Science.gov

Sample records for potential matrix elements

  1. Potential-model calculation of an order-v2 nonrelativistic QCD matrix element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Jungil

    2006-07-01

    We present two methods for computing dimensionally regulated nonrelativistic QCD heavy-quarkonium matrix elements that are related to the second derivative of the heavy-quarkonium wave function at the origin. The first method makes use of a hard-cutoff regulator as an intermediate step and requires knowledge only of the heavy-quarkonium wave function. It involves a significant cancellation that is an obstacle to achieving high numerical accuracy. The second method is more direct and yields a result that is identical to the Gremm-Kapustin relation, but it is limited to use in potential models. It can be generalized to the computation of matrix elements of higher order in the heavy-quark velocity and can be used to resum the contributions to decay and production rates that are associated with those matrix elements. We apply these methods to the Cornell potential model and compute a matrix element for the J/ψ state that appears in the leading relativistic correction to the production and decay of that state through the color-singlet quark-antiquark channel.

  2. Efficient and accurate evaluation of potential energy matrix elements for quantum dynamics using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alborzpour, Jonathan P.; Tew, David P.; Habershon, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a linear combination of basis functions, such as Gaussian wavepackets (GWPs), requires costly evaluation of integrals over the entire potential energy surface (PES) of the system. The standard approach, motivated by computational tractability for direct dynamics, is to approximate the PES with a second order Taylor expansion, for example centred at each GWP. In this article, we propose an alternative method for approximating PES matrix elements based on PES interpolation using Gaussian process regression (GPR). Our GPR scheme requires only single-point evaluations of the PES at a limited number of configurations in each time-step; the necessity of performing often-expensive evaluations of the Hessian matrix is completely avoided. In applications to 2-, 5-, and 10-dimensional benchmark models describing a tunnelling coordinate coupled non-linearly to a set of harmonic oscillators, we find that our GPR method results in PES matrix elements for which the average error is, in the best case, two orders-of-magnitude smaller and, in the worst case, directly comparable to that determined by any other Taylor expansion method, without requiring additional PES evaluations or Hessian matrices. Given the computational simplicity of GPR, as well as the opportunities for further refinement of the procedure highlighted herein, we argue that our GPR methodology should replace methods for evaluating PES matrix elements using Taylor expansions in quantum dynamics simulations.

  3. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  4. Semiclassical integrable matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, J.J.

    1996-03-01

    A semiclassical expression for matrix elements of an arbitrary operator with respect to the eigenstates of an integrable Hamiltonian is derived. This is essentially the Heisenberg correspondence principle, and it is shown via the Weyl correspondence that the approximation is valid through the lowest two orders in {h_bar}. The result is used to prove that an asymptotic form of the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for two large and one small angular momenta is valid through two orders. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Graphical evaluation of relativistic matrix elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, K. N.

    1978-01-01

    A graphical representation of angular momentum was used to evaluate relativistic matrix elements between antisymmetrized states of many particle configurations having any number of open shells. The antisymmetrized matrix element was expanded as a sum of semisymmetrized matrix elements. The diagram representing a semisymmetrized matrix element was composed of four diagram blocks; the bra block, the ket block, the spectator block, and the interaction block. The first three blocks indicate the couplings of the two interacting configurations while the last depends on the interaction and is the replaceable component. Interaction blocks for relativistic operators and commonly used potentials were summarized in ready to use forms. A simple step by step procedure was prescribed generally for calculating antisymmetrized matrix elements of one and two particle operators.

  6. Exact tensor hypercontraction: a universal technique for the resolution of matrix elements of local finite-range N-body potentials in many-body quantum problems.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Hohenstein, Edward G; Schunck, Nicolas F; Sherrill, C David; Martínez, Todd J

    2013-09-27

    Configuration-space matrix elements of N-body potentials arise naturally and ubiquitously in the Ritz-Galerkin solution of many-body quantum problems. For the common specialization of local, finite-range potentials, we develop the exact tensor hypercontraction method, which provides a quantized renormalization of the coordinate-space form of the N-body potential, allowing for a highly separable tensor factorization of the configuration-space matrix elements. This representation allows for substantial computational savings in chemical, atomic, and nuclear physics simulations, particularly with respect to difficult "exchangelike" contractions.

  7. Matrix elements from moments of correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia Cheng; Bouchard, Chris; Orginos, Konstantinos; Richards, David G.

    2016-10-01

    Momentum-space derivatives of matrix elements can be related to their coordinate-space moments through the Fourier transform. We derive these expressions as a function of momentum transfer Q2 for asymptotic in/out states consisting of a single hadron. We calculate corrections to the finite volume moments by studying the spatial dependence of the lattice correlation functions. This method permits the computation of not only the values of matrix elements at momenta accessible on the lattice, but also the momentum-space derivatives, providing {\\it a priori} information about the Q2 dependence of form factors. As a specific application we use the method, at a single lattice spacing and with unphysically heavy quarks, to directly obtain the slope of the isovector form factor at various Q2, whence the isovector charge radius. The method has potential application in the calculation of any hadronic matrix element with momentum transfer, including those relevant to hadronic weak decays.

  8. Potential curves and nonadiabatic matrix elements for collisions involving fragments of the HeN + molecular ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian-ping; Buenker, Robert J.; Hirsch, Gerhard; Kimura, Mineo

    1995-05-01

    Ab initio multireference CI calculations have been carried out for the HeN+ molecular ion in order to describe collision processes between its constituent neutral and ionized atoms. The accuracy of these calculations is evaluated by means of a comparison of results obtained at large internuclear separations with the corresponding asymptotic energies deduced from atomic spectral data. Energy values are computed for the eleven lowest He++N and He+N+ atomic limits and average discrepancies relative to the experimental excitation energies up to 110 000 cm-1 are found to lie in the 1000-3000 cm-1 range, of which only 200 cm-1 appears to be the fault of the configuration interaction (CI) technique itself, with the main portion of the error stemming from the choice of atomic orbital (AO) basis instead. The HeN+ X 3Σ- ground state is calculated to have a De value of only 1414 cm-1, but the excited 2 3Π state has a much larger value of 22 133 cm-1 by virtue of an avoided crossing with the lower state of this symmetry. The corresponding radial nonadiabatic coupling is responsible for a large cross section for an excitation process between the N+(3Pg)+He and N+(3Du)+He channels which indirectly provides an efficient electron-capture mechanism leading to the N(4Su)+He+ exit channel. Additional nonadiabatic matrix elements for rotational and spin-orbit coupling have also been obtained and analyzed, as well as transition moments between the various HeN+ molecular states calculated.

  9. Analytic Matrix Elements and Gradients with Shifted Correlated Gaussians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are shown to be analytic. Their gradients with respect to the non-linear parameters of the Gaussians are also analytic. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.

  10. POTHMF: A program for computing potential curves and matrix elements of the coupled adiabatic radial equations for a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Gerdt, V. P.; Rostovtsev, V. A.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Abrashkevich, A. G.; Kaschiev, M. S.; Serov, V. V.

    2008-02-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program is presented which calculates with the relative machine precision potential curves and matrix elements of the coupled adiabatic radial equations for a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field. The potential curves are eigenvalues corresponding to the angular oblate spheroidal functions that compose adiabatic basis which depends on the radial variable as a parameter. The matrix elements of radial coupling are integrals in angular variables of the following two types: product of angular functions and the first derivative of angular functions in parameter, and product of the first derivatives of angular functions in parameter, respectively. The program calculates also the angular part of the dipole transition matrix elements (in the length form) expressed as integrals in angular variables involving product of a dipole operator and angular functions. Moreover, the program calculates asymptotic regular and irregular matrix solutions of the coupled adiabatic radial equations at the end of interval in radial variable needed for solving a multi-channel scattering problem by the generalized R-matrix method. Potential curves and radial matrix elements computed by the POTHMF program can be used for solving the bound state and multi-channel scattering problems. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the energy values, a short-range reaction matrix and corresponding wave functions with the help of the KANTBP program. Benchmark calculations for the known photoionization cross-sections are presented. Program summaryProgram title:POTHMF Catalogue identifier:AEAA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:8123 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data

  11. Comix, a New Matrix Element Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Gleisberg, Tanju; Hoche, Stefan; /Durham U., IPPP

    2008-09-03

    We present a new tree-level matrix element generator, based on the color dressed Berends-Giele recursive relations. We discuss two new algorithms for phase space integration, dedicated to be used with large multiplicities and color sampling.

  12. Semiclassical matrix elements from periodic orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, B.; Fishman, S.; Mueller, K.; Wintgen, D.

    1992-01-01

    An extension of Gutzwiller's (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1990) semiclassical theory for chaotic systems that allows a determination of matrix elements in terms of classical periodic orbits. Associated zeta functions are derived. The semiclassical predictions are found to be in good agreement with Fourier transforms of quantum spectra of hydrogen in a magnetic field. Expressions for off-diagonal matrix elements are derived that are extensions of the Bohr correspondence relations for integrable systems.

  13. Semiclassical matrix elements from periodic orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, B.; Fishman, S.; Mueller, K.; Wintgen, D.

    1992-01-01

    An extension of Gutzwiller's (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1990) semiclassical theory for chaotic systems that allows a determination of matrix elements in terms of classical periodic orbits. Associated zeta functions are derived. The semiclassical predictions are found to be in good agreement with Fourier transforms of quantum spectra of hydrogen in a magnetic field. Expressions for off-diagonal matrix elements are derived that are extensions of the Bohr correspondence relations for integrable systems.

  14. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  15. Renormalon ambiguities in NRQCD operator matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Chen, Yu-Qi

    1999-09-01

    We analyze the renormalon ambiguities that appear in factorization formulas in QCD. Our analysis contains a simple argument that the ambiguities in the short-distance coefficients and operator matrix elements are artifacts of dimensional-regularization factorization schemes and are absent in cutoff schemes. We also present a method for computing the renormalon ambiguities in operator matrix elements and apply it to a computation of the ambiguities in the matrix elements that appear in the NRQCD factorization formulas for the annihilation decays of S-wave quarkonia. Our results, combined with those of Braaten and Chen for the short-distance coefficients, provide an explicit demonstration that the ambiguities cancel in the physical decay rates. In addition, we analyze the renormalon ambiguities in the Gremm-Kapustin relation and in various definitions of the heavy-quark mass.

  16. The MOON project and DBD matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-06-01

    This is a brief report on experimental studies of double beta decays (DBD) in Japan, the MOON project for spectroscopic studies of neutrino-less DBD (0vββ) and on experimental studies of DBD nuclear matrix elements. Experimental DBD studies in Japan were made by geochemical methods on 130Te, 128Te and 96Zr and by a series of ELEGANT(EL) counting methods, EL III on 76Ge, EL IV, V on 100Mo, 116Cd, and EL VI on 48Ca. Future counter experiments are MOON, CANDLES, XMASS and DCBA. The MOON project, which is based on EL V, aims at studies of the Majorana nature of the neutrino (v) and the v-mass spectrum by spectroscopic 0vββ experiments with the v-mass sensitivity of < mmv > = 100-30 meV. The MOON detector is a super ensemble of multi-layer modules, each being composed by PL scintillator plates and position-sensitive detector planes. DBD nuclear matrix elements have been studied experimentally by using charge exchange reactions. The 2-neutrino DBD matrix elements are expressed by successive single-β matrix elements through low-lying intermediate states.

  17. Status Report on Weak Matrix Element Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    1996-03-01

    This talk presents results of weak matrix elements calculated from simulations done on 170 32 3 × 64 lattices at β = 6.0 using quenched Wilson fermions. We discuss the extraction of pseudoscalar decay constants ƒπ, ƒ K, ƒ D, and f Ds, the form-factors for the rare decay B → K*γ, and the matrix elements of the 4-fermion operators relevant to B K, B7, B8. We present an analysis of the various sources of systematic errors, and show that these are now much larger than the statistical errors for each of these observables. Our main results are ƒ D = 186(29) MeV, ƒ Ds = 224(16) MeV, T1 = T2 = 0.24(1), B K( NDR,2 GeV) = 0.67(9), and B8 ( NDR, 2 GeV) = 0.81(1).

  18. Lattice QCD calculations of weak matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detar, Carleton

    2017-01-01

    Lattice QCD has become the method of choice for calculating the hadronic environment of the electroweak interactions of quarks. So it is now an essential tool in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Advances in computing power and algorithms have resulted in increasingly precise predictions and increasingly stringent tests of the Standard Model. I review results of recent calculations of weak matrix elements and discuss their implications for new physics. Supported by US NSF grant PHY10-034278.

  19. Twisted mass QCD for weak matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Carlos

    2006-12-01

    I report on the application of tmQCD techniques to the computation of hadronic matrix elements of four-fermion operators. Emphasis is put on the computation of BK in quenched QCD performed by the ALPHA Collaboration. The extension of tmQCD strategies to the study of neutral B- meson mixing is briefly discussed. Finally, some remarks are made concerning proposals to apply tmQCD to the computation of K → ππ amplitudes.

  20. Random matrix triality at nonzero chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, M.A.; Osborn, J.C.; Verbaarschot, J.J.

    1997-12-01

    We introduce three universality classes of chiral random matrix ensembles with a nonzero chemical potential and real, complex or quaternion real matrix elements. In the thermodynamic limit we find that the distribution of the eigenvalues in the complex plane does not depend on the Dyson index, and is given by the solution proposed by Stephanov. For a finite number of degrees of freedom, N, we find an accumulation of eigenvalues on the imaginary axis for real matrices, whereas for quaternion real matrices we find a depletion of eigenvalues in this domain. This effect is of order 1/{radical} (N) . In particular for the real case the resolvent shows a discontinuity of order 1/{radical} (N) . These results are in agreement with lattice QCD simulations with staggered fermions and recent instanton liquid simulations both for two colors and a nonzero chemical potential. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Rovibrational matrix elements of the quadrupole moment of N2 in a solid parahydrogen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Adya P.; Balasubramanian, T. K.

    2008-11-01

    The present work pertains to the study of the rotational dynamics of N2 molecules solvated in a matrix of solid para-H2. It is shown that the mixing of the rotational states due to the anisotropic part of the N2-H2 pair potential in the solid gives rise to an additional 5.4% contribution to the intensity of quadrupole-induced double transitions involving N2-H2 pair. Hence the recently reported quadrupole moment matrix element of N2 in a solid para-H2 crystal [A. P. Mishra and T. K. Balasubramanian, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 124507 (2006)], which was deduced from a comparison of the theoretical intensity (with rotational mixing of states neglected) with the measured value is larger by ˜2.7%. The ground electronic state rovibrational matrix elements ⟨v'J'|Q2(r)|vJ⟩ of N2 molecule in a solid parahydrogen matrix for v,v'≤1 and J,J'≤4 have also been computed by taking into account the changes in the intramolecular potential of N2 due to the intermolecular interaction in the matrix. The computed quadrupole moment matrix elements agree well with a few available values (for v =v'=0) deduced from the observed transitions.

  2. Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element

    SciTech Connect

    Alwall, Johan; Freitas, Ayres; Mattelaer, Olivier; /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /Louvain U.

    2012-04-10

    We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM. The goal of the LHC at CERN, scheduled to start this year, is to discover new physics through deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. After discovery of deviations from the SM, the next step will be classification of the new physics. An important first goal in this process will be establishing a mass spectrum of the new particles. One of the most challenging scenarios is pair-production of new particles which decay to invisible massive particles, giving missing energy signals. Many methods have been proposed for mass determination in such scenarios (for a recent list of references, see e.g. [1]). In this proceeding, we report the first steps in applying the Matrix Element Method (MEM) in the context of supersymmetric scenarios giving missing energy signals. After a quick review of the MEM, we will focus on squark pair production, a process where other mass determination techniques have difficulties to simultaneously determine the LSP and squark masses. Finally, we will introduce methods to extend the range of validity of the MEM, by taking into account initial state radiation (ISR) in the method.

  3. Quenching of spin matrix elements in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towner, I. S.

    1987-11-01

    Matrix elements of spin operators evaluated in a nuclear medium are systematically quenched compared to their values in free space. There are a number of contributing reasons for this. Foremost is the traditional nuclear structure difficulty of the inadequacy of the lowest-order shell-model wavefunctions. We use the Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory to correct for this, arguing that calculations must be carried through at least t o second order. This is a question of the appropriate effective interaction. We review the Landau-Migdal approach in which only RPA graphs are retained and discuss the strength of this interaction in the spin-isospin channel expressed in terms of the parameter g'. We also consider one-boson-exchange models and compare the two. The advantage of the OBEP models is that the two-nucleon meson-exchange current operators can be constructed to be consistent with the potential as required by the continuity equation for vector currents and the partial conservation (PCAC) equation for axial currents. We give a complete derivation of the MEC operators of heavy-meson range starting with the chiral Lagrangians used by Ivanov and Truhlik. Nonlocal terms are retained in the computations. We single out one class of MEC processes involving isobar excitation and demonstrate that in lowest order there is an equivalence between treating the isobar as an MEC correction and treating it as a nuclear constituent through the transition spin formalism. Differences occur in higher orders. There are a number of uncertainties in the isobar calculation involving the neglect of the isobar's natural width, the relativistic propagator being off the mass shell and the coupling constants not being known with any precision. We present a comprehensive calculation of core-polarisation, meson-exchange current and isobar-current corrections to low-energy M1 and Gamow-Teller transitions in closed-shell-plus-one nuclei (at LS and jj closed shells) expressing the results in

  4. ARPES matrix element and the waterfall effect in the cuprates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Susmita; Das, Tanmoy; Nieminen, Jouko; Lindroos, Matti; Lin, Hsin; Markiewicz, Robert; Bansil, Arun

    2009-03-01

    The high-energy kink (HEK) or the 'waterfall' effect as seen in angle-resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) in the cuprates has the potential of revealing important information about the dressing of quasiparticles by electronic excitations [1,2,3]. However, recently it has been suggested that matrix element effects radically modify the experimental spectra in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (Bi2212), and it has been questioned whether the HEK exists [4]. Here we discuss how the interplay between the matrix element and self-energy effects shapes the ARPES spectra. Both the ARPES matrix element and the self-energy are found to be necessary for understanding the experimental spectra. Work supported in part by the USDOE. [1] R. S. Markiewicz et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 174514 (2007). [2] A. Macridin et al.,Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 237001 (2007). [3] Tanmoy Das et al., cond-mat:0807.4257. [4] D.S. Inosov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 237002 (2007).

  5. Microscopic method for E 0 transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. A.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Kibédi, T.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    We present a microscopic model for electric monopole (E 0 ) transition matrix elements by combining a configuration interaction model for orbital occupations with an energy-density functional model for the single-particle potential and radial wave functions. The configuration interaction model is used to constrain the orbital occupations for the diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements. These are used in an energy-density functional calculation to obtain a self-consistent transition density. This density contains the valence contribution, as well as the polarization of the protons by the valence protons and neutrons. We show connections between E 0 matrix elements and isomer and isotope shifts of the charge radius. The spin-orbit correction to the charge density is important in some cases. This model accounts for a large part of the data over a wide region of the nuclear chart. It also accounts for the shape of the observed electron scattering form factors. The results depend on the Skyrme parameters used for the energy-density functional and might be used to provide new constraints for them.

  6. Useful extremum principle for the variational calculation of matrix elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Rau, A. R. P.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    Variational principles are considered for the approximate evaluation of the diagonal matrix elements of an arbitrary known linear Hermitian operator. A method is derived that is immediately applicable to the variational determination of both the off-diagonal and diagonal matrix elements of normal and modified Green's functions.

  7. Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transfer Matrix Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    jACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) (UNCLASSIFIED) ROTORDYNAMIC ANALYSIS WITH SHELL ELEMENTS FOR THE TRANSFER MATRIX METHOD 12...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE AFIT/CI "OVERPRINT" iii ABSTRACT Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transfer Matrix Method. (August...analysts in indus- try . ’ . ," Accesiu:, For NTIS CR,4i Fi FilC TA,: [3 0. fi A-1 B I ., ,.................. ,., ROTORDYNAMIC ANALYSIS WITH SHELL ELEMENTS

  8. ‘tripleint_cc’: A program for 2-centre variational leptonic Coulomb potential matrix elements using Hylleraas-type trial functions, with a performance optimization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, M.; Armour, E. A. G.; Todd, A. C.; Franklin, C. P.; Cooper, J. N.

    2009-12-01

    We present a program used to calculate intricate three-particle integrals for variational calculations of solutions to the leptonic Schrödinger equation with two nuclear centres in which inter-leptonic distances (electron-electron and positron-electron) are included directly in the trial functions. The program has been used so far in calculations of He-H¯ interactions and positron H 2 scattering, however the precisely defined integrals are applicable to other situations. We include a summary discussion of how the program has been optimized from a 'legacy'-type code to a more modern high-performance code with a performance improvement factor of up to 1000. Program summaryProgram title: tripleint.cc Catalogue identifier: AEEV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 829 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 91 798 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 (fixed format) Computer: Modern PC (tested on AMD processor) [1], IBM Power5 [2] Cray XT4 [3], similar Operating system: Red Hat Linux [1], IBM AIX [2], UNICOS [3] Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Serial (multi-core shared memory may be needed for some large jobs) RAM: Dependent on parameter sizes and option to use intermediate I/O. Estimates for practical use: 0.5-2 GBytes (with intermediate I/O); 1-4 GBytes (all-memory: the preferred option). Classification: 2.4, 2.6, 2.7, 2.9, 16.5, 16.10, 20 Nature of problem: The 'tripleint.cc' code evaluates three-particle integrals needed in certain variational (in particular: Rayleigh-Ritz and generalized-Kohn) matrix elements for solution of the Schrödinger equation with two fixed centres (the solutions may then be used in subsequent dynamic

  9. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  10. Configuration interaction matrix elements for the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Macek, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    In the spherical model of the quantum Hall system, the two-body matrix elements and pseudopotentials can be found analytically in terms of a general scalar pair interaction potential by expressing the pair interaction as a weighted sum over Legendre polynomials. For non-infinite systems, only a finite set of terms in the potential expansion contribute to the interactions; the contributing terms define an effective spatial potential for the system. The connection between the effective spatial potential and the pseudopotential is one-to-one for finite systems, and any completely defined model pseudopotential can be analytically inverted to give a unique corresponding spatial potential. This technique of inverting the pseudopotential to derive effective spatial potentials may be of use for developing accurate model spatial potentials for quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We demonstrate the technique and the corresponding spatial potentials for a few example model pseudopotentials. Supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. DOE, Grant DE-FG02-02ER15283 to the University of Tennessee.

  11. Vanishing of dipole matrix elements at level crossings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocher, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration that the vanishing of certain coupling matrix elements at level crossings follow from angular momentum commutation relations. A magnetic dipole transition having delta M = plus or minus 1, induced near a crossing of the levels in a nonzero magnetic field, is found to have a dipole matrix element comparable to or smaller than the quotient of the level separation and the field. This result also applies in the analogous electric field electric dipole case.

  12. The dynamic stiffness matrix of two-dimensional elements: application to Kirchhoff's plate continuous elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimir, J. B.; Kevorkian, S.; Vinh, T.

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes a procedure for building the dynamic stiffness matrix of two-dimensional elements with free edge boundary conditions. The dynamic stiffness matrix is the basis of the continuous element method. Then, the formulation is used to build a Kirchhoff rectangular plate element. Gorman's method of boundary condition decomposition and Levy's series are used to obtain the strong solution of the elementary problem. A symbolic computation software partially performs the construction of the dynamic stiffness matrix from this solution. The performances of the element are evaluated from comparisons with harmonic responses of plates obtained by the finite element method.

  13. Status and future of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-beta decay: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Jonathan; Menéndez, Javier

    2017-04-01

    The nuclear matrix elements that govern the rate of neutrinoless double beta decay must be accurately calculated if experiments are to reach their full potential. Theorists have been working on the problem for a long time but have recently stepped up their efforts as ton-scale experiments have begun to look feasible. Here we review past and recent work on the matrix elements in a wide variety of nuclear models and discuss work that will be done in the near future. Ab initio nuclear-structure theory, which is developing rapidly, holds out hope of more accurate matrix elements with quantifiable error bars.

  14. Status and future of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-beta decay: a review.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jonathan; Menéndez, Javier

    2017-04-01

    The nuclear matrix elements that govern the rate of neutrinoless double beta decay must be accurately calculated if experiments are to reach their full potential. Theorists have been working on the problem for a long time but have recently stepped up their efforts as ton-scale experiments have begun to look feasible. Here we review past and recent work on the matrix elements in a wide variety of nuclear models and discuss work that will be done in the near future. Ab initio nuclear-structure theory, which is developing rapidly, holds out hope of more accurate matrix elements with quantifiable error bars.

  15. The Matrix Element Method: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Gainer, James S.; Lykken, Joseph; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Mrenna, Stephen; Park, Myeonghun

    2013-07-12

    The increasing use of multivariate methods, and in particular the Matrix Element Method (MEM), represents a revolution in experimental particle physics. With continued exponential growth in computing capabilities, the use of sophisticated multivariate methods-- already common-- will soon become ubiquitous and ultimately almost compulsory. While the existence of sophisticated algorithms for disentangling signal and background might naively suggest a diminished role for theorists, the use of the MEM, with its inherent connection to the calculation of differential cross sections will benefit from collaboration between theorists and experimentalists. In this white paper, we will briefly describe the MEM and some of its recent uses, note some current issues and potential resolutions, and speculate about exciting future opportunities.

  16. Coulomb matrix elements in multi-orbital Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünemann, Jörg; Gebhard, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Coulomb matrix elements are needed in all studies in solid-state theory that are based on Hubbard-type multi-orbital models. Due to symmetries, the matrix elements are not independent. We determine a set of independent Coulomb parameters for a d-shell and an f-shell and all point groups with up to 16 elements (O h , O, T d , T h , D 6h , and D 4h ). Furthermore, we express all other matrix elements as a function of the independent Coulomb parameters. Apart from the solution of the general point-group problem we investigate in detail the spherical approximation and first-order corrections to the spherical approximation.

  17. Opportunity potential matrix for Atlantic Canadians

    Treesearch

    Greg Danchuk; Ed Thomson

    1992-01-01

    Opportunity for provision of Parks Service benefit to Atlantic Canadians was investigated by mapping travel behaviour into a matrix in terms of origin, season, purpose, distance, time, and destination. Findings identified potential for benefit in several activity areas, particularly within residents' own province.

  18. Constraining neutrinoless double-beta decay matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Neutrinoless double-beta decay, if detected, would proof the Majorana nature of neutrinos. The decay lifetime is governed by the absolute neutrino masses and the nuclear matrix elements of the transition. Therefore accurate matrix elements are needed to asses the sensitivity of current and future experiments, and to determine the absolute neutrino masses and hierarchy with neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, present nuclear matrix element calculations show significant uncertainties. These affect the nuclear structure description of the mother and daughter nuclei, and also the treatment of the transition operator. In this talk I cover recent progress on neutrinoless double-beta decay nuclear matrix element calculations. On the one hand, I discuss the role of the size of the configuration space and of nuclear structure correlations. By comparing matrix elements obtained with different nuclear structure approaches and interactions, optimal strategies for improving the nuclear structure calculations capturing the most important correlations are identified. On the other hand, I describe first attempts to include two-body currents in the double-beta decay operator. They can be related to the ``quenching'' of the spin-isospin operator empirically found in nuclear structure studies.

  19. Computer programs for the Boltzmann collision matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, P.

    1989-09-01

    When the distribution function in the kinetic theory of gases is expanded in a basis of orthogonal functions, the Boltzmann collision operators can be evaluated in terms of appropriate matrix elements. These matrix elements are usually given in terms of highly complex algebraic expressions. When Burnett functions, which consist of Sonine polynomials and spherical harmonics, are used as the basis, the irreducible tensor formalism provides expressions for the matrix elements that are algebraically simple, possess high symmetry, and are computationally more economical than in any other basis. The package reported here consists of routines to compute such matrix elements in a Burnett function basis for a mixture of hard sphere gases, as also the loss integral of a Burnett mode and the functions themselves. The matrix elements involve the Clebsch-Gordan and Brody-Moshinsky coefficients, both of which are used here for unusually high values of their arguments. For the purpose of validation both coefficients are computed using two different methods. Though written for hard sphere molecules the package can, with only slight modification, be adapted to more general molecular models as well.

  20. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  1. The matrix element method at next-to-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John M.; Giele, Walter T.; Williams, Ciaran

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an extension of the matrix element method to next-to-leading order in perturbation theory, for electro-weak final states. To accomplish this we have developed a method to calculate next-to-leading order weights on an event-by-event basis. This allows for the definition of next-to-leading order likelihoods in exactly the same fashion as at leading order, thus extending the matrix element method to next-to-leading order. A welcome by-product of the method is the straightforward and efficient generation of unweighted next-to-leading order events. As examples of the application of our next-to-leading order matrix element method we consider the measurement of the mass of the Z boson and also the search for the Higgs boson in the four lepton channel.

  2. Neutrinoless double-β decay and nuclear transition matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P. K.

    2015-10-28

    Within mechanisms involving the light Majorana neutrinos, squark-neutrino, Majorons, sterile neutrinos and heavy Majorana neutrino, nuclear transition matrix elements for the neutrinoless (β{sup −}β{sup −}){sub 0ν} decay of {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 128,130}Te and {sup 150}Nd nuclei are calculated by employing the PHFB approach. Effects due to finite size of nucleons, higher order currents, short range correlations, and deformations of parent as well as daughter nuclei on the calculated matrix elements are estimated. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements within long-ranged mechanisms but for double Majoron accompanied (β{sup −}β{sup −}ϕϕ){sub 0ν} decay modes are 9%–15%. In the case of short ranged heavy Majorona neutrino exchange mechanism, the maximum uncertainty is about 35%. The maximum systematic error within the mechanism involving the exchange of light Majorana neutrino is about 46%.

  3. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE PAGES

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inversemore » of the background distribution.« less

  4. Distributions of off-diagonal scattering matrix elements: Exact results

    SciTech Connect

    Nock, A. Kumar, S. Sommers, H.-J. Guhr, T.

    2014-03-15

    Scattering is a ubiquitous phenomenon which is observed in a variety of physical systems which span a wide range of length scales. The scattering matrix is the key quantity which provides a complete description of the scattering process. The universal features of scattering in chaotic systems is most generally modeled by the Heidelberg approach which introduces stochasticity to the scattering matrix at the level of the Hamiltonian describing the scattering center. The statistics of the scattering matrix is obtained by averaging over the ensemble of random Hamiltonians of appropriate symmetry. We derive exact results for the distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the off-diagonal scattering matrix elements applicable to orthogonally-invariant and unitarily-invariant Hamiltonians, thereby solving a long standing problem. -- Highlights: •Scattering problem in complex or chaotic systems. •Heidelberg approach to model the chaotic nature of the scattering center. •A novel route to the nonlinear sigma model based on the characteristic function. •Exact results for the distributions of off-diagonal scattering-matrix elements. •Universal aspects of the scattering-matrix fluctuations.

  5. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S.; Frederico, T.; Krein,; Williams, A.G.

    1991-12-31

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  6. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S. ); Frederico, T. , Sao Jose dos Campos, SP . Inst. de Estudos Avancados); Krein, . Inst. de Fisica Teorica); Williams, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  7. Precision Measurement of Transition Matrix Elements via Light Shift Cancellation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    two zeros, so that simultaneous fits to both zeros accurately determine R6p, independent of the other pa - rameters. With the addition of sufficiently...data set. The extracted matrix elements are insensitive to the exclusion value. [35] U. Volz and H. Schmoranzer, Phys. Scr. T65, 48 (1996). [36] See

  8. Some New Elements for the Matrix Displacement Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-10-01

    OCT 1968 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1968 to 00-00-1968 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Some New Elements for the Matrix Displacement Method 5a...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory,Wright Patterson AFB,OH,45433 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9...on Matrix Methods in Structural Mechanics (2nd) Held at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, on 15-17 October 1968. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  9. Covariances from Light-Element R-Matrix Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.

    2008-12-15

    We review the method for obtaining covariance information for light-element reactions using R-matrix theory. The general LANL R-matrix analysis code EDA provides accurate covariances for the resonance parameters at a solution due to the search algorithm it uses to find a local minimum of the chi-square surface. This information is used, together with analytically calculated sensitivity derivatives, in the first-order error propagation equation to obtain cross-section covariances for all reactions included in the analysis. Examples are given of the covariances obtained from the EDA analyses for n-p scattering and for the n+{sup 6}Li reactions used in the latest light-element standard cross section evaluation. Also discussed is a method of defining 'pure theory' correlations that could be useful for extensions to higher energies and heavier systems.

  10. Nuclear matrix elements for double-β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barea, J.; Kotila, J.; Iachello, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Direct determination of the neutrino mass through double-β decay is at the present time one of the most important areas of experimental and theoretical research in nuclear and particle physics.Purpose: We calculate nuclear matrix elements for the extraction of the average neutrino mass in neutrinoless double-β decay.Methods: The microscopic interacting boson model (IBM-2) is used.Results: Nuclear matrix elements in the closure approximation are calculated for 48Ca, 76Ge, 82Se, 96Zr, 100Mo, 110Pd, 116Cd, 124Sn, 128Te, 130Te, 148Nd, 150Nd, 154Sm, 160Gd, and 198Pt decay.Conclusions: Realistic predictions for the expected half-lives in neutrinoless double-β decay with light and heavy neutrino exchange in terms of neutrino masses are made and limits are set from current experiments.

  11. Magic wavelengths, matrix elements, polarizabilities, and lifetimes of Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Clark, Charles W.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent interest in their applications, we report a systematic study of Cs atomic properties calculated by a high-precision relativistic all-order method. Excitation energies, reduced matrix elements, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for levels with principal quantum numbers n ≤12 and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers l ≤3 . Recommended values and estimates of uncertainties are provided for a number of electric-dipole transitions and the electric dipole polarizabilities of the n s , n p , and n d states. We also report a calculation of the electric quadrupole polarizability of the ground state. We display the dynamic polarizabilities of the 6 s and 7 p states for optical wavelengths between 1160 and 1800 nm and identify corresponding magic wavelengths for the 6 s -7 p1 /2 and 6 s -7 p3 /2 transitions. The values of relevant matrix elements needed for polarizability calculations at other wavelengths are provided.

  12. Calculation of transition matrix elements by nonsingular orbital transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kývala, Mojmír

    A general strategy is described for the evaluation of transition matrix elements between pairs of full class CI wave functions built up from mutually nonorthogonal molecular orbitals. A new method is proposed for the counter-transformation of the linear expansion coefficients of a full CI wave function under a nonsingular transformation of the molecular-orbital basis. The method, which consists in a straightforward application of the Cauchy-Binet formula to the definition of a Slater determinant, is shown to be simple and suitable for efficient implementation on current high-performance computers. The new method appears mainly beneficial to the calculation of miscellaneous transition matrix elements among individually optimized CASSCF states and to the re-evaluation of the CASCI expansion coefficients in Slater-determinant bases formed from arbitrarily rotated (e.g., localized or, conversely, delocalized) active molecular orbitals.

  13. Disk level S-matrix elements at eikonal Regge limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garousi, Mohammad R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the calculation of the color-ordered disk level S-matrix element of massless scalar vertex operators for the special case that some of the Mandelstam variables for which there are no open string channel in the amplitude, are set to zero. By explicit calculation we show that the string form factors in the 2n-point functions reduce to one at the eikonal Regge limit.

  14. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; ...

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  15. Calculating weak matrix elements using HYP staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Bhattacharya; G. T. Fleming; G. Kilcup; R. Gupta; W. Lee; S. Sharpe

    2004-03-01

    We present preliminary results of weak matrix elements relevant to CP violation calculated using the HYP (II) staggered fermions. Since the complete set of matching coefficients at the one-loop level became available recently, we have constructed lattice operators with all the g{sup 2} corrections included. The main results include both {Delta}I = 3/2 and {Delta}I = 1/2 contributions.

  16. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Evaluation of a matrix element].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of the matrix element of the probability of interprotein electron transfer on the mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor centers and the distance between them was calculated. The calculations were made under the assumption that electron transfer proceeds mainly by a collective excitation of polaron nature, like a solvated electron state. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data and indicate the nonexponential behavior of this dependence in the case when the distance transfer is less than 20 A.

  17. Reweighting QCD matrix-element and parton-shower calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmann, Enrico; Schönherr, Marek; Schumann, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    We present the implementation and validation of the techniques used to efficiently evaluate parametric and perturbative theoretical uncertainties in matrix-element plus parton-shower simulations within the Sherpa event-generator framework. By tracing the full α _s and PDF dependences, including the parton-shower component, as well as the fixed-order scale uncertainties, we compute variational event weights on-the-fly, thereby greatly reducing the computational costs to obtain theoretical-uncertainty estimates.

  18. Global U(1 ) Y⊗BRST symmetry and the LSS theorem: Ward-Takahashi identities governing Green's functions, on-shell T -matrix elements, and the effective potential in the scalar sector of the spontaneously broken extended Abelian Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Bryan W.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2017-09-01

    self-consistency conditions with those for gauge theories, further severely constrains the effective potential, and guarantees infrared finiteness for zero NGB (π ˜) mass. The on-shell WTI include a Lee-Stora-Symanzik theorem, also for gauge theories. This enforces the strong condition mπ2=0 on the pseudoscalar π (not just the much weaker condition mπ˜2=0 on the NGB π ˜), and causes all relevant-operator contributions to the effective Lagrangian to vanish exactly. In consequence, certain heavy C P -conserving Φ , ψ matter decouple completely in the mHe a v y 2/mwe a k 2→∞ limit. We prove four new low-energy heavy-particle decoupling theorems that are more powerful than the usual Appelquist-Carazzone decoupling theorem: including all virtual ϕ and ψ loop contributions, relevant operators operators vanish exactly due to the exact U (1 )Y symmetry of 1-soft-π Adler-self-consistency relations governing on-shell T-matrix elements. Underlying our results is that global U (1 )Y transformations δU (1 )Y,and nilpotent s2=0 BRST transformations, commute: we prove [δU (1 )Y,s ] in G. 't Hooft's Rξ gauges. With its on-shell T-matrix constraints, SSB E-AHM physics therefore has more symmetry than does its BRST-invariant Lagrangian LE-AHM Rξ : i.e. global U (1 )Y⊗BRST symmetry. The NGB π ˜ decouples from the observable particle spectrum Bμ,h ˜, Φ ˜, ψ ˜ in the usual way, when the observable vector Bμ≡Aμ+1/e ⟨H ⟩ ∂μπ ˜ absorbs it, as if it were a gauge transformation, hiding both towers of U (1 )Y WTI from observable particle physics.

  19. Double-β decay matrix elements from lattice quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiburzi, Brian C.; Wagman, Michael L.; Winter, Frank; Chang, Emmanuel; Davoudi, Zohreh; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin J.; Shanahan, Phiala E.; Nplqcd Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) calculation of the nuclear matrix element relevant to the n n →p p e e ν¯eν¯e transition is described in detail, expanding on the results presented in Ref. [P. E. Shanahan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 062003 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.062003]. This matrix element, which involves two insertions of the weak axial current, is an important input for phenomenological determinations of double-β decay rates of nuclei. From this exploratory study, performed using unphysical values of the quark masses, the long-distance deuteron-pole contribution to the matrix element is separated from shorter-distance hadronic contributions. This polarizability, which is only accessible in double-weak processes, cannot be constrained from single-β decay of nuclei, and is found to be smaller than the long-distance contributions in this calculation, but non-negligible. In this work, technical aspects of the LQCD calculations, and of the relevant formalism in the pionless effective field theory, are described. Further calculations of the isotensor axial polarizability, in particular near and at the physical values of the light-quark masses, are required for precise determinations of both two-neutrino and neutrinoless double-β decay rates in heavy nuclei.

