations affect landfill design and site management practices which, in turn, influence decomposition rates. Finally, future trends in landfilling, and their relationship to gas production, will be examined. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads

    SciTech Connect

    Biermayer, Peter J.

    2005-09-28

    This paper estimates the benefits and costs of six water reduction scenarios. Benefits and costs of showerhead scenarios are ranked in this paper by an estimated water reduction percentage. To prioritize potential water and energy saving scenarios regarding showerheads, six scenarios were analyzed for their potential water and energy savings and the associated dollar savings to the consumer.

  19. Geothermal Energy Potential in Western United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryde, Philip R.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews types of geothermal energy sources in the western states, including hot brine systems and dry steam systems. Conversion to electrical energy is a major potential use of geothermal energy, although it creates environmental disruptions such as noise, corrosion, and scaling of equipment. (AV)

  20. Geothermal Energy Potential in Western United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryde, Philip R.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews types of geothermal energy sources in the western states, including hot brine systems and dry steam systems. Conversion to electrical energy is a major potential use of geothermal energy, although it creates environmental disruptions such as noise, corrosion, and scaling of equipment. (AV)

  1. Non-minimal coupling of torsion-matter satisfying null energy condition for wormhole solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila

    2016-12-01

    We explore wormhole solutions in a non-minimal torsion-matter coupled gravity by taking an explicit non-minimal coupling between the matter Lagrangian density and an arbitrary function of the torsion scalar. This coupling describes the transfer of energy and momentum between matter and torsion scalar terms. The violation of the null energy condition occurred through an effective energy-momentum tensor incorporating the torsion-matter non-minimal coupling, while normal matter is responsible for supporting the respective wormhole geometries. We consider the energy density in the form of non-monotonically decreasing function along with two types of models. The first model is analogous to the curvature-matter coupling scenario, that is, the torsion scalar with T-matter coupling, while the second one involves a quadratic torsion term. In both cases, we obtain wormhole solutions satisfying the null energy condition. Also, we find that the increasing value of the coupling constant minimizes or vanishes on the violation of the null energy condition through matter.

  2. Non-minimal derivative coupling scalar field and bulk viscous dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghel, Behrang; Moshafi, Hossein; Movahed, S. M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Inspired by thermodynamical dissipative phenomena, we consider bulk viscosity for dark fluid in a spatially flat two-component Universe. Our viscous dark energy model represents phantom-crossing which avoids big-rip singularity. We propose a non-minimal derivative coupling scalar field with zero potential leading to accelerated expansion of the Universe in the framework of bulk viscous dark energy model. In this approach, the coupling constant, κ , is related to viscosity coefficient, γ , and the present dark energy density, \\varOmega _DE^0. This coupling is bounded as κ \\in [-1/9H_0^2(1-\\varOmega _DE^0), 0]. We implement recent observational data sets including a joint light-curve analysis (JLA) for SNIa, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) for most luminous astrophysical objects at high redshifts, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) from different surveys, Hubble parameter from HST project, Planck CMB power spectrum and lensing to constrain model free parameters. The joint analysis of JLA + GRBs + BAO + HST shows that \\varOmega _DE^0=0.696± 0.010, γ =0.1404± 0.0014 and H_0=68.1± 1.3. Planck TT observation provides γ =0.32^{+0.31}_{-0.26} in the 68% confidence limit for the viscosity coefficient. The cosmographic distance ratio indicates that current observed data prefer to increase bulk viscosity. The competition between phantom and quintessence behavior of the viscous dark energy model can accommodate cosmological old objects reported as a sign of age crisis in the \\varLambda CDM model. Finally, tension in the Hubble parameter is alleviated in this model.

  3. Pixel level image fusion for medical imaging: an energy minimizing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Brandon; Law, Max W. K.; Ben-Ayed, Ismail; Garvin, Greg; Fenster, Aaron; Li, Shuo

    2012-03-01

    In an attempt to improve the visualisation techniques for diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, we present a novel image fusion method for a pixel-wise fusion of CT and MR images. We focus on the spine and it's related diseases including osteophyte growth, degenerate disc disease and spinal stenosis. This will have benefit to the 50-75% of people who suffer from back pain, which is the reason for 1.8% of all hospital stays in the United States.1 Pre-registered CT and MR image pairs were used. Rigid registration was performed based on soft tissue correspondence. A pixel-wise image fusion algorithm has been designed to combine CT and MR images into a single image. This is accomplished by minimizing an energy functional using a Graph Cut approach. The functional is formulated to balance the similarity between the resultant image and the CT image as well as between the resultant image and the MR image. Furthermore the variational smoothness of the resultant image is considered in the energy functional (to enforce natural transitions between pixels). The results have been validated based on the amount of significant detail preserved in the final fused image. Based on bone cortex and disc / spinal cord areas, 95% of the relevant MR detail and 85% of the relevant CT detail was preserved. This work has the potential to aid in patient diagnosis, surgery planning and execution along with post operative follow up.

  4. Band offset formation at semiconductor heterojunctions through density-based minimization of interface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Raymond T.; Kronik, Leeor

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the magnitude of band offset (BO) at any semiconductor heterojunction is directly derivable from the distribution of charge at that interface and that the latter is decided by a minimization of total energy. However, the fact that BO formation is governed by energy minimization has not been explicitly used in theoretical BO models, likely because the equilibrium charge densities at heterojunction interfaces appear difficult to predict, except via explicit calculation. In this paper, electron densities at a large number of (100), (110), and (111) oriented heterojunctions between lattice-matched, isovalent semiconductors with the zinc blende (ZB) structure have been calculated by first-principles methods and analyzed in detail for possible common characteristics among energy-minimized densities. Remarkably, the heterojunction electron density was found to largely depend only on the immediate, local atomic arrangement. In fact, it is so much so that a juxtaposition of local electron-densities generated in oligo-cells (LEGOs) accurately reproduced the charge densities that minimize the energy for the heterojunctions. Furthermore, the charge distribution for each bulk semiconductor was found to display a striking separability of its electrostatic effect into two neutral parts, associated with the cation and the anion, which are approximately transferrable among semiconductors. These discoveries form the basis of a neutral polyhedra theory (NPT) that approximately predicts the equilibrium charge density and BO of relaxed heterojunctions from the energy minimization requirement. Well-known experimentally observed characteristics of heterojunctions, such as the insensitivity of BO to heterojunction orientation and the identity of interface bonds, the transitivity rule, etc., are all in good agreement with the NPT. Therefore, energy minimization, which essentially decides the electronic properties of all other solid and molecular systems, also governs

  5. Green Energy in New Construction: Maximize Energy Savings and Minimize Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventresca, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    People often use the term "green energy" to refer to alternative energy technologies. But green energy doesn't guarantee maximum energy savings at a minimum cost--a common misconception. For school business officials, green energy means getting the lowest energy bills for the lowest construction cost, which translates into maximizing green energy…

  6. Consolidation of hydrophobic transition criteria by using an approximate energy minimization approach.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Neelesh A

    2010-06-01

    Recent experimental work has successfully revealed pressure induced transition from Cassie to Wenzel state on rough hydrophobic substrates. Formulas, based on geometric considerations and imposed pressure, have been developed as transition criteria. In the past, transition has also been considered as a process of overcoming the energy barrier between the Cassie and Wenzel states. A unified understanding of the various considerations of transition has not been apparent. To address this issue, in this work, we consolidate the transition criteria with a homogenized energy minimization approach. This approach decouples the problem of minimizing the energy to wet the rough substrate, from the energy of the macroscopic drop. It is seen that the transition from Cassie to Wenzel state, due to depinning of the liquid-air interface, emerges from the approximate energy minimization approach if the pressure-volume energy associated with the impaled liquid in the roughness is included. This transition can be viewed as a process in which the work done by the pressure force is greater than the barrier due to the surface energy associated with wetting the roughness. It is argued that another transition mechanism, due to a sagging liquid-air interface that touches the bottom of the roughness grooves, is not typically relevant if the substrate roughness is designed such that the Cassie state is at lower energy compared to the Wenzel state.

  7. On the energy-minimizing strains in martensitic microstructures—Part 2: Geometrically linear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peigney, Michaël

    2013-06-01

    This paper addresses the theoretical prediction of the quasiconvex hull of energy-minimizing (or stress-free) strains that can be realized by martensitic microstructure. Polyconvexification and related notions are used to derive some upper bounds (in the sense of inclusion) on the quasiconvex hull. Lower bounds are obtained from lamination techniques. The geometrically linear setting (infinitesimal strains) is considered in the present Part 2. Three-, four-, and twelve-well problems are considered. In particular, the structure of the set of energy-minimizing strains in cubic to monoclinic transformations is investigated in detail. That investigation is notably supported by three-dimensional vizualisations obtained by considering four-well restrictions.

  8. Communication: Fitting potential energy surfaces with fundamental invariant neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Kejie; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dong H.

    2016-08-01

    A more flexible neural network (NN) method using the fundamental invariants (FIs) as the input vector is proposed in the construction of potential energy surfaces for molecular systems involving identical atoms. Mathematically, FIs finitely generate the permutation invariant polynomial (PIP) ring. In combination with NN, fundamental invariant neural network (FI-NN) can approximate any function to arbitrary accuracy. Because FI-NN minimizes the size of input permutation invariant polynomials, it can efficiently reduce the evaluation time of potential energy, in particular for polyatomic systems. In this work, we provide the FIs for all possible molecular systems up to five atoms. Potential energy surfaces for OH3 and CH4 were constructed with FI-NN, with the accuracy confirmed by full-dimensional quantum dynamic scattering and bound state calculations.

  9. Teardrop Shapes Minimize Bending Energy of Fusion Pores Connecting Planar Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ryham, Rolf J.; Ward, Mark A.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical gradient flow procedure was devised to characterize minimal energy shapes of fusion pores connecting two parallel planar bilayer membranes. Pore energy, composed of splay, tilt, and stretching, was obtained by modeling each bilayer as two monolayers and treating each monolayer of a bilayer membrane as a freely deformable surface described with a mean lipid orientation field. Voids between the two monolayers were prevented by a steric penalty formulation. Pore shapes were assumed to possess both axial and reflectional symmetry. For fixed pore radius and bilayer separation, the gradient flow procedure was applied to initially toroidal pore shapes. Using initially elliptical pore shapes yielded the same final shape. The resulting minimal pore shapes and energies were analyzed as a function of pore dimension and lipid composition. Previous studies either assumed or confined pore shapes, thereby tacitly supplying an unspecified amount of energy to maintain shape. The shapes derived in the present study were outputs of calculations and an externally provided energy was not supplied. Our procedure therefore yielded energy minima significantly lower than those reported in prior studies. The membrane of minimal energy pores bowed outward near the pore lumen, yielding a pore length that exceeded the distance between the two fusing membranes. PMID:24483480

  10. Teardrop shapes minimize bending energy of fusion pores connecting planar bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ryham, Rolf J; Ward, Mark A; Cohen, Fredric S

    2013-12-01

    A numerical gradient flow procedure was devised to characterize minimal energy shapes of fusion pores connecting two parallel planar bilayer membranes. Pore energy, composed of splay, tilt, and stretching, was obtained by modeling each bilayer as two monolayers and treating each monolayer of a bilayer membrane as a freely deformable surface described with a mean lipid orientation field. Voids between the two monolayers were prevented by a steric penalty formulation. Pore shapes were assumed to possess both axial and reflectional symmetry. For fixed pore radius and bilayer separation, the gradient flow procedure was applied to initially toroidal pore shapes. Using initially elliptical pore shapes yielded the same final shape. The resulting minimal pore shapes and energies were analyzed as a function of pore dimension and lipid composition. Previous studies either assumed or confined pore shapes, thereby tacitly supplying an unspecified amount of energy to maintain shape. The shapes derived in the present study were outputs of calculations and an externally provided energy was not supplied. Our procedure therefore yielded energy minima significantly lower than those reported in prior studies. The membrane of minimal energy pores bowed outward near the pore lumen, yielding a pore length that exceeded the distance between the two fusing membranes.

  11. Teardrop shapes minimize bending energy of fusion pores connecting planar bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryham, Rolf J.; Ward, Mark A.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical gradient flow procedure was devised to characterize minimal energy shapes of fusion pores connecting two parallel planar bilayer membranes. Pore energy, composed of splay, tilt, and stretching, was obtained by modeling each bilayer as two monolayers and treating each monolayer of a bilayer membrane as a freely deformable surface described with a mean lipid orientation field. Voids between the two monolayers were prevented by a steric penalty formulation. Pore shapes were assumed to possess both axial and reflectional symmetry. For fixed pore radius and bilayer separation, the gradient flow procedure was applied to initially toroidal pore shapes. Using initially elliptical pore shapes yielded the same final shape. The resulting minimal pore shapes and energies were analyzed as a function of pore dimension and lipid composition. Previous studies either assumed or confined pore shapes, thereby tacitly supplying an unspecified amount of energy to maintain shape. The shapes derived in the present study were outputs of calculations and an externally provided energy was not supplied. Our procedure therefore yielded energy minima significantly lower than those reported in prior studies. The membrane of minimal energy pores bowed outward near the pore lumen, yielding a pore length that exceeded the distance between the two fusing membranes.

  12. Reaction Path Optimization with Holonomic Constraints and Kinetic Energy Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Brokaw, Jason B.; Haas, Kevin R.; Chu, Jhih-wei

    2009-08-11

    Two methods are developed to enhance the stability, efficiency, and robustness of reaction path optimization using a chain of replicas. First, distances between replicas are kept equal during path optimization via holonomic constraints. Finding a reaction path is, thus, transformed into a constrained optimization problem. This approach avoids force projections for finding minimum energy paths (MEPs), and fast-converging schemes such as quasi-Newton methods can be readily applied. Second, we define a new objective function - the total Hamiltonian - for reaction path optimization, by combining the kinetic energy potential of each replica with its potential energy function. Minimizing the total Hamiltonian of a chain determines a minimum Hamiltonian path (MHP). If the distances between replicas are kept equal and a consistent force constant is used, then the kinetic energy potentials of all replicas have the same value. The MHP in this case is the most probable isokinetic path. Our results indicate that low-temperature kinetic energy potentials (<5 K) can be used to prevent the development of kinks during path optimization and can significantly reduce the required steps of minimization by 2-3 times without causing noticeable differences between a MHP and MEP. These methods are applied to three test cases, the C₇eq-to-Cax isomerization of an alanine dipeptide, the ⁴C₁- to-¹C₄ transition of an α-D-glucopyranose, and the helix-to-sheet transition of a GNNQQNY heptapeptide. By applying the methods developed in this work, convergence of reaction path optimization can be achieved for these complex transitions, involving full atomic details and a large number of replicas (>100). For the case of helix-to-sheet transition, we identify pathways whose energy barriers are consistent with experimental measurements. Further, we develop a method based on the work energy theorem to quantify the accuracy of reaction paths and to determine whether the atoms used to define a

  13. Reaction Path Optimization with Holonomic Constraints and Kinetic Energy Potentials.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, Jason B; Haas, Kevin R; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2009-08-11

    Two methods are developed to enhance the stability, efficiency, and robustness of reaction path optimization using a chain of replicas. First, distances between replicas are kept equal during path optimization via holonomic constraints. Finding a reaction path is, thus, transformed into a constrained optimization problem. This approach avoids force projections for finding minimum energy paths (MEPs), and fast-converging schemes such as quasi-Newton methods can be readily applied. Second, we define a new objective function - the total Hamiltonian - for reaction path optimization, by combining the kinetic energy potential of each replica with its potential energy function. Minimizing the total Hamiltonian of a chain determines a minimum Hamiltonian path (MHP). If the distances between replicas are kept equal and a consistent force constant is used, then the kinetic energy potentials of all replicas have the same value. The MHP in this case is the most probable isokinetic path. Our results indicate that low-temperature kinetic energy potentials (<5 K) can be used to prevent the development of kinks during path optimization and can significantly reduce the required steps of minimization by 2-3 times without causing noticeable differences between a MHP and MEP. These methods are applied to three test cases, the C7eq-to-Cax isomerization of an alanine dipeptide, the (4)C1-to-(1)C4 transition of an α-d-glucopyranose, and the helix-to-sheet transition of a GNNQQNY heptapeptide. By applying the methods developed in this work, convergence of reaction path optimization can be achieved for these complex transitions, involving full atomic details and a large number of replicas (>100). For the case of helix-to-sheet transition, we identify pathways whose energy barriers are consistent with experimental measurements. Further, we develop a method based on the work energy theorem to quantify the accuracy of reaction paths and to determine whether the atoms used to define a path

  14. Wave Energy Potential in the Latvian EEZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beriņš, J.; Beriņš, J.; Kalnačs, J.; Kalnačs, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with one of the alternative forms of energy - sea wave energy potential in the Latvian Exclusice Economic Zone (EEZ). Results have been achieved using a new method - VEVPP. Calculations have been performed using the data on wave parameters over the past five years (2010-2014). We have also considered wave energy potential in the Gulf of Riga. The conclusions have been drawn on the recommended methodology for the sea wave potential and power calculations for wave-power plant pre-design stage.

  15. Sobolev gradient approach for the time evolution related to energy minimization of Ginzburg-Landau functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Nauman; Sial, Sultan; Siddiqi, Shahid S.

    2009-04-01

    The Sobolev gradient technique has been discussed previously in this journal as an efficient method for finding energy minima of certain Ginzburg-Landau type functionals [S. Sial, J. Neuberger, T. Lookman, A. Saxena, Energy minimization using Sobolev gradients: application to phase separation and ordering, J. Comput. Phys. 189 (2003) 88-97]. In this article a Sobolev gradient method for the related time evolution is discussed.

  16. Minimizing the Free Energy: A Computer Method for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heald, Emerson F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a computer method for teaching chemical equilibrium concepts using material balance conditions and the minimization of the free energy. Method for the calculation of chemical equilibrium, the computer program used to solve equilibrium problems and applications of the method are also included. (HM)

  17. Measurement of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions with minimal dependence on neutrino energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.-G.; Pickering, L.; Dolan, S.; Barr, G.; Coplowe, D.; Uchida, Y.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Yuan, T.

    2016-07-01

    We present a phenomenological study of nuclear effects in neutrino charged-current interactions, using transverse kinematic imbalances in exclusive measurements. Novel observables with minimal dependence on neutrino energy are proposed to study quasielastic scattering and especially resonance production. They should be able to provide direct constraints on nuclear effects in neutrino- and antineutrino-nucleus interactions.

  18. Minimizing the Free Energy: A Computer Method for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heald, Emerson F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a computer method for teaching chemical equilibrium concepts using material balance conditions and the minimization of the free energy. Method for the calculation of chemical equilibrium, the computer program used to solve equilibrium problems and applications of the method are also included. (HM)

  19. Wind energy in China: Estimating the potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiahai

    2016-07-01

    Persistent and significant curtailment has cast concern over the prospects of wind power in China. A comprehensive assessment of the production of energy from wind has identified grid-integrated wind generation potential at 11.9-14% of China's projected energy demand by 2030.

  20. Continuous Matrix Product States for Quantum Fields: An Energy Minimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganahl, Martin; Rincón, Julián; Vidal, Guifre

    2017-06-01

    The generalization of matrix product states (MPS) to continuous systems, as proposed in the breakthrough Letter of Verstraete and Cirac [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 190405 (2010)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.190405], provides a powerful variational ansatz for the ground state of strongly interacting quantum field theories in one spatial dimension. A continuous MPS (cMPS) approximation to the ground state can be obtained by simulating a Euclidean time evolution. In this Letter we propose a cMPS optimization algorithm based instead on energy minimization by gradient methods and demonstrate its performance by applying it to the Lieb-Liniger model (an integrable model of an interacting bosonic field) directly in the thermodynamic limit. We observe a very significant computational speed-up, of more than 2 orders of magnitude, with respect to simulating a Euclidean time evolution. As a result, a much larger cMPS bond dimension D can be reached (e.g., D =256 with moderate computational resources), thus helping unlock the full potential of the cMPS representation for ground state studies.

  1. Restoration of images degraded by signal-dependent noise based on energy minimization: an empirical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajić, Buda; Lindblad, Joakim; Sladoje, Nataša

    2016-07-01

    Most energy minimization-based restoration methods are developed for signal-independent Gaussian noise. The assumption of Gaussian noise distribution leads to a quadratic data fidelity term, which is appealing in optimization. When an image is acquired with a photon counting device, it contains signal-dependent Poisson or mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise. We quantify the loss in performance that occurs when a restoration method suited for Gaussian noise is utilized for mixed noise. Signal-dependent noise can be treated by methods based on either classical maximum a posteriori (MAP) probability approach or on a variance stabilization approach (VST). We compare performances of these approaches on a large image material and observe that VST-based methods outperform those based on MAP in both quality of restoration and in computational efficiency. We quantify improvement achieved by utilizing Huber regularization instead of classical total variation regularization. The conclusion from our study is a recommendation to utilize a VST-based approach combined with regularization by Huber potential for restoration of images degraded by blur and signal-dependent noise. This combination provides a robust and flexible method with good performance and high speed.

  2. Manufacturing of mushroom-shaped structures and its hydrophobic robustness analysis based on energy minimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Yang, Xiaonan; Wang, Quandai; Yang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Hui; Lu, Bingheng

    2017-07-01

    The construction of stable hydrophobic surfaces has increasingly gained attention owing to its wide range of potential applications. However, these surfaces may become wet and lose their slip effect owing to insufficient hydrophobic stability. Pillars with a mushroom-shaped tip are believed to enhance hydrophobicity stability. This work presents a facile method of manufacturing mushroom-shaped structures, where, compared with the previously used method, the modulation of the cap thickness, cap diameter, and stem height of the structures is more convenient. The effects of the development time on the cap diameter and overhanging angle are investigated and well-defined mushroom-shaped structures are demonstrated. The effect of the microstructure geometry on the contact state of a droplet is predicted by taking an energy minimization approach and is experimentally validated with nonvolatile ultraviolet-curable polymer with a low surface tension by inspecting the profiles of liquid-vapor interface deformation and tracking the trace of the receding contact line after exposure to ultraviolet light. Theoretical and experimental results show that, compared with regular pillar arrays having a vertical sidewall, the mushroom-like structures can effectively enhance hydrophobic stability. The proposed manufacturing method will be useful for fabricating robust hydrophobic surfaces in a cost-effective and convenient manner.

  3. Continuous Matrix Product States for Quantum Fields: An Energy Minimization Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ganahl, Martin; Rincón, Julián; Vidal, Guifre

    2017-06-02

    The generalization of matrix product states (MPS) to continuous systems, as proposed in the breakthrough Letter of Verstraete and Cirac [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 190405 (2010).PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.190405], provides a powerful variational ansatz for the ground state of strongly interacting quantum field theories in one spatial dimension. A continuous MPS (cMPS) approximation to the ground state can be obtained by simulating a Euclidean time evolution. In this Letter we propose a cMPS optimization algorithm based instead on energy minimization by gradient methods and demonstrate its performance by applying it to the Lieb-Liniger model (an integrable model of an interacting bosonic field) directly in the thermodynamic limit. We observe a very significant computational speed-up, of more than 2 orders of magnitude, with respect to simulating a Euclidean time evolution. As a result, a much larger cMPS bond dimension D can be reached (e.g., D=256 with moderate computational resources), thus helping unlock the full potential of the cMPS representation for ground state studies.

  4. Minimal cooling speed for glass transition in a simple solvable energy landscape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Marín, J. Quetzalcóatl; Castillo, Isaac Pérez; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-06-01

    The minimal cooling speed required to form a glass is obtained for a simple solvable energy landscape model. The model, made from a two-level system modified to include the topology of the energy landscape, is able to capture either a glass transition or a crystallization depending on the cooling rate. In this setup, the minimal cooling speed to achieve glass formation is then found to be related with the crystallization relaxation time, energy barrier and with the thermal history. In particular, we obtain that the thermal history encodes small fluctuations around the equilibrium population which are exponentially amplified near the glass transition, which mathematically corresponds to the boundary layer of the master equation. The change in the glass transition temperature is also found as a function of the cooling rate. Finally, to verify our analytical results, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation was implemented.

  5. Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

    2000-09-04

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

  6. Line Integral Alternating Minimization Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaqi; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Politte, David G; Evans, Joshua D; Han, Dong; Whiting, Bruce R; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new algorithm, called line integral alternating minimization (LIAM), for dual-energy X-ray CT image reconstruction. Instead of obtaining component images by minimizing the discrepancy between the data and the mean estimates, LIAM allows for a tunable discrepancy between the basis material projections and the basis sinograms. A parameter is introduced that controls the size of this discrepancy, and with this parameter the new algorithm can continuously go from a two-step approach to the joint estimation approach. LIAM alternates between iteratively updating the line integrals of the component images and reconstruction of the component images using an image iterative deblurring algorithm. An edge-preserving penalty function can be incorporated in the iterative deblurring step to decrease the roughness in component images. Images from both simulated and experimentally acquired sinograms from a clinical scanner were reconstructed by LIAM while varying the regularization parameters to identify good choices. The results from the dual-energy alternating minimization algorithm applied to the same data were used for comparison. Using a small fraction of the computation time of dual-energy alternating minimization, LIAM achieves better accuracy of the component images in the presence of Poisson noise for simulated data reconstruction and achieves the same level of accuracy for real data reconstruction.

  7. The Yukawa potential: ground state energy and critical screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, James P.; Gerber, Urs; Schubert, Christian; Trejo, Maria A.; Weber, Axel

    2017-08-01

    We study the ground state energy and the critical screening parameter of the Yukawa potential in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. After a short review of the existing literature on these quantities, we apply fifth-order perturbation theory to the calculation of the ground state energy, using the exact solutions of the Coulomb potential together with a cutoff on the principal number summations. We also perform a variational calculation of the ground state energy using a Coulomb-like radial wave function and the exact solution of the corresponding minimization condition. For not too large values of the screening parameter, close agreement is found between the perturbative and variational results. For the critical screening parameter, we devise a novel method that permits us to determine it to 10 digits. This is the most precise calculation of this quantity to date, and allows us to resolve some discrepancies between previous results.

  8. Tailored surface free energy of membrane diffusers to minimize microbial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Wang, S.; Müller-Steinhagen, H.

    2004-05-01

    Biofouling is considered to be the limiting factor of the majority of membrane processes. Since microbial adhesion is a prerequisite for membrane biofouling, prevention of microbial adhesion and colonization on the membrane surfaces will have a major impact in preventing biofouling. In this paper the effects of surface free energies on bacterial adhesion were investigated and the optimum surface free energy of membranes on which bacterial adhesion force is minimal was obtained. A graded nickel-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite coating technique was used to tailor the surface free energy of membrane diffusers to the optimum value. Initial experimental results showed that these coatings reduced microbial adhesion by 68-94%.

  9. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1995-07-01

    MRCI (configuration interaction) calculations were used to examine possible pathways for the O{sub 2} + CCH reaction. The H{sub 2} + CN potential surface was examined. An initial survey was made of the HCl + CN potential energy surface at a low level of theory.

  10. Potential energy savings from aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.R.; Weijo, R.O.

    1988-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory researchers developed an aggregate-level model to estimate the short- and long-term potential energy savings from using aquifer thermal storage (ATES) in the United States. The objectives of this effort were to (1) develop a basis from which to recommend whether heat or chill ATES should receive future research focus and (2) determine which market sector (residential, commercial, or industrial) offers the largest potential energy savings from ATES. Information was collected on the proportion of US land area suitable for ATES applications. The economic feasibility of ATES applications was then evaluated. The potential energy savings from ATES applications was calculated. Characteristic energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors was examined, as was the relationship between waste heat production and consumption by industrial end-users. These analyses provided the basis for two main conclusions: heat ATES applications offer higher potential for energy savings than do chill ATES applications; and the industrial sector can achieve the highest potential energy savings for the large consumption markets. Based on these findings, it is recommended that future ATES research and development efforts be directed toward heat ATES applications in the industrial sector. 11 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  12. Energy minimization of mobile video devices with a hardware H.264/AVC encoder based on energy-rate-distortion optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Donghun; Lee, Jungeon; Jung, Jongpil; Lee, Chul-Hee; Kyung, Chong-Min

    2014-09-01

    In mobile video systems powered by battery, reducing the encoder's compression energy consumption is critical to prolong its lifetime. Previous Energy-rate-distortion (E-R-D) optimization methods based on a software codec is not suitable for practical mobile camera systems because the energy consumption is too large and encoding rate is too low. In this paper, we propose an E-R-D model for the hardware codec based on the gate-level simulation framework to measure the switching activity and the energy consumption. From the proposed E-R-D model, an energy minimizing algorithm for mobile video camera sensor have been developed with the GOP (Group of Pictures) size and QP(Quantization Parameter) as run-time control variables. Our experimental results show that the proposed algorithm provides up to 31.76% of energy consumption saving while satisfying the rate and distortion constraints.

  13. Minimizing Characterization - Derived Waste at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pelt, R. S.; Amidon, M. B.; Reboul, S. H.

    2002-02-25

    Environmental restoration activities at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) utilize innovative site characterization approaches and technologies that minimize waste generation. Characterization is typically conducted in phases, first by collecting large quantities of inexpensive data, followed by targeted minimally invasive drilling to collect depth-discrete soil/groundwater data, and concluded with the installation of permanent multi-level groundwater monitoring wells. Waste-reducing characterization methods utilize non-traditional drilling practices (sonic drilling), minimally intrusive (geoprobe, cone penetrometer) and non-intrusive (3-D seismic, ground penetration radar, aerial monitoring) investigative tools. Various types of sensor probes (moisture sensors, gamma spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, laser induced and X-ray fluorescence) and hydrophobic membranes (FLUTe) are used in conjunction with depth-discrete sampling techniques to obtain high-resolution 3-D plume profiles. Groundwater monitoring (short/long-term) approaches utilize multi-level sampling technologies (Strata-Sampler, Cone-Sipper, Solinst Waterloo, Westbay) and low-cost diffusion samplers for seepline/surface water sampling. Upon collection of soil and groundwater data, information is portrayed in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) format for interpretation and planning purposes. At the SRS, the use of non-traditional drilling methods and minimally/non intrusive investigation approaches along with in-situ sampling methods has minimized waste generation and improved the effectiveness and efficiency of characterization activities.

  14. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-14

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Caratheodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Caratheodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point.

  15. RADIUS CONSTRAINTS AND MINIMAL EQUIPARTITION ENERGY OF RELATIVISTICALLY MOVING SYNCHROTRON SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Piran, Tsvi; Nakar, Ehud E-mail: tsvi.piran@mail.huji.ac.il

    2013-07-20

    A measurement of the synchrotron self-absorption flux and frequency provides tight constraints on the physical size of the source and a robust lower limit on its energy. This lower limit is also a good estimate of the magnetic field and electrons' energy, if the two components are at equipartition. This well-known method was used for decades to study numerous astrophysical sources moving at non-relativistic (Newtonian) speeds. Here, we generalize the Newtonian equipartition theory to sources moving at relativistic speeds including the effect of deviation from spherical symmetry expected in such sources. As in the Newtonian case, minimization of the energy provides an excellent estimate of the emission radius and yields a useful lower limit on the energy. We find that the application of the Newtonian formalism to a relativistic source would yield a smaller emission radius, and would generally yield a larger lower limit on the energy (within the observed region). For sources where the synchrotron-self-Compton component can be identified, the minimization of the total energy is not necessary and we present an unambiguous solution for the parameters of the system.

  16. Deterministic and stochastic algorithms for resolving the flow fields in ducts and networks using energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochi, Taha

    2016-09-01

    Several deterministic and stochastic multi-variable global optimization algorithms (Conjugate Gradient, Nelder-Mead, Quasi-Newton and global) are investigated in conjunction with energy minimization principle to resolve the pressure and volumetric flow rate fields in single ducts and networks of interconnected ducts. The algorithms are tested with seven types of fluid: Newtonian, power law, Bingham, Herschel-Bulkley, Ellis, Ree-Eyring and Casson. The results obtained from all those algorithms for all these types of fluid agree very well with the analytically derived solutions as obtained from the traditional methods which are based on the conservation principles and fluid constitutive relations. The results confirm and generalize the findings of our previous investigations that the energy minimization principle is at the heart of the flow dynamics systems. The investigation also enriches the methods of computational fluid dynamics for solving the flow fields in tubes and networks for various types of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.

  17. Pyramidal defects in Mg-doped GaN in light of strain-energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2011-12-01

    The planar segregation gives rise to stress and strain fields which are approximated by a uniaxial character in a displacement controlled system. In this condition, the elastic strain energy is proportional to Young's modulus. Young's modulus of GaN is minimized when the directions normal to a conical segregation surface make about 48° with the c-axis of hexagonal GaN, which is close to the angle 47.3° between the c-axis and the directions normal to the {112¯3} planes. This implies that the formation of pyramidal defects in magnesium-doped GaN can be a compromise between minimization of the elastic strain energy due to segregation of magnesium and the planar segregation.

  18. Energy Minimization of Molecular Features Observed on the (110) Face of Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perozzo, Mary A.; Konnert, John H.; Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics and energy minimization have been carried out using the program XPLOR to check the plausibility of a model lysozyme crystal surface. The molecular features of the (110) face of lysozyme were observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A model of the crystal surface was constructed using the PDB file 193L, and was used to simulate an AFM image. Molecule translations, van der Waals radii, and assumed AFM tip shape were adjusted to maximize the correlation coefficient between the experimental and simulated images. The highest degree of 0 correlation (0.92) was obtained with the molecules displaced over 6 A from their positions within the bulk of the crystal. The quality of this starting model, the extent of energy minimization, and the correlation coefficient between the final model and the experimental data will be discussed.

  19. Biomass resource potential using energy crops

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

    1993-09-01

    Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

  20. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    DOE PAGES

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; ...

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, andmore » prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.« less

  1. New insights gained on mechanisms of low-energy proton-induced SEUs by minimizing energy straggle

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Dodd, Paul E.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Black, Jeffrey D.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; McCurdy, M. W.; Weller, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present low-energy proton single-event upset (SEU) data on a 65 nm SOI SRAM whose substrate has been completely removed. Since the protons only had to penetrate a very thin buried oxide layer, these measurements were affected by far less energy loss, energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering than previous datasets. The minimization of these common sources of experimental interference allows more direct interpretation of the data and deeper insight into SEU mechanisms. The results show a strong angular dependence, demonstrate that energy straggle, flux attrition, and angular scattering affect the measured SEU cross sections, and prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for low-energy proton-induced SEUs in these circuits.

  2. Minimization of cochlear implant artifact in cortical auditory evoked potentials in children.

    PubMed

    Bakhos, D; Roux, S; Robier, A; Bonnet-Brilhault, F; Lescanne, E; Bruneau, N

    2012-11-01

    In congenitally deaf children fit with a cochlear implant, little is known about the maturation of the auditory cortex. Cortical auditory evoked potentials are a useful methodology to study the auditory cortical system of children with cochlear implants. Nevertheless, these recordings are contaminated by a cochlear implant artifact. The objective of this study was to use independent component analysis to minimize the artifact of the cochlear implant to study cortical auditory evoked potentials. Prospective study. A total of 5 children ranging in age from 21 to 49 months who were fitted with a cochlear implant for at least 6 months were included in this study. The stimuli were pure tones (750 Hz, 200 ms duration, 70 dB SPL) presented with an irregular interstimulus interval (1000-2000 ms) via loud speakers. The cortical auditory evoked potentials were recorded from 17 Ag-AgCl electrodes referenced to the nose. The peak latency and amplitude of each deflection culminating at the fronto-central and temporal sites were analyzed. The P100-N250 peak latencies and amplitudes of the cortical auditory evoked potentials recorded from children fitted with cochlear implants. Scalp map potentials distributions were done for each child for the N250 wave. The use of independent component analysis permitted to minimize the cochlear implant artifact for the five children. Cortical auditory evoked potentials were recorded at fronto-central and temporal sites. Scalp map potentials distributions for the N2 wave showed activation of temporal generators contralateral at the CI for the five children. This preliminary electrophysiological study confirms the value and the limits of independent component analysis. It could allow longitudinal studies in cochlear implant users to examine the maturation of auditory cortex. It could also be used to identify objective cortical electrophysiological measures to help the fitting of CIs in children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  3. Iterative methods for obtaining energy-minimizing parametric snakes with applications to medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Mitrea, Alexandru Ioan; Badea, Radu; Mitrea, Delia; Nedevschi, Sergiu; Mitrea, Paulina; Ivan, Dumitru Mircea; Gurzău, Octavian Mircia

    2012-01-01

    After a brief survey on the parametric deformable models, we develop an iterative method based on the finite difference schemes in order to obtain energy-minimizing snakes. We estimate the approximation error, the residue, and the truncature error related to the corresponding algorithm, then we discuss its convergence, consistency, and stability. Some aspects regarding the prosthetic sugical methods that implement the above numerical methods are also pointed out.

  4. Isometric immersions, energy minimization and self-similar buckling in non-Euclidean elastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John; Sharon, Eran; Shearman, Toby; Venkataramani, Shankar C.

    2016-04-01

    The edges of torn plastic sheets and growing leaves often display hierarchical buckling patterns. We show that this complex morphology i) emerges even in zero strain configurations, and ii) is driven by a competition between the two principal curvatures, rather than between bending and stretching. We identify the key role of branch point (or “monkey saddle”) singularities in generating complex wrinkling patterns in isometric immersions, and show how they arise naturally from minimizing the elastic energy.

  5. Iterative Methods for Obtaining Energy-Minimizing Parametric Snakes with Applications to Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitrea, Alexandru Ioan; Badea, Radu; Mitrea, Delia; Nedevschi, Sergiu; Mitrea, Paulina; Ivan, Dumitru Mircea; Gurzău, Octavian Mircia

    2012-01-01

    After a brief survey on the parametric deformable models, we develop an iterative method based on the finite difference schemes in order to obtain energy-minimizing snakes. We estimate the approximation error, the residue, and the truncature error related to the corresponding algorithm, then we discuss its convergence, consistency, and stability. Some aspects regarding the prosthetic sugical methods that implement the above numerical methods are also pointed out. PMID:22474542

  6. B-spline image model for energy minimization-based optical flow estimation.

    PubMed

    Le Besnerais, Guy; Champagnat, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    Robust estimation of the optical flow is addressed through a multiresolution energy minimization. It involves repeated evaluation of spatial and temporal gradients of image intensity which rely usually on bilinear interpolation and image filtering. We propose to base both computations on a single pyramidal cubic B-spline model of image intensity. We show empirically improvements in convergence speed and estimation error and validate the resulting algorithm on real test sequences.

  7. Potential energy function for the hydroperoxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, W.J.; Hase, W.L.

    1987-03-12

    A switching function formalism is used to derive an analytic potential energy surface for the O + OH in equilibrium HO/sub 2/ in equilibrium H + O/sub 2/ reactive system. Both experimental and ab initio data are used to derive parameters for the potential energy surface. Trajectory calculations for highly excited HO/sub 2/ are performed on this surface. From these trajectories quasi-periodic eigentrajectories are found for vibrational levels near the HO/sub 2/ dissociation threshold with small amounts of quanta in the OH stretch mode and large amounts of quanta in the OO stretch mode.

  8. Potential energy surfaces for cluster emitting nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Gherghescu, Radu A.; Greiner, Walter

    2006-01-15

    Potential energy surfaces are calculated by use of the most advanced asymmetric two-center shell model that allows us to obtain shell-and-pairing corrections that are added to the Yukawa-plus-exponential model deformation energy. Shell effects are of crucial importance for the experimental observation of spontaneous disintegration by heavy-ion emission. Results for {sup 222}Ra, {sup 232}U, {sup 236}Pu, and {sup 242}Cm illustrate the main ideas and show for the first time, for a cluster emitter, a potential barrier obtained by use of the macroscopic-microscopic method.