  20. Algebraic evaluation of matrix elements in the Laguerre function basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, A. E.; Caprio, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Laguerre functions constitute one of the fundamental basis sets for calculations in atomic and molecular electron-structure theory, with applications in hadronic and nuclear theory as well. While similar in form to the Coulomb bound-state eigenfunctions (from the Schrödinger eigenproblem) or the Coulomb-Sturmian functions (from a related Sturm-Liouville problem), the Laguerre functions, unlike these former functions, constitute a complete, discrete, orthonormal set for square-integrable functions in three dimensions. We construct the SU(1, 1) × SO(3) dynamical algebra for the Laguerre functions and apply the ideas of factorization (or supersymmetric quantum mechanics) to derive shift operators for these functions. We use the resulting algebraic framework to derive analytic expressions for matrix elements of several basic radial operators (involving powers of the radial coordinate and radial derivative) in the Laguerre function basis. We illustrate how matrix elements for more general spherical tensor operators in three dimensional space, such as the gradient, may then be constructed from these radial matrix elements.

  1. Multi-jet Merging with NLO Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Siegert, Frank; Hoche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2011-08-18

    In the algorithm presented here, the ME+PS approach to merge samples of tree-level matrix elements into inclusive event samples is combined with the POWHEG method, which includes exact next-to-leading order matrix elements in the parton shower. The advantages of the method are discussed and the quality of its implementation in SHERPA is exemplified by results for e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into hadrons at LEP, for deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering at HERA, for Drell-Yan lepton-pair production at the Tevatron and for W{sup +}W{sup -}-production at LHC energies. The simulation of hard QCD radiation in parton-shower Monte Carlos has seen tremendous progress over the last years. It was largely stimulated by the need for more precise predictions at LHC energies where the large available phase space allows additional hard QCD radiation alongside known Standard Model processes or even signals from new physics. Two types of algorithms have been developed, which allow to improve upon the soft-collinear approximations made in the parton shower, such that hard radiation is simulated according to exact matrix elements. In the ME+PS approach [1] higher-order tree-level matrix elements for different final-state jet multiplicity are merged with each other and with subsequent parton shower emissions to generate an inclusive sample. Such a prescription is invaluable for analyses which are sensitive to final states with a large jet multiplicity. The only remaining deficiency of such tree-level calculations is the large uncertainty stemming from scale variations. The POWHEG method [2] solves this problem for the lowest multiplicity subprocess by combining full NLO matrix elements with the parton shower. While this leads to NLO accuracy in the inclusive cross section and the exact radiation pattern for the first emission, it fails to describe higher-order emissions with improved accuracy. Thus it is not sufficient if final states with high jet multiplicities are considered

  2. Weak matrix elements on the lattice - Circa 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, A.

    1995-10-03

    Status of weak matrix elements is reviewed. In particular, e{prime}/e, B {yields} K*{gamma}, B{sub B} and B{sub B}, are discussed and the overall situation with respect to the lattice effort and some of its phenomenological implications are summarised. For e{prime}/e the need for the relevant matrix elements is stressed in view of the forthcoming improved experiments. For some of the operators, (e.g. O{sub 6}), even bound on their matrix elements would be very helpful. On B {yields} K{degrees}{gamma}, a constant behavior of T{sub 2} appears disfavored although dependence of T{sub 2} could, of course, be milder than a simple pole. Improved data is badly needed to settle this important issue firmly, especially in view of its ramification for extractions of V{sub td} from B {yields} {rho}{gamma}. On B{sub {kappa}}, the preliminary result from JLQCD appears to contradict Sharpe et al. JLQCD data seems to fit very well to linear {alpha} dependence and leads to an appreciably lower value of B{sub {kappa}}. Four studies of B{sub {kappa}} in the {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} (n{sub f} = 2) theory indicate very little quenching effects on B{sub {kappa}}; the full theory value seems to be just a little less than the quenched result. Based on expectations from HQET, analysis of B-parameter (B{sub h}{ell}) for the heavy-light mesons via B{sub h}{ell}) = constant + constants{prime}/m{sub h}{ell} is suggested. A summary of an illustrative sample of hadron matrix elements is given and constraints on CKM parameters (e.g. V{sub td}/V{sub ts}, on the unitarity triangle and on x{sub s}/x{sub d}, emerging from the lattice calculations along with experimental results are briefly discussed. In quite a few cases, for the first time, some indication of quenching errors on weak matrix elements are now becoming available.

  3. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; ...

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore » technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  4. Kaon matrix elements and CP violation from quenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristian, Calin-Radu

    We report the results of a calculation of the K → pipi matrix elements relevant for the DeltaI = 1/2 rule and epsilon '/epsilon in quenched lattice QCD using domain wall fermions at a fixed lattice spacing of a-1 ˜ 2 GeV. Working in the three-quark effective theory, where only the u, d and s quarks enter and which is known perturbatively to next-to-leading order; we calculate the lattice K → pi and K → |0> matrix elements of dimension six, four-fermion operators. Through lowest order chiral perturbation theory these yield K → pipi matrix elements, which we then normalize to continuum values through a non-perturbative renormalization technique. For the Delta I = 1/2 rule we find a value of 25.3 +/- 1.8 (statistical error only) compared to the experimental value of 22.2, with individual isospin amplitudes 10--20% below the experimental values. For epsilon '/epsilon; using known central values for standard model parameters, we calculate (-4.0 +/- 2.3) x 10-4 (statistical error only) compared to the current experimental average of (17.2 +/- 1.8) x 10-4. Because we find a large cancellation between the I = 0 and I = 2 contributions to epsilon'/epsilon, the result may be very sensitive to the approximations employed. Among these are the use of: quenched QCD, lowest order chiral perturbation theory and continuum perturbation theory below 1.3 GeV. We have also calculated the kaon B parameter, BK and find BK(2 GeV) = 0.532(11). Although currently unable to give a reliable systematic error; we have control over statistical errors and more simulations will yield information about the effects of the approximations on this first-principles determination of these important quantities.

  5. Separable approximation to two-body matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, Luis M.

    2010-04-15

    Two-body matrix elements of arbitrary local interactions are written as the sum of separable terms in a way that is well suited for the exchange and pairing channels present in mean-field calculations. The expansion relies on the transformation to center of mass and relative coordinate (in the spirit of Talmi's method) and therefore it is only useful (finite number of expansion terms) for harmonic oscillator single particle states. The converge of the expansion with the number of terms retained is studied for a Gaussian two body interaction. The limit of a contact (delta) force is also considered. Ways to handle the general case are also discussed.

  6. Weak matrix elements efforts on the lattice: Status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, A.

    1995-01-01

    Lattice approach to weak matrix elements is reviewed. Recent progress in treating heavy quarks on the lattice is briefly discussed. Illustrative sample of results obtained so far is given. Among them I elaborate on B{sub K}, {line_integral}{sub B} and B {yields} K*{sub {gamma}}. Experimental implications especially with regard to constraints on the Standard Model (i.e. Wolfenstein) parameters, V{sub td} measurements and expectations for B{sub s}-{bar B}{sub s}, oscillations are briefly discussed.

  7. The Matrix Element Method in the LHC era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    The Matrix Element Method (MEM) is a powerful multivariate method allowing to maximally exploit the experimental and theoretical information available to an analysis. The method is reviewed in depth, and several recent applications of the MEM at LHC experiments are discussed, such as searches for rare processes and measurements of Standard Model observables in Higgs and Top physics. Finally, a new implementation of the MEM is presented. This project builds on established phase-space parametrisations known to greatly improve the speed of the calculations, and aims at a much improved modularity and maintainability compared to previous software, easing the use of the MEM for high-statistics data analyses.

  8. Improved lattice computation of proton decay matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasumichi; Izubuchi, Taku; Shintani, Eigo; Soni, Amarjit

    2017-07-01

    We present an improved result for the lattice computation of the proton decay matrix elements in Nf=2 +1 QCD. In this study, by adopting the error reduction technique of all-mode-averaging, a significant improvement of the statistical accuracy is achieved for the relevant form factor of proton (and also neutron) decay on the gauge ensemble of Nf=2 +1 domain-wall fermions with mπ=0.34 - 0.69 GeV on a 2.7 fm3 lattice, as used in our previous work [1]. We improve the total accuracy of matrix elements to 10-15% from 30-40% for p →π e+ or from 20-40% for p →K ν ¯. The accuracy of the low-energy constants α and β in the leading-order baryon chiral perturbation theory (BChPT) of proton decay are also improved. The relevant form factors of p →π estimated through the "direct" lattice calculation from the three-point function appear to be 1.4 times smaller than those from the "indirect" method using BChPT with α and β . It turns out that the utilization of our result will provide a factor 2-3 larger proton partial lifetime than that obtained using BChPT. We also discuss the use of these parameters in a dark matter model.

  9. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a set of Mathematica notebooks to compute symbolically quantum transition matrices relevant for atomic ionization processes. The utilization of a symbolic language allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix elements required in charged-particle and laser induced ionization of atoms. Additionally, by using a few simple commands, it is possible to export these symbolic expressions to standard programming languages, such as Fortran or C, for the subsequent computation of differential cross sections or other observables. One of the main drawbacks in the calculation of transition matrices is the tedious algebraic work required when initial states other than the simple hydrogenic 1s state need to be considered. Using these notebooks the work is dramatically reduced and it is possible to generate exact expressions for a large set of bound states. We present explicit examples of atomic collisions (in First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave Theory) and laser-matter interactions (within the Dipole and Strong Field Approximations and different gauges) using both hydrogenic wavefunctions and Slater-Type Orbitals with arbitrary nlm quantum numbers as initial states. Catalogue identifier: AEMI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 444 195 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Single machines using Linux or Windows (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Any OS that supports Mathematica. The notebooks have been tested under Windows and Linux and with versions 6.x, 7.x and 8.x Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem

  10. Role of the Euclidean signature in lattice calculations of quasidistributions and other nonlocal matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.; Monahan, Christopher J.

    2017-07-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) provides the only known systematic, nonperturbative method for first-principles calculations of nucleon structure. However, for quantities such as light-front parton distribution functions (PDFs) and generalized parton distributions (GPDs), the restriction to Euclidean time prevents direct calculation of the desired observable. Recently, progress has been made in relating these quantities to matrix elements of spatially nonlocal, zero-time operators, referred to as quasidistributions. Still, even for these time-independent matrix elements, potential subtleties have been identified in the role of the Euclidean signature. In this work, we investigate the analytic behavior of spatially nonlocal correlation functions and demonstrate that the matrix elements obtained from Euclidean lattice QCD are identical to those obtained using the Lehmann-Symanzik-Zimmermann reduction formula in Minkowski space. After arguing the equivalence on general grounds, we also show that it holds in a perturbative calculation, where special care is needed to identify the lattice prediction. Finally we present a proof of the uniqueness of the matrix elements obtained from Minkowski and Euclidean correlation functions to all order in perturbation theory.

  11. Role of the Euclidean signature in lattice calculations of quasidistributions and other nonlocal matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Briceno, Raul A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.; Monahan, Christopher J.

    2017-07-11

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) provides the only known systematic, nonperturbative method for first-principles calculations of nucleon structure. However, for quantities such as light-front parton distribution functions (PDFs) and generalized parton distributions (GPDs), the restriction to Euclidean time prevents direct calculation of the desired observable. Recently, progress has been made in relating these quantities to matrix elements of spatially nonlocal, zero-time operators, referred to as quasidistributions. Still, even for these time-independent matrix elements, potential subtleties have been identified in the role of the Euclidean signature. In this work, we investigate the analytic behavior of spatially nonlocal correlation functions and demonstrate thatmore » the matrix elements obtained from Euclidean lattice QCD are identical to those obtained using the Lehmann-Symanzik-Zimmermann reduction formula in Minkowski space. After arguing the equivalence on general grounds, we also show that it holds in a perturbative calculation, where special care is needed to identify the lattice prediction. Lastly, we present a proof of the uniqueness of the matrix elements obtained from Minkowski and Euclidean correlation functions to all order in perturbation theory.« less

  12. Closed String S-matrix Elements in Open String Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garousi, Mohammad R.; Maktabdaran, G. R.

    2005-03-01

    We study the S-matrix elements of the gauge invariant operators corresponding to on-shell closed strings, in open string field theory. In particular, we calculate the tree level S-matrix element of two arbitrary closed strings, and the S-matrix element of one closed string and two open strings. By mapping the world-sheet of these amplitudes to the upper half z-plane, and by evaluating explicitly the correlators in the ghost part, we show that these S-matrix elements are exactly identical to the corresponding disk level S-matrix elements in perturbative string theory.

  13. The application of the transfer matrix and matrix condensation methods with finite elements to duct acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craggs, A.

    1989-08-01

    When making an acoustic finite element model of a duct system, the resulting matrices can be very large due to the length of ductwork, the complex changes in geometry and the numerous junctions, and a full model may require several thousand nodes. In this paper two techniques are given for reducing the size of the matrices; the transfer matrix method and the condensed stiffness matrix approach—both of which lead to equations expressed in terms of the input and output nodes only. The methods are demonstrated with examples on a straight section of duct and a branched duct network. The substantial reductions in computer memory shown imply that duct acoustic problems can be studied using a desktop work station.

  14. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  15. Generalized Potential Energy Finite Elements for Modeling Molecular Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chatzieleftheriou, Stavros; Adendorff, Matthew R; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2016-10-24

    The potential energy of molecules and nanostructures is commonly calculated in the molecular mechanics formalism by superimposing bonded and nonbonded atomic energy terms, i.e. bonds between two atoms, bond angles involving three atoms, dihedral angles involving four atoms, nonbonded terms expressing the Coulomb and Lennard-Jones interactions, etc. In this work a new, generalized numerical simulation is presented for studying the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional nanostructures at the atomic scale. The energy gradient and Hessian matrix of such assemblies are usually computed numerically; a potential energy finite element model is proposed herein where these two components are expressed analytically. In particular, generalized finite elements are developed that express the interactions among atoms in a manner equivalent to that invoked in simulations performed based on the molecular dynamics method. Thus, the global tangent stiffness matrix for any nanostructure is formed as an assembly of the generalized finite elements and is directly equivalent to the Hessian matrix of the potential energy. The advantages of the proposed model are identified in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. In the case of popular force fields (e.g., CHARMM), the computation of the Hessian matrix by implementing the proposed method is of the same order as that of the gradient. This analysis can be used to minimize the potential energy of molecular systems under nodal loads in order to derive constitutive laws for molecular systems where the entropy and solvent effects are neglected and can be approximated as solids, such as double stranded DNA nanostructures. In this context, the sequence dependent stretch modulus for some typical base pairs step is calculated.

  16. Determination of CKM Matrix Elements with Superallowed Fermi Decays^*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Brian

    1996-10-01

    The u-d element (V_ud) of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark mixing matrix is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions. Its most precise determination comes from nuclear physics experiments, in particular, from measurements of superallowed Fermi beta decays. Precise knowledge of V_ud will allow a variety of tests of the Standard Model, in addition to placing a number of important constraints on astrophysics and cosmology. These measurements, which require both precision nuclear physics experiments and state of the art theoretical nuclear physics calculations, have been made for a variety of nuclei ranging from ^14O to ^54Co. The u-d element obtained from these measurements are in statistical agreement and the average value obtained implies a non-unitary CKM matrix, which if correct, would require exotic extensions to the Standard Model. Unfortunately the theoretical calculations of the isospin breaking corrections, which are necessary to extract V_ud, are controversial. In order to resolve this controversy, much effort has recently been invested in measuring V_ud from the superallowed Fermi decay of ^10C, where the isospin breaking corrections are expected to be small. This is a very challenging experiment, since it requires the precision measurement of very small branching ratios in a high background environment. I will report on the current status of the determination of V_ud emphasizing the recent experimental effort to measure V_ud from the superallowed Fermi decay of ^10C. ^*Supported by the U.S. D.O.E. under Contracts No. W-31-109-ENG-38 and No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  17. Derivation of many-body potential among charged particles in the S-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tadayuki; Kimura, Toshiei

    1992-06-01

    A general method of deriving a classical potential from the S-matrix element of particle scattering in the theory of quantized fields is applied to electrodynamics to the post-post-Coulombian approximation. To obtain the many-body potential, a consistent prescription is implemented in subtracting the contributions of the repetition of lower-order potential from the S-matrix elements of the higher-order diagrams. The result shows that the four-body potential between charged particles has a characteristic feature at a large distance and the two-body potential is identical with that given in the reduced Hamiltonian of Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics. The advantage of the S-matrix method over the canonical formalism is to give the potential directly, without complicated treatment of the interaction with higher derivatives by a method of constrained dynamics.

  18. Fabrication of synthetic diffractive elements using advanced matrix laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, M.; Svoboda, J.; Květoň, M.; Fiala, P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a matrix laser writing device based on a demagnified projection of a micro-structure from a computer driven spatial light modulator. The device is capable of writing completely aperiodic micro-structures with resolution higher than 200 000 DPI. An optical system is combined with ultra high precision piezoelectric stages with an elementary step ~ 4 nm. The device operates in a normal environment, which significantly decreases the costs compared to competitive technologies. Simultaneously, large areas can be exposed up to 100 cm2. The capabilities of the constructed device will be demonstrated on particular elements fabricated for real applications. The optical document security is the first interesting field, where the synthetic image holograms are often combined with sophisticated aperiodic micro-structures. The proposed technology can easily write simple micro-gratings creating the color and kinetic visual effects, but also the diffractive cryptograms, waveguide couplers, and other structures recently used in the field of optical security. A general beam shaping elements and special photonic micro-structures are another important applications which will be discussed in this paper.

  19. Placing three-dimensional isoparametric elements into NASTRAN. [alterations in matrix assembly to simplify generation of higher order elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, M. B.; Filstrup, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Linear (8 node), parabolic (20 node), cubic (32 node) and mixed (some edges linear, some parabolic and some cubic) have been inserted into NASTRAN, level 15.1. First the dummy element feature was used to check out the stiffness matrix generation routines for the linear element in NASTRAN. Then, the necessary modules of NASTRAN were modified to include the new family of elements. The matrix assembly was changed so that the stiffness matrix of each isoparametric element is only generated once as the time to generate these higher order elements tends to be much longer than the other elements in NASTRAN. This paper presents some of the experiences and difficulties of inserting a new element or family of elements into NASTRAN.

  20. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  1. Determination of the weak magnetism matrix element in {sup 14}C beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Zeuli, A.R.; Ahmad, I.; Coulter, K.P.; Greene, J.P.; Schiffer, J.P.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Mortara, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Higher order beta decay matrix elements, such as weak magnetism, will introduce small departures (a shape factor) from the allowed beta decay electron energy spectrum. The value of the weak magnetism matrix element is predicted by the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and an experimental determination of the weak magnetism matrix element can be interpreted as a test of CVC. We have determined the weak magnetism matrix element from the {sup 14}C shape factor, which was measured using an apparatus incorporating a high resolution solid state detector and a super conducting solenoid. The results of our measurement will be presented.

  2. Neutrinoless Double Beta Nuclear Matrix Elements Around Mass 80 in the Nuclear Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji; Taguchi, Daisuke; Teruya, Eri

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. In its theoretical nuclear side it is particularly important to estimate three types of nuclear matrix elements, namely, Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) types matrix elements. The shell model calculations and also the pair-truncated shell model calculations are carried out to check the model dependence on nuclear matrix elements. In this work the neutrinoless double-beta decay for mass A = 82 nuclei is studied. It is found that the matrix elements are quite sensitive to the ground state wavefunctions.

  3. Matrix element method for high performance computing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasseau, G.; Chamont, D.; Beaudette, F.; Bianchini, L.; Davignon, O.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Strebler, T.

    2015-12-01

    Lot of efforts have been devoted by ATLAS and CMS teams to improve the quality of LHC events analysis with the Matrix Element Method (MEM). Up to now, very few implementations try to face up the huge computing resources required by this method. We propose here a highly parallel version, combining MPI and OpenCL, which makes the MEM exploitation reachable for the whole CMS datasets with a moderate cost. In the article, we describe the status of two software projects under development, one focused on physics and one focused on computing. We also showcase their preliminary performance obtained with classical multi-core processors, CUDA accelerators and MIC co-processors. This let us extrapolate that with the help of 6 high-end accelerators, we should be able to reprocess the whole LHC run 1 within 10 days, and that we have a satisfying metric for the upcoming run 2. The future work will consist in finalizing a single merged system including all the physics and all the parallelism infrastructure, thus optimizing implementation for best hardware platforms.

  4. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  5. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey -Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-08

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1-flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323 × 64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a = 0.081 fm and with Mπ = 312 MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. As a result, a detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep → ∞ estimates is presented.

  6. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; ...

    2016-06-08

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1-flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323 × 64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a = 0.081 fm and with Mπ = 312 MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. Wemore » show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. As a result, a detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep → ∞ estimates is presented.« less

  7. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey -Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-08

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1-flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323 × 64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a = 0.081 fm and with Mπ = 312 MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. As a result, a detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep → ∞ estimates is presented.

  8. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joó, Bálint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1 flavor ensemble with lattices of size $32^3 \\times 64$ generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at $a=0.081$~fm and with $M_\\pi=312$~MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a two-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation $t_{\\rm sep}$. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost-effectiveness. A detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of $t_{\\rm sep}$ needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the $t_{\\rm sep} \\to \\infty $ estimates is presented.

  9. Combined NDE/finite element technique to study the effects of matrix porosity on the behavior of ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Ghosn, Louis J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2003-08-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are being considered as candidate materials for high temperature aircraft engine components to replace the current high density metal alloys. The current Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) are engineered material composed of coated 2D woven high strength fiber tows and melt infiltrated ceramic matrix. Matrix voids are common anomalies generated during the melt infiltration process. The effects of these matrix porosities are usually associated with a reduction in the initial overall composite stiffness, and an increase in the thermal conductivity of the component. Furthermore, the role of the matrix as well as the coating is to protect the fibers from the harsh engine environment. Hence, the current design approach is to limit the design stress level of CMC components to be always below the first matrix cracking stress. In this study, the effects of matrix porosity on the initial component stiffness and the onset of matrix cracking are analyzed using a combined NDE/Finite-Element Technique. The Computed Tomography (CT) is utilized as the NDE technique to characterize the initial matrix porosity's locations and sizes in various CMC test specimens. The Finite Element is utilized to calculate the localized stress field around these pores based on the geometric modeling of the specimen's CT results, using image analysis and geometric modeling software. The same specimen was also scanned after tensile testing to a maximum nominal stress of 150 MPa to depict any growth of the previous observe voids. The post test CT scans depicted an enlargement and some coalescence of the existing voids.

  10. Full simulation of chiral random matrix theory at nonzero chemical potential by complex Langevin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollgaard, A.; Splittorff, K.

    2015-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the complex Langevin method can simulate chiral random matrix theory at nonzero chemical potential. The successful match with the analytic prediction for the chiral condensate is established through a shift of matrix integration variables and choosing a polar representation for the new matrix elements before complexification. Furthermore, we test the proposal to work with a Langevin-time-dependent quark mass and find that it allows us to control the fluctuations of the phase of the fermion determinant throughout the Langevin trajectory.

  11. North African geology: exploration matrix for potential major hydrocarbon discoveries

    SciTech Connect

    Kanes, W.H.; O'Connor, T.E.

    1985-02-01

    Based on results and models presented previously, it is possible to consider an exploration matrix that examines the 5 basic exploration parameters: source, reservoir, timing, structure, and seal. This matrix indicates that even those basins that have had marginal exploration successes, including the Paleozoic megabasin and downfaulted Triassic grabens of Morocco, the Cyrenaican platform of Libya, and the Tunisia-Sicily shelf, have untested plays. The exploration matrix also suggests these high-risk areas could change significantly, if one of the 5 basic matrix parameters is upgraded or if adjustments in political or financial risk are made. The Sirte basin and the Gulf of Suez, 2 of the more intensely explored areas, also present attractive matrix prospects, particularly with deeper Nubian beds or with the very shallow Tertiary sections. The Ghadames basin of Libya and Tunisia shows some potential, but its evaluation responds strongly to stratigraphic and external nongeologic matrix variations based on degree of risk exposure to be assumed. Of greatest risk in the matrix are the very deep Moroccan Paleozoic clastic plays and the Jurassic of Sinai. However, recent discoveries may upgrade these untested frontier areas. Based on the matrix generated by the data presented at a North African Petroleum Geology symposium, significant hydrocarbon accumulations are yet to be found. The remaining questions are: where in the matrix does each individual company wish to place its exploration capital and how much should be the risk exposure.

  12. Application of the Finite-Element Z-Matrix Method to e-H2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The present study adapts the Z-matrix formulation using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians. This is a energy-independent basis which allows flexible boundary conditions and is amenable to efficient algorithms for evaluating the necessary matrix elements with molecular targets.

  13. Recurrent procedure for constructing nonisotropic matrix elements of the collision integral of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ender, I. A.; Bakaleinikov, L. A.; Flegontova, E. Yu.; Gerasimenko, A. B.

    2017-08-01

    We have proposed an algorithm for the sequential construction of nonisotropic matrix elements of the collision integral, which are required to solve the nonlinear Boltzmann equation using the moments method. The starting elements of the matrix are isotropic and assumed to be known. The algorithm can be used for an arbitrary law of interactions for any ratio of the masses of colliding particles.

  14. Localization in band random matrix models with and without increasing diagonal elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-ge

    2002-06-01

    It is shown that localization of eigenfunctions in the Wigner band random matrix model with increasing diagonal elements can be related to localization in a band random matrix model with random diagonal elements. The relation is obtained by making use of a result of a generalization of Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory, which shows that reduced Hamiltonian matrices with relatively small dimensions can be introduced for nonperturbative parts of eigenfunctions, and by employing intermediate basis states, which can improve the method of the reduced Hamiltonian matrix. The latter model deviates from the standard band random matrix model mainly in two aspects: (i) the root mean square of diagonal elements is larger than that of off-diagonal elements within the band, and (ii) statistical distributions of the matrix elements are close to the Lévy distribution in their central parts, except in the high top regions.

  15. Uncertainty evaluation for the matrix ``solidified state'' of fissionable elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Elena; Iancso, Georgeta

    2012-09-01

    In case of the analysis of the radioactive liquid samples, no matter the relative physical analysis method used, two impediments act that belong to the behavior in time of the dispersion state of the liquid samples to be analyzed and of the standard used in the analysis. That is, one of them refers to the state of the sample to be analyzed when being sampled, which "alter" during the time elapsed from sampling up to the analysis of the sample. The other impediment is the natural change of the dispersion state of the standard radioactive solutions, due to the occurrence and evolution in time of the radiocolloidal and pseudo-radiocolloidal states. These radiocolloidal states are states of aggregation and they lead to the destruction of the homogeneity of the solutions. Taking into consideration the advantages offered by the relative physical methods of analysis as against the chemical or the radiochemical ones, different ways of eliminating these impediments have been tried. We eliminated these impediments processing the liquid reference materials (the solutions calibrated in radionuclides of interest), immediately after the preparation. This processing changes the liquid physical state of the reference materials in a "solidified state". Through this procedure the dispersion states of the samples, practically, can no longer be essentially modified in time and also ensure the uniform distribution of the radionuclides of interest in the elemental matrix of the samples "state solidified". The homogeneity of the distribution of the atoms of the radionuclides from the samples "solidified state" was checked up through the track micromapping technique of the alpha particles. Through this technique, in the chemically etched track detectors that were put in direct contact with the sample for a determined period of time, the alpha exposure time of the detectors, micromaps of alpha tracks were obtained. These micromaps are retorts through tracks of the distributions atoms of

  16. Uncertainty evaluation for the matrix 'solidified state' of fissionable elements

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Elena; Iancso, Georgeta

    2012-09-06

    In case of the analysis of the radioactive liquid samples, no matter the relative physical analysis method used, two impediments act that belong to the behavior in time of the dispersion state of the liquid samples to be analyzed and of the standard used in the analysis. That is, one of them refers to the state of the sample to be analyzed when being sampled, which 'alter' during the time elapsed from sampling up to the analysis of the sample. The other impediment is the natural change of the dispersion state of the standard radioactive solutions, due to the occurrence and evolution in time of the radiocolloidal and pseudo-radiocolloidal states. These radiocolloidal states are states of aggregation and they lead to the destruction of the homogeneity of the solutions. Taking into consideration the advantages offered by the relative physical methods of analysis as against the chemical or the radiochemical ones, different ways of eliminating these impediments have been tried. We eliminated these impediments processing the liquid reference materials (the solutions calibrated in radionuclides of interest), immediately after the preparation. This processing changes the liquid physical state of the reference materials in a 'solidified state'. Through this procedure the dispersion states of the samples, practically, can no longer be essentially modified in time and also ensure the uniform distribution of the radionuclides of interest in the elemental matrix of the samples 'state solidified'. The homogeneity of the distribution of the atoms of the radionuclides from the samples 'solidified state' was checked up through the track micromapping technique of the alpha particles. Through this technique, in the chemically etched track detectors that were put in direct contact with the sample for a determined period of time, the alpha exposure time of the detectors, micromaps of alpha tracks were obtained. These micromaps are retorts through tracks of the distributions atoms of

  17. Finite element analysis of metal matrix composite blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isai Thamizh, R.; Velmurugan, R.; Jayagandhan, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, compressor rotor blade of a gas turbine engine has been analyzed for stress, maximum displacement and natural frequency using ANSYS software for determining its failure strength by simulating the actual service conditions. Static stress analysis and modal analysis have been carried out using Ti-6Al-4V alloy, which is currently used in compressor blade. The results are compared with those obtained using Ti matrix composites reinforced with SiC. The advantages of using metal matrix composites in the gas turbine compressor blades are investigated. From the analyses carried out, it seems that composite rotor blades have lesser mass, lesser tip displacement and lower maximum stress values.

  18. A model independent analysis of gluonic pole matrix elements and universality of TMD fragmentation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Gamberg, Asmita Mukherjee, Piet J. Mulders

    2011-04-01

    Gluonic pole matrix elements explain the appearance of single spin asymmetries (SSA) in high-energy scattering processes. They involve a combination of operators which are odd under time reversal (T-odd). Such matrix elements appear in principle both for parton distribution functions and parton fragmentation functions. We show that for parton fragmentation functions these gluonic pole matrix elements vanish as a consequence of the analytic structure of scattering amplitudes in Quantum Chromodynamics. This result is important in the study of the universality of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) fragmentation functions.

  19. Determination of configuration matrix element and outer synchronization among networks with different topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Ling; Liu, Shuo; Li, Gang; Zhao, Guannan; Gu, Jiajia; Tian, Jing; Wang, Zhouyang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we research the outer synchronization among discrete networks with different topologies. Based on Lyapunov theorem, a novel synchronization technique is designed. Further, the control inputs of the networks and the adaptive laws of configuration matrix element are obtained. In the end, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the synchronization technique. It is found that the designed control input of the networks ensures the convergence of the errors among the networks to zero. And the designed adaptive law of configuration matrix element can replace effectively configuration matrix element in networks.

  20. EH3 matrix mineralogy with major and trace element composition compared to chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, S. W.; McDonough, W. F.; NéMeth, P.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the matrix mineralogy in primitive EH3 chondrites Sahara 97072, ALH 84170, and LAR 06252 with transmission electron microscopy; measured the trace and major element compositions of Sahara 97072 matrix and ferromagnesian chondrules with laser-ablation, inductively coupled, plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS); and analyzed the bulk composition of Sahara 97072 with LA-ICPMS, solution ICPMS, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The fine-grained matrix of EH3 chondrites is unlike that in other chondrite groups, consisting primarily of enstatite, cristobalite, troilite, and kamacite with a notable absence of olivine. Matrix and pyroxene-rich chondrule compositions differ from one another and are distinct from the bulk meteorite. Refractory lithophile elements are enriched by a factor of 1.5-3 in chondrules relative to matrix, whereas the matrix is enriched in moderately volatile elements. The compositional relation between the chondrules and matrix is reminiscent of the difference between EH3 pyroxene-rich chondrules and EH3 Si-rich, highly sulfidized chondrules. Similar refractory element ratios between the matrix and the pyroxene-rich chondrules suggest the fine-grained material primarily consists of the shattered, sulfidized remains of the formerly pyroxene-rich chondrules with the minor addition of metal clasts. The matrix, chondrule, and metal-sulfide nodule compositions are probably complementary, suggesting all the components of the EH3 chondrites came from the same nebular reservoir.

  1. Design of a shielded coil element of a matrix gradient coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Feng; Littin, Sebastian; Layton, Kelvin J.; Kroboth, Stefan; Yu, Huijun; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2017-08-01

    The increasing interest in spatial encoding with non-linear magnetic fields has intensified the need for coils that generates such fields. Matrix coils consisting of multiple coil elements appear to offer a high flexibility in generating customized encoding fields and are particularly promising for localized high resolution imaging applications. However, coil elements of existing matrix coils were primarily designed and constructed for better shimming and therefore are not expected to achieve an optimal performance for local spatial encoding. Moreover, eddy current properties of such coil elements were not fully explored. In this work, an optimization problem is formulated based on the requirement of local non-linear encoding and eddy current reduction that results in novel designs of coil elements for an actively-shielded matrix gradient coil. Two metrics are proposed to assess the performance of different coil element designs. The results are analyzed to reveal new insights into coil element design.

  2. Energy and energy gradient matrix elements with N-particle explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions with L=1.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2008-03-21

    In this work we consider explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions for expanding the wave function of an N-particle system with the L=1 total orbital angular momentum. We derive analytical expressions for various matrix elements with these basis functions including the overlap, kinetic energy, and potential energy (Coulomb interaction) matrix elements, as well as matrix elements of other quantities. The derivatives of the overlap, kinetic, and potential energy integrals with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters are also derived and used to calculate the energy gradient. All the derivations are performed using the formalism of the matrix differential calculus that facilitates a way of expressing the integrals in an elegant matrix form, which is convenient for the theoretical analysis and the computer implementation. The new method is tested in calculations of two systems: the lowest P state of the beryllium atom and the bound P state of the positronium molecule (with the negative parity). Both calculations yielded new, lowest-to-date, variational upper bounds, while the number of basis functions used was significantly smaller than in previous studies. It was possible to accomplish this due to the use of the analytic energy gradient in the minimization of the variational energy.

  3. Energy and energy gradient matrix elements with N-particle explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions with L =1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2008-03-01

    In this work we consider explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions for expanding the wave function of an N-particle system with the L =1 total orbital angular momentum. We derive analytical expressions for various matrix elements with these basis functions including the overlap, kinetic energy, and potential energy (Coulomb interaction) matrix elements, as well as matrix elements of other quantities. The derivatives of the overlap, kinetic, and potential energy integrals with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters are also derived and used to calculate the energy gradient. All the derivations are performed using the formalism of the matrix differential calculus that facilitates a way of expressing the integrals in an elegant matrix form, which is convenient for the theoretical analysis and the computer implementation. The new method is tested in calculations of two systems: the lowest P state of the beryllium atom and the bound P state of the positronium molecule (with the negative parity). Both calculations yielded new, lowest-to-date, variational upper bounds, while the number of basis functions used was significantly smaller than in previous studies. It was possible to accomplish this due to the use of the analytic energy gradient in the minimization of the variational energy.

  4. Theory and computation of electromagnetic transition matrix elements in the continuous spectrum of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examines the mathematical properties of the free-free ( f - f) matrix elements of the full electric field operator, O E (κ, r̅), of the multipolar Hamiltonian. κ is the photon wavenumber. Special methods are developed and applied for their computation, for the general case where the scattering wavefunctions are calculated numerically in the potential of the term-dependent ( N - 1) electron core, and are energy-normalized. It is found that, on the energy axis, the f - f matrix elements of O E (κ, r̅) have singularities of first order, i.e., as ɛ' → ɛ, they behave as ( ɛ - ɛ')-1. The numerical applications are for f - f transitions in hydrogen and neon, obeying electric dipole and quadrupole selection rules. In the limit κ = 0, O E (κ, r̅) reduces to the length form of the electric dipole approximation (EDA). It is found that the results for the EDA agree with those of O E (κ, r̅), with the exception of a wave-number region k' = k ± κ about the point k' = k.

  5. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  6. Neutrinoless double beta nuclear matrix elements around mass 80 in the nuclear shell-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, N.; Higashiyama, K.; Taguchi, D.; Teruya, E.

    2015-05-01

    The observation of the neutrinoless double-beta decay can determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle or not. For theoretical nuclear physics it is particularly important to estimate three types of matrix elements, namely Fermi (F), Gamow-Teller (GT), and tensor (T) matrix elements. In this paper, we carry out shell-model calculations and also pair-truncated shell-model calculations to check the model dependence in the case of mass A=82 nuclei.

  7. Matrix elements and duality for type 2 unitary representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, Jason L.; Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.

    2015-12-15

    The characteristic identity formalism discussed in our recent articles is further utilized to derive matrix elements of type 2 unitary irreducible gl(m|n) modules. In particular, we give matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, including the non-elementary generators, together with their phases on finite dimensional type 2 unitary irreducible representations which include the contravariant tensor representations and an additional class of essentially typical representations. Remarkably, we find that the type 2 unitary matrix element equations coincide with the type 1 unitary matrix element equations for non-vanishing matrix elements up to a phase.

  8. Symbolic algorithms for the computation of Moshinsky brackets and nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursescu, D.; Tomaselli, M.; Kuehl, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    . Method of solution:Moshinsky's transformation brackets as well as two-nucleon matrix elements are provided within the framework of MAPLE. The transformation brackets are evaluated recursively for a given number of shells and utilized for the computation of the two-particle matrix elements for different coupling schemes and interactions. Moreover, a simple notation has been introduced to handle the two-particle nuclear states in ll-, LSJ-, and jj-coupling, both in the center-of-well and the relative and center-of-mass coordinates. Restrictions onto the complexity of the problem:The program supports in principle an arbitrary number of shell states with the only limitation given by the computer resources themselves. Typically, the time requirements for the recursive computation of the Moshinsky brackets and matrix elements increase rapidly with the number of the allowed shell states but can be reduced significantly by the pre-calculation of the transformation brackets. Unusual features of the program:Moshinsky brackets are computed and provided in either numeric, algebraic or some symbolic form. In addition, the two-particle matrix elements are calculated for a scalar potential, spin-orbit coupling and tensorial forces, both in floating-point and algebraic notation. All two-particle matrix elements are expressed in terms of the Talmi integrals but can be evaluated also explicitly for several predefined types of the interaction. To simplify the handling of the program, a short but very powerful notation has been introduced which help the user to deal with the two-particle states in various coupling notations. The main commands of the current version of the program are described in detail in Appendix B. Typical running time:The computation of all Moshinsky brackets in floating-point notation, up to ρ=6, takes about 5 s at a 2.26 GHz Intel Pentium IIII processor with 512 MB; in algebraic form, the same computations take about 13 s. Similarly, the computation of these brackets

  9. Matrix elements of Δ B =0 operators in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Wan

    2015-05-01

    We study the light-quark mass and spatial volume dependence of the matrix elements of Δ B =0 four-quark operators relevant for the determination of Vu b and the lifetime ratios of single-b hadrons. To this end, one-loop diagrams are computed in the framework of heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory with partially quenched formalism for three light-quark flavors in the isospin limit; flavor-connected and -disconnected diagrams are carefully analyzed. These calculations include the leading light-quark flavor and heavy-quark spin symmetry breaking effects in the heavy hadron spectrum. Our results can be used in the chiral extrapolation of lattice calculations of the matrix elements to the physical light-quark masses and to infinite volume. To provide insight on such chiral extrapolation, we evaluate the one-loop contributions to the matrix elements containing external Bd, Bs mesons and Λb baryon in the QCD limit, where sea and valence quark masses become equal. In particular, we find that the matrix elements of the λ3 flavor-octet operators with an external Bd meson receive the contributions solely from connected diagrams in which current lattice techniques are capable of precise determination of the matrix elements. Finite volume effects are at most a few percent for typical lattice sizes and pion masses.