  9. An energy minimization approach to automated extraction of regular building footprints from airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Zhang, C.; Fraser, C. S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents an automated approach to the extraction of building footprints from airborne LiDAR data based on energy minimization. Automated 3D building reconstruction in complex urban scenes has been a long-standing challenge in photogrammetry and computer vision. Building footprints constitute a fundamental component of a 3D building model and they are useful for a variety of applications. Airborne LiDAR provides large-scale elevation representation of urban scene and as such is an important data source for object reconstruction in spatial information systems. However, LiDAR points on building edges often exhibit a jagged pattern, partially due to either occlusion from neighbouring objects, such as overhanging trees, or to the nature of the data itself, including unavoidable noise and irregular point distributions. The explicit 3D reconstruction may thus result in irregular or incomplete building polygons. In the presented work, a vertex-driven Douglas-Peucker method is developed to generate polygonal hypotheses from points forming initial building outlines. The energy function is adopted to examine and evaluate each hypothesis and the optimal polygon is determined through energy minimization. The energy minimization also plays a key role in bridging gaps, where the building outlines are ambiguous due to insufficient LiDAR points. In formulating the energy function, hard constraints such as parallelism and perpendicularity of building edges are imposed, and local and global adjustments are applied. The developed approach has been extensively tested and evaluated on datasets with varying point cloud density over different terrain types. Results are presented and analysed. The successful reconstruction of building footprints, of varying structural complexity, along with a quantitative assessment employing accurate reference data, demonstrate the practical potential of the proposed approach.

  10. Potential reduction of DSN uplink energy cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinsky, S.; Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    DSN Earth stations typically transmit more power than that required to meet minimum specifications for uplink performance. Energy and cost savings that could result from matching the uplink power to the amount required for specified performance are studied. The Galileo mission was selected as a case study. Although substantial reduction in transmitted energy is possible, potential savings in source energy (oil or electricity) savings are much less. This is because of the rising inefficiency in power conversion and radio frequency power generation that accompanies reduced power output.

  11. Potential reduction of DSN uplink energy cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinsky, S.; Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    DSN Earth stations typically transmit more power than that required to meet minimum specifications for uplink performance. Energy and cost savings that could result from matching the uplink power to the amount required for specified performance are studied. The Galileo mission was selected as a case study. Although substantial reduction in transmitted energy is possible, potential savings in source energy (oil or electricity) savings are much less. This is because of the rising inefficiency in power conversion and radio frequency power generation that accompanies reduced power output.

  12. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  13. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  14. Power allocation strategies to minimize energy consumption in wireless body area networks.

    PubMed

    Kailas, Aravind

    2011-01-01

    The wide scale deployment of wireless body area networks (WBANs) hinges on designing energy efficient communication protocols to support the reliable communication as well as to prolong the network lifetime. Cooperative communications, a relatively new idea in wireless communications, offers the benefits of multi-antenna systems, thereby improving the link reliability and boosting energy efficiency. In this short paper, the advantages of resorting to cooperative communications for WBANs in terms of minimized energy consumption are investigated. Adopting an energy model that encompasses energy consumptions in the transmitter and receiver circuits, and transmitting energy per bit, it is seen that cooperative transmission can improve energy efficiency of the wireless network. In particular, the problem of optimal power allocation is studied with the constraint of targeted outage probability. Two strategies of power allocation are considered: power allocation with and without posture state information. Using analysis and simulation-based results, two key points are demonstrated: (i) allocating power to the on-body sensors making use of the posture information can reduce the total energy consumption of the WBAN; and (ii) when the channel condition is good, it is better to recruit less relays for cooperation to enhance energy efficiency.

  15. Potential energy sputtering of EUVL materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, J M; Ratliff, L P; Gillaspy, J D; Bajt, S

    2004-07-02

    Of the many candidates employed for understanding the erosion of critical Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) components, potential energy damage remains relatively uninvestigated. Unlike the familiar kinetic energy sputtering, which is a consequence of the momentum transferred by an ion to atoms in the target, potential energy sputtering occurs when an ion rapidly collects charge from the target as it neutralizes. Since the neutralization energy of a singly charged ion is typically on the order of 10 eV, potential energy effects are generally neglected for low charge state ions, and hence the bulk of the sputtering literature. As an ion's charge state is increased, the potential energy (PE) increases rapidly, e.g. PE(Xe{sup 1+})= 11 eV, PE(Xe{sup 10+}) = 810 eV, PE(Xe{sup 20+}) = 4.6 keV, etc. By comparison, the binding energy of a single atom on a surface is typically about 5 eV, so even relatively inefficient energy transfer mechanisms can lead to large quantities of material being removed, e.g. 25% efficiency for Xe{sup 10+} corresponds to {approx} 40 atoms/ion. By comparison, singly charged xenon ions with {approx} 20 keV of kinetic energy sputter only about 5 atoms/ion at normal incidence, and less than 1 atom/ion at typical EUV source energies. EUV light sources are optimized for producing approximately 10{sup 16} xenon ions per shot with an average charge state of q=10 in the core plasma. At operational rates of {approx}10 kHz, the number of ions produced per second becomes a whopping 10{sup 20}. Even if only one in a billion ions reaches the collector, erosion rates could reach {approx}10{sup 12} atoms per second, severely reducing the collector lifetime (for an average yield of 10 atoms/ion). In addition, efforts to reduce contamination effects may contribute to reduced neutralization and even larger potential energy damages rates (discussed further below). In order to provide accurate estimates for collector lifetimes and to develop mitigation schemes

  16. Computation of mixed phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol bilayer structures by energy minimization.

    PubMed Central

    Vanderkooi, G

    1994-01-01

    The energetically preferred structures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)-cholesterol bilayers were determined at a 1:1 mole ratio. Crystallographic symmetry operations were used to generate planar bilayers of cholesterol and DMPC. Energy minimization was carried out with respect to bond rotations, rigid body motions, and the two-dimensional lattice constants. The lowest energy structures had a hydrogen bond between the cholesterol hydroxyl and the carbonyl oxygen of the sn-2 acyl chain, but the largest contribution to the intermolecular energy was from the nonbonded interactions between the flat alpha surface of cholesterol and the acyl chains of DMPC. Two modes of packing in the bilayer were found; in structure A (the global minimum), unlike molecules are nearest neighbors, whereas in structure B (second lowest energy) like-like intermolecular interactions predominate. Crystallographic close packing of the molecules in the bilayer was achieved, as judged from the molecular areas and the bilayer thickness. These energy-minimized structures are consistent with the available experimental data on mixed bilayers of lecithin and cholesterol, and may be used as starting points for molecular dynamics or other calculations on bilayers. PMID:8061195

  17. Cosmological dynamics with non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycyna, Orest; Szydłowski, Marek E-mail: marek.szydlowski@uj.edu.pl

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical systems methods are used to investigate global behaviour of the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model in gravitational theory with a non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function. We show that the system can be reduced to an autonomous three-dimensional dynamical system and additionally is equipped with an invariant manifold corresponding to an accelerated expansion of the universe. Using this invariant manifold we find an exact solution of the reduced dynamics. We investigate all solutions for all admissible initial conditions using theory of dynamical systems to obtain a classification of all evolutional paths. The right-hand sides of the dynamical system depend crucially on the value of the non-minimal coupling constant therefore we study bifurcation values of this parameter under which the structure of the phase space changes qualitatively. We found a special bifurcation value of the non-minimal coupling constant which is distinguished by dynamics of the model and may suggest some additional symmetry in matter sector of the theory.

  18. A strategy to minimize the energy offset in carrier injection from excited dyes to inorganic semiconductors for efficient dye-sensitized solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Jun-Ichi; Osawa, Ayumi; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-08-10

    Photoinduced carrier injection from dyes to inorganic semiconductors is a crucial process in various dye-sensitized solar energy conversions such as photovoltaics and photocatalysis. It has been reported that an energy offset larger than 0.2-0.3 eV (threshold value) is required for efficient electron injection from excited dyes to metal-oxide semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO2). Because the energy offset directly causes loss in the potential of injected electrons, it is a crucial issue to minimize the energy offset for efficient solar energy conversions. However, a fundamental understanding of the energy offset, especially the threshold value, has not been obtained yet. In this paper, we report the origin of the threshold value of the energy offset, solving the long-standing questions of why such a large energy offset is necessary for the electron injection and which factors govern the threshold value, and suggest a strategy to minimize the threshold value. The threshold value is determined by the sum of two reorganization energies in one-electron reduction of semiconductors and typically-used donor-acceptor (D-A) dyes. In fact, the estimated values (0.21-0.31 eV) for several D-A dyes are in good agreement with the threshold value, supporting our conclusion. In addition, our results reveal that the threshold value is possible to be reduced by enlarging the π-conjugated system of the acceptor moiety in dyes and enhancing its structural rigidity. Furthermore, we extend the analysis to hole injection from excited dyes to semiconductors. In this case, the threshold value is given by the sum of two reorganization energies in one-electron oxidation of semiconductors and D-A dyes.

  19. Minimizing the injury potential of deploying airbag interactions with car occupants.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Harold J; Prasad, Priya; Dalmotas, Dainius

    2013-11-01

    Minimizing the injury potential of the interactions between deploying airbags and car occupants is the major issue with the design of airbag systems. This concern was identified in 1964 by Carl Clark when he presented the results of human volunteer and dummy testing of the "Airstop" system that was being developed for aircraft. The following is a chronological summary of the actions taken by the car manufacturers, airbag suppliers, SAE and ISO task groups, research institutes and universities, and consumer and government groups to address this issue.

  20. Prolongation of minimal action potential duration in sustained fibrillation decreases complexity by transient destabilization.

    PubMed

    Bingen, Brian O; Askar, Saïd F A; Schalij, Martin J; Kazbanov, Ivan V; Ypey, Dirk L; Panfilov, Alexander V; Pijnappels, Daniël A

    2013-01-01

    Sustained ventricular fibrillation (VF) is maintained by multiple stable rotors. Destabilization of sustained VF could be beneficial by affecting VF complexity (defined by the number of rotors). However, underlying mechanisms affecting VF stability are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to correlate changes in arrhythmia complexity with changes in specific electrophysiological parameters, allowing a search for novel factors and underlying mechanisms affecting stability of sustained VF. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocyte monolayers and Langendorff-perfused adult rat hearts were exposed to increasing dosages of the gap junctional uncoupler 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) to induce arrhythmias. Ion channel blockers/openers were added to study effects on VF stability. Electrophysiological parameters were assessed by optical mapping and patch-clamp techniques. Arrhythmia complexity in cardiomyocyte cultures increased with increasing dosages of 2-APB (n > 38), leading to sustained VF: 0.0 ± 0.1 phase singularities/cm(2) in controls vs. 0.0 ± 0.1, 1.0 ± 0.9, 3.3 ± 3.2, 11.0 ± 10.1, and 54.3 ± 21.7 in 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 µmol/L 2-APB, respectively. Arrhythmia complexity inversely correlated with wavelength. Lengthening of wavelength during fibrillation could only be induced by agents (BaCl(2)/BayK8644) increasing the action potential duration (APD) at maximal activation frequencies (minimal APD); 123 ± 32%/117 ± 24% of control. Minimal APD prolongation led to transient VF destabilization, shown by critical wavefront collision leading to rotor termination, followed by significant decreases in VF complexity and activation frequency (52%/37%). These key findings were reproduced ex vivo in rat hearts (n = 6 per group). These results show that stability of sustained fibrillation is regulated by minimal APD. Minimal APD prolongation leads to transient destabilization of fibrillation, ultimately decreasing VF complexity, thereby providing

  1. A discriminative Ramachandran potential of mean force aimed at minimizing secondary structure bias.

    PubMed

    Koppole, Sampath; Schaefer, Michael

    2012-03-15

    We introduce PMF*, a novel potential of mean force (PMF) for the Ramachandran ϕ/Ψ dihedral plot of the 20 standard amino acids and assess its relevance to the conformation of polypeptides by scoring structures in the protein data bank and decoy datasets. The new energy function is a linear combination of the conventional, unreferenced PMF and the ΔPMF relative to the free energy of all amino acids in the parameterization set of structures, effectively removing their respective biases toward α-helix and β-strand. It is shown that low-resolution crystal structures, NMR structures, and theoretical models have on average significantly higher energies than high-resolution crystal structures; also PMF* is more discriminative for structure quality than the individual PMF and ΔPMF energy functions. PMF* may be well suited for use as a restraint energy term in the refinement of experimental structures and theoretical models.

  2. Minimizers of the Landau-de Gennes Energy Around a Spherical Colloid Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alama, Stan; Bronsard, Lia; Lamy, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    We consider energy minimizing configurations of a nematic liquid crystal around a spherical colloid particle, in the context of the Landau-de Gennes model. The nematic is assumed to occupy the exterior of a ball B r0, and satisfy homeotropic weak anchoring at the surface of the colloid and approach a uniform uniaxial state as {|x|to∞}. We study the minimizers in two different limiting regimes: for balls which are small {r_0≪ L^{1/2}} compared to the characteristic length scale {L^{1/2}}, and for large balls, {r_0≫ L^{1/2}}. The relationship between the radius and the anchoring strength W is also relevant. For small balls we obtain a limiting quadrupolar configuration, with a "Saturn ring" defect for relatively strong anchoring, corresponding to an exchange of eigenvalues of the Q-tensor. In the limit of very large balls we obtain an axisymmetric minimizer of the Oseen-Frank energy, and a dipole configuration with exactly one point defect is obtained.

  3. Ten scenarios from early radiation to late time acceleration with a minimally coupled dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, Stéphane

    2013-09-01

    We consider General Relativity with matter, radiation and a minimally coupled dark energy defined by an equation of state w. Using dynamical system method, we find the equilibrium points of such a theory assuming an expanding Universe and a positive dark energy density. Two of these points correspond to classical radiation and matter dominated epochs for the Universe. For the other points, dark energy mimics matter, radiation or accelerates Universe expansion. We then look for possible sequences of epochs describing a Universe starting with some radiation dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy), then matter dominated epoch(s) (mimicked or not by dark energy) and ending with an accelerated expansion. We find ten sequences able to follow this Universe history without singular behaviour of w at some saddle points. Most of them are new in dark energy literature. To get more than these ten sequences, w has to be singular at some specific saddle equilibrium points. This is an unusual mathematical property of the equation of state in dark energy literature, whose physical consequences tend to be discarded by observations. This thus distinguishes the ten above sequences from an infinity of ways to describe Universe expansion.

  4. Potential Energy Cost Savings from Increased Commercial Energy Code Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Zhang, Jian; Cohan, David F.

    2016-08-22

    An important question for commercial energy code compliance is: “How much energy cost savings can better compliance achieve?” This question is in sharp contrast to prior efforts that used a checklist of code requirements, each of which was graded pass or fail. Percent compliance for any given building was simply the percent of individual requirements that passed. A field investigation method is being developed that goes beyond the binary approach to determine how much energy cost savings is not realized. Prototype building simulations were used to estimate the energy cost impact of varying levels of non-compliance for newly constructed office buildings in climate zone 4C. Field data collected from actual buildings on specific conditions relative to code requirements was then applied to the simulation results to find the potential lost energy savings for a single building or for a sample of buildings. This new methodology was tested on nine office buildings in climate zone 4C. The amount of additional energy cost savings they could have achieved had they complied fully with the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code is determined. This paper will present the results of the test, lessons learned, describe follow-on research that is needed to verify that the methodology is both accurate and practical, and discuss the benefits that might accrue if the method were widely adopted.

  5. Divacancy binding energy, formation energy and surface energy of BCC transition metals using MEAM potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uniyal, Shweta; Chand, Manesh; Joshi, Subodh; Semalty, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    The modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential parameters have been employed to calculate the unrelaxed divacancy formation energy, binding energy and surface energies for low index planes in bcc transition metals. The calculated results of divacancy binding energy and vacancy formation energy compare well with experimental and other available calculated results.

  6. Divacancy binding energy, formation energy and surface energy of BCC transition metals using MEAM potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Uniyal, Shweta Chand, Manesh Joshi, Subodh Semalty, P. D.

    2016-05-06

    The modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential parameters have been employed to calculate the unrelaxed divacancy formation energy, binding energy and surface energies for low index planes in bcc transition metals. The calculated results of divacancy binding energy and vacancy formation energy compare well with experimental and other available calculated results.

  7. Potential energy hypersurface and molecular flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koča, Jaroslav

    1993-02-01

    The molecular flexibility phenomenon is discussed from the conformational potential energy(hyper) surface (PES) point of view. Flexibility is considered as a product of three terms: thermodynamic, kinetic and geometrical. Several expressions characterizing absolute and relative molecular flexibility are introduced, depending on a subspace studied of the entire conformational space, energy level E of PES as well as absolute temperature. Results obtained by programs DAISY, CICADA and PANIC in conjunction with molecular mechanics program MMX for flexibility analysis of isopentane, 2,2-dimethylpentane and isohexane molecules are introduced.

  8. Optimizing rice yields while minimizing yield-scaled global warming potential.

    PubMed

    Pittelkow, Cameron M; Adviento-Borbe, Maria A; van Kessel, Chris; Hill, James E; Linquist, Bruce A

    2014-05-01

    To meet growing global food demand with limited land and reduced environmental impact, agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are increasingly evaluated with respect to crop productivity, i.e., on a yield-scaled as opposed to area basis. Here, we compiled available field data on CH4 and N2 O emissions from rice production systems to test the hypothesis that in response to fertilizer nitrogen (N) addition, yield-scaled global warming potential (GWP) will be minimized at N rates that maximize yields. Within each study, yield N surplus was calculated to estimate deficit or excess N application rates with respect to the optimal N rate (defined as the N rate at which maximum yield was achieved). Relationships between yield N surplus and GHG emissions were assessed using linear and nonlinear mixed-effects models. Results indicate that yields increased in response to increasing N surplus when moving from deficit to optimal N rates. At N rates contributing to a yield N surplus, N2 O and yield-scaled N2 O emissions increased exponentially. In contrast, CH4 emissions were not impacted by N inputs. Accordingly, yield-scaled CH4 emissions decreased with N addition. Overall, yield-scaled GWP was minimized at optimal N rates, decreasing by 21% compared to treatments without N addition. These results are unique compared to aerobic cropping systems in which N2 O emissions are the primary contributor to GWP, meaning yield-scaled GWP may not necessarily decrease for aerobic crops when yields are optimized by N fertilizer addition. Balancing gains in agricultural productivity with climate change concerns, this work supports the concept that high rice yields can be achieved with minimal yield-scaled GWP through optimal N application rates. Moreover, additional improvements in N use efficiency may further reduce yield-scaled GWP, thereby strengthening the economic and environmental sustainability of rice systems. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-14

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity - as described by the Gaussian network model - with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  10. The exponentiated Hencky-logarithmic strain energy. Part II: Coercivity, planar polyconvexity and existence of minimizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Patrizio; Lankeit, Johannes; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel; Martin, Robert; Steigmann, David

    2015-08-01

    We consider a family of isotropic volumetric-isochoric decoupled strain energies based on the Hencky-logarithmic (true, natural) strain tensor log U, where μ > 0 is the infinitesimal shear modulus, is the infinitesimal bulk modulus with the first Lamé constant, are dimensionless parameters, is the gradient of deformation, is the right stretch tensor and is the deviatoric part (the projection onto the traceless tensors) of the strain tensor log U. For small elastic strains, the energies reduce to first order to the classical quadratic Hencky energy which is known to be not rank-one convex. The main result in this paper is that in plane elastostatics the energies of the family are polyconvex for , extending a previous finding on its rank-one convexity. Our method uses a judicious application of Steigmann's polyconvexity criteria based on the representation of the energy in terms of the principal invariants of the stretch tensor U. These energies also satisfy suitable growth and coercivity conditions. We formulate the equilibrium equations, and we prove the existence of minimizers by the direct methods of the calculus of variations.

  11. Sufficient minimal model for DNA denaturation: Integration of harmonic scalar elasticity and bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit Raj; Granek, Rony

    2016-10-01

    We study DNA denaturation by integrating elasticity — as described by the Gaussian network model — with bond binding energies, distinguishing between different base pairs and stacking energies. We use exact calculation, within the model, of the Helmholtz free-energy of any partial denaturation state, which implies that the entropy of all formed "bubbles" ("loops") is accounted for. Considering base pair bond removal single events, the bond designated for opening is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all remaining base pair bonds. Despite of its great simplicity, for several known DNA sequences our results are in accord with available theoretical and experimental studies. Moreover, we report free-energy profiles along the denaturation pathway, which allow to detect stable or meta-stable partial denaturation states, composed of bubble, as local free-energy minima separated by barriers. Our approach allows to study very long DNA strands with commonly available computational power, as we demonstrate for a few random sequences in the range 200-800 base-pairs. For the latter, we also elucidate the self-averaging property of the system. Implications for the well known breathing dynamics of DNA are elucidated.

  12. Generalized Potential Energy Finite Elements for Modeling Molecular Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chatzieleftheriou, Stavros; Adendorff, Matthew R; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2016-10-24

    The potential energy of molecules and nanostructures is commonly calculated in the molecular mechanics formalism by superimposing bonded and nonbonded atomic energy terms, i.e. bonds between two atoms, bond angles involving three atoms, dihedral angles involving four atoms, nonbonded terms expressing the Coulomb and Lennard-Jones interactions, etc. In this work a new, generalized numerical simulation is presented for studying the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional nanostructures at the atomic scale. The energy gradient and Hessian matrix of such assemblies are usually computed numerically; a potential energy finite element model is proposed herein where these two components are expressed analytically. In particular, generalized finite elements are developed that express the interactions among atoms in a manner equivalent to that invoked in simulations performed based on the molecular dynamics method. Thus, the global tangent stiffness matrix for any nanostructure is formed as an assembly of the generalized finite elements and is directly equivalent to the Hessian matrix of the potential energy. The advantages of the proposed model are identified in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. In the case of popular force fields (e.g., CHARMM), the computation of the Hessian matrix by implementing the proposed method is of the same order as that of the gradient. This analysis can be used to minimize the potential energy of molecular systems under nodal loads in order to derive constitutive laws for molecular systems where the entropy and solvent effects are neglected and can be approximated as solids, such as double stranded DNA nanostructures. In this context, the sequence dependent stretch modulus for some typical base pairs step is calculated.

  13. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open

  14. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  15. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  16. Potential energy surfaces of Polonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Pomorski, K.; Schmitt, C.; Bartel, J.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the potential energy landscape is analysed in detail for ten even-even polonium isotopes in the mass range 188\\lt A\\lt 220 as obtained within the macroscopic-microscopic approach, relying on the Lublin-Strasbourg drop model and the Yukawa-folded single-particle energies for calculating the microscopic shell and pairing corrections. A variant of the modified Funny-Hills nuclear shape parametrization is used to efficiently map possible fission paths. The approach explains the main features of the fragment partition as measured in low-energy fission along the polonium chain. The latter lies in a transitional region of the nuclear chart, and will be essential to consistently understand the evolution of fission properties from neutron-deficient mercury to heavy actinides. The ability of our method to predict fission observables over such an extended region looks promising.

  17. The Wind Energy Potential of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Bjornsson, Halldór; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Jónasson, Kristján; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2014-05-01

    While Iceland has an abundant wind energy resource, its use for electrical power production has so far been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated primarily from hydro- and geothermal sources, and adding wind energy has so far not been considered practical or even necessary. However, wind energy is becoming a more viable option, as opportunities for new hydro- or geothermal power installations become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland, a wind atlas has been developed as part of the joint Nordic project 'Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing' (IceWind). Downscaling simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to determine the large-scale wind energy potential of Iceland. Local wind speed distributions are represented by Weibull statistics. The shape parameter across Iceland varies between 1.2 and 3.6, with the lowest values indicative of near-exponential distributions at sheltered locations, and the highest values indicative of normal distributions at exposed locations in winter. Compared with summer, average power density in winter is increased throughout Iceland by a factor of 2.0 - 5.5. In any season, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 - 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 - 1500 W m-2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations of 500 - 1000 m above mean sea level, power density is independent of the distance to the coast. In addition to seasonal and spatial variability, differences in average wind speed and power density also exist for different wind directions. Along the coast in winter, power density of onshore winds is higher by 100 - 700 W m-2 than that of offshore winds. The regions with the highest average wind speeds are impractical for wind farms, due to the distances from road

  18. Method of minimizing energy consumption when reducing iron oxide with reducing gases

    SciTech Connect

    Mathisson, G.; Santen, S.

    1984-02-21

    Energy consumption may be minimized when reducing iron oxide with reducing gases which are at least partially re-circulated in the process and where the re-circulation gas is washed to remove the reaction product CO/sub 2/ in what is known as a CO/sub 2/ wash to enable it to be re-used, by the heat requirement necessary for regenerating the washing liquid in the CO/sub 2/ wash being entirely or partially covered by the physical heat content in top gas from the shaft furnace and/or gas leaving the sponge-iron cooler of the shaft furnace.

  19. Potential Energy Curves of Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the X(sup 1)sigma+ and V(sup 1)sigma+ states of HF and DF have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The results calculated from the different sets of data for HF and DF are found to be in very good agreement. The theoretical results of Karo are compared to the experimental results obtained here.

  20. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Alvine, Kyle J.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  1. Potential energy landscapes of tetragonal pyramid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Sato, Hirofumi; Morgan, John W. R.; Wales, David J.

    2016-11-01

    Hiraoka et al. have developed a self-assembling system referred to as a nanocube (Hiraoka et al., 2008). In the present contribution a coarse-grained model for this system is analysed, focusing on how the potential energy landscape for self-assembly is related to the geometry of the building blocks. We find that six molecules assemble to form various clusters, with cubic and sheet structures the most stable. The relative stability is determined by the geometry of the building blocks.

  2. Control of flow around a circular cylinder for minimizing energy dissipation.

    PubMed

    Naito, Hiroshi; Fukagata, Koji

    2014-11-01

    Control of flow around a circular cylinder is studied numerically aiming at minimization of the energy dissipation. First, we derive a mathematical relationship (i.e., identity) between the energy dissipation in an infinitely large volume and the surface quantities, so that the cost function can be expressed by the surface quantities only. Subsequently a control law to minimize the energy dissipation is derived by using the suboptimal control procedure [J. Fluid Mech. 401, 123 (1999)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S002211209900659X]. The performance of the present suboptimal control law is evaluated by a parametric study by varying the value of the arbitrary parameter contained. Two Reynolds numbers, Re=100 and 1000, are investigated by two-dimensional simulations. Although no improvement is obtained at Re=100, the present suboptimal control shows better results at Re=1000 than the suboptimal controls previously proposed. With the present suboptimal control, the dissipation and the drag are reduced by 58% and 44% as compared to the uncontrolled case, respectively. The suction around the front stagnation point and the blowing in the rear half are found to be weakened as compared to those in the previous suboptimal control targeting at pressure drag reduction. A predetermined control based on the control input profile obtained by the suboptimal control is also performed. The energy dissipation and the drag are found to be reduced as much as those in the present suboptimal control. It is also found that the present suboptimal and predetermined controls have better energy efficiencies than the suboptimal control previously proposed. Investigation at different control amplitudes reveals an advantage of the present control at higher amplitude. Toward its practical implementation, a localized version of the predetermined control is also examined, and it is found to work as effectively as the continuous case. Finally, the present predetermined control is confirmed to work well in a

  3. Hydrogel-forming microneedle arrays: Potential for use in minimally-invasive lithium monitoring.

    PubMed

    Eltayib, Eyman; Brady, Aaron J; Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Patricia; Zaid Alkilani, Ahlam; McCarthy, Helen O; McElnay, James C; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2016-05-01

    We describe, for the first time, hydrogel-forming microneedle (s) (MN) arrays for minimally-invasive extraction and quantification of lithium in vitro and in vivo. MN arrays, prepared from aqueous blends of hydrolysed poly(methyl-vinylether-co-maleic anhydride) and crosslinked by poly(ethyleneglycol), imbibed interstitial fluid (ISF) upon skin insertion. Such MN were always removed intact. In vitro, mean detected lithium concentrations showed no significant difference following 30min MN application to excised neonatal porcine skin for lithium citrate concentrations of 0.9 and 2mmol/l. However, after 1h application, the mean lithium concentrations extracted were significantly different, being appropriately concentration-dependent. In vivo, rats were orally dosed with lithium citrate equivalent to 15mg/kg and 30mg/kg lithium carbonate, respectively. MN arrays were applied 1h after dosing and removed 1h later. The two groups, having received different doses, showed no significant difference between lithium concentrations in serum or MN. However, the higher dosed rats demonstrated a lithium concentration extracted from MN arrays equivalent to a mean increase of 22.5% compared to rats which received the lower dose. Hydrogel-forming MN clearly have potential as a minimally-invasive tool for lithium monitoring in outpatient settings. We will now focus on correlation between serum and MN lithium concentrations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand.

  5. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  6. Potential Energy Surfaces and Dynamics of High Energy Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-13

    such calculations with dynamics and condensed phase models, and (b) apply these methods to design and evaluate potentially new high energy species. The...IBM SP2 at the Maui High Performance Computation Center, the heat of formation for 1 is predicted to be 456.8 kcallmol. This translates to an l sp...which numerical derivatives become trivially parallel in a coarse-grained sense by having each function evaluation performed on a different node. If

  7. Kaehler potentials for the minimally supersymmetric standard model inflation and the spectral index

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, Sami

    2008-01-15

    Recently it has been argued that some of the fine-tuning problems of the minimally supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) inflation associated with the existence of a saddle point along a flat direction may be solved naturally in a class of supergravity models. Here we extend the analysis and show that the constraints on the Kaehler potentials in these models are considerably relaxed when the location of the saddle point is treated as a free variable. We also examine the effect of supergravity corrections on inflationary predictions and find that they can slightly alter the value of the spectral index. As an example, for flat direction field values | {phi}-bar {sub 0}|=1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}M{sub P} we find n{approx}0.92...0.94 while the prediction of the MSSM inflation without any corrections is n{approx}0.92.

  8. Labor management evidence update: potential to minimize risk of cesarean birth in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice

    2014-01-01

    New evidence regarding normal parameters of labor progress for healthy women has the potential to minimize risk of cesarean birth and thereby enhance current and future maternal well-being if clinicians apply the research findings to obstetric practice. The economic and reproductive health consequences of the increasing cesarean birth rate in the United States are considerable; therefore, action on this issue by all stakeholders is necessary. Review and integration of the recent recommendations for labor management from experts convened by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine are required to make maternity care in the United States as safe as possible.

  9. Fifteen observations on the structure of energy-minimizing gaits in many simple biped models

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Manoj

    2011-01-01

    A popular hypothesis regarding legged locomotion is that humans and other large animals walk and run in a manner that minimizes the metabolic energy expenditure for locomotion. Here, using numerical optimization and supporting analytical arguments, I obtain the energy-minimizing gaits of many different simple biped models. I consider bipeds with point-mass bodies and massless legs, with or without a knee, with or without a springy tendon in series with the leg muscle and minimizing one of many different ‘metabolic cost’ models—correlated with muscle work, muscle force raised to some power, the Minetti–Alexander quasi-steady approximation to empirical muscle metabolic rate (from heat and ATPase activity), a new cost function called the ‘generalized work cost’ Cg having some positivity and convexity properties (and includes the Minetti–Alexander cost and the work cost as special cases), and generalizations thereof. For many of these models, walking-like gaits are optimal at low speeds and running-like gaits at higher speeds, so a gait transition is optimal. Minimizing the generalized work cost Cg appears mostly indistinguishable from minimizing muscle work for all the models. Inverted pendulum walking and impulsive running gaits minimize the work cost, generalized work costs Cg and a few other costs for the springless bipeds; in particular, a knee-torque-squared cost, appropriate as a simplified model for electric motor power for a kneed robot biped. Many optimal gaits had symmetry properties; for instance, the left stance phase was identical to the right stance phases. Muscle force–velocity relations and legs with masses have predictable qualitative effects, if any, on the optima. For bipeds with compliant tendons, the muscle work-minimizing strategies have close to zero muscle work (isometric muscles), with the springs performing all the leg work. These zero work gaits also minimize the generalized work costs Cg with substantial additive force or

  10. Fifteen observations on the structure of energy-minimizing gaits in many simple biped models.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Manoj

    2011-01-06

    A popular hypothesis regarding legged locomotion is that humans and other large animals walk and run in a manner that minimizes the metabolic energy expenditure for locomotion. Here, using numerical optimization and supporting analytical arguments, I obtain the energy-minimizing gaits of many different simple biped models. I consider bipeds with point-mass bodies and massless legs, with or without a knee, with or without a springy tendon in series with the leg muscle and minimizing one of many different 'metabolic cost' models-correlated with muscle work, muscle force raised to some power, the Minetti-Alexander quasi-steady approximation to empirical muscle metabolic rate (from heat and ATPase activity), a new cost function called the 'generalized work cost' C(g) having some positivity and convexity properties (and includes the Minetti-Alexander cost and the work cost as special cases), and generalizations thereof. For many of these models, walking-like gaits are optimal at low speeds and running-like gaits at higher speeds, so a gait transition is optimal. Minimizing the generalized work cost C(g) appears mostly indistinguishable from minimizing muscle work for all the models. Inverted pendulum walking and impulsive running gaits minimize the work cost, generalized work costs C(g) and a few other costs for the springless bipeds; in particular, a knee-torque-squared cost, appropriate as a simplified model for electric motor power for a kneed robot biped. Many optimal gaits had symmetry properties; for instance, the left stance phase was identical to the right stance phases. Muscle force-velocity relations and legs with masses have predictable qualitative effects, if any, on the optima. For bipeds with compliant tendons, the muscle work-minimizing strategies have close to zero muscle work (isometric muscles), with the springs performing all the leg work. These zero work gaits also minimize the generalized work costs C(g) with substantial additive force or force rate

  11. MO-A-BRD-02: Noise Suppression for Dual-Energy CT Through Entropy Minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Petrongolo, M; Niu, T; Zhu, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In dual energy CT (DECT), noise amplification during signal decomposition significantly limits the utility of basis material images. Since clinically relevant objects contain a limited number of materials, we propose to suppress noise in decomposed images through entropy minimization within a 2D transformation space. Distinct from other noise suppression techniques, the entropy minimization method does not estimate and suppress noise based on spatial variations of signals and thus maximally preserves image spatial resolution. Methods: From decomposed images, we first generate a 2D plot of scattered data points, using basis material densities as coordinates. Data points representing the same material generate a cluster with a highly asymmetric shape. We orient an axis by minimizing the entropy in a 1D histogram of these points projected onto the axis. To suppress noise, we replace the pixel values of decomposed images with center-of-mass values in the direction perpendicular to the optimized axis. The proposed method's performance is assessed using a Catphan 600 phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Electron density calculations are used to quantify its accuracy. Our results are compared to those without noise suppression, with a filtering method, and with a recently developed iterative method. Results: On both phantoms, the proposed method reduces noise standard deviations of the decomposed images by at least on order of magnitude. In the Catphan study, this method retains the spatial resolution of the CT images and increases the accuracy of electron density calculations. In the head phantom study, the proposed method outperforms the others in retaining fine, intricate structures. Conclusion: This work shows that the proposed method of noise suppression through entropy minimization for DECT suppresses noise without loss of spatial resolution while increasing electron density calculation accuracy. Future investigations will analyze possible bias and

  12. Minimally invasive plating of high-energy metaphyseal distal tibia fractures.

    PubMed

    Collinge, Cory; Kuper, Mark; Larson, Kirk; Protzman, Robert

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate clinical results and outcomes of a strict cohort of high-energy injuries of the metaphyseal distal tibia with minimal or no intraarticular involvement treated using the minimally invasive plating concept. Level II trauma center. Retrospective analysis of a consecutive case series with limb-specific and whole-person outcomes measures. Minimally invasive medial plating for high-energy metaphyseal fractures of the distal tibia with little or no intraarticular involvement. Clinical and radiographic results were assessed at a minimum of 1 year, and outcomes measures were applied at final follow-up at a minimum of 2 years. Limbs were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Surgeons (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot instrument and the method of Olerud and Molander. Patient outcomes were evaluated with the Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (MFA). Twenty-six patients were followed until healed at an average of 36 months (12-56 months). Mean fracture healing time was 35 weeks (12-112 weeks) with acceptable alignment restored (angulation2 years were comparable to normative data of patients with uninjured limbs, whereas MFA results showed functional deficits in 4 of 10 subsections. Minimally invasive medial plating will restore limb alignment and yield successful clinical outcomes for high-energy metaphyseal fractures of the distal tibia. Despite the significant reoperation rate and prolonged time to union, most patients can expect a predictable return of function. Strong consideration should be given to adjunctive measures in at-risk patients, including those with highly

  13. Parameter Estimation and Energy Minimization for Region-Based Semantic Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Pawan; Turki, Haithem; Preston, Dan; Koller, Daphne

    2015-07-01

    We consider the problem of parameter estimation and energy minimization for a region-based semantic segmentation model. The model divides the pixels of an image into non-overlapping connected regions, each of which is to a semantic class. In the context of energy minimization, the main problem we face is the large number of putative pixel-to-region assignments. We address this problem by designing an accurate linear programming based approach for selecting the best set of regions from a large dictionary. The dictionary is constructed by merging and intersecting segments obtained from multiple bottom-up over-segmentations. The linear program is solved efficiently using dual decomposition. In the context of parameter estimation, the main problem we face is the lack of fully supervised data. We address this issue by developing a principled framework for parameter estimation using diverse data. More precisely, we propose a latent structural support vector machine formulation, where the latent variables model any missing information in the human annotation. Of particular interest to us are three types of annotations: (i) images segmented using generic foreground or background classes; (ii) images with bounding boxes specified for objects; and (iii) images labeled to indicate the presence of a class. Using large, publicly available datasets we show that our methods are able to significantly improve the accuracy of the region-based model.

  14. Energy-efficient approach to minimizing the energy consumption in an extended job-shop scheduling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dunbing; Dai, Min

    2015-09-01

    The traditional production planning and scheduling problems consider performance indicators like time, cost and quality as optimization objectives in manufacturing processes. However, environmentally-friendly factors like energy consumption of production have not been completely taken into consideration. Against this background, this paper addresses an approach to modify a given schedule generated by a production planning and scheduling system in a job shop floor, where machine tools can work at different cutting speeds. It can adjust the cutting speeds of the operations while keeping the original assignment and processing sequence of operations of each job fixed in order to obtain energy savings. First, the proposed approach, based on a mixed integer programming mathematical model, changes the total idle time of the given schedule to minimize energy consumption in the job shop floor while accepting the optimal solution of the scheduling objective, makespan. Then, a genetic-simulated annealing algorithm is used to explore the optimal solution due to the fact that the problem is strongly NP-hard. Finally, the effectiveness of the approach is performed smalland large-size instances, respectively. The experimental results show that the approach can save 5%-10% of the average energy consumption while accepting the optimal solution of the makespan in small-size instances. In addition, the average maximum energy saving ratio can reach to 13%. And it can save approximately 1%-4% of the average energy consumption and approximately 2.4% of the average maximum energy while accepting the near-optimal solution of the makespan in large-size instances. The proposed research provides an interesting point to explore an energy-aware schedule optimization for a traditional production planning and scheduling problem.

  15. Energy barriers, entropy barriers, and non-Arrhenius behavior in a minimal glassy model.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Weeks, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    We study glassy dynamics using a simulation of three soft Brownian particles confined to a two-dimensional circular region. If the circular region is large, the disks freely rearrange, but rearrangements are rarer for smaller system sizes. We directly measure a one-dimensional free-energy landscape characterizing the dynamics. This landscape has two local minima corresponding to the two distinct disk configurations, separated by a free-energy barrier that governs the rearrangement rate. We study several different interaction potentials and demonstrate that the free-energy barrier is composed of a potential-energy barrier and an entropic barrier. The heights of both of these barriers depend on temperature and system size, demonstrating how non-Arrhenius behavior can arise close to the glass transition.

  16. Reduced impact logging minimally alters tropical rainforest carbon and energy exchange

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Scott D.; Goulden, Michael L.; Hutyra, Lucy R.; Keller, Michael; Saleska, Scott R.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Figueira, Adelaine Michela Silva; da Rocha, Humberto R.; de Camargo, Plinio B.

    2011-01-01

    We used eddy covariance and ecological measurements to investigate the effects of reduced impact logging (RIL) on an old-growth Amazonian forest. Logging caused small decreases in gross primary production, leaf production, and latent heat flux, which were roughly proportional to canopy loss, and increases in heterotrophic respiration, tree mortality, and wood production. The net effect of RIL was transient, and treatment effects were barely discernable after only 1 y. RIL appears to provide a strategy for managing tropical forest that minimizes the potential risks to climate associated with large changes in carbon and water exchange. PMID:22087005

  17. California's biomass and its energy potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lucarelli, F.B. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The potentials for using California's biomass for energy have been assessed. The study relies on the recent work of Amory Lovins and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Distributed Energy System's Project to specify an energy future for Californians. These works identify transportation fuels as the most valuable energy conversion for biomass. Within this context, the extent of five categories of terrestial biomass is estimated, in addition to the environmental impacts and monetary cost of collecting and transporting each biomass category. Estimates of the costs of transforming biomass into different fuels as well as a survey of government's role in a biomass energy program are presented. The major findings are summarized below. (1) California's existing biomass resources are sufficient to provide only 20 percent of its future liquid fuel requirements. (2) Meeting the full transportation demand with biomass derived fuels will require the development of exotic biomass sources such as kelp farms and significant reductions in automobile travel in the State. (3) Under assumptions of moderate increases in gasoline prices and without major new government incentives, the cost of transforming biomass into transport fuels will be competitive with the price of gasoline on a Btu basis by the year 1990. (4) The environmental impacts of collecting most forms of biomass are beneficial and should reduce air pollution from agricultural burning and water pollution from feedlot and dairy farm runoff. Moreover, the collection of logging residues should improve timber stand productivity and the harvest of chaparral should reduce the risk of wildfire in the State. (5) The institutional context for implementing biomass energy projects is complex and fragmented.

  18. Dark energy, non-minimal couplings and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Maroto, Antonio L. E-mail: maroto@fis.ucm.es

    2010-12-01

    In this work we consider the most general electromagnetic theory in curved space-time leading to linear second order differential equations, including non-minimal couplings to the space-time curvature. We assume the presence of a temporal electromagnetic background whose energy density plays the role of dark energy, as has been recently suggested. Imposing the consistency of the theory in the weak-field limit, we show that it reduces to standard electromagnetism in the presence of an effective electromagnetic current which is generated by the momentum density of the matter/energy distribution, even for neutral sources. This implies that in the presence of dark energy, the motion of large-scale structures generates magnetic fields. Estimates of the present amplitude of the generated seed fields for typical spiral galaxies could reach 10{sup −9} G without any amplification. In the case of compact rotating objects, the theory predicts their magnetic moments to be related to their angular momenta in the way suggested by the so called Schuster-Blackett conjecture.

  19. Energy spread minimization in a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator via velocity bunching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Yu, Changhai; Tian, Ye; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Deng, Aihua; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Liu, Jiaqi; Xia, Changquan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a scheme to minimize the energy spread of an electron beam (e-beam) in a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to the one-thousandth-level by inserting a stage to compress its longitudinal spatial distribution. In this scheme, three-segment plasma stages are designed for electron injection, e-beam length compression, and e-beam acceleration, respectively. The trapped e-beam in the injection stage is transferred to the zero-phase region at the center of one wakefield period in the compression stage where the length of the e-beam can be greatly shortened owing to the velocity bunching. After being seeded into the third stage for acceleration, the e-beam can be accelerated to a much higher energy before its energy chirp is compensated owing to the shortened e-beam length. A one-dimensional theory and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have demonstrated this scheme and an e-beam with 0.2% rms energy spread and low transverse emittance could be generated without loss of charge.

  20. Energy spread minimization in a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator via velocity bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Wentao; Wang, Wentao; Yu, Changhai; Tian, Ye; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Liu, Jiaqi; Li, Ruxin Xu, Zhizhan; Liu, Jiansheng; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Deng, Aihua; Xia, Changquan

    2016-05-15

    We propose a scheme to minimize the energy spread of an electron beam (e-beam) in a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to the one-thousandth-level by inserting a stage to compress its longitudinal spatial distribution. In this scheme, three-segment plasma stages are designed for electron injection, e-beam length compression, and e-beam acceleration, respectively. The trapped e-beam in the injection stage is transferred to the zero-phase region at the center of one wakefield period in the compression stage where the length of the e-beam can be greatly shortened owing to the velocity bunching. After being seeded into the third stage for acceleration, the e-beam can be accelerated to a much higher energy before its energy chirp is compensated owing to the shortened e-beam length. A one-dimensional theory and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have demonstrated this scheme and an e-beam with 0.2% rms energy spread and low transverse emittance could be generated without loss of charge.

  1. Hack's relation and optimal channel networks: The elongation of river basins as a consequence of energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjasz-Vasquez, Ede J.; Bras, Rafael L.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    1993-08-01

    As pointed by Hack (1957), river basins tend to become longer and narrower as their size increases. This work shows that this property may be partially regarded as the consequence of competition and minimization of energy expenditure in river basins.

  2. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.

  3. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  4. Assessment of wind energy potential in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starosta, Katarzyna; Linkowska, Joanna; Mazur, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is to show the suitability of using numerical model wind speed forecasts for the wind power industry applications in Poland. In accordance with the guidelines of the European Union, the consumption of wind energy in Poland is rapidly increasing. According to the report of Energy Regulatory Office from 30 March 2013, the installed capacity of wind power in Poland was 2807MW from 765 wind power stations. Wind energy is strongly dependent on the meteorological conditions. Based on the climatological wind speed data, potential energy zones within the area of Poland have been developed (H. Lorenc). They are the first criterion for assessing the location of the wind farm. However, for exact monitoring of a given wind farm location the prognostic data from numerical model forecasts are necessary. For the practical interpretation and further post-processing, the verification of the model data is very important. Polish Institute Meteorology and Water Management - National Research Institute (IMWM-NRI) runs an operational model COSMO (Consortium for Small-scale Modelling, version 4.8) using two nested domains at horizontal resolutions of 7 km and 2.8 km. The model produces 36 hour and 78 hour forecasts from 00 UTC, for 2.8 km and 7 km domain resolutions respectively. Numerical forecasts were compared with the observation of 60 SYNOP and 3 TEMP stations in Poland, using VERSUS2 (Unified System Verification Survey 2) and R package. For every zone the set of statistical indices (ME, MAE, RMSE) was calculated. Forecast errors for aerological profiles are shown for Polish TEMP stations at Wrocław, Legionowo and Łeba. The current studies are connected with a topic of the COST ES1002 WIRE-Weather Intelligence for Renewable Energies.

  5. Triton Binding Energy of Kharkov Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, H.; Shebeko, O.; Arslanaliev, A.

    2017-03-01

    The Kharkov potential is a recent field theoretical model of nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction that has been built up in the framework of the instant form of relativistic dynamics starting with the total Hamiltonian of interacting meson and nucleon fields and using the method of unitary clothing transformations. The latter connect the representation of "bare" particles and the representation of "clothed" particles, i.e., the particles with physical properties. Unlike many available NN potentials each of which is the kernel of the corresponding nonrelativistic Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation this potential being dependent in momentum space on the Feynman-like propagators and covariant cutoff factors at the meson-nucleon vertices is the kernel of relativistic integral equations for the NN bound and scattering states. Therefore we do not need to invent any transform of a given nonrelativistic potential to its relativistic counterpart. As a feasible study, we have started with the so-called 5ch Faddeev calculation for three-nucleon bound state (triton) and obtained a reasonable value of its binding energy (-7.42 MeV).

  6. Assessment of nociceptive system in vegetative and minimally conscious state by using laser evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    De Salvo, S; Naro, A; Bonanno, L; Russo, M; Muscarà, N; Bramanti, P; Marino, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess if laser evoked potentials (LEPs) examination should be considered as an objective evidence of potential or residual pain perception capacity in vegetative (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) patients and if it could be a feasible methodology in order to differentiate these two clinical entities. This is a cross-sectional observational study focusing on the role of LEP examination, which is an easy and objective neurophysiological approach of the nociceptive system. Thirteen VS and 10 MCS patients were enrolled. All subjects were evaluated clinically by using validated behavioural scales and underwent to upper and lower limbs LEP recording. Intra-group LEPs analysis in VS patients highlighted significant differences for N2P2 latency (p = 0.036) and amplitude (p = 0.018). Inter-group LEPs analysis showed significant differences in post-anoxic condition for N2P2 latency (p = 0.034), amplitude (p = 0.034) and a trend in N2P2 latency in brain trauma (p = 0.07). Interestingly, correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between N2P2 amplitude and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised scoring in the post-traumatic VS (r = 0.823, p = 0.044). The findings lead to detection of potential markers of conscious pain perception in patients with DOC, with important impact on therapeutic and rehabilitative management, and provide new information that may allow a better differential diagnosis.

  7. Potential energy surfaces of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.; Rutz, K.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Reinhard, P.-G. Rutz, K.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.

    1998-10-01

    We investigate the structure of the potential energy surfaces of the superheavy nuclei {sub 158}{sup 258}Fm{sub 100}, {sub 156}{sup 264}Hs{sub 108}, {sub 166}{sup 278}112, {sub 184}{sup 298}114, and {sub 172}{sup 292}120 within the framework of self-consistent nuclear models, i.e., the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach and the relativistic mean-field model. We compare results obtained with one representative parametrization of each model which is successful in describing superheavy nuclei. We find systematic changes as compared to the potential energy surfaces of heavy nuclei in the uranium region: there is no sufficiently stable fission isomer any more, the importance of triaxial configurations to lower the first barrier fades away, and asymmetric fission paths compete down to rather small deformation. Comparing the two models, it turns out that the relativistic mean-field model gives generally smaller fission barriers. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Nonintuitive Diabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for Thioanisole.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaohong L; Xu, Xuefei; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-09-03

    Diabatization of potential energy surfaces is a technique that enables convenient molecular dynamics simulations of electronically nonadiabatic processes, but diabatization itself is nonunique and can be inconvenient; the best methods to achieve diabatization are still under study. Here, we present the diabatization of two electronic states of thioanisole in the S-CH3 bond stretching and C-C-S-C torsion two-dimensional nuclear coordinate space containing a conical intersection. We use two systematic methods: the (orbital-dependent) 4-fold way and the (orbital-free) Boys localization diabatization method. These very different methods yield strikingly similar diabatic potential energy surfaces that cross at geometries where the adiabatic surfaces are well separated and do not exhibit avoided crossings, and the contours of the diabatic gap and diabatic coupling are similar for the two methods. The validity of the diabatization is supported by comparing the nonadiabatic couplings calculated from the diabatic matrix elements to those calculated by direct differentiation of the adiabatic states.

  9. Structural model for an oligonucleotide containing a bulged guanosine by NMR and energy minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.; Crothers, D.M.

    1988-05-03

    The authors present three-dimensional structural models for a DNA oligomer containing a bulged guanosine based on proton NMR data and energy minimization computations. The nonexchangeable proton resonances of the duplex /sup 5'/d(GATGGGCAG) x d(CTGCGCCATC) are assigned by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and correlated spectroscopy connectivities, and the NMR spectrum is compared with that of a regular 8-mer of similar sequence, /sup 5'/d(GATGGCAG) x d(CTGCCATC). Experimental proton-proton distances are obtained from NOESY spectra acquired with mixing times of 100, 150, and 200 ms. A refined three-dimensional structure for the bulge-containing duplex is calculated from regular B DNA starting coordinates by using the AMBER molecular mechanics program. They compare structures obtained by building the helix in three and four base pair increments with structures obtained by direct minimization of the entire nine base sequence,with and without experimental distance constraints. The general features of all the calculated structures are very similar. The helix is of the B family, with the extra guanine stacked into the helix, and the helix axis is bent by 18-23/sup 0/, in agreement with gel mobility data for bulge-containing sequences.

  10. Minimal energy packings of weakly semiflexible polymers: Application to targeted self-assembly of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwayne-Gidansky, Jared; Hoy, Robert S.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2012-02-01

    Using exact enumeration, we characterize how structure, mechanical and thermodynamic stability of minimal energy packings of short ``sticky tangent sphere'' (SHS) polymer chains vary with angular interaction strength kb and equilibrium bond angle θ0. While flexible SHS polymers possess highly degenerate ground states (i. e. many differently ordered ``macrostates'' [1]), angular interactions dramatically break this degeneracy. The macrostate associated with the ground state semiflexible packing changes as kb and θ0 are varied. Further degeneracy breaking arises from angular interactions' influence on packing size, asymmetry, and vibrational entropy. The strength of these effects increases with chain length N. Our exact analysis provides design principles for self-assembly of polymers into a variety of structures that can be tuned by varying N, kb and θ0. [4pt] [1] R. S. Hoy and C. S. O'Hern, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 068001 (2010).

  11. On the energy-minimizing strains in martensitic microstructures—Part 1: Geometrically nonlinear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peigney, Michaël

    2013-06-01

    This paper addresses the theoretical prediction of the quasiconvex hull of energy-minimizing strains that can be realized by martensitic microstructures. Polyconvexification and related notions are used to derive some upper bounds (in the sense of inclusion) on the quasiconvex hull. Lower bounds are constructed by lamination techniques. The geometrically nonlinear theory (finite strains) is considered in the present Part 1. Analytical expressions are obtained for a three-well problem which encompasses the cubic to tetragonal transformation as a special case. Twelve-well problems related to cubic to monoclinic transformations are also studied. In that case, sufficient conditions are derived for the microstructure to be restricted to only two of the 12 wells.

  12. SU-E-T-498: Energy Minimization and Dose-Volume Inverse Optimization in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaylov, I; Moros, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dose-volume (DVH) and energy minimization-based (EM) optimization for prostate cancer cases. Methods: A dozen of prostate plans were retrospectively studied. For each case two IMRT plans were generated, one with DVH and the other with EM objective cost function. Those different objective functions were used only for the organs at risk (OARs), while target objectives were achieved through DVH cost functions. The plans used the same beam angles, maximum number of segments per plan, minimum segment area and MUs per segment. Both plans were normalized such that 95% of the PTV was covered by the same prescription dose. After prescription was achieved, doses to the OARs were iteratively lowered until the standard deviation of the dose across the PTV was ~3.5%. Plan quality was evaluated by several dose indices (DIs). A DI represents the dose delivered to certain volume of a structure. Tallied DIs were for rectum and bladder 10%, 40%, 60% volumes, and 1% volumes of the femoral heads as surrogate for maximum doses. Statistical significance in the differences among DIs was quantified with two-tailed paired t-tests. Results: On average EM plans performed better than DVH plans. Statistically significant dose reduction in rectum DI10, DI40, and DI60, were 2.6%, 25.7%, and 35.9%, respectively. For bladder DI10, DI40, and DI60 the differences were 1.1%, 20.8%, and 29.7%. Left and right femoral head DI1s were better by 33.8% and 27.8% in EM plans. The quoted dose reduction is with respect to EM absolute doses for the DIs. Conclusion: The performance of EM optimization with respect to DVH optimization is patient and DI dependent. While in some cases specific DIs were better with DVH optimization, on average the energy minimization allows better (ranging from 1% to ~40%) OAR sparing than DVH optimization. NIH-NCI.

  13. Training potential in minimally invasive surgery in a tertiary care, paediatric urology centre.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R P J; Chrzan, R J; Klijn, A J; Kuijper, C F; Dik, P; de Jong, T P V M

    2015-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is being utilized more frequently as a surgical technique in general surgery and in paediatric urology. It is associated with a steep learning curve. Currently, the centre does not offer a MIS training programme. It is hypothesized that the number of MIS procedures performed in the low-volume specialty of paediatric urology will offer insufficient training potential for surgeons. To assess the MIS training potential of a highly specialized, tertiary care, paediatric urology training centre that has been accredited by the Joint Committee of Paediatric Urology (JCPU). The clinical activity of the department was retrospectively reviewed by extracting the annual number of admissions, outpatient consultations and operative procedures. The operations were divided into open procedures and MIS. Major ablative procedures (nephrectomy) and reconstructive procedures (pyeloplasty) were analysed with reference to the patients' ages. The centre policy is not to perform major MIS in children who are under 2 years old or who weigh less than 12 kg. Every year, this institution provides approximately 4300 out-patient consultations, 600 admissions, and 1300 procedures under general anaesthesia for children with urological problems. In 2012, 35 patients underwent major intricate MIS: 16 pyeloplasties, eight nephrectomies and 11 operations for incontinence (seven Burch, and four bladder neck procedures). In children ≥2 years of age, 16/21 of the pyeloplasties and 8/12 of the nephrectomies were performed laparoscopically. The remaining MIS procedures included 25 orchidopexies and one intravesical ureteral reimplantation. There is no consensus on how to assess laparoscopic training. It would be valuable to reach a consensus on a standardized laparoscopic training programme in paediatric urology. Often training potential is based on operation numbers only. In paediatric urology no minimum requirement has been specified. The number of procedures quoted

  14. Minimally nonlocal nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Δ resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Piarulli, M.; Girlanda, L.; Schiavilla, R.; ...

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including Δ-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale). The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0–300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$more » and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a Χ2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  15. Estimation of free-living energy expenditure using a novel activity monitor designed to minimize obtrusiveness.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Alberto G; Plasqui, Guy; Goris, Annelies H C; Westerterp, Klass R

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a novel activity monitor designed to be minimally obtrusive in predicting free-living energy expenditure. Subjects were 18 men and 12 women (age: 41 +/- 11 years, BMI: 24.4 +/- 3 kg/m(2)). The habitual physical activity was monitored for 14 days using a DirectLife triaxial accelerometer for movement registration (Tracmor(D)) (Philips New Wellness Solutions, Lifestyle Incubator, the Netherlands). Tracmor(D) output was expressed as activity counts per day (Cnts/d). Simultaneously, total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured in free living conditions using doubly labeled water (DLW). Activity energy expenditure (AEE) and the physical activity level (PAL) were determined from TEE and sleeping metabolic rate (SMR). A multiple-linear regression model predicted 76% of the variance in TEE, using as independent variables SMR (partial-r(2) = 0.55, P < 0.001), and Cnts/d (partial r(2) = 0.21, P < 0.001). The s.e. of TEE estimates was 0.9 MJ/day or 7.4% of the average TEE. A model based on body mass (partial-r(2) = 0.31, P < 0.001) and Cnts/d (partial-r(2) = 0.23, P < 0.001) predicted 54% of the variance in TEE. Cnts/d were significantly and positively associated with AEE (r = 0.54, P < 0.01), PAL (r = 0.68, P < 0.001), and AEE corrected by body mass (r = 0.71, P < 0.001). This study showed that the Tracmor(D) is a highly accurate instrument for predicting free-living energy expenditure. The miniaturized design did not harm the ability of the instrument in measuring physical activity and in determining outcome parameters of physical activity such as TEE, AEE, and PAL.

  16. Bohm's quantum potential as an internal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Glen; de Gosson, Maurice A.; Hiley, Basil J.

    2015-06-01

    We pursue our discussion of Fermi's surface initiated by Dennis, de Gosson and Hiley and show that Bohm's quantum potential can be viewed as an internal energy of a quantum system, giving further insight into its role in stationary states. This implies that the 'particle' referred to in Bohm's theory is not a classical point-like object but rather has an extended structure in phase space which can be linked to the notion of a symplectic capacity, a topological feature of the underlying symplectic geometry. This structure provides us with a new, physically motivated derivation of Schrödinger's equation provided we interpret Gleason's theorem as a derivation of the Born rule from fundamental assumptions about quantum probabilities.

  17. The Wind Energy Potential of Kurdistan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Arefi, Farzad; Moshtagh, Jamal; Moradi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In the current work by using statistical methods and available software, the wind energy assessment of prone regions for installation of wind turbines in, Qorveh, has been investigated. Information was obtained from weather stations of Baneh, Bijar, Zarina, Saqez, Sanandaj, Qorveh, and Marivan. The monthly average and maximum of wind speed were investigated between the years 2000-2010 and the related curves were drawn. The Golobad curve (direction and percentage of dominant wind and calm wind as monthly rate) between the years 1997-2000 was analyzed and drawn with plot software. The ten-minute speed (at 10, 30, and 60 m height) and direction (at 37.5 and 10 m height) wind data were collected from weather stations of Iranian new energy organization. The wind speed distribution during one year was evaluated by using Weibull probability density function (two-parametrical), and the Weibull curve histograms were drawn by MATLAB software. According to the average wind speed of stations and technical specifications of the types of turbines, the suitable wind turbine for the station was selected. Finally, the Divandareh and Qorveh sites with favorable potential were considered for installation of wind turbines and construction of wind farms.

  18. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion: Technology and market potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrowski, L.J.; Pernisz, U.C.; Fraas, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report contains material displayed on poster panels during the Conference. The purpose of the contribution was to present a summary of the business overview of thermophotovoltaic generation of electricity and its market potential. The market analysis has shown that the TPV market, while currently still in an early nucleation phase, is evolving into a range of small niche markets out of which larger-size opportunities can emerge. Early commercial applications on yachts and recreational vehicles which require a quiet and emission-free compact electrical generator fit the current TPV technology and economics. Follow-on residential applications are attractive since they can combine generation of electricity with space and hot water heating in a co-generation system. Development of future markets in transportation, both private and communal or industrial, will be driven by legislation requiring emission-free vehicles, and by a reduction in TPV systems cost. As a result of {open_quote}{open_quote}moving down the learning curve,{close_quote}{close_quote} growing power and consumer markets are predicted to come into reach of TPV systems, a development favored by high overall energy conversion efficiency due to high radiation energy density and to high electric conversion efficiency available with photovoltaic cells. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  20. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion: Technology and market potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Leon J.; Pernisz, Udo C.; Fraas, Lewis M.

    1996-02-01

    This report contains material displayed on poster panels during the Conference. The purpose of the contribution was to present a summary of the business overview of thermophotovoltaic generation of electricity and its market potential. The market analysis has shown that the TPV market, while currently still in an early nucleation phase, is evolving into a range of small niche markets out of which larger-size opportunities can emerge. Early commercial applications on yachts and recreational vehicles which require a quiet and emission-free compact electrical generator fit the current TPV technology and economics. Follow-on residential applications are attractive since they can combine generation of electricity with space and hot water heating in a co-generation system. Development of future markets in transportation, both private and communal or industrial, will be driven by legislation requiring emission-free vehicles, and by a reduction in TPV systems cost. As a result of ``moving down the learning curve,'' growing power and consumer markets are predicted to come into reach of TPV systems, a development favored by high overall energy conversion efficiency due to high radiation energy density and to high electric conversion efficiency available with photovoltaic cells.

  1. The Wind Energy Potential of Kurdistan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Arefi, Farzad; Moshtagh, Jamal; Moradi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In the current work by using statistical methods and available software, the wind energy assessment of prone regions for installation of wind turbines in, Qorveh, has been investigated. Information was obtained from weather stations of Baneh, Bijar, Zarina, Saqez, Sanandaj, Qorveh, and Marivan. The monthly average and maximum of wind speed were investigated between the years 2000–2010 and the related curves were drawn. The Golobad curve (direction and percentage of dominant wind and calm wind as monthly rate) between the years 1997–2000 was analyzed and drawn with plot software. The ten-minute speed (at 10, 30, and 60 m height) and direction (at 37.5 and 10 m height) wind data were collected from weather stations of Iranian new energy organization. The wind speed distribution during one year was evaluated by using Weibull probability density function (two-parametrical), and the Weibull curve histograms were drawn by MATLAB software. According to the average wind speed of stations and technical specifications of the types of turbines, the suitable wind turbine for the station was selected. Finally, the Divandareh and Qorveh sites with favorable potential were considered for installation of wind turbines and construction of wind farms. PMID:27355042

  2. Is there a conflict between minimizing effort and energy expenditure with increasing velocities of muscle contraction in humans?

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Jones, N L; Killian, K J

    1999-08-01

    1. The present study examined the possibility that minimizing effort conflicts with minimizing energy expenditure at different velocities of muscle contraction during cycling. 2. Six normal subjects underwent incremental exercise on an electrically stabilized cycle ergometer. Power output increased by 45 W every 3 min to exhaustion at pedalling frequencies of 40, 60, 80 and 100 r.p.m. on separate days. Energy expenditure (oxygen uptake), leg effort and dyspnoea (Borg 0-10 scale) were measured in parallel at the end of each minute. 3. All six subjects completed 10 min of exercise achieving 180 W for all four pedalling frequencies. Two-way analysis of variance indicated that oxygen uptake (P < 0.0001), leg effort (P < 0.0001) and dyspnoea (P < 0.0001) increased with duration of exercise and power output; oxygen uptake (P < 0.0001) and leg effort (P < 0.05) were significantly different between pedalling frequencies; the interactions were not significant. Oxygen uptake was minimal at 60 r.p.m., and increased at both higher and lower pedalling frequencies. Both leg effort and dyspnoea were minimal at 80 r.p.m.; leg effort intensified at higher and lower pedalling frequencies; and dyspnoea was most intense at 100 r.p.m. 4. There was a conflict between minimization of energy expenditure and leg effort at power outputs less than 180 W. Minimizing effort occurred at the expense of an increase in energy expenditure.

  3. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  4. Zeta potential of selected bacteria in drinking water when dead, starved, or exposed to minimal and rich culture media.

    PubMed

    Soni, Kamlesh A; Balasubramanian, Ashwin K; Beskok, Ali; Pillai, Suresh D

    2008-01-01

    The zeta potentials of E. coli, GFP (green fluorescence protein)-labeled E. coli, Salmonella Newport, and Pseudomonas sp. in different states (nutrient-starved and dead) and grown in rich and minimal media were measured. Capillary electrophoresis experiments were conducted to measure the zeta potential of the different cells suspended in a drinking water sample. Salmonella Newport strain showed a lower zeta potential compared to E. coli, GFP-labeled E. coli, and Pseudomonas sp. Starved E. coli cells had a lower zeta potential compared to E. coli cells grown under rich media conditions. Salmonella Newport cells grown in minimal media also had a lower zeta potential compared to rich, starved, and dead cells. The different bacterial cell types exhibited differences in size as well. These results suggest that when bacterial cells are present in drinking water they can exhibit significant heterogeneity in the size and zeta potential, depending on their physiological state.

  5. Evaluation of the suitability of free-energy minimization using nearest-neighbor energy parameters for RNA secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Kishore J; Cannone, Jamie J; Cobaugh, Christian W; Gutell, Robin R

    2004-01-01

    Background A detailed understanding of an RNA's correct secondary and tertiary structure is crucial to understanding its function and mechanism in the cell. Free energy minimization with energy parameters based on the nearest-neighbor model and comparative analysis are the primary methods for predicting an RNA's secondary structure from its sequence. Version 3.1 of Mfold has been available since 1999. This version contains an expanded sequence dependence of energy parameters and the ability to incorporate coaxial stacking into free energy calculations. We test Mfold 3.1 by performing the largest and most phylogenetically diverse comparison of rRNA and tRNA structures predicted by comparative analysis and Mfold, and we use the results of our tests on 16S and 23S rRNA sequences to assess the improvement between Mfold 2.3 and Mfold 3.1. Results The average prediction accuracy for a 16S or 23S rRNA sequence with Mfold 3.1 is 41%, while the prediction accuracies for the majority of 16S and 23S rRNA structures tested are between 20% and 60%, with some having less than 20% prediction accuracy. The average prediction accuracy was 71% for 5S rRNA and 69% for tRNA. The majority of the 5S rRNA and tRNA sequences have prediction accuracies greater than 60%. The prediction accuracy of 16S rRNA base-pairs decreases exponentially as the number of nucleotides intervening between the 5' and 3' halves of the base-pair increases. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that the current set of nearest-neighbor energy parameters in conjunction with the Mfold folding algorithm are unable to consistently and reliably predict an RNA's correct secondary structure. For 16S or 23S rRNA structure prediction, Mfold 3.1 offers little improvement over Mfold 2.3. However, the nearest-neighbor energy parameters do work well for shorter RNA sequences such as tRNA or 5S rRNA, or for larger rRNAs when the contact distance between the base-pairs is less than 100 nucleotides. PMID:15296519

  6. Transportation Energy Use and Conservation Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Eric

    1973-01-01

    Analyzes transportation energy consumption and energy intensiveness for inter-city freight and passenger traffic and urban passenger traffic with the definition of energy intensiveness as Btu per ton-mile or per passenger-mile. Indicates that public education is one of three ways to achieve the goals of energy conservation. (CC)

  7. Transportation Energy Use and Conservation Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Eric

    1973-01-01

    Analyzes transportation energy consumption and energy intensiveness for inter-city freight and passenger traffic and urban passenger traffic with the definition of energy intensiveness as Btu per ton-mile or per passenger-mile. Indicates that public education is one of three ways to achieve the goals of energy conservation. (CC)

  8. An ab initio method for locating potential energy minima

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, Nicolas; Peery, Travis; Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric; Wallace, Duane; Lizarraga, Raquel; Holmstrom, Erik

    2009-01-01

    We study the potential energy landscape underlying the motion of monatomic liquids by quenching from random initial configurations (stochastic configurations) to the nearest local minimum of the potential energy. We show that this procedure reveals the underlying potential energy surface directly. This is in contrast to the common technique of quenching from a molecular dynamics trajectory which does not allow a direct view of the underlying potential energy surface, but needs to be corrected for thermodynamic weighting factors.

  9. Renewable Energy Potential for New Mexico

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    RE-Powering America's Land: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Land and Mining Sites was presented by Penelope McDaniel, during the 2008 Brown to Green: Make the Connection to Renewable Energy workshop.

  10. Recovery of freshwater from wastewater: upgrading process configurations to maximize energy recovery and minimize residuals.

    PubMed

    Scherson, Yaniv D; Criddle, Craig S

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of conventional and novel wastewater treatment configurations reveals large differences in energy consumed or produced and solids generated per cubic meter of domestic wastewater treated. Complete aerobic BOD removal consumes 0.45 kWh and produces 153 g of solids, whereas complete anaerobic treatment produces 0.25 kWh and 80 g of solids. Emerging technologies, that include short-circuit nitrogen removal (SHARON, CANON with Anammox, CANDO) and mainstream anaerobic digestion, can potentially remove both BOD and nitrogen with an energy surplus of 0.17 kWh and production of 95 g of solids. Heat from biogas combustion can completely dry the solids, and these solids can be converted to syngas without imported energy. Syngas combustion can produce ∼ 0.1 kWh with an inorganic residue of just 10 g. If salt is removed, freshwater can be recovered with net production of electrical energy from methane (0.03-0.13 kWh) and syngas (∼ 0.1 kWh) and an inorganic residue of ∼ 0.1-0.3 kg as brine. Current seawater desalination requires 3-4 kWh (thermodynamic limit of 1 kWh) and results in an inorganic residue of ∼ 35 kg as brine.

  11. Energy Minimization of Discrete Protein Titration State Models Using Graph Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Purvine, Emilie AH; Monson, Kyle E.; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Star, Keith T.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2016-09-01

    There are several applications in computational biophysics which require the optimization of discrete interacting states; e.g., amino acid titration states, ligand oxidation states, or discrete rotamer angles. Such optimization can be very time-consuming as it scales exponentially in the number of sites to be optimized. In this paper, we describe a new polynomial-time algorithm for optimization of discrete states in macromolecular systems. This algorithm was adapted from image processing and uses techniques from discrete mathematics and graph theory to restate the optimization problem in terms of maximum flow-minimum cut graph analysis. The interaction energy graph, a graph in which vertices (amino acids) and edges (interactions) are weighted with their respective energies, is transformed into a flow network in which the value of the minimum cut in the network equals the minimum free energy of the protein, and the cut itself encodes the state that achieves the minimum free energy. Because of its deterministic nature and polynomial-time performance, this algorithm has the potential to allow for the ionization state of larger proteins to be discovered.

  12. Energy Minimization of Discrete Protein Titration State Models Using Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    Purvine, Emilie; Monson, Kyle; Jurrus, Elizabeth; Star, Keith; Baker, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    There are several applications in computational biophysics which require the optimization of discrete interacting states; e.g., amino acid titration states, ligand oxidation states, or discrete rotamer angles. Such optimization can be very time-consuming as it scales exponentially in the number of sites to be optimized. In this paper, we describe a new polynomial-time algorithm for optimization of discrete states in macromolecular systems. This algorithm was adapted from image processing and uses techniques from discrete mathematics and graph theory to restate the optimization problem in terms of “maximum flow-minimum cut” graph analysis. The interaction energy graph, a graph in which vertices (amino acids) and edges (interactions) are weighted with their respective energies, is transformed into a flow network in which the value of the minimum cut in the network equals the minimum free energy of the protein, and the cut itself encodes the state that achieves the minimum free energy. Because of its deterministic nature and polynomial-time performance, this algorithm has the potential to allow for the ionization state of larger proteins to be discovered. PMID:27089174

  13. Energy Minimization of Discrete Protein Titration State Models Using Graph Theory.

    PubMed

    Purvine, Emilie; Monson, Kyle; Jurrus, Elizabeth; Star, Keith; Baker, Nathan A

    2016-08-25

    There are several applications in computational biophysics that require the optimization of discrete interacting states, for example, amino acid titration states, ligand oxidation states, or discrete rotamer angles. Such optimization can be very time-consuming as it scales exponentially in the number of sites to be optimized. In this paper, we describe a new polynomial time algorithm for optimization of discrete states in macromolecular systems. This algorithm was adapted from image processing and uses techniques from discrete mathematics and graph theory to restate the optimization problem in terms of "maximum flow-minimum cut" graph analysis. The interaction energy graph, a graph in which vertices (amino acids) and edges (interactions) are weighted with their respective energies, is transformed into a flow network in which the value of the minimum cut in the network equals the minimum free energy of the protein and the cut itself encodes the state that achieves the minimum free energy. Because of its deterministic nature and polynomial time performance, this algorithm has the potential to allow for the ionization state of larger proteins to be discovered.

  14. An experimental comparison of min-cut/max-flow algorithms for energy minimization in vision.

    PubMed

    Boykov, Yuri; Kolmogorov, Vladimir

    2004-09-01

    After [15], [31], [19], [8], [25], [5], minimum cut/maximum flow algorithms on graphs emerged as an increasingly useful tool for exact or approximate energy minimization in low-level vision. The combinatorial optimization literature provides many min-cut/max-flow algorithms with different polynomial time complexity. Their practical efficiency, however, has to date been studied mainly outside the scope of computer vision. The goal of this paper is to provide an experimental comparison of the efficiency of min-cut/max flow algorithms for applications in vision. We compare the running times of several standard algorithms, as well as a new algorithm that we have recently developed. The algorithms we study include both Goldberg-Tarjan style "push-relabel" methods and algorithms based on Ford-Fulkerson style "augmenting paths." We benchmark these algorithms on a number of typical graphs in the contexts of image restoration, stereo, and segmentation. In many cases, our new algorithm works several times faster than any of the other methods, making near real-time performance possible. An implementation of our max-flow/min-cut algorithm is available upon request for research purposes.

  15. Application of free energy minimization to the design of adaptive multi-agent teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, Georgiy; Pattipati, Krishna; Fouse, Adam; Serfaty, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Many novel DoD missions, from disaster relief to cyber reconnaissance, require teams of humans and machines with diverse capabilities. Current solutions do not account for heterogeneity of agent capabilities, uncertainty of team knowledge, and dynamics of and dependencies between tasks and agent roles, resulting in brittle teams. Most importantly, the state-of-the-art team design solutions are either centralized, imposing role and relation assignment onto agents, or completely distributed, suitable for only homogeneous organizations such as swarms. Centralized design models can't provide insights for team's self-organization, i.e. adapting team structure over time in distributed collaborative manner by team members with diverse expertise and responsibilities. In this paper we present an information-theoretic formalization of team composition and structure adaptation using a minimization of variational free energy. The structure adaptation is obtained in an iterative distributed and collaborative manner without the need for centralized control. We show that our model is lightweight, predictive, and produces team structures that theoretically approximate an optimal policy for team adaptation. Our model also provides a unique coupling between the structure and action policy, and captures three essential processes of learning, perception, and control.

  16. Energy savings potential from energy-conserving irrigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.L.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Clark, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    This report systematically compares, within a consistent framework, the technical and economic characteristics of energy-conserving irrigation systems with those of conventional irrigation systems and to determine total energy savings. Levelized annual costs of owning and operating both energy-conserving and conventional irrigation systems have been developed and compared for all 17 states to account for the differences in energy costs and irrigation conditions in each state. Market penetration of energy-conserving systems is assessed for those systems having lower levelized annual costs than conventional systems performing the same function. Annual energy savings were computed by matching the energy savings per system with an assumed maximum market penetration of 100 percent in those markets where the levelized annual costs of energy-conserving systems are lower than the levelized annual costs of conventional systems.

  17. Minimizing invasive potential of Miscanthus × giganteus grown for bioenergy: identifying demographic thresholds for population growth and spread

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Production of herbaceous perennial bioenergy crops in the north central region of the USA is being targeted primarily at marginal lands to avoid conflicts between food and fuel. A fundamental challenge for biofeedstock development is to evaluate and minimize the potential of such crops to escape cul...

  18. Generation of transgenic energy cane plants with integration of minimal transgene expression cassette.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Walid M; Hao, Wu; Xiong, Yuan; Steeves, Cody; Sandhu, Surinder K; Altpeter, Fredy

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to serve as feedstock and direct replacement for petrochemicals in the fuel, chemical, pharmaceutical and material industries. Energy cane has been identified by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as prime lignocellulosic feedstock as it produces record biomass yields and is able to grow on low-value land with reduced inputs. Molecular improvement of energy cane is an essential step toward the development of a high-value crop and may contribute to improved biomass conversion to value added products. Such improvements require a development of an efficient regeneration and transformation system for the vegetatively propagated energy cane varieties. In this report, an efficient biolistic gene delivery protocol for energy canes (genotype L 79-1002 and Ho 00-961) has been established with immature leaf rolls as explants. Embryonic calli, developed approximately 6 weeks after culture initiation and was used as target for biolistic transfer of a minimum expression cassette of P-ubi::nptII::35S polyA derived from plasmid pJFNPTII. Putative transgenic clones of callus were obtained after selection on callus induction medium supplemented with 30 mg l(-1) geneticin. Regeneration was carried out on NB medium, which is modified from MS supplemented with 1.86 mg l(-1) naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 0.1mg l(-1), 6- benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 20mg l(-1) paromomycin. Shoots growing on selection media were transferred to hormone free medium with 20 mg l(-1) paromomycin. Putative transgenic lines were first analyzed by PCR. Transgene integration was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) and Immunochromathography assays confirmed transgene expression.