  10. Insights into Nuclear Triaxiality from Interference Effects in E2 Matrix Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allmond, J. M.; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.

    2007-10-01

    Recently, we have introduced [1] a triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and E2 tensors. The E2 matrix elements [2] of the osmium isotopes (186, 188, 190, and 192) are studied in the framework of this model (59 of 84 E2 matrix elements deviate by 30% or less). It is shown that interference effects in the inertia tensor (K-mixing) and the E2 tensor can lead to significant reductions in the diagonal E2 matrix elements. In some instances, the diagonal E2 matrix elements may decrease with increasing spin. Additionally, a sum rule for diagonal E2 matrix elements is shown and used to explore missing strength from K-admixtures. [1] J.L. Wood, A-M. Oros-Peusquens, R. Zaballa, J.M. Allmond, and W.D. Kulp, Phys. Rev. C 70, 024308 (2004). [2] C.Y. Wu, D. Cline, T. Czosnyka, A. Backlin, C. Baktash, R.M. Diamond, G.D. Dracoulis, L. Hasselgren, H. Kluge, et al., Nucl. Phys. A607, 178 (1996).

  11. 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements with self-consistent short-range correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Simkovic, Fedor; Faessler, Amand; Muether, Herbert; Rodin, Vadim; Stauf, Markus

    2009-05-15

    A self-consistent calculation of nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double-beta decays (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 128}Te, {sup 130}Te, and {sup 136}Xe is presented in the framework of the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (RQRPA) and the standard QRPA. The pairing and residual interactions as well as the two-nucleon short-range correlations are for the first time derived from the same modern realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, namely, from the charge-dependent Bonn potential (CD-Bonn) and the Argonne V18 potential. In a comparison with the traditional approach of using the Miller-Spencer Jastrow correlations, matrix elements for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay are obtained that are larger in magnitude. We analyze the differences among various two-nucleon correlations including those of the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM) and quantify the uncertainties in the calculated 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix elements.

  12. Detection of Matrix Crack Density of CFRP using an Electrical Potential Change Method with Multiple Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoroki, Akira; Omagari, Kazuomi

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminates are adopted for fuel tank structures of next generation space rockets or automobiles. Matrix cracks may cause fuel leak or trigger fatigue damage. A monitoring system of the matrix crack density is required. The authors have developed an electrical resistance change method for the monitoring of delamination cracks in CFRP laminates. Reinforcement fibers are used as a self-sensing system. In the present study, the electric potential method is adopted for matrix crack density monitoring. Finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to investigate the possibility of monitoring matrix crack density using multiple electrodes mounted on a single surface of a specimen. The FEA reveals the matrix crack density increases electrical resistance for a target segment between electrodes. Experimental confirmation was also performed using cross-ply laminates. Eight electrodes were mounted on a single surface of a specimen using silver paste after polishing of the specimen surface with sandpaper. The two outermost electrodes applied electrical current, and the inner electrodes measured electric voltage changes. The slope of electrical resistance during reloading is revealed to be an appropriate index for the detection of matrix crack density.

  13. Mesh refinement in finite element analysis by minimization of the stiffness matrix trace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittur, Madan G.; Huston, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Most finite element packages provide means to generate meshes automatically. However, the user is usually confronted with the problem of not knowing whether the mesh generated is appropriate for the problem at hand. Since the accuracy of the finite element results is mesh dependent, mesh selection forms a very important step in the analysis. Indeed, in accurate analyses, meshes need to be refined or rezoned until the solution converges to a value so that the error is below a predetermined tolerance. A-posteriori methods use error indicators, developed by using the theory of interpolation and approximation theory, for mesh refinements. Some use other criterions, such as strain energy density variation and stress contours for example, to obtain near optimal meshes. Although these methods are adaptive, they are expensive. Alternatively, a priori methods, until now available, use geometrical parameters, for example, element aspect ratio. Therefore, they are not adaptive by nature. An adaptive a-priori method is developed. The criterion is that the minimization of the trace of the stiffness matrix with respect to the nodal coordinates, leads to a minimization of the potential energy, and as a consequence provide a good starting mesh. In a few examples the method is shown to provide the optimal mesh. The method is also shown to be relatively simple and amenable to development of computer algorithms. When the procedure is used in conjunction with a-posteriori methods of grid refinement, it is shown that fewer refinement iterations and fewer degrees of freedom are required for convergence as opposed to when the procedure is not used. The mesh obtained is shown to have uniform distribution of stiffness among the nodes and elements which, as a consequence, leads to uniform error distribution. Thus the mesh obtained meets the optimality criterion of uniform error distribution.

  14. Quenched domain wall QCD with DBW2 gauge action toward nucleon decay matrix element calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasumichi

    2001-10-01

    The domain wall fermion action is a promising way to control chiral symmetry in lattice gauge theory. By the good chiral symmetry of this approach even at finite lattice spacing, one is able to extract hadronic matrix elements, like kaon weak matrix elements, for which the symmetry is extremely important. Ordinary fermions with poor chiral symmetry make calculation difficult because of the large mixing of operators with different chiral structure. Even though the domain wall fermion action with the simple Wilson gauge action has a good chiral symmetry, one can further improve the symmetry by using a different gauge action. We take a non-perturbatively improved action, the DBW2 action of the QCD Taro group. Hadron masses are systematically examined for a range of parameters. Application to nucleon decay matrix element is also discussed.

  15. B(s) 0-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B -meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ =1.206 (18 )(6 ), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B -meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vt d|=8.00 (34 )(8 )×10-3, |Vt s|=39.0 (1.2 )(0.4 )×10-3, and |Vt d/Vt s|=0.2052 (31 )(10 ), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2 σ . These results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  16. Interface Cohesive Elements to Model Matrix Crack Evolution in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the transverse matrix (resin) cracking developed in multidirectional composite laminates loaded in tension was numerically investigated by a finite element (FE) model implemented in the commercially available software Abaqus/Explicit 6.10. A theoretical solution using the equivalent constraint model (ECM) of the damaged laminate developed by Soutis et al. was employed to describe matrix cracking evolution and compared to the proposed numerical approach. In the numerical model, interface cohesive elements were inserted between neighbouring finite elements that run parallel to fibre orientation in each lamina to simulate matrix cracking with the assumption of equally spaced cracks (based on experimental measurements and observations). The stress based traction-separation law was introduced to simulate initiation of matrix cracking and propagation under mixed-mode loading. The numerically predicted crack density was found to depend on the mesh size of the model and the material fracture parameters defined for the cohesive elements. Numerical predictions of matrix crack density as a function of applied stress are in a good agreement to experimentally measured and theoretically (ECM) obtained values, but some further refinement will be required in near future work.

  17. Generalization of the Mulliken-Hush treatment for the calculation of electron transfer matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for the calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element for electron transfer processes is introduced and results for several systems are presented. The method can be applied to ground and excited state systems and can be used in cases where several states interact strongly. Within the set of states chosen it is a non-perturbative treatment, and can be implemented using quantities obtained solely in terms of the adiabatic states. Several applications based on quantum chemical calculations are briefly presented. Finally, since quantities for adiabatic states are the only input to the method, it can also be used with purely experimental data to estimate electron transfer matrix elements.

  18. Semiclassical matrix elements for a chaotic propagator in the scar function basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Alejandro M. F.

    2013-04-01

    A semiclassical approximation for the matrix elements of a quantum chaotic propagator in the scar function basis has been derived. The obtained expression is solely expressed in terms of canonical invariant objects. For our purpose, we have used the recently developed, semiclassical matrix elements of the propagator in coherent states, together with the linearization of the flux in the neighborhood of a classically unstable periodic orbit of chaotic two-dimensional systems. The expression derived here is successfully verified to be exact for a (linear) cat map, after the theory is adapted to a discrete phase space appropriate to a quantized torus.

  19. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  20. Axial-Current Matrix Elements in Light Nuclei from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Martin; Shanahan, Phiala E.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; Wagman, Michael L.; Winter, Frank T.; Beane, Silas; Chang, Emmanuel; Davoudi, Zohreh; Detmold, William; Orginos, Konstantinos

    2016-12-01

    I present results from the first lattice QCD calculations of axial-current matrix elements in light nuclei, performed by the NPLQCD collaboration. Precision calculations of these matrix elements, and the subsequent extraction of multi-nucleon axial-current operators, are essential in refining theoretical predictions of the proton-proton fusion cross section, neutrino-nucleus cross sections and $\\beta\\beta$-decay rates of nuclei. In addition, they are expected to shed light on the phenomenological quenching of $g_A$ that is required in nuclear many-body calculations.

  1. Matrix elements for type 1 unitary irreducible representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.; Werry, Jason L.

    2014-01-15

    Using our recent results on eigenvalues of invariants associated to the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n), we use characteristic identities to derive explicit matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, particularly non-elementary generators, on finite dimensional type 1 unitary irreducible representations. We compare our results with existing works that deal with only subsets of the class of type 1 unitary representations, all of which only present explicit matrix elements for elementary generators. Our work therefore provides an important extension to existing methods, and thus highlights the strength of our techniques which exploit the characteristic identities.

  2. Analytic matrix elements for the two-electron atomic basis with logarithmic terms

    SciTech Connect

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2014-08-01

    The two-electron problem for the helium-like atoms in S-state is considered. The basis containing the integer powers of ln r, where r is a radial variable of the Fock expansion, is studied. In this basis, the analytic expressions for the matrix elements of the corresponding Hamiltonian are presented. These expressions include only elementary and special functions, what enables very fast and accurate computation of the matrix elements. The decisive contribution of the correct logarithmic terms to the behavior of the two-electron wave function in the vicinity of the triple-coalescence point is reaffirmed.

  3. Double β-decay nuclear matrix elements for the A=48 and A=58 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouras, L. D.; Vergados, J. D.

    1983-11-01

    The nuclear matrix elements entering the double β decays of the 48Ca-48Ti and 58Ni-58Fe systems have been calculated using a realistic two nucleon interaction and realistic shell model spaces. Effective transition operators corresponding to a variety of gauge theory models have been considered. The stability of such matrix elements against variations of the nuclear parameters is examined. Appropriate lepton violating parameters are extracted from the A=48 data and predictions are made for the lifetimes of the positron decays of the A=58 system. RADIOACTIVITY Double β decay. Gauge theories. Lepton nonconservation. Neutrino mass. Shell model calculations.

  4. Myocardial fibroblast-matrix interactions and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Edie C; Bradshaw, Amy D; Zile, Michael R; Spinale, Francis G

    2014-05-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic structure, adapting to physiological and pathological stresses placed on the myocardium. Deposition and organization of the matrix fall under the purview of cardiac fibroblasts. While often overlooked compared to myocytes, fibroblasts play a critical role in maintaining ECM homeostasis under normal conditions and in response to pathological stimuli assume an activated, myofibroblast phenotype associated with excessive collagen accumulation contributing to impaired cardiac function. Complete appreciation of fibroblast function is hampered by the lack of fibroblast-specific reagents and the heterogeneity of fibroblast precursors. This is further complicated by our ability to dissect the role of myofibroblasts versus fibroblasts in myocardial in remodeling. This review highlights critical points in the regulation of collagen deposition by fibroblasts, the current panel of molecular tools used to identify fibroblasts and the role of fibroblast-matrix interactions in fibroblast function and differentiation into the myofibroblast phenotype. The clinical potential of exploiting differences between fibroblasts and myofibroblasts and using them to target specific fibroblast populations is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signalling in Myocardium." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2016-06-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s { n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  7. On the Feynman-Hellmann theorem in quantum field theory and the calculation of matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Chris; Chang, Chia Cheng; Kurth, Thorsten; Orginos, Kostas; Walker-Loud, André

    2017-07-01

    The Feynman-Hellmann theorem can be derived from the long Euclidean-time limit of correlation functions determined with functional derivatives of the partition function. Using this insight, we fully develop an improved method for computing matrix elements of external currents utilizing only two-point correlation functions. Our method applies to matrix elements of any external bilinear current, including nonzero momentum transfer, flavor-changing, and two or more current insertion matrix elements. The ability to identify and control all the systematic uncertainties in the analysis of the correlation functions stems from the unique time dependence of the ground-state matrix elements and the fact that all excited states and contact terms are Euclidean-time dependent. We demonstrate the utility of our method with a calculation of the nucleon axial charge using gradient-flowed domain-wall valence quarks on the Nf=2 +1 +1 MILC highly improved staggered quark ensemble with lattice spacing and pion mass of approximately 0.15 fm and 310 MeV respectively. We show full control over excited-state systematics with the new method and obtain a value of gA=1.213 (26 ) with a quark-mass-dependent renormalization coefficient.

  8. On the Feynman-Hellmann theorem in quantum field theory and the calculation of matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Bouchard, Chris; Chang, Chia Cheng; Kurth, Thorsten; ...

    2017-07-12

    In this paper, the Feynman-Hellmann theorem can be derived from the long Euclidean-time limit of correlation functions determined with functional derivatives of the partition function. Using this insight, we fully develop an improved method for computing matrix elements of external currents utilizing only two-point correlation functions. Our method applies to matrix elements of any external bilinear current, including nonzero momentum transfer, flavor-changing, and two or more current insertion matrix elements. The ability to identify and control all the systematic uncertainties in the analysis of the correlation functions stems from the unique time dependence of the ground-state matrix elements and the fact that all excited states and contact terms are Euclidean-time dependent. We demonstrate the utility of our method with a calculation of the nucleon axial charge using gradient-flowed domain-wall valence quarks on themore » $$N_f=2+1+1$$ MILC highly improved staggered quark ensemble with lattice spacing and pion mass of approximately 0.15 fm and 310 MeV respectively. We show full control over excited-state systematics with the new method and obtain a value of $$g_A = 1.213(26)$$ with a quark-mass-dependent renormalization coefficient.« less

  9. Matrix elements and diquark correlations in quenched QCD with overlap fermions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebbi, Claudio

    2006-12-01

    We present results for BK and selected matrix elements for beyond the standard model interactions obtained in quenched QCD with overlap fermions. We also illustrate results on baryon wave- functions and diquark correlations within baryons in the Coulomb and Landau gauge.

  10. Relativistic description of nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double-β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L. S.; Yao, J. M.; Ring, P.; Meng, J.

    2014-11-01

    Background: Neutrinoless double-β (0 ν β β ) decay is related to many fundamental concepts in nuclear and particle physics beyond the standard model. Currently there are many experiments searching for this weak process. An accurate knowledge of the nuclear matrix element for the 0 ν β β decay is essential for determining the effective neutrino mass once this process is eventually measured. Purpose: We report the first full relativistic description of the 0 ν β β decay matrix element based on a state-of-the-art nuclear structure model. Methods: We adopt the full relativistic transition operators which are derived with the charge-changing nucleonic currents composed of the vector coupling, axial-vector coupling, pseudoscalar coupling, and weak-magnetism coupling terms. The wave functions for the initial and final nuclei are determined by the multireference covariant density functional theory (MR-CDFT) based on the point-coupling functional PC-PK1. Correlations beyond the mean field are introduced by configuration mixing of both angular momentum and particle number projected quadrupole deformed mean-field wave functions. Results: The low-energy spectra and electric quadrupole transitions in 150Nd and its daughter nucleus 150Sm are well reproduced by the MR-CDFT calculations. The 0 ν β β decay matrix elements for both the 01+→01+ and 01+→02+ decays of 150Nd are evaluated. The effects of particle number projection, static and dynamic deformations, and the full relativistic structure of the transition operators on the matrix elements are studied in detail. Conclusions: The resulting 0 ν β β decay matrix element for the 01+→01+ transition is 5.60 , which gives the most optimistic prediction for the next generation of experiments searching for the 0 ν β β decay in 150Nd.

  11. Nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-β decay: Relativity and short-range correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L. S.; Yao, J. M.; Ring, P.; Meng, J.

    2017-02-01

    Background:The discovery of neutrinoless double-β (0 ν β β ) decay would demonstrate the nature of neutrinos, have profound implications for our understanding of matter-antimatter mystery, and solve the mass hierarchy problem of neutrinos. The calculations for the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν of 0 ν β β decay are crucial for the interpretation of this process. Purpose: We study the effects of relativity and nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations on the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν by assuming the mechanism of exchanging light or heavy neutrinos for the 0 ν β β decay. Methods:The nuclear matrix elements M0 ν are calculated within the framework of covariant density functional theory, where the beyond-mean-field correlations are included in the nuclear wave functions by configuration mixing of both angular-momentum and particle-number projected quadrupole deformed mean-field states. Results: The nuclear matrix elements M0 ν are obtained for ten 0 ν β β -decay candidate nuclei. The impact of relativity is illustrated by adopting relativistic or nonrelativistic decay operators. The effects of short-range correlations are evaluated. Conclusions: The effects of relativity and short-range correlations play an important role in the mechanism of exchanging heavy neutrinos though the influences are marginal for light neutrinos. Combining the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν with the observed lower limits on the 0 ν β β -decay half-lives, the predicted strongest limits on the effective masses are ||<0.06 eV for light neutrinos and | |-1>3.065 ×108GeV for heavy neutrinos.

  12. Numerical investigations on the effect of slenderness ratio of matrix elements in cryogenic chill down process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reby Roy, K. E.; Mohammed, Jesna; Abhiroop, V. M.; Thekkethil, S. R.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic fluids have many applications in space, medicine, preservation etc. The chill-down of cryogenic fluid transfer line is a complicated phenomenon occurring in most of the cryogenic systems. The cryogenic fluid transfer line, which is initially at room temperature, has to be cooled to the temperature of the cryogen as fast as possible. When the cryogenic fluid at liquid state passes along the line, transient heat transfer between the cryogen and the transfer line causes voracious evaporation of the liquid. This paper makes a contribution to the two-phase flow along a rectangular flow passage consisting of an array of elliptically shaped matrix elements. A simplified 2D model is considered and the problem is solved using ANSYS FLUENT. The present analysis aims to study the influence of the slenderness ratio of matrix elements on the heat transfer rate and chill down time. For a comparative study, matrix elements of slenderness ratios 5 and 10 are considered. Liquid nitrogen at 74K flows through the matrix. The material of the transfer line is assumed to be aluminium which is initially at room temperature. The influence of Reynolds numbers from 800 to 3000 on chill-down is also investigated.

  13. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  14. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-14

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  15. Quarkonium polarization and the long distance matrix elements hierarchies using jet substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin; Shrivastava, Prashant

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms in jets at the LHC, using the fragmenting jet functions (FJF) approach. Specifically, we discuss the jet energy dependence of the J /ψ production cross section at the LHC. By comparing the cross sections for the different NRQCD production channels (1S0[8], 3S1[8], 3PJ[8], and 3cripts>S1[1]), we find that at fixed values of energy fraction z carried by the J /ψ , if the normalized cross section is a decreasing function of the jet energy, in particular for z >0.5 , then the depolarizing 1S0[8] must be the dominant channel. This makes the prediction made in [Baumgart et al., J. High Energy Phys. 11 (2014) 003, 10.1007/JHEP11(2014)003] for the FJF's also true for the cross section. We also make comparisons between the long distance matrix elements extracted by various groups. This analysis could potentially shed light on the polarization properties of the J /ψ production in high pT region.

  16. $B^0_{(s)}$-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran

    2016-06-28

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B-meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ=1.206(18)(6), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B-meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vtd| = 8.00(34)(8)×10-3, |Vts| = 39.0(1.2)(0.4)×10-3, and |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2052(31)(10), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2σ. In addition, these results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  17. $$B^0_{(s)}$$-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    DOE PAGES

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; ...

    2016-06-28

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B-meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ=1.206(18)(6), where the second errormore » stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B-meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vtd| = 8.00(34)(8)×10-3, |Vts| = 39.0(1.2)(0.4)×10-3, and |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2052(31)(10), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2σ. In addition, these results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.« less

  18. $B^0_{(s)}$-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran

    2016-06-28

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B-meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ=1.206(18)(6), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B-meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vtd| = 8.00(34)(8)×10-3, |Vts| = 39.0(1.2)(0.4)×10-3, and |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2052(31)(10), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2σ. In addition, these results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  19. General expressions for the matrix elements of the tight-binding operator within the Racah-Wigner algebra*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    General expressions for the matrix elements of the tight-binding operator are presented using the Racah-Wigner algebra, where the wave functions are expressed as coupled multiplet wave functions within a given angular momentum coupling scheme. The knowledge of all possible Slater determinants is not necessary and the matrix elements can be written as compact expressions computable with arbitrary accuracy.

  20. Potential of Organic Matrix Composites for Liquid Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Samuel E.; Herald, Stephen D.; Stolzfus, Joel M.; Engel, Carl D.; Bohlen, James W.; Palm, Tod; Robinson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Composite materials are being considered for the tankage of cryogenic propellants in access to space because of potentially lower structural weights. A major hurdle for composites is an inherent concern about the safety of using flammable structural materials in contact with liquid and gaseous oxygen. A hazards analysis approach addresses a series of specific concerns that must be addressed based upon test data. Under the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle contracts, testing was begun for a variety of organic matrix composite materials both to aid in the selection of materials and to provide needed test data to support hazards analyses. The work has continued at NASA MSFC and the NASA WSTF to provide information on the potential for using composite materials in oxygen systems. Appropriate methods for oxygen compatibility testing of structural materials and data for a range of composite materials from impact, friction, flammability and electrostatic discharge testing are presented. Remaining concerns and conclusions about composite tank structures, and recommendations for additional testing are discussed. Requirements for system specific hazards analysis are identified.

  1. Potential of Organic Matrix Composites for Liquid Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Samuel E.; Herald, Stephen D.; Stolzfus, Joel M.; Engel, Carl D.; Bohlen, James W.; Palm, Tod; Robinson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Composite materials are being considered for the tankage of cryogenic propellants in access to space because of potentially lower structural weights. A major hurdle for composites is an inherent concern about the safety of using flammable structural materials in contact with liquid and gaseous oxygen. A hazards analysis approach addresses a series of specific concerns that must be addressed based upon test data. Under the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle contracts, testing was begun for a variety of organic matrix composite materials both to aid in the selection of materials and to provide needed test data to support hazards analyses. The work has continued at NASA MSFC and the NASA WSTF to provide information on the potential for using composite materials in oxygen systems. Appropriate methods for oxygen compatibility testing of structural materials and data for a range of composite materials from impact, friction, flammability and electrostatic discharge testing are presented. Remaining concerns and conclusions about composite tank structures, and recommendations for additional testing are discussed. Requirements for system specific hazards analysis are identified.

  2. Comments on the effect of Δ (1232 MeV)-hole excitation in quenching the gamow-teller matrix element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, A.; Cheon, T.; Shimizu, K.; Hyuga, H.; Suzuki, T.

    1983-03-01

    The effect of the Δ-hole excitation in quenching the Gamow-Teller matrix element is investigated using the pion and rho-meson exchange potential. The contributions are found to be smaller than those given by the calculation using the Landau-Migdal type interaction with g' Δ = 0.6. The difference is found to be due to the choice of g' Δ. Discussions concerning the validity of the universality g' N = g' Δ and the estimate of g' Δ are given.

  3. A novel FPGA-programmable switch matrix interconnection element in quantum-dot cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Sara; Rahimi Azghadi, Mostafa; Zakerolhosseini, Ali; Navi, Keivan

    2015-04-01

    The Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is a novel nanotechnology, promising extra low-power, extremely dense and very high-speed structure for the construction of logical circuits at a nanoscale. In this paper, initially previous works on QCA-based FPGA's routing elements are investigated, and then an efficient, symmetric and reliable QCA programmable switch matrix (PSM) interconnection element is introduced. This element has a simple structure and offers a complete routing capability. It is implemented using a bottom-up design approach that starts from a dense and high-speed 2:1 multiplexer and utilise it to build the target PSM interconnection element. In this study, simulations of the proposed circuits are carried out using QCAdesigner, a layout and simulation tool for QCA circuits. The results demonstrate high efficiency of the proposed designs in QCA-based FPGA routing.

  4. Addressable test matrix for measuring analog transfer characteristics of test elements used for integrated process control and device evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A set of addressable test structures, each of which uses addressing schemes to access individual elements of the structure in a matrix, is used to test the quality of a wafer before integrated circuits produced thereon are diced, packaged and subjected to final testing. The electrical characteristic of each element is checked and compared to the electrical characteristic of all other like elements in the matrix. The effectiveness of the addressable test matrix is in readily analyzing the electrical characteristics of the test elements and in providing diagnostic information.

  5. Inelastic proton scattering as a mean for the determination of neutron and proton matrix element ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamanos, N.; Pakou, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Musumarra, A.

    1999-12-01

    The determination of ratio of neutron over proton matrix elements by inelastic proton scattering, for 0 +→2 + transitions, is investigated via the comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations. Calculations into the context of a macroscopic and a microscopic description are performed for a wide mass range nuclei: 18O, 30Si, 32,34S, 48Ca, 88Sr, for which these ratios were determined previously with an independent technique. At that point the choice of the theoretical model may be very critical. It is thus the purpose of this investigation to point out the most suitable model. It is found that in general both theoretical models can be employed for the reliable determination of neutron over proton matrix element ratios.

  6. Calculation of Dipole Transition Matrix Elements and Expectation Values by Vibrational Coupled Cluster Method.

    PubMed

    Banik, Subrata; Pal, Sourav; Prasad, M Durga

    2010-10-12

    An effective operator approach based on the coupled cluster method is described and applied to calculate vibrational expectation values and absolute transition matrix elements. Coupled cluster linear response theory (CCLRT) is used to calculate excited states. The convergence pattern of these properties with the rank of the excitation operator is studied. The method is applied to a water molecule. Arponen-type double similarity transformation in extended coupled cluster (ECCM) framework is also used to generate an effective operator, and the convergence pattern of these properties is compared to the normal coupled cluster (NCCM) approach. It is found that the coupled cluster method provides an accurate description of these quantities for low lying vibrational excited states. The ECCM provides a significant improvement for the calculation of the transition matrix elements.

  7. Short-distance matrix elements for $D$-meson mixing for 2+1 lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We study the short-distance hadronic matrix elements for D-meson mixing with partially quenched Nf = 2+1 lattice QCD. We use a large set of the MIMD Lattice Computation Collaboration's gauge configurations with a2 tadpole-improved staggered sea quarks and tadpole-improved Lüscher-Weisz gluons. We use the a2 tadpole-improved action for valence light quarks and the Sheikoleslami-Wohlert action with the Fermilab interpretation for the valence charm quark. Our calculation covers the complete set of five operators needed to constrain new physics models for D-meson mixing. We match our matrix elements to the MS-NDR scheme evaluated at 3 GeV. We report values for the Beneke-Buchalla-Greub-Lenz-Nierste choice of evanescent operators.

  8. A new formulation to calculate general HFB matrix elements through the Pfaffian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Oi, Makito

    2012-08-01

    A new formula is presented for the calculation of matrix elements between multi-quasiparticle Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) states. The formula is expressed in terms of the Pfaffian, and is derived by using Fermion coherent states with Grassmann numbers. It turns out that the formula corresponds to an extension of the generalized Wick's theorem and simplifies the combinatorial complexity resulting from practical applications of the generalized Wick's theorem by unifying the transition density and the transition pairing tensor in HFB theory. The resultant formula is simpler and more compact than the traditional description of matrix elements of general many-body operators. In addition, through the derivation of our new formula, we found that the Pfaffian version of the Lewis Carroll formula corresponds to a relation suggested by Balian and Brezin for HFB theory in 1969.

  9. Finite element applications to explore the effects of partial bonding on metal matrix composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Trowbridge, D.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanics of materials approach (definition of E, G, Nu, and Alpha) and the finite element method are used to explore the effects of partial bonding and fiber fracture on the behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites. Composite ply properties are calculated for various degrees of disbonding to evaluate the sensitivity of these properties to the presence of fiber/matrix disbonding and fiber fracture. The mechanics of materials approach allows for the determination of the basic ply material properties needed for design/analysis of composites. The finite element method provides the necessary structural response (forces and displacements) for the mechanics of materials equations. Results show that disbonding of fractured fibers affect only E sub (111) and alpha sub (111) significantly.

  10. Nuclear matrix elements of the double beta decay for mass around 80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Higashiyama, Koji; Teruya, Eri

    2014-09-01

    In nature there are 30 kinds of nuclei which are expected to have double beta decays. Among them ten nuclei are actually observed for the neutrino double beta decays. Still no observation is made for the neutrinoless double beta decays (0 νββ) . The 0 νββ decay is expected to occur only when neutrinos have masses and they are Majorana particles. In that respect observation of 0 νββ is to determine whether neutrinos are Majorana particles or not. In theoretical side in order to estimate the half life of 0 νββ determination of the nuclear matrix elements are essential. They were calculated in many theoretical frameworks, but the results are not consistent in various models. In this study we carry out shell model calculations for 82Se and 82Kr nuclei. After obtaining the wavefunctions, we calculate the nuclear matrix elements. For comparison we make pair truncated shell model calculations.

  11. Charge-independent trend of isoscalar matrix elements along the N˜Z line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orce, J. N.; Velázquez, V.

    2006-01-01

    Shell model calculations have been carried out using the m-scheme numerical code ANTOINE in order to elucidate the particular trend of the isoscalar matrix elements, M, for A=4n+2 isobaric triplets ranging from A=18 to A=42. The 21+(T=1)→01+(T=1) transition energies, reduced transition probabilities and isoscalar matrix elements are predicted to a high degree of accuracy. The general agreement of M between those from mirror pairs and those from T=0 nuclides support our shell model calculations. The predicted results tie together recent experimental data, and the trend of M strength along the sd and beginning of the fp shells is interpreted in terms of the dynamic shell structure. Certain discrepancies arise at A=18 and A=38 isobaric triplets, which might be explained in terms of core polarization effects and the low occupancy of the orbits at the extremes of the sd shell.

  12. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM.

  13. Calculation of the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction involving relativistic hydrogenic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2017-03-01

    The program MTRDCOUL [1] calculates the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction between a charged particle and an atomic electron, ∫ ψf∗ (r) ∣ R - r∣-1ψi(r) d r. Bound-free transitions are considered, and relativistic hydrogenic wave functions are used. In this revised version a bug discovered in the F3Y CPC Program Library subprogram [2] is fixed.

  14. Determination of electric-dipole matrix elements in K and Rb from Stark shift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Bindiya; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2007-11-15

    Stark shifts of potassium and rubidium D1 lines have been measured with high precision by Miller et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49, 5128 (1994)]. In this work, we combine these measurements with our all-order calculations to determine the values of the electric-dipole matrix elements for the 4p{sub j}-3d{sub j{sup '}} transitions in K and the 5p{sub j}-4d{sub j{sup '}} transitions in Rb to high precision. The 4p{sub 1/2}-3d{sub 3/2} and 5p{sub 1/2}-4d{sub 3/2} transitions contribute on the order of 90% to the respective polarizabilities of the np{sub 1/2} states in K and Rb, and the remaining 10% can be accurately calculated using the relativistic all-order method. Therefore, the combination of the experimental data and theoretical calculations allows us to determine the np-(n-1)d matrix elements and their uncertainties. We compare these values with our all-order calculations of the np-(n-1)d matrix elements in K and Rb for a benchmark test of the accuracy of the all-order method for transitions involving nd states. Such matrix elements are of special interest for many applications, such as determination of ''magic'' wavelengths in alkali-metal atoms for state-insensitive cooling and trapping, and determination of blackbody radiation shifts in optical frequency standards with ions.

  15. Three loop massive operator matrix elements and asymptotic Wilson coefficients with two different masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablinger, J.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; Hasselhuhn, A.; Schneider, C.; Wißbrock, F.

    2017-08-01

    Starting at 3-loop order, the massive Wilson coefficients for deep-inelastic scattering and the massive operator matrix elements describing the variable flavor number scheme receive contributions of Feynman diagrams carrying quark lines with two different masses. In the case of the charm and bottom quarks, the usual decoupling of one heavy mass at a time no longer holds, since the ratio of the respective masses, η = mc2/mb2 ∼ 1 / 10, is not small enough. Therefore, the usual variable flavor number scheme (VFNS) has to be generalized. The renormalization procedure in the two-mass case is different from the single mass case derived in [1]. We present the moments N = 2 , 4 and 6 for all contributing operator matrix elements, expanding in the ratio η. We calculate the analytic results for general values of the Mellin variable N in the flavor non-singlet case, as well as for transversity and the matrix element Agq(3). We also calculate the two-mass scalar integrals of all topologies contributing to the gluonic operator matrix element Agg. As it turns out, the expansion in η is usually inapplicable for general values of N. We therefore derive the result for general values of the mass ratio. From the single pole terms we derive, now in a two-mass calculation, the corresponding contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions. We introduce a new general class of iterated integrals and study their relations and present special values. The corresponding functions are implemented in computer-algebraic form.

  16. Nuclear Matrix Elements for two-neutrino DBD in Te isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, D. R.; Civitarese, O.

    2009-11-09

    Theoretical matrix elements, for the ground-state to ground-state two-neutrino double-beta-decay mode of {sup 128,130}Te isotopes, are calculated within a formalism which describes interactions between neutrons in a superfluid phase and protons in a normal phase. The model is basically a parameter-free one, since all relevant parameters are fixed from phenomenology. A comparison with the available experimental data is presented.

  17. Measuring the CKM matrix element V{sub tb} at D-zero and CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Heinson, A.P.

    1997-07-01

    I present measurements by the CDF collaboration of the Standard Model three generation CKM matrix element V{sub tb} and of a special case extension with additional assumptions, using current Tevatron t{anti t} data. I then show how we can significantly improve the precision on V{sub tb} and at the same time extend the measurement so it is not constrained by Standard Model assumptions, using single top production at the upgraded Tevatron.

  18. Quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation.

    PubMed

    D'Ariano, G M; Lo Presti, P

    2001-05-07

    Quantum operations describe any state change allowed in quantum mechanics, including the evolution of an open system or the state change due to a measurement. We present a general method based on quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation. As input the method needs only a single entangled state. The feasibility of the technique for the electromagnetic field is shown, and the experimental setup is illustrated based on homodyne tomography of a twin beam.

  19. An improved method for extracting matrix elements from lattice three-point functions

    SciTech Connect

    C. Aubin, K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    The extraction of matrix elements from baryon three-point functions is complicated by the fact that the signal-to-noise drops rapidly as a function of time. Using a previously discussed method to improve the signal-to-noise for lattice two-point functions, we use this technique to do so for lattice three-point functions, using electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon and Delta as an example.

  20. Useful extremum principle for the variational calculation of matrix elements. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1975-01-01

    Recent work (Gerjuoy et al., 1974) on variational principles for diagonal bound state matrix elements of arbitrary Hermitian operators is extended. In particular, it is shown that the previously derived minimum principle for the trial auxiliary function appearing in such variational principles can be constructed using a modified Hamiltonian possessing not heretofore recognized positive definite properties. Thus there is at least one alternative to the particular modified Hamiltonian on which the results of Gerjuoy et al. (1974) originally were based.

  1. Useful extremum principle for the variational calculation of matrix elements. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1975-01-01

    Recent work (Gerjuoy et al., 1974) on variational principles for diagonal bound state matrix elements of arbitrary Hermitian operators is extended. In particular, it is shown that the previously derived minimum principle for the trial auxiliary function appearing in such variational principles can be constructed using a modified Hamiltonian possessing not heretofore recognized positive definite properties. Thus there is at least one alternative to the particular modified Hamiltonian on which the results of Gerjuoy et al. (1974) originally were based.

  2. Finite element analysis of stress transfer mechanism from matrix to the fiber in SWCN reinforced nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2017-02-01

    This study defined as micromechanical finite element (FE) approach examining the stress transfer mechanism in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCN) reinforced composites. In the modeling, 3D unit-cell method was evaluated. Carbon nanotube reinforced composites were modeled as three layers which comprises CNT, interface and matrix material. Firstly; matrix, fiber and interfacial materials all together considered as three layered cylindrical nanocomposite. Secondly, the cylindrical matrix material was assumed to be isotropic and also considered as a continuous medium. Then, fiber material was represented with zigzag type SWCNs. Finally, SWCN was combined with the elastic medium by using springs with different constants. In the FE modeling of SWCN reinforced composite model springs were modeled by using ANSYS spring damper element COMBIN14. The developed interfacial van der Waals interaction effects between the continuous matrix layer and the carbon nanotube fiber layer were simulated by applying these various spring stiffness values. In this study, the layered composite cylindrical FE model was presented as the equivalent mechanical properties of SWCN structures in terms of Young's modulus. The obtained results and literature values were presented and discussed. Figures, 16, 17, and 18 of the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, a solid diamond symbol appeared instead of a Greek tau on the y axis labels for these three figures. This article was updated on 17 March 2017 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged.

  3. Matrix effects for elemental fractionation within ICPMS: applications for U-Th-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent development in instruments provides significant technical supports for daily, quick, money saving geochemical analyses. Laser ablation ICPMS stands out due to these reasons, especially for the U-Th-Pb isotopic dating. Matrix-matched external standardization is by far the most common approach used in U-Th-Pb dating via LA-ICPMS. However, matrix-effects between standard and sample for in-situ dating have shown to be both significant and insignificant. It remains mysterious whether a well matrix-matched standard is needed for U-Th-Pb dating by LA-ICPMS. This study provides an experimental framework for the understanding of matrix effects induced elemental fractionation for U-Th-Pb associated with ICPMS. A preliminary study on the influence of varied U, Th and Pb amounts on their fractionations has been carried out. Experimental data show that different U, Th and Pb contents result in varied 238U/206Pb and 232Th/208Pb ratios. The fractionations of U/Pb and Th/Pb increase with the increasing contents (1 ppb to 100 ppb) with a strong positive anomaly at 10 ppb. Matrixes representing minerals frequently used in dating have been investigated for the influences on U/Pb and Th/Pb fractionations, which suggest a complicated effect. Little fractionations observed between mineral pairs (e.g., monazite and apatite; zircon and perovskite; rutile and perovskite; xenotime and baddeleyite), whereas large fractionations identified for other minerals (e.g., zircon and baddeleyite; monazite and sphene; rutile and baddeleyite). Single element matrix (i.e., Si, P, Ca, Zr, Ti) has been studied to identify their effects on the fractionations. U/Pb ratio increases with the increasing Si and P contents, whereas it decreases for Zr, Ca and Ti. Th/Pb ratio increases with increasing Si contents, decreases for P and Zr, and increases first then decreases for Ca and Ti. Above all, different matrix and U, Th and Pb amounts show distinct U/Pb and Th/Pb fractionations within ICPMS. The

  4. MOON for neutrino-less ββ decays and ββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-11-01

    The MOON project aims at spectroscopic 0vββ studies with the v-mass sensitivity of 100-30 meV by measuring two beta rays from 100Mo and/or 82Se. The detector is a compact super-module of multi-layer PL scintillator plates. R&D works made by the pro to-type MOON-1 and the small PL plate show the possible energy resolution of around σ~2.2%, as required for the mass sensitivity. Nuclear matrix elements M2v for 2vββ are shown to be given by the sum ΣLMk of the 2vββ matrix elements Mk through intermediate quasi-particle states in the Fermi-surface, where Mi is obtained experimentally by using the GT(Jπ = 1+) matrix elements of Mi(k) and Mf(k) for the successive single-β transitions through the k-th intermediate state.