  19. Generation of Transgenic Energy Cane Plants with Integration of Minimal Transgene Expression Cassette.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Walid M; Hao, W U; Xiong, Yuan; Steeves, Cody; Sandhu, Surinder K; Altpeter, Fredy

    2015-03-03

    Lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to serve as feedstock and direct replacement for petrochemicals in the fuel, chemical, pharmaceutical and material industries. Energy cane has been identified by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as prime lignocellulosic feedstock as it produces record biomass yields and is able to grow on low-value land with reduced inputs. Molecular improvement of energy cane is an essential step toward the development of a high-value crop and may contribute to improved biomass conversion to value added products. Such improvements require a development of an efficient regeneration and transformation system for the vegetatively propagated energy cane varieties. In this report, an efficient biolistic gene delivery protocol for energy canes (genotype L 79-1002 and Ho 00-961) has been established with immature leaf rolls as explants. Embryonic calli, developed approximately 6 weeks after culture initiation and was used as target for biolistic transfer of a minimum expression cassette of P-ubi::nptII::35S polyA derived from plasmid pJFNPTII. Putative transgenic clones of callus were obtained after selection on callus induction medium supplemented with 30 mg l-1 geneticin. Regeneration was carried out on NB medium, which is modified from MS supplemented with 1.86 mg l-1 naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 0.1mg l-1, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 20mg l-1 paromomycin. Shoots growing on selection media were transferred to hormone free medium with 20 mg l-1 paromomycin. Putative transgenic lines were first analyzed by PCR. Transgene integration was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) and Immunochromathography assays confirmed transgene expression.

  20. Simulation of deep-bed drying of Virginia peanuts to minimize energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Kulasiri, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    A deep-bed drying model simulating the drying of peanuts in a fixed bed is required for designing energy-efficient and automatically controlled dryers. A deep-red drying model consists of a thin-layer drying model to calculate the moisture release from the material and a set of mass and energy balances. An experimental setup was constructed to determine drying rates of Virginia-type peanuts under 14 different drying air conditions. Selected empirical and semi-theoretical models available for modeling thin-layer drying rates were fitted to the collected data using nonlinear regression techniques. The modified Page's model and the two-term exponential model fitted the data better than other models considered. A deep-bed drying model PEATECH based on four coupled partial differential equations consisting of four variables, air temperature, peanut temperature, air humidity, and peanut moisture content was developed. Validation of the model was accomplished by using the data collected from 36 deep-bed drying experiments conducted using three laboratory dryers during 1987, 1988, and 1989. PEATECH predicted the variables within a peanut bed with an accuracy of less than {plus minus} 6%. The energy saving potential of exhaust-air recirculation was established by conducting simulated experiments using a modified version of PEATECH.

  1. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  2. The Potential Energy of an Autoencoder.

    PubMed

    Kamyshanska, Hanna; Memisevic, Roland

    2015-06-01

    Autoencoders are popular feature learning models, that are conceptually simple, easy to train and allow for efficient inference. Recent work has shown how certain autoencoders can be associated with an energy landscape, akin to negative log-probability in a probabilistic model, which measures how well the autoencoder can represent regions in the input space. The energy landscape has been commonly inferred heuristically, by using a training criterion that relates the autoencoder to a probabilistic model such as a Restricted Boltzmann Machine (RBM). In this paper we show how most common autoencoders are naturally associated with an energy function, independent of the training procedure, and that the energy landscape can be inferred analytically by integrating the reconstruction function of the autoencoder. For autoencoders with sigmoid hidden units, the energy function is identical to the free energy of an RBM, which helps shed light onto the relationship between these two types of model. We also show that the autoencoder energy function allows us to explain common regularization procedures, such as contractive training, from the perspective of dynamical systems. As a practical application of the energy function, a generative classifier based on class-specific autoencoders is presented.

  3. Energy in America: Progress and Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    An overview of America's energy situation is presented with emphasis on recent progress, the risk of depending upon foreign oil, and policy choices. Section one reviews the energy problems of the 1970s, issues of the 1980s, concerns for the future, and choices that if made today could alleviate future problems. Section two examines past problems,…

  4. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  5. Energy in America: Progress and Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    An overview of America's energy situation is presented with emphasis on recent progress, the risk of depending upon foreign oil, and policy choices. Section one reviews the energy problems of the 1970s, issues of the 1980s, concerns for the future, and choices that if made today could alleviate future problems. Section two examines past problems,…

  6. Self-organization, free energy minimization, and optimal grip on a field of affordances.

    PubMed

    Bruineberg, Jelle; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we set out to develop a theoretical and conceptual framework for the new field of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience. This framework should be able to integrate insights from several relevant disciplines: theory on embodied cognition, ecological psychology, phenomenology, dynamical systems theory, and neurodynamics. We suggest that the main task of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience is to investigate the phenomenon of skilled intentionality from the perspective of the self-organization of the brain-body-environment system, while doing justice to the phenomenology of skilled action. In previous work, we have characterized skilled intentionality as the organism's tendency toward an optimal grip on multiple relevant affordances simultaneously. Affordances are possibilities for action provided by the environment. In the first part of this paper, we introduce the notion of skilled intentionality and the phenomenon of responsiveness to a field of relevant affordances. Second, we use Friston's work on neurodynamics, but embed a very minimal version of his Free Energy Principle in the ecological niche of the animal. Thus amended, this principle is helpful for understanding the embeddedness of neurodynamics within the dynamics of the system "brain-body-landscape of affordances." Next, we show how we can use this adjusted principle to understand the neurodynamics of selective openness to the environment: interacting action-readiness patterns at multiple timescales contribute to the organism's selective openness to relevant affordances. In the final part of the paper, we emphasize the important role of metastable dynamics in both the brain and the brain-body-environment system for adequate affordance-responsiveness. We exemplify our integrative approach by presenting research on the impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on affordance responsiveness of OCD patients.

  7. Self-organization, free energy minimization, and optimal grip on a field of affordances

    PubMed Central

    Bruineberg, Jelle; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we set out to develop a theoretical and conceptual framework for the new field of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience. This framework should be able to integrate insights from several relevant disciplines: theory on embodied cognition, ecological psychology, phenomenology, dynamical systems theory, and neurodynamics. We suggest that the main task of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience is to investigate the phenomenon of skilled intentionality from the perspective of the self-organization of the brain-body-environment system, while doing justice to the phenomenology of skilled action. In previous work, we have characterized skilled intentionality as the organism's tendency toward an optimal grip on multiple relevant affordances simultaneously. Affordances are possibilities for action provided by the environment. In the first part of this paper, we introduce the notion of skilled intentionality and the phenomenon of responsiveness to a field of relevant affordances. Second, we use Friston's work on neurodynamics, but embed a very minimal version of his Free Energy Principle in the ecological niche of the animal. Thus amended, this principle is helpful for understanding the embeddedness of neurodynamics within the dynamics of the system “brain-body-landscape of affordances.” Next, we show how we can use this adjusted principle to understand the neurodynamics of selective openness to the environment: interacting action-readiness patterns at multiple timescales contribute to the organism's selective openness to relevant affordances. In the final part of the paper, we emphasize the important role of metastable dynamics in both the brain and the brain-body-environment system for adequate affordance-responsiveness. We exemplify our integrative approach by presenting research on the impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on affordance responsiveness of OCD patients. PMID:25161615

  8. Energy conserving and potential-enstrophy dissipating schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Hsu, Yueh-Jiuan G.

    1990-01-01

    To incorporate potential enstrophy dissipation into discrete shallow water equations with no or arbitrarily small energy dissipation, a family of finite-difference schemes have been derived with which potential enstrophy is guaranteed to decrease while energy is conserved (when the mass flux is nondivergent and time is continuous). Among this family of schemes, there is a member that minimizes the spurious impact of infinite potential vorticities associated with infinitesimal fluid depth. The scheme is, therefore, useful for problems in which the free surface may intersect with the lower boundary.

  9. Energy conserving and potential-enstrophy dissipating schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Hsu, Yueh-Jiuan G.

    1990-01-01

    To incorporate potential enstrophy dissipation into discrete shallow water equations with no or arbitrarily small energy dissipation, a family of finite-difference schemes have been derived with which potential enstrophy is guaranteed to decrease while energy is conserved (when the mass flux is nondivergent and time is continuous). Among this family of schemes, there is a member that minimizes the spurious impact of infinite potential vorticities associated with infinitesimal fluid depth. The scheme is, therefore, useful for problems in which the free surface may intersect with the lower boundary.

  10. Potential Advantages of Reusing Potentially Contaminated Land for Renewable Energy Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA promotes the reuse of potentially contaminated lands and landfills for renewable energy. This strategy creates new markets for potentially contaminated lands, while providing a sustainable land development strategy for renewable energy.

  11. Potential for energy recovery from humid air streams.

    Treesearch

    Howard H. Rosen

    1979-01-01

    The potential for energy recovery from the vent stream of dryers is examined by assuming the vent stream transfers its energy in a regenerative heat exchanger. Tables present energy recovery over a range of conditions. Example problems demonstrate the use of the energy recovery tables.

  12. Solar Energy: Potential Powerhouse for Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallion, Tom

    1976-01-01

    Components of solar energy systems are described, the development of the solar industry discussed, and implications are drawn for employment opportunities in industries (which may expand into new, solar-related areas) and in the professions, from law to sales, upon the advent of solar heating. (AJ)

  13. Adding energy minimization strategy to peptide-design algorithm enables better search for RNA-binding peptides: Redesigned λ N peptide binds boxB RNA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xingqing; Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N; Hall, Carol K

    2016-10-15

    Our previously developed peptide-design algorithm was improved by adding an energy minimization strategy which allows the amino acid sidechains to move in a broad configuration space during sequence evolution. In this work, the new algorithm was used to generate a library of 21-mer peptides which could substitute for λ N peptide in binding to boxB RNA. Six potential peptides were obtained from the algorithm, all of which exhibited good binding capability with boxB RNA. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were then conducted to examine the ability of the λ N peptide and three best evolved peptides, viz. Pept01, Pept26, and Pept28, to bind to boxB RNA. Simulation results demonstrated that our evolved peptides are better at binding to boxB RNA than the λ N peptide. Sequence searches using the old (without energy minimization strategy) and new (with energy minimization strategy) algorithms confirm that the new algorithm is more effective at finding good RNA-binding peptides than the old algorithm. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on Indian Lands

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    Includes information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households and tribes, the comparative electricity rates that Indian households are paying, and the potential for renewable resources development of Indian lands.

  15. Molecular understanding of mutagenicity using potential energy methods

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Shapiro, R.

    1992-07-01

    Our objective, has been to elucidate on a molecular level, at atomic resolution, the structures of DNAs modified by 2-aminofluorene and its N-acetyl derivative, 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF). The underlying hypothesis is that DNA replicates with reduced fidelity when its normal right-handed B-structure is altered, and one result is a higher mutation rate. This change in structure may occur normally at a low incidence, for example by the formation of hairpin loops in appropriate sequences, but it may be enhanced greatly after covalent modification by a mutagenic substance. We use computational methods and have been able to incorporate the first data from NMR studies in our calculations. Computational approaches are important because x-ray and spectroscopic studies have not succeeded in producing atomic resolution views of mutagen and carcinogen-oligonucleotide adducts. The specific methods that we employ are minimized potential energy calculations using the torsion angle space molecular mechanics program DUPLEX to yield static views. Molecular dynamics simulations, with full solvent and salt, of the important static structures are carried out with the program AMBER; this yields mobile views in a medium that mimics the natural aqueous environment of the cell as well as can be done with current available computing resources.

  16. Bandwidth Study on Energy Use and Potential Energy Saving Opportunities in U.S. Chemical Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine Brueske, Caroline Kramer, Aaron Fisher

    2015-06-01

    Energy bandwidth studies of U.S. manufacturing sectors can serve as foundational references in framing the range (or bandwidth) of potential energy savings opportunities. This bandwidth study examines energy consumption and potential energy savings opportunities in U.S. chemical manufacturing. The study relies on multiple sources to estimate the energy used in the production of 74 individual chemicals, representing 57% of sector-wide energy consumption. Energy savings opportunities for individual chemicals and for 15 subsectors of chemicals manufacturing are based on technologies currently in use or under development; these potential savings are then extrapolated to estimate sector-wide energy savings opportunity.

  17. Bandwidth Study on Energy Use and Potential Energy Savings Opportunities in U.S. Petroleum Refining

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine Brueske, Caroline Kramer, Aaron Fisher

    2015-06-01

    Energy bandwidth studies of U.S. manufacturing sectors can serve as foundational references in framing the range (or bandwidth) of potential energy savings opportunities. This bandwidth study examines energy consumption and potential energy savings opportunities in U.S. petroleum refining. The study relies on multiple sources to estimate the energy used in nine individual process areas, representing 68% of sector-wide energy consumption. Energy savings opportunities for individual processes are based on technologies currently in use or under development; these potential savings are then extrapolated to estimate sector-wide energy savings opportunity.

  18. Energy Savings Potential and Research & Development Opportunities for Commercial Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-09-01

    This study documents the energy consumption of commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE) in the U.S. and evaluated the energy savings potential of various technologies and energy efficiency measures that could be applied to such equipment. The study provided an overview of CRE applications, assessed the energy-savings potential of CRE in the U.S., outline key barriers to adoption of energy-savings technologies, and recommended opportunities for advanced energy saving technology research. The study was modeled after an earlier 1996 report by Arthur D. Little, Inc., and updated key information, examined more equipment types, and outlined long-term research and development opportunities.

  19. Wood Energy Potential in Northwestern South Carolina

    Treesearch

    James W. McMinn

    1986-01-01

    The quantity of unused wood in an Ill-county area in northwestern South Carolina was projected to be more than 16 million tons annually. Wood that is unsuitable for products other than fuel amounts to nearly 9 million tons annually.The most likely energy demand by industrial plants that are good candidates for wood fuel systems is 1.5 million tons annually.Maximum...

  20. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study.

  1. Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, G.

    1984-12-01

    Sugarcane presents a tremendous potential as a renewable energy source for the non-oil producing countries of the Caribbean. The energy cane concept is sugarcane managed for maximum dry matter (total fermentable solids for alcohol fuel and combustible solids for electricity) rather than sucrose. The use of sugarcane as a renewable energy source can provide a solution, either partial or total, to the Caribbean energy problem. Sugar cane production and the use of this crop as a renewable energy source are described.

  2. Potential Energy Sources Pose Mining Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes the discussions of a Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry symposium on solids handling for synthetic fuels production. Included is a description of technical difficulties with the use of coal seams and deposits of oil shale and oil sand as potential sources of fuel. (CC)

  3. Potential Energy Sources Pose Mining Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes the discussions of a Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry symposium on solids handling for synthetic fuels production. Included is a description of technical difficulties with the use of coal seams and deposits of oil shale and oil sand as potential sources of fuel. (CC)

  4. Minimal Model of Quantum Kinetic Clusters for the Energy-Transfer Network of a Light-Harvesting Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianlan; Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Cao, Jianshu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-04-02

    The energy absorbed in a light-harvesting protein complex is often transferred collectively through aggregated chromophore clusters. For population evolution of chromophores, the time-integrated effective rate matrix allows us to construct quantum kinetic clusters quantitatively and determine the reduced cluster-cluster transfer rates systematically, thus defining a minimal model of energy-transfer kinetics. For Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) and light-havrvesting complex II (LCHII) monomers, quantum Markovian kinetics of clusters can accurately reproduce the overall energy-transfer process in the long-time scale. The dominant energy-transfer pathways are identified in the picture of aggregated clusters. The chromophores distributed extensively in various clusters can assist a fast and long-range energy transfer.

  5. A fast multigrid algorithm for energy minimization under planar density constraints.

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, D.; Safro, I.; Brandt, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Weizmann Inst. of Science

    2010-09-07

    The two-dimensional layout optimization problem reinforced by the efficient space utilization demand has a wide spectrum of practical applications. Formulating the problem as a nonlinear minimization problem under planar equality and/or inequality density constraints, we present a linear time multigrid algorithm for solving a correction to this problem. The method is demonstrated in various graph drawing (visualization) instances.

  6. Fine-tuning of protein domain boundary by minimizing potential coiled coil regions.

    PubMed

    Iwaya, Naoko; Goda, Natsuko; Unzai, Satoru; Fujiwara, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Tomii, Kentaro; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2007-01-01

    Structural determination of individual protein domains isolated from multidomain proteins is a common approach in the post-genomic era. Novel and thus uncharacterized domains liberated from intact proteins often self-associate due to incorrectly defined domain boundaries. Self-association results in missing signals, poor signal dispersion and a low signal-to-noise ratio in (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra. We have found that a putative, non-canonical coiled coil region close to a domain boundary can cause transient hydrophobic self-association and monomer-dimer equilibrium in solution. Here we propose a rational method to predict putative coiled coil regions adjacent to the globular core domain using the program COILS. Except for the amino acid sequence, no preexisting knowledge concerning the domain is required. A small number of mutant proteins with a minimized coiled coil region have been rationally designed and tested. The engineered domains exhibit decreased self-association as assessed by (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra with improved peak dispersion and sharper cross peaks. Two successful examples of isolating novel N-terminal domains from AAA-ATPases are demonstrated. Our method is useful for the experimental determination of domain boundaries suited for structural genomics studies.

  7. The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for Next Generation Safeguards Specialists--Maximizing Potential and Minimizing the Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Eipeldauer, Mary D

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to provide an overview of the workshop entitled 'The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for the Next Generation Safeguards Experts-Maximizing Benefits While Minimizing Proliferation Risks', conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in partnership with the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This document presents workshop objectives; lists the numerous participant universities and individuals, the nuclear nonproliferation lecture topics covered, and the facilities tours taken as part of the workshop; and discusses the university partnership sessions and proposed areas for collaboration between the universities and ORNL for 2009. Appendix A contains the agenda for the workshop; Appendix B lists the workshop attendees and presenters with contact information; Appendix C contains graphics of the evaluation form results and survey areas; and Appendix D summarizes the responses to the workshop evaluation form. The workshop was an opportunity for ORNL, Y-12, and SRNL staff with more than 30 years combined experience in nuclear nonproliferation to provide a comprehensive overview of their expertise for the university professors and their students. The overall goal of the workshop was to emphasize nonproliferation aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and to identify specific areas where the universities and experts from operations and national laboratories could collaborate.

  8. Automated global mapping of minimal energy points on seams of crossing by the anharmonic downward distortion following method: a case study of H2CO.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoshi; Ohno, Koichi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2009-03-05

    Automated global mapping of minimal energy points on seams of crossing (MSX structures) were performed by using the anharmonic downward distortion following (ADD-following) method, which has previously been applied to the single potential energy surfaces (PESs) to perform automated global reaction route mapping. In this study, the ADD-following is applied to a penalty function based on two PESs of different electronic states. The present approach is effective not only for crossing seams between states with different symmetry but also for conical intersections for states with the same symmetry. Many new MSX structures were discovered on the S(0)/T(1) and S(1)/T(1) crossing seams and the S(0)/S(1) conical intersections of H(2)CO by automated global mapping using the ADD-following method. A possible pathway for dissociation of formaldehyde excited to S(1) at low energy is discussed.

  9. Achieving wood energy potentials: evidence in northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Dennis P. Bradley; David C. Lothner

    1987-01-01

    A study of wood energy potential in northeastern Minnesota concludes that (1) the forests of the region could support a much larger wood energy harvest without significant cost increases for other forest products; (2) existing stands are predominantly overmature and cutting more now will enhance future wood supplies for all users; (3) converting to wood energy could...

  10. Potential energy changes and the Boussinesq approximation in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, K.; Rottman, J. W.; Nomura, K. K.; Stretch, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    The evolution of the potential energy of an ideal binary fluid mixture that is initially stably stratified is re-examined. The initial stable stratification evolves to a state of uniform density under the influence of molecular diffusion. We derive the appropriate governing equations using either a mass-averaged or a volume-averaged definition of velocity, and develop an energy budget describing the changes between kinetic, potential and internal energies without invoking the Boussinesq approximation. We compare the energy evolution equations with those based on the commonly used Boussinesq approximation and clarify some subtleties associated with the exchanges between the different forms of energy in this problem. In particular, we show that the mass-averaged velocity is nonzero and that all of the increase in potential energy comes from the initial kinetic energy.

  11. Morphing ab initio potential energy curve of beryllium monohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špirko, Vladimír

    2016-12-01

    Effective (mass-dependent) potential energy curves of the ground electronic states of 9BeH, 9BeD, and 9BeT are constructed by morphing a very accurate MR-ACPF ab initio potential of Koput (2011) within the framework of the reduced potential energy curve approach of Jenč (1983). The morphing is performed by fitting the RPC parameters to available experimental ro-vibrational data. The resulting potential energy curves provide a fairly quantitative reproduction of the fitted data. This allows for a reliable prediction of the so-far unobserved molecular states in terms of only a small number of fitting parameters.

  12. Potential for energy recovery from solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Velzy, C.O.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the technologies, opportunities, and problems of energy-from-refuse systems. Topics considered include the direct combustion of as-received refuse, the mass-burn systems, the combustion of refuse-derived fuel, and the production of methane gas from the organic and cellulosic fraction of solid waste. A DOE-sponsored methane plant operated by Waste Management is now being evaluated at Pompano Beach, Florida. The Europeans have moved ahead so rapidly in the beneficial use of heat from the combustion of their solid waste because of the availability of a ready market for the heat in municipal facilities and/or town district heating systems. It is suggested that the use of the heat from the combustion of solid waste should be broadened to include district heating and cooling, complementary municipal functions (e.g. the disposal of sludges from wastewater treatment), integration in power generation facilities in uses other than direct production of power (e.g. boiler feedwater heating), and in industrial processing.

  13. An asymmetric dimer in a periodic potential: a minimal model for friction of graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hens, Remco; Fasolino, Annalisa

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the friction and motion of a model of a dimer with asymmetric interactions with a substrate potential. Starting from the consideration that a rigid dimer with spacing equal to half of the period of the potential has exactly zero static friction like the infinite incommensurate Frenkel Kontorova model, we show how stick-slip behaviour and friction arise as a function of asymmetry. We argue that this model can yield a simple yet insightful description of the frictional behaviour of graphene flakes on graphite and of superlubricity. The results can also be of interest for diatomic molecules on surfaces. Supplementary material in the form of three mp4 files available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70273-5

  14. Potential environmental problems of photovoltaic energy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrey, G.R.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Patten, D.; Berry, W.; Conway, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the ten papers of this proceedings of a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1980. The purposes of this proceedings are to provide a preliminary identificaton and assessment of environmental hazards which might be realistically associated with growth of the photovoltaic industry, and to provide a reference for environmental considerations by obtaining a 1980 state-of-the-art assessment of growth anticipated for the industry. Currently the industry is considered to be in the early stages of development and several possible technological options are available for large-scale manufacturing as the industry grows. Estimates of the industrial emissions of materials considered to be potentially harmful in the environment were obtained by several different analytical methods. (KRM)

  15. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Residents with Minimal Potential Window Views of Trees by Block Group

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the total block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has little access to potential window views of trees at home. Having little potential access to window views of trees is defined as having no trees & forest land cover within 50 meters. The window views are considered potential because the procedure does not account for presence or directionality of windows in one's home. In this community, forest is defined as Trees & Forest and Woody Wetlands. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas ) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  16. EnviroAtlas - Memphis, TN - Residents with Minimal Potential Window Views of Trees by Block Group

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the total block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has little access to potential window views of trees at home. Having little potential access to window views of trees is defined as having no trees & forest land cover within 50 meters. The window views are considered potential because the procedure does not account for presence or directionality of windows in one's home. Forest is defined as Trees & Forest and Woody Wetlands. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  17. EnviroAtlas - Austin, TX - Residents with Minimal Potential Window Views of Trees by Block Group

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the total block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has little access to potential window views of trees at home. Having little potential access to window views of trees is defined as having no trees & forest land cover within 50 meters. The window views are considered potential because the procedure does not account for presence or directionality of windows in one's home. Forest is defined as Trees & Forest. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  18. Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hiester, T.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

  19. Minimization of energy and surface roughness of the products machined by milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloufi, A.; Abdelkrim, M.; Bouakba, M.; Rezgui, I.

    2017-08-01

    Metal cutting represents a large portion in the manufacturing industries, which makes this process the largest consumer of energy. Energy consumption is an indirect source of carbon footprint, we know that CO2 emissions come from the production of energy. Therefore high energy consumption requires a large production, which leads to high cost and a large amount of CO2 emissions. At this day, a lot of researches done on the Metal cutting, but the environmental problems of the processes are rarely discussed. The right selection of cutting parameters is an effective method to reduce energy consumption because of the direct relationship between energy consumption and cutting parameters in machining processes. Therefore, one of the objectives of this research is to propose an optimization strategy suitable for machining processes (milling) to achieve the optimum cutting conditions based on the criterion of the energy consumed during the milling. In this paper the problem of energy consumed in milling is solved by an optimization method chosen. The optimization is done according to the different requirements in the process of roughing and finishing under various technological constraints.

  20. Thermodynamic free-energy minimization for unsupervised fusion of dual-color infrared breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Miao, Lidan; Qi, Hairong

    2006-04-01

    function [A] may vary from the point tumor to its neighborhood, we could not rely on neighborhood statistics as did in a popular unsupervised independent component analysis (ICA) mathematical statistical method, we instead impose the physics equilibrium condition of the minimum of Helmholtz free-energy, H = E - T °S. In case of the point breast cancer, we can assume the constant ground state energy E ° to be normalized by those benign neighborhood tissue, and then the excited state can be computed by means of Taylor series expansion in terms of the pixel I/O data. We can augment the X-ray mammogram technique with passive IR imaging to reduce the unwanted X-rays during the chemotherapy recovery. When the sequence is animated into a movie, and the recovery dynamics is played backward in time, the movie simulates the cameras' potential for early detection without suffering the PD=0.1 search uncertainty. In summary, we applied two satellite-grade dual-color IR imaging cameras and advanced military (automatic target recognition) ATR spectrum fusion algorithm at the middle wavelength IR (3 - 5μm) and long wavelength IR (8 - 12μm), which are capable to screen malignant tumors proved by the time-reverse fashion of the animated movie experiments. On the contrary, the traditional thermal breast scanning/imaging, known as thermograms over decades, was IR spectrum-blind, and limited to a single night-vision camera and the necessary waiting for the cool down period for taking a second look for change detection suffers too many environmental and personnel variabilities.

  1. Low-Energy Signals for a Minimal Gauge-Mediated Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielli, E.; Sarid, U.

    1997-12-01

    The inclusive branching ratio B{r_arrow}X{sub s}{gamma} and the anomalous magnetic moment g{sub {mu}}{minus}2 of the muon are accurately calculated within a minimal gauge-mediated supersymmetry-breaking model which naturally generates a large tan{beta} . The predictions are strongly correlated, and in somewhat better agreement with current experiments; new data will soon critically test these predictions. Predictions for B{r_arrow}X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}} branching ratios and asymmetries, to be tested at future colliders, are also presented. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Potential Interventions by Government and Industry to Minimize Violations of Temporary Flight Restrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuschlag, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This document enumerates interventions to reduce the frequency of restricted airspace violations, particularly those associated with temporary flight restrictions (TFRs) and air defense identification zones (ADIZs), by more effectively providing pilots with the information necessary to avoid such violations. Interventions are divided into both near term and far term groupings. Short term interventions, some variants of which are already in progress focus on improving the form and content of the textual Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) as well as the graphical depiction of TFRs. A long-term technical intervention is proposed which would provide pilots the following functionality: ground and airborne presentation of information on any restricted airspace, including display on an electronic moving map, fully mechanized execution from the cockpit of the procedures required for entry into restricted airspaces that allow for entry, and alerting of the potential for TFR violations both during flight planning and while the aircraft is moving.

  3. Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on Public Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-02-01

    This report represents an initial activity of the Bureau of Land Managements (BLM) proposed National Energy Policy Implementation Plan: identify and evaluate renewable energy resources on federal lands and any limitations on accessing them. Ultimately, BLM will prioritize land-use planning activities to increase industrys development of renewable energy resources. These resources include solar, biomass, geothermal, water, and wind energy. To accomplish this, BLM and the Department of Energys National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) established a partnership to conduct an assessment of renewable energy resources on BLM lands in the western United States. The objective of this collaboration was to identify BLM planning units in the western states with the highest potential for private-sector development of renewable resources. The assessment resulted in the following findings: (1) 63 BLM planning units in nine western states have high potential for one or more renewable energy technologies; and (2) 20 BLM planning units in seven western states have high potential for power production from three or more renewable energy sources. This assessment report provides BLM with information needed to prioritize land-use planning activities on the basis of potential for the development of energy from renewable resources.

  4. Combined Ankle-Foot Energetics are Conserved When Distal Foot Energy Absorption is Minimized.

    PubMed

    Arch, Elisa S; Fylstra, Bretta L

    2016-12-01

    The large, late-stance energy generated by the ankle is believed to be critical during gait. However, the distal foot absorbs/dissipates a considerable amount of energy during the same phase. Thus, the energy generated by the combined ankle-foot system is more modest, which raises questions regarding the necessity of such a large ankle power and the interplay between foot and ankle energetics. This study aimed to evaluate our conservation of energy hypothesis, which predicted if distal foot energy absorption/dissipation was reduced, then less energy would be generated at the ankle and thus the same combined ankle-foot energetics would be achieved. Motion analysis data were collected as healthy subjects walked under 2 conditions (Shoes, Footplate). In the Footplate condition, the shoe was replaced with a customized, rigid footplate with a rocker profile. In support of the hypothesis, there was significantly less positive ankle and less negative distal foot work with footplate use, resulting in very similar combined ankle-foot work between conditions. These findings suggest that there is an interplay between the energy generated by the ankle and absorbed by the foot. This interplay should be considered when designing orthotic and prosthetic ankle-foot systems and rehabilitation programs for individuals with weakened ankle muscles.

  5. Thermal energy storage to minimize cost and improve efficiency of a polygeneration district energy system in a real-time electricity market

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Kody M.; Kim, Jong Suk; Cole, Wesley J.; Kapoor, Kriti; Mojica, Jose L.; Hedengren, John D.; Edgar, Thomas F.

    2016-10-01

    District energy systems can produce low-cost utilities for large energy networks, but can also be a resource for the electric grid by their ability to ramp production or to store thermal energy by responding to real-time market signals. In this work, dynamic optimization exploits the flexibility of thermal energy storage by determining optimal times to store and extract excess energy. This concept is applied to a polygeneration distributed energy system with combined heat and power, district heating, district cooling, and chilled water thermal energy storage. The system is a university campus responsible for meeting the energy needs of tens of thousands of people. The objective for the dynamic optimization problem is to minimize cost over a 24-h period while meeting multiple loads in real time. The paper presents a novel algorithm to solve this dynamic optimization problem with energy storage by decomposing the problem into multiple static mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) problems. Another innovative feature of this work is the study of a large, complex energy network which includes the interrelations of a wide variety of energy technologies. Results indicate that a cost savings of 16.5% is realized when the system can participate in the wholesale electricity market.

  6. Minimizing Energy Use and GHG Emissions of Lift Stations Utilizing Real-Time Pump Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Crane, Travis; Hollifield, Darren; Wilcoxson, David; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2016-11-01

      Wastewater collection system lift station operations require a substantial amount of energy, and can be as a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for wastewater utilities. Many lift stations operate with local or basic controls that have no hydraulic relationship with other collection system lift stations. This study demonstrated a unique energy-efficient control method of lift station operation that utilizes hydraulic modeling results generated from site-specific conditions to optimize the pumping units and reduce simultaneous running cycles on a real time basis. The pilot tests conducted at two pilot areas of the wastewater collection system of a utility in Florida demonstrated that the energy savings obtained through such operational optimization was 14 to 17% for the two pilot areas investigated. The study demonstrated that substantial annual energy costs and GHG emissions reduction could be achieved utilizing this method, particularly for utilities located in flat geographic locations where hundreds of lift stations are required to transfer wastewater.

  7. Immunocontraceptive potential of recombinantly expressed minimized chicken riboflavin carrier protein (mini-RCP) in rodents.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sarada; Karandeb, Anjali A; Adiga, P Radhakantha

    2004-12-01

    Chicken riboflavin carrier protein (RCP; 219 AA) harbours four linear epitopes, constituted by the peptide residues 3-23, 64-83, 130-147 and 200-219. Antibodies to these sequences bioneutralize maternal RCP and provide protection from pregnancy in rodents. In order to overcome the major histocompatibility complex-dependent variability in immune response often encountered with use of single peptides for vaccination in genetically outbred populations, we have assembled a novel synthetic gene, incorporating in tandem the nucleotide sequences coding for all the four neutralizing epitopes of chicken RCP and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene product, mini-RCP has been characterized for its immunogenic properties and contraceptive potential in rodents. Immunization of rabbits and rats led to generation of antibodies against individual peptide components, as determined by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, immunized rats carried pregnancy to term and delivered healthy offsprings. Antisera from these rats exhibited decreased affinity of binding to the native protein. These findings suggest that the prospects of covalently-linked epitope peptides need to be cautiously evaluated during the design and development of peptide-based vaccines.

  8. When the Lowest Energy Does Not Induce Native Structures: Parallel Minimization of Multi-Energy Values by Hybridizing Searching Intelligences

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Qiang; Xia, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Rong; Miao, Da-Jun; Chen, Sha-Sha; Quan, Li-Jun; Li, Hai-Ou

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein structure prediction (PSP), which is usually modeled as a computational optimization problem, remains one of the biggest challenges in computational biology. PSP encounters two difficult obstacles: the inaccurate energy function problem and the searching problem. Even if the lowest energy has been luckily found by the searching procedure, the correct protein structures are not guaranteed to obtain. Results A general parallel metaheuristic approach is presented to tackle the above two problems. Multi-energy functions are employed to simultaneously guide the parallel searching threads. Searching trajectories are in fact controlled by the parameters of heuristic algorithms. The parallel approach allows the parameters to be perturbed during the searching threads are running in parallel, while each thread is searching the lowest energy value determined by an individual energy function. By hybridizing the intelligences of parallel ant colonies and Monte Carlo Metropolis search, this paper demonstrates an implementation of our parallel approach for PSP. 16 classical instances were tested to show that the parallel approach is competitive for solving PSP problem. Conclusions This parallel approach combines various sources of both searching intelligences and energy functions, and thus predicts protein conformations with good quality jointly determined by all the parallel searching threads and energy functions. It provides a framework to combine different searching intelligence embedded in heuristic algorithms. It also constructs a container to hybridize different not-so-accurate objective functions which are usually derived from the domain expertise. PMID:23028708

  9. Intermolecular potential energy surface for CS2 dimer.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, Hossein; Mombeini, Zainab; Namazian, Mansoor; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-04-15

    A new four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface for CS(2) dimer is obtained by ab initio calculation of the interaction energies for a range of configurations and center-of-mass separation distances for the first time. The calculations were performed using the supermolecular approach at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with the augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVxZ, x = D, T) and corrected for the basis-set superposition error using the full counterpoise correction method. A two-point extrapolation method was used to extrapolate the calculated energy points to the complete basis set limit. The effect of using the higher levels of theory, quadratic configuration interaction containing single, double, and perturbative triple excitations QCISD(T) and coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples excitations CCSD(T), on the shape of potential energy surface was investigated. It is shown that the MP2 level of theory apparently performs extremely poorly for describing the intermolecular potential energy surface, overestimating the total energy by a factor of nearly 1.73 in comparison with the QCISD(T) and CCSD(T) values. The value of isotropic dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (C(6) ) of CS(2) fluid was obtained from the extrapolated MP2 potential energy surface. The MP2 extrapolated energy points were fitted to well-known analytical potential functions using two different methods to represent the potential energy surface analytically. The most stable configuration of the dimer was determined at R = 6.23 au, α = 90°, β = 90°, and γ = 90°, with a well depth of 3.980 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level of theory. Finally, the calculated second virial coefficients were compared with experimental values to test the quality of the presented potential energy surface. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher B; Campbell, J Elliott; Lobell, David B

    2008-02-01

    Increased production of biomass for energy has the potential to offset substantial use of fossil fuels, but it also has the potential to threaten conservation areas, pollute water resources and decrease food security. The net effect of biomass energy agriculture on climate could be either cooling or warming, depending on the crop, the technology for converting biomass into useable energy, and the difference in carbon stocks and reflectance of solar radiation between the biomass crop and the pre-existing vegetation. The area with the greatest potential for yielding biomass energy that reduces net warming and avoids competition with food production is land that was previously used for agriculture or pasture but that has been abandoned and not converted to forest or urban areas. At the global scale, potential above-ground plant growth on these abandoned lands has an energy content representing approximately 5% of world primary energy consumption in 2006. The global potential for biomass energy production is large in absolute terms, but it is not enough to replace more than a few percent of current fossil fuel usage. Increasing biomass energy production beyond this level would probably reduce food security and exacerbate forcing of climate change.

  11. Minimizing noise in fiberglass aquaculture tanks: Noise reduction potential of various retrofits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidson, J.; Frankel, A.S.; Ellison, W.T.; Summerfelt, S.; Popper, A.N.; Mazik, P.; Bebak, J.

    2007-01-01

    Equipment used in intensive aquaculture systems, such as pumps and blowers can produce underwater sound levels and frequencies within the range of fish hearing. The impacts of underwater noise on fish are not well known, but limited research suggests that subjecting fish to noise could result in impairment of the auditory system, reduced growth rates, and increased stress. Consequently, reducing sound in fish tanks could result in advantages for cultured species and increased productivity for the aquaculture industry. The objective of this study was to evaluate the noise reduction potential of various retrofits to fiberglass fish culture tanks. The following structural changes were applied to tanks to reduce underwater noise: (1) inlet piping was suspended to avoid contact with the tank, (2) effluent piping was disconnected from a common drain line, (3) effluent piping was insulated beneath tanks, and (4) tanks were elevated on cement blocks and seated on insulated padding. Four combinations of the aforementioned structural changes were evaluated in duplicate and two tanks were left unchanged as controls. Control tanks had sound levels of 120.6 dB re 1 ??Pa. Each retrofit contributed to a reduction of underwater sound. As structural changes were combined, a cumulative reduction in sound level was observed. Tanks designed with a combination of retrofits had sound levels of 108.6 dB re 1 ??Pa, a four-fold reduction in sound pressure level. Sound frequency spectra indicated that the greatest sound reductions occurred between 2 and 100 Hz and demonstrated that nearby pumps and blowers created tonal frequencies that were transmitted into the tanks. The tank modifications used during this study were simple and inexpensive and could be applied to existing systems or considered when designing aquaculture facilities. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Real-space finite-difference approach for multi-body systems: path-integral renormalization group method and direct energy minimization method.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Kojo, Masashi; Hirose, Kikuji; Goto, Hidekazu

    2011-11-02

    The path-integral renormalization group and direct energy minimization method of practical first-principles electronic structure calculations for multi-body systems within the framework of the real-space finite-difference scheme are introduced. These two methods can handle higher dimensional systems with consideration of the correlation effect. Furthermore, they can be easily extended to the multicomponent quantum systems which contain more than two kinds of quantum particles. The key to the present methods is employing linear combinations of nonorthogonal Slater determinants (SDs) as multi-body wavefunctions. As one of the noticeable results, the same accuracy as the variational Monte Carlo method is achieved with a few SDs. This enables us to study the entire ground state consisting of electrons and nuclei without the need to use the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Recent activities on methodological developments aiming towards practical calculations such as the implementation of auxiliary field for Coulombic interaction, the treatment of the kinetic operator in imaginary-time evolutions, the time-saving double-grid technique for bare-Coulomb atomic potentials and the optimization scheme for minimizing the total-energy functional are also introduced. As test examples, the total energy of the hydrogen molecule, the atomic configuration of the methylene and the electronic structures of two-dimensional quantum dots are calculated, and the accuracy, availability and possibility of the present methods are demonstrated.

  13. Morcellator's Port-site Metastasis of a Uterine Smooth Muscle Tumor of Uncertain Malignant Potential After Minimally Invasive Myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Lorusso, Domenica; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Carcangiu, Maria L; Fiore, Marco; Gronchi, Alessandro; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Since the safety warning from the US Food and Drug Administration on the use of power morcellators, minimally invasive procedures involving the removal of uterine myomas and large uteri are under scrutiny. Growing evidence suggests that morcellation of undiagnosed uterine malignancies is associated with worse survival outcomes of patients affected by uterine sarcoma. However, to date, only limited data regarding morcellation of low-grade uterine neoplasms are available. In the present article, we reported a case of a (morcellator) port-site implantation of a smooth muscle tumor that occurred 6 years after laparoscopic morcellation of a uterine smooth muscle tumor of uncertain potential. This case highlights the effects of intra-abdominal morcellation, even in low-grade uterine neoplasms. Caution should be used when determining techniques for tissue extraction; the potential adverse consequences of morcellation should be more fully explored.