  5. Matrix element method at next-to-leading order for arbitrary jet algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, Robin; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The matrix element method usually employs leading-order matrix elements. We discuss the generalization towards higher orders in perturbation theory and show how the matrix element method can be used at next-to-leading order for arbitrary infrared-safe jet algorithms. We discuss three variants at next-to-leading order. The first two variants work at the level of the jet momenta. The first variant adheres to strict fixed order in perturbation theory. We present a method for the required integration over the radiation phase space. The second variant is inspired by the POWHEG method and works as the first variant at the level of the jet momenta. The third variant is a more exclusive POWHEG version. Here we resolve exactly one jet into two subjets. If the two subjets are resolved above a scale p⊥min, the likelihood is computed from the POWHEG-modified real emission part, otherwise it is given by the POWHEG-modified virtual part.

  6. MOON for neutrino-less {beta}{beta} decays and {beta}{beta} nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-11-09

    The MOON project aims at spectroscopic 0v{beta}{beta} studies with the v-mass sensitivity of 100-30 meV by measuring two beta rays from {sup 100}Mo and/or {sup 82}Se. The detector is a compact super-module of multi-layer PL scintillator plates. R and D works made by the pro to-type MOON-1 and the small PL plate show the possible energy resolution of around {sigma}{approx}2.2%, as required for the mass sensitivity. Nuclear matrix elements M{sup 2v} for 2v{beta}{beta} are shown to be given by the sum {sigma}{sub L}M{sub k} of the 2v{beta}{beta} matrix elements M{sub k} through intermediate quasi-particle states in the Fermi-surface, where Mi is obtained experimentally by using the GT(J{sup {pi}} = 1{sup +}) matrix elements of M{sub i}(k) and M{sub f}(k) for the successive single-{beta} transitions through the k-th intermediate state.

  7. Urinary stones as a novel matrix for human biomonitoring of toxic and essential elements.

    PubMed

    Kuta, J; Smetanová, S; Benová, D; Kořistková, T; Machát, J

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring of body burden of toxic elements is usually based on analysis of concentration of particular elements in blood, urine and/or hair. Analysis of these matrices, however, predominantly reflects short- or medium-term exposure to trace elements or pollutants. In this work, urinary stones were investigated as a matrix for monitoring long-term exposure to toxic and essential elements. A total of 431 samples of urinary calculi were subjected to mineralogical and elemental analysis by infrared spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The effect of mineralogical composition of the stones and other parameters such as sex, age and geographical location on contents of trace and minor elements is presented. Our results demonstrate the applicability of such approach and confirm that the analysis of urinary calculi can be helpful in providing complementary information on human exposure to trace metals and their excretion. Analysis of whewellite stones (calcium oxalate monohydrate) with content of phosphorus <0.6 % has been proved to be a promising tool for biomonitoring of trace and minor elements.

  8. Palindromic repetitive DNA elements with coding potential in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Mikita; Lathe, Warren C; Bork, Peer

    2005-10-10

    We have identified 141 novel palindromic repetitive elements in the genome of euryarchaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. The total length of these elements is 14.3kb, which corresponds to 0.9% of the total genomic sequence and 6.3% of all extragenic regions. The elements can be divided into three groups (MJRE1-3) based on the sequence similarity. The low sequence identity within each of the groups suggests rather old origin of these elements in M. jannaschii. Three MJRE2 elements were located within the protein coding regions without disrupting the coding potential of the host genes, indicating that insertion of repeats might be a widespread mechanism to enhance sequence diversity in coding regions.

  9. Spectral element discontinuous Galerkin simulations for wake potential calculations : NEKCEM.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Fischer, P. F.; Chae, Y.-C.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present high-order spectral element discontinuous Galerkin simulations for wake field and wake potential calculations. Numerical discretizations are based on body-conforming hexagonal meshes on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids. We demonstrate wake potential profiles for cylindrically symmetric cavity structures in 3D, including the cases for linear and quadratic transitions between two cross sections. Wake potential calculations are carried out on 2D surfaces for various bunch sizes.

  10. A Data Matrix Method for Improving the Quantification of Element Percentages of SEM/EDX Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2009-01-01

    A simple 2D M N matrix involving sample preparation enables the microanalyst to peer below the noise floor of element percentages reported by the SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/ energy dispersive x-ray) analysis, thus yielding more meaningful data. Using the example of a 2 3 sample set, there are M = 2 concentration levels of the original mix under test: 10 percent ilmenite (90 percent silica) and 20 percent ilmenite (80 percent silica). For each of these M samples, N = 3 separate SEM/EDX samples were drawn. In this test, ilmenite is the element of interest. By plotting the linear trend of the M sample s known concentration versus the average of the N samples, a much higher resolution of elemental analysis can be performed. The resulting trend also shows how the noise is affecting the data, and at what point (of smaller concentrations) is it impractical to try to extract any further useful data.

  11. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  12. Model independent analysis of gluonic pole matrix elements and universality of transverse-momentum-dependent fragmentation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Gamberg, L. P.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulders, P. J.

    2011-04-01

    Gluonic pole matrix elements explain the appearance of single spin asymmetries (SSA) in high-energy scattering processes. They involve a combination of operators which are odd under time reversal (T-odd). Such matrix elements appear in principle both for parton distribution functions and parton fragmentation functions. We show that for parton fragmentation functions, these gluonic pole matrix elements vanish as a consequence of the analytic structure of scattering amplitudes in quantum chromodynamics. This result is important in the study of the universality of transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) fragmentation functions.

  13. X-ray microanalysis of elements present in the matrix of cnidarian nematocysts.

    PubMed

    Tardent, P; Zierold, K; Klug, M; Weber, J

    1990-01-01

    The composition and concentration of elements, in particular those of metallic cations, present in the intracapsular matrix and the wall of nematocysts of various cnidarian species have been recorded by means of X-ray microanalysis performed on 100nm thick cryosections. The predominant cation detected in the nematocyst matrix of the hydrozoan Podocoryne carnea (medusa), the scyphozoan Aurelia aurita (scyphopolyp) and the anthozoan Calliactis parasitica (tentacles and acontia) is K(+). Mg(2+) prevails in tentacular cysts of Anthopleura elegantissima, Actinia equina and Anemonia viridis, whereas, the acrorhagial cysts of A. elegantissima and A. equina contain Ca(2+) instead of Mg(2+). The acrorhagial cysts of A. viridis contain Mg(2+) like those of the tentacles. In the tentacular nematocysts of Podocoryne carnea polyps (Hydrozoa) on the other hand ambiguous element contents were found indicating that the cysts of this species has no preference for a particular cation. The high values of sulfur recorded in the matrix and particularly the wall of all the cysts are reflecting the presence of numerous protein disulfide bonds within the structural components (wall, shaft, tubule) of the nematocysts.

  14. A triangular element based on generalized potential energy concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Stiffness equations are formulated for a doubly-curved triangular thin shell finite element. The strain energy component of the potential energy is first expressed in terms of displacements and displacement gradients with the aid of consistent deep shell strain-displacement equations. The element in-plane and normal displacement fields are approximated by complete cubic polynomials. These functions do not satisfy the interelement displacement admissibility conditions. Satisfaction is forced by the imposition of constraint conditions on the interelement boundaries; the constraints represent the modification of the potential energy. Some numerical results for a pinched cylinder, a cylindrical sphere, and a pinched sphere are examined.

  15. A triangular element based on generalized potential energy concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Stiffness equations are formulated for a doubly-curved triangular thin shell finite element. The strain energy component of the potential energy is first expressed in terms of displacements and displacement gradients with the aid of consistent deep shell strain-displacement equations. The element in-plane and normal displacement fields are approximated by complete cubic polynomials. These functions do not satisfy the interelement displacement admissibility conditions. Satisfaction is forced by the imposition of constraint conditions on the interelement boundaries; the constraints represent the modification of the potential energy. Some numerical results for a pinched cylinder, a cylindrical sphere, and a pinched sphere are examined.

  16. First ionization potential of the heaviest actinide lawrencium, element 103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tetsuya K.; Asai, Masato; Borschevsky, Anastasia; Stora, Thierry; Sato, Nozomi; Kaneya, Yusuke; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Düllmann, Christoph E.; Eberhardt, Klaus; Eliav, Ephraim; Ichikawa, Shinichi; Kaldor, Uzi; Kratz, Jens V.; Miyashita, Sunao; Nagame, Yuichiro; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Osa, Akihiko; Renisch, Dennis; Runke, Jörg; Schädel, Matthias; Thörle-Pospiech, Petra; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Trautmann, Norbert

    2016-12-01

    The first ionization potential (IP1) of element 103, lawrencium (Lr), has been successfully determined for the first time by using a newly developed method based on a surface ionization process. The measured IP1 value is 4.963 eV. This value is the smallest among those of actinide elements and is in excellent agreement with the value of 4.963(15) eV predicted by state-of-the-art relativistic calculations also performed in this work. Our results strongly support that the Lr atom has an electronic configuration of [Rn]7s25f147p, which is influenced by strong relativistic effects. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations and also opens the way for studies on atomic properties of heavy elements with atomic number Z > 100. Moreover, the present achievement has triggered a controversy on the position of lutetium (Lu) and Lr in the Periodic Table of Elements.

  17. Potential energy landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.

    2006-02-15

    We describe the potential energy landscapes of elemental S{sub 8}, Se{sub 8}, and Te{sub 8} clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se{sub 8}. We also map the potential energy landscapes of heterogeneous Se{sub n}(S,Te){sub 8-n} clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.

  18. Study of color-octet matrix elements through J/ψ production in e+e- annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Jie; Xu, Guang-Zhi; Zhang, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Liu, Kui-Yong

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the color-octet long distance matrix elements are studied through the inclusive J/ψ production in e+e- annihilation within the framework of non-relativistic QCD factorization. The calculations are up-to next-to-leading order with the radiative and relativistic corrections in the energy region of the B-factory and the near-threshold region of 4.6{-}5.6 GeV. A constraint of the long distance matrix elements (< ^1S_08> , < ^3P_08> ) is obtained. Through our estimation, the P-wave color-octet matrix element (< 0|^3P^8_0|0> ) should be of the order of 0.008m_c^2 GeV^3 or less. The constrained region is not compatible with the values of the long distance matrix elements fitted at hadron colliders.

  19. Nucleon matrix elements with Nf=2+1+1 maximally twisted fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Dinter, Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2010-06-01

    We present the first lattice calculation of nucleon matrix elements using four dynamical flavors. We use the Nf=2+1+1 maximally twisted mass formulation. The renormalization is performed non-perturbatively in the RI'-MOM scheme and results are given for the vector and axial vector operators with up to one-derivative. Our calculation of the average momentum of the unpolarized non-singlet parton distribution is presented and compared to our previous results obtained from the Nf=2 case.

  20. Using the modified matrix element method to constrain Lμ-Lτ interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Fatemeh; Martin, Adam

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we explore the discriminatory power of the matrix element method (MEM) in constraining the Lμ-Lτ model at the LHC. The Z' boson associated with the spontaneously broken U (1 )Lμ-Lτ symmetry only interacts with the second and third generation of leptons at tree level, and is thus difficult to produce at the LHC. We argue that the best channels for discovering this Z' are in Z →4 μ and 2 μ + ET. Both these channels have a large number of kinematic observables, which strongly motivates the usage of a multivariate technique. The MEM is a multivariate analysis that uses the squared matrix element |M |2 to quantify the likelihood of the testing hypotheses. As the computation of the |M |2 requires knowing the initial and final state momenta and the model parameters, it is not commonly used in new physics searches. Conventionally, new parameters are estimated by maximizing the likelihood of the signal with respect to the background, and we outline scenarios in which this procedure is (in)effective. We illustrate that the new parameters can also be estimated by studying the |M |2 distributions, and, even if our parameter estimation is off, we can gain better sensitivity than cut-and-count methods. Additionally, unlike the conventional MEM, where one integrates over all unknown momenta in processes with ET, we show an example scenario where these momenta can be estimated using the process topology. This procedure, which we refer to as the "modified squared matrix element," is computationally much faster than the canonical matrix element method and maintains signal-background discrimination. Bringing the MEM and the aforementioned modifications to bear on the Lμ-Lτ model, we find that with 300 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, we are sensitive to the couplings of gZ'≳0.002 g1 and MZ'<20 GeV , and gZ'≳0.005 g1 and 20 GeV

  1. Many-body correlations of QRPA in nuclear matrix elements of double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, J.

    2015-10-28

    We present two new ideas on the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) approach for calculating nuclear matrix elements of double-beta decay. First, it is necessary to calculate overlaps of the QRPA states obtained on the basis of the ground states of different nuclei. We calculate this overlap using quasiboson vacua as the QRPA ground states. Second, we show that two-particle transfer paths are possible to use for the calculation under the closure approximation. A calculation is shown for {sup 150}Nd→{sup 150}Sm using these two new ideas, and their implication is discussed.

  2. A Fortran program to calculate the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction involving hydrogenic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2017-03-01

    The program MTRXCOUL [1] calculates the matrix elements of the Coulomb interaction between a charged particle and an atomic electron, ∫ψf∗ (r) | R - r | - 1ψi(r) d r. Bound-free transitions are considered, and non-relativistic hydrogenic wave functions are used. In this revised version a bug discovered in the F3Y CPC Program Library (PL) subprogram [2] is fixed. Furthermore, the COULCC CPC PL subprogram [3] applied for the calculations of the radial wave functions of the free states and the Bessel functions is replaced by the CPC PL subprogram DCOUL [4].

  3. Closed formula for the matrix elements of the volume operator in canonical quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, T.

    1998-06-01

    We derive a closed formula for the matrix elements of the volume operator for canonical Lorentzian quantum gravity in four space-time dimensions in the continuum in a spin-network basis. We also display a new technique of regularization which is state dependent but we are forced to it in order to maintain diffeomorphism covariance and in that sense it is natural. We arrive naturally at the expression for the volume operator as defined by Ashtekar and Lewandowski up to a state-independent factor.

  4. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  5. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  6. Stochastic method with low mode substitution for nucleon isovector matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Gong, Ming; Liu, Keh-Fei; χ QCD Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a stochastic method with low-mode substitution to evaluate the connected three-point functions. The isovector matrix elements of the nucleon for the axial-vector coupling gA3, scalar couplings gS3 and the quark momentum fraction ⟨x ⟩u -d are calculated with overlap fermion on 2 +1 flavor domain-wall configurations on a 243×64 lattice at mπ=330 MeV with lattice spacing a =0.114 fm .

  7. Number-conserving random phase approximation with analytically integrated matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kyotoku, M. ); Schmid, K.W. ); Gruemmer, F. ); Faessler, A. )

    1990-01-01

    In the present paper a number conserving random phase approximation is derived as a special case of the recently developed random phase approximation in general symmetry projected quasiparticle mean fields. All the occurring integrals induced by the number projection are performed analytically after writing the various overlap and energy matrices in the random phase approximation equation as polynomials in the gauge angle. In the limit of a large number of particles the well-known pairing vibration matrix elements are recovered. We also present a new analytically number projected variational equation for the number conserving pairing problem.

  8. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega

    SciTech Connect

    M. Williams, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer

    2009-12-01

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (CM) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 112 10-MeV wide CM energy bins, each subdivided into cos(theta_CM) bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive omega photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  9. Reduced matrix elements of spin-spin interactions for the atomic f-electron configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Y. Y.

    2014-03-01

    A re-examination of some major references on the intra-atomic magnetic interactions over the last six decades reveals that there exist some gaps or puzzles concerning the previous studies of the spin-spin interactions for the atomic f-shell electrons. Hence, tables are provided for the relevant reduced matrix elements of the four double-tensor operators zr (r=1,2,3, and 4) of rank 2 in both the orbital and spin spaces. The range of the tables covers all states of the configurations from f4 to f7.

  10. Comparative Study of Various Algorithms for the Merging of Parton Showers and Matrix Elements in Hadronic Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alwall, J.; Hoche, S.; Krauss, F.; Lavesson, N.; Lonnblad, L.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Moretti, M.; Papadopoulos, C.G.; Piccinini, F.; Schumann, S.; Treccani, M.; Winter, J.; Worek, M.; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Lund U. /Louvain U. /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Athens U. /INFN, Pavia /Dresden, Tech. U. /Karlsruhe U., TP /Silesia U.

    2007-06-27

    We compare different procedures for combining fixed-order tree-level matrix-element generators with parton showers. We use the case of W-production at the Tevatron and the LHC to compare different implementations of the so-called CKKW and MLM schemes using different matrix-element generators and different parton cascades. We find that although similar results are obtained in all cases, there are important differences.

  11. Transposable elements and their potential role in complex lung disorder.

    PubMed

    Sargurupremraj, Muralidharan; Wjst, Matthias

    2013-10-05

    Transposable elements (TEs) are a class of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) that were long regarded as junk DNA, which make up approximately 45% of the genome. Although most of these elements are rendered inactive by mutations and other gene silencing mechanisms, TEs such as long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) are still active and translocate within the genome. During transposition, they may create lesions in the genome, thereby acting as epigenetic modifiers. Approximately 65 disease-causing LINE insertion events have been reported thus far; however, any possible role of TEs in complex disorders is not well established. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one such complex disease that is primarily caused by cigarette smoking. Although the exact molecular mechanism underlying COPD remains unclear, oxidative stress is thought to be the main factor in the pathogenesis of COPD. In this review, we explore the potential role of oxidative stress in epigenetic activation of TEs such as LINEs and the subsequent cascade of molecular damage. Recent advancements in sequencing and computation have eased the identification of mobile elements. Therefore, a comparative study on the activity of these elements and markers for genome instability would give more insight on the relationship between MGEs and complex disorder such as COPD.

  12. Extraction radiopolarography for determining the oxidation potentials of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kosyakov, V.N.; Yakovlev, N.G.; Vlasov, M.M.

    1987-03-01

    A method is described for determining the oxidation potentials for valency transitions in transplutonium elements (TPE), which is usable when the element is present in trace amounts. This is based on electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the TPE in combination with a solvent-extraction method of determining the concentration ratio for the oxidized and reduced forms. The method is applicable to determining the potential of almost any reversible reaction if the solvent-extraction parameters for the oxidized and reduced forms differ substantially, while the potential (with allowance for the extraction system) lies in a region accessible to electrochemical oxidation or reduction. Two forms of use are considered: with liquid extraction and with extraction chromatography. The method is demonstrated on the Bk(IV)/Bk(III) transition with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid as extraction agent.

  13. Measurement of single top quark production at D0 using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrevski, Jovan Pavle

    2007-01-01

    Until now, the top quark has only been observed produced in pairs, by the strong force. According to the standard model, it can also be produced singly, via an electroweak interaction. Top quarks produced this way provide powerful ways to test the charged-current electroweak interactions of the top quark, to measure |Vtb|, and to search for physics beyond the standard model. This thesis describes the application of the matrix element analysis technique to the search for single top quark production with the D0 detector using 0.9 fb-1 of Run II data. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the background model, assuming a Standard Model s-channel to t-channel cross section ratio of σst = 0.44, we measure the single top quark production cross section: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.8$-1.4\\atop{+1.6}$ pb. This result has a p-value of 0.08%, corresponding to a 3.2 standard deviation Gaussian equivalent significance.

  14. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II with the matrix-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-05-01

    We describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convoluting the leading order matrix element describing q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime} {nu}{sub {ell}}, with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}, we observe 33 candidate events and measure M{sub top} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons and is the most precise single measurement of the top quark mass in this channel.

  15. Precision Measurement of the Neutron Twist-3 Matrix Element dn2: Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Posik, Matthew; Flay, David; Parno, Diana; Allada, Kalyan; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Chiranjib; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Franklin, Gregg; Friend, Megan; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Gomez, Javier; Guo, Lei; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, J; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jin, Ge; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lukhanin, Oleksandr; Mamyan, Vahe; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Moffit, Bryan; Muangma, Navaphon; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Oh, Yongseok; Peng, Jen-chieh; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Troth, Wolfgang; Wang, Diancheng; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2014-07-01

    Double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections were measured at large Bjorken x (0.25 lte x lte 0.90), in both the deep-inelastic and resonance regions, by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV from a transversely and longitudinally polarized 3He target. In this dedicated experiment, the spin structure function g2 on 3He was determined with precision at large x, and the neutron twist-three matrix element dn2 was measured at ?Q2? of 3.21 and 4.32 GeV2/c2, with an absolute precision of about 10?5. Our results are found to be in agreement with lattice QCD calculations and resolve the disagreement found with previous data at ?Q2?= 5 GeV2/c2. Combining dn2 and a newly extracted twist-four matrix element, fn2, the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were extracted and found to be of opposite sign and about 60 MeV/fm in magnitude.

  16. Many-body-localization transition: strong multifractality spectrum for matrix elements of local operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    For short-ranged disordered quantum models in one dimension, the many-body-localization is analyzed via the adaptation to the many-body context (Serbyn et al 2015 Phys. Rev. X 5 041047) of the Thouless point of view on the Anderson transition: the question is whether a local interaction between two long chains is able to reshuffle completely the eigenstates (delocalized phase with a volume-law entanglement) or whether the hybridization between tensor states remains limited (many-body-localized phase with an area-law entanglement). The central object is thus the level of hybridization induced by the matrix elements of local operators, as compared with the difference of diagonal energies. The multifractal analysis of these matrix elements of local operators is used to analyze the corresponding statistics of resonances. Our main conclusion is that the critical point is characterized by the strong-multifractality spectrum f(0≤slant α ≤slant 2)=\\fracα{2} , well known in the context of Anderson localization in spaces of effective infinite dimensionality, where the size of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the volume. Finally, the possibility of a delocalized non-ergodic phase near criticality is discussed.

  17. Charge-exchange reactions and nuclear matrix elements for {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Frekers, D.

    2009-11-09

    Charge-exchange reactions of (n, p) and (p, n) type at intermediate energies are a powerful tool for the study of nuclear matrix element in {beta}{beta} decay. The present paper reviews some of the most recent experiments in this context. Here, the (n, p) type reactions are realized through (d, {sup 2}He), where {sup 2}He refers to two protons in a singlet {sup 1}S{sub 0} state and where both of these are momentum analyzed and detected by the same spectrometer and detector. These reactions have been developed and performed exclusively at KVI, Groningen (NL), using an incident deuteron energy of 183 MeV. Final state resolutions of about 100 keV have routinely been available. On the other hand, the ({sup 3}He, t) reaction is of (p, n) type and was developed at the RCNP facility in Osaka (JP). Measurements with an unprecedented high resolution of 30 keV at incident energies of 420 MeV are now readily possible. Using both reaction types one can extract the Gamow-Teller transition strengths B(GT{sup +}) and B(GT{sup -}), which define the two ''legs'' of the {beta}{beta} decay matrix elements for the 2v{beta}{beta} decay The high resolution available in both reactions allows a detailed insight into the excitations of the intermediate odd-odd nuclei and, as will be shown, some unexpected features are being unveiled.

  18. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  19. Determination of color-octet matrix elements from e+e- processes at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Feng; Qiao, Cong-Feng; Chao, Kuang-Ta

    1997-08-01

    We present an analysis of the preliminary experimental data of direct J/ψ production in e+e- processes at low energies. We find that the color-octet contributions are crucially important to the cross section in this energy region, and their inclusion produces a good description of the data. By fitting to the data, we extract the individual values of two color-octet matrix elements: ~1.1×10-2 GeV3; /m2c~7.4×10-3 GeV3. We discuss the allowed range of the two matrix elements constrained by the theoretical uncertainties. We find that is poorly determined because it is sensitive to the variation of the choice of mc, αs and . However, /m2c is quite stable [about (6-9)×10-3 GeV3] when the parameters vary in reasonable ranges. The uncertainties due to large experimental errors are also discussed.

  20. The Sp(3, R) Sympletic Model: a comparison of exact and approximate matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Anna; Caprio, Mark; Rowe, David

    2014-03-01

    The Sp(3, R) symplectic model has a close physical connection to both the microscopic shell model and the collective deformation and rotational degrees of freedom, and it is a natural extension of the Elliot SU(3) model from single-shell to multi-shell dynamics. The Sp(3, R) Lie algebra--which contains the angular momentum operators, the quadrupole and vibrational momentum operators and the quadrupole flow tensor operators--is the smallest algebra containing both the shell model Hamiltonian and the rotor algebra. In the limit of large number of oscillator quanta, the Sp(3, R) algebra contracts to the U(3) boson algebra. For large values of the Casimir operator of the SU(3) subalgebra, the sp(3, R) algebra further contracts to the algebra of the collective coupled rotor-vibrator model. The exact Sp(3, R) matrix elements, calculated using the vector coherent state method, are compared with approximate matrix elements calculated in the U(3) boson limit. Science Advancement under a Cottrell Scholar Award and by the US DOE under grant DE-FG02-95ER-40934.

  1. Coulomb and spin-orbit interaction matrix elements in the ? configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Edwin

    1998-11-01

    The 0953-4075/31/21/006/img2 configuration is analysed in group-theoretical terms. Starting from the table given by Condon and Odabasi for the configuration 0953-4075/31/21/006/img2, we determine a set of convenient group-theoretical basis states, and rewrite the Coulomb matrix elements in terms of this new basis. Linear combinations from the different parts of the Coulomb operators are formed such that they have simple group transformation properties in our scheme. The sequence of groups that we use is 0953-4075/31/21/006/img4, where T denotes the isospin of Simonis et al, in which electrons with the same angular momentum l but different principal quantum numbers n are accommodated by introducing the eigenvalue 0953-4075/31/21/006/img5 of 0953-4075/31/21/006/img6. Using the Wigner-Eckart theorem and selection rules on the higher symmetry groups, the tables of the Coulomb and spin-orbit matrix elements for the reconstituted operators (with simple group transformation properties) are much simplified in terms of these basis states.

  2. Top quark mass measurement in the lepton plus jets channel using a modified matrix element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Siegrist, J.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-04-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, mt, obtained from p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. We analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb-1. We select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. We calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. Our event likelihood is a function of mt and a parameter JES (jet energy scale) that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. We use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. We also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, we find mt=172.7±1.8(stat+JES)±1.2(syst)GeV/c2.

  3. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton final state using the matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Grohsjean, Alexander

    2008-12-15

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, is the heaviest known fundamental particle. The precise knowledge of its mass yields important constraints on the mass of the yet-unobserved Higgs boson and allows to probe for physics beyond the Standard Model. The first measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel with the Matrix Element method at the D0 experiment is presented. After a short description of the experimental environment and the reconstruction chain from hits in the detector to physical objects, a detailed review of the Matrix Element method is given. The Matrix Element method is based on the likelihood to observe a given event under the assumption of the quantity to be measured, e.g. the mass of the top quark. The method has undergone significant modifications and improvements compared to previous measurements in the lepton+jets channel: the two undetected neutrinos require a new reconstruction scheme for the four-momenta of the final state particles, the small event sample demands the modeling of additional jets in the signal likelihood, and a new likelihood is designed to account for the main source of background containing tauonic Z decay. The Matrix Element method is validated on Monte Carlo simulated events at the generator level. For the measurement, calibration curves are derived from events that are run through the full D0 detector simulation. The analysis makes use of the Run II data set recorded between April 2002 and May 2008 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb-1. A total of 107 t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events with one electron and one muon in the final state are selected. Applying the Matrix Element method to this data set, the top quark mass is measured to be mtopRun IIa = 170.6 ± 6.1(stat.)-1.5+2.1(syst.)GeV; mtopRun IIb = 174.1 ± 4.4(stat.)-1.8+2.5(syst.)GeV; m

  4. Potential matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors from edible marine algae: a review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Noel Vinay; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are endopeptidases which belong to the group of metalloproteinases that contribute for the extra-cellular matrix degradation, and several tissue remodeling processes. An imbalance in the regulation of these endopeptidases eventually leads to several severe pathological complications like cancers, cardiac, cartilage, and neurological related diseases. Hence inhibitory substances of metalloproteinases (MMPIs) could prove beneficial in the management of above specified pathological conditions. The available synthetic MMPIs that have been reported until now have few shortcomings and thus many of them could not make to the final clinical trials. Hence a growing interest among researchers on screening of MMPIs from different natural resources is evident and especially natural products from marine origin. As there has been an unparalleled contribution of several biologically active compounds from marine resources that have shown profound applications in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and pharmaceuticals, we have attempted to discuss the various MMPIs from edible sea-weeds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fucoidans from marine algae as potential matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Noel Vinay; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are endopeptidases which belong to the group of metalloproteinases that contribute for the extracellular matrix degradation and several tissue remodeling processes. An imbalance in the regulation of these endopeptidases eventually leads to several severe pathological complications like cancers, cardiac, cartilage, and neurological-related diseases. Hence, inhibitory substances of metalloproteinases (MMPIs) could prove beneficial in the management of above specified pathological conditions. The available synthetic MMPIs that have been reported until now have few shortcomings, and thus many of them could not make to the final clinical trials. Hence, a growing interest among researchers on screening of MMPIs from different natural resources is evident and especially natural products from marine origin. As there has been an unparalleled contribution of several biologically active compounds from marine resources that have shown a profound applications in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and pharmaceuticals, we have attempted to discuss the various MMPIs from edible seaweeds. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Beneficial effect of the antioxidant riboflavin on gene expression of extracellular matrix elements, antioxidants and oxidases in keratoconic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Isabella M Y; McGhee, Charles N J; Sherwin, Trevor

    2014-07-01

    Keratoconus manifests as a conical protrusion of the cornea and is characterised by stromal thinning. This causes debilitating visual impairment which may necessitate corneal transplantation. Therapeutic targets related to disease mechanisms are currently lacking, as the pathobiology remains unclear. Many pathological features may be manifestations of defects in wound healing and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated functions. In a wide range of tissue and cell types, antioxidant exposure has beneficial effects on both of these pathways. This study investigated the effect of treatment with the antioxidant riboflavin on wound healing and ROS-associated functions in keratoconus. Stromal cells were isolated from human central keratoconic (n = 3) and normal (n = 3) corneas. Total RNA was extracted and reverse-transcribed into complementary DNA. The gene expression of 22 genes involved in repair (eight normal and four repair-type extracellular matrix constituents) and ROS-associated processes (eight antioxidants and two ROS-synthesising oxidases) was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This was also performed on keratoconic stromal cells treated in vitro with riboflavin (n = 3). In stromal cells from untreated keratoconic corneas (compared with untreated normal corneas), there was an up-regulation of 7/12 extracellular matrix elements. Four of eight antioxidants and two of two oxidases were also increased. In treated keratoconic corneas (compared with untreated keratoconic corneas), six out of eight normal extracellular matrix constituents were up-regulated and two of four repair-type molecules were reduced. An increase was also observed in seven out of eight antioxidants and there was a diminution in two out of two oxidases. Riboflavin encourages the synthesis of a normal extracellular matrix and reduces reactive oxygen species levels in keratoconus. This supports the occurrence of wound healing and ROS-associated abnormalities in keratoconus

  7. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  8. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  9. Single element of the matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: Measurements of the extracted currents combined with diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yordanov, D. Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.

    2016-02-15

    Combining measurements of the extracted currents with probe and laser-photodetachment diagnostics, the study is an extension of recent tests of factors and gas-discharge conditions stimulating the extraction of volume produced negative ions. The experiment is in a single element of a rf source with the design of a matrix of small-radius inductively driven discharges. The results are for the electron and negative-ion densities, for the plasma potential and for the electronegativity in the vicinity of the plasma electrode as well as for the currents of the extracted negative ions and electrons. The plasma-electrode bias and the rf power have been varied. Necessity of a high bias to the plasma electrode and stable linear increase of the extracted currents with the rf power are the main conclusions.

  10. Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites - Aerospace potential and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermostructural ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites are attractive in numerous aerospace applications; the noncatastrophic fracture behavior and flaw-insensitivity of continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs renders them especially desirable. The present development status evaluation notes that, for most highly-loaded high-temperature applications, the requisite fiber-technology base is at present insufficient. In addition to materials processing techniques, the life prediction and NDE methods are immature and require a projection of 15-20 years for the maturity of CMC turbine rotors. More lightly loaded, moderate temperature aircraft engine applications are approaching maturity.

  11. Measurement of the first ionization potential of lawrencium, element 103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T. K.; Asai, M.; Borschevsky, A.; Stora, T.; Sato, N.; Kaneya, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliav, E.; Ichikawa, S.; Kaldor, U.; Kratz, J. V.; Miyashita, S.; Nagame, Y.; Ooe, K.; Osa, A.; Renisch, D.; Runke, J.; Schädel, M.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Toyoshima, A.; Trautmann, N.

    2015-04-01

    The chemical properties of an element are primarily governed by the configuration of electrons in the valence shell. Relativistic effects influence the electronic structure of heavy elements in the sixth row of the periodic table, and these effects increase dramatically in the seventh row--including the actinides--even affecting ground-state configurations. Atomic s and p1/2 orbitals are stabilized by relativistic effects, whereas p3/2, d and f orbitals are destabilized, so that ground-state configurations of heavy elements may differ from those of lighter elements in the same group. The first ionization potential (IP1) is a measure of the energy required to remove one valence electron from a neutral atom, and is an atomic property that reflects the outermost electronic configuration. Precise and accurate experimental determination of IP1 gives information on the binding energy of valence electrons, and also, therefore, on the degree of relativistic stabilization. However, such measurements are hampered by the difficulty in obtaining the heaviest elements on scales of more than one atom at a time. Here we report that the experimentally obtained IP1 of the heaviest actinide, lawrencium (Lr, atomic number 103), is electronvolts. The IP1 of Lr was measured with 256Lr (half-life 27 seconds) using an efficient surface ion-source and a radioisotope detection system coupled to a mass separator. The measured IP1 is in excellent agreement with the value of 4.963(15) electronvolts predicted here by state-of-the-art relativistic calculations. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations and also opens the way for IP1 measurements of superheavy elements (that is, transactinides) on an atom-at-a-time scale.

  12. Measurement of the first ionization potential of lawrencium, element 103.

    PubMed

    Sato, T K; Asai, M; Borschevsky, A; Stora, T; Sato, N; Kaneya, Y; Tsukada, K; Düllmann, Ch E; Eberhardt, K; Eliav, E; Ichikawa, S; Kaldor, U; Kratz, J V; Miyashita, S; Nagame, Y; Ooe, K; Osa, A; Renisch, D; Runke, J; Schädel, M; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Toyoshima, A; Trautmann, N

    2015-04-09

    The chemical properties of an element are primarily governed by the configuration of electrons in the valence shell. Relativistic effects influence the electronic structure of heavy elements in the sixth row of the periodic table, and these effects increase dramatically in the seventh row--including the actinides--even affecting ground-state configurations. Atomic s and p1/2 orbitals are stabilized by relativistic effects, whereas p3/2, d and f orbitals are destabilized, so that ground-state configurations of heavy elements may differ from those of lighter elements in the same group. The first ionization potential (IP1) is a measure of the energy required to remove one valence electron from a neutral atom, and is an atomic property that reflects the outermost electronic configuration. Precise and accurate experimental determination of IP1 gives information on the binding energy of valence electrons, and also, therefore, on the degree of relativistic stabilization. However, such measurements are hampered by the difficulty in obtaining the heaviest elements on scales of more than one atom at a time. Here we report that the experimentally obtained IP1 of the heaviest actinide, lawrencium (Lr, atomic number 103), is 4.96(+0.08)(-0.07) electronvolts. The IP1 of Lr was measured with (256)Lr (half-life 27 seconds) using an efficient surface ion-source and a radioisotope detection system coupled to a mass separator. The measured IP1 is in excellent agreement with the value of 4.963(15) electronvolts predicted here by state-of-the-art relativistic calculations. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations and also opens the way for IP1 measurements of superheavy elements (that is, transactinides) on an atom-at-a-time scale.

  13. Measurement of the RMS Parity Violating Matrix Element in URANIUM-239

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xianzhou (Joe).

    We report the first determination of the Root -Mean-Square (RMS) parity violating matrix element in a compound nucleus (CN) system, ^{239 }U. The experiment was performed using the intense pulsed epithermal neutron beam available at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). The helicity dependence of neutron transmission through a spin zero target (^{238}U) is measured for neutron energies from 6 eV to 300 eV. Parity violation is analyzed on 17 p-wave resonances among which five show 2sigma or larger effects. The largest is a 7sigma effect at the 63.5 eV resonance which shows a parity violating asymmetry of p = 2.6%. A likelihood analysis is performed on these 17 parity violating asymmetries, and the RMS parity violating matrix element is determined for the first time to be M = 0.59_sp{-0.25}{+0.50} meV which corresponds to a parity violating spreading width ofGamma^{PV} = (1.0 {+1.7atop -0.8} ) times 10^{-7} {rm eV}.Using statistical nuclear spectroscopy, we are able to relate M to the effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. The result is | alpha_{p}| ~ (4 {+4atop -2} ) times 10^{-7} where alpha_{p} is the ratio of the parity violating strength to the parity conserving strength in the effective NN interaction. This agrees qualitatively with the estimate of free NN interaction. The consistency of the experimental measurement with expectation suggests that the manifestation of parity violating NN interaction in CN is understood. It is a challenging problem for the theorists to relate the RMS matrix element in the CN to the underlying NN interaction, therefore providing alternative ways to determine the Desplanques -Donoghue-Holstein (DDH) parameters of the NN interaction. The success of the parity violation study also validates the proposed experiment of studying the time reversal symmetry violation utilizing the large enhancement in the CN.

  14. Therapeutic potential of matrix metalloproteinases in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yuji; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Sato, Shuichi; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are secreted proteinases that have physiologic roles in degradation and remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) in almost all tissues. However, their excessive production in disease conditions leads to many pathological features including tissue breakdown, inflammation, cell death, and fibrosis. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating genetic muscle disorder caused by partial or complete loss of cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Progressive muscle wasting in DMD is accompanied by myofiber necrosis followed by cycles of regeneration and degeneration and inflammation that eventually result in replacement of myofiber by connective and adipose tissues. Emerging evidence suggests that gene expression and the activity of various MMPs are aberrantly regulated in muscle biopsies from DMD patients and in skeletal muscle of animal models of DMD. Moreover, a few studies employing genetic mouse models have revealed that different MMPs play distinct roles in disease progression in DMD. Modulation of the activity of MMPs improves myofiber regeneration and enhances the efficacy of transplantation and engraftment of muscle progenitor cells in dystrophic muscle in mouse models of DMD. Furthermore, recent reports also suggest that some MMPs especially MMP-9 can serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of DMD. In this article, we provide a succinct overview of the regulation of various MMPs and their therapeutic importance in DMD. PMID:25364719

  15. Therapeutic potential of matrix metalloproteinases in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuji; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Sato, Shuichi; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are secreted proteinases that have physiologic roles in degradation and remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) in almost all tissues. However, their excessive production in disease conditions leads to many pathological features including tissue breakdown, inflammation, cell death, and fibrosis. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating genetic muscle disorder caused by partial or complete loss of cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Progressive muscle wasting in DMD is accompanied by myofiber necrosis followed by cycles of regeneration and degeneration and inflammation that eventually result in replacement of myofiber by connective and adipose tissues. Emerging evidence suggests that gene expression and the activity of various MMPs are aberrantly regulated in muscle biopsies from DMD patients and in skeletal muscle of animal models of DMD. Moreover, a few studies employing genetic mouse models have revealed that different MMPs play distinct roles in disease progression in DMD. Modulation of the activity of MMPs improves myofiber regeneration and enhances the efficacy of transplantation and engraftment of muscle progenitor cells in dystrophic muscle in mouse models of DMD. Furthermore, recent reports also suggest that some MMPs especially MMP-9 can serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of DMD. In this article, we provide a succinct overview of the regulation of various MMPs and their therapeutic importance in DMD.

  16. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  17. Influence of Pairing on the Nuclear Matrix Elements of the Neutrinoless {beta}{beta} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.

    2008-02-08

    We study in this Letter the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements (NME's) in the framework of the interacting shell model. We analyze them in terms of the total angular momentum of the decaying neutron pair and as a function of the seniority truncations in the nuclear wave functions. This point of view turns out to be very adequate to gauge the accuracy of the NME's predicted by different nuclear models. In addition, it gives back the protagonist role in this process to the pairing interaction, the one which is responsible for the very existence of double beta decay emitters. We show that low seniority approximations, comparable to those implicit in the quasiparticle RPA in a spherical basis, tend to overestimate the NME's in several decays.

  18. Lattice QCD calculation of the proton decay matrix element in the continuum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, N.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Aoki, S.; Kanaya, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Iwasaki, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Onogi, T.

    2004-12-01

    We present a quenched lattice QCD calculation of the {alpha} and {beta} parameters of the proton decay matrix element. The simulation is carried out using the Wilson quark action at three values of the lattice spacing in the range a{approx_equal}0.1-0.064 fm to study the scaling violation effect. We find only mild scaling violation when the lattice scale is determined by the nucleon mass. We obtain in the continuum limit, vertical bar {alpha}(NDR,2 GeV) vertical bar=0.0090(09)(+5-19) GeV{sup 3} and vertical bar{beta}(NDR,2 GeV)vertical bar=0.0096(09)(+6-20) GeV{sup 3} with {alpha} and {beta} in a relatively opposite sign, where the first error is statistical and the second is due to the uncertainty in the determination of the physical scale.

  19. The Matrix Element Method at the LHC: status and prospects for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    The Matrix Element Method (MEM) is a powerful multivariate method allowing to maximally exploit the experimental and theoretical information available to an analysis. Applications of the MEM at LHC experiments are discussed, such as searches for rare processes and measurements of properties of the Standard Model Higgs boson. The MadWeight software, allowing for a fast and automated computation of MEM weights for any user- specified process, is briefly reviewed. A new implementation of the MEM in the C++ language, MoMEMta, is presented. Building on MadWeight's tricks to accelerate the calculations, it aims at a much improved modularity and maintainability. Examples of this modularity are discussed: the possibility to compute several weights in parallel (propagation of systematic uncertainties), the Differential MEM (DMEM), and a novel way to search for lion-resonant. New Physics.

  20. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.

  1. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain amore » top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.« less

  2. A modified Finite Element-Transfer Matrix for control design of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, T.-M.; Yousuff, A.; Bahar, L. Y.; Konstandinidis, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Finite Element-Transfer Matrix (FETM) method was developed for reducing the computational efforts involved in structural analysis. While being widely used by structural analysts, this method does, however, have certain limitations, particularly when used for the control design of large flexible structures. In this paper, a new formulation based on the FETM method is presented. The new method effectively overcomes the limitations in the original FETM method, and also allows an easy construction of reduced models that are tailored for the control design. Other advantages of this new method include the ability to extract open loop frequencies and mode shapes with less computation, and simplification of the design procedures for output feedback, constrained compensation, and decentralized control. The development of this new method and the procedures for generating reduced models using this method are described in detail and the role of the reduced models in control design is discussed through an illustrative example.

  3. Grassmann integral and Balian-Brézin decomposition in Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Oi, Makito; Chen, Fang-Qi; Sun, Yang

    2013-08-01

    We present a new formula to calculate matrix elements of a general unitary operator with respect to Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov states allowing multiple quasi-particle excitations. The Balian-Brézin decomposition of the unitary operator [R. Balian, E. Brézin, Il Nuovo Cimento B 64 (1969) 37] is employed in the derivation. We found that this decomposition is extremely suitable for an application of Fermion coherent state and Grassmann integrals in the quasi-particle basis. The resultant formula is compactly expressed in terms of the Pfaffian, and shows the similar bipartite structure to the formula that we have previously derived in the bare-particles basis [T. Mizusaki, M. Oi, Phys. Lett. B 715 (2012) 219].

  4. Top Quark Mass Measurement Using a Matrix Element Method with Quasi-Monte Carlo Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Lujan, Paul J.

    2008-10-01

    We report an updated measurement of the top quark mass obtained from ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Our measurement uses a matrix element integration method to obtain a signal likelihood, with a neural network used to identify background events and a likelihood cut applied to reduce the effect of badly reconstructed events. We use a 2.7 fb{sup -1} sample and observe 422 events passing all of our cuts. We find m{sub t} = 172.2 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.9 (JES) +/- 1.0 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, or m{sub t} = 172.2 +/- 1.7 (total) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. Energy density functional study of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless ββ decay.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Tomás R; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2010-12-17

    We present an extensive study of nuclear matrix elements (NME) for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the nuclei 48Ca, 76Ge, 82Se, 96Zr, 100Mo, 116Cd, 124Sn, 128Te, 130Te, 136Xe, and 150Nd based on state-of-the-art energy density functional methods using the Gogny D1S functional. Beyond-mean-field effects are included within the generating coordinate method with particle number and angular momentum projection for both initial and final ground states. We obtain a rather constant value for the NMEs around 4.7 with the exception of 48Ca and 150Nd, where smaller values are found. We analyze the role of deformation and pairing in the evaluation of the NME and present detailed results for the decay of 150Nd.

  6. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 . The matrix element technique is applied to t t ¯ events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton +jets final state of t t ¯ decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt=173.93 ±1.84 GeV .

  7. Comparison of finite element and transfer matrix methods for numerical investigation of surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddouche, Issam; Cherbi, Lynda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) in the visible regime at a metal/dielectric interface within two different waveguide structures, the first is a Photonic Crystal Fiber where the Full Vector Finite Element Method (FVFEM) is used and the second is a slab waveguide where the transfer matrix method (TMM) is used. Knowing the diversities between the two methods in terms of speed, simplicity, and scope of application, computation is implemented with respect to wavelength and metal layer thickness in order to analyze and compare the performances of the two methods. Simulation results show that the TMM can be a good approximation for the FVFEM and that SPPs behave more like modes propagating in a semi infinite metal/dielectric structure as metal thickness increases from about 150 nm.

  8. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.

  9. S -matrix element of two R-R and one NS states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Mojtaba; Garousi, Mohammad R.

    2017-09-01

    We explicitly calculate the disk-level S -matrix element of two closed string R-R and one open string NS vertex operators in RNS formalism. We show that the amplitude satisfies various duality Ward identities. In particular, when one of the R-R is zero form, the other one is two form, and the NS state is a gauge boson, the amplitude transforms under an S-duality Ward identity to the amplitude of one dilaton, one B-field, and one gauge boson, which has recently been calculated explicitly. We have also proposed a soft theorem for the disk-level scattering amplitude of an ar bitrary number of hard closed strings and one soft open string at the leading order of soft momentum, and we have shown that the above amplitude satisfies the soft theorem.

  10. Nucleon distribution amplitudes and proton decay matrix elements on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Vladimir M.; Goeckeler, Meinulf; Kaltenbrunner, Thomas; Warkentin, Nikolaus; Horsley, Roger; Zanotti, James M.; Nakamura, Yoshifumi; Pleiter, Dirk; Rakow, Paul E. L.; Schaefer, Andreas; Schierholz, Gerrit; Stueben, Hinnerk

    2009-02-01

    Baryon distribution amplitudes (DAs) are crucial for the theory of hard exclusive reactions. We present a calculation of the first few moments of the leading-twist nucleon DA within lattice QCD. In addition we deal with the normalization of the next-to-leading (twist-four) DAs. The matrix elements determining the latter quantities are also responsible for proton decay in grand unified theories. Our lattice evaluation makes use of gauge field configurations generated with two flavors of clover fermions. The relevant operators are renormalized nonperturbatively with the final results given in the MS scheme. We find that the deviation of the leading-twist nucleon DA from its asymptotic form is less pronounced than sometimes claimed in the literature.

  11. Single-particle parity-nonconserving matrix elements in {sup 207}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Komives, A.; Knott, J.E.; Leuschner, M.; Szymanski, J.J.; Bowman, J.D.; Jamrisk, D.

    1993-10-01

    Measurements of the helicity dependence of neutron scattering off of heavy nuclei by the TRIPLE collaboration have yielded multiple parity-nonconserving asymmetries. The asymmetries are predominantly positive, in contradiction to the zero average asymmetry predicted by the statistical model of neutron- nucleus scattering. Theoretical calculations that explain the non-zero average asymmetry require single-particle parity- nonconserving matrix elements 10-100 times larger than those predicted by meson exchange models. We are determining the single-particle parity non-conserving mixing in {sup 207}Pb by measuring the circular polarization of the 1.064 MeV {gamma} ray. The experiment uses a transmission polarimeter and a fast data acquisition system. Initial results are presented.

  12. Standard Model anatomy of WIMP dark matter direct detection. II. QCD analysis and hadronic matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Richard J.; Solon, Mikhail P.

    2015-02-01

    Models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) specified at the electroweak scale are systematically matched to effective theories at hadronic scales where WIMP-nucleus scattering observables are evaluated. Anomalous dimensions and heavy-quark threshold matching conditions are computed for the complete basis of lowest-dimension effective operators involving quarks and gluons. The resulting QCD renormalization group evolution equations are solved. The status of relevant hadronic matrix elements is reviewed and phenomenological illustrations are given, including details for the computation of the universal limit of nucleon scattering with heavy S U (2 )W×U (1 )Y charged WIMPs. Several cases of previously underestimated hadronic uncertainties are isolated. The results connect arbitrary models specified at the electroweak scale to a basis of nf=3 -flavor QCD operators. The complete basis of operators and Lorentz invariance constraints through order v2/c2 in the nonrelativistic nucleon effective theory are derived.

  13. Spin dipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay nuclei by charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.; Frekers, D.

    2016-11-01

    Spin dipole (SD) strengths for double beta-decay (DBD) nuclei were studied experimentally for the first time by using measured cross sections of (3He, t) charge-exchange reactions (CERs). Then SD nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) {M}α ({{SD}}) for low-lying 2- states were derived from the experimental SD strengths by referring to the experimental α = GT (Gamow-Teller) and α = F (Fermi) strengths. They are consistent with the empirical NMEs M({{SD}}) based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant. The CERs are used to evaluate the SD NME, which is associated with one of the major components of the neutrino-less DBD NME.

  14. Semiclassical form factor for spectral and matrix element fluctuations of multidimensional chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Turek, Marko; Spehner, Dominique; Müller, Sebastian; Richter, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    We present a semiclassical calculation of the generalized form factor Kab(tau) which characterizes the fluctuations of matrix elements of the operators a and b in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian of a chaotic system. Our approach is based on some recently developed techniques for the spectral form factor of systems with hyperbolic and ergodic underlying classical dynamics and f = 2 degrees of freedom, that allow us to go beyond the diagonal approximation. First we extend these techniques to systems with f > 2. Then we use these results to calculate Kab(tau). We show that the dependence on the rescaled time tau (time in units of the Heisenberg time) is universal for both the spectral and the generalized form factor. Furthermore, we derive a relation between Kab(tau) and the classical time-correlation function of the Weyl symbols of a and b.

  15. A simple representation of energy matrix elements in terms of symmetry-invariant bases.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Guiqing; Boyd, Russell J

    2010-02-01

    When a system under consideration has some symmetry, usually its Hamiltonian space can be parallel partitioned into a set of subspaces, which is invariant under symmetry operations. The bases that span these invariant subspaces are also invariant under the symmetry operations, and they are the symmetry-invariant bases. A standard methodology is available to construct a series of generator functions (GFs) and corresponding symmetry-adapted basis (SAB) functions from these symmetry-invariant bases. Elements of the factorized Hamiltonian and overlap matrix can be expressed in terms of these SAB functions, and their simple representations can be deduced in terms of GFs. The application of this method to the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian is demonstrated.

  16. Nuclear-Structure Data Relevant to Neutinoless-Double-Beta-Decay Matrix Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    An observation of neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the most exciting prospects in contemporary physics. It follows that calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for this process are of high priority. The change in the wave functions between the initial and final states of the neutrinoless-double-beta-decay candidates 76Ge-->76Se, 100Mo-->100Ru, 130Te-->130Xe, and 136Xe-->136Ba have been studied with transfer reactions. The data are focused on the change in the occupancies of the valence orbitals in the ground states as two neutrons decay into two protons. The results set a strict constraint on any theoretical calculations describing this rearrangement and thus on the magnitude of the nuclear matrix elements for this process, which currently exhibit uncertainties at the factor of 2-4 level. Prior to these measurements there were limited experimental data were available A = 76 and 100 systems, and very limited data for the A = 130 and 136 systems, in a large part due to the gaseous Xe isotopes involved. The uncertainties on most of these data are estimated to range from 0.1-0.3 nucleons. The program started with the A = 76 system, with subsequent calculations, modified to reproduce the experimental occupancies, exhibiting a significant reduction in the discrepancy between various models. New data are available for the A = 100 , 130, and 136 systems. I review the program, making detailed comparisons between the latest theoretical calculations and the experimental data where available. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  17. On-shell Delta I= 3/2 kaon weak matrix elements with nonzero total momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, T.

    2009-05-20

    We present our results for the on-shell {Delta}I = 3/2 kaon decay matrix elements using domain wall fermions and the DBW2 gauge action at one coarse lattice spacing corresponding to a{sup -1} = 1.31 GeV in the quenched approximation. The on-shell matrix elements are evaluated in two different frames: the center-of-mass frame and nonzero total-momentum frame. We employ the formula proposed by Lellouch and Luescher in the center-of-mass frame, and its extension for a nonzero total-momentum frame to extract the infinite volume, on-shell, center-of-mass frame decay amplitudes. We determine the decay amplitude at the physical pion mass and momentum from the chiral extrapolation and an interpolation of the relative momentum using the results calculated in the two frames. We have obtained ReA{sub 2} = 1.66(23)(+48/-03)(+53/-0) x 10{sup -8} GeV and ImA{sub 2} = -1.181(26)(+141/-014)(+44/-0) x 10{sup -12} GeV at the physical point, using the data at the relatively large pion mass, m{sub {pi}} > 0.35 GeV. The first error is statistic, and the second and third are systematic. The second error is estimated with several fits of the chiral extrapolation including the (quenched) chiral perturbation formula at next to leading order using only lighter pion masses. The third one is estimated with an analysis using the lattice dispersion relation. The result of ReA{sub 2} is reasonably consistent with experiment.

  18. Open-Ended Recursive Approach for the Calculation of Multiphoton Absorption Matrix Elements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an implementation of single residues for response functions to arbitrary order using a recursive approach. Explicit expressions in terms of density-matrix-based response theory for the single residues of the linear, quadratic, cubic, and quartic response functions are also presented. These residues correspond to one-, two-, three- and four-photon transition matrix elements. The newly developed code is used to calculate the one-, two-, three- and four-photon absorption cross sections of para-nitroaniline and para-nitroaminostilbene, making this the first treatment of four-photon absorption in the framework of response theory. We find that the calculated multiphoton absorption cross sections are not very sensitive to the size of the basis set as long as a reasonably large basis set with diffuse functions is used. The choice of exchange–correlation functional, however, significantly affects the calculated cross sections of both charge-transfer transitions and other transitions, in particular, for the larger para-nitroaminostilbene molecule. We therefore recommend the use of a range-separated exchange–correlation functional in combination with the augmented correlation-consistent double-ζ basis set aug-cc-pVDZ for the calculation of multiphoton absorption properties. PMID:25821415

  19. Open-Ended Recursive Approach for the Calculation of Multiphoton Absorption Matrix Elements.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ringholm, Magnus; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-03-10

    We present an implementation of single residues for response functions to arbitrary order using a recursive approach. Explicit expressions in terms of density-matrix-based response theory for the single residues of the linear, quadratic, cubic, and quartic response functions are also presented. These residues correspond to one-, two-, three- and four-photon transition matrix elements. The newly developed code is used to calculate the one-, two-, three- and four-photon absorption cross sections of para-nitroaniline and para-nitroaminostilbene, making this the first treatment of four-photon absorption in the framework of response theory. We find that the calculated multiphoton absorption cross sections are not very sensitive to the size of the basis set as long as a reasonably large basis set with diffuse functions is used. The choice of exchange-correlation functional, however, significantly affects the calculated cross sections of both charge-transfer transitions and other transitions, in particular, for the larger para-nitroaminostilbene molecule. We therefore recommend the use of a range-separated exchange-correlation functional in combination with the augmented correlation-consistent double-ζ basis set aug-cc-pVDZ for the calculation of multiphoton absorption properties.

  20. Minimizing matrix effect by femtosecond laser ablation and ionization in elemental determination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bochao; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2013-05-07

    Matrix effect is unavoidable in direct solid analysis, which usually is a leading cause of the nonstoichiometric effect in quantitative analysis. In this research, experiments were carried out to study the overall characteristics of atomization and ionization in laser-solid interaction. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers were applied in a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twenty-nine solid standards of ten different matrices, including six metals and four dielectrics, were analyzed. The results indicate that the fs-laser mode offers more stable relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) with irradiance higher than 7 × 10(13) W·cm(-2), which could be more reliable in the determination of element composition of solids. The matrix effect is reduced by half when the fs-laser is employed, owing to the fact that the fs-laser ablation and ionization (fs-LAI) incurs an almost heat-free ablation process and creates a dense plasma for the stable ionization.

  1. Leptonic CP phase determined by an equation involving PMNS matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Jia-Hui; Li, Xue-Qian

    2017-04-01

    Several approximate equalities among the matrix elements of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) and Pontecorvo–Maki–Nakagawa–Sakata (PMNS) matrices imply that hidden symmetries may exist and be common for both quark and neutrino sectors. The charge parity (CP) phase of the CKM matrix ({δ }{CKM}) is involved in these equalities and can be investigated when these equalities turn into several equations. As we substitute those experimentally measured values of the three mixing angles into the equations for quarks, it is noted that one of the equations which holds exactly has a solution {δ }{CKM}=({68.95}-1.15+1.15)^\\circ . That value accords with ({69.1}-3.85+2.02)^\\circ determined from available data. Generalizing the scenario to the lepton sector, the same equality determines the leptonic CP phase {δ }{PMNS} to be ({275.20}-1.15+1.15)^\\circ . Thus we predict the value of {δ }{PMNS} from the equation. So far there is no direct measurement on {δ }{PMNS}, but a recent analysis based on the neutrino oscillation data prefers a phase close to 270°.

  2. Latent Regulatory Potential of Human-Specific Repetitive Elements

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michelle C.; Wilson, Michael D.; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Schmidt, Dominic; Stark, Rory; Pan, Qun; Schwalie, Petra C.; Menon, Suraj; Lukk, Margus; Watt, Stephen; Thybert, David; Kutter, Claudia; Kirschner, Kristina; Flicek, Paul; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Odom, Duncan T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary At least half of the human genome is derived from repetitive elements, which are often lineage specific and silenced by a variety of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Using a transchromosomic mouse strain that transmits an almost complete single copy of human chromosome 21 via the female germline, we show that a heterologous regulatory environment can transcriptionally activate transposon-derived human regulatory regions. In the mouse nucleus, hundreds of locations on human chromosome 21 newly associate with activating histone modifications in both somatic and germline tissues, and influence the gene expression of nearby transcripts. These regions are enriched with primate and human lineage-specific transposable elements, and their activation corresponds to changes in DNA methylation at CpG dinucleotides. This study reveals the latent regulatory potential of the repetitive human genome and illustrates the species specificity of mechanisms that control it. PMID:23246434

  3. Improved EPMA Trace Element Accuracy Using a Matrix Iterated Quantitative Blank Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, J. J.; Wark, D. A.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    At trace element levels below several hundred PPM, accuracy is more often the limiting factor for EPMA quantification rather than precision. Modern EPMA instruments equipped with low noise detectors, counting electronics and large area analyzing crystals can now routinely achieve sensitivities for most elements in the 10 to 100 PPM levels (or even lower). But due to various sample and instrumental artifacts in the x-ray continuum, absolute accuracy is often the limiting factor for ultra trace element quantification. These artifacts have various mechanisms, but are usually attributed to sample artifacts (e.g., sample matrix absorption edges)1, detector artifacts (e.g., Ar or Xe absorption edges) 2 and analyzing crystal artifacts (extended peak tails preventing accurate determination of the true background and ¡§negative peaks¡¨ or ¡§holes¡¨ in the x-ray continuum). The latter being first described3 by Self, et al. and recently documented for the Ti kÑ in quartz geo-thermometer. 4 Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Si () O () Total Average: -.00146 -.00031 -.00180 .00013 .00240 46.7430 53.2563 99.9983 Std Dev: .00069 .00075 .00036 .00190 .00117 .00000 .00168 .00419 The general magnitude of these artifacts can be seen in the above analyses of Ti ka in a synthetic quartz standard. The values for each spectrometer/crystal vary systematically from ¡V18 PPM to + 24 PPM. The exact mechanism for these continuum ¡§holes¡¨ is not known but may be related to secondary lattice diffraction occurring at certain Bragg angles depending on crystal mounting orientation for non-isometric analyzing crystals5. These x-ray continuum artifacts can produce systematic errors at levels up to 100 PPM or more depending on the particular analytical situation. In order to correct for these inaccuracies, a ¡§blank¡¨ correction has been developed that applies a quantitative correction to the measured x-ray intensities during the matrix iteration, by calculating the intensity

  4. Modes of occurrence of potentially hazardous elements in coal: levels of confidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    The modes of occurrence of the potentially hazardous elements in coal will be of significance in any attempt to reduce their mobilization due to coal combustion. Antimony and selenium may be present in solid solution in pyrite, as minute accessory sulfides dispersed throughout the organic matrix, or in organic association. Because of these modes of occurrence it is anticipated that less than 50% of these elements will be routinely removed by conventional coal cleaning procedures. Arsenic and mercury occur primarily in late-stage coarse-grained pyrite therefore physical coal cleaning procedures should be successful in removing substantial proportions of these elements. Cadmium occurs in sphalerite and lead in galena. Both of these minerals exhibit a wide range of particle sizes and textural relations. Depending on the particle size and textural relations, physical coal cleaning may remove as little as 25% of these elements or as much as 75%. Manganese in bituminous coal occurs in carbonates, especially siderite. Physical coal cleaning should remove a substantial proportion of this element. More information is needed to elucidate the modes of occurrence of beryllium, chromium, cobalt, and nickel. ?? 1994.

  5. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program was developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions showed significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. The velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation, since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field, as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provided a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  6. Potential sources of analytical bias and error in selected trace element data-quality analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, Angela P.; Garbarino, John R.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Rosen, Michael R.; Mebane, Christopher A.; Struzeski, Tedmund M.

    2016-09-28

    Potential sources of analytical bias and error associated with laboratory analyses for selected trace elements where concentrations were greater in filtered samples than in paired unfiltered samples were evaluated by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Quality Specialists in collaboration with the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) and the Branch of Quality Systems (BQS).Causes for trace-element concentrations in filtered samples to exceed those in associated unfiltered samples have been attributed to variability in analytical measurements, analytical bias, sample contamination either in the field or laboratory, and (or) sample-matrix chemistry. These issues have not only been attributed to data generated by the USGS NWQL but have been observed in data generated by other laboratories. This study continues the evaluation of potential analytical bias and error resulting from matrix chemistry and instrument variability by evaluating the performance of seven selected trace elements in paired filtered and unfiltered surface-water and groundwater samples collected from 23 sampling sites of varying chemistries from six States, matrix spike recoveries, and standard reference materials.Filtered and unfiltered samples have been routinely analyzed on separate inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry instruments. Unfiltered samples are treated with hydrochloric acid (HCl) during an in-bottle digestion procedure; filtered samples are not routinely treated with HCl as part of the laboratory analytical procedure. To evaluate the influence of HCl on different sample matrices, an aliquot of the filtered samples was treated with HCl. The addition of HCl did little to differentiate the analytical results between filtered samples treated with HCl from those samples left untreated; however, there was a small, but noticeable, decrease in the number of instances where a particular trace-element concentration was greater in a filtered sample than in the associated

  7. Heavy-ion double charge exchange reactions: A tool toward 0 νββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta decay is fundamental for neutrino physics. In this paper, an innovative technique to extract information on the nuclear matrix elements by measuring the cross section of a double charge exchange nuclear reaction is proposed. The basic point is that the initial- and final-state wave functions in the two processes are the same and the transition operators are similar. The double charge exchange cross sections can be factorized in a nuclear structure term containing the matrix elements and a nuclear reaction factor. First pioneering experimental results for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV incident energy show that such cross section factorization reasonably holds for the crucial 0+ → 0+ transition to 40Args, at least at very forward angles.

  8. Matrix elements in the coupled-cluster approach - With application to low-lying states in Li

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ynnerman, Anders

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is suggested for evaluating matrix elements of an operator between wavefunctions in the coupled-cluster form. The use of the exponential ansatz leads to compact exponential expressions also for matrix elements. Algorithms are developed for summing all effects of one-particle clusters and certain chains of two-particle clusters (containing the well-known random-phase approximation as a subset). The treatment of one-particle perturbations in single valence states is investigated in detail. As examples the oscillator strength for the 2s-2p transition in Li as well as the hyperfine structure for the two states are studied and compared to earlier work.

  9. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  10. Fermionic Symmetries: Degeneracies when T=0 Two body matrix elements are set equal to zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamick, Larry; Robinson, Shadow Jq

    2001-10-01

    In shell model calculations for ^43Ti and ^44Ti not perfect but surprisingly good results are obtained when all the T=0 two body matrix elements are set equal to zero. In this model and in the single j shell approximation (j=f_7/2) many degeneracies arise. For example for the T=1/2 states in ^43Ti(^43Sc) the I=1/2_1^- and 1/32_1^- states are degenerate as are the 1/32_2^-, 1/72_1^- and 1/92_1^- T=1/2 states. In ^44Ti the T=0 states 3^+_2, 7^+_2,9^+_1, and 10^+1 are degenerate and so are the 10^+2 and 12^+1 states. Concerning the 1/2_1^- and 1/32_1^- we find that both have (J_p,J_n) configuration (4,7/2). For the 3^+_2, 7^+_2,9^+_1, and 10^+1 all four states have the configurations (4,6) and (6,4). This means that couplings to other states will vanish. This means that certain 6j and 9j symbols will vanish e.g. j & j& 4 j&1/32& 6 \\=0 and j & j& 6 j&j& 6 4 & 6 &10 \\=0. One can explain these vanishings in terms of Talmi's method of calculating coeffiecients of fractional parentage to states not allowed by the Pauli principle. For example for the T=3/2 states of ^43Ca there are no f_7/2^3 I=1/32^- states. Hence the c.f.p. to these states must vanish. One c.f.p. contains the above 6j symbol and so this 6j symbol will vanish. For the T=2 states in ^44Ca there is no f_7/2^4 state with I=10^+. One of the two particle c.f.p to this state is proportional to the above 9j symbol and so the 9j must vanish. Note that we are using arguments about T=3/2 states to explain degeneracies of T=1/2 states; and we are using arguments about T=2 states to explain degeneracies of T=0 states. When T=0 two body matrix elements are reintroduced the 9^+1 and 10^+1 are no longer degenerate and the splitting even in a full fp space calculation is due almost entirely to the T=0 matrix elements. The common thread for the T=1/2 and T=0 states that are degenerate is that they have angular momentum which in the single j shell calculation cannot occur for identical particles. For these angular momenta

  11. LATTICE MATRIX ELEMENTS AND CP VIOLATION IN B AND KA PHYSICS: STATUS AND OUTLOOK.

    SciTech Connect

    SONI,A.

    2003-01-03

    Status of lattice calculations of hadron matrix elements along with CP violation in B and in K systems is reviewed. Lattice has provided useful input which, in conjunction with experimental data, leads to the conclusion that CP-odd phase in the CKM matrix plays the dominant role in the observed asymmetry in B {yields} {psi}K{sub s}. It is now quite likely that any beyond the SM, CP-odd, phase will cause only small deviations in B-physics. Search for the effects of the new phase(s) will consequently require very large data samples as well as very precise theoretical predictions. Clean determination of all the angles of the unitarity triangle therefore becomes essential. In this regard B {yields} KD{sup 0} processes play a unique role. Regarding K-decays, remarkable progress made by theory with regard to maintenance of chiral symmetry on the lattice is briefly discussed. First application already provide quantitative information on B{sub K} and the {Delta}I = 1/2 rule. The enhancement in ReA{sub 0} appears to arise solely from tree operators, esp. Q{sub 2}; penguin contribution to ReA{sub 0} appears to be very small. However, improved calculations are necessary for {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} as there the contributions of QCD penguins and electroweak penguins largely seem to cancel. There are good reasons, though, to believe that these cancellations will not survive improvements that are now underway. Importance of determining the unitarity triangle purely from K-decays is also emphasized.

  12. Potentially toxic element release by fenton oxidation of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J P; Asaadi, M; Clarke, B; Ouki, S

    2006-01-01

    The presence, in sewage sludge, of excess levels of the potentially toxic elements (PTE) copper, zinc, chromium, cadmium, nickel, lead and mercury, could impact on our ability to recycle these residues in the future. Far stricter limits on the levels of PTEs are likely in proposed legislation. A method involving the dosing of Fenton's reagent, a mixture of ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide, under acidic conditions was evaluated for its potential to reduce metal levels. The [Fe]:[H2O2] (w/w) ratio was found to give a good indication of the percentage copper and zinc elution obtainable. Sites with no iron dosing as part of wastewater treatment required extra iron to be added in order to initiate the Fenton's reaction. A significant reduction, in excess of 70%, of the copper and zinc was eluted from both raw primary and activated sludge solid fractions. Cadmium and nickel could be reduced to below detection limits but elution of mercury, lead and chromium was less than 40%. The iron catalyst concentration was found to be a crucial parameter. This process has the potential to reduce the heavy metal content of the sludge and allow the recycling of sludge to continue in a sustainable manner.

  13. Zinc: an essential trace element with potential benefits to soldiers.

    PubMed

    McClung, James P; Scrimgeour, Angus G

    2005-12-01

    Zinc is a trace element known to be an essential nutrient for life. It functions as a cofactor for numerous enzymes, including those involved in DNA and RNA replication and protein synthesis. Soldiers represent a unique population faced with intense metabolic and mental demands, as well as exposure to various immune challenges. Some of these factors may affect their dietary zinc requirements. Although severe zinc deficiency is unlikely to occur, some soldiers may experience less than optimal zinc status because of diminished intake coupled with increased requirements. For those soldiers, supplemental dietary zinc may serve a protective function in numerous disease states affecting modern warfighters. This review highlights the importance of adequate zinc nutriture to soldiers and discusses the potential benefits of supplemental zinc in a number of diseases currently affecting soldiers, including diarrhea, respiratory diseases, malaria, and leishmaniasis.

  14. Draco cloud as a matrix of potential protostars

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    The Draco molecular cloud is inbound at a z distance of a few hundred parsecs, according to previous observations. IRAS Point Source Catalog data for a 36 sq deg area that includes most of the cloud and a comparison area around it are tabulated, illustrated, and discussed. The sources are classified as 56 unidentified, 38 identified extragalactic objects, and 44 identified stars. The unidentified and unresolved 100 micron sources appear to be globule-like clumps that are candidates for producing protostars, although the data cannot demonstrate currently accreting protostars in the globules. An undetermined percent of 100 micron sources may be artifactual, but only a small percent of them may be galaxies because of the adherence to the Draco cloud. Sources detected also at 60 micron or only at 60 micron do not adhere to the cloud and are probably galaxies. Unless artifactual the unidentified and unresolved 100 micron sources may provide considerable new information about the cloud components and therefore about potential star formation in a new class of sites and origins. Six unidentified sources have 12-25 micron stellar spectral distributions, but neither they nor the identified stars have 12-25 micron spectra characteristic of T Tauri stars. 18 references.

  15. The Draco cloud as a matrix of potential protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hugh M.

    1986-01-01

    The Draco molecular cloud is inbound at a z distance of a few hundred parsecs, according to previous observations. IRAS Point Source Catalog data for a 36 sq deg area that includes most of the cloud and a comparison area around it are tabulated, illustrated, and discussed. The sources are classified as 56 unidentified, 38 identified extragalactic objects, and 44 identified stars. The unidentified and unresolved 100 micron sources appear to be globule-like clumps that are candidates for producing protostars, although the data cannot demonstrate currently accreting protostars in the globules. An undetermined percent of 100 micron sources may be artifactual, but only a small percent of them may be galaxies because of the adherence to the Draco cloud. Sources detected also at 60 micron or only at 60 micron do not adhere to the cloud and are probably galaxies. Unless artifactual the unidentified and unresolved 100 micron sources may provide considerable new information about the cloud components and therefore about potential star formation in a new class of sites and origins. Six unidentified sources have 12-25 micron stellar spectral distributions, but neither they nor the identified stars have 12-25 micron spectra characteristic of T Tauri stars.

  16. Automated evaluation of matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions: A Mathematica version of the FRODO program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2013-02-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO), formerly developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme, has been rewritten in Mathematica. New version : A program summaryProgram title: FRODO Catalogue identifier: ADV Y _v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3878 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 170729 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which the Mathematica computer algebra system can be installed Operating system: Linux Classification: 5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADV Y _v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 171(2005)63 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No Nature of problem. In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICFs) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The previous formulation of such matrix elements in the MuPAD computer algebra system, has been rewritten using Mathematica. Solution method: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICFs and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Reasons for new version: Some years ago we published in this journal a couple of papers [1, 2

  17. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Adam Paul

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb-1 dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t$\\bar{t}$ and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb-1 dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 ± 2.6(stat) ± 3.3(syst) GeV/c2 from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 178 GTeV/c2 and 3.1 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 172.5 GeV/c2. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  18. Calculating three loop ladder and V-topologies for massive operator matrix elements by computer algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; von Manteuffel, A.; Schneider, C.

    2016-05-01

    Three loop ladder and V-topology diagrams contributing to the massive operator matrix element AQg are calculated. The corresponding objects can all be expressed in terms of nested sums and recurrences depending on the Mellin variable N and the dimensional parameter ε. Given these representations, the desired Laurent series expansions in ε can be obtained with the help of our computer algebra toolbox. Here we rely on generalized hypergeometric functions and Mellin-Barnes representations, on difference ring algorithms for symbolic summation, on an optimized version of the multivariate Almkvist-Zeilberger algorithm for symbolic integration, and on new methods to calculate Laurent series solutions of coupled systems of differential equations. The solutions can be computed for general coefficient matrices directly for any basis also performing the expansion in the dimensional parameter in case it is expressible in terms of indefinite nested product-sum expressions. This structural result is based on new results of our difference ring theory. In the cases discussed we deal with iterative sum- and integral-solutions over general alphabets. The final results are expressed in terms of special sums, forming quasi-shuffle algebras, such as nested harmonic sums, generalized harmonic sums, and nested binomially weighted (cyclotomic) sums. Analytic continuations to complex values of N are possible through the recursion relations obeyed by these quantities and their analytic asymptotic expansions. The latter lead to a host of new constants beyond the multiple zeta values, the infinite generalized harmonic and cyclotomic sums in the case of V-topologies.

  19. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements.

  20. Theoretical uncertainties in the nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay: The transition operator

    SciTech Connect

    Menéndez, Javier

    2013-12-30

    We explore the theoretical uncertainties related to the transition operator of neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay. The transition operator used in standard calculations is a product of one-body currents, that can be obtained phenomenologically as in Tomoda [1] or Šimkovic et al. [2]. However, corrections to the operator are hard to obtain in the phenomenological approach. Instead, we calculate the 0νββ decay operator in the framework of chiral effective theory (EFT), which gives a systematic order-by-order expansion of the transition currents. At leading orders in chiral EFT we reproduce the standard one-body currents of Refs. [1] and [2]. Corrections appear as two-body (2b) currents predicted by chiral EFT. We compute the effects of the leading 2b currents to the nuclear matrix elements of 0νββ decay for several transition candidates. The 2b current contributions are related to the quenching of Gamow-Teller transitions found in nuclear structure calculations.

  1. Matrix Element Effects in the ARPES Spectra of High-Tc's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, A.; Lindroos, M.

    1998-03-01

    We have extended our first-principles photointensity computations [see, e.g., Lindroos and Bansil, Phys. Rev. Letters 75, 1182(1995)] to treat the complex Bi2212 structure. Results for emission from the (001) surface along high symmetry directions in the Brillouin zone are discussed. Although the calculations are implicitly based on the LDA wavefunctions, we have carried out a number of simulations to mimic correlation effects in order to assess the robustness of our results. The total weight of the spectral peak associated with the CuO2 plane bands is found to vary anisotropically as one moves away from the zone center in remarkable overall accord with the corresponding experimental observations [Ding et al., Phys. Rev. Letters 76, 1533(1996)]. The photon-energy, polarization and k-dependencies of the spectra in the vicinity of the M-point are analyzed in some detail with an eye towards identifying signatures of one vs two CuO2 plane bands in the spectra. Our study shows clearly that matrix element effects are important in interpreting the ARPES spectra of the high-Tc's and that caution should be exercised in making direct comparisons between the observed features and the computed one-particle spectral density functions. Work supported in part by the DOE and the Academy of Finland.

  2. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  3. Fast calculation of the sensitivity matrix in magnetic induction tomography by tetrahedral edge finite elements and the reciprocity theorem.

    PubMed

    Hollaus, K; Magele, C; Merwa, R; Scharfetter, H

    2004-02-01

    Magnetic induction tomography of biological tissue is used to reconstruct the changes in the complex conductivity distribution by measuring the perturbation of an alternating primary magnetic field. To facilitate the sensitivity analysis and the solution of the inverse problem a fast calculation of the sensitivity matrix, i.e. the Jacobian matrix, which maps the changes of the conductivity distribution onto the changes of the voltage induced in a receiver coil, is needed. The use of finite differences to determine the entries of the sensitivity matrix does not represent a feasible solution because of the high computational costs of the basic eddy current problem. Therefore, the reciprocity theorem was exploited. The basic eddy current problem was simulated by the finite element method using symmetric tetrahedral edge elements of second order. To test the method various simulations were carried out and discussed.

  4. Elevated expression of periostin in human osteoarthritic cartilage and its potential role in matrix degradation via matrix metalloproteinase-13

    PubMed Central

    Attur, Mukundan; Yang, Qing; Shimada, Kohei; Tachida, Yuki; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Mignatti, Paolo; Statman, Lauren; Palmer, Glyn; Kirsch, Thorsten; Beier, Frank; Abramson, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of periostin, an extracellular matrix protein, in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA). In OA, dysregulated gene expression and phenotypic changes in articular chondrocytes culminate in progressive loss of cartilage from the joint surface. The molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. We examined periostin expression by immunohistochemical analysis of lesional and nonlesional cartilage from human and rodent OA knee cartilage. In addition, we used small interfering (si)RNA and adenovirus transduction of chondrocytes to knock down and up-regulate periostin levels, respectively, and analyzed its effect on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, a disintegrin and MMP with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-4, and type II collagen expression. We found high periostin levels in human and rodent OA cartilage. Periostin increased MMP-13 expression dose [1–10 µg/ml (EC50 0.5–1 μg/ml)] and time (24–72 h) dependently, significantly enhanced expression of ADAMTS4 mRNA, and promoted cartilage degeneration through collagen and proteoglycan degradation. Periostin induction of MMP-13 expression was inhibited by CCT031374 hydrobromide, an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In addition, siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous periostin blocked constitutive MMP-13 expression. These findings implicate periostin as a catabolic protein that promotes cartilage degeneration in OA by up-regulating MMP-13 through canonical Wnt signaling.—Attur, M., Yang, Q., Shimada, K., Tachida, Y., Nagase, H., Mignatti, P., Statman, L., Palmer, G., Kirsch, T., Beier, F., Abramson, A. B. Elevated expression of periostin in human osteoarthritic cartilage and its potential role in matrix degradation via matrix metalloproteinase-13. PMID:26092928

  5. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q-) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, ( {< {| {H_ab } |^2 } > } )^{1/2} = 6.7 {mH}, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, | {H_ab } | = 3.8 {mH}. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q- in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  6. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set.