  14. Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, G.

    1984-08-01

    Sugarcane grown as energy cane presents a new potential to the Caribbean countries to provide their own energy needs and to reduce or eliminate fuel oil imports. The use of proper agronomic techniques can convert conventional sugarcane growing to a crop capable of giving energy feedstocks in the form of fiber for boiler fuel for electricity and fermentable solids for alcohol for motor fuel. Sugarcane can still be obtained from the energy cane for domestic consumption and export if desired. The aerable land now devoted to sugarcane can utilized for energy-cane production without causing any serious imbalance in food crop production.

  15. Waste minimization policies, regulations, and practices within the U.S. Department of Energy defense programs

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.P.

    1989-11-01

    In 1984 the US Congress enacted the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). One of the goals of this legislation was to focus attention on the need to reduce or eliminate hazardous waste so as to minimize the threat to human health and the environment. Subsequently, in September of 1988, DOE issued a Radioactive Waste Management Policy, DOE Order 5820.2A, and in November a General Environmental Program Order, DOE Order 5400.1. These documents embrace the principles set forth in RCRA, and expand their scope to include radioactive, mixed, and pollutant waste, and all actions for reducing waste from the point of generation through waste treatment, storage, transportation and disposal. This paper will present an overview of the legislation and policies for waste reduction and, in addition, give site responsibilities for implementing waste reduction program activities.

  16. Minimizing the energy requirement of dewatering scenedesmus sp. by microfiltration: performance, costs, and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Gerardo, Michael L; Oatley-Radcliffe, Darren L; Lovitt, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The harvesting of the microalgae Scenedesmus species using a 200 L pilot-scale microfiltration system was investigated and critically assessed. The energy requirement was determined and correlated to the different operating parameters, such as transmembrane pressure (ΔP), membrane area, temperature, and initial biomass concentration. A filtration model was developed and showed a strong correlation with experimental data up to 20.0 g of dry cell weight (DCW)/L. The non-optimized filtration system had an energy requirement of 2.23 kWh/m(3) with an associated cost of $0.282/kg of microalgae. The investigation into the influence of the operating parameters and scale-up effects showed that the energy requirement could be substantially reduced to 0.90 kWh/m(3) and $0.058/kg of microalgae harvested. Maintenance costs associated with cleaning were estimated to be 0.23 kWh or $0.029/batch of microalgae processed. Dependent upon the operating conditions, harvesting may represent 6-45% of the energy embedded in the microalgae with a carbon footprint of 0.74-1.67 kg of CO2/kg of microalgae. Microfiltration was demonstrated to be a feasible microalgae harvesting technology allowing for more than 99% volume reduction. The energy requirement and associated carbon footprint of microalgae harvesting reported here do not forfeit the need for an industrial-scale study; however, the information provided presents a more realistic approximation than the literature reported to date.

  17. Saint Paul Energy Park: the potential for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Kron, R.; Davis, H.

    1980-03-01

    The results of ANL's study of the energy and economic aspects of using district heating in the St. Paul Energy Park are summarized. The Energy Park is a 6 million ft/sup 2/ residential, commercial office, and light industrial complex to be built in the midway area of St. Paul, Minnesota. Space heating and cooling design loads for the park were calculated assuming that the ASHRAE's 90-75 energy-conserving construction standards would be used in constructing the park's buildings. Based in part on this assumption, ANL estimated the costs and energy use characteristics of six possible energy system options for supplying Energy Park's space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water heating needs. The results indicate that in today's economy, a central heating and cooling plant with natural gas boilers and electrically driven centrifugal chillers with thermal storage has good potential for energy and economic savings and clearly merits further consideration.

  18. Biomechanical energy harvesting: generating electricity during walking with minimal user effort.

    PubMed

    Donelan, J M; Li, Q; Naing, V; Hoffer, J A; Weber, D J; Kuo, A D

    2008-02-08

    We have developed a biomechanical energy harvester that generates electricity during human walking with little extra effort. Unlike conventional human-powered generators that use positive muscle work, our technology assists muscles in performing negative work, analogous to regenerative braking in hybrid cars, where energy normally dissipated during braking drives a generator instead. The energy harvester mounts at the knee and selectively engages power generation at the end of the swing phase, thus assisting deceleration of the joint. Test subjects walking with one device on each leg produced an average of 5 watts of electricity, which is about 10 times that of shoe-mounted devices. The cost of harvesting-the additional metabolic power required to produce 1 watt of electricity-is less than one-eighth of that for conventional human power generation. Producing substantial electricity with little extra effort makes this method well-suited for charging powered prosthetic limbs and other portable medical devices.

  19. Energy spread minimization in a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator via velocity bunching (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-05-01

    We report the observation of energy-spread compensation of electron bunches in a laser wakefield accelerator in experiment. The compensation was caused by the gradient wakefield in plasma wake, and the energy spectra of the bunches evolved during the acceleration so that we propose a new method to diagnose the longitudinal length of the ultrashort electron bunch. By analyzing the energy spectra of electron bunches with different acceleration length, the wakefield gradient difference and the wakefield slope of the bunch could be estimated by combining with the slippage between the plasma wave and the electron bunch, thus the electron bunches' longitudinal length could be estimated. By applying this new method, the longitudinal length of electron bunches with charge of about 40 pC generated from a laser wakefield accelerator was estimated to be (2.4 ± 2.2) μm in experiment, which was in good agreement with three-dimension particle-in-cell simulations.

  20. Ab initio Potential Energy Surface for H-H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate potential energy surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged potential determined from the calculated energies agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- (mu)E(sub h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive potential energy surfaces. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 potential energy surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(sub 0) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.

  1. Representing Global Reactive Potential Energy Surfaces Using Gaussian Processes.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Brian; Marshall, Paul; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2017-04-06

    Representation of multidimensional global potential energy surfaces suitable for spectral and dynamical calculations from high-level ab initio calculations remains a challenge. Here, we present a detailed study on constructing potential energy surfaces using a machine learning method, namely, Gaussian process regression. Tests for the (3)A″ state of SH2, which facilitates the SH + H ↔ S((3)P) + H2 abstraction reaction and the SH + H' ↔ SH' + H exchange reaction, suggest that the Gaussian process is capable of providing a reasonable potential energy surface with a small number (∼1 × 10(2)) of ab initio points, but it needs substantially more points (∼1 × 10(3)) to converge reaction probabilities. The implications of these observations for construction of potential energy surfaces are discussed.

  2. Semiclassical energy levels and the corresponding potentials in nonhydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, P.; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J.

    1992-11-01

    A semiclassical expression is derived for the potential seen by an nl-shell electron in a nonhydrogenic ion. Corresponding energies Enl are compared with experimental values and with results of self-consistent-field calculations.

  3. Potential energy stored by planets and grand minima events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo G.

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Wolff & Patrone (2010), have developed a simple but very interesting model by which the movement of the Sun around the barycentre of the Solar system could create potential energy that could be released by flows pre-existing inside the Sun. The authors claim that it is the first mechanism showing how planetary movements can modify internal structure in the Sun that can be related to solar cycle. In this work we point out limitations of mentioned mechanism (which is based on interchange arguments), which could be inapplicable to a real star. Then, we calculate the temporal evolution of potential energy stored in zones of Sun's interior in which the potential energy could be most efficiently stored taking into account detailed barycentric Sun dynamics. We show strong variations of potential energy related to Maunder Minimum, Dalton Minimum and the maximum of Cycle 22, around 1990. We discuss briefly possible implications of this putative mechanism to solar cycle specially Grand Minima events.

  4. Ab initio Potential Energy Surface for H-H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate potential energy surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged potential determined from the calculated energies agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- (mu)E(sub h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive potential energy surfaces. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 potential energy surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(sub 0) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.

  5. Minimizing Wind Power Producer's Balancing Costs Using Electrochemical Energy Storage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, J.; Tikka, V.; Lassila, J.; Partanen, J.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper examines how electrochemical energy storage can be used to decrease the balancing costs of a wind power producer in the Nordic market. Because electrochemical energy storage is developing in both technological and financial terms, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for the most important variables in the wind-storage hybrid system. The system was studied from a wind power producer's point of view. The main result is that there are no technical limitations to using storage for reducing the balancing costs. However, in terms of economic feasibility, installing hybrid wind-storage systems such as the one studied in this paper faces challenges in both the short and long terms.

  6. MRI tissue classification and bias field estimation based on coherent local intensity clustering: a unified energy minimization framework.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunming; Xu, Chenyang; Anderson, Adam W; Gore, John C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new energy minimization method for simultaneous tissue classification and bias field estimation of magnetic resonance (MR) images. We first derive an important characteristic of local image intensities--the intensities of different tissues within a neighborhood form separable clusters, and the center of each cluster can be well approximated by the product of the bias within the neighborhood and a tissue-dependent constant. We then introduce a coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) criterion function as a metric to evaluate tissue classification and bias field estimation. An integration of this metric defines an energy on a bias field, membership functions of the tissues, and the parameters that approximate the true signal from the corresponding tissues. Thus, tissue classification and bias field estimation are simultaneously achieved by minimizing this energy. The smoothness of the derived optimal bias field is ensured by the spatially coherent nature of the CLIC criterion function. As a result, no extra effort is needed to smooth the bias field in our method. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is robust to the choice of initial conditions, thereby allowing fully automatic applications. Our algorithm has been applied to high field and ultra high field MR images with promising results.

  7. Soft tissue strain energy minimization: a candidate control scheme for intra-finger normal-tangential force coordination.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Todd C

    2005-08-01

    The safety margin (SM) measure has been used to quantify the phenomenon that humans grasp objects more firmly than is necessary to prevent slip. The biomechanical basis for the SM phenomenon is addressed herein. A hypothesis is proposed regarding intra-finger normal-tangential force coordination. The idea is that the central nervous system (CNS) minimizes the strain energy of the soft finger pad tissue by varying normal force when presented with a certain tangential force. This control scheme requires no knowledge of the frictional conditions at the finger-object interface; the CNS needs only to detect the strain energy in the contact region, an area abundant with strain-sensitive mechanoreceptors. The scheme is not independent, but is rather a possible component of a more complicated system. The strain energy minimization problem was solved using the finite element model (FEM) of Wu et al. (Med. Eng. Phys. 24(4)(2002) 253). Optimization results revealed that the suggested control scheme produced SM values of 30-50%, corresponding closely to those reported experimentally. Slip prevention naturally emerges from the control scheme provided that the friction coefficient exceeds 0.7, a value lower than typically encountered.

  8. Why do dislocations assemble into interfaces in epitaxy as well as in crystal plasticity? To minimize free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, D.

    2002-08-01

    Dislocations commonly form planar arrays that minimize the free interfacial energy between relatively mismatched crystal volumes. In epitaxy and phase transformations, the causative misfit is that between differences in lattice structure and/or orientations of different phases. In deformed homogeneous crystalline materials, the planar dislocation arrays are grain and mosaic block boundaries that accommodate relative misorientations within the same crystal structure. Thus, overwhelmingly, planar dislocation arrays have a basically common origin, namely minimization of interfacial energies. Consequently, they are all subject to the low-energy dislocation structures (LEDS) hypothesis. While the specific applications of the underlying general theory are well advanced in terms of epitaxy, phase, and grain boundaries, in connection with plastic deformation that very basis is widely overlooked, if not denied. The present article aims to (a) document the fact that, while being formed, dislocation structures due to plastic deformation are in thermodynamical equilibrium, (b) firmly establish the outlined connection between planar dislocation arrays of all types, and, thereby, (c) establish the kinship between epitaxy and plastic deformation of crystalline materials.

  9. Ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for CS2: determination of molecular vibrational energies.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ekadashi; Carreón-Macedo, José-Luis; Cuervo, Javier E; Schröder, Markus; Brown, Alex

    2013-08-15

    The ground state potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for CS2 have been determined at the CASPT2/C:cc-pVTZ,S:aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z level of theory. The potential energy surface has been fit to a sum-of-products form using the neural network method with exponential neurons. A generic interface between neural network potential energy surface fitting and the Heidelberg MCTDH software package is demonstrated. The potential energy surface has also been fit using the potfit procedure in MCTDH. For fits to the low-energy regions of the potential, the neural network method requires fewer parameters than potfit to achieve high accuracy; global fits are comparable between the two methods. Using these potential energy surfaces, the vibrational energies have been computed for the four most abundant CS2 isotopomers. These results are compared to experimental and previous theoretical data. The current potential energy surfaces are shown to accurately reproduce the low-lying vibrational energies within a few wavenumbers. Hence, the potential energy and dipole moments surfaces will be useful for future study on the control of quantum dynamics in CS2.

  10. Possible explanation of the atmospheric kinetic and potential energy spectra.

    PubMed

    Vallgren, Andreas; Deusebio, Enrico; Lindborg, Erik

    2011-12-23

    We hypothesize that the observed wave number spectra of kinetic and potential energy in the atmosphere can be explained by assuming that there are two related cascade processes emanating from the same large-scale energy source, a downscale cascade of potential enstrophy, giving rise to the k(-3) spectrum at synoptic scales and a downscale energy cascade giving rise to the k(-5/3) spectrum at mesoscales. The amount of energy which is going into the downscale energy cascade is determined by the rate of system rotation, with negligible energy going downscale in the limit of very fast rotation. We present a set of simulations of a system with strong rotation and stratification, supporting these hypotheses and showing good agreement with observations.

  11. Potential energy landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.

    2006-02-15

    We describe the potential energy landscapes of elemental S{sub 8}, Se{sub 8}, and Te{sub 8} clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se{sub 8}. We also map the potential energy landscapes of heterogeneous Se{sub n}(S,Te){sub 8-n} clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.

  12. Energy potential of municipal solid waste is limited

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Energy recovery from municipal solid waste has the potential for making only a limited contribution to the nation`s overall energy production. Although the current contribution of waste-derived energy production is less than one-half of 1 percent of the nation`s total energy Supply, DOE has set a goal for energy from waste at 2 percent of the total supply by 2010. The industry`s estimates show a smaller role for waste as an energy source in the future. The energy potential from waste is limited not only by the volume and energy content of the waste itself, but also by the factors affecting the use of waste disposal options, including public opposition and the availability of financing. Energy production from waste combustors and from landfill gases generates pollutants, although these are reduced through current regulations that require the use of emissions control technology and define operational criteria for the facilities. Although DOE estimates that one-third of the energy available from waste is available in the form of energy savings through the recycling of materials, the Department`s research in this area is ongoing.

  13. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    SciTech Connect

    Regnier, Cindy

    2012-08-01

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  14. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  15. Waste to Energy Potential - A High Concentration Anaerobic Bioreactor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-23

    output • Uses the organic portion of solid waste (such as food waste , paper products, and agricultural waste ) to fuel an anaerobic digestion ...Sustainability Symposium & Exhibition Anaerobic Digestion • What does it do? • Offers sustainability by addressing renewable energy, waste ... Waste to Energy Potential – A High Concentration Anaerobic Bioreactor Presenter: Scott Murphy & Rebecca Robbennolt ARCADIS/Malcolm Pirnie Date

  16. Gravitational potential as a source of earthquake energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrows, L.; Langer, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Some degree of tectonic stress within the earth originates from gravity acting upon density structures. The work performed by this "gravitational tectonics stress" must have formerly existed as gravitational potential energy contained in the stress-causing density structure. According to the elastic rebound theory (Reid, 1910), the energy of earthquakes comes from an elastic strain field built up by fairly continuous elastic deformation in the period between events. For earthquakes resulting from gravitational tectonic stress, the elastic rebound theory requires the transfer of energy from the gravitational potential of the density structures into an elastic strain field prior to the event. An alternate theory involves partial gravitational collapse of the stress-causing density structures. The earthquake energy comes directly from a net decrease in gravitational potential energy. The gravitational potential energy released at the time of the earthquake is split between the energy released by the earthquake, including work done in the fault zone and an increase in stored elastic strain energy. The stress associated with this elastic strain field should oppose further fault slip. ?? 1981.

  17. Minimally interacting holographic dark energy model in Bianchi type-III universe in Brans-Dicke theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umadevi, S.; Ramesh, G.

    2015-10-01

    A spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III universe filled with two minimally interacting fields is investigated: matter and holographic dark energy components in the framework of the Brans-Dicke (Phys. Rev. 124:925, 1961) theory of gravitation. To obtain determinate solutions of the field equations we have used (i) scalar expansion proportional to the shear scalar and (ii) special law of variation for Hubble's parameter proposed by Berman (Nuovo Comento B 74:182, 1983). Some physical and kinematical properties of the model are also discussed.

  18. Free energy calculations: an efficient adaptive biasing potential method.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Bradley M; Legoll, Frédéric; Lelièvre, Tony; Stoltz, Gabriel; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul

    2010-05-06

    We develop an efficient sampling and free energy calculation technique within the adaptive biasing potential (ABP) framework. By mollifying the density of states we obtain an approximate free energy and an adaptive bias potential that is computed directly from the population along the coordinates of the free energy. Because of the mollifier, the bias potential is "nonlocal", and its gradient admits a simple analytic expression. A single observation of the reaction coordinate can thus be used to update the approximate free energy at every point within a neighborhood of the observation. This greatly reduces the equilibration time of the adaptive bias potential. This approximation introduces two parameters: strength of mollification and the zero of energy of the bias potential. While we observe that the approximate free energy is a very good estimate of the actual free energy for a large range of mollification strength, we demonstrate that the errors associated with the mollification may be removed via deconvolution. The zero of energy of the bias potential, which is easy to choose, influences the speed of convergence but not the limiting accuracy. This method is simple to apply to free energy or mean force computation in multiple dimensions and does not involve second derivatives of the reaction coordinates, matrix manipulations nor on-the-fly adaptation of parameters. For the alanine dipeptide test case, the new method is found to gain as much as a factor of 10 in efficiency as compared to two basic implementations of the adaptive biasing force methods, and it is shown to be as efficient as well-tempered metadynamics with the postprocess deconvolution giving a clear advantage to the mollified density of states method.

  19. Separable representation of energy-dependent optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlophe, L.; Elster, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Background: One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g., (d ,p ) reactions, should be used. Those (d ,p ) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose: Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy dependent. Potential matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that fulfill reciprocity exactly. Methods: Momentum space Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations are solved with standard techniques to obtain the form factors for the separable representation. Results: Starting from a separable, energy-independent representation of global optical potentials based on a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler (EST) scheme, a further generalization is needed to take into account the energy dependence. Applications to n +48Ca ,n +208Pb , and p +208Pb are investigated for energies from 0 to 50 MeV with special emphasis on fulfilling reciprocity. Conclusions: We find that the energy-dependent separable representation of complex, energy-dependent phenomenological optical potentials fulfills reciprocity exactly. In addition, taking into account the explicit energy dependence slightly improves the description of the S matrix elements.

  20. Scenarios of energy demand and efficiency potential for Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect

    Tzvetanov, P.; Ruicheva, M.; Denisiev, M.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents aggregated results on macroeconomic and final energy demand scenarios developed within the Bulgarian Country Study on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Mitigation, supported by US Country Studies Program. The studies in this area cover 5 main stages: (1) {open_quotes}Baseline{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Energy Efficiency{close_quotes} socioeconomic and energy policy philosophy; (2) Modeling of macroeconomic and sectoral development till 2020; (3) Expert assessments on the technological options for energy efficiency increase and GHG mitigation in the Production, Transport and Households and Services Sectors; (4) Bottom-up modeling of final energy demand; and (5) Sectoral and overall energy efficiency potential and policy. Within the Bulgarian Country Study, the presented results have served as a basis for the final integration stage {open_quotes}Assessment of the Mitigation Policy and Measures in the Energy System of Bulgaria{close_quotes}.

  1. Solar energy in California industry - Applications, characteristics and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey to determine the potential applicability of solar thermal energy to industrial processes in California are presented. It is found that if the heat for all industrial processes at temperatures below 212 F were supplied by solar energy, total state energy consumption could be reduced by 100 trillion Btus (2%), while the use of solar energy in processes between 212 and 350 F could displace 500 trillion Btus. The issues and problems with which solar energy must contend are illustrated by a description of fluid milk processing operations. Solar energy application is found to be technically feasible for processes with thermal energy requirements below 212 F, with design, and degree of technical, economic and management feasibility being site specific. It is recommended that the state provide support for federal and industrial research, development and demonstration programs in order to stimulate acceptance of solar process heat application by industry.

  2. Solar energy in California industry - Applications, characteristics and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey to determine the potential applicability of solar thermal energy to industrial processes in California are presented. It is found that if the heat for all industrial processes at temperatures below 212 F were supplied by solar energy, total state energy consumption could be reduced by 100 trillion Btus (2%), while the use of solar energy in processes between 212 and 350 F could displace 500 trillion Btus. The issues and problems with which solar energy must contend are illustrated by a description of fluid milk processing operations. Solar energy application is found to be technically feasible for processes with thermal energy requirements below 212 F, with design, and degree of technical, economic and management feasibility being site specific. It is recommended that the state provide support for federal and industrial research, development and demonstration programs in order to stimulate acceptance of solar process heat application by industry.

  3. APPARATUS FOR MINIMIZING ENERGY LOSSES FROM MAGNETICALLY CONFINED VOLUMES OF HOT PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1961-10-01

    An apparatus is described for controlling electron temperature in plasma confined in a Pyrotron magnetic containment field. Basically the device comprises means for directing low temperature electrons to the plasma in controlled quantities to maintain a predetermined optimum equilibrium electron temperature whereat minimum losses of plasma ions due to ambipolar effects and energy damping of the ions due to dynamical friction with the electrons occur. (AEC)

  4. Viterbi algorithm as an alternative to energy minimization for stereo image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Martin J.; Kubik, Kurt; McKinnon, David; Andrews, Robert

    2001-04-01

    The correspondence problem in image matching is an ill-defined one. It is difficult to match two stereo images to produce an accurate depth map without applying some sort of constraints to the matching process. Matching is made especially difficult near discontinuities and occlusions in the images. A popular method of applying constraints to image matching is energy minimisation. However, this technique is computationally expensive and is not guaranteed to finish at an optimal solution. This paper describes the use of a least cost path finding algorithm called the Viterbi algorithm as an alternative to energy minimisation. The Viterbi algorithm operates on individual horizontal scanlines and uses a cost function to find the optimum "path" of nodes through disparity space from one side of the image to the other. Constraints can be applied by restricting the possible movements of the path or by modifying the cost function. The Viterbi algorithm, unlike energy minimisation, is not an iterative process and is guaranteed to find the path that has the least possible cost. The implementation of the Viterbi algorithm described in this paper uses constraints that were developed to make the image matching robust in the presence of discontinuities and occlusions. Results are shown for both synthetic and real-world stereo pairs.

  5. Metallic bionanocatalysts: potential applications as green catalysts and energy materials.

    PubMed

    Macaskie, Lynne E; Mikheenko, Iryna P; Omajai, Jacob B; Stephen, Alan J; Wood, Joseph

    2017-08-22

    Microbially generated or supported nanocatalysts have potential applications in green chemistry and environmental application. However, precious (and base) metals biorefined from wastes may be useful for making cheap, low-grade catalysts for clean energy production. The concept of bionanomaterials for energy applications is reviewed with respect to potential fuel cell applications, bio-catalytic upgrading of oils and manufacturing 'drop-in fuel' precursors. Cheap, effective biomaterials would facilitate progress towards dual development goals of sustainable consumption and production patterns and help to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Potential of energy farms in the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, L.C.; Park, W.R.; Trehan, R.K.

    1980-12-01

    This report assesses the potential of biomass energy farms to supply feedstock for electrical energy needs in the Dominican Republic. That part of the dry forest area not used for agriculture production (1.3 million acres) is found to have a production potential of 200 MW to 1400 MW, depending upon the level of management and choice of species. A biomass energy farm design and conversion facility is described and the economics of operating a wood fired facility of 50 MW, 20 MW, 5 MW, and 2 MW is compared to 50 MW and 20 MW.

  7. A triangular element based on generalized potential energy concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Stiffness equations are formulated for a doubly-curved triangular thin shell finite element. The strain energy component of the potential energy is first expressed in terms of displacements and displacement gradients with the aid of consistent deep shell strain-displacement equations. The element in-plane and normal displacement fields are approximated by complete cubic polynomials. These functions do not satisfy the interelement displacement admissibility conditions. Satisfaction is forced by the imposition of constraint conditions on the interelement boundaries; the constraints represent the modification of the potential energy. Some numerical results for a pinched cylinder, a cylindrical sphere, and a pinched sphere are examined.

  8. A triangular element based on generalized potential energy concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Stiffness equations are formulated for a doubly-curved triangular thin shell finite element. The strain energy component of the potential energy is first expressed in terms of displacements and displacement gradients with the aid of consistent deep shell strain-displacement equations. The element in-plane and normal displacement fields are approximated by complete cubic polynomials. These functions do not satisfy the interelement displacement admissibility conditions. Satisfaction is forced by the imposition of constraint conditions on the interelement boundaries; the constraints represent the modification of the potential energy. Some numerical results for a pinched cylinder, a cylindrical sphere, and a pinched sphere are examined.

  9. Investigating energy-saving potentials in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Sheng

    2014-02-20

    Collecting webpage messages can serve as a sensor for investigating the energy-saving potential of buildings. Focusing on stores, a cloud sensor system is developed to collect data and determine their energy-saving potential. The owner of a store under investigation must register online, report the store address, area, and the customer ID number on the electric meter. The cloud sensor system automatically surveys the energy usage records by connecting to the power company website and calculating the energy use index (EUI) of the store. Other data includes the chain store check, company capital, location price, and the influence of weather conditions on the store; even the exposure frequency of store under investigation may impact the energy usage collected online. After collecting data from numerous stores, a multi-dimensional data array is constructed to determine energy-saving potential by identifying stores with similarity conditions. Similarity conditions refer to analyzed results that indicate that two stores have similar capital, business scale, weather conditions, and exposure frequency on web. Calculating the EUI difference or pure technical efficiency of stores, the energy-saving potential is determined. In this study, a real case study is performed. An 8-dimensional (8D) data array is constructed by surveying web data related to 67 stores. Then, this study investigated the savings potential of the 33 stores, using a site visit, and employed the cloud sensor system to determine the saving potential. The case study results show good agreement between the data obtained by the site visit and the cloud investigation, with errors within 4.17%. Among 33 the samples, eight stores have low saving potentials of less than 5%. The developed sensor on the cloud successfully identifies them as having low saving potential and avoids wasting money on the site visit.

  10. Investigating Energy-Saving Potentials in the Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Da-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Collecting webpage messages can serve as a sensor for investigating the energy-saving potential of buildings. Focusing on stores, a cloud sensor system is developed to collect data and determine their energy-saving potential. The owner of a store under investigation must register online, report the store address, area, and the customer ID number on the electric meter. The cloud sensor system automatically surveys the energy usage records by connecting to the power company website and calculating the energy use index (EUI) of the store. Other data includes the chain store check, company capital, location price, and the influence of weather conditions on the store; even the exposure frequency of store under investigation may impact the energy usage collected online. After collecting data from numerous stores, a multi-dimensional data array is constructed to determine energy-saving potential by identifying stores with similarity conditions. Similarity conditions refer to analyzed results that indicate that two stores have similar capital, business scale, weather conditions, and exposure frequency on web. Calculating the EUI difference or pure technical efficiency of stores, the energy-saving potential is determined. In this study, a real case study is performed. An 8-dimensional (8D) data array is constructed by surveying web data related to 67 stores. Then, this study investigated the savings potential of the 33 stores, using a site visit, and employed the cloud sensor system to determine the saving potential. The case study results show good agreement between the data obtained by the site visit and the cloud investigation, with errors within 4.17%. Among 33 the samples, eight stores have low saving potentials of less than 5%. The developed sensor on the cloud successfully identifies them as having low saving potential and avoids wasting money on the site visit. PMID:24561405

  11. Assessment of the potential of halophytes as energy crops for the electric utility industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goodin, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    This technical report assesses and estimates the potential of selected halophytes as future renewable energy resources, especially by US electric utilities, and familiarizes nonspecialists with research and development problems that must be resolved before these energy sources can become dependable supplies of energy. A literature search related to both indigenous and exotic species of halophytes has been done and appropriate terrestrial species have been selected. Selection criteria include: total biomass potential, genetic constraints, establishment and cultivation requirements, regions of suitability, secondary credits, and a number of other factors. Based on these selection criteria, for the arid western states with high levels of salinity in water and/or soils, there is little potential for energy feedstocks derived from grasses and herbaceous forbs. Likewise, coastal marshes, estuaries, and mangrove swamps, although excellent biomass producers, are too limited by region and have too many ecological and environmental problems for consideration. The deep-rooted, perennial woody shrubs indigenous to many saline regions of the west provide the best potential. The number of species in this group is limited, and Atriplex canescens, Sarcobatus vermiculatus, and Chrysothamnus nauseosus are the three species with the greatest biological potential. These shrubs would receive minimal energy inputs in cultivation, would not compete with agricultural land, and would restore productivity to severely disturbed sites. One might logically expect to achieve biomass feedstock yields of three to five tons/acre/yr on a long-term sustainable basis. The possibility also exists that exotic species might be introduced. 67 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  12. Regional prediction of long-term landfill gas to energy potential.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamid R; Reinhart, Debra R

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) potential as a source of renewable energy is difficult due to the challenges involved in modeling landfill gas (LFG) generation. In this paper a methodology is presented to estimate LFGTE potential on a regional scale over a 25-year timeframe with consideration of modeling uncertainties. The methodology was demonstrated for the US state of Florida, as a case study, and showed that Florida could increase the annual LFGTE production by more than threefold by 2035 through installation of LFGTE facilities at all landfills. The estimated electricity production potential from Florida LFG is equivalent to removing some 70 million vehicles from highways or replacing over 800 million barrels of oil consumption during the 2010-2035 timeframe. Diverting food waste could significantly reduce fugitive LFG emissions, while having minimal effect on the LFGTE potential; whereas, achieving high diversion goals through increased recycling will result in reduced uncollected LFG and significant loss of energy production potential which may be offset by energy savings from material recovery and reuse. Estimates showed that the power density for Florida LFGTE production could reach as high as 10 Wm(-2) with optimized landfill operation and energy production practices. The environmental benefits from increased lifetime LFG collection efficiencies magnify the value of LFGTE projects.

  13. Study of the potential of wave energy in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wan Ching; Chan, Keng Wai; Ooi, Heivin

    2017-07-01

    Renewable energy is generally defined as energy harnessed from resources which are naturally replenished. It is an alternative to the current conventional energy sources such as natural gas, oil and coal, which are nonrenewable. Besides being nonrenewable, the harnessing of these resources generally produce by-products which could be potentially harmful to the environment. On the contrary, the generation from renewable energy does not pose environmental degradation. Some examples of renewable energy sources are sunlight, wind, tides, waves and geothermal heat. Wave energy is considered as one of the most promising marine renewable resources and is becoming commercially viable quicker than other renewable technologies at an astonishing growth rate. This paper illustrates the working principle of wave energy converter (WEC) and the availability of wave energy in Malaysia oceans. A good understanding of the behaviour of ocean waves is important for designing an efficient WEC as the characteristics of the waves in shallow and deep water are different. Consequently, wave energy converters are categorized into three categories on shore, near shore and offshore. Therefore, the objectives of this study is ought to be carried out by focusing on the formation of waves and wave characteristics in shallow as well as in deep water. The potential sites for implementation of wave energy harvesting technology in Malaysia and the wave energy available in the respective area were analysed. The potential of wave energy in Malaysia were tabulated and presented with theoretical data. The interaction between motion of waves and heave buoys for optimum phase condition by using the mass and diameter as the variables were investigated.

  14. Minimization of the Vibration Energy of Thin-Plate Structures and the Application to the Reduction of Gearbox Vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inoue, Katsumi; Krantz, Timothy L.

    1995-01-01

    While the vibration analysis of gear systems has been developed, a systematic approach to the reduction of gearbox vibration has been lacking. The technique of reducing vibration by shifting natural frequencies is proposed here for gearboxes and other thin-plate structures using the theories of finite elements, modal analysis, and optimization. A triangular shell element with 18 degrees of freedom is developed for structural and dynamic analysis. To optimize, the overall vibration energy is adopted as the objective function to be minimized at the excitation frequency by varying the design variable (element thickness) under the constraint of overall constant weight. Modal analysis is used to determine the sensitivity of the vibration energy as a function of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The optimum design is found by the gradient projection method and a unidimensional search procedure. By applying the computer code to design problems for beams and plates, it was verified that the proposed method is effective in reducing vibration energy. The computer code is also applied to redesign the NASA Lewis gear noise rig test gearbox housing. As one example, only the shape of the top plate is varied, and the vibration energy levels of all the surfaces are reduced, yielding an overall reduction of 1/5 compared to the initial design. As a second example, the shapes of the top and two side plates are varied to yield an overall reduction in vibration energy of 1/30.

  15. Kappa distribution in the presence of a potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2015-02-01

    The present paper develops the theory and formulations of the kappa distributions that describe particle systems characterized by a nonzero potential energy. As yet, kappa distributions were used for the statistical description of the velocity or kinetic energy of particles but not of the potential energy. With the results provided here, it is straightforward to use the developed kappa distributions to describe any particle population of space plasmas subject to a nonnegligible potential energy. Starting from the kappa distribution of the Hamiltonian function, we develop the distributions that describe either the complete phase space or the marginal spaces of positions and velocities. The study shows, among others: (a) The kappa distributions of velocities that describe space plasmas can be vastly different from the standard formulation of the kappa distribution, because of the presence of a potential energy; the correct formulation should be given by the marginal kappa distribution of velocities by integrating the distribution of the Hamiltonian over the potential energy. (b) The long-standing problem of the divergence of the Boltzmannian exponential distribution for bounded radial potentials is solved using kappa distributions of negative kappa index. (c) Anisotropic distributions of velocities can exist in the presence of a velocity-dependent potential. (d) A variety of applications, including derivations/verifications of the following: (i) the Jeans', the most frequent, and the maximum radii in spherical/linear gravitational potentials; (ii) the Virial theorem for power law potentials; (iii) the generalized barometric formula, (iv) the plasma density profiles in Saturnian magnetosphere, and (v) the average electron magnetic moment in Earth's magnetotail.

  16. New Methods for Exploring QM:MM Potential Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hratchian, Hrant P.

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, the applicability of quantum chemical methods for large system studies has been greatly enhanced by the development of hybrid QM:MM techniques. Despite these advancements, exploring the associated potential energy surfaces continues to present two key challenges. First, the QM energy and derivative evaluations may be too costly for simulations; and second, the system size for many QM:MM cases are too large to effectively store or use second-order information, an approach often used in QM studies to allow for larger integration steps and fewer QM evaluations of the potential energy surface. Our most recent work is focused on overcoming both computational bottlenecks. Using surface fitting models together with direct Hessian-vector and diagonalization algorithms, we are developing models that can accurately and efficiently explore QM:MM potential energy landscapes for very large systems. Our current development status and results from initial applications will be described.

  17. Energy life cycle assessment of rice straw bio-energy derived from potential gasification technologies.

    PubMed

    Shie, Je-Lueng; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chen, Ci-Syuan; Shaw, Dai-Gee; Chen, Yi-Hung; Kuan, Wen-Hui; Ma, Hsiao-Kan

    2011-06-01

    To be a viable alternative, a biofuel should provide a net energy gain and be capable of being produced in large quantities without reducing food supplies. Amounts of agricultural waste are produced and require treatment, with rice straw contributing the greatest source of such potential bio-fuel in Taiwan. Through life-cycle accounting, several energy indicators and four potential gasification technologies (PGT) were evaluated. The input energy steps for the energy life cycle assessment (ELCA) include collection, generator, torrefaction, crushing, briquetting, transportation, energy production, condensation, air pollution control and distribution of biofuels to the point of end use. Every PGT has a positive energy benefit. The input of energy required for the transportation and pre-treatment are major steps in the ELCA. On-site briquetting of refused-derived fuel (RDF) provides an alternative means of reducing transportation energy requirements. Bio-energy sources, such as waste rice straw, provide an ideal material for the bio-fuel plant.

  18. An improved way of minimizing free energy in the variational method with the square well reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, N. E.; Filippov, V. V.; Yuryev, A. A.; Vatolin, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    For the variational method of the thermodynamic perturbation theory with the square well reference system to which the semianalytical way of solving the mean spherical approximation is applied, a new way of minimizing the free energy is proposed. The approach is applied to liquid sodium and potassium, the effective pair interaction in which is described within the framework of the pseudopotential theory. For each of the metals under study, the global minimum of the free energy was found as a function of two independent variables (the hard core diameter and the mean atomic volume). In this minimum, a better agreement between the calculation results and the experimental data is obtained than when using the hard sphere reference system.

  19. Topology optimization of a suction muffler in a fluid machine to maximize energy efficiency and minimize broadband noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungjae; Wang, Semyung; Cho, Sungman

    2016-03-01

    A suction muffler used in a fluid machine has three functions: noise reduction; minimizing pressure drop and improving energy efficiency using acoustic effects. However, no method of suction muffler design considers all three of these functions concurrently. Therefore, in this study, we attempt to provide an integrated design method of a suction muffler in a fluid machine that considers all three functions. The topology optimization method for acoustic and fluid systems was applied to an integrated design. However, the interaction between fluid and acoustic was not considered. In addition, the acoustic input impedance of a suction muffler was used for a specific acoustical resonance frequency to improve the energy efficiency of a fluid machine. Finally, the sequential optimization method based on physical investigations was proposed to satisfy several design criteria. The proposed method was applied to the suction muffler in refrigerator's compressor.

  20. Potential for energy conservation in the glass industry

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Bruno, G.A.

    1986-06-01

    While the glass industry (flat glass, container glass, pressed and blown glass, and insulation fiber glass) has reduced its specific energy use (Btu/ton) by almost 30% since 1972, significant potential for further reduction still remains. State-of-the-art technologies are available which could lead to incremental improvements in glass industry energy productivity; however, these technologies must compete for capital with projects undertaken for other reasons (e.g., capacity expansion, equipment rebuild, labor cost reduction, product quality improvement, or compliance with environmental, health or safety regulations). Narrowing profit margins in the large tonnage segments of the glass industry in recent years and the fact that energy costs represent less than 25% of the value added in glass manufacture have combined to impede the widespread adoption of many state-of-the-art conservation technologies. Savings in energy costs alone have not provided the incentive to justify the capital expenditures required to realize the energy savings. Beyond implementation of state-of-the-art technologies, significant potential energy savings could accrue from advanced technologies which represent a radical departure from current glass making technology. Long-term research and development (R and D) programs, which address the technical and economic barriers associated with advanced, energy-conserving technologies, offer the opportunity to realize this energy-saving potential.

  1. Calculation of molecular free energies in classical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhi, Asaf; Singh, Bipin

    2016-02-01

    Free energies of molecules can be calculated by quantum chemistry computations or by normal mode classical calculations. However, the first can be computationally impractical for large molecules and the second is based on the assumption of harmonic dynamics. We present a novel, accurate and complete calculation of molecular free energies in standard classical potentials. In this method we transform the molecule by relaxing potential terms which depend on the coordinates of a group of atoms in that molecule and calculate the free energy difference associated with the transformation. Then, since the transformed molecule can be treated as non-interacting systems, the free energy associated with these atoms is analytically or numerically calculated. This two-step calculation can be applied to calculate free energies of molecules or free energy difference between (possibly large) molecules in a general environment. We demonstrate the method in free energy calculations for methanethiol and butane molecules in vacuum and solvent. We suggest the potential application of free energy calculation of chemical reactions in classical molecular simulations.

  2. Fusion at deep subbarrier energies: potential inversion revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, K.; Rowley, N.

    2009-03-04

    For a single potential barrier, the barrier penetrability can be inverted based on the WKB approximation to yield the barrier thickness. We apply this method to heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies well below the Coulomb barrier and directly determine the inter-nucleus potential between the colliding nuclei. To this end, we assume that fusion cross sections at deep subbarrier energies are governed by the lowest barrier in the barrier distribution. The inverted inter-nucleus potentials for the {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb reactions show that they are much thicker than phenomenological potentials. We discuss a consequence of such thick potential by fitting the inverted potentials with the Bass function.

  3. Polar cap potential saturation: An energy conservation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. William

    2007-07-01

    In the long run, energy entering the magnetosphere from the solar wind must be balanced by energy dissipation in or escape from the system. It then follows that the Joule heating rate in the ionosphere statistically should be bounded from the upside by the solar wind energy input function (e.g., the Perrault-Akasofu parameter). We show that this energy constraint, coupled with some observationally motivated assumptions about the behavior of the auroral oval under escalating solar wind conditions, leads to the prediction of polar cap potential saturation.

  4. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

    2010-01-01

    State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

  5. Communication: Separable potential energy surfaces from multiplicative artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Werner Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-07-14

    We present a potential energy surface fitting scheme based on multiplicative artificial neural networks. It has the sum of products form required for efficient computation of the dynamics of multidimensional quantum systems with the multi configuration time dependent Hartree method. Moreover, it results in analytic potential energy matrix elements when combined with quantum dynamics methods using Gaussian basis functions, eliminating the need for a local harmonic approximation. Scaling behavior with respect to the complexity of the potential as well as the requested accuracy is discussed.

  6. Minimizing energy utilization for growing strawberries during long-duration space habitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Santini, Judith B.; Mitchell, Cary A.

    2010-09-01

    Strawberry is a candidate crop for space that is rich in protective antioxidants and could also have psychological benefits as a component of crew diets during long-duration space habitation. Energy for electric lighting is a major input to a controlled-environment crop-production system for space habitation. Day-neutral strawberry cultivars were evaluated at several different photoperiods to determine minimum lighting requirements without limiting yield or negatively impacting fruit quality. The cultivars 'Tribute', 'Seascape', and 'Fern' were grown at 14, 17, or 20 h of light per day, and fruit yield was evaluated over a 31-week production period. This amounted to a difference of 2418 kWh m -2 in energy usage between the longest and shortest photoperiods. All cultivars produced similar total fresh weight of fruit regardless of photoperiod. Volunteer tasters rated organoleptic characteristics including sweetness, tartness, texture, and overall appeal as measures of fruit quality. Generally, organoleptic attributes were not affected by photoperiod, but these attributes were somewhat dependent upon cultivar and harvest time. Cultivars under different photoperiods varied in their production of fruit over time. 'Seascape' was the most consistent producer, typically with the largest, most palatable fruit. 'Seascape' plants subsequently were grown at 10-, 12-, or 14-h photoperiods over a treatment period of 33 weeks. Photoperiod again had no significant effect on total fruit weight, although there were periodic flushes of productivity. Fruit under all photoperiods had acceptable approval ratings. A large-fruited, day-neutral strawberry cultivar such as 'Seascape' remains productive under shortened photoperiods, allowing reductions in energy and crew labor while maintaining flexibility for mixed-cropping scenarios in space.

  7. A biomolecular implementation of logically reversible computation with minimal energy dissipation.

    PubMed

    Klein, J P; Leete, T H; Rubin, H

    1999-10-01

    Energy dissipation associated with logic operations imposes a fundamental physical limit on computation and is generated by the entropic cost of information erasure, which is a consequence of irreversible logic elements. We show how to encode information in DNA and use DNA amplification to implement a logically reversible gate that comprises a complete set of operators capable of universal computation. We also propose a method using this design to connect, or 'wire', these gates together in a biochemical fashion to create a logic network, allowing complex parallel computations to be executed. The architecture of the system permits highly parallel operations and has properties that resemble well known genetic regulatory systems.

  8. Minimizing the energy spread within a single bunch by shaping its charge distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Wang, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    It has been known for some time that partial compensation of the longitudinal wake field effects can be obtained for any bunch by placing it ahead of the accelerating crest (in space), thereby letting the positive rising sinusoidal field offset the negative beam loading field. The work presented in this paper shows that it is possible to obtain complete compensation, i.e., to reduce the energy spread essentially to zero by properly shaping the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and by placing it at the correct position on the wave. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. MO-FG-204-01: Improved Noise Suppression for Dual-Energy CT Through Entropy Minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Petrongolo, M; Zhu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In dual energy CT (DECT), noise amplification during signal decomposition significantly limits the utility of basis material images. Since clinically relevant objects contain a limited number of materials, we propose to suppress noise for DECT based on image entropy minimization. An adaptive weighting scheme is employed during noise suppression to improve decomposition accuracy with limited effect on spatial resolution and image texture preservation. Methods: From decomposed images, we first generate a 2D plot of scattered data points, using basis material densities as coordinates. Data points representing the same material generate a highly asymmetric cluster. We orient an axis by minimizing the entropy in a 1D histogram of these points projected onto the axis. To suppress noise, we replace pixel values of decomposed images with center-of-mass values in the direction perpendicular to the optimal axis. To limit errors due to cluster overlap, we weight each data point’s contribution based on its high and low energy CT values and location within the image. The proposed method’s performance is assessed on physical phantom studies. Electron density is used as the quality metric for decomposition accuracy. Our results are compared to those without noise suppression and with a recently developed iterative method. Results: The proposed method reduces noise standard deviations of the decomposed images by at least one order of magnitude. On the Catphan phantom, this method greatly preserves the spatial resolution and texture of the CT images and limits induced error in measured electron density to below 1.2%. In the head phantom study, the proposed method performs the best in retaining fine, intricate structures. Conclusion: The entropy minimization based algorithm with adaptive weighting substantially reduces DECT noise while preserving image spatial resolution and texture. Future investigations will include extensive investigations on material decomposition

  10. Ordered arrays of a defect-modified ferroelectric polymer for non-volatile memory with minimized energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang-Zhong; Chen, Xin; Guo, Xu; Cui, Yu-Shuang; Shen, Qun-Dong; Ge, Hai-Xiong

    2014-10-01

    Ferroelectric polymers are among the most promising materials for flexible electronic devices. Highly ordered arrays of the defect-modified ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) (poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene)) are fabricated by nanoimprint lithography for nonvolatile memory application. The defective CFE units reduce the coercive field to one-fifth of that of the un-modified P(VDF-TrFE), which can help minimize the energy consumption and extend the lifespan of the device. The nanoimprint process leads to preferable orientation of polymer chains and delicately controlled distribution of the defects, and thus a bi-stable polarization that makes the memory nonvolatile, as revealed by the pulsed polarization experiment.Ferroelectric polymers are among the most promising materials for flexible electronic devices. Highly ordered arrays of the defect-modified ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) (poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene)) are fabricated by nanoimprint lithography for nonvolatile memory application. The defective CFE units reduce the coercive field to one-fifth of that of the un-modified P(VDF-TrFE), which can help minimize the energy consumption and extend the lifespan of the device. The nanoimprint process leads to preferable orientation of polymer chains and delicately controlled distribution of the defects, and thus a bi-stable polarization that makes the memory nonvolatile, as revealed by the pulsed polarization experiment. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03866e

  11. Minimization of the energy loss of nuclear power plants in case of partial in-core monitoring system failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, A. M.; Ramazanov, R. N.; Lunegova, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we consider the optimization problem minimize of the energy loss of nuclear power plants in case of partial in-core monitoring system failure. It is possible to continuation of reactor operation at reduced power or total replacement of the channel neutron measurements, requiring shutdown of the reactor and the stock of detectors. This article examines the reconstruction of the energy release in the core of a nuclear reactor on the basis of the indications of height sensors. The missing measurement information can be reconstructed by mathematical methods, and replacement of the failed sensors can be avoided. It is suggested that a set of ‘natural’ functions determined by means of statistical estimates obtained from archival data be constructed. The procedure proposed makes it possible to reconstruct the field even with a significant loss of measurement information. Improving the accuracy of the restoration of the neutron flux density in partial loss of measurement information to minimize the stock of necessary components and the associated losses.

  12. Use of Binary Partition Tree and energy minimization for object-based classification of urban land cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengmeng; Bijker, Wietske; Stein, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    Two main challenges are faced when classifying urban land cover from very high resolution satellite images: obtaining an optimal image segmentation and distinguishing buildings from other man-made objects. For optimal segmentation, this work proposes a hierarchical representation of an image by means of a Binary Partition Tree (BPT) and an unsupervised evaluation of image segmentations by energy minimization. For building extraction, we apply fuzzy sets to create a fuzzy landscape of shadows which in turn involves a two-step procedure. The first step is a preliminarily image classification at a fine segmentation level to generate vegetation and shadow information. The second step models the directional relationship between building and shadow objects to extract building information at the optimal segmentation level. We conducted the experiments on two datasets of Pléiades images from Wuhan City, China. To demonstrate its performance, the proposed classification is compared at the optimal segmentation level with Maximum Likelihood Classification and Support Vector Machine classification. The results show that the proposed classification produced the highest overall accuracies and kappa coefficients, and the smallest over-classification and under-classification geometric errors. We conclude first that integrating BPT with energy minimization offers an effective means for image segmentation. Second, we conclude that the directional relationship between building and shadow objects represented by a fuzzy landscape is important for building extraction.

  13. Optimization of object region and boundary extraction by energy minimization for activity recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalooshi, Fatema A.; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2013-05-01

    Automatic video segmentation for human activity recognition has played an important role in several computer vision applications. Active contour model (ACM) has been used extensively for unsupervised adaptive segmentation and automatic object region and boundary extraction in video sequences. This paper presents optimizing Active Contour Model using recurrent architecture for automatic object region and boundary extraction in human activity video sequences. Taking advantage of the collective computational ability and energy convergence capability of the recurrent architecture, energy function of Active Contour Model is optimized with lower computational time. The system starts with initializing recurrent architecture state based on the initial boundary points and ends up with final contour which represent actual boundary points of human body region. The initial contour of the Active Contour Model is computed using background subtraction based on Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) such that background model is built dynamically and regularly updated to overcome different challenges including illumination changes, camera oscillations, and changes in background geometry. The recurrent nature is useful for dealing with optimization problems due to its dynamic nature, thus, ensuring convergence of the system. The proposed boundary detection and region extraction can be used for real time processing. This method results in an effective segmentation that is less sensitive to noise and complex environments. Experiments on different databases of human activity show that our method is effective and can be used for real-time video segmentation.

  14. Energy minimization of separation processes using conventional/membrane hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L. )

    1990-09-28

    The purpose of this study was to identify the general principles governing the choice of hybrid separation systems over straight membrane or straight nonmembrane systems and to do so by examining practical applications (process design and economics). Our focus was to examine the energy consumption characteristics and overall cost factors of the membrane and nonmembrane technologies that cause hybrid systems to be preferred over nonhybrid systems. We evaluated four cases studies, chosen on the basis of likelihood of commercial viability of a hybrid system and magnitude of energy savings: (1) propane/propylene separation; (2) removal of nitrogen from natural gas; (3) concentration of Kraft black liquor; and (4)solvent deasphalting. For propane/propylene splitting, the membrane proved to be superior to distillation in both thermodynamic efficiency and processing cost (PC) when the product was 95% pure propylene. However, to produce higher purity products, the membrane alone could not perform the separation, and a membrane/distillation hybrid was required. In these cases, there is an optimum amount of separation to be accomplished by the membrane (expressed as the fraction of the total availability change of the membrane/distillation hybrid that takes place in the membrane and defined as {phi}{sub m}, the thermodynamic extent of separation). Qualitative and quantitative guidelines are discussed with regard to choosing a hybrid system. 54 refs., 66 figs., 36 tabs.

  15. Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Cowlin, S. C.; Heimiller, D.; Bilello, D.; Renne, D.

    2008-01-01

    This analysis explores the technical potential of photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP) to address energy poverty in Africa through a geographic information system (GIS) screening of solar resource data developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  16. Final Technical Report - Advanced Optical Sensors to Minimize Energy Consumption in Polymer Extrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan J. Foulk

    2012-07-24

    Project Objective: The objectives of this study are to develop an accurate and stable on-line sensor system to monitor color and composition on-line in polymer melts, to develop a scheme for using the output to control extruders to eliminate the energy, material and operational costs of off-specification product, and to combine or eliminate some extrusion processes. Background: Polymer extrusion processes are difficult to control because the quality achieved in the final product is complexly affected by the properties of the extruder screw, speed of extrusion, temperature, polymer composition, strength and dispersion properties of additives, and feeder system properties. Extruder systems are engineered to be highly reproducible so that when the correct settings to produce a particular product are found, that product can be reliably produced time after time. However market conditions often require changes in the final product, different products or grades may be processed in the same equipment, and feed materials vary from lot to lot. All of these changes require empirical adjustment of extruder settings to produce a product meeting specifications. Optical sensor systems that can continuously monitor the composition and color of the extruded polymer could detect process upsets, drift, blending oscillations, and changes in dispersion of additives. Development of an effective control algorithm using the output of the monitor would enable rapid corrections for changes in materials and operating conditions, thereby eliminating most of the scrap and recycle of current processing. This information could be used to identify extruder systems issues, diagnose problem sources, and suggest corrective actions in real-time to help keep extruder system settings within the optimum control region. Using these advanced optical sensor systems would give extruder operators real-time feedback from their process. They could reduce the amount of off-spec product produced and

  17. RKRV potential energy curves and dissociation energies of NH and PH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, R. R.; Viswanath, R.

    1989-05-01

    The turning points of the potential energy curves for the ground states of NH and PH molecules were calculated using the approach of Rydberg-Klein-Rees modified by Vanderslice et al. (1960), together with the energy values obtained from the Lippincott potential function. These values were compared with those obtained by Jarmain (1960). The values of the dissociation energies of the NH and PH were estimated to be about 3.45 and 3.16, respectively.

  18. Minimal energy ensemble Monte Carlo algorithm for the partition function of fermions coupled to classical fields.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Przemysław R; Czekaj, Łukasz; Nogala, Mariusz; Ścibior, Adam; Chhajlany, Ravindra W

    2016-06-01

    Models of noninteracting fermions coupled to auxiliary classical fields are relevant to the understanding of a wide variety of problems in many-body physics, e.g., the description of manganites, diluted magnetic semiconductors, or strongly interacting electrons on lattices. We present a flat-histogram Monte Carlo algorithm that simulates a statistical ensemble that allows one to directly acquire the partition function at all temperatures for such systems. The defining feature of the algorithm is that it utilizes the complete thermodynamic information from the full energy spectrum of noninteracting fermions available during sampling of the configuration space of the classical fields. We benchmark the method for the classical Ising and Potts models in two dimensions, as well as the Falicov-Kimball model describing itinerant electrons interacting with heavy ions.

  19. Minimal energy ensemble Monte Carlo algorithm for the partition function of fermions coupled to classical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Przemysław R.; Czekaj, Łukasz; Nogala, Mariusz; Ścibior, Adam; Chhajlany, Ravindra W.

    2016-06-01

    Models of noninteracting fermions coupled to auxiliary classical fields are relevant to the understanding of a wide variety of problems in many-body physics, e.g., the description of manganites, diluted magnetic semiconductors, or strongly interacting electrons on lattices. We present a flat-histogram Monte Carlo algorithm that simulates a statistical ensemble that allows one to directly acquire the partition function at all temperatures for such systems. The defining feature of the algorithm is that it utilizes the complete thermodynamic information from the full energy spectrum of noninteracting fermions available during sampling of the configuration space of the classical fields. We benchmark the method for the classical Ising and Potts models in two dimensions, as well as the Falicov-Kimball model describing itinerant electrons interacting with heavy ions.

  20. The potential for harvesting energy from the movement of trees.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Scott; Knight, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, wireless devices have decreased in size and power requirements. These devices generally use batteries as a power source but can employ additional means of power, such as solar, thermal or wind energy. However, sensor networks are often deployed in conditions of minimal lighting and thermal gradient such as densely wooded environments, where even normal wind energy harvesting is limited. In these cases a possible source of energy is from the motion of the trees themselves. We investigated the amount of energy and power available from the motion of a tree in a sheltered position, during Beaufort 4 winds. We measured the work performed by the tree to lift a mass, we measured horizontal acceleration of free movement, and we determined the angular deflection of the movement of the tree trunk, to determine the energy and power available to various types of harvesting devices. We found that the amount of power available from the tree, as demonstrated by lifting a mass, compares favourably with the power required to run a wireless sensor node.

  1. The Potential for Harvesting Energy from the Movement of Trees

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, Scott; Knight, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, wireless devices have decreased in size and power requirements. These devices generally use batteries as a power source but can employ additional means of power, such as solar, thermal or wind energy. However, sensor networks are often deployed in conditions of minimal lighting and thermal gradient such as densely wooded environments, where even normal wind energy harvesting is limited. In these cases a possible source of energy is from the motion of the trees themselves. We investigated the amount of energy and power available from the motion of a tree in a sheltered position, during Beaufort 4 winds. We measured the work performed by the tree to lift a mass, we measured horizontal acceleration of free movement, and we determined the angular deflection of the movement of the tree trunk, to determine the energy and power available to various types of harvesting devices. We found that the amount of power available from the tree, as demonstrated by lifting a mass, compares favourably with the power required to run a wireless sensor node. PMID:22163695

  2. Warm body temperature facilitates energy efficient cortical action potentials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P; McCormick, David A

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na(+) channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na(+), and outward K(+), currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na(+) entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37-42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code.

  3. Warm Body Temperature Facilitates Energy Efficient Cortical Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuguo; Hill, Adam P.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The energy efficiency of neural signal transmission is important not only as a limiting factor in brain architecture, but it also influences the interpretation of functional brain imaging signals. Action potential generation in mammalian, versus invertebrate, axons is remarkably energy efficient. Here we demonstrate that this increase in energy efficiency is due largely to a warmer body temperature. Increases in temperature result in an exponential increase in energy efficiency for single action potentials by increasing the rate of Na+ channel inactivation, resulting in a marked reduction in overlap of the inward Na+, and outward K+, currents and a shortening of action potential duration. This increase in single spike efficiency is, however, counterbalanced by a temperature-dependent decrease in the amplitude and duration of the spike afterhyperpolarization, resulting in a nonlinear increase in the spike firing rate, particularly at temperatures above approximately 35°C. Interestingly, the total energy cost, as measured by the multiplication of total Na+ entry per spike and average firing rate in response to a constant input, reaches a global minimum between 37–42°C. Our results indicate that increases in temperature result in an unexpected increase in energy efficiency, especially near normal body temperature, thus allowing the brain to utilize an energy efficient neural code. PMID:22511855

  4. Potential for natural evaporation as a reliable renewable energy resource.

    PubMed

    Cavusoglu, Ahmet-Hamdi; Chen, Xi; Gentine, Pierre; Sahin, Ozgur

    2017-09-26

    About 50% of the solar energy absorbed at the Earth's surface drives evaporation, fueling the water cycle that affects various renewable energy resources, such as wind and hydropower. Recent advances demonstrate our nascent ability to convert evaporation energy into work, yet there is little understanding about the potential of this resource. Here we study the energy available from natural evaporation to predict the potential of this ubiquitous resource. We find that natural evaporation from open water surfaces could provide power densities comparable to current wind and solar technologies while cutting evaporative water losses by nearly half. We estimate up to 325 GW of power is potentially available in the United States. Strikingly, water's large heat capacity is sufficient to control power output by storing excess energy when demand is low, thus reducing intermittency and improving reliability. Our findings motivate the improvement of materials and devices that convert energy from evaporation.The evaporation of water represents an alternative source of renewable energy. Building on previous models of evaporation, Cavusoglu et al. show that the power available from this natural resource is comparable to wind and solar power, yet it does not suffer as much from varying weather conditions.

  5. Wind energy potential analysis in Al-Fattaih-Darnah

    SciTech Connect

    Tjahjana, Dominicus Danardono Dwi Prija Salem, Abdelkarim Ali Himawanto, Dwi Aries

    2016-03-29

    In this paper the wind energy potential in Al-Fattaih-Darnah, Libya, had been studied. Wind energy is very attractive because it can provide a clean and renewable energy. Due mostly to the uncertainty caused by the chaotic characteristics of wind near the earth’s surface, wind energy characteristic need to be investigated carefully in order to get consistent power generation. This investigation was based on one year wind data measured in 2003. As a result of the analysis, wind speed profile and wind energy potential have been developed. The wind energy potential of the location is looked very promising to generate electricity. The annual wind speed of the site is 8.21 m/s and the wind speed carrying maximum energy is 7.97 m/s. The annual power density of the site is classified into class 3. The Polaris P50-500 wind turbine can produce 768.39 M Wh/year and has capacity factor of 17.54%.

  6. Wind energy potential analysis in Al-Fattaih-Darnah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahjana, Dominicus Danardono Dwi Prija; Salem, Abdelkarim Ali; Himawanto, Dwi Aries

    2016-03-01

    In this paper the wind energy potential in Al-Fattaih-Darnah, Libya, had been studied. Wind energy is very attractive because it can provide a clean and renewable energy. Due mostly to the uncertainty caused by the chaotic characteristics of wind near the earth's surface, wind energy characteristic need to be investigated carefully in order to get consistent power generation. This investigation was based on one year wind data measured in 2003. As a result of the analysis, wind speed profile and wind energy potential have been developed. The wind energy potential of the location is looked very promising to generate electricity. The annual wind speed of the site is 8.21 m/s and the wind speed carrying maximum energy is 7.97 m/s. The annual power density of the site is classified into class 3. The Polaris P50-500 wind turbine can produce 768.39 M Wh/year and has capacity factor of 17.54%.

  7. Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Its Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.; Smith, S.

    2011-12-01

    Wind power, a clean and renewable energy resource, can play an important role in providing energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Yet there are substantial and important uncertainties about the potential costs and supplies of wind that influence our ability to understand today the strategic role of wind power in the future. A detailed global assessment of onshore wind energy potential and its uncertainties will help decision-makers develop policies and strategies to meet energy and environmental goals. In this study, we assess the technical and economic potential of onshore wind energy and its spatial distribution using reanalysis wind speed data from the National Centers for Environmental Modeling (Figure 1). The study focuses in particular in exploring a range of uncertainties that impact the economic potential of wind power by constructing quantitative scenarios for eight key physical and economic parameters. We present quantification of the impact of uncertainties in these parameters, focusing on areas relevant to geoscience research (Figure 2). The amount of economic potential of wind energy depends strongly on several uncertain parameters such as wind speed, turbine cost, and land-suitability. The distribution of wind speed at fine temporal and spatial scales is a key parameter, but is not well quantified in many regions of the world. Reanalysis datasets with more accurate wind fields are a first step, along with computationally tractable downscaling methodologies. Another key assumption is land-suitability, which is the fraction of a particular land-cover type assumed to be available for wind farm development. There is currently little scientific basis for land-suitability assumptions. While some of the data needed for progress in these areas is readily available, such as high-resolution land-cover and terrain data, further advances are likely to require new methodologies and inter-disciplinary collaboration. We outline a number of areas where further

  8. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface for H-H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate potential energy surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged potential determined from the calculated energies agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- 3 micro E(h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive potential energy surfaces (25-70 kcal/mol above the H-H2 asymptote) at small interatomic separations; the Boothroyd, Keogh, Martin, and Peterson (BKMP) potential energy surface is found to agree with results of the present calculations within the expected uncertainty (+/- 1 kcal/mol) of the fit. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 potential energy surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(0)) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.

  9. The metabolic energy cost of action potential velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Sangrey, Thomas; Levy, William

    2006-03-01

    Voltage changes in neurons and other active cells are caused by the passage of ions across the cell membrane. These ionic currents depend on the transmembrane ion concentration gradients, which in unmyelinated axons are maintained during rest and restored after electrical activity by an ATPase sodium-potassium exchanger in the membrane. The amount of ATP consumed by this exchanger can be taken as the metabolic energy cost of any electrical activity in the axon. We use this measure, along with biophysical models of voltage-gated sodium and potassium ion channels, to quantify the energy cost of action potentials propagating in squid giant axons. We find that the energy of an action potential can be naturally divided into three separate components associated with different aspects of the action potential. We calculate these energy components as functions of the ion channel densities and axon diameters and find that the component associated with the rising phase and velocity of the action potential achieves a minimum near the biological values of these parameters. This result, which is robust with respect to other parameters such as temperature, suggests that evolution has optimized the axon for the energy of the action potential wavefront.

  10. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface for H-H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate potential energy surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged potential determined from the calculated energies agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- 3 micro E(h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive potential energy surfaces (25-70 kcal/mol above the H-H2 asymptote) at small interatomic separations; the Boothroyd, Keogh, Martin, and Peterson (BKMP) potential energy surface is found to agree with results of the present calculations within the expected uncertainty (+/- 1 kcal/mol) of the fit. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 potential energy surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(0)) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.

  11. Special phase space regions with minimal energy and momentum dependencies of the ARPES matrix element in Bi2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Matti; Markiewicz, Robert; Bansil, Arun

    2003-03-01

    Strong momentum (k_allel) and photon energy (hν) dependencies of the ARPES matrix element[1,2] will significantly complicate the applicability of recently proposed ARPES-based tests of the fundamental mechanism of cuprate superconductivity[3]. In this connection, we have carried out extensive first-principles simulations of the angle-resolved photointensity in Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8+δ (Bi2212) within the one-step photoemission model. A careful search of simulated photointensities in the (hν,k_allel) phase space indicates that it is generally difficult to minimize the effect of the ARPES matrix element with polarized light, but that for unpolarized radiation, it is possible to identify special energies around which the ARPES matrix element is more or less constant. ARPES spectra for emission from the Fermi energy at such selected photon energies are presented and discussed. 1. A. Bansil, and M. Lindroos, Phys. Rev. Letters 83, 5154 (1999). 2. M. Lindroos, S. Sahrakorpi, and A. Bansil, Phys. Rev. B 65, 054514 (2002). 3: I. Vekhter, and C.M. Varma, cond-mat/0210508.

  12. Computer modelling of the 4-n-alkyl-4'-cyanobiphenyls adsorbed on graphite: energy minimizations and molecular dynamics of periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaver, D. J.; Callaway, M. J.; Forester, T.; Smith, W.; Tildesley, D. J.

    The structures adopted within adsorbed monolayers of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8-CB) molecules have been investigated using energy minimizations and molecular dynamics simulations of periodic systems. Using a smooth substrate potential, the most favourable energy of adsorption is found for a system with an eight-molecule unit-cell structure. This result is entirely consistent with scanning tunnelling microscopy studies of such systems, and differs from previous results using simulations of short strips which suggested a four-molecule unit cell. Molecular dynamics simulations of this 8-CB monolayer show that while the system exhibits smectic ordering at 150 K, the detailed eight-molecule unit-cell structure is lost. Simulations performed on a bilayer system indicate that the presence of a second molecular layer stabilizes the unit cell structure, except in the regions where there is partial penetration by the second layer molecules into the first layer. A third set of molecular dynamics simulations where the monolayer is confined between the substrate and a planar probe, shows that the eight-molecule unit cell is stable when out-of-plane motion is restricted by the probe. The effect of the molecular chain length on the intramolecular structure is also investigated: energy minimizations performed using the longer molecule 10-CB indicate that the eight-molecule unit cell is not the most stable configuration for this molecule. In this system, six- and ten-molecule unit cells both give lower energy arrangements than the eight-molecule cell adopted by 8-CB.

  13. Dynamic Electron Correlation Effects on the Ground State Potential Energy Surface of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Huntress, Mark; Schapiro, Igor; Lindh, Roland; Granovsky, Alexander A; Angeli, Celestino; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-11-13

    The ground state potential energy surface of the retinal chromophore of visual pigments (e.g., bovine rhodopsin) features a low-lying conical intersection surrounded by regions with variable charge-transfer and diradical electronic structures. This implies that dynamic electron correlation may have a large effect on the shape of the force fields driving its reactivity. To investigate this effect, we focus on mapping the potential energy for three paths located along the ground state CASSCF potential energy surface of the penta-2,4-dieniminium cation taken as a minimal model of the retinal chromophore. The first path spans the bond length alternation coordinate and intercepts a conical intersection point. The other two are minimum energy paths along two distinct but kinetically competitive thermal isomerization coordinates. We show that the effect of introducing the missing dynamic electron correlation variationally (with MRCISD) and perturbatively (with the CASPT2, NEVPT2, and XMCQDPT2 methods) leads, invariably, to a stabilization of the regions with charge transfer character and to a significant reshaping of the reference CASSCF potential energy surface and suggesting a change in the dominating isomerization mechanism. The possible impact of such a correction on the photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore is discussed.

  14. Renewable energy technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: potentials, barriers and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable energy penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great potential for renewable energies from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of Energy initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable energy to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable energy resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable energy use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable energy policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable energy development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable energy technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable energy technology sector in Kazakhstan.

  15. An integrated assessment of the potential of agricultural and forestry residues for energy production in China

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Ji; Zhang, Aiping; Lam, Shu Kee; Zhang, Xuesong; Thomson, Allison M.; Lin, Erda; Jiang, Kejun; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, Page G.; Yu, Sha; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhou, Sheng

    2016-01-05

    Biomass has been widely recognized as an important energy source with high potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while minimizing environmental pollution. In this study, we employ the Global Change Assessment Model to estimate the potential of agricultural and forestry residue biomass for energy production in China. Potential availability of residue biomass as an energy source was analyzed for the 21st century under different climate policy scenarios. Currently, the amount of total annual residue biomass, averaged over 2003-2007, is around 15519PJ in China, consisting of 10818PJ from agriculture residues (70%) and 4701PJ forestry residues (30%). We estimate that 12693PJ of the total biomass is available for energy production, with 66% derived from agricultural residue and 34% from forestry residue. Most of the available residue is from south central China (3347PJ), east China (2862PJ) and south-west China (2229PJ), which combined exceeds 66% of the total national biomass. Under the reference scenario without carbon tax, the potential availability of residue biomass for energy production is projected to be 3380PJ by 2050 and 4108PJ by 2095, respectively. When carbon tax is imposed, biomass availability increases substantially. For the CCS 450ppm scenario, availability of biomass increases to 9002PJ (2050) and 11524PJ (2095), respectively. For the 450ppm scenario without CCS, 9183 (2050) and 11150PJ (2095) residue biomass, respectively, is projected to be available. Moreover, the implementation of CCS will have a little impact on the supply of residue biomass after 2035. Our results suggest that residue biomass has the potential to be an important component in China's sustainable energy production portfolio. As a low carbon emission energy source, climate change policies that involve carbon tariff and CCS technology promote the use of residue biomass for energy production in a low carbon-constrained world.

  16. Polarizable interaction potential for water from coupled cluster calculations. I. Analysis of dimer potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukowski, Robert; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; van der Avoird, Ad

    2008-03-01

    A six-dimensional interaction potential for the water dimer has been fitted to ab initio interaction energies computed at 2510 dimer configurations. These energies were obtained by combining the supermolecular second-order energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit from up to quadruple-zeta quality basis sets with the contribution from the coupled-cluster method including single, double, and noniterative triple excitations computed in a triple-zeta quality basis set. All basis sets were augmented by diffuse functions and supplemented by midbond functions. The energies have been fitted using an analytic form with the induction component represented by a polarizable term, making the potential directly transferable to clusters and the bulk phase. Geometries and energies of stationary points on the potential surface agree well with the results of high-level ab initio geometry optimizations.

  17. A Gibbs Energy Minimization Approach for Modeling of Chemical Reactions in a Basic Oxygen Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruskopf, Ari; Visuri, Ville-Valtteri

    2017-08-01

    In modern steelmaking, the decarburization of hot metal is converted into steel primarily in converter processes, such as the basic oxygen furnace. The objective of this work was to develop a new mathematical model for top blown steel converter, which accounts for the complex reaction equilibria in the impact zone, also known as the hot spot, as well as the associated mass and heat transport. An in-house computer code of the model has been developed in Matlab. The main assumption of the model is that all reactions take place in a specified reaction zone. The mass transfer between the reaction volume, bulk slag, and metal determine the reaction rates for the species. The thermodynamic equilibrium is calculated using the partitioning of Gibbs energy (PGE) method. The activity model for the liquid metal is the unified interaction parameter model and for the liquid slag the modified quasichemical model (MQM). The MQM was validated by calculating iso-activity lines for the liquid slag components. The PGE method together with the MQM was validated by calculating liquidus lines for solid components. The results were compared with measurements from literature. The full chemical reaction model was validated by comparing the metal and slag compositions to measurements from industrial scale converter. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model was found to compare favorably with the models proposed in the literature. The real-time capability of the proposed model was confirmed in test calculations.

  18. Expanding gas clouds of ellipsoidal shape - the solutions of minimal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffet, B.

    1999-07-01

    Ovsiannikov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 111 (1965)] and Dyson [J. Math. Mech. 18 (1968) 91] have proposed a model of an ellipsoidal gas cloud adiabatically expanding into a vacuum, and have shown that the equations of fluid motion are thereby reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations, of order 18 in the most general case. Gaffet [J. Fluid Mech. 325 (1996) 113] has shown that their integration reduces to quadratures (if the gas is monatomic and there is no rotating motion of the ellipsoid’s principal axes), as a result of the existence of two integrals of the motion, m and I2. In the present work we establish the minimum value m0( I2) of m, compatible with the existence of physically meaningful solutions. We succeed in performing the separation of variables, and obtain the unexpected result that, when the energy integral m takes its minimum value m0( I2), the general solution of the equations of motion is described by elliptic functions.

  19. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  20. Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Mark Z.; Archer, Cristina L.

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical energy, which returns to the atmosphere as heat to regenerate some potential and kinetic energy. As the number of wind turbines increases over large geographic regions, power extraction first increases linearly, but then converges to a saturation potential not identified previously from physical principles or turbine properties. These saturation potentials are >250 terawatts (TW) at 100 m globally, approximately 80 TW at 100 m over land plus coastal ocean outside Antarctica, and approximately 380 TW at 10 km in the jet streams. Thus, there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining half (approximately 5.75 TW) or several times the world’s all-purpose power from wind in a 2030 clean-energy economy. PMID:23019353

  1. Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark Z; Archer, Cristina L

    2012-09-25

    Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical energy, which returns to the atmosphere as heat to regenerate some potential and kinetic energy. As the number of wind turbines increases over large geographic regions, power extraction first increases linearly, but then converges to a saturation potential not identified previously from physical principles or turbine properties. These saturation potentials are >250 terawatts (TW) at 100 m globally, approximately 80 TW at 100 m over land plus coastal ocean outside Antarctica, and approximately 380 TW at 10 km in the jet streams. Thus, there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining half (approximately 5.75 TW) or several times the world's all-purpose power from wind in a 2030 clean-energy economy.

  2. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  3. Low-energy K- optical potentials: deep or shallow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplý, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2001-12-01

    The K- optical potential in the nuclear medium is evaluated self consistently from a free-space K-Nt matrix constructed within a coupled-channel chiral approach. The fit of model parameters gives a good description of the low-energy data plus the available K- atomic data. The resulting optical potential is relatively `shallow' in contradiction to the potentials obtained from phenomenological analysis. The calculated (Kstop-,π) hypernuclear production rates are very sensitive to the details of kaonic bound state wave function. The (Kstop-,π) reaction could thus serve as a suitable tool to distinguish between shallow and deep K- optical potentials.

  4. Two dark matter components in dark matter extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and the high energy positron spectrum in PAMELA/HEAT data

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Ji-Haeng; Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok

    2009-03-15

    We present a dark matter extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model to give the recent trend of the high energy positron spectrum of the PAMELA/HEAT experiments. If the trend is caused indeed by dark matter, the minimal supersymmetric standard model needs to be extended. Here, we minimally extend the minimal supersymmetric standard model with one more dark matter component N together with a heavy lepton E and introduce the coupling e{sub R}E{sub R}{sup c}N{sub R}. This coupling naturally appears in the flipped SU(5) grand unification models. We also present the needed parameter ranges of these additional particles.

  5. Reference pressure changes and available potential energy in isobaric coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A formulation of the available potential energy (APE) equation in isobaric coordinates which alleviates the need for computing temporal derivatives of reference pressure and describes how work done relates to changes in the APE of a limited region is presented. The APE budget equation possesses terms analogous to those in Johnson's (1970) isentropic version. It is shown that APE changes result from either mechanical work inside the domain or an exchange of energy via boundary processes with the surrounding environment.

  6. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described.

  7. Reference pressure changes and available potential energy in isobaric coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A formulation of the available potential energy (APE) equation in isobaric coordinates which alleviates the need for computing temporal derivatives of reference pressure and describes how work done relates to changes in the APE of a limited region is presented. The APE budget equation possesses terms analogous to those in Johnson's (1970) isentropic version. It is shown that APE changes result from either mechanical work inside the domain or an exchange of energy via boundary processes with the surrounding environment.

  8. Minimal configuration of body surface potential mapping for discrimination of left versus right dominant frequencies during atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, M; Climent, A M; Liberos, A; Fernández-Aviles, F; Atienza, F; Guillem, M S; Berenfeld, O

    2017-08-01

    Ablation of drivers maintaining atrial fibrillation (AF) has been demonstrated as an effective therapy. Drivers in the form of rapidly activated atrial regions can be noninvasively localized to either left or right atria (LA, RA) with body surface potential mapping (BSPM) systems. This study quantifies the accuracy of dominant frequency (DF) measurements from reduced-leads BSPM systems and assesses the minimal configuration required for ablation guidance. Nine uniformly distributed lead sets of eight to 66 electrodes were evaluated. BSPM signals were registered simultaneously with intracardiac electrocardiograms (EGMs) in 16 AF patients. DF activity was analyzed on the surface potentials for the nine leads configurations, and the noninvasive measures were compared with the EGM recordings. Surface DF measurements presented similar values than panoramic invasive EGM recordings, showing the highest DF regions in corresponding locations. The noninvasive DFs measures had a high correlation with the invasive discrete recordings; they presented a deviation of <0.5 Hz for the highest DF and a correlation coefficient of >0.8 for leads configurations with 12 or more electrodes. Reduced-leads BSPM systems enable noninvasive discrimination between LA versus RA DFs with similar results as higher-resolution 66-leads system. Our findings demonstrate the possible incorporation of simplified BSPM systems into clinical planning procedures for AF ablation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A Parsimonious Model of the Rabbit Action Potential Elucidates the Minimal Physiological Requirements for Alternans and Spiral Wave Breakup

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the underlying mechanisms of fatal cardiac arrhythmias requires a tight integration of electrophysiological experiments, models, and theory. Existing models of transmembrane action potential (AP) are complex (resulting in over parameterization) and varied (leading to dissimilar predictions). Thus, simpler models are needed to elucidate the “minimal physiological requirements” to reproduce significant observable phenomena using as few parameters as possible. Moreover, models have been derived from experimental studies from a variety of species under a range of environmental conditions (for example, all existing rabbit AP models incorporate a formulation of the rapid sodium current, INa, based on 30 year old data from chick embryo cell aggregates). Here we develop a simple “parsimonious” rabbit AP model that is mathematically identifiable (i.e., not over parameterized) by combining a novel Hodgkin-Huxley formulation of INa with a phenomenological model of repolarization similar to the voltage dependent, time-independent rectifying outward potassium current (IK). The model was calibrated using the following experimental data sets measured from the same species (rabbit) under physiological conditions: dynamic current-voltage (I-V) relationships during the AP upstroke; rapid recovery of AP excitability during the relative refractory period; and steady-state INa inactivation via voltage clamp. Simulations reproduced several important “emergent” phenomena including cellular alternans at rates > 250 bpm as observed in rabbit myocytes, reentrant spiral waves as observed on the surface of the rabbit heart, and spiral wave breakup. Model variants were studied which elucidated the minimal requirements for alternans and spiral wave break up, namely the kinetics of INa inactivation and the non-linear rectification of IK.The simplicity of the model, and the fact that its parameters have physiological meaning, make it ideal for engendering generalizable

  10. Minimal Pairs: Minimal Importance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Adam

    1995-01-01

    This article argues that minimal pairs do not merit as much attention as they receive in pronunciation instruction. There are other aspects of pronunciation that are of greater importance, and there are other ways of teaching vowel and consonant pronunciation. (13 references) (VWL)

  11. Energy and water potential of the Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaygusuz, K.

    1999-12-01

    This article gives an overview of energy and water potential of the Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP) in Turkey. This integrated socioeconomic development project is one of the largest of its kind in the world. The GAP region is rich in water and soil resources. The Euphrates and Tigris Rivers represent over 28% of the nation's water supply by rivers, and the economically irrigatable areas in the region make up 20% of those for the entire country. On the other hand, the GAP region is the richest region of the country in terms of its hydroelectric potential as well as its oil and asphalt reserves. The GAP region has a 22% share of the country's total hydroelectric potential, with plans for 22 dams and 19 hydropower plants. Once completed, 27 billion kWh of electricity will be generated. In addition to this hydropower and oil potential, the GAP region is also the richest region of Turkey as far as solar energy production is concerned. In meeting the energy requirements of the developing regions worldwide and in Turkey, solar energy is being taken into account as an important renewable source of energy.