    PubMed

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-28

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q(-)) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, (<|H(ab)|(2)>)(1/2)=6.7 mH, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, |H(ab)|=3.8 mH. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q(-) in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  7. Continental shelves as potential resource of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Tuduri, Johann

    2017-07-19

    The results of this study allow the reassessment of the rare earth elements (REE) external cycle. Indeed, the river input to the oceans has relatively flat REE patterns without cerium (Ce) anomalies, whereas oceanic REE patterns exhibit strong negative Ce anomalies and heavy REE enrichment. Indeed, the processes at the origin of seawater REE patterns are commonly thought to occur within the ocean masses themselves. However, the results from the present study illustrate that seawater-like REE patterns already occur in the truly dissolved pool of river input. This leads us to favor a partial or complete removal of the colloidal REE pool during estuarine mixing by coagulation, as previously shown for dissolved humic acids and iron. In this latter case, REE fractionation occurs because colloidal and truly dissolved pools have different REE patterns. Thus, the REE patterns of seawater could be the combination of both intra-oceanic and riverine processes. In this study, we show that the Atlantic continental shelves could be considered potential REE traps, suggesting further that shelf sediments could potentially become a resource for REE, similar to metalliferous deep sea sediments.

  8. An Investigation of Reliability Models for Ceramic Matrix Composites and their Implementation into Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of modeling approaches for the failure analysis of ceramic-based material systems used in high temperature environments was the primary objective of this research effort. These materials have the potential to support many key engineering technologies related to the design of aeropropulsion systems. Monolithic ceramics exhibit a number of useful properties such as retention of strength at high temperatures, chemical inertness, and low density. However, the use of monolithic ceramics has been limited by their inherent brittleness and a large variation in strength. This behavior has motivated material scientists to reinforce the monolithic material with a ceramic fiber. The addition of a second ceramic phase with an optimized interface increases toughness and marginally increases strength. The primary purpose of the fiber is to arrest crack growth, not to increase strength. The material systems of interest in this research effort were laminated ceramic matrix composites, as well as two- and three- dimensional fabric reinforced ceramic composites. These emerging composite systems can compete with metals in many demanding applications. However, the ongoing metamorphosis of ceramic composite material systems, and the lack of standardized design data has in the past tended to minimize research efforts related to structural analysis. Many structural components fabricated from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have been designed by "trial and error." The justification for this approach lies in the fact that during the initial developmental phases for a material system fabrication issues are paramount. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating feasibility rather than fully understanding the processes controlling mechanical behavior. This is understandable during periods of rapid improvements in material properties for any composite system. But to avoid the ad hoc approach, the analytical methods developed under this effort can be used to develop rational structural

  9. Adinkras from ordered quartets of BC4 Coxeter group elements and regarding 1,358,954,496 matrix elements of the Gadget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James; Guyton, Forrest; Harmalkar, Siddhartha; Kessler, David S.; Korotkikh, Vadim; Meszaros, Victor A.

    2017-06-01

    We examine values of the Adinkra Holoraumy-induced Gadget representation space metric over all possible four-color, four-open node, and four-closed node adinkras. Of the 1,358,954,496 gadget matrix elements, only 226,492,416 are non-vanishing and take on one of three values: -1/3, 1/3, or 1 and thus a subspace isomorphic to a description of a body-centered tetrahedral molecule emerges.

  10. Interaction of Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Cross-ply Laminates: Simulations with Stochastic Cohesive Zone Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, Zahid R.; Ashcroft, Ian A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2011-02-01

    Two main damage mechanisms of laminates—matrix cracking and inter-ply delaminationare closely linked together (Joshi and Sun 1). This paper is focussed on interaction between matrix cracking and delamination failure mechanisms in CFRP cross-ply laminates under quasi-static tensile loading. In the first part of the work, a transverse crack is introduced in 90o layers of the cross-ply laminate [01/904/01], and the stresses and strains that arise due to tensile loading are analyzed. In the second part, the cohesive zone modelling approach where the constitutive behaviour of the cohesive elements is governed by traction-displacement relationship is employed to deal with the problem of delamination initiation from the matrix crack introduced in the 90o layers of the laminate specimen. Additionally, the effect of microstructural randomness, exhibited by CFRP laminates on the damage behaviour of these laminates is also accounted for in simulations. This effect is studied in numerical finite-element simulations by introducing stochastic cohesive zone elements. The proposed damage modelling effectively simulated the interaction between the matrix crack and delamination and the variations in the stresses, damage and crack lengths of the laminate specimen due to the microstructural randomness.

  11. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  12. Assessing the elements mobility through the regolith and their potential as tracers for hydrological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moragues-Quiroga, Cristina; Hissler, Christophe; Chabaux, François; Legout, Arnaud; Stille, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Regoliths encompass different materials from the fresh bedrock to the top of the organic horizons. The regolith is a major component of the critical zone where fluxes of water, energy, solutes and matter occur. Therefore, its bio-physico-chemical properties drastically impact the water that percolates and/or stores in its different parts (organic and mineral soil horizons, and weathered and fractured bedrock). In order to better understand the critical zone functioning, we propose to assess the interaction between chemical elements from the regolith matrix and water during drainage infiltration. For this, we focus firstly on the potential mobility of different groups of major and trace elements according to a leaching experiment made on 10 different layers of a 7.5 m depth slate regolith, which covers a large part of the Rhenish Massif. Secondly, we carried out Sr-Nd-Pb-U-Th isotope analyses for 5 of these samples in both the untreated and leached samples. Given the specific chemical and mineralogical composition of each sampled material, our approach enables to trace the origin of major and trace elements and eventually assess their mobility. The results deliver valuable information on exchange processes at the water-mineral interface in the different zones of the regolith, which could improve the selection of tracers for the study of hydrological processes.

  13. Matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator between kaon and pion states

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, I.; Lubicz, V.; Martinelli, G.; Orifici, L.; Simula, S.

    2011-10-01

    We compute the matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator sF{sub {mu}{nu}}{sigma}{sup {mu}{nu}}d between kaon and pion states, using lattice QCD with maximally twisted-mass fermions and two flavors of dynamical quarks (N{sub f}=2). The operator is renormalized nonperturbatively in the RI'/MOM scheme and our simulations cover pion masses as light as 270 MeV and three values of the lattice spacing from {approx_equal}0.07 up to {approx_equal}0.1 fm. At the physical point our result for the corresponding tensor form factor at zero-momentum transfer is f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.417(14{sub stat})(5{sub syst}), where the systematic error does not include the effect of quenching the strange and charm quarks. Our result differs significantly from the old quenched result f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.78(6) obtained by the SPQ{sub cd}R Collaboration with pion masses above 500 MeV. We investigate the source of this difference and conclude that it is mainly related to the chiral extrapolation. We also study the tensor charge of the pion and obtain the value f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.195(8{sub stat})(6{sub syst}) in good agreement with, but more accurate than the result f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.216(34) obtained by the QCDSF Collaboration using higher pion masses.

  14. Poles of the S-matrix in Woods-Saxon and Salamon-Vertse potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertse, T.; Lovas, R. G.; Salamon, P.; Rácz, A.

    2012-10-01

    The motions of the l = 0 poles of the S-matrix with varying potential strength is calculated in a cut-off Woods-Saxon (CWS) potential and in the Salamon-Vertse (SV) potential [3]. Both potentials are zero beyond a certain finite distance but the CWS potential has a jump at the cut while the SV potential goes to zero smoothly. The jump of the CWS potential might cause a strange circling of the trajectories at their starting region. This feature does not appear with the SV potential. Starting points of the trajectories depend on the ranges of the potentials. For CWS these points do depend on the unphysical cut-off radius. In this respect the SV potential seems to be superior to the CWS potential.

  15. Trajectories of S-matrix poles in a new finite-range potential

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, A.; Salamon, P.; Vertse, T.

    2011-09-15

    The trajectories of S-matrix poles are calculated in the finite-range phenomenological potential introduced recently by Salamon and Vertse [Phys. Rev. C 77, 037302 (2008)] (SV). The potential is similar to a Woods-Saxon (WS) interaction, but it is exactly zero beyond a radius, without any cutoff. The trajectories of the resonance poles in this SV potential are compared to the corresponding trajectories in a cutoff WS potential for l>0. The dependence on the cutoff radius is demonstrated. The starting points of the trajectories turn out to be related to the average ranges of the two terms in the SV potential.

  16. Direct measurement of excited-state dipole matrix elements using electromagnetically induced transparency in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Daniel J.; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2016-04-01

    Applying large magnetic fields to gain access to the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime can isolate three-level systems in a hot alkali metal vapors, thereby simplifying usually complex atom-light interactions. We use this method to make the first direct measurement of the |<5 P ||e r ||5 D >| matrix element in 87Rb. An analytic model with only three levels accurately models the experimental electromagnetically induced transparency spectra and extracted Rabi frequencies are used to determine the dipole matrix element. We measure |<5 P3 /2||e r ||5 D5 /2>| =(2.290 ±0 .002stat±0 .04syst) e a0 , which is in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations of Safronova, Williams, and Clark [Phys. Rev. A 69, 022509 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevA.69.022509].

  17. Analysis of the influence of external magnetic field on transition matrix elements in quantum well and quantum cascade laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demić, Aleksandar; Radovanović, Jelena; Milanović, Vitomir

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for modeling nonparabolicity effects (NPE) in quantum nanostructures in presence of external electric and magnetic field by using second order perturbation theory. The method is applied to analysis of quantum well structure and active region of a quantum cascade laser (QCL). This model will allow us to examine the influence of magnetic field on dipole matrix element in QCL structures, which will provide a better insight to how NPE can affect the gain of QCL structures.

  18. A single Lanczos propagation method for calculating transition amplitudes. III. S-matrix elements with a complex-symmetric Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenmin; Li, Guohui; Guo, Hua

    2001-12-01

    The recently proposed single Lanczos propagation method [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 9944 (1999); ibid. 114, 1467 (2001)] is extended to complex-symmetric Hamiltonians. It is shown that the complex-symmetric Lanczos algorithm possesses several useful numerical properties similar to those observed in real-symmetric cases, which enable one to compute multiple transition amplitudes with a single Lanczos propagation. The usefulness of the method is illustrated in calculating the S-matrix elements for the collinear H+H2 reaction.

  19. Calculation of Moment Matrix Elements for Bilinear Quadrilaterals and Higher-Order Basis Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-06

    restricted to the Electric Field Integral Equation and focuses on the self- elements of the IM and elements for which the observation point is near...to 15 significant digits. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Method of Moments (MoM); Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE); Bilinear Quadrilaterals (BQ). 16...functions. Our method is restricted to the Electric Field Integral Equation and focuses on the self- elements of the IM and elements for which the observation

  20. Land Application of Wastes: An Educational Program. Potentially Toxic Elements - Module 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, W. W.; And Others

    Five elements are identified as being potentially hazardous in this module. These are boron, cadmium, copper, molybdenum, and nickel. The hazards to plants and animals posed by these elements are discussed in some detail. The sources of toxic elements in sewage and the factors that effect the uptake of toxic elements by sewage sludge are also…

  1. Land Application of Wastes: An Educational Program. Potentially Toxic Elements - Module 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, W. W.; And Others

    Five elements are identified as being potentially hazardous in this module. These are boron, cadmium, copper, molybdenum, and nickel. The hazards to plants and animals posed by these elements are discussed in some detail. The sources of toxic elements in sewage and the factors that effect the uptake of toxic elements by sewage sludge are also…

  2. The Direct Effect of Toroidal Magnetic Fields on Stellar Oscillations: An Analytical Expression for the General Matrix Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, René; Schad, Ariane; Roth, Markus

    2017-09-01

    Where is the solar dynamo located and what is its modus operandi? These are still open questions in solar physics. Helio- and asteroseismology can help answer them by enabling us to study solar and stellar internal structures through global oscillations. The properties of solar and stellar acoustic modes are changing with the level of magnetic activity. However, until now, the inference on subsurface magnetic fields with seismic measures has been very limited. The aim of this paper is to develop a formalism to calculate the effect of large-scale toroidal magnetic fields on solar and stellar global oscillation eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies. If the Lorentz force is added to the equilibrium equation of motion, stellar eigenmodes can couple. In quasi-degenerate perturbation theory, this coupling, also known as the direct effect, can be quantified by the general matrix element. We present the analytical expression of the matrix element for a superposition of subsurface zonal toroidal magnetic field configurations. The matrix element is important for forward calculations of perturbed solar and stellar eigenfunctions and frequency perturbations. The results presented here will help to ascertain solar and stellar large-scale subsurface magnetic fields, and their geometric configuration, strength, and change over the course of activity cycles.

  3. Special phase space regions with minimal energy and momentum dependencies of the ARPES matrix element in Bi2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Matti; Markiewicz, Robert; Bansil, Arun

    2003-03-01

    Strong momentum (k_allel) and photon energy (hν) dependencies of the ARPES matrix element[1,2] will significantly complicate the applicability of recently proposed ARPES-based tests of the fundamental mechanism of cuprate superconductivity[3]. In this connection, we have carried out extensive first-principles simulations of the angle-resolved photointensity in Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8+δ (Bi2212) within the one-step photoemission model. A careful search of simulated photointensities in the (hν,k_allel) phase space indicates that it is generally difficult to minimize the effect of the ARPES matrix element with polarized light, but that for unpolarized radiation, it is possible to identify special energies around which the ARPES matrix element is more or less constant. ARPES spectra for emission from the Fermi energy at such selected photon energies are presented and discussed. 1. A. Bansil, and M. Lindroos, Phys. Rev. Letters 83, 5154 (1999). 2. M. Lindroos, S. Sahrakorpi, and A. Bansil, Phys. Rev. B 65, 054514 (2002). 3: I. Vekhter, and C.M. Varma, cond-mat/0210508.

  4. Analytical O (αs) corrections to the beam frame double-spin density matrix elements of e+e-→t t ¯

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldamäe, L.; Groote, S.; Körner, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    We provide analytical results for the O (αs) corrections to the double-spin density matrix elements in the reaction e+e-→t t ¯ . These concern the elements l l , l t , l n , t t , t n , and n n of the double-spin density matrix elements where l , t , n stand for longitudinal, transverse and normal orientations with respect to the beam frame spanned by the electron and the top quark momentum.

  5. Energy levels and transition probability matrix elements of ruby for maser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berwin, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Program computes fine structure energy levels of ruby as a function of magnetic field. Included in program is matrix formulation, each row of which contains a magnetic field and four corresponding energy levels.

  6. Efficient formulation of robust hybrid elements using orthogonal stress/strain interpolants and admissible matrix formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, K. Y.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of using orthogonal constant and higher order stress modes in formulating efficient hybrid elements by equipping the primary idea of Bergan and Hanssen (1975). Two sample elements modified from Pian-Sumihara 5-beta plane and Pian-Tong 18-beta hexahedral assumed contravariant stress elements are derived. With the suggested admissible simplifications of the flexibility matrices incorporated into the two new elements, new plane and hexahedral elements requiring respectively no and a negligible amount of computing efforts for inverting the flexibility matrices are formed. All proposed elements are stable, invariant, contain no empirically determined factor and strictly pass the patch test. Popular benchmark problems are studied and the accuracy of the proposed elements is close to their parent models.

  7. Superconducting axisymmetric finite elements based on a gauged potential variational principle. Part 1: Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James J.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1994-01-01

    The present work is part of a research program for the numerical simulation of electromagnetic (EM) fields within conventional Ginzburg-Landau (GL) superconductors. The final goal of this research is to formulate, develop and validate finite element (FE) models that can accurately capture electromagnetic thermal and material phase changes in a superconductor. The formulations presented here are for a time-independent Ginzburg-Landau superconductor and are derived from a potential-based variational principle. We develop an appropriate variational formulation of time-independent supercontivity for the general three-dimensional case and specialize it to the one-dimensional case. Also developed are expressions for the material-dependent parameters alpha and beta of GL theory and their dependence upon the temperature T. The one-dimensional formulation is then discretized for finite element purposes and the first variation of these equations is obtained. The resultant Euler equations contain nonlinear terms in the primary variables. To solve these equations, an incremental-iterative solution method is used. Expressions for the internal force vector, external force vector, loading vector and tangent stiffness matrix are therefore developed for use with the solution procedure.

  8. Efficient and precise calculation of the b-matrix elements in diffusion-weighted imaging pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Zubkov, Mikhail; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Price, William S

    2014-06-01

    Precise NMR diffusion measurements require detailed knowledge of the cumulative dephasing effect caused by the numerous gradient pulses present in most NMR pulse sequences. This effect, which ultimately manifests itself as the diffusion-related NMR signal attenuation, is usually described by the b-value or the b-matrix in the case of multidirectional diffusion weighting, the latter being common in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging. Neglecting some of the gradient pulses introduces an error in the calculated diffusion coefficient reaching in some cases 100% of the expected value. Therefore, ensuring the b-matrix calculation includes all the known gradient pulses leads to significant error reduction. Calculation of the b-matrix for simple gradient waveforms is rather straightforward, yet it grows cumbersome when complexly shaped and/or numerous gradient pulses are introduced. Making three broad assumptions about the gradient pulse arrangement in a sequence results in an efficient framework for calculation of b-matrices as well providing some insight into optimal gradient pulse placement. The framework allows accounting for the diffusion-sensitising effect of complexly shaped gradient waveforms with modest computational time and power. This is achieved by using the b-matrix elements of the simple unmodified pulse sequence and minimising the integration of the complexly shaped gradient waveform in the modified sequence. Such re-evaluation of the b-matrix elements retains all the analytical relevance of the straightforward approach, yet at least halves the amount of symbolic integration required. The application of the framework is demonstrated with the evaluation of the expression describing the diffusion-sensitizing effect, caused by different bipolar gradient pulse modules.

  9. Efficient and precise calculation of the b-matrix elements in diffusion-weighted imaging pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkov, Mikhail; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Price, William S.

    2014-06-01

    Precise NMR diffusion measurements require detailed knowledge of the cumulative dephasing effect caused by the numerous gradient pulses present in most NMR pulse sequences. This effect, which ultimately manifests itself as the diffusion-related NMR signal attenuation, is usually described by the b-value or the b-matrix in the case of multidirectional diffusion weighting, the latter being common in diffusion-weighted NMR imaging. Neglecting some of the gradient pulses introduces an error in the calculated diffusion coefficient reaching in some cases 100% of the expected value. Therefore, ensuring the b-matrix calculation includes all the known gradient pulses leads to significant error reduction. Calculation of the b-matrix for simple gradient waveforms is rather straightforward, yet it grows cumbersome when complexly shaped and/or numerous gradient pulses are introduced. Making three broad assumptions about the gradient pulse arrangement in a sequence results in an efficient framework for calculation of b-matrices as well providing some insight into optimal gradient pulse placement. The framework allows accounting for the diffusion-sensitising effect of complexly shaped gradient waveforms with modest computational time and power. This is achieved by using the b-matrix elements of the simple unmodified pulse sequence and minimising the integration of the complexly shaped gradient waveform in the modified sequence. Such re-evaluation of the b-matrix elements retains all the analytical relevance of the straightforward approach, yet at least halves the amount of symbolic integration required. The application of the framework is demonstrated with the evaluation of the expression describing the diffusion-sensitizing effect, caused by different bipolar gradient pulse modules.

  10. Diagnosis potential of near infrared Mueller Matrix imaging for colonic adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mueller matrix imaging along with polar decomposition method was employed for the colonic adenocarcinoma detection by polarized light in the near-infrared spectral range (700-1100 nm). A high-speed (<5s) Muller matrix imaging system with dual-rotating waveplates was developed. 16 (4 by 4) full Mueller matrices of the colonic tissues (i.e., normal and caner) were acquired. Polar decomposition was further implemented on the 16 images to derive the diattentuation, depolarization, and the retardance images. The decomposed images showed clear margin between the normal and adenocarcinomaous colon tissue samples. The work shows the potential of near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for the early diagnosis and detection of malignant lesions in the colon.

  11. Scytonemin Plays a Potential Role in Stabilizing the Exopolysaccharidic Matrix in Terrestrial Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic oxygen-evolving prokaryotes that are distributed in diverse habitats. They synthesize the ultraviolet (UV)-screening pigments, scytonemin (SCY) and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), located in the exopolysaccharide (EPS) matrix. Multiple roles for both pigments have gradually been recognized, such as sunscreen ability, antioxidant activity, and heat dissipation from absorbed UV radiation. In this study, a filamentous terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme was used to evaluate the potential stabilizing role of SCY on the EPS matrix. SCY (∼3.7 %) was partially removed from N. flagelliforme filaments by rinsing with 100 % acetone for 5 s. The physiological damage to cells resulting from this treatment, in terms of photosystem II activity parameter Fv/Fm, was repaired after culturing the sample for 40 h. The physiologically recovered sample was further desiccated by natural or rapid drying and then allowed to recovery for 24 h. Compared with the normal sample, a relatively slower Fv/Fm recovery was observed in the SCY-partially removed sample, suggesting that the decreased SCY concentration in the EPS matrix caused cells to suffer further damage upon desiccation. In addition, the SCY-partially removed sample could allow the release of MAAs (∼25 %) from the EPS matrix, while the normal sample did not. Therefore, damage caused by drying of the former resulted from at least the reduction of structural stability of the EPS matrix as well as the loss of partial antioxidant compounds. Considering that an approximately 4 % loss of SCY led to this significant effect, the structurally stabilizing potential of SCY on the EPS matrix is crucial for terrestrial cyanobacteria survival in complex environments.

  12. Aircraft Measurements of Aerosol Phase Matrix Elements by the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, G.; Martins, J.; Espinosa, R.; Dubovik, O.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the radiative balance and water cycle of our planet through influencing atmospheric radiation. Remote sensing of aerosols relies on scattering phase matrix information to retrieve aerosol properties with frequent global coverage, the assumed phase matrices must be validated by measurements. At the Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) we developed a new technique to directly measure the aerosol phase function (P11), the degree of linear polarization of the scattered light (-P12/P11), and the volume scattering coefficient (SCAT). We designed and built a portable instrument called the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph), shown in Figure 1 (a). The PI-Neph successfully participated in dozens of flights of the NASA Development and Evaluation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters (DEVOTE) project and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project and the January and February deployment of the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (Discover-AQ) mission. The ambient aerosol enters the PI-Neph through an inlet and the sample is illuminated by laser light (wavelength of 532 nm); the scattered light is imaged by a stationary wide field of view camera in the scattering angle range of 2° to 178° (in some cases stray light limited the scattering angle range to 3° to 176°). Data for P11, P12, and SCAT were taken every 12 seconds, example datasets from DEVOTE of P11 times SCAT are shown on Figure 1 (b). The talk will highlight results from the three field deployments and will show microphysical retrievals from the scattering data. The size distribution and the average complex refractive index of the ambient aerosol ensemble can be retrieved from the data by an algorithm similar to that of AERONET, as illustrated in Figure 1 (c). Particle sphericity can potentially be

  13. Effective elastoplastic behavior of two-phase ductile matrix composites: Return mapping algorithm and finite element implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, J.W.; Tseng, K.H.

    1995-12-31

    Discrete numerical integration algorithm is employed to integrate rate equations in the effective elastoplastic model for particle reinforced ductile matrix composites based on probabilistic micromechanical formulations. In particular, the unconditionally stable implicit backward Euler integration algorithm is formulated for elastoplasticity of particle reinforced plastic matrix composites. In addition to the local integration algorithm, in nonlinear finite element methods for boundary value problems, tangent moduli are needed for the global Newton`s iterations. For this purpose, the continuum tangent operator based on the continuous rate equations is derived. In order to preserve the quadratic rate of convergence, the consistent tangent operator is constructed based on the proposed backward Euler integration algorithm. The elastoplastic model is further extended to accommodate the effect of viscosity in the matrix. The extension is based on the method of Duvaut-Lions viscoplasticity. The local integration algorithm and the consistent tangent operator are formulated for particle reinforced viscoplastic matrix composites. Numerical experiments are performed to assess the capability of the proposed integration algorithm and the convergence behavior of various tangent moduli.

  14. Tellurium: an element with great biological potency and potential.

    PubMed

    Ba, Lalla Aicha; Döring, Mandy; Jamier, Vincent; Jacob, Claus

    2010-10-07

    Tellurium has long appeared as a nearly 'forgotten' element in Biology, with most studies focusing on tellurite, tellurate and a handful of organic tellurides. During the last decade, several discoveries have fuelled a renewed interest in this element. Bioincorporation of telluromethionine provides a new approach to add heavy atoms to selected sites in proteins. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanoparticles are fluorescent and may be used as quantum dots in imaging and diagnosis. The antibiotic properties of tellurite, long known yet almost forgotten, have attracted renewed interest, especially since the biochemical mechanisms of tellurium cytotoxicity are beginning to emerge. The close chemical relationship between tellurium and sulfur also transcends into in vitro and in vivo situations and provides new impetus for the development of enzyme inhibitors and redox modulators, some of which may be of interest in the field of antibiotics and anticancer drug design.

  15. The c-myc insulator element and matrix attachment regions define the c-myc chromosomal domain.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Wendy M; Farris, Stephen D; Rubio, Eric D; Morey-Rosler, Kristin M; Schubach, William H; Krumm, Anton

    2003-12-01

    Insulator elements and matrix attachment regions are essential for the organization of genetic information within the nucleus. By comparing the pattern of histone modifications at the mouse and human c-myc alleles, we identified an evolutionarily conserved boundary at which the c-myc transcription unit is separated from the flanking condensed chromatin enriched in lysine 9-methylated histone H3. This region harbors the c-myc insulator element (MINE), which contains at least two physically separable, functional activities: enhancer-blocking activity and barrier activity. The enhancer-blocking activity is mediated by CTCF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that CTCF is constitutively bound at the insulator and at the promoter region independent of the transcriptional status of c-myc. This result supports an architectural role of CTCF rather than a regulatory role in transcription. An additional higher-order nuclear organization of the c-myc locus is provided by matrix attachment regions (MARs) that define a domain larger than 160 kb. The MARs of the c-myc domain do not act to prevent the association of flanking regions with lysine 9-methylated histones, suggesting that they do not function as barrier elements.

  16. The Conservation/Solution Element (STE) Method for Linear Potential Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeyeye, John O.; Attia, Naguib F.; Jackson, Joy; Hunter, Timothy

    1996-01-01

    The potential equation is discretized on rectangular domains using the Conservation/Solution Element Method (STE) approach. Computational examples with a discussion of numerical experience gained are given.

  17. Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations. Potentials for main group elements Na to Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Wadt, W.R.; Hay, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A consistent set of ab initio effective core potentials (ECP) has been generated for the main group elements from Na to Bi using the procedure originally developed by Kahn. The ECP's are derived from all-electron numerical Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions and fit to analytical representations for use in molecular calculations. For Rb to Bi the ECP's are generated from the relativistic Hartree--Fock atomic wave functions of Cowan which incorporate the Darwin and mass--velocity terms. Energy-optimized valence basis sets of (3s3p) primitive Gaussians are presented for use with the ECP's. Comparisons between all-electron and valence-electron ECP calculations are presented for NaF, NaCl, Cl/sub 2/, Cl/sub 2//sup -/, Br/sub 2/, Br/sub 2//sup -/, and Xe/sub 2//sup +/. The results show that the average errors introduced by the ECP's are generally only a few percent.

  18. [Study of sustained-matrix tablets Ambroxol hydrochloride and potential impact of different fillers on the matrix tablet's scale-up].

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng-yuan; Yang, Ya-peng; Chang, Jun-biao; Guo, Min-tong

    2012-10-18

    To study the release profiles of Ambroxol hydrochloride in matrix tablets with different fillers and controlled release materials, and investigate the potential impact on different fillers on the matrix tablet's scale-up. Ambroxol hydrochloride was chosen as the model drug to make single-layer matrix tablets with different types of hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose as matrix material, and lactose or microcrystalline cellulose as the filler. In vitro dissolution test was used to evaluate the drug release performance of the matrix tablets made. Also ethyl cellulose was used to prepare double-layer matrix tablets to investigate how different kinds of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and fillers would affect the drug release in double-layer matrix tablets. The drug release rate of single-layer tablets with lactose and HPMC decreased significantly with the increase of the level and viscosity of HPMC. However the release profile only slightly slowed down with the increase of the content and viscosity of HPMC for single-layer matrix tablets of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). Compared with the single-layer tablets, the level and viscosity of HPMC had less impact on the drug release of the double-layer matrix tablets. The matrix tablet with lactose and HPMC has greater flexibility to design formulations with different drug release rate, however the introduction of other process parameters during the scale-up could lead the shifting of the drug release profile from small scale batches. The drug release profiles of matrix tablets with insoluble filler-MCC only change within a small range with the increase of the level and viscosity of HPMC. From the formulation design point of view, it could be necessary to select different type of controlled release polymers to meet the design requirement.

  19. Qualitative Analysis of Teeth and Evaluation of Amalgam Elements Penetration into Dental Matrix Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gazmeh, Meisam; Bahreini, Maryam; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Asnaashari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for qualitative analysis of healthy and carious teeth. The technique of laser ablation is receiving increasing attention for applications in dentistry, specifically for the treatment of teeth such as drilling of micro-holes and plaque removal. Methods: A quality-switched (Q-switched) Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser operating at wavelength of 1064 nm, pulse energy of 90 mJ/pulse, repetition rate of 2Hz and pulse duration of 6 ns was used in this analysis. In the process of ablation a luminous micro-plasma is normally generated which may be exploited for on-line elemental analysis via laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy as a rapid, in situ and easy method for monitoring drilling process. Results: The results of elemental analysis show the presence of some trace elements in teeth including P, Ca, Mg, Zn, K, Sr, C, Na, H, O and the permeability of some amalgam (teeth filling materials) elements including Hg, Ag, Cu and Sn into dental matrix. Conclusion: This study addresses the ability of LIBS in elemental analysis of teeth and its feasibility in acute identification of healthy and carious teeth during drilling process for future clinical applications. PMID:25987971

  20. The analytical transfer matrix method for PT-symmetric complex potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naceri, Leila; Hammou, Amine B.

    2017-07-01

    We have extended the analytical transfer matrix (ATM) method to solve quantum mechanical bound state problems with complex PT-symmetric potentials. Our work focuses on a class of models studied by Bender and Jones, we calculate the energy eigenvalues, discuss the critical values of g and compare the results with those obtained from other methods such as exact numerical computation and WKB approximation method.

  1. Computation of scattering matrix elements of large and complex shaped absorbing particles with multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yueqian; Yang, Minglin; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2015-05-01

    Light scattering properties of absorbing particles, such as the mineral dusts, attract a wide attention due to its importance in geophysical and environment researches. Due to the absorbing effect, light scattering properties of particles with absorption differ from those without absorption. Simple shaped absorbing particles such as spheres and spheroids have been well studied with different methods but little work on large complex shaped particles has been reported. In this paper, the surface Integral Equation (SIE) with Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) is applied to study scattering properties of large non-spherical absorbing particles. SIEs are carefully discretized with piecewise linear basis functions on triangle patches to model whole surface of the particle, hence computation resource needs increase much more slowly with the particle size parameter than the volume discretized methods. To improve further its capability, MLFMA is well parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed memory computer platform. Without loss of generality, we choose the computation of scattering matrix elements of absorbing dust particles as an example. The comparison of the scattering matrix elements computed by our method and the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA) for an ellipsoid dust particle shows that the precision of our method is very good. The scattering matrix elements of large ellipsoid dusts with different aspect ratios and size parameters are computed. To show the capability of the presented algorithm for complex shaped particles, scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 600 of complex refractive index m = 1.555 + 0.004 i and different orientations are studied.

  2. Time-dependent wave-packet method for the complete determination of S-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael

    1990-01-01

    An alternative time-dependent wave-packet method for treating three-dimensional gas phase reactive atom-diatom collisions is presented. The method employs a nonreactive body-frame wave packet propagation procedure, made possible by judicious use of absorbing optical potentials, a novel scheme for interpolating the wave function from coordinates in one arrangement to those in another and the fact that the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is an initial-value problem. The last feature makes possible a computationally viable and accurate procedure for changing from one arrangement's coordinates to another. In addition, the method allows the determination of S-matrix elements over a wide range of energies from a single wave-packet propagation. The method is illustrated by carrying out detailed calculations of inelastic and reactive scattering in the H + H2 system using the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz potential surface.

  3. Time-dependent wave-packet method for the complete determination of S-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael

    1990-01-01

    An alternative time-dependent wave-packet method for treating three-dimensional gas phase reactive atom-diatom collisions is presented. The method employs a nonreactive body-frame wave packet propagation procedure, made possible by judicious use of absorbing optical potentials, a novel scheme for interpolating the wave function from coordinates in one arrangement to those in another and the fact that the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is an initial-value problem. The last feature makes possible a computationally viable and accurate procedure for changing from one arrangement's coordinates to another. In addition, the method allows the determination of S-matrix elements over a wide range of energies from a single wave-packet propagation. The method is illustrated by carrying out detailed calculations of inelastic and reactive scattering in the H + H2 system using the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz potential surface.

  4. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    SciTech Connect

    Agodi, C. Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.; Cappuzzello, F.; Greco, V.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Longhitano, F.; Branchina, V.; Foti, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2015-10-28

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  5. Analytic structure of the multichannel Jost matrix for potentials with Coulombic tails

    SciTech Connect

    Rakityansky, S. A.; Elander, N.

    2013-12-15

    A quantum system is considered that can move in N two-body channels with the potentials that may include the Coulomb interaction. For this system, the Jost matrix is constructed in such a way that all its dependencies on the channel momenta and Sommerfeld parameters are factorized in the form of explicit analytic expressions. It is shown that the two remaining unknown matrices are single-valued analytic functions of the energy and therefore can be expanded in the Taylor series near an arbitrary point within the domain of their analyticity. It is derived a system of first-order differential equations whose solutions determine the expansion coefficients of these series. Alternatively, the unknown expansion coefficients can be used as fitting parameters for parametrizing experimental data similarly to the effective-range expansion. Such a parametrization has the advantage of preserving proper analytic structure of the Jost matrix and can be done not only near the threshold energies, but around any collision or even complex energy. As soon as the parameters are obtained, the Jost matrix (and therefore the S-matrix) is known analytically on all sheets of the Riemann surface, and thus enables one to locate possible resonances.

  6. Overlap Dirac operator at nonzero chemical potential and random matrix theory.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Jacques; Wettig, Tilo

    2006-07-07

    We show how to introduce a quark chemical potential in the overlap Dirac operator. The resulting operator satisfies a Ginsparg-Wilson relation and has exact zero modes. It is no longer gamma5 Hermitian, but its nonreal eigenvalues still occur in pairs. We compute the spectral density of the operator on the lattice and show that, for small eigenvalues, the data agree with analytical predictions of non-Hermitian chiral random matrix theory for both trivial and nontrivial topology. We also explain an observed change in the number of zero modes as a function of chemical potential.

  7. Overlap Dirac Operator at Nonzero Chemical Potential and Random Matrix Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, Jacques; Wettig, Tilo

    2006-07-07

    We show how to introduce a quark chemical potential in the overlap Dirac operator. The resulting operator satisfies a Ginsparg-Wilson relation and has exact zero modes. It is no longer {gamma}{sub 5} Hermitian, but its nonreal eigenvalues still occur in pairs. We compute the spectral density of the operator on the lattice and show that, for small eigenvalues, the data agree with analytical predictions of non-Hermitian chiral random matrix theory for both trivial and nontrivial topology. We also explain an observed change in the number of zero modes as a function of chemical potential.

  8. Topology and chiral random matrix theory at nonzero imaginary chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, C.; Wettig, T.; Ohtani, M.; Verbaarschot, J. J. M.

    2009-04-01

    We study the effect of topology for a random matrix model of QCD at nonzero imaginary chemical potential or nonzero temperature. Nonuniversal fluctuations of Dirac eigenvalues lead to normalization factors that contribute to the {theta} dependence of the partition function. These normalization factors have to be canceled in order to reproduce the {theta} dependence of the QCD partition function. The reason for this behavior is that the topological domain of the Dirac spectrum (the region of the Dirac spectrum that is sensitive to the topological charge) extends beyond the microscopic domain at nonzero imaginary chemical potential or temperature. Such behavior could persist in certain lattice formulations of QCD.

  9. General formulation of rovibrational kinetic energy operators and matrix elements in internal bond-angle coordinates using factorized Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Wassja A.; Leonhard, Kai

    2016-12-01

    We show how inverse metric tensors and rovibrational kinetic energy operators in terms of internal bond-angle coordinates can be obtained analytically following a factorization of the Jacobian worked out by Frederick and Woywod. The structure of these Jacobians is exploited in two ways: On one hand, the elements of the metric tensor as well as its determinant all have the form ∑rmsin (αn) cos (βo) . This form can be preserved by working with the adjugate metric tensor that can be obtained without divisions. On the other hand, the adjugate can be obtained with less effort by exploiting the lower triangular structure of the Jacobians. Together with a suitable choice of the wavefunction, we avoid singularities and show how to obtain analytical expressions for the rovibrational kinetic energy matrix elements.

  10. Solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for matrix removal in trace element assay of actinide materials.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Manard, Benjamin T; Castro, Alonso; Montoya, Dennis P; Xu, Ning; Chamberlin, Rebecca M

    2017-05-15

    Advances in sample nebulization and injection technology have significantly reduced the volume of solution required for trace impurity analysis in plutonium and uranium materials. Correspondingly, we have designed and tested a novel chip-based microfluidic platform, containing a 100-µL or 20-µL solid-phase microextraction column, packed by centrifugation, which supports nuclear material mass and solution volume reductions of 90% or more compared to standard methods. Quantitative recovery of 28 trace elements in uranium was demonstrated using a UTEVA chromatographic resin column, and trace element recovery from thorium (a surrogate for plutonium) was similarly demonstrated using anion exchange resin AG MP-1. Of nine materials tested, compatibility of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chips with the strong nitric acid media was highest. The microcolumns can be incorporated into a variety of devices and systems, and can be loaded with other solid-phase resins for trace element assay in high-purity metals.

  11. Potential inert matrix materials: Materials synthesis and evaluation of in-service engineering parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng

    Containing no fertile materials, inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been introduced as a potential transmutation solution for the increasing inventory of both weapon grade and reactor grade plutonium (Pu). In the present work, the MgO-pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) composites and spinel magnesium stannate (Mg2SnO4) were selected as potential inert matrix (IM) materials. A comprehensive investigation was conducted on evaluation of the engineering parameters of the potential IM materials. The MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composites and Mg 2SnO4 were fabricated through conventional solid state processing. The crystal structure and microstructure of the synthesized composites and Mg2SnO4 were studied. The irradiation tolerance of the potential IM materials was first assessed. The resistance of Mg2SnO 4 against irradiation induced amorphization was assessed experimentally using in situ TEM technique. The critical amorphization doses for Mg2SnO4 irradiated by 1 MeV Kr2+ ions were determined to be 5.5 dpa at 50 K and 11.0 dpa at 150 K, respectively. The obtained results were compared with other spinels especially MgAl 2O4, and the radiation tolerance of spinels were discussed. The next evaluation was water corrosion resistance of the potential IM materials. Homogeneous MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composites exhibited an improved hydrothermal corrosion resistance than inhomogeneous composites and pure MgO. Even though spinel Mg2SnO4 was not stable in water at 300°C and saturation pressure, the corrosion was limited only to the surface, and the volume and mass changes were less than 1 % after 720 h corrosion. Feasibility of aqueous reprocessing was evaluated by studying the dissolution behavior of the potential IM materials in acidic solutions, with an emphasis on nitric acid. Dissolution of the MgO-Nd2Zr2O 7 composites in HNO3 resulted in a selective dissolution of MgO. Mechanical agitation such as magnetic bar stirring was necessary to achieve a completed dissolution of MgO and disintegration of porous Nd 2Zr2O7

  12. Division of focal plane polarimeter-based 3 × 4 Mueller matrix microscope: a potential tool for quick diagnosis of human carcinoma tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jintao; He, Honghui; Wang, Ye; Huang, Yi; Li, Xianpeng; He, Chao; Liao, Ran; Zeng, Nan; Liu, Shaoxiong; Ma, Hui

    2016-05-01

    A polarization microscope is a useful tool to reveal the optical anisotropic nature of a specimen and can provide abundant microstructural information about samples. We present a division of focal plane (DoFP) polarimeter-based polarization microscope capable of simultaneously measuring both the Stokes vector and the 3×4 Mueller matrix with an optimal polarization illumination scheme. The Mueller matrix images of unstained human carcinoma tissue slices show that the m24 and m34 elements can provide important information for pathological observations. The characteristic features of the m24 and m34 elements can be enhanced by polarization staining under illumination by a circularly polarized light. Hence, combined with a graphics processing unit acceleration algorithm, the DoFP polarization microscope is capable of real-time polarization imaging for potential quick clinical diagnoses of both standard and frozen slices of human carcinoma tissues.

  13. A static analysis of metal matrix composite spur gear by three-dimensional finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, N.; Vijayarangan, S.

    1993-03-01

    A number of engineering components have recently been made using metal matrix composite (MMC) materials, due to their overwhelming advantages, such as light weight high strength, higher dimensional stability and minimal attack by environment, when compared with polymer-based composite materials, even though the cost of MMCs are very high. Power transmission gears are one such area able to make use of MMC materials. Here an attempt is made to study and compare the performance of gears made of MMC materials with that of conventional steel material gears. It may be concluded from this study that MMC materials are highly suitable for making gears that are to transmit even fairly large power.

  14. Structure and calculation of field-induced free-free transition matrix elements in many-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2012-08-01

    In earlier work [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.65.043412 65, 043412 (2002)] we examined the description of atom-radiation coupling in terms of the multipolar Hamiltonian rather than the minimal coupling one, and reached the conclusion that the simple operator DSF(r)={r,rmatrix elements using DSF(r) and state-specific, energy-normalized, numerical scattering functions in polyelectronic atoms, and explains how their computation can be done efficiently. Accurate knowledge of such matrix elements is critical to the quantitative solution of time-dependent or time-independent problems involving various multiphoton processes that are induced by strong fields and involve off-resonance coupling between extended wave functions representing high-n Rydberg states of the discrete spectrum or asymptotically unbound states of the continuum. For completeness, the singularities of the EDA are also derived and discussed within the present approach.

  15. Orbital angular momentum eigenfunctions for fast and numerically stable evaluations of closed-form pseudopotential matrix elements.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anguang; Chan, Nora W C; Dunlap, Brett I

    2017-08-21

    The computation of s-type Gaussian pseudopotential matrix elements involving low powers of the distance from the pseudopotential center using Gaussian orbitals can be reduced to familiar integrals. They may be directly expressed as either simple three-center overlap integrals for even powers of the radial distance from the pseudopotential center or related to the three-center nuclear integrals of a Gaussian charge distribution for odd powers. Orbital angular momentum about each atom is added to these integrals by solid-harmonic differentiation with respect to its center. The solid-harmonic addition theorem allows all the integrals to be factored into products of invariant one-dimensional integrals involving the Gaussian exponents and angular factors that contain the azimuthal quantum numbers but are independent of all Gaussian exponents. Precomputing the angular factors allow looping over all Gaussian exponents about the three centers. The fact that solid harmonics are eigenstates of angular momentum removes the singularities seen in previous treatments of pseudopotential matrix elements.

  16. Short-distance matrix elements for D-meson mixing for 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia Cheng

    We study the short-distance hadronic matrix elements for D-meson mixing with partially quenched Nf = 2+1 lattice QCD. We use a large set of the MIMD Lattice Computation Collaboration's gauge configurations with a2 tadpole-improved staggered sea quarks and tadpole-improved Luscher-Weisz gluons. We use the a2 tadpole-improved action for valence light quarks and the Sheikoleslami-Wohlert action with the Fermilab interpretation for the valence charm quark. Our calculation covers the complete set of five operators needed to constrain new physics models for D-meson mixing. We match our matrix elements to the MS-NDR scheme evaluated at 3GeV. We report values for the Beneke-Buchalla-Greub-Lenz-Nierste choice of evanescent operators and obtain / mD = 0.042(4)GeV3, /mD = -0.078(4)GeV3, < O3>/mD = 0.033(2)GeV 3, /mD = 0.155(10)GeV3, /mD = 0.058(6)GeV3.

  17. Orbital angular momentum eigenfunctions for fast and numerically stable evaluations of closed-form pseudopotential matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anguang; Chan, Nora W. C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2017-08-01

    The computation of s-type Gaussian pseudopotential matrix elements involving low powers of the distance from the pseudopotential center using Gaussian orbitals can be reduced to familiar integrals. They may be directly expressed as either simple three-center overlap integrals for even powers of the radial distance from the pseudopotential center or related to the three-center nuclear integrals of a Gaussian charge distribution for odd powers. Orbital angular momentum about each atom is added to these integrals by solid-harmonic differentiation with respect to its center. The solid-harmonic addition theorem allows all the integrals to be factored into products of invariant one-dimensional integrals involving the Gaussian exponents and angular factors that contain the azimuthal quantum numbers but are independent of all Gaussian exponents. Precomputing the angular factors allow looping over all Gaussian exponents about the three centers. The fact that solid harmonics are eigenstates of angular momentum removes the singularities seen in previous treatments of pseudopotential matrix elements.

  18. Pericellular Matrix Mechanics in the Anulus Fibrosus Predicted by a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Model and In Situ Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li; Guilak, Farshid; Setton, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Anulus fibrosus (AF) cells have been demonstrated to exhibit dramatic differences in morphology and biologic responses to different types of mechanical stimuli. AF cells may reside as single cell, paired or multiple cells in a contiguous pericellular matrix (PCM), whose structure and properties are expected to have a significant influence on the mechanical stimuli that these cells may experience during physiologic loading of the spine, as well as in tissue degeneration and regeneration. In this study, a computational model was developed to predict the micromechanical stimuli, such as stress and strain, fluid pressure and flow, of cells and their surrounding PCM in the AF tissue using three-dimensional (3D) finite element models based on in situ morphology. 3D solid geometries of cell-PCM regions were registered from serial confocal images obtained from mature rat AF tissues by custom codes. Distinct cell-matrix units were modeled with a custom 3D biphasic finite element code (COMSOL Multiphysics), and simulated to experience uni-axial tensile strain along the local collagen fiber direction. AF cells were predicted to experience higher volumetric strain with a strain amplification ratio (relative to that in the extracellular matrix) of ~ 3.1 – 3.8 at equilibrium, as compared to the PCM domains (1.3 – 1.9). The strain concentrations were generally found at the cell/PCM interface and stress concentration at the PCM/ECM interface. Increased numbers of cells within a contiguous PCM was associated with an apparent increase of strain levels and decreased rate of fluid pressurization in the cell, with magnitudes dependent on the cell size, shape and relative position inside the PCM. These studies provide spatio-temporal information on micromechanics of AF cells in understanding the mechanotransduction in the intervertebral disc. PMID:19946619

  19. Potential Application of Silica Mineral from Dieng Mountain in Agriculture Sector to Control the Release Rate of Fertilizer Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solihin; Mursito, Anggoro Tri; Dida, Eki N.; Erlangga, Bagus D.; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Silica mineral, which comes along with geothermal fluid in Dieng, is a product of erosion, decomposition and dissolution of silicon oxide based mineral, which is followed by precipitation to form silica mineral. This silica cell structure is non crystalline, and it contains 85,60 % silicon oxide, 6.49 volatile elements, and also other oxide elements. Among the direct potential application of this silica is as raw material in slow release fertilizer. Silica in compacted slow release fertilizer is able control the release rate of fertilizer elements. Two type of slow release fertilizer has been made by using silica as the matrix in these slow release fertilizer. The first type is the mixing of ordinary solid fertilizer with Dieng silica, whereas the second one is the mixing of disposal leach water with Dieng silica. The release test shows that both of these modified fertilizers have slow release fertilizer characteristic. The release rate of fertilizer elements (magnesium, potassium, ammonium, and phosphate) can be significantly reduced. The addition of kaolin in the first type of slow release fertilizer makes the release rate of fertilizer elements can be more slowed down. Meanwhile in the second type of slow release fertilizer, the release rate is determined by ratio of silica/hydrogel. The lowest release rate is achieved by sample that has highest ratio of silica/hydrogel.

  20. Matrix equation decomposition and parallel solution of systems resulting from unstructured finite element problems in electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    Finite element modeling has proven useful for accurately simulating scattered or radiated electromagnetic fields from complex three-dimensional objects whose geometry varies on the scale of a fraction of an electrical wavelength. An unstructured finite element model of realistic objects leads to a large, sparse, system of equations that needs to be solved efficiently with regard to machine memory and execution time. Both factorization and iterative solvers can be used to produce solutions to these systems of equations. Factorization leads to high memory requirements that limit the electrical problem size of three-dimensional objects that can be modeled. An iterative solver can be used to efficiently solve the system without excessive memory use and in a minimal amount of time if the convergence rate is controlled.

  1. [Characterization of matrix effects in microanalysis of sulfide minerals by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry based on an element pair method].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ji-hai; Zhan, Xiu-chun; Hu, Ming-yue; Zhao, Ling-hao; Sun, Dong-yang

    2015-02-01

    Matrix effect between reference materials and samples is one of the major factors affecting the accuracy of analytical results by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). However, there is no method or calculation formula to quantify matrix effect between standards and samples up to date. In this paper, the linear correlation coefficient r of the Ii/I(is-Ci)/Cis graphs of element pairs were used to characterize the matrix effect, which took the ratios of concentrations (ci/ c(is)) and intensities (Ii/Iis) of the analytical element and internal standard element as x-axis and gamma-axis, respectively. Matrix effects of 6 element pairs in 13 glass reference materials, 2 sulfide reference materials and 2 sulfide minerals using Fe as internal standard was studied, with the linear correlation coefficient r of Fe-Cu, Fe-Zn element pairs both less than 0. 999 and trace Fe--Mn, Fe--Co, Fe--Ga, Fe--Pb element pairs all better than 0.999. Matrix effects of 3 major element pairs in 2 sulfide ref- erence materials and 6 sulfide minerals using S as internal standard was also studied, with the linear correlation coefficient r of S--Fe, S--Cu, S--Zn all less than 0.999. The great majority of relative errors of EMPA analytical results for major elements in sulfide minerals were greater than 10%, whether analyzed using Fe as internal standard with glass reference materials as external standard, or S as internal standard with sulfide reference materials MASS-1, IMER-1 as external standard, respectively. But the most analytical results for trace elements calibrated by glass reference materials using Fe as internal standard were well agreed with sulfide standard MASS-1, with the relative errors less than 15%. The results showed that matrix effects existed in glass reference materials, sulfide reference materials and sulfide minerals, and it also proved a certain rationality and practicability for quantification of matrix effect using the linear

  2. Mesh Refinement in Finite Element Analysis by Minimization of the Stiffness Matrix Trace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    preceed the last card "CEND" in the Executive Control Deck. The following set of DMAP instructions were used in the trace calculations: Nastran Executive...3 edges. NASTRAN MSGMESH t , GIFTSc , SUPERSAP. and SUPARTABt (in I-DEAS) have this capability. For a more complicated geometry Schwarz-Christoffel...distortion factors of the elements. t NASTRAN MSGMESH is developed by MacNeal-Schwendler Corporation C) GIFTS is developed by Sperry Univac Computer System

  3. Solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for matrix removal in trace element assay of actinide materials

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Jun; Manard, Benjamin Thomas; Castro, Alonso; ...

    2017-02-02

    Advances in sample nebulization and injection technology have significantly reduced the volume of solution required for trace impurity analysis in plutonium and uranium materials. Correspondingly, we have designed and tested a novel chip-based microfluidic platform, containing a 100-µL or 20-µL solid-phase microextraction column, packed by centrifugation, which supports nuclear material mass and solution volume reductions of 90% or more compared to standard methods. Quantitative recovery of 28 trace elements in uranium was demonstrated using a UTEVA chromatographic resin column, and trace element recovery from thorium (a surrogate for plutonium) was similarly demonstrated using anion exchange resin AG MP-1. Of ninemore » materials tested, compatibility of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chips with the strong nitric acid media was highest. Finally, the microcolumns can be incorporated into a variety of devices and systems, and can be loaded with other solid-phase resins for trace element assay in high-purity metals.« less

  4. Notch Sensitivity of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Tensile Loading: An Experimental, Analytical, and Finite Element Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haque, A.; Ahmed, L.; Ware, T.; Jeelani, S.; Verrilli, Michael J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The stress concentrations associated with circular notches and subjected to uniform tensile loading in woven ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) have been investigated for high-efficient turbine engine applications. The CMC's were composed of Nicalon silicon carbide woven fabric in SiNC matrix manufactured through polymer impregnation process (PIP). Several combinations of hole diameter/plate width ratios and ply orientations were considered in this study. In the first part, the stress concentrations were calculated measuring strain distributions surrounding the hole using strain gages at different locations of the specimens during the initial portion of the stress-strain curve before any microdamage developed. The stress concentration was also calculated analytically using Lekhnitskii's solution for orthotropic plates. A finite-width correction factor for anisotropic and orthotropic composite plate was considered. The stress distributions surrounding the circular hole of a CMC's plate were further studied using finite element analysis. Both solid and shell elements were considered. The experimental results were compared with both the analytical and finite element solutions. Extensive optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations were carried out for identifying the fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of both the notched and notched specimens. The stress concentration factors (SCF) determined by analytical method overpredicted the experimental results. But the numerical solution underpredicted the experimental SCF. Stress concentration factors are shown to increase with enlarged hole size and the effects of ply orientations on stress concentration factors are observed to be negligible. In all the cases, the crack initiated at the notch edge and propagated along the width towards the edge of the specimens.

  5. Notch Sensitivity of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Tensile Loading: An Experimental, Analytical, and Finite Element Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haque, A.; Ahmed, L.; Ware, T.; Jeelani, S.; Verrilli, Michael J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The stress concentrations associated with circular notches and subjected to uniform tensile loading in woven ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) have been investigated for high-efficient turbine engine applications. The CMC's were composed of Nicalon silicon carbide woven fabric in SiNC matrix manufactured through polymer impregnation process (PIP). Several combinations of hole diameter/plate width ratios and ply orientations were considered in this study. In the first part, the stress concentrations were calculated measuring strain distributions surrounding the hole using strain gages at different locations of the specimens during the initial portion of the stress-strain curve before any microdamage developed. The stress concentration was also calculated analytically using Lekhnitskii's solution for orthotropic plates. A finite-width correction factor for anisotropic and orthotropic composite plate was considered. The stress distributions surrounding the circular hole of a CMC's plate were further studied using finite element analysis. Both solid and shell elements were considered. The experimental results were compared with both the analytical and finite element solutions. Extensive optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations were carried out for identifying the fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of both the notched and notched specimens. The stress concentration factors (SCF) determined by analytical method overpredicted the experimental results. But the numerical solution underpredicted the experimental SCF. Stress concentration factors are shown to increase with enlarged hole size and the effects of ply orientations on stress concentration factors are observed to be negligible. In all the cases, the crack initiated at the notch edge and propagated along the width towards the edge of the specimens.

  6. Optical elements formed by compressed gases: Analysis and potential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Spherical, cylindrical, and conical shock waves are optically analogous to gas lenses. The geometrical optics of these shock configurations are analyzed as they pertain to flow visualization instruments, particularly the rainbow schlieren apparatus and single-pass interferometers. It is proposed that a lens or mirror formed by gas compressed between plastic sheets has potential as a fluid visualization test object; as the objective mirror in a very large space-based telescope, communication antenna, or energy collector; as the objective mirror in inexpensive commercial telescopes; and as a component in fluid visualization apparatuses.

  7. Bacteria Inside Semiconductors as Potential Sensor Elements: Biochip Progress

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Vasu R.; Baier, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    It was discovered at the beginning of this Century that living bacteria—and specifically the extremophile Pseudomonas syzgii—could be captured inside growing crystals of pure water-corroding semiconductors—specifically germanium—and thereby initiated pursuit of truly functional “biochip-based” biosensors. This observation was first made at the inside ultraviolet-illuminated walls of ultrapure water-flowing semiconductor fabrication facilities (fabs) and has since been, not as perfectly, replicated in simpler flow cell systems for chip manufacture, described here. Recognizing the potential importance of these adducts as optical switches, for example, or probes of metabolic events, the influences of the fabs and their components on the crystal nucleation and growth phenomena now identified are reviewed and discussed with regard to further research needs. For example, optical beams of current photonic circuits can be more easily modulated by integral embedded cells into electrical signals on semiconductors. Such research responds to a recently published Grand Challenge in ceramic science, designing and synthesizing oxide electronics, surfaces, interfaces and nanoscale structures that can be tuned by biological stimuli, to reveal phenomena not otherwise possible with conventional semiconductor electronics. This short review addresses only the fabrication facilities' features at the time of first production of these potential biochips. PMID:24961215

  8. Bacteria inside semiconductors as potential sensor elements: biochip progress.

    PubMed

    Sah, Vasu R; Baier, Robert E

    2014-06-24

    It was discovered at the beginning of this Century that living bacteria-and specifically the extremophile Pseudomonas syzgii-could be captured inside growing crystals of pure water-corroding semiconductors-specifically germanium-and thereby initiated pursuit of truly functional "biochip-based" biosensors. This observation was first made at the inside ultraviolet-illuminated walls of ultrapure water-flowing semiconductor fabrication facilities (fabs) and has since been, not as perfectly, replicated in simpler flow cell systems for chip manufacture, described here. Recognizing the potential importance of these adducts as optical switches, for example, or probes of metabolic events, the influences of the fabs and their components on the crystal nucleation and growth phenomena now identified are reviewed and discussed with regard to further research needs. For example, optical beams of current photonic circuits can be more easily modulated by integral embedded cells into electrical signals on semiconductors. Such research responds to a recently published Grand Challenge in ceramic science, designing and synthesizing oxide electronics, surfaces, interfaces and nanoscale structures that can be tuned by biological stimuli, to reveal phenomena not otherwise possible with conventional semiconductor electronics. This short review addresses only the fabrication facilities' features at the time of first production of these potential biochips.

  9. Two distinct membrane potential-dependent steps drive mitochondrial matrix protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Alexander Benjamin; Schulz, Christian; Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Clancy, Anne; Guiard, Bernard; Ieva, Raffaele; van der Laan, Martin; Rehling, Peter

    2017-01-02

    Two driving forces energize precursor translocation across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Although the membrane potential (Δψ) is considered to drive translocation of positively charged presequences through the TIM23 complex (presequence translocase), the activity of the Hsp70-powered import motor is crucial for the translocation of the mature protein portion into the matrix. In this study, we show that mitochondrial matrix proteins display surprisingly different dependencies on the Δψ. However, a precursor's hypersensitivity to a reduction of the Δψ is not linked to the respective presequence, but rather to the mature portion of the polypeptide chain. The presequence translocase constituent Pam17 is specifically recruited by the receptor Tim50 to promote the transport of hypersensitive precursors into the matrix. Our analyses show that two distinct Δψ-driven translocation steps energize precursor passage across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The Δψ- and Pam17-dependent import step identified in this study is positioned between the two known energy-dependent steps: Δψ-driven presequence translocation and adenosine triphosphate-driven import motor activity.

  10. Structure of low-energy collective 0 --states in doubly magic nuclei and matrix elements of the P-odd and P- and T-odd weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorov, O. K.; Auerbach, N.; Flambaum, V. V.

    1996-02-01

    The structure of the collective low-energy Jπ = 0 - ( T = 0 and T = 1) modes is studied for a doubly magic nucleus in a simplified analytic model of RPA. The 0 - phonon states ( T = 0, 1) lie at energies ET=0 (0 -) ≲ ω and ET=1 (0 -) > ω, where ω is the oscillator frequency. The matrix elements of P-odd and P- and T-odd weak one-body potentials connecting the ground state to these 0 --states, Wcoll, are enhanced by the factor ∼ 2( {ω}/{E}) {1}/{2}A {1}/{3} ∼ 10 as compared to the single-particle value wsp what can result in values | Wcoll| ∼ 20-30 eV if standard values of DDH parameters are used for wsp. Similar enhancement arises in the P- and T-odd case.

  11. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  12. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-01

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  13. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  14. Fluorinated matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors--Phosphonate based potential probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bernd; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Riemann, Burkhard; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter

    2016-02-15

    Fluorine-containing inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) can serve as lead structures for the development of (18)F-labeled radioligands. These compounds might be useful as non-invasive imaging probes to characterize pathologies associated with increased MMP activity. Results with a series of fluorinated analogs of a known biphenyl sulfonamide inhibitor have shown that fluorine can be incorporated into two different positions of the molecular scaffold without significant loss of potency in the nanomolar range. Additionally, the potential of a hitherto unknown fluorinated tertiary sulfonamide as MMP inhibitor has been demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. R-matrix and Potential Model Extrapolations for NACRE Update and Extension Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Katsuma, Masahiko; Takahashi, Kohji; Arnould, Marcel; Arai, Koji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-07-12

    NACRE, the 'nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Its update and extension programme started within a Konan-Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) collaboration. At the present moment, experimental data in refereed journals have been collected, and their theoretical extrapolations are being performed using the R-matrix or potential models. For the 3H(d,n)4He and 2H(p,{gamma})3He reactions, we present preliminary results that could well reproduce the experimental data.

  16. Inelastic scattering matrix elements for the nonadiabatic collision B(2P1/2)+H2(1Σg+,j)<-->B(2P3/2)+H2(1Σg+,j')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David E.; Niday, Thomas A.; Yang, Sang H.

    2006-10-01

    Inelastic scattering matrix elements for the nonadiabatic collision B(P1/22)+H2(Σg+1,j)↔B(P3/22)+H2(Σg+1,j') are calculated using the time dependent channel packet method (CPM). The calculation employs 1A'2, 2A'2, and 1A″2 adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces determined by numerical computation at the multireference configuration-interaction level [M. H. Alexander, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 6041 (1993)]. The 1A'2 and 2A'2, adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces are transformed to yield diabatic electronic potential energy surfaces that, when combined with the total B +H2 rotational kinetic energy, yield a set of effective potential energy surfaces [M. H. Alexander et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7956 (1995)]. Within the framework of the CPM, the number of effective potential energy surfaces used for the scattering matrix calculation is then determined by the size of the angular momentum basis used as a representation. Twenty basis vectors are employed for these calculations, and the corresponding effective potential energy surfaces are identified in the asymptotic limit by the H2 rotor quantum numbers j =0, 2, 4, 6 and B electronic states Pja2, ja=1/2, 3/2. Scattering matrix elements are obtained from the Fourier transform of the correlation function between channel packets evolving in time on these effective potential energy surfaces. For these calculations the H2 bond length is constrained to a constant value of req=1.402a.u. and state to state scattering matrix elements corresponding to a total angular momentum of J =1/2 are discussed for j =0↔j'=0,2,4 and P1/22↔P1/22, P3/22 over a range of total energy between 0.0 and 0.01a.u.

  17. On the evaluation of nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements for MCSCF/CI wave functions. IV. Second derivative terms using analytic gradient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxe, Paul; Yarkony, David R.

    1987-01-01

    A recently proposed methodology for determining second derivative nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements h(J,I,Rα,R) ≡<ΨJ(r;R)‖(∂2/∂R2α )ΨI(r;R)>r based on analytic gradient methods is implemented and discussed. Here r denotes the electronic coordinates, R the nuclear coordinates, and the ΨJ (r;R) are eigenfunctions of the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer Hamiltonian at the state averaged MCSCF/CI level. The region of a conical intersection of the 1,2 2A' potential energy surfaces of the Li-H2 system is considered in order to illustrate the potential of this approach. The relation between h(J,I,Rα,R) and the first derivative matrix elements g(J,I,Rα,R) ≡<ΨJ(r;R)‖(∂/∂Rα)ΨI (r;R)>r is considered and the role of symmetry discussed. The h(J,I,Rα,R) are analyzed in terms of contributions from molecular orbital and CI coefficient derivatives and the importance of the various nuclear degree of freedom, Rα, is considered. It is concluded that for the case considered a flexible multiconfiguration wave function is desirable for characterizing h(J,I,Rα,R). This methodology complements recent advances in treating nonadiabatic processes for diatomic and triatomic systems starting with adiabatic states, including the work of Mead, Truhlar, and co-workers on conical (Jahn-Teller) intersections in X3 systems, by providing an essential computational step for the ab initio characterization the relevant electronic structure parameters.

  18. An optimization method for the calculation of Hamiltonian matrix elements for Josephson flux qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. V.; Klenov, N. V.

    2017-05-01

    This work aims to describe the method of analytical calculation of an orthonormalized basis of states of the Josephson flux quantum bits (qubits) using a two-level approximation under the condition that the potential energy of the system is a combination of two potential wells separated by a tunnel barrier. For illustration, the calculation results in the case of the well-known three- and four-junction flux qubits, as well as promising silent qubits, are presented.

  19. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Wong, Kelvin K L; Joldes, Grand R; Rich, Addison J; Tan, Chin Wee; Burgess, Antony W; Smith, David W

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus) and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen) are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties). Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings). Each particle is in effect an 'agent', meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory.

  20. Cardiogel: A Nano-Matrix Scaffold with Potential Application in Cardiac Regeneration Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santhakumar, Rajalakshmi; Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2014-01-01

    3-Dimensional conditions for the culture of Bone Marrow-derived Stromal/Stem Cells (BMSCs) can be generated with scaffolds of biological origin. Cardiogel, a cardiac fibroblast-derived Extracellular Matrix (ECM) has been previously shown to promote cardiomyogenic differentiation of BMSCs and provide protection against oxidative stress. To determine the matrix composition and identify significant proteins in cardiogel, we investigated the differences in the composition of this nanomatrix and a BMSC-derived ECM scaffold, termed as ‘mesogel’. An optimized protocol was developed that resulted in efficient decellularization while providing the maximum yield of ECM. The proteins were sequentially solubilized using acetic acid, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and Dithiothreitol (DTT). These proteins were then analyzed using surfactant-assisted in-solution digestion followed by nano-liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). The results of these analyses revealed significant differences in their respective compositions and 17 significant ECM/matricellular proteins were differentially identified between cardiogel and mesogel. We observed that cardiogel also promoted cell proliferation, adhesion and migration while enhancing cardiomyogenic differentiation and angiogenesis. In conclusion, we developed a reproducible method for efficient extraction and solubilization of in vitro cultured cell-derived extracellular matrix. We report several important proteins differentially identified between cardiogel and mesogel, which can explain the biological properties of cardiogel. We also demonstrated the cardiomyogenic differentiation and angiogenic potential of cardiogel even in the absence of any external growth factors. The transplantation of Bone Marrow derived Stromal/Stem Cells (BMSCs) cultured on such a nanomatrix has potential applications in regenerative therapy for Myocardial Infarction (MI). PMID:25521816

  1. Top quark mass measurement in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method and in situ jet energy calibration.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Griso, S Pagan; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Siegrist, J; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-12-17

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m(t) is obtained using a sample of tt events from pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m(t) and a parameter Δ(JES) used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, a value of m(t)=173.0 ± 1.2 GeV/c(2) is measured.

  2. Occupancies of individual orbits, and the nuclear matrix element of the {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, J.; Poves, A.

    2009-10-15

    We discuss the variation of the nuclear matrix element (NME) for the neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay of {sup 76}Ge when the wave functions are constrained to reproduce the experimental occupancies of the two nuclei involved in the transition. In the interacting shell model description the value of the NME is enhanced about 15% compared to previous calculations, whereas in the QRPA the NME's are reduced by 20%-30%. This diminishes the discrepancies between both approaches. In addition, we discuss the effect of the short-range correlations on the NME in light of the recently proposed parametrizations based on a consistent renormalization of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} transition operator.

  3. Charge-transfer contributions to the excitonic coupling matrix element in BODIPY-based energy transfer cassettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, J. Dominik; Lyskov, Igor; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Marian, Christel M.

    2017-01-01

    BODIPY-based dyads serve as model systems for the investigation of excitation energy transfer (EET). Through-space EET is brought about by direct and exchange interactions between the transition densities of donor and acceptor localized states. The presence of a molecular linker gives rise to additional charge transfer (CT) contributions. Here, we present a novel approach for the calculation of the excitonic coupling matrix element (ECME) including CT contributions which is based on supermolecular one-electron transition density matrices (STD). The validity of the approach is assessed for a model system of two π -stacked ethylene molecules at varying intermolecular separation. Wave functions and electronic excitation energies of five EET cassettes comprising anthracene as exciton donor and BODIPY as exciton acceptor are obtained by the redesigned combined density functional theory and multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI-R) method. CT contributions to the ECME are shown to be important in the covalently linked EET cassettes.

  4. Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix Element |Vub| with B→ρeν Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Jolly, S.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Falbo, M.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Grenier, G. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; van Bibber, K.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Campagna, E.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Abe, K.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Himel, T.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Henderson, R.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-05-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction for the rare decays B→ρeν and extract a value for the magnitude of Vub, one of the smallest elements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix. The results are given for five different calculations of form factors used to para­metrize the hadronic current in semileptonic decays. Using a sample of 55×106 BB¯ meson pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring, we obtain B(B0→ρ-e+ν)=(3.29±0.42±0.47±0.55)×10-4 and |Vub|=(3.64±0.22±0.25+0.39-0.56)×10-3, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and theoretical, respectively.

  5. Measurement of the CKM Matrix Element |V{sub ub}| with B {yields} {rho}e{nu} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Wilden, Leif H

    2003-01-02

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction for the rare decays B {yields} {rho}e{nu} and extract a value for the magnitude of V{sub ub}, one of the smallest elements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix. The results are given for five different calculations of form factors used to parametrize the hadronic current in semileptonic decays. Using a sample of 55 million B{bar B} meson pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, we obtain {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -1} e{sup +} {nu}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.47 {+-} 0.60) x 10{sup -4} and |V{sub ub}| = (3.64 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.25{sub -0.56}{sup +0.39}) x 10{sup -3}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and theoretical, respectively.

  6. Calculation of the covariant matrix elements, and cross-sections of Compton diffusion on a bound electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Saleh, Salwa

    2016-10-01

    This paper completes a previous published work that calculated analytically the relativistic wavefunctions for bound electron in a Compton diffusion process. This work calculates the relativistic propagator and the Wronskian of the two associated Feynman diagrams of Compton diffusion (emission first and absorption first). Then find an explicit expression for the covariant matrix elements separated into two parts: spin-angular part and radial part. Using these explicit expressions, the effective cross-section for Compton diffusion in the most general form is obtained in terms of basic dynamical and static quantities, like electron's and photon's 4-momenta and atomic number. The form of the cross-section is put ready for numerical calculations.

  7. Two-loop massive operator matrix elements and unpolarized heavy flavor production at asymptotic values Q≫m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierenbaum, Isabella; Blümlein, Johannes; Klein, Sebastian

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the O(αs2) massive operator matrix elements for the twist-2 operators, which contribute to the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in unpolarized deeply inelastic scattering in the region Q≫m. The calculation has been performed using light-cone expansion techniques. We confirm an earlier result obtained in [M. Buza, Y. Matiounine, J. Smith, R. Migneron, W.L. van Neerven, Nucl. Phys. B 472 (1996) 611, arxiv:/hep-ph/9601302]. The calculation is carried out without using the integration-by-parts method and in Mellin space using harmonic sums, which lead to a significant compactification of the analytic results derived previously. The results allow to determine the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients for F(x,Q) to O(αs2) and for F(x,Q) to O(αs3) for all but the power suppressed terms ∝(/Q)k,k⩾1.

  8. Zinc as an essential trace element in the acceleration of matrix vesicles-mediated mineral deposition.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Atsushi; Matsunaga, Tsunenori; Ishizaki, Hidetaka; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2011-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) has a potent stimulatory effect on osteoblastic bone formation and an inhibitory effect on osteoclastic bone resorption. The effect of Zn on the function of matrix vesicles (MVs) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Zn on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of osteoblasts and in the initial biological MVs-mediated mineral deposition. Osteoblasts were treated with varying concentrations of Zn dissolved in culture medium. After three, five, and seven days of culture, ALP activity was assayed. For the detection of a low level of calcium concentration in MVs, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses were applied. The effect of Zn for the transformation of calcium phosphate was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope fitted with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) system. The ALP activity of osteoblasts in culture medium supplemented with 1 × 10(-5) M of Zn was significantly increased at both five and seven days. XRF data demonstrated higher levels of calcium concentration over time in the Zn-supplemented group. EDX data showed that mineral deposits beginning on day 3 were transformed from whitlockite to calcium phosphate near hydroxyapatite, and that Zn accelerated this transformation. The proper concentration of Zn increased the ALP activity of osteoblasts after five and seven days of incubation. The present XRF and EDX data suggest that the increase of mineral deposition with Zn exposure for one to five days might be mediated by the activation of ALP and calcium-binding proteins. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Measurement of the electroweak top quark production cross section and the CKM matrix element Vtb with the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, Matthias

    2009-06-29

    At particle accelerators the Standard Model has been tested and will be tested further to a great precision. The data analyzed in this thesis have been collected at the world's highest energetic-collider, the Tevatron, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in the vicinity of Chicago, IL, USA. There, protons and antiprotons are collided at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The discovery of the top quark was one of the remarkable results not only for the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider, but also for the Standard Model, which had predicted the existence of the top quark because of symmetry arguments long before already. Still, the Tevatron is the only facility able to produce top quarks. The predominant production mechanism of top quarks is the production of a top-antitop quark pair via the strong force. However, the Standard Model also allows the production of single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. This process features the unique opportunity to measure the |Vtb| matrix element of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix directly, without assuming unitarity of the matrix or assuming that the number of quark generations is three. Hence, the measurement of the cross section of electroweak top quark production is more than the technical challenge to extract a physics process that only occurs one out of ten billion collisions. It is also an important test of the V-A structure of the electroweak interaction and a potential window to physics beyond the Standard Model in the case where the measurement of |V{sub tb}| would result in a value significantly different from 1, the value predicted by the Standard Model. At the Tevatron two production processes contribute significantly to the production of single top quarks: the production via the t-channel, also called W-gluon fusion, and the production via the s-channel, known as well as W* process. This analysis searches for the combined s+t channel

  10. Am phases in the matrix of a U–Pu–Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn E.; Kennedy, J. Rory; Madden, James W.; O’Holleran, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ζ-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in δ-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  11. Determination of trace elements in dolomite and gypsum by atomic absorption spectrometry: overcoming the matrix interference by flotation separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafilov, Trajče; Zendelovska, Dragica; Pavlovska, Gorica; Čundeva, Katarina

    2002-05-01

    The interferences of Ca and Mg as matrix elements in dolomite and gypsum on Ag, Cd, Cr, Mn, Tl and Zn absorbances during their electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) determination are investigated. The results reveal that Ca and Mg do not interfere on Zn and Mn, tend to decrease absorbances of Ag, Cd and Cr, while Tl suffers the most significant influence. A flotation separation method is proposed to eliminate matrix interferences. Hydrated iron(III) oxide, Fe 2O 3· xH 2O, and iron(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Fe(HMDTC) 3, are applied as flotation collectors. The influence of hydrophobic dithiocarbamate anion, HMDTC, on flotation recoveries of each analyte is studied. The most suitable concentrations of dolomite and gypsum solutions for flotation are determined. To avoid flotation suppression due to the reaction of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ with surfactant ions, a fit foaming agent was selected. The elements present in dolomite and gypsum as traces have been analyzed by ETAAS. Their ETAAS limits of detection following flotation are found to be 0.021 μg·g -1 for Ag, 0.019 μg·g -1 for Cd, 0.014 μg·g -1 for Cr and 0.11 μg·g -1 for Tl. The determination of Mn and Zn can be performed by flame AAS (FAAS). The limit of detection for Mn is 1.5 μg·g -1, while for Zn 0.8 μg·g -1.

  12. On-shell {delta}I=3/2 kaon weak matrix elements with nonzero total momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2009-05-01

    We present our results for the on-shell {delta}I=3/2 kaon decay matrix elements using domain wall fermions and the DBW2 gauge action at one coarse lattice spacing corresponding to a{sup -1}=1.31 GeV in the quenched approximation. The on-shell matrix elements are evaluated in two different frames: the center-of-mass frame and nonzero total-momentum frame. We employ the formula proposed by Lellouch and Luescher in the center-of-mass frame, and its extension for a nonzero total-momentum frame to extract the infinite volume, on-shell, center-of-mass frame decay amplitudes. We determine the decay amplitude at the physical pion mass and momentum from the chiral extrapolation and an interpolation of the relative momentum using the results calculated in the two frames. We have obtained ReA{sub 2}=1.66(23)((+48/-03))((+53/-0))x10{sup -8} GeV and ImA{sub 2}=-1.181(26)((+141/-014))((+44/-0))x10{sup -12} GeV at the physical point, using the data at the relatively large pion mass, m{sub {pi}}>0.35 GeV. The first error is statistic, and the second and third are systematic. The second error is estimated with several fits of the chiral extrapolation including the (quenched) chiral perturbation formula at next to leading order using only lighter pion masses. The third one is estimated with an analysis using the lattice dispersion relation. The result of ReA{sub 2} is reasonably consistent with experiment.

  13. Dirac Particle in an Aharonov-Bohm Potential: The Structure of the First Order S-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikakhwa, M. S.

    2007-02-01

    The structure of the interaction Hamiltonian in the first order S-matrix element of a Dirac particle in an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) field is analyzed and shown to have interesting interesting algebraic properties. It is demonstrated that as a consequence of these properties, this interaction Hamiltonian splits both the incident and outgoing waves in the the first order S-matrix into their Σ_3/2-components (eigenstates of the third component of the spin). The matrix element can then be viewed as the sum of two transitions taking place in these two channels of the spin. At the level of partial waves, each partial wave of the conserved total angular momentum is split into two partial waves of the orbital angular momentum in a manner consistent with the conservation of the total angular momentum quantum number.

  14. Singular-potential random-matrix model arising in mean-field glassy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemann, Gernot; Villamaina, Dario; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2014-06-01

    We consider an invariant random matrix ensemble where the standard Gaussian potential is distorted by an additional single pole of arbitrary fixed order. Potentials with first- and second-order poles have been considered previously and found applications in quantum chaos and number theory. Here we present an application to mean-field glassy systems. We derive and solve the loop equation in the planar limit for the corresponding class of potentials. We find that the resulting mean or macroscopic spectral density is generally supported on two disconnected intervals lying on the two sides of the repulsive pole, whose edge points can be completely determined imposing the additional constraint of traceless matrices on average. For an unbounded potential with an attractive pole, we also find a possible one-cut solution for certain values of the couplings, which is ruled out when the traceless condition is imposed. Motivated by the calculation of the distribution of the spin-glass susceptibility in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin-glass model, we consider in detail a second-order pole for a zero-trace model and provide the most explicit solution in this case. In the limit of a vanishing pole, we recover the standard semicircle. Working in the planar limit, our results apply to matrices with orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic invariance. Numerical simulations and an independent analytical Coulomb fluid calculation for symmetric potentials provide an excellent confirmation of our results.