  12. Kappa distribution in the presence of a potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.

    2016-12-01

    Kappa distributions were used for the statistical description of the velocity or kinetic energy of particles but not of the potential energy. However, understanding the statistical origin of kappa distributions was the cornerstone of important theoretical developments and applications, one of which is the generalization to phase-space kappa distribution of a Hamiltonian with non-zero potentials. We present the theory behind the phase-space kappa distributions, and three characteristic applications in geophysical and space collisionless plasmas: (i) derivation of polytropic relation; (ii) barometric relation (i.e., pressure vs. altitude); and (iii) Plasma magnetization.

  13. Calculating vibrational spectra using modified Shepard interpolated potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Christian R; Manthe, Uwe

    2008-07-14

    A potential energy interpolation approach based on modified Shepard interpolation and specifically designed for calculation of vibrational states is presented. The importance of the choice of coordinates for the rate of convergence is demonstrated. Studying the vibrational states of the water molecule as a test case, a coordinate system comprised of inverse bond distances and trigonometric functions of the bond angle is found to be particularly efficient. Different sampling schemes used to locate the reference points in the modified Shepard interpolation are investigated. A final scheme is recommended, which allows the construction of potential energy surfaces to sub-wave-number accuracy.

  14. Energy savings potential in air conditioners and chiller systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Durmus; Alidrisi, Hisham

    2014-01-22

    In the current paper we quantified and evaluated the energy saving potential in air conditioners and chiller systems. Here, we also showed how to reduce the cost of air conditioners and chiller systems in existing facilities on the basis of payback periods. Among the measures investigated were: (1) installing higher efficiency air conditioners, (2) installing higher efficiency chillers, (3) duty cycling air conditioning units, and (4) utilizing existing economizers on air conditioning units. For each method, examples were provided from Arizona, USA. In these examples, the amount of saved energy, the financial evaluation of this energy, and the investment cost and pay back periods were calculated.

  15. Energy savings potential in air conditioners and chiller systems

    DOE PAGES

    Kaya, Durmus; Alidrisi, Hisham

    2014-01-22

    In the current paper we quantified and evaluated the energy saving potential in air conditioners and chiller systems. Here, we also showed how to reduce the cost of air conditioners and chiller systems in existing facilities on the basis of payback periods. Among the measures investigated were: (1) installing higher efficiency air conditioners, (2) installing higher efficiency chillers, (3) duty cycling air conditioning units, and (4) utilizing existing economizers on air conditioning units. For each method, examples were provided from Arizona, USA. In these examples, the amount of saved energy, the financial evaluation of this energy, and the investment costmore » and pay back periods were calculated.« less

  16. LHC Physics Potential vs. Energy: Considerations for the 2011 Run

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2011-02-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I quantify the advantage of increasing the beam energy from 3.5 TeV to 4 TeV. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u {bar d}, qq, and gq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes. This note extends the analysis presented in Ref. [1]. Full-size figures are available as pdf files at lutece.fnal.gov/PartonLum11/.

  17. Potential function and dissociation energy of alkali halide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Abhay P.; Pandey, Anjani K.; Pandey, Brijesh K.

    2016-05-01

    Dissociation energy of some alkali halides have been calculated by using different interaction potential function such as Born-Mayer, Varshani-Shukla and L5 potential model. The theoretical calculation is compared with experimental values. The Result shows that the values of dissociation energy as calculated by using different potential models have an equal amount of deviation with experimental values. The above said deviation with experimental values can be explained by consideration of rotational-vibrational coupling between the constituents of molecules in the limelight of molecular spectroscopy. Findings of present work suggest that the existing potential model need to be reviewed in view of the correction factors solely depending on the rotational, vibrational and electronic coupling between the constituents of molecules.

  18. Potential function and dissociation energy of alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Abhay P.; Pandey, Brijesh K.; Pandey, Anjani K.

    2016-05-06

    Dissociation energy of some alkali halides have been calculated by using different interaction potential function such as Born-Mayer, Varshani-Shukla and L{sub 5} potential model. The theoretical calculation is compared with experimental values. The Result shows that the values of dissociation energy as calculated by using different potential models have an equal amount of deviation with experimental values. The above said deviation with experimental values can be explained by consideration of rotational-vibrational coupling between the constituents of molecules in the limelight of molecular spectroscopy. Findings of present work suggest that the existing potential model need to be reviewed in view of the correction factors solely depending on the rotational, vibrational and electronic coupling between the constituents of molecules.

  19. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    There is a growing awareness of the serious problems associated with the provision of sufficient energy to meet human needs and to fuel economic growth world-wide. This has pointed to the need for energy and material efficiency, which would reduce air, water and thermal pollution, as well as waste production. Increasing energy and material efficiency also have the benefits of increased employment, improved balance of imports and exports, increased security of energy supply, and adopting environmentally advantageous energy supply. A large potential exists for energy savings through energy and material efficiency improvements. Technologies are not now, nor will they be, in the foreseeable future, the limiting factors with regard to continuing energy efficiency improvements. There are serious barriers to energy efficiency improvement, including unwillingness to invest, lack of available and accessible information, economic disincentives and organizational barriers. A wide range of policy instruments, as well as innovative approaches have been tried in some countries in order to achieve the desired energy efficiency approaches. These include: regulation and guidelines; economic instruments and incentives; voluntary agreements and actions, information, education and training; and research, development and demonstration. An area that requires particular attention is that of improved international co-operation to develop policy instruments and technologies to meet the needs of developing countries. Material efficiency has not received the attention that it deserves. Consequently, there is a dearth of data on the qualities and quantities for final consumption, thus, making it difficult to formulate policies. Available data, however, suggest that there is a large potential for improved use of many materials in industrialized countries.

  20. Vegetative versus Minimally Conscious States: A Study Using TMS-EEG, Sensory and Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzoni, Aldo; Pirulli, Cornelia; Veniero, Domenica; Feurra, Matteo; Cincotta, Massimo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Chiaramonti, Roberta; Lino, Mario; Rossi, Simone; Miniussi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses between vegetative and minimally conscious states (VS and MCS, respectively) are frequently incorrect. Hence, further research is necessary to improve the diagnostic accuracy at the bedside. The main neuropathological feature of VS is the diffuse damage of cortical and subcortical connections. Starting with this premise, we used electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to evaluate the cortical reactivity and effective connectivity during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in chronic VS or MCS patients. Moreover, the TMS-EEG data were compared with the results from standard somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and event-related potentials (ERPs). Thirteen patients with chronic consciousness disorders were examined at their bedsides. A group of healthy volunteers served as the control group. The amplitudes (reactivity) and scalp distributions (connectivity) of the cortical potentials evoked by TMS (TEPs) of the primary motor cortex were measured. Short-latency median nerve SEPs and auditory ERPs were also recorded. Reproducible TEPs were present in all control subjects in both the ipsilateral and the contralateral hemispheres relative to the site of the TMS. The amplitudes of the ipsilateral and contralateral TEPs were reduced in four of the five MCS patients, and the TEPs were bilaterally absent in one MCS patient. Among the VS patients, five did not manifest ipsilateral or contralateral TEPs, and three of the patients exhibited only ipsilateral TEPs with reduced amplitudes. The SEPs were altered in five VS and two MCS patients but did not correlate with the clinical diagnosis. The ERPs were impaired in all patients and did not correlate with the clinical diagnosis. These TEP results suggest that cortical reactivity and connectivity are severely impaired in all VS patients, whereas in most MCS patients, the TEPs are preserved but with abnormal features. Therefore, TEPs may add valuable information to the current clinical and

  1. Vegetative versus minimally conscious states: a study using TMS-EEG, sensory and event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Ragazzoni, Aldo; Pirulli, Cornelia; Veniero, Domenica; Feurra, Matteo; Cincotta, Massimo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Chiaramonti, Roberta; Lino, Mario; Rossi, Simone; Miniussi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses between vegetative and minimally conscious states (VS and MCS, respectively) are frequently incorrect. Hence, further research is necessary to improve the diagnostic accuracy at the bedside. The main neuropathological feature of VS is the diffuse damage of cortical and subcortical connections. Starting with this premise, we used electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to evaluate the cortical reactivity and effective connectivity during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in chronic VS or MCS patients. Moreover, the TMS-EEG data were compared with the results from standard somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and event-related potentials (ERPs). Thirteen patients with chronic consciousness disorders were examined at their bedsides. A group of healthy volunteers served as the control group. The amplitudes (reactivity) and scalp distributions (connectivity) of the cortical potentials evoked by TMS (TEPs) of the primary motor cortex were measured. Short-latency median nerve SEPs and auditory ERPs were also recorded. Reproducible TEPs were present in all control subjects in both the ipsilateral and the contralateral hemispheres relative to the site of the TMS. The amplitudes of the ipsilateral and contralateral TEPs were reduced in four of the five MCS patients, and the TEPs were bilaterally absent in one MCS patient. Among the VS patients, five did not manifest ipsilateral or contralateral TEPs, and three of the patients exhibited only ipsilateral TEPs with reduced amplitudes. The SEPs were altered in five VS and two MCS patients but did not correlate with the clinical diagnosis. The ERPs were impaired in all patients and did not correlate with the clinical diagnosis. These TEP results suggest that cortical reactivity and connectivity are severely impaired in all VS patients, whereas in most MCS patients, the TEPs are preserved but with abnormal features. Therefore, TEPs may add valuable information to the current clinical and

  2. Potential Coastal Pumped Hydroelectric Energy Storage Locations Identified using GIS-based Topographic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R.; Barnhart, C. J.; Benson, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale electrical energy storage could accommodate variable, weather dependent energy resources such as wind and solar. Pumped hydroelectric energy storage (PHS) and compressed energy storage area (CAES) have life cycle energy and financial costs that are an order of magnitude lower than conventional electrochemical storage technologies. However PHS and CAES storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Conventional PHS requires an upper and lower reservoir separated by at least 100 m of head, but no more than 10 km in horizontal distance. Conventional PHS also impacts fresh water supplies, riparian ecosystems, and hydrologic environments. A PHS facility that uses the ocean as the lower reservoir benefits from a smaller footprint, minimal freshwater impact, and the potential to be located near off shore wind resources and population centers. Although technologically nascent, today one coastal PHS facility exists. The storage potential for coastal PHS is unknown. Can coastal PHS play a significant role in augmenting future power grids with a high faction of renewable energy supply? In this study we employ GIS-based topographic analysis to quantify the coastal PHS potential of several geographic locations, including California, Chile and Peru. We developed automated techniques that seek local topographic minima in 90 m spatial resolution shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) digital elevation models (DEM) that satisfy the following criteria conducive to PHS: within 10 km from the sea; minimum elevation 150 m; maximum elevation 1000 m. Preliminary results suggest the global potential for coastal PHS could be very significant. For example, in northern Chile we have identified over 60 locations that satisfy the above criteria. Two of these locations could store over 10 million cubic meters of water or several GWh of energy. We plan to report a global database of candidate coastal PHS locations and to estimate their energy storage capacity.

  3. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, Michael A; McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2008-06-15

    This report estimates the global potential reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 for energy efficiency improvements associated with equipment (appliances, lighting, and HVAC) in buildings by means of energy efficiency standards and labels (EES&L). A consensus has emerged among the world's scientists and many corporate and political leaders regarding the need to address the threat of climate change through emissions mitigation and adaptation. A further consensus has emerged that a central component of these strategies must be focused around energy, which is the primary generator of greenhouse gas emissions. Two important questions result from this consensus: 'what kinds of policies encourage the appropriate transformation to energy efficiency' and 'how much impact can these policies have'? This report aims to contribute to the dialogue surrounding these issues by considering the potential impacts of a single policy type, applied on a global scale. The policy addressed in this report is Energy Efficient Standards and Labeling (EES&L) for energy-consuming equipment, which has now been implemented in over 60 countries. Mandatory energy performance standards are important because they contribute positively to a nation's economy and provide relative certainty about the outcome (both timing and magnitudes). Labels also contribute positively to a nation's economy and importantly increase the awareness of the energy-consuming public. Other policies not analyzed here (utility incentives, tax credits) are complimentary to standards and labels and also contribute in significant ways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We believe the analysis reported here to be the first systematic attempt to evaluate the potential of savings from EES&L for all countries and for such a large set of products. The goal of the analysis is to provide an assessment that is sufficiently well-quantified and accurate to allow comparison and integration with other strategies under

  4. ForceFit: a code to fit classical force fields to quantum mechanical potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Waldher, Benjamin; Kuta, Jadwiga; Chen, Samuel; Henson, Neil; Clark, Aurora E

    2010-09-01

    The ForceFit program package has been developed for fitting classical force field parameters based upon a force matching algorithm to quantum mechanical gradients of configurations that span the potential energy surface of the system. The program, which runs under UNIX and is written in C++, is an easy-to-use, nonproprietary platform that enables gradient fitting of a wide variety of functional force field forms to quantum mechanical information obtained from an array of common electronic structure codes. All aspects of the fitting process are run from a graphical user interface, from the parsing of quantum mechanical data, assembling of a potential energy surface database, setting the force field, and variables to be optimized, choosing a molecular mechanics code for comparison to the reference data, and finally, the initiation of a least squares minimization algorithm. Furthermore, the code is based on a modular templated code design that enables the facile addition of new functionality to the program.

  5. Improved Potential Energy Surface of Ozone Constructed Using the Fitting by Permutationally Invariant Polynomial Function

    DOE PAGES

    Ayouz, Mehdi; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    New global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state of ozone is constructed at the complete basis set level of the multireference configuration interaction theory. A method of fitting the data points by analytical permutationally invariant polynomial function is adopted. A small set of 500 points is preoptimized using the old surface of ozone. In this procedure the positions of points in the configuration space are chosen such that the RMS deviation of the fit is minimized. New ab initio calculations are carried out at these points and are used to build new surface. Additional points are addedmore » to the vicinity of the minimum energy path in order to improve accuracy of the fit, particularly in the region where the surface of ozone exhibits a shallow van der Waals well. New surface can be used to study formation of ozone at thermal energies and its spectroscopy near the dissociation threshold.« less

  6. Energy harvesting potential of tuned inertial mass electromagnetic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Takehiko; Araki, Yoshikazu; Ikago, Kohju

    2017-02-01

    The demand for developing renewable energy technologies has been growing in today's society. As one of promising renewable energy sources, large-scale energy harvesting from structural vibrations employing electromagnetic transducers has recently been proposed and considerable effort has been devoted to increase the power generation capability. In this paper, we introduce the mechanism of a tuned inertial mass electromagnetic transducer (TIMET), which can absorb vibratory energy more efficiently by tuning the parameters to adjust the system. Then we propose a new vibratory energy harvester with the TIMET and determine the parameter values for the device with a simple static admittance (SA) control law to maximize the energy harvested from a stationary stochastic disturbance. To investigate the energy harvesting potential of the TIMET further, the performance-guaranteed (PG) control and the LQG control proposed in the literature are applied as well. Then the numerical simulation studies are carried out and the effectiveness of the proposed energy harvester is examined by comparing the traditional electromagnetic transducers.

  7. Potential of Using Solar Energy for Drinking Water Treatment Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhary, S. S.; Batista, J.; Ahmad, S.

    2016-12-01

    Where water is essential to energy generation, energy usage is integral to life cycle processes of water extraction, treatment, distribution and disposal. Increasing population, climate change and greenhouse gas production challenges the water industry for energy conservation of the various water-related operations as well as limiting the associated carbon emissions. One of the ways to accomplish this is by incorporating renewable energy into the water sector. Treatment of drinking water, an important part of water life cycle processes, is vital for the health of any community. This study explores the feasibility of using solar energy for a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) with the long-term goal of energy independence and sustainability. A 10 MGD groundwater DWTP in southwestern US was selected, using the treatment processes of coagulation, filtration and chlorination. Energy consumption in units of kWh/day and kWh/MG for each unit process was separately determined using industry accepted design criteria. Associated carbon emissions were evaluated in units of CO2 eq/MG. Based on the energy consumption and the existing real estate holdings, the DWTP was sized for distributed solar. Results showed that overall the motors used to operate the pumps including the groundwater intake pumps were the largest consumers of energy. Enough land was available around DWTP to deploy distributed solar. Results also showed that solar photovoltaics could potentially be used to meet the energy demands of the selected DWTP, but warrant the use of a large storage capacity, and thus increased costs. Carbon emissions related to solar based design were negligible compared to the original case. For future, this study can be used to analyze unit processes of other DWTP based on energy consumption, as well as for incorporating sustainability into the DWTP design.

  8. Pseudospectral Gaussian quantum dynamics: Efficient sampling of potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heaps, Charles W; Mazziotti, David A

    2016-04-28

    Trajectory-based Gaussian basis sets have been tremendously successful in describing high-dimensional quantum molecular dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a pseudospectral Gaussian-based method that achieves accurate quantum dynamics using efficient, real-space sampling of the time-dependent basis set. As in other Gaussian basis methods, we begin with a basis set expansion using time-dependent Gaussian basis functions guided by classical mechanics. Unlike other Gaussian methods but characteristic of the pseudospectral and collocation methods, the basis set is tested with N Dirac delta functions, where N is the number of basis functions, rather than using the basis function as test functions. As a result, the integration for matrix elements is reduced to function evaluation. Pseudospectral Gaussian dynamics only requires O(N) potential energy calculations, in contrast to O(N(2)) evaluations in a variational calculation. The classical trajectories allow small basis sets to sample high-dimensional potentials. Applications are made to diatomic oscillations in a Morse potential and a generalized version of the Henon-Heiles potential in two, four, and six dimensions. Comparisons are drawn to full analytical evaluation of potential energy integrals (variational) and the bra-ket averaged Taylor (BAT) expansion, an O(N) approximation used in Gaussian-based dynamics. In all cases, the pseudospectral Gaussian method is competitive with full variational calculations that require a global, analytical, and integrable potential energy surface. Additionally, the BAT breaks down when quantum mechanical coherence is particularly strong (i.e., barrier reflection in the Morse oscillator). The ability to obtain variational accuracy using only the potential energy at discrete points makes the pseudospectral Gaussian method a promising avenue for on-the-fly dynamics, where electronic structure calculations become computationally significant.

  9. Potential Energy Surface Database of Group II Dimer

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 143 NIST Potential Energy Surface Database of Group II Dimer (Web, free access)   This database provides critical atomic and molecular data needed in order to evaluate the feasibility of using laser cooled and trapped Group II atomic species (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) for ultra-precise optical clocks or quantum information processing devices.

  10. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: Potential and Kinetic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on potential and kinetic energy is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each…

  11. Teaching Field Concept and Potential Energy at A-Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Argues for a greater emphasis on the reality of fields in electronics and gravitation instruction. Advocates that the potential energy in a system be regarded as stored in the field rather than in the material bodies of the system. Provides a rationale and examples for this position. (ML)

  12. Teaching Field Concept and Potential Energy at A-Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Argues for a greater emphasis on the reality of fields in electronics and gravitation instruction. Advocates that the potential energy in a system be regarded as stored in the field rather than in the material bodies of the system. Provides a rationale and examples for this position. (ML)

  13. Assessing the potential for biomass energy development in South Carolina

    Treesearch

    Roger C. Conner; Tim O. Adams; Tony G. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    An assessment of the potential for developing a sustainable biomass energy industry in South Carolina was conducted. Biomass as defined by Forest Inventory and Analysis is the aboveground dry weight of wood in the bole and limbs of live trees ≥1-inch diameter at breast height, and excludes tree foliage, seedlings, and understory...

  14. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: Potential and Kinetic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on potential and kinetic energy is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each…

  15. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of PF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifzadeh, Lida; Balasubramanian, K.

    1995-09-01

    Spectroscopic constants of low-lying bound electronic states and potential energy curves of 19 electronic states of PF arising from the valence dissociation limits are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods, which included up to 0.9 million configurations.

  16. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifzadeh, Lida; Balasubramanian, K.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 21 electronic states of AsF are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) and multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. The computed spectroscopic constants agree with the experimental values for the observed states.

  17. Review of Potential Characterization Techniques in Approaching Energy and Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    LePoire, David

    2014-03-20

    Societal prosperity is linked to sustainable energy and a healthy environment. But, tough global challenges include increased demand for fossil fuels, while approaching peak oil production and uncertainty in the environmental impacts of energy generation. Recently, energy use was identified as a major component of economic productivity, along with capital and labor. Furthermore, other environmental resources and impacts may be nearing environmental thresholds as indicated by nine planetary environmental boundaries, many of which are linked to energy production and use. Foresight techniques could be applied to guide future actions which include emphasis on (1) energy efficiency to bridge the transition to a renewable energy economy, (2) continued research, development, and assessment of new technologies, (3) improved understanding of environment impacts including natural capital use and degradation, (4) exploration of GDP alternative measures that include both economic production and environmental impacts, and (5) international cooperation and awareness of longer-term opportunities and their associated potential scenarios. Examples from the U.S. and the international community illustrate challenges and potential.

  18. Review of Potential Characterization Techniques in Approaching Energy and Sustainability

    DOE PAGES

    LePoire, David

    2014-03-20

    Societal prosperity is linked to sustainable energy and a healthy environment. But, tough global challenges include increased demand for fossil fuels, while approaching peak oil production and uncertainty in the environmental impacts of energy generation. Recently, energy use was identified as a major component of economic productivity, along with capital and labor. Furthermore, other environmental resources and impacts may be nearing environmental thresholds as indicated by nine planetary environmental boundaries, many of which are linked to energy production and use. Foresight techniques could be applied to guide future actions which include emphasis on (1) energy efficiency to bridge the transitionmore » to a renewable energy economy, (2) continued research, development, and assessment of new technologies, (3) improved understanding of environment impacts including natural capital use and degradation, (4) exploration of GDP alternative measures that include both economic production and environmental impacts, and (5) international cooperation and awareness of longer-term opportunities and their associated potential scenarios. Examples from the U.S. and the international community illustrate challenges and potential.« less

  19. Global interior eddy available potential energy diagnosed from Argo floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullet, Guillaume; Capet, Xavier; Maze, Guillaume

    2014-03-01

    By combining all Argo profiles for the period 2002 to present, a cumulative density function is constructed on a 3-D grid of the global ocean. This function quantifies the statistics of isopycnals: time-averaged density, root-mean square of isopycnal displacement, and eddy available potential energy (EAPE). EAPE is the analogue of the eddy kinetic energy, but for the potential energy reservoir. Because it is essentially tied to the spatial structure and magnitude of mesoscale activity, EAPE is an important quantity that should be useful to evaluate eddy resolving/permitting model turbulence and circulation. Among other striking features are the turbulent behavior of Pacific and southern Atlantic Tsuchiya jets and subsurface EAPE maxima in some parts of the ocean, particularly in the Southern Ocean.

  20. Turkey's High Temperature Geothermal Energy Resources and Electricity Production Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, Ö.

    2012-04-01

    Turkey is in the first 7 countries in the world in terms of potential and applications. Geothermal energy which is an alternative energy resource has advantages such as low-cost, clean, safe and natural resource. Geothermal energy is defined as hot water and steam which is formed by heat that accumulated in various depths of the Earth's crust; with more than 20oC temperature and which contain more than fused minerals, various salts and gases than normal underground and ground water. It is divided into three groups as low, medium and high temperature. High-temperature fluid is used in electricity generation, low and medium temperature fluids are used in greenhouses, houses, airport runways, animal farms and places such as swimming pools heating. In this study high temperature geothermal fields in Turkey which is suitable for electricity production, properties and electricity production potential was investigated.

  1. Three-dimensional potential energy surface of Ar-CO.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki

    2015-01-14

    A three-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface of the Ar-CO complex has been determined by fitting most of the previously reported spectroscopic data, where observed transition frequencies by microwave, millimeter-wave, submillimeter-wave, and infrared spectroscopy were reproduced simultaneously within their experimental accuracies. A free rotor model Hamiltonian considering all the freedom of motions for an atom-diatom system was applied to calculate vibration-rotation energies. A three-dimensional potential energy surface obtained by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory was parameterized by a model function consisting of 46 parameters. They were used as initial values for the least-squares analysis of the experimental data. A total of 20 parameters were optimized to reproduce all the spectroscopic data.

  2. Three-dimensional potential energy surface of Ar–CO

    SciTech Connect

    Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki

    2015-01-14

    A three-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface of the Ar–CO complex has been determined by fitting most of the previously reported spectroscopic data, where observed transition frequencies by microwave, millimeter-wave, submillimeter-wave, and infrared spectroscopy were reproduced simultaneously within their experimental accuracies. A free rotor model Hamiltonian considering all the freedom of motions for an atom-diatom system was applied to calculate vibration-rotation energies. A three-dimensional potential energy surface obtained by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory was parameterized by a model function consisting of 46 parameters. They were used as initial values for the least-squares analysis of the experimental data. A total of 20 parameters were optimized to reproduce all the spectroscopic data.

  3. N2(+) bound quartet and sextet state potential energy curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The N2(+) potential energies have been determined from a complete active space self-consistent field calculation with active 2s and 2p electrons. A (6s 4p 3d 1f) Gaussian basis set was used together with additional higher angular momentum and diffuse functions. The calculated potential energy curves for the states 4Sigma(mu)(+), 4Pi(g), and 6Sigma(g)(+), for which there are no spectroscopic observations, are presented. The corresponding spectroscopic constants have been determined from a polynomial curve fit to the computed energies near the well minima and are shown. The 6Sigma(g)(+) state is found to be significantly bound, with a minimum at 1.72 A.

  4. Understanding Potential Climate Variability Impacts on the Offshore Energy Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stear, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate variability may have important implications for the offshore energy industry. Scenarios of increased storm activity and changes in sea level could require the retrofit of existing offshore platforms and coastal infrastructure, the decommissioning of facilities for which upgrade or relocation is not economically viable, and the development of new methods and equipment which are removed from or less sensitive to environmental loads. Over the past years the energy industry has been actively involved in collaborative research efforts with government and academia to identify the potential changes in the offshore operating environment, and corresponding risk implications. This presentation will review several of these efforts, and for several of the hypothetical climate variation scenarios, review the potential impacts on and possible mitigations for offshore and coastal energy infrastructure and operations.

  5. Testing excited-state energy-density functionals and potentials with the ionization potential theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbola, Manoj; Myneni, Hemanadhan; Shamim, Md.

    2014-03-01

    The modified local spin density functional and the related local potential for excited-states are tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The functional is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding potential is given by analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ɛmax accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behavior by employing the van Leeuwen-Barends correction to it. The highest occupied orbital energy ɛmax thus obtained is then compared with the ΔSCF ionization energy calculated using the excited-state functional. It is shown that the two match quite accurately, demonstrating thereby that our approach of constructing excited-state functional is on sound footing.

  6. Vibration attenuation of rotating machines by application of magnetorheological dampers to minimize energy losses in the rotor support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapoměl, J.; Ferfecki, P.

    2016-09-01

    A frequently used technological solution for minimization of undesirable effects caused by vibration of rotating machines consists in placing damping devices in the rotor supports. The application of magnetorheological squeeze film dampers enables their optimum performance to be achieved in a wide range of rotating speeds by adapting their damping effect to the current operating conditions. The damping force, which is produced by squeezing the layer of magnetorheological oil, can be controlled by changing magnetic flux passing through the lubricant. The force acting between the rotor and its frame is transmitted through the rolling element bearing, the lubricating layer and the squirrel spring. The loading of the bearing produces a time variable friction moment, energy losses, uneven rotor running, and has an influence on the rotor service life and the current fluctuation in electric circuits. The carried out research consisted in the development of a mathematical model of a magnetorheological squeeze film damper, its implementation into the computational models of rotor systems, and in performing the study on the dependence of the energy losses and variation of the friction moment on the damping force and its control. The new and computationally stable mathematical model of a magnetorheological squeeze film damper, its implementation in the computational models of rigid rotors and learning more on the energy losses generated in the rotor supports in dependence on the damping effect are the principal contributions of this paper. The results of the computational simulations prove that a suitable control of the damping force enables the energy losses to be reduced in a wide velocity range.

  7. U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Rich; Borgeson, Sam; Koomey, Jon; Biermayer, Peter

    2008-09-30

    This paper presents an estimate of the potential for energy efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the Energy Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency potential studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of Energy's Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings potential in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved energy. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved energy of 2.7 cents/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu. This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual energy bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).

  8. Increasing the percentage of energy from dietary sugar, fats, and alcohol in adults is associated with increased energy intake but has minimal association with biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Austin, Gregory L; Krueger, Patrick M

    2013-10-01

    The optimal diet composition to prevent obesity and its complications is unknown. Study aims were to determine the association of diet composition with energy intake, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and C-reactive protein (CRP). Data were from the NHANES for eligible adults aged 20-74 y from 2005 to 2006 (n = 3073). Energy intake and diet composition were obtained by dietary recall. HOMA-IR was calculated from fasting insulin and glucose concentrations, and CRP was measured directly. Changes for a 1-point increase in percentage of sugar, saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and alcohol were determined across their means in exchange for a 1-point decrease in percentage of nonsugar carbohydrates. Regression analyses were performed, and means ± SEs were estimated. Increasing the percentage of sugar was associated with increased energy intake in men (23 ± 5 kcal; P < 0.001) and women (12 ± 3 kcal; P = 0.002). In men, increasing percentages of SFAs (58 ± 13 kcal; P = 0.001) and PUFAs (66 ± 19 kcal; P < 0.001) were associated with increased energy intake. In women, increasing percentages of SFAs (27 ± 10 kcal; P = 0.02), PUFAs (43 ± 6 kcal; P < 0.001), and MUFAs (36 ± 13 kcal; P = 0.01) were associated with increased energy intake. Increasing the percentage of alcohol was associated with increased energy intake in men (38 ± 7 kcal; P < 0.001) and women (25 ± 8 kcal; P = 0.001). Obesity was associated with increased HOMA-IR and CRP in both genders (all P ≤ 0.001). Increasing PUFAs was associated with decreasing CRP in men (P = 0.02). In conclusion, increasing the percentage of calories from sugar, fats, and alcohol was associated with substantially increased energy intake but had minimal association with HOMA-IR and CRP.

  9. Potential energy curves and dissociation energy of group IIA diatomic fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, M. P.; Ishwar, N. B.; Jha, B. L.

    1982-04-01

    Reliable (RKRV) potential energy curves have been constructed for different experimentally observed electronic states of BeF, MgF, CaF, SrF and BaF molecules from the latest spectroscopic data using the method of Rao and Venkateswarlu. Using a three-parameters Lippincott potential function the precise values of ground state dissociation energies of these molecules have been obtained. Values so obtained are found to be in close agreement with the experimental results.

  10. An exploration of the ozone dimer potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Scheiner, Steve

    2014-06-28

    The (O{sub 3}){sub 2} dimer potential energy surface is thoroughly explored at the ab initio CCSD(T) computational level. Five minima are characterized with binding energies between 0.35 and 2.24 kcal/mol. The most stable may be characterized as slipped parallel, with the two O{sub 3} monomers situated in parallel planes. Partitioning of the interaction energy points to dispersion and exchange as the prime contributors to the stability, with varying contributions from electrostatic energy, which is repulsive in one case. Atoms in Molecules analysis of the wavefunction presents specific O⋯O bonding interactions, whose number is related to the overall stability of each dimer. All internal vibrational frequencies are shifted to the red by dimerization, particularly the antisymmetric stretching mode whose shift is as high as 111 cm{sup −1}. In addition to the five minima, 11 higher-order stationary points are identified.

  11. Detailed study of the water trimer potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.E.; Schaefer, H.F. III )

    1995-01-11

    The potential energy surface of the water trimer has been studied through the use of ab initio quantum mechanical methods. Five stationary points were located, including one minimum and two transition states. All geometries were optimized at levels up to the double-[Zeta] plus polarization plus diffuse (DZP + diff) single and double excitation coupled cluster (CCSD) level of theory. CCSD single energy points were obtained for the minimum, two transition states, and the water monomer using the triple-[Zeta] plus double polarization plus diffuse (TZ2P + diff) basis at the geometries predicted by the DZP + diff CCSD method. Reported are the following: geometrical parameters, total and relative energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities for the minimum, and zero point vibrational energies for the minimum, two transition states, and three separated water molecules. 27 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Novel mixture model for the representation of potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tien Lam; Kino, Hiori; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Miyake, Takashi; Dam, Hieu Chi

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate that knowledge of chemical physics on a materials system can be automatically extracted from first-principles calculations using a data mining technique; this information can then be utilized to construct a simple empirical atomic potential model. By using unsupervised learning of the generative Gaussian mixture model, physically meaningful patterns of atomic local chemical environments can be detected automatically. Based on the obtained information regarding these atomic patterns, we propose a chemical-structure-dependent linear mixture model for estimating the atomic potential energy. Our experiments show that the proposed mixture model significantly improves the accuracy of the prediction of the potential energy surface for complex systems that possess a large diversity in their local structures.

  13. Intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Robert

    2017-03-01

    A six-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the interaction of two rigid propane molecules was determined from supermolecular ab initio calculations up to the coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations level of theory for 9452 configurations. An analytical site-site potential function with 14 sites per molecule was fitted to the calculated interaction energies. To validate the analytical PES, the second virial coefficient and the dilute gas shear viscosity and thermal conductivity of propane were computed. The dispersion part of the potential function was slightly adjusted such that quantitative agreement with the most accurate experimental data for the second virial coefficient at room temperature was achieved. The adjusted PES yields values for the three properties that are in very good agreement with the best experimental data at all temperatures.

  14. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  15. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  16. Minimally nonlocal nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Δ resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Piarulli, M.; Girlanda, L.; Schiavilla, R.; Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including Δ-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale). The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0–300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a Χ2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.

  17. Geochemical energy potentially available to organisms in martian hydrothermal systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnes, E. S.; Jakosky, B. M.; McCollom, T. M.

    2001-11-01

    Although a global average of energy available to potentially support life from chemosynthesis on Mars has been estimated, issues of how the energy is distributed and which environments have the greatest potential to support life remain unresolved. We have begun to address these questions by developing numerical geochemical models of martian hydrothermal systems using the software package EQ3/6. In order to model hydrothermal systems, the elemental composition of the initial fluid (the groundwater) and the initial host rock with which it interacts must be defined. The host rock was defined using the composition of LEW 88516, which is similar to the martian mantle. This host rock was reacted at high temperature (350 deg C) with a series of groundwaters. Groundwaters are either pure water in equilibrium with present martian atmosphere or in equilibrium with Pathfinder-composition soils and the atmosphere. The hot fluid resulting from the rock/groundwater reaction was then reacted with increments of fresh groundwater, simulating the mixing that occurs in hydrothermal systems. During mixing, oxidation and reduction reactions are kinetically inhibited; organisms may exploit this inhibition to derive metabolic energy. The maximum amount of energy an organism can obtain from a given reaction is determined from the Gibbs free energy of that reaction. For each model run, we have calculated the Gibbs free energy of reactions that are important for terrestrial chemosynthetic organisms and likely representative for putative martians. Our results indicate that substantial amounts of energy may be derived from these reactions, but they depend sensitively on the oxidation state of the groundwater and whether saturated species precipitate to equilibrium. Thus, it is unknown whether sufficient energy is available to support martian life, although it is likely that suitable environments exist.

  18. Potential for luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov A. V.

    2012-05-20

    At the Brookhaven National Laboratory, a physics program, motivated by the search of the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with heavy ions at very low beam energies corresponding to 2.5-20 GeV/n. Several physics runs were already successfully performed at these low energies. However, the luminosity is very low at lowest energies of interest (< 10 GeV/n) limited by the intra-beam scattering and space-charge, as well as by machine nonlinearities. At these low energies, electron cooling could be very effective in counteracting luminosity degradation due to the IBS, while it is less effective against other limitations. Overall potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation from cooling is summarized for various energies, taking into account all these limitations as well as beam lifetime measured during the low-energy RHIC runs. We also explore a possibility of further luminosity improvement under the space-charge limitation.

  19. Mathematical Modelling of Liner Piston Maintenance Activity using Field Data to Minimize Overhauling Time and Human Energy Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkhode, Pramod Namdeorao

    2017-06-01

    Field data based model is proposed to reduce the overhauling time and human energy consumed in liner piston maintenance activity so as to increase the productivity of liner piston maintenance activity. The independent variables affecting the phenomenon such as anthropometric parameters of workers (Eastman Kodak Co. Ltd in Section VIA Appendix-A: Anthropometric Data. Ergonomic Design for People at Work, Van Nostrans Reinhold, New York, 1), workers parameters, specification of liner piston data, specification of tools used in liner piston maintenance activity, specification of solvents, axial clearance of big end bearing and bolt elongation, workstation data (Eastman Kodak Co. Ltd in Work Place Ergonomic Design for People at Work, Van Nostrans Reinhold, New York, 2) and extraneous variables, namely, temperature, humidity at workplace, illumination at workplace and noise at workplace (Eastman Kodak Co. Ltd in Chapter V Environment Ergonomic Design for People at Work, Van Nostrans Reinhold, New York, 3) are taken into account. The model is formulated for dependent variables of liner piston maintenance activity to minimize the overhauling time and human energy consumption so as to improve the productivity of liner piston maintenance activity. The developed model can predict the performance of liner piston maintenance activity which involves man and machine system (Schenck in Theories of Engineering Experimentation, Mc-Graw Hill, New York 4). The model is then optimized by optimization technique and the sensitivity analysis of the model has also been estimated.

  20. a Canonical Approach to Generate Multidimensional Potential Energy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Jay R.; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; Lucchese, Robert R.