  15. Singular-potential random-matrix model arising in mean-field glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Gernot; Villamaina, Dario; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2014-06-01

    We consider an invariant random matrix ensemble where the standard Gaussian potential is distorted by an additional single pole of arbitrary fixed order. Potentials with first- and second-order poles have been considered previously and found applications in quantum chaos and number theory. Here we present an application to mean-field glassy systems. We derive and solve the loop equation in the planar limit for the corresponding class of potentials. We find that the resulting mean or macroscopic spectral density is generally supported on two disconnected intervals lying on the two sides of the repulsive pole, whose edge points can be completely determined imposing the additional constraint of traceless matrices on average. For an unbounded potential with an attractive pole, we also find a possible one-cut solution for certain values of the couplings, which is ruled out when the traceless condition is imposed. Motivated by the calculation of the distribution of the spin-glass susceptibility in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin-glass model, we consider in detail a second-order pole for a zero-trace model and provide the most explicit solution in this case. In the limit of a vanishing pole, we recover the standard semicircle. Working in the planar limit, our results apply to matrices with orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic invariance. Numerical simulations and an independent analytical Coulomb fluid calculation for symmetric potentials provide an excellent confirmation of our results.

  16. The FEM-R-Matrix Approach: Use of Mixed Finite Element and Gaussian Basis Sets for Electron Molecule Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    For the calculation of electron molecule collision cross sections R-matrix methods automatically take advantage of the division of configuration space into an inner region (I) bounded by radius tau b, where the scattered electron is within the molecular charge cloud and the system is described by an correlated Configuration Interaction (CI) treatment in close analogy to bound state calculations, and an outer region (II) where the scattered electron moves in the long-range multipole potential of the target and efficient analytic methods can be used for solving the asymptotic Schroedinger equation plus boundary conditions.

  17. Time Dependent Channel Packet Calculation of Two Nucleon Scattering Matrix Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    3.2. Feynman Diagram of a Pi Meson Exchange ........................................................... 26 3.3. Centripetal Potential centV... Feynman diagram in Figure 3.2. Figure 3.2. Feynman Diagram of a Pi Meson Exchange between Two Arbitrary Nucleons [9] N N N N π 27...Shultis, J. Kenneth and Richard E. Faw. Fundamentals of Nuclear Science and Engineering. Florida, CRC Press, 2002. pp. 27-35. 56. Bridgman

  18. Ionization potentials of superheavy elements No, Lr, and Rf and their ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Kramida, A.

    2016-10-01

    We predict ionization potentials of superheavy elements No, Lr, and Rf and their ions using a relativistic hybrid method that combines configuration interaction (CI) with the linearized coupled-cluster approach. Extensive study of the completeness of the four-electron CI calculations for Hf and Rf was carried out. As a test of theoretical accuracy, we also calculated ionization potential of Yb, Lu, Hf, and their ions, which are homologues of the superheavy elements of this study.

  19. Ionization potentials of superheavy elements No, Lr, and Rf and their ions

    PubMed Central

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Kramida, A.

    2016-01-01

    We predict ionization potentials of superheavy elements No, Lr, and Rf and their ions using a relativistic hybrid method that combines configuration interaction (CI) with the linearized coupled-cluster approach. Extensive study of the completeness of the four-electron CI calculations for Hf and Rf was carried out. As a test of theoretical accuracy, we also calculated ionization potential of Yb, Lu, Hf, and their ions, which are homologues of the superheavy elements of this study. PMID:28058290

  20. Electromagnetic finite elements based on a four-potential variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James J.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic finite elements based on a variational principle that uses the electromagnetic four-potential as a primary variable are derived. This choice is used to construct elements suitable for downstream coupling with mechanical and thermal finite elements for the analysis of electromagnetic/mechanical systems that involve superconductors. The main advantages of the four-potential as a basis for finite element formulation are that the number of degrees of freedom per node remains modest as the problem dimensionally increases, that jump discontinuities on interfaces are naturally accommodated, and that statics as well as dynamics may be treated without any a priori approximations. The new elements are tested on an axisymmetric problem under steady state forcing conditions. The results are in excellent agreement with analytical solutions.

  1. Electromagnetic finite elements based on a four-potential variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic finite elements based on a variational principle that uses the electromagnetic four-potential as primary variable are derived. This choice is used to construct elements suitable for downstream coupling with mechanical and thermal finite elements for the analysis of electromagnetic/mechanical systems that involve superconductors. The main advantages of the four-potential as a basis for finite element formulation are: (1) the number of degrees of freedom per node remains modest as the problem dimensionality increases, (2) jump discontinuities on interfaces are naturally accommodated, and (3) statics as well as dynamics may be treated without any a priori approximations. The new elements are tested on an axisymmetric problem under steady-state forcing conditions. The results are in excellent agreement with analytical solutions.

  2. Electromagnetic finite elements based on a four-potential variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic finite elements based on a variational principle that uses the electromagnetic four-potential as primary variable are derived. This choice is used to construct elements suitable for downstream coupling with mechanical and thermal finite elements for the analysis of electromagnetic/mechanical systems that involve superconductors. The main advantages of the four-potential as a basis for finite element formulation are: (1) the number of degrees of freedom per node remains modest as the problem dimensionality increases, (2) jump discontinuities on interfaces are naturally accommodated, and (3) statics as well as dynamics may be treated without any a priori approximations. The new elements are tested on an axisymmetric problem under steady-state forcing conditions. The results are in excellent agreement with analytical solutions.

  3. Structural Anomalies Detected in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Combined Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Analysis (NDE and FEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Most reverse engineering approaches involve imaging or digitizing an object and then creating a computerized reconstruction that can be integrated, in three dimensions, into a particular design environment. The rapid prototyping technique builds high-quality physical prototypes directly from computer-aided design files. This fundamental technique for interpreting and interacting with large data sets is being used here via Velocity2 (an integrated image-processing software, ref. 1) using computed tomography (CT) data to produce a prototype three-dimensional test specimen model for analyses. A study at the NASA Glenn Research Center proposes to use these capabilities to conduct a combined nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) to screen pretest and posttest structural anomalies in structural components. A tensile specimen made of silicon nitrite (Si3N4) ceramic matrix composite was considered to evaluate structural durability and deformity. Ceramic matrix composites are being sought as candidate materials to replace nickel-base superalloys for turbine engine applications. They have the unique characteristics of being able to withstand higher operating temperatures and harsh combustion environments. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass (ref. 2). Detailed three-dimensional volume rendering of the tensile test specimen was successfully carried out with Velocity2 (ref. 1) using two-dimensional images that were generated via computed tomography. Subsequent, three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed, and the results obtained were compared with those predicted by NDE-based calculations and experimental tests. It was shown that Velocity2 software can be used to render a three-dimensional object from a series of CT scan images with a minimum level of complexity. The analytical results (ref. 3) show that the high-stress regions correlated well with the damage sites identified by the CT scans

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo with density matrix: potential energy curve derived properties.

    PubMed

    Bonfim, Víctor S; Borges, Nádia M; Martins, João B L; Gargano, Ricardo; Politi, José Roberto Dos S

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we used diffusion quantum Monte Carlo with density matrix (d-DMC) and variational quantum Monte Carlo (d-VMC) to determine the potential energy curve (PEC) and obtain the spectroscopic constants of H2 molecule in the ground state, in order to evaluate the capability of these methods to provide an accurate PEC description. These quantum Monte Carlo methods build with density matrix are new approaches to conventional quantum Monte Carlo methods based on wave function formed by product of α and β determinants. To investigate the robustness of d-DMC, we performed calculations with two different basis sets and analyzed the influence of the size of these sets on results. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that shows the dissociation energy and rotational constant obtained from d-QMC. We found that the quality of PEC described by the d-DMC is essentially coincident with the most accurate results available in the literature, regardless of the complexity of basis set employed.

  5. Extracellular matrix family proteins that are potential targets of Dd-STATa in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nao; Nishio, Keiko; Maeda, Mineko; Urushihara, Hideko; Kawata, Takefumi

    2004-10-01

    Dd-STATa is a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins, which is activated by cAMP and is thereby translocated into the nuclei of anterior tip cells of the prestalk region of the slug. By using in situ hybridization analyses, we found that the SLF308 cDNA clone, which contains the ecmF gene that encodes a putative extracellular matrix protein and is expressed in the anterior tip cells, was greatly down-regulated in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. Disruption of the ecmF gene, however, resulted in almost no phenotypic change. The absence of any obvious mutant phenotype in the ecmF-null mutant could be due to a redundancy of similar genes. In fact, a search of the Dictyostelium whole genome database demonstrates the existence of an additional 16 homologues, all of which contain a cellulose-binding module. Among these homologues, four genes show Dd-STATa-dependent expression, while the others are Dd-STATa-independent. We discuss the potential role of Dd-STATa in morphogenesis via its effect on the interaction between cellulose and these extracellular matrix family proteins.

  6. The Potential Impacts on Aquatic Ecosystems from the Release of Trace Elements in Geothermal Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-14

    Geothermal energy will likely constitute an increasing percentage of our nation's future energy ''mix,'' both for electrical and nonelectrical uses. Associated with the exploitation of geothermal resources is the handling and disposal of fluids which contain a wide variety of potentially toxic trace elements. We present analyses of 14 trace elements found in hydrothermal fluids from various geothermal reservoirs in the western United States. The concentrations of these elements vary over orders of magnitude between reservoirs. Potential impacts are conservatively assessed on the basis of (1) toxicity to freshwater biota, and (2) bioaccumulation in food fish to the point where consumption might be hazardous to human health. Trace element concentrations generally range from benign levels to levels which might prove toxic to freshwater biota and contaminate food fisheries. We stress the need for site-specific analyses and careful handling of geothermal fluids in order to minimize potential impacts.

  7. Modal correlation of test and finite element results using cross orthogonality with a reduced mass matrix obtained by modal reduction and NASTRAN's Generalized Dynamic Reduction solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Derek; Budynas, Richard G.

    A common procedure for performing a cross orthogonality check for the purpose of modal correlation between the test and the finite element analysis results incorporates the Guyan reduction method to obtain a reduced mass matrix. This paper describes a procedure which uses NASTRAN's Generalized Dynamic Reduction solution routine which is much more accurate than the standard Guyan reduction solution and which offers the advantage of not requiring the selection of mdof. Using NASTRAN's DMAP programming methods, a modal reduction of the full analytical mass matrix is performed based on the accelerometer locations and the analytical modal matrix results. The accuracy of the procedure is illustrated in two case studies.

  8. HGF potentiates extracellular matrix-driven migration of human myoblasts: involvement of matrix metalloproteinases and MAPK/ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    González, Mariela Natacha; de Mello, Wallace; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Silva-Barbosa, Suse Dayse; Mouly, Vincent; Savino, Wilson; Riederer, Ingo

    2017-10-10

    The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is required for the activation of muscle progenitor cells called satellite cells (SC), plays a role in the migration of proliferating SC (myoblasts), and is present as a soluble factor during muscle regeneration, along with extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. In this study, we aimed at determining whether HGF is able to interact with ECM proteins, particularly laminin 111 and fibronectin, and to modulate human myoblast migration. We evaluated the expression of the HGF-receptor c-Met, laminin, and fibronectin receptors by immunoblotting, flow cytometry, or immunofluorescence and used Transwell assays to analyze myoblast migration on laminin 111 and fibronectin in the absence or presence of HGF. Zymography was used to check whether HGF could modulate the production of matrix metalloproteinases by human myoblasts, and the activation of MAPK/ERK pathways was evaluated by immunoblotting. We demonstrated that human myoblasts express c-Met, together with laminin and fibronectin receptors. We observed that human laminin 111 and fibronectin have a chemotactic effect on myoblast migration, and this was synergistically increased when low doses of HGF were added. We detected an increase in MMP-2 activity in myoblasts treated with HGF. Conversely, MMP-2 inhibition decreased the HGF-associated stimulation of cell migration triggered by laminin or fibronectin. HGF treatment also induced in human myoblasts activation of MAPK/ERK pathways, whose specific inhibition decreased the HGF-associated stimulus of cell migration triggered by laminin 111 or fibronectin. We demonstrate that HGF induces ERK phosphorylation and MMP production, thus stimulating human myoblast migration on ECM molecules. Conceptually, these data state that the mechanisms involved in the migration of human myoblasts comprise both soluble and insoluble moieties. This should be taken into account to optimize the design of therapeutic cell transplantation strategies by improving

  9. A highly soluble matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitor for potential treatment of dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mattia; De Lorenzo, Emanuele; Torre, Eugenio; Fragai, Marco; Nativi, Cristina; Luchinat, Claudio; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2012-11-01

    Dry eye syndrome (DES) or keratoconjunctivitis sicca is an eye disease caused by the chronic lack of lubrication and moisture of the eye. The pathogenesis of DES involves the over-expression and over-activity of corneal Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). We propose herein a new, non-symptomatic approach for the treatment of DES based on the inhibition of MMP-9 by a new highly soluble molecule, designed as PES_103 that has been shown to inhibit MMP-9 both in vitro and in vivo. The efficacy of PES_103 in vivo and the potential benefits of this treatment in restoring tear production were studied in this work using an animal model of reduced lacrimation. PES_103 did not show any significant corneal toxicity. © 2012 The Authors Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2012 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  10. A tale of two dead ends: origin of a potential new gene and a potential new transposable element.

    PubMed

    Clutterbuck, A John

    2007-03-01

    An article in this issue of Molecular Microbiology by Cultrone et al. describes how a non-autonomous helitron element could arise from its autonomous parent transposon by deletion followed by readthrough into an adjacent gene and its promoter, thus providing a mechanism for distribution of a specifically regulated promoter sequence around the genome, where it would have the potential to evolve new functions.

  11. Trivial center element and Coulombic potential of the thick center vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Alireza; Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh

    2017-01-01

    The thick center vortex potentials in the SU(3) gauge group have been calculated by means of the modified inter-quark potential which consists of two terms. One term is the result of the area law fall-off for the large Wilson loop which leads to the linear potentials. The second term represents vacuum fluctuations leading to the perimeter law fall-off believed to contain the trivial center element. We introduce a new Gaussian flux limited to vary in a finite region of space which causes the corresponding group factor to have only some small deviations from the trivial center element. So, this flux increases the role of the trivial center element and W0 is enhanced in the induced potential of the model at small quark separations. Using both trivial and non-trivial center elements in the potential between static color sources, results in the correct 3-ality dependence at large quark separations and a very good agreement with Casimir scaling at short and intermediate distances. In fact, the ratios of the potential of each representation to that of the fundamental one have been improved - in comparison with the previous work on the short distance potentials, remarkably. So, one might use the thick center vortex model to describe the inter-quark potential of every regime.

  12. A Regularized Galerkin Boundary Element Method (RGBEM) for Simulating Potential Flow About Zero Thickness Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    GHARAKHANI,ADRIN; WOLFE,WALTER P.

    1999-10-01

    The prediction of potential flow about zero thickness membranes by the boundary element method constitutes an integral component of the Lagrangian vortex-boundary element simulation of flow about parachutes. To this end, the vortex loop (or the panel) method has been used, for some time now, in the aerospace industry with relative success [1, 2]. Vortex loops (with constant circulation) are equivalent to boundary elements with piecewise constant variation of the potential jump. In this case, extending the analysis in [3], the near field potential velocity evaluations can be shown to be {Omicron}(1). The accurate evaluation of the potential velocity field very near the parachute surface is particularly critical to the overall accuracy and stability of the vortex-boundary element simulations. As we will demonstrate in Section 3, the boundary integral singularities, which arise due to the application of low order boundary elements, may lead to severely spiked potential velocities at vortex element centers that are near the boundary. The spikes in turn cause the erratic motion of the vortex elements, and the eventual loss of smoothness of the vorticity field and possible numerical blow up. In light of the arguments above, the application of boundary elements with (at least) a linear variation of the potential jump--or, equivalently, piecewise constant vortex sheets--would appear to be more appropriate for vortex-boundary element simulations. For this case, two strategies are possible for obtaining the potential flow field. The first option is to solve the integral equations for the (unknown) strengths of the surface vortex sheets. As we will discuss in Section 2.1, the challenge in this case is to devise a consistent system of equations that imposes the solenoidality of the locally 2-D vortex sheets. The second approach is to solve for the unknown potential jump distribution. In this case, for commonly used C{sup o} shape functions, the boundary integral is singular at

  13. Bioaccumulation of potentially toxic trace elements in benthic organisms of Admiralty Bay (King George Island, Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Majer, Alessandra Pereira; Petti, Mônica Angélica Varella; Corbisier, Thais Navajas; Ribeiro, Andreza Portella; Theophilo, Carolina Yume Sawamura; Ferreira, Paulo Alves de Lima; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes

    2014-02-15

    Data about the concentration, accumulation and transfer of potentially toxic elements in Antarctic marine food webs are essential for understanding the impacts of these elements, and for monitoring the pollution contribution of scientific stations, mainly in Admiralty Bay due to the 2012 fire in the Brazilian scientific station. Accordingly, the concentration of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn was measured in eight benthic species collected in the 2005/2006 austral summer and the relationship between concentration and trophic position (indicated by δ(15)N values) was tested. A wide variation in metal content was observed depending on the species and the element. In the studied trophic positions, it was observed bioaccumulation for As, Cd and Pb, which are toxic elements with no biological function. In addition, Cd showed a positive relationship between concentration and trophic level suggesting the possible biomagnification of this element.

  14. Transforming potential and matrix stiffness co-regulate confinement sensitivity of tumor cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Amit

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that tumor cell invasion through tissue is strongly regulated by the microstructural and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, it remains unclear how these physical microenvironmental inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic lesions to drive invasion. In this study, we address this open question by combining a microfabricated polyacrylamide channel (μPAC) platform that enables independent control of ECM stiffness and confinement with an isogenically-matched breast tumor progression series in which the oncogenes ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ are overexpressed independently or in tandem. We find that increasing channel confinement and overexpressing ErbB2 both promote cell migration to a similar degree when other parameters are kept constant. In contrast, 14-3-3ζ overexpression slows migration speed, and does so in a fashion that dwarfs effects of ECM confinement and stiffness. We also find that ECM stiffness dramatically enhances cell motility when combined with ErbB2 overexpression, demonstrating that biophysical cues and cell-intrinsic parameters promote cell invasion in an integrative manner. Morphometric analysis of cells inside the μPAC platform reveals that the rapid cell migration induced by narrow channels and ErbB2 overexpression both are accompanied by increased cell polarization. Disruption of this polarization by pharmacological inhibition of Rac GTPase phenocopies 14-3-3ζ overexpression by reducing cell polarization and slowing migration. By systematically measuring migration speed as a function of matrix stiffness and confinement, we also quantify for the first time the sensitivity of migration speed to microchannel properties and transforming potential. These results demonstrate that oncogenic lesions and ECM biophysical properties can synergistically interact to drive invasive migration, and that both inputs may act through common molecular mechanisms to enhance migration speed. PMID:23832051

  15. Transforming potential and matrix stiffness co-regulate confinement sensitivity of tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-08-01

    It is now well established that tumor cell invasion through tissue is strongly regulated by the microstructural and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, it remains unclear how these physical microenvironmental inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic lesions to drive invasion. In this study, we address this open question by combining a microfabricated polyacrylamide channel (μPAC) platform that enables independent control of ECM stiffness and confinement with an isogenically-matched breast tumor progression series in which the oncogenes ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ are overexpressed independently or in tandem. We find that increasing channel confinement and overexpressing ErbB2 both promote cell migration to a similar degree when other parameters are kept constant. In contrast, 14-3-3ζ overexpression slows migration speed, and does so in a fashion that dwarfs effects of ECM confinement and stiffness. We also find that ECM stiffness dramatically enhances cell motility when combined with ErbB2 overexpression, demonstrating that biophysical cues and cell-intrinsic parameters promote cell invasion in an integrative manner. Morphometric analysis of cells inside the μPAC platform reveals that the rapid cell migration induced by narrow channels and ErbB2 overexpression are both accompanied by increased cell polarization. Disruption of this polarization occurs by pharmacological inhibition of Rac GTPase phenocopies 14-3-3ζ overexpression by reducing cell polarization and slowing migration. By systematically measuring migration speed as a function of matrix stiffness and confinement, we also quantify for the first time the sensitivity of migration speed to microchannel properties and transforming potential. These results demonstrate that oncogenic lesions and ECM biophysical properties can synergistically interact to drive invasive migration, and that both inputs may act through common molecular mechanisms to enhance migration speed.

  16. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in oral potentially malignant disorders: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Archana; Uma Maheswari, T N

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is an inducible enzyme. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) are considered as the early tissue changes that happen due to various habits such as smoking tobacco, chewing tobacco or stress. This alteration in the tissues alters the expression of MMP-9. The rationale of the review is to know the expression of MMP-9 in OPMDs. Hand searching and electronic databases such as PubMed and ScienceDirect were done for mesh terms such as OPMDs and MMP-9. Eight articles were obtained, after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. These articles were assessed with QUADAS and data were extracted and evaluated. The included eight studies were done in 182 oral squamous cell carcinoma cases, 430 OPMDs (146 oral lichen planus, 264 leukoplakia and 20 oral submucous fibrosis) and 352 healthy controls evaluated for MMP-9. MMP-9 expression was found to be elevated in tissue, serum and saliva samples of OPMDs than in healthy controls. There is only one study in each serum and saliva samples to evaluate MMP-9. Saliva being noninvasive and serum being minimally invasive, more studies need to be done in both serum and saliva to establish MMP-9 as an early diagnostic marker in OPMDs to know its potential in malignant transformation.

  17. Evaluation of the Technical-Economic Potential of Particle- Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites and Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, A.; Götze, U.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Herold, F.; Meichsner, G.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional cutting, the processing of materials by electrochemical machining offers some technical advantages like high surface quality, no thermal or mechanical impact on the work piece and preservation of the microstructure of the work piece material. From the economic point of view, the possibility of process parallelization and the absence of any process-related tool wear are mentionable advantages of electrochemical machining. In this study, based on experimental results, it will be evaluated to what extent the electrochemical machining is technically and economically suitable for the finish-machining of particle- reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Initial studies showed that electrochemical machining - in contrast to other machining processes - has the potential to fulfil demanding requirements regarding precision and surface quality of products or components especially when applied to AMCs. In addition, the investigations show that processing of AMCs by electrochemical machining requires less energy than the electrochemical machining of stainless steel. Therefore, an evaluation of electrochemically machined AMCs - compared to stainless steel - from a technical and an economic perspective will be presented in this paper. The results show the potential of electro-chemically machined AMCs and contribute to the enhancement of instruments for technical-economic evaluations as well as a comprehensive innovation control.

  18. Influence of soil texture on nutrients and potentially hazardous elements in Eremanthus erythropappus.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Maurilio Assis; Leite, Mariangela Garcia Praça; Kozovits, Alessandra Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors that control uptake rates and allocation of chemical elements among plant organs is a fundamental prerequisite to improve phytostabilization techniques of hazardous elements in contaminated areas. The present study shows evidence that different substrate textures (coarse and fine laterite) do not significantly change the partitioning of root and shoot dry biomass and with few exceptions, do not significantly affect the final average concentration of elements in Eremanthus erythropappus, but change the root:shoot allocation of both essential nutrients and elements potentially toxic to biota. Growth on coarse laterite resulted in significant higher K (30%), Mg (34%), P (25%), S (32%), Cu (58%), and Na (43%) concentrations in roots and lower Cd concentration (29%). In shoots, coarse laterite led to reduction in K, Fe, Al, and Cr and increase in Na and Sr concentrations. Changes in element allocation could be, in part, a result of differences in the water availability of substrates. Matric potential in coarse laterite was significantly lower in at least 47% of the days analyzed throughout the year. Changes in element phytoextraction or phytostabilization potential could influence the efficiency of rehabilitation projects in areas degraded by mining activities.

  19. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  20. A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John C

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  1. Electric dipole moment function of the X1 Sigma/+/ state of CO - Vibration-rotation matrix elements for transitions of gas laser and astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The electric dipole moment function of the ground electronic state of carbon monoxide has been determined by combining numerical solutions of the radial Schrodinger equation with absolute intensity data of vibration-rotation bands. The derived dipole moment function is used to calculate matrix elements of interest to stellar astronomy and of importance in the carbon monoxide laser.

  2. Kaon matrix elements and CP violation from lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu

    Low energy constants describing the weak, two-pion decays of K mesons in chiral perturbation theory are computed using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions in a finite volume with spatial extent 2.74 fm and for a single inverse lattice spacing 1/a = 1.73 GeV. Partially quenched perturbation theory is used in both leading and next-to-leading order. The non-perturbative regularization independent RI/MOM renormalization scheme is employed to determine these low energy constants in the continuum, RI normalization scheme with 20% statistical errors but systematic errors which are estimated to lie between 50 and 100% depending on the operator. These low energy constants are then used to estimate the DeltaI = 1/2 and DeltaI = 3/2 K → pipi decay matrix elements and epsilon'/epsilon. The poor convergence of chiral perturbation theory for quark masses as large as that of the strange quark severely limits the accuracy of these results.

  3. Solvent dynamical effects in electron transfer: Evaluation of electronic matrix coupling elements for metallocene self-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManis, George E.; Nielson, Roger M.; Gochev, Alexander; Weaver, Michael J.

    1989-07-01

    The functional dependence of the rate constants for self exchange, k sub ex, for a series of metallocene redox couples to solvent-induced variations in the nuclear frequency factor, nu, engendered by alterations in the longitudinal solvent relaxation time, tau sub L, are utilized to deduce values of the electronic matrix coupling element, H12, for electron exchange. The analysis exploits the sensitivity of the k sub ex tau sub L -1 dependence to the degree of reaction adiabaticity and hence H12 for a given electron exchange reaction. Six metallocene couples are examined: Cp2Co+/o, Cp2Fe+/o (Cp = cyclopentadienyl) and the decamethyl derivatives Cp2Co+/o and Cp2Fe+/o scrutinized previously, additional solvent-dependent k sub ex values for carboxymethyl (cobaltocenium-cobaltocene) (Cp(e)Z Co+/o, e= ester) and hydroxymethyl (ferrocenium-ferrocene) (HMFc+/o.) Kinetic data are examined in 15 solvents, including 11 debye solvents for which it is anticipated that is proportioned to 1/tau sub L. Corrections to k sub ex for the solvent-dependent variations in the barrier height were obtained by corresponding measurements of the optical electron transfer energies for the related binuclear complex biferrocenylacetylene, yielding barrier corrected rate constants, k sub ex. The relationship between H12 superscript o and metallocene electronic structure is briefly discussed. The analysis also enables effective solvent relaxation times for adiabatic barrier crossing in non-Debye media including primary alcohols, to be extracted.

  4. A novel approach for computing glueball masses and matrix elements in Yang-Mills theories on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Morte, Michele; Giusti, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    We make use of the global symmetries of the Yang-Mills theory on the lattice to design a new computational strategy for extracting glueball masses and matrix elements which achieves an exponential reduction of the statistical error with respect to standard techniques. By generalizing our previous work on the parity symmetry, the partition function of the theory is decomposed into a sum of path integrals each giving the contribution from multiplets of states with fixed quantum numbers associated to parity, charge conjugation, translations, rotations and central conjugations Z N 3. Ratios of path integrals and correlation functions can then be computed with a multi-level Monte Carlo integration scheme whose numerical cost, at a fixed statistical precision and at asymptotically large times, increases power-like with the time extent of the lattice. The strategy is implemented for the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory, and a full-fledged computation of the mass and multiplicity of the lightest glueball with vacuum quantum numbers is carried out at a lattice spacing of 0.17 fm.

  5. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for γp → φp from CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Biplab; Meyer, Curtis A.

    2011-10-01

    Preliminary differential cross-sections and the ρMM'0 spin density matrix elements (SDME) for the reaction γρ → φp for both charged- (φ → K+K-) and neutral-mode (φ → KL0KS0) topologies obtained from CLAS are presented. Our kinematic coverage is from near production threshold (√s ˜1.97 GeV) to (√s = 2.84 GeV), with a wide coverage in the production angle. As seen in previous LEPS results, the differential cross-sections show a localized "bump" between (√s ˜2 and 2.2 GeV that is not expected from a simple Pomeron exchange picture. Comparisons between the charged- and neutral-mode results and possible effects from the K+Λ(1520) channel are discussed. Our SDME results confirm the well-known deviations from t-channel helicity conservation (TCHC) for Pomeron exchange, but s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC) is also seen to be broken.

  6. Determination of transition dipole matrix elements for the 266 nm photofragmentation of JKM state-selected CD3I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipes, Leonard C.; Kim, Dae Young; Brandstater, Nathan; Fuglesang, Christopher D.; Baugh, Delroy

    1995-12-01

    The photofragmentation of rovibrational energy-level and magnetic-state polarized ( overlineX1A 1)CD 3I ∣JKM>≡∣111> was performed at 266 nm. The ∣ NK) rotational energy level distribution and the angular momentum polarization of the vibrationless ( overlineX2A″ 2) CD 3 photofragment were measured by (2+1) REMPI. State-selecting the parent CD 3I allowed the elements of the transition dipole matrix (or T-matrix) to be determined by relating the initial system (CD 3I plus photon) statistical tensors to measured product statistical moments. This is believed to be the first report of the experimental determination of T-matrix elements for a chemical reaction.

  7. First Measurements of the 1̂, 2̂, and 3̂ Spin Density Matrix Elements in γp ->pφ using CLAS at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernarsky, Brian

    2012-10-01

    In an effort towards a ``complete'' experiment for the φ meson, we present studies from two experiments with unpolarized targets, one using a circularly polarized photon beam (g1c) and one using a linearly polarized photon beam (g8b), both carried out using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The experiments were analyzed using an extended maximum likelihood fit to the cross section with partial wave amplitudes. New likelihood functions were calculated to account for the polarization of the photon beams. The results of these fits are then used to project out the spin density matrix for the φ. First measurements of the 1̂, 2̂, and 3̂ spin density matrix elements will be presented using this method. As a check, we compare to another method, Schilling's method, which fits the decay angular distribution with a function that uses the spin density matrix elements as parameters.

  8. Plant-soil distribution of potentially toxic elements in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Duval, Benjamin D; Dijkstra, Paul; Natali, Susan M; Megonigal, J Patrick; Ketterer, Michael E; Drake, Bert G; Lerdau, Manuel T; Gordon, Gwyneth; Anbar, Ariel D; Hungate, Bruce A

    2011-04-01

    The distribution of contaminant elements within ecosystems is an environmental concern because of these elements' potential toxicity to animals and plants and their ability to hinder microbial ecosystem services. As with nutrients, contaminants are cycled within and through ecosystems. Elevated atmospheric CO2 generally increases plant productivity and alters nutrient element cycling, but whether CO2 causes similar effects on the cycling of contaminant elements is unknown. Here we show that 11 years of experimental CO2 enrichment in a sandy soil with low organic matter content causes plants to accumulate contaminants in plant biomass, with declines in the extractable contaminant element pools in surface soils. These results indicate that CO2 alters the distribution of contaminant elements in ecosystems, with plant element accumulation and declining soil availability both likely explained by the CO2 stimulation of plant biomass. Our results highlight the interdependence of element cycles and the importance of taking a broad view of the periodic table when the effects of global environmental change on ecosystem biogeochemistry are considered.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene promoter polymorphisms: A potential risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Karachalios, Charalampos; Bakas, Panagiotis; Kaparos, Georgios; Demeridou, Styliani; Liapis, Ilias; Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Liapis, Aggelos

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a common multifactorial condition. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes capable of breaking down various connective tissue elements. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regulatory areas of MMP-encoding genes can alter their transcription rate, and therefore the possible effect on pelvic floor supporting structures. The insertion of an adenine (A) base in the promoter of the MMP-3 gene at position −1612/−1617 produces a sequence of six adenines (6A), whereas the other allele has five (5A). The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of MMP-3 gene promoter SNPs with the risk of POP. The patient group comprised 80 women with clinically significant POP [Stage II, III or IV; POP quantification (POP-Q) system]. The control group consisted of 80 females without any or important pelvic floor support defects (Stages 0 or I; POP-Q system). All the participants underwent the same preoperative evaluation. SNP detection was determined with whole blood sample DNA analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in LightCycler® PCR platforms, using the technique of sequence-specific hybridization probe-binding assays and melting temperature curve analysis. The results showed there was no statistically significant difference between 5A/5A, 5A/6A and 6A/6A MMP-3 gene promoter variants in the two study groups (P=0.4758). Therefore, MMP-3 gene promoter SNPs alone is insufficient to increase the genetic susceptibility to POP development. PMID:27588175

  10. Source imaging of potential fields through a matrix space-domain algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniamerian, Jamaledin; Oskooi, Behrooz; Fedi, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Imaging of potential fields yields a fast 3D representation of the source distribution of potential fields. Imaging methods are all based on multiscale methods allowing the source parameters of potential fields to be estimated from a simultaneous analysis of the field at various scales or, in other words, at many altitudes. Accuracy in performing upward continuation and differentiation of the field has therefore a key role for this class of methods. We here describe an accurate method for performing upward continuation and vertical differentiation in the space-domain. We perform a direct discretization of the integral equations for upward continuation and Hilbert transform; from these equations we then define matrix operators performing the transformation, which are symmetric (upward continuation) or anti-symmetric (differentiation), respectively. Thanks to these properties, just the first row of the matrices needs to be computed, so to decrease dramatically the computation cost. Our approach allows a simple procedure, with the advantage of not involving large data extension or tapering, as due instead in case of Fourier domain computation. It also allows level-to-drape upward continuation and a stable differentiation at high frequencies; finally, upward continuation and differentiation kernels may be merged into a single kernel. The accuracy of our approach is shown to be important for multi-scale algorithms, such as the continuous wavelet transform or the DEXP (depth from extreme point method), because border errors, which tend to propagate largely at the largest scales, are radically reduced. The application of our algorithm to synthetic and real-case gravity and magnetic data sets confirms the accuracy of our space domain strategy over FFT algorithms and standard convolution procedures.

  11. Targeting extracellular matrix remodeling in disease: Could resveratrol be a potential candidate?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Renu; Agarwal, Puneet

    2017-02-01

    Disturbances of extracellular matrix homeostasis are associated with a number of pathological conditions. The ability of extracellular matrix to provide contextual information and hence control the individual or collective cellular behavior is increasingly being recognized. Hence, newer therapeutic approaches targeting extracellular matrix remodeling are widely investigated. We reviewed the current literature showing the effects of resveratrol on various aspects of extracellular matrix remodeling. This review presents a summary of the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix deposition and breakdown. Mechanisms of action of resveratrol in extracellular matrix deposition involving growth factors and their signaling pathways are discussed. Involvement of phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and role of transcription factors and sirtuins on the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix homeostasis are summarized. It is evident from the literature presented in this review that resveratrol has significant effects on both the synthesis and breakdown of extracellular matrix. The major molecular targets of the action of resveratrol are growth factors and their signaling pathways, phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, transcription factors, and SIRT-1. The effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix and the molecular targets appear to be related to experimental models, experimental environment as well as the doses.

  12. Analysis of superconducting electromagnetic finite elements based on a magnetic vector potential variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, James J.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic finite elements are extended based on a variational principle that uses the electromagnetic four potential as primary variable. The variational principle is extended to include the ability to predict a nonlinear current distribution within a conductor. The extension of this theory is first done on a normal conductor and tested on two different problems. In both problems, the geometry remains the same, but the material properties are different. The geometry is that of a 1-D infinite wire. The first problem is merely a linear control case used to validate the new theory. The second problem is made up of linear conductors with varying conductivities. Both problems perform well and predict current densities that are accurate to within a few ten thousandths of a percent of the exact values. The fourth potential is then removed, leaving only the magnetic vector potential, and the variational principle is further extended to predict magnetic potentials, magnetic fields, the number of charge carriers, and the current densities within a superconductor. The new element produces good results for the mean magnetic field, the vector potential, and the number of superconducting charge carriers despite a relatively high system condition number. The element did not perform well in predicting the current density. Numerical problems inherent to this formulation are explored and possible remedies to produce better current predicting finite elements are presented.

  13. Porous calcium alginate-gelatin interpenetrated matrix and its biomineralization potential.

    PubMed

    Stancu, Izabela-Cristina; Dragusin, Diana Maria; Vasile, Eugeniu; Trusca, Roxana; Antoniac, Iulian; Vasilescu, Dan Sorin

    2011-03-01

    Artificial bone composites exhibit distinctive features by comparison to natural tissues, due to a lack of self-organization and intimate interaction apatite-matrix. This explains the need of "bio-inspired materials", in which hydroxyapatite grows in contact with self-assembling natural polymers. The present work investigates the function of a rational design in the hydroxyapatite-forming potential of a common biopolymer. Gelatin modified through intrinsic interactions with calcium alginate led through freeze-drying to porous hydrogels, whose architecture, constitutive features and chemistry were investigated with respect to their role on biomineralization. The apatite-forming ability was enhanced by the porosity of the materials, while the presence of alginate-reinforced Gel elastic chains, definitely favored this phenomenon. Depending on the concentration, polysaccharide chains act as "ionic pumps" enhancing the biomineralization. The mineralization-promoting effect of the peptide-polysaccharide network strictly depends on the hydrogels structural, compositional and morphological features derived from the interaction between the above mentioned two components.

  14. Copper quantum clusters in protein matrix: potential sensor of Pb2+ ion.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Nirmal; Giri, Anupam; Bootharaju, M S; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Pradeep, Thalappil; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2011-12-15

    A one-pot synthesis of extremely stable, water-soluble Cu quantum clusters (QCs) capped with a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), is reported. From matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, we assign the clusters to be composed of Cu(5) and Cu(13) cores. The QCs also show luminescence properties having excitation and emission maxima at 325 and 410 nm, respectively, with a quantum yield of 0.15, which are found to be different from that of protein alone in similar experimental conditions. The quenching of luminescence of the protein-capped Cu QCs in the presence of very low hydrogen peroxide concentration (approximately nanomolar, or less than part-per-billion) reflects the efficacy of the QCs as a potential sensing material in biological environments. Moreover, as-prepared Cu QCs can detect highly toxic Pb(2+) ions in water, even at the part-per-million level, without suffering any interference from other metal ions.

  15. Extracellular Matrix-dependent Pathways in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Reveal Potential Targets for Anticancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Stankevicius, Vaidotas; Vasauskas, Gintautas; Noreikiene, Rimante; Kuodyte, Karolina; Valius, Mindaugas; Suziedelis, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells grown in a 3D culture are more resistant to anticancer therapy treatment compared to those in a monolayer 2D culture. Emerging evidence has suggested that the key reasons for increased cell survival could be gene expression changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction-dependent manner. Global gene-expression changes were obtained in human colorectal carcinoma HT29 and DLD1 cell lines between 2D and laminin-rich (lr) ECM 3D growth conditions by gene-expression microarray analysis. The most significantly altered functional categories were revealed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. The microarray data revealed that 841 and 1190 genes were differentially expressed in colorectal carcinoma DLD1 and HT29 cells. KEGG analysis indicated that the most significantly altered categories were cell adhesion, mitogen-activated protein kinase and immune response. Our results indicate altered pathways related to cancer development and progression and suggest potential ECM-regulated targets for the development of anticancer therapies. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Tunneling currents between carbon nanotubes inside the 3-dimensional potential of a dielectric matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsagarakis, M. S.; Xanthakis, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    We have examined the tunneling currents between CNTs dispersed in a dielectric matrix as is normally the case in a tensile stress or toxic gas sensors. Due