    2017-06-01

    Previously adaptions of canonical approaches were applied to algebraic forms of the classic Morse, Lennard-Jones, and Kratzer potentials. Using the classic Morse, Lennard-Jones, or Kratzer potential as reference, inverse canonical transformations allow the accurate generation of Born-Oppenheimer potentials for H_2^+ ion, neutral covalently bound H_2, van der Waals bound Ar_2, and the hydrogen bonded 1-dimensional dissociative coordinate in water dimer. This methodology is now extending to multidimensional potential energy surfaces, and as a proof-of-concept, it is applied to the 3-dimensional water molecule potential surface. Canonical transformations previously developed for diatomic molecules are used to construct accurate approximations to the 3-dimensional potential surface of the water molecule from judiciously chosen 1-dimensional planar slices that are shown to have the same canonical shape as the classical Lennard-Jones potential curve. Spline interpolation is then used to piece together the 1-dimensional canonical potential curves, to obtain the full 3-dimensional potential surface of water molecule with a relative error less than 0.008.

  1. A generalization of CAPE into potential-energy convertibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Guichard, Françoise

    2005-04-01

    The concept of the potential-energy convertibility (PEC) is proposed as a generalization of convective available potential energy (CAPE). It is defined as a vertical integral of buoyancy weighted by a non-dimensional normalized vertical momentum. This is a measure of convertibility of potential energy into kinetic energy in the sense that the actual conversion rate is recovered when PEC evaluated by the convective-scale local buoyancy and vertical momentum, as available from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations, is multiplied by the normalization factor for the vertical momentum. It reduces to CAPE, when the standard parcel-lifted buoyancy and a unit value for the normalized vertical momentum are used. It is equivalent to Arakawas-Schubert's cloud work function, when the buoyancy and the vertical momentum profile for an entraining plume are used. PEC evaluated from locally defined buoyancy and vertical momentum in CRM simulations correlates better with the convective precipitation than CAPE. The evaluation of PEC within a convective parametrization may be possible with an appropriate definition of the effective entrainment rate, for example, which is expected to improve CAPE-based convective parametrizations.

  2. Catching the right wave: evaluating wave energy resources and potential compatibility with existing marine and coastal uses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Toft, Jodie E; Papenfus, Michael; Verutes, Gregory; Guerry, Anne D; Ruckelshaus, Marry H; Arkema, Katie K; Guannel, Gregory; Wood, Spencer A; Bernhardt, Joanna R; Tallis, Heather; Plummer, Mark L; Halpern, Benjamin S; Pinsky, Malin L; Beck, Michael W; Chan, Francis; Chan, Kai M A; Levin, Phil S; Polasky, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance the need for profitability of the facilities with the need to minimize conflicts with other ocean uses. Our wave energy model quantifies harvestable wave energy and evaluates the net present value (NPV) of a wave energy facility based on a capital investment analysis. The model has a flexible framework and can be easily applied to wave energy projects at local, regional, and global scales. We applied the model and compatibility analysis on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada to provide information for ongoing marine spatial planning, including potential wave energy projects. In particular, we conducted a spatial overlap analysis with a variety of existing uses and ecological characteristics, and a quantitative compatibility analysis with commercial fisheries data. We found that wave power and harvestable wave energy gradually increase offshore as wave conditions intensify. However, areas with high economic potential for wave energy facilities were closer to cable landing points because of the cost of bringing energy ashore and thus in nearshore areas that support a number of different human uses. We show that the maximum combined economic benefit from wave energy and other uses is likely to be realized if wave energy facilities are sited in areas that maximize wave energy NPV and minimize conflict with existing ocean uses. Our tools will help decision-makers explore alternative locations for wave energy facilities by mapping expected wave energy NPV and helping to identify sites that provide maximal returns yet avoid spatial competition with existing ocean uses.

  3. Catching the Right Wave: Evaluating Wave Energy Resources and Potential Compatibility with Existing Marine and Coastal Uses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Toft, Jodie E.; Papenfus, Michael; Verutes, Gregory; Guerry, Anne D.; Ruckelshaus, Marry H.; Arkema, Katie K.; Guannel, Gregory; Wood, Spencer A.; Bernhardt, Joanna R.; Tallis, Heather; Plummer, Mark L.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Pinsky, Malin L.; Beck, Michael W.; Chan, Francis; Chan, Kai M. A.; Levin, Phil S.; Polasky, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Many hope that ocean waves will be a source for clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy, yet wave energy conversion facilities may affect marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms, including competition with other human uses. We developed a decision-support tool to assist siting wave energy facilities, which allows the user to balance the need for profitability of the facilities with the need to minimize conflicts with other ocean uses. Our wave energy model quantifies harvestable wave energy and evaluates the net present value (NPV) of a wave energy facility based on a capital investment analysis. The model has a flexible framework and can be easily applied to wave energy projects at local, regional, and global scales. We applied the model and compatibility analysis on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada to provide information for ongoing marine spatial planning, including potential wave energy projects. In particular, we conducted a spatial overlap analysis with a variety of existing uses and ecological characteristics, and a quantitative compatibility analysis with commercial fisheries data. We found that wave power and harvestable wave energy gradually increase offshore as wave conditions intensify. However, areas with high economic potential for wave energy facilities were closer to cable landing points because of the cost of bringing energy ashore and thus in nearshore areas that support a number of different human uses. We show that the maximum combined economic benefit from wave energy and other uses is likely to be realized if wave energy facilities are sited in areas that maximize wave energy NPV and minimize conflict with existing ocean uses. Our tools will help decision-makers explore alternative locations for wave energy facilities by mapping expected wave energy NPV and helping to identify sites that provide maximal returns yet avoid spatial competition with existing ocean uses. PMID:23144824

  4. Meson energies and the dual superconducting QCD potential

    SciTech Connect

    Fulcher, L.P.

    1995-04-01

    Baker, Ball and Zachariasen (BBZ) have derived an effective quark-antiquark potential from the dual QCD Lagrangian by eliminating the gluon fields and the Higgs field in favor of quark variables for heavy slow-moving quarks. Their potential includes a central part, a spin-orbit part, a spin-spin part, and a velocity-dependent, spin-independent part. Their original tests of the potential were carried out in charmonium and the upsilon system, where the Schroedinger equation may be used for the eigenvalue calculations. A new procedure for solving the spinless Salpeter equation, which is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz-Galerkin method, is used to determine the energy eigenvalues for the B and the D mesons. First order perturbation theory is used to consider the effects of the velocity-dependent spin-independent part. The Yukawa parts of the potential are treated with a matrix approach that exploits analytic expressions for the matrix elements of the linear potential and the Coulomb potential. The results are compared with spin averages of the measured energies.

  5. Study of chirally motivated low-energy K - optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplý, A.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2001-12-01

    The K - optical potential in the nuclear medium is evaluated self consistently from a free-space K -N t matrix constructed within a coupled-channel chiral approach to the low-energy K¯N data. The chiral-model parameters are fitted to a select subset of the low-energy data plus the K - atomic data throughout the periodic table. The resulting attractive K - optical potentials are relatively 'shallow', with central depth of the real part about 55 MeV, for a fairly reasonable reproduction of the atomic data with χ2/ N≈2.2. Relatively 'deep' attractive potentials of depth about 180 MeV, which result in other phenomenological approaches with χ2/ N≈1.5, are ruled out within chirally motivated models. Different physical data input is required to distinguish between shallow and deep K - optical potentials. The (K -stop, π) reaction could provide such a test, with exclusive rates differing by over a factor of three for the two classes of potentials. Finally, forward (K -,p) differential cross sections for the production of relatively narrow deeply bound K -nuclear states are evaluated for deep K - optical potentials, yielding values considerably lower than those estimated before.

  6. Residential energy efficiency: Progress since 1973 and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    1985-11-01

    Today's 85 million U.S. homes use 100 billion of fuel and electricity (1150/home). If their energy intensity (resource energy/ft2) were still frozen at 1973 levels, they would use 18% more. With well-insulated houses, need for space heat is vanishing. Superinsulated Saskatchewan homes spend annually only 270 for space heat, 150 for water heat, and 400 for appliances, yet they cost only 2000±1000 more than conventional new homes. The concept of Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE) is used to rank conservation technologies for existing and new homes and appliances, and to develop supply curves of conserved energy and a least cost scenario. Calculations are calibrated with the BECA and other data bases. By limiting investments in efficiency to those whose CCE is less than current fuel and electricity prices, the potential residential plus commercial energy use in 2000 AD drops to half of that estimated by DOE, and the number of power plants needed drops by 200. For the whole buildings sector, potential savings by 2000 are 8 Mbod (worth 50B/year), at an average CCE of 10/barrel.

  7. A test of H2-He potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Franck; Wcisło, Piotr; Ciuryło, Roman

    2016-11-01

    The close-coupling method is used to calculate purely rotational relaxation rates and pressure broadening and shifting coefficients for H2-He collisions, in order to test various potential energy surfaces. Downward rate coefficients k3→1(T) and k2→0(T) are compared with experimental data, but the subtle differences in the potential energy surfaces are hardly reflected in these rates. Helium pressure broadening and shifting generalized cross sections for the isotropic Raman Q(1) lines of the fundamental bands of D2 and H2 as well as the purely rotational Stokes S0(1) line of H2 are therefore also considered. While these spectroscopic characteristics are much more sensitive to the precise form of the interaction potential, a proper validation cannot be performed without taking into account the influence of the translational motion on the molecular line shapes. After including this, it is found that the potential energy surface of Bakr, Smith and Patkowski [B.W. Bakr, D.G.A. Smith, K. Patkowski, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144305 (2013)] allows the best reproduction of the experimental data.

  8. Using peat for energy: Potential environmental restraints. Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. M.; Voorhees, L. D.; Mulholland, P. J.

    Serious consideration is being given to using peat as an energy resource in Minnesota, North Carolina, Florida, and some New England States. Potential environmental constraints for using peat as an energy resource are associated with disruption of important regional wetland ecosystems. Mining peatlands may significantly modify ground and surface water hydrology, degrade water quality in downstream receiving systems, contribute to the deterioration of local air quality, disrupt or eliminate plant and animal populations having specialized requirements and limited distributions, and destroy unique wetland ecosystems representing important scientific and educational resources. Careful selection of peatlands to be developed and application of appropriate mitigation and monitoring programs will be necessary to offset these impacts.

  9. [Biomass energy utilization in microbial fuel cells: potentials and challenges].

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Cheng, Shaoan

    2010-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that can harvest biomass energy from organic wastes through microbial catalysis have garnered more and more attention within the past decade due to its potential benefits to ecological environment. In this article, the updated progress in MFCs is reviewed, with a focus on frontier technologies such as chamber configurations, feedstock varieties and the integration of MFCs with microbial electrolysis cells for hydrogen production. And on the other hand, the challenges like development of cost-effective electrode materials, improvement of biomass energy recovery and power output, design and optimization of commercial MFC devices are presented.

  10. Assessment of Tidal Stream Energy Potential for the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.; Defne, Z.; Jiang, L.; Fritz, H. M.

    2010-12-01

    Tidal streams are high velocity sea currents created by periodic horizontal movement of the tides, often magnified by local topographical features such as headlands, inlets to inland lagoons, and straits. Tidal stream energy extraction is derived from the kinetic energy of the moving flow; analogous to the way a wind turbine operates in air, and as such differs from tidal barrages, which relies on providing a head of water for energy extraction. With the constantly increasing effort in promoting alternative energy, tidal streams have become promising energy sources due to their continuous, predictable and concentrated characteristics. However, the present lack of a full spatial-temporal assessment of tidal currents for the U.S. coastline down to the scale of individual devices is a barrier to the comprehensive development of tidal current energy technology. A methodology for creating a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology has been developed. The tidal flows are simulated using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The model is calibrated and validated using observations and tidal predictions. The calibration includes adjustments to model parameters such as bottom friction coefficient, changed land/water masks, or increased grid resolutions. A systematic validation process has been developed after defining various parameters to quantify the validation results. In order to determine the total tidal stream power resource, a common method frequently proposed is to estimate it as a fraction of the total kinetic energy flux passing through a vertical section; however, this now has been shown to generally underestimate the total available resource. The total tidal energy flux includes not just the kinetic energy but also the energy flux due to the work done by the pressure force associated with the tidal motion on the water column as well

  11. The H 2O ++ Ground State Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, P. R.; Bludsky, Ota; Jensen, Per; Wesolowski, S. S.; Van Huis, T. J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Schaefer, H. F.

    1999-12-01

    At the correlation-consistent polarized-valence quadruple-zeta complete active space self-consistent field second-order configuration interaction level of ab initio theory (cc-pVQZ CASSCF-SOCI), we calculated 129 points on the ground electronic state potential energy surface of the water dication H2O++; this calculation includes the energy of X3Σ- OH+ at equilibrium and the energy of the triplet oxygen atom. We determined the parameters in an analytical function that represents this surface out to the (OH+ + H+) and (O + 2H+) dissociation limits, for bending angles from 70 to 180°. There is a metastable minimum in this surface, at an energy of 43 600 cm-1 above the H+ + OH+ dissociation energy, and the geometry at this minimum is linear (D∞h), with an OH bond length of 1.195 Å. On the path to dissociation to H+ + OH+, there is a saddle point at an energy of 530 cm-1 above the minimum, and the geometry at the saddle point is linear (C∞ Kv) with OH bond lengths of 1.121 and 1.489 Å. Using the stabilization method, we calculated the lowest resonance on this surface. Relative to the metastable local minimum on the potential energy surface, the position of the lowest resonance for H2O++, D2O++, and T2O++ is 1977(85), 1473(25), and 1249(10) cm-1, respectively, where the width of each resonance (in cm-1) is given in parentheses.

  12. Using Diurnal Temperature Range to Examine the Climatology of Solar Energy Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zercher, C. N.; Hanrahan, J.; Murphy, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The potential for annual solar energy production largely depends on the amount of incoming shortwave radiation which is dependent on cloud cover. Due to natural large-scale climate variability, long-term cloud cover can vary substantially, therefore modifying the total energy that can be produced by solar cells in individual locations. Under anthropogenic climate change, future precipitation is expected to significantly deviate from observed values, therefore suggesting that cloud cover, and thus solar energy potential, will also change. The expected changes are both positive and negative depending on geographic region and can be highly spatially variable, particularly in regions of complex terrain. Because of the short-term availability of observed radiation and cloud cover data, it is difficult to study the historical climatology of solar energy potential, thus making future projections uncertain. Research has shown that another readily available climate variable, the diurnal temperature range, correlates well with daily averaged shortwave radiation values during months of minimal/no snow cover, and can thus serve as a proxy for shortwave radiation during the warm season throughout the period of record. In the present study, the diurnal temperature range is shown to be an excellent predictor of shortwave radiation around the state of Vermont, independent of latitude and elevation. Monte Carlo significance testing is also used to examine recent trends in this region.

  13. Docking to RNA via Root-Mean-Square-Deviation-Driven Energy Minimization with Flexible Ligands and Flexible Targets

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, Christophe; James, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Structure-based drug design is now well-established for proteins as a key first step in the lengthy process of developing new drugs. In many ways, RNA may be a better target to treat disease than a protein because it is upstream in the translation pathway, so inhibiting a single mRNA molecule could prevent the production of thousands of protein gene products. Virtual screening is often the starting point for structure-based drug design. However, computational docking of a small molecule to RNA seems to be more challenging than that to protein due to the higher intrinsic flexibility and highly charged structure of RNA. Previous attempts at docking to RNA showed the need for a new approach. We present here a novel algorithm using molecular simulation techniques to account for both nucleic acid and ligand flexibility. In this approach, with both the ligand and the receptor permitted some flexibility, they can bind one another via an induced fit, as the flexible ligand probes the surface of the receptor. A possible ligand can explore a low-energy path at the surface of the receptor by carrying out energy minimization with root-mean-square-distance constraints. Our procedure was tested on 57 RNA complexes (33 crystal and 24 NMR structures); this is the largest data set to date to reproduce experimental RNA binding poses. With our procedure, the lowest-energy conformations reproduced the experimental binding poses within an atomic root-mean-square deviation of 2.5 Å for 74% of tested complexes. PMID:18510306

  14. Leptin stimulates bone formation in ob/ob mice at doses having minimal impact on energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Philbrick, Kenneth A; Wong, Carmen P; Branscum, Adam J; Turner, Russell T; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2017-03-01

    Leptin, the protein product of the ob gene, is essential for normal bone growth, maturation and turnover. Peripheral actions of leptin occur at lower serum levels of the hormone than central actions because entry of leptin into the central nervous system (CNS) is limited due to its saturable transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We performed a study in mice to model the impact of leptin production associated with different levels of adiposity on bone formation and compared the response with well-established centrally mediated actions of the hormone on energy metabolism. Leptin was infused (0, 4, 12, 40, 140 or 400 ng/h) for 12 days into 6-week-old female ob/ob mice (n = 8/group) using sc-implanted osmotic pumps. Treatment resulted in a dose-associated increase in serum leptin. Bone formation parameters were increased at EC50 infusion rates of 7-17 ng/h, whereas higher levels (EC50, 40-80 ng/h) were required to similarly influence indices of energy metabolism. We then analyzed gene expression in tibia and hypothalamus at dose rates of 0, 12 and 140 ng/h; the latter dose resulted in serum leptin levels similar to WT mice. Infusion with 12 ng/h leptin increased the expression of genes associated with Jak/Stat signaling and bone formation in tibia with minimal effect on Jak/Stat signaling and neurotransmitters in hypothalamus. The results suggest that leptin acts peripherally to couple bone acquisition to energy availability and that limited transport across the BBB insures that the growth-promoting actions of peripheral leptin are not curtailed by the hormone's CNS-mediated anorexigenic actions. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Economical disposal of municipal solid waste with minimal discharges to the atmosphere and maximum recycling of energy and metal values

    SciTech Connect

    Grohse, E.W.; Steinberg, M.; Koppel, P.E.; Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA )

    1989-03-01

    A process has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the disposal of municipal solid wastes with minimal discharges to the atmosphere and maximum recycling of the energy and metal values contained therein. The energy values are recovered as zero ash, zero sulfur, zero nitrogen, zero chlorine particulate carbon (carbon black) fuels and a hydrogen-rich (or methane-rich) gaseous co-product. The process is especially adaptable to the disposal of plastic wastes and recycling of its energy values. Also, the inclusion of medical wastes should be no problem. The process consists of hydrogasifying prepared MSW (or any carbonaceous feedstock) to form a methane-rich process gas, which is then thermally decomposed (cracked) to form the primary product, carbon black, and hydrogen which is recycled to the hydrogasifier. Oxygen in the MSW is presently removed as water from the hydrogasifier effluent before it enters the methane decomposer. Any remaining hydrogen in the MSW feed is ultimately removed from the process as a co-product gas as hydrogen per se and/or methane (SNG). Chlorine in feed containing PVCs, for example, is removed as relatively minute amounts of hydrogen chloride in the condensed water discharged from the recuperative partial condenser. Desulfurization is not required to produce sulfur-free carbon black per se. Various options are available for desulfurization of the co-product gas. Since the process operates under a highly-reducing hydrogen atmosphere, toxic oxygenated compounds such as dioxins cannot form and metals entering with the MSW are removed with the ash'' as metals, not oxides.

  16. The Potential For Energy Efficiency In The State of Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2001-12-05

    The purpose of this study was to do an initial estimate of the potential for energy savings in the state of Iowa. Several methods for determining savings were examined, including existing programs, surveys, savings calculators, and economic simulation. Each method has advantages and disadvantages, trading off between detail of information, accuracy of results, and scope. This paper concentrated on using economic simulation (the NEMS model (EIA 2000a)) to determine market potential for energy savings for the residential and commercial sectors. The results of surveys were used to calculate the economic potential for savings in the industrial sector. The NEMS model is used by the Energy Information Administration to calculate twenty-year projections of energy use for every region of the country. The results of the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 were used as the Base case (EIA 1999a). Two alternative cases were created to simulate energy savings policies. Voluntary, market-related programs were simulated by lowering the effective discount rates that end-users use when making decisions on equipment purchases. Standards programs in the residential sector were simulated by eliminating the availability of low efficiency equipment in future years. The parameters for these programs were based on the Moderate scenario from the DOE Clean Energy Futures study (Interlaboratory Working Group 2000), which assumed increased concern by society on energy efficiency but not to the point of fiscal policies such as taxes or direct subsidies. The study only considered a subset of the various programs, policies, and technologies that could reduce energy use. The major end-uses in the residential sector affected by the policies were space cooling (20% savings by 2020) and water heating (14% savings by 2020.) Figure S-1 shows the space cooling savings when voluntary programs and minimum efficiency standards were implemented. Refrigerators, freezers, and clothes dryers saw slight improvements

  17. Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzisera, Steven; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-06-09

    Network connectivity has become nearly ubiquitous, and the energy use of the equipment required for this connectivity is growing. Network equipment consists of devices that primarily switch and route Internet Protocol (IP) packets from a source to a destination, and this category specifically excludes edge devices like PCs, servers and other sources and sinks of IP traffic. This paper presents the results of a study of network equipment energy use and includes case studies of networks in a campus, a medium commercial building, and a typical home. The total energy use of network equipment is the product of the stock of equipment in use, the power of each device, and their usage patterns. This information was gathered from market research reports, broadband market penetration studies, field metering, and interviews with network administrators and service providers. We estimate that network equipment in the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1percent of building electricity, in 2008 and that consumption is expected to grow at roughly 6percent per year to 23 TWh in 2012; world usage in 2008 was 51 TWh. This study shows that office building network switches and residential equipment are the two largest categories of energy use consuming 40percent and 30percent of the total respectively. We estimate potential energy savings for different scenarios using forecasts of equipment stock and energy use, and savings estimates range from 20percent to 50percent based on full market penetration of efficient technologies.

  18. Mashreq Arab interconnected power system potential for economic energy trading

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shehri, A.M.; El-Amin, I.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Mashreq Arab countries covered in this study are Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. A feasibility study for the interconnection of the electrical networks of the Mashreq Arab countries, sponsored by the Arab Fund, was completed in June 1992. Each country is served by one utility except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The Mashreq Arab region has a considerable mix of energy resources. Egypt and Syria have some limited amounts of hydropower resources, and the Arabian Gulf region is abundant in fossil fuel reserves. Owing to the differences in energy production costs, a potential exists for substantial energy trading between electric utilities in the region. The major objective of this project is to study the feasibility of electric energy trading between the Mashreq Arab countries. The basis, assumptions, and methodologies on which this energy trading study is based relate to the results and conclusions arising out of the previous study, power plant characteristics and costs, assumptions on economic parameters, rules for economy energy exchange, etc. This paper presents the basis, methodology, and major findings of the study.

  19. The Potential for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2003-08-06

    As many states have restructured their electric power industry, they have established a ''systems benefit charge'' to help fund those activities that will no longer be funded by utilities in the new structure. Examples include weatherization of low-income housing, efficiency programs, and renewable energy development. Varying amounts have been collected and allocated depending on state needs and abilities. One question that arises is what are the potential results of funding the different types of programs. What is the potential for energy efficiency or for renewable power, and what would be accomplished given the amount of funding that the system benefit charge may provide? The purpose of this project is to provide an initial estimate of the potential for energy efficiency and renewable energy in North Carolina. This potential could be funded by a public benefits fund resulting from a green power program being considered in the state. It concentrates on electric energy savings and production. Savings in buildings can include improvements to space conditioning as well as improvements to lighting or other appliances. Distributed power potential, through use of combined heat and power and renewables such as photovoltaic, wind, and biomass were examined. The goal is to provide information to decision makers who are developing a green power program in North Carolina. It will not be a complete and detailed study of all efficiency potentials but is more of a scoping exercise to determine the relative impacts and begin the process for a more definitive study at a later date. Statewide energy savings potential cannot be directly measured but must be calculated. First, the word ''potential'' means that the savings have not occurred yet. Second, the savings are often only indirectly measured by estimating what energy use there would have been without the changes in technology or behavior. Calculations through sampling and statistical analysis or by simulation are a necessary

  20. Exposure to minimally processed pear and melon during shelf life could modify the pathogenic potential of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Colás-Medà, Pilar; Viñas, Inmaculada; Oliveira, Márcia; Anguera, Marina; Serrano, Jose C E; Abadias, Maribel

    2017-04-01

    Survival and virulence of foodborne pathogens can be influenced by environmental factors such as the intrinsic properties of food as well as the extrinsic properties that contribute to food shelf life (e.g., temperature and gas atmosphere). The direct contribution of food matrix characteristics on the survival of L. monocytogenes during fresh-cut fruit shelf life is not very well understood. In addition, the gastrointestinal tract is the primary route of listeriosis infection and penetration of the intestinal epithelial cell barrier is the first step in the infection process. Hence, the pathogenic potential of L. monocytogenes, measured as the capability for the organism to survive a simulated gastrointestinal tract and the proportion of cells able to subsequently adhere to and invade differentiated Caco-2 cells, subjected to fresh-cut pear and melon shelf life, was investigated. Samples were inoculated, stored at 10 °C for 7 days and evaluated after inoculation and again after 2 and 7 days of storage. A decrease in L. monocytogenes' capacity to survive a simulated gastrointestinal tract was observed with increasing storage time, regardless of the fruit matrix evaluated. Furthermore, L. monocytogenes placed on fresh-cut pear and melon was subjected to an attachment and invasion assay after crossing the simulated gastrointestinal tract. After inoculation, pathogen on fresh-cut pear showed 5-fold more capacity to adhere to Caco-2 cells than pathogen on fresh-cut melon. After 2 days of storage, L. monocytogenes grown on fresh-cut melon showed similar adhesive capacity (1.11%) than cells grown on pear (1.83%), but cells grown on melon had the higher invasive capacity (0.0093%). We can conclude that minimally processed melon could represent a more important hazard than pear under the studied shelf life.

  1. The potential impact of hydrogen energy use on the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.

    2009-04-01

    Energy models show very different trajectories for future energy systems (partly as function of future climate policy). One possible option is a transition towards a hydrogen-based energy system. The potential impact of such hydrogen economy on atmospheric emissions is highly uncertain. On the one hand, application of hydrogen in clean fuel cells reduces emissions of local air pollutants, like SOx and NOx. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen from system leakages are expected to change the atmospheric concentrations and behaviour (see also Price et al., 2007; Sanderson et al., 2003; Schultz et al., 2003; Tromp et al., 2003). The uncertainty arises from several sources: the expected use of hydrogen, the intensity of leakages and emissions, and the atmospheric chemical behaviour of hydrogen. Existing studies to the potential impacts of a hydrogen economy on the atmosphere mostly use hydrogen emission scenarios that are based on simple assumptions. This research combines two different modelling efforts to explore the range of impacts of hydrogen on atmospheric chemistry. First, the potential role of hydrogen in the global energy system and the related emissions of hydrogen and other air pollutants are derived from the global energy system simulation model TIMER (van Vuuren, 2007). A set of dedicated scenarios on hydrogen technology development explores the most pessimistic and optimistic cases for hydrogen deployment (van Ruijven et al., 2008; van Ruijven et al., 2007). These scenarios are combined with different assumptions on hydrogen emission factors. Second, the emissions from the TIMER model are linked to the NCAR atmospheric model (Lamarque et al., 2005; Lamarque et al., 2008), in order to determine the impacts on atmospheric chemistry. By combining an energy system model and an atmospheric model, we are able to consistently explore the boundaries of both hydrogen use, emissions and impacts on atmospheric chemistry. References: Lamarque, J.-F., Kiehl, J. T

  2. Evaluation of global onshore wind energy potential and generation costs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J; Clarke, Leon

    2012-07-17

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance, land suitability factors, cost assumptions, and explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of the world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region and with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global economic wind potential under central assumptions, that is, intermediate between optimistic and pessimistic, is estimated to be approximately 119.5 petawatt hours per year (13.6 TW) at less than 9 cents/kWh. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly wind speed (varying by -70% to +450% at less than 9 cents/kWh), land suitability (by -55% to +25%), turbine density (by -60% to +80%), and cost and financing options (by -20% to +200%), many of which have important policy implications. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  3. A global potential energy surface for ArH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a simple analytic representation of the ArH2 potential energy surface which well reproduces the results of extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations. The analytic representation smoothly interpolates between the dissociated H2 and strong bonding limits. In the fitting process, emphasis is made on accurately reproducing regions of the potential expected to be important for high temperature (ca. 3000 K) collision processes. Overall, the anisotropy and H2 bond length dependence of the analytic representation well reproduce the input data.

  4. Energy splitting in a finite periodic multiple-well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dae-Yup

    2017-09-01

    The low-lying states for a one-dimensional potential consisting of N identical wells are considered, assuming that the wells are parabolic around the minima. The N localized approximate eigenfunctions, each of which matches an eigenfunction of the simple harmonic oscillator in one of the wells, are constructed, relying on the WKB approximation. Diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in the subspace spanned by the approximate eigenfunctions, a formula for the energy eigenvalues is obtained. The present work will be useful for introducing Bloch wave functions in a periodic potential to undergraduate and graduate students. It is shown that the formula for the eigenvalues can reproduce a known rigorous expression on the Mathieu equation.

  5. A global potential energy surface for ArH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a simple analytic representation of the ArH2 potential energy surface which well reproduces the results of extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations. The analytic representation smoothly interpolates between the dissociated H2 and strong bonding limits. In the fitting process, emphasis is made on accurately reproducing regions of the potential expected to be important for high temperature (ca. 3000 K) collision processes. Overall, the anisotropy and H2 bond length dependence of the analytic representation well reproduce the input data.

  6. A global potential energy surface for ArH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a simple analytic representation of the ArH2 potential energy surface which well reproduces the results of extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations. The analytic representation smoothly interpolates between the dissociated H2 and strong bonding limits. In the fitting process, emphasis is made on accurately reproducing regions of the potential expected to be important for high temperature (ca. 3000 K) collision processes. Overall, the anisotropy and H2 bond length dependence of the analytic representation well reproduce the input data.

  7. Free energy generalization of the Peierls potential in iron.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M R; Schuck, P; Sadigh, B; Marian, J

    2013-08-30

    In body-centered-cubic (bcc) crystals, 1/2<111> screw dislocations exhibit high intrinsic lattice friction as a consequence of their nonplanar core structure, which results in a periodic energy landscape known as the Peierls potential U(P). The main features determining plastic flow, including its stress and temperature dependences, can be derived directly from this potential, hence its importance. In this Letter, we use thermodynamic integration to provide a full thermodynamic extension of U(P) for bcc Fe. We compute the Peierls free energy path as a function of stress and temperature and show that the critical stress vanishes at 700 K, supplying the qualitative elements that explain plastic behavior in the athermal limit.

  8. Conformational changes in the selectivity filter of the open-state KcsA channel: an energy minimization study.

    PubMed

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V; Jordan, Peter C

    2008-10-01

    Potassium channels switch between closed and open conformations and selectively conduct K(+) ions. There are at least two gates. The TM2 bundle at the intracellular site is the primary gate of KcsA, and rearrangements at the selectivity filter (SF) act as the second gate. The SF blocks ion flow via an inactivation process similar to C-type inactivation of voltage-gated K(+) channels. We recently generated the open-state conformation of the KcsA channel. We found no major, possibly inactivating, structural changes in the SF associated with this massive inner-pore rearrangement, which suggests that the gates might act independently. Here we energy-minimize the open state of wild-type and mutant KcsA, validating in silico structures of energy-minimized SFs by comparison with crystallographic structures, and use these data to gain insight into how mutation, ion depletion, and K(+) to Na(+) substitution influence SF conformation. Both E71 or D80 protonations/mutations and the presence/absence of protein-buried water molecule(s) modify the H-bonding network stabilizing the P-loops, spawning numerous SF conformations. We find that the inactivated state corresponds to conformations with a partially unoccupied or an entirely empty SF. These structures, involving modifications in all four P-loops, are stabilized by H-bonds between amide H and carbonyl O atoms from adjacent P-loops, which block ion passage. The inner portions of the P-loops are more rigid than the outer parts. Changes are localized to the outer binding sites, with innermost site S4 persisting in the inactivated state. Strong binding by Na(+) locally contracts the SF around Na(+), releasing ligands that do not participate in Na(+) coordination, and occluding the permeation pathway. K(+) selectivity primarily appears to arise from the inability of the SF to completely dehydrate Na(+) ions due to basic structural differences between liquid water and the "quasi-liquid" SF matrix.

  9. The Potential of Renewable Energy Sources in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakipova, S.; Jakovics, A.; Gendelis, S.

    2016-02-01

    The article discusses some aspects of the use of renewable energy sources in the climatic conditions prevailing in most of the territory of Latvia, with relatively low wind speeds and a small number of sunny days a year. The paper gives a brief description of the measurement equipment and technology to determine the parameters of the outer air; the results of the measurements are also analysed. On the basis of the data obtained during the last two years at the meteorological station at the Botanical Garden of the University of Latvia, the energy potential of solar radiation and wind was estimated. The values of the possible and the actual amount of produced energy were determined.

  10. CO dimer: new potential energy surface and rovibrational calculations.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2013-08-15

    The spectrum of CO dimer was investigated by solving the rovibrational Schrödinger equation on a new potential energy surface constructed from coupled-cluster ab initio points. The Schrödinger equation was solved with a Lanczos algorithm. Several 4D (rigid monomer) global ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) were made using a previously reported interpolating moving least-squares (IMLS) fitting procedure specialized to describe the interaction of two linear fragments. The potential has two nonpolar minima giving rise to a complicated set of energy level stacks, which are very sensitive to the shapes and relative depths of the two wells. Although the CO dimer has defied previous attempts at an accurate purely ab initio description our best surface yields results in good agreement with experiment. Root-mean-square (rms) fitting errors of less than 0.1 cm(-1) were obtained for each of the fits using 2226 ab initio data at different levels. This allowed direct assessment of the quality of various levels of ab initio theory for prediction of spectra. Our tests indicate that standard CCSD(T) is slow to converge the interaction energy even when sextuple zeta bases as large as ACV6Z are used. The explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b method was found to recover significantly more correlation energy (from singles and doubles) at the CBS limit. Correlation of the core-electrons was found to be important for this system. The best PES was obtained by extrapolation of calculations at the CCSD(T)(AE)-F12b/CVnZ-F12 (n = 3,4) levels. The calculated energy levels were compared to 105 J ≤ 10 levels from experiment. The rms error for 68 levels with J ≤ 6 is only 0.29 cm(-1). The calculated energy levels were assigned stack labels using several tools. New stacks were found. One of them, stack y1, has an energy lower than many previously known stacks and may be observable.

  11. Geothermal Energy Potential of Turkey: Inferred from the Aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ates, Abdullah; Bilim, Funda; Buyuksarac, Aydin; Bektas, Ozcan

    2010-05-01

    Geothermal energy potential of Turkey is well known. There are lots of hot springs with over 30° C water temperatures. However, the significance of these geothermal energy potential of Turkey is not adequately understood. We believe that the main reason for this; is the lack of exploration methods and tools in a wide area as large as Turkey. We exploited a well known physical property of rocks to estimate the geothermal energy potential. Physically, substances lose their magnetization above a temperature known as the Curie that is the 580° C for magnetite. Properties of the Curie temperature have been exploited to observe the bottom depth of the magnetization. That is the depth where the heat reaches to 580° C. In another word, there is no magnetization below this depth. In normal crust this depth is about 22-24 km. Thus, investigation of the bottom depth of magnetization by using aeromagnetic anomalies can lead to information that if there are any anomalous regions well above the normal crust. The aeromagnetic anomalies of whole of Turkey were surveyed by the Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) of Turkey. The survey was completed during late 1980's. Five kilometers grid data were available and used for regional exploration purposes. Exploration of the geothermal energy potential of Turkey was done from west to east in the similar way to search for shallow high temperature regions. These are from west to east; i.) Western Turkey: Two major shallow depth regions were determined at the west of Kutahya and the north-east of Denizli. The Curie Point Depths (CPDs) were calculated as about 7 km and about 9 km in Kutahya and Denizli, respectively. Also, high heat flow values and crustal thinning (about 32 km from gravity anomalies of western Turkey) were calculated for western Turkey. ii.) Central Turkey: A CPD depth of 8 km was calculated. This gives us a temperature gradient of 0.073° C/m. Geothermal energy potential was studied using water chemistry and isotopic

  12. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ruedenberg, K.

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  13. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for NH + NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1993-01-01

    The potential energy surface for NH + NO was characterized using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) gradient calculation to determine the stationary point geometries and frequencies followed by CASSCF/internally contracted configuration interaction calculations to refine the energetics. The present results are in qualitative accord with the BAC-MP4 calculations, but there are differences as large as 8 kcal/mol in the detailed energetics.

  14. MCSCF potential energy surface for photodissociation of formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.; Morokuma, K.

    1976-01-01

    The ground state potential energy surface for the dissociation of formaldehyde (H2CO to H2 and CO) is calculated with the ab initio MCSCF method with an extended (4-31G) basis set. The location, barrier height, and force constants of the transition state are determined, and the normal coordinate analysis is carried out. The calculated barrier height is 4.5 eV. Based on the calculated quantities, the detailed mechanism of the photochemical dissociation is discussed.

  15. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for NH + NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1993-01-01

    The potential energy surface for NH + NO was characterized using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) gradient calculation to determine the stationary point geometries and frequencies followed by CASSCF/internally contracted configuration interaction calculations to refine the energetics. The present results are in qualitative accord with the BAC-MP4 calculations, but there are differences as large as 8 kcal/mol in the detailed energetics.

  16. MCSCF potential energy surface for photodissociation of formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.; Morokuma, K.

    1976-01-01

    The ground state potential energy surface for the dissociation of formaldehyde (H2CO to H2 and CO) is calculated with the ab initio MCSCF method with an extended (4-31G) basis set. The location, barrier height, and force constants of the transition state are determined, and the normal coordinate analysis is carried out. The calculated barrier height is 4.5 eV. Based on the calculated quantities, the detailed mechanism of the photochemical dissociation is discussed.

  17. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of GeF +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Balasubramanian, K.

    1995-05-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 27 electronic states of GeF + are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods that included up to 1.6 million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants of the 1Σ+ electronic state fit well with the experimentally observed X ground state. Other yet to be observed properties of several excited electronic states are reported.

  18. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of SnF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Dingguo; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-07-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 20 electronic states of SnF arising from valence dissociation limits are computed using the complete active space MCSCF (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods, which included up to one million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants of five electronic states fit well with the experimentally observed X, A, a, and C states. The dipole moments and other yet to be observed properties of several electronic states are reported.

  19. Spectroscopic Properties and Potential Energy Curves of SnF +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.; Xu, H.

    1995-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties and potential energy curves of several electronic states of SnF+ are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods that include up to 1.6 million configurations. Spin-orbit effects were incorporated using the relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) method. Spectroscopic properties of several excited electronic states of SnF+ are reported, none of which is observed at present.

  20. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of yttrium carbide (YC).

    PubMed

    Suo, Bingbing; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2007-06-14

    The potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states of yttrium carbide (YC) and its cation are calculated at the complete active space self-consistent field and the multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) levels of theory. Fifteen low-lying electronic states of YC with different spin and spatial symmetries were identified. The X (4)Sigma- state prevails as the ground state of YC, and a low-lying excited A (4)Pi state is found to be 1661 cm(-1) higher at the MRSDCI level. The computations of the authors support the assignment of the observed spectra to a B (4)Delta(Omega=72)<--A (4)Pi(Omega=52) transition with a reinterpretation that the A (4)Pi state is appreciably populated under the experimental conditions as it is less than 2000 cm(-1) of the X (4)Sigma- ground state, and the previously suggested (4)Pi ground state is reassigned to the first low-lying excited state of YC. The potential energy curves of YC+ confirm a previous prediction by Seivers et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 6322 (1996)] that the ground state of YC+ is formed through a second pathway at higher energies. The calculated ionization energy of YC is 6.00 eV, while the adiabatic electron affinity is 0.95 eV at the MRSDCI level. The computed ionization energy of YC and dissociation energy of YC+ confirm the revised experimental estimates provided by Seivers et al. although direct experimental measurements yielded results with greater errors due to uncertainty in collisional cross sections for YC+ formation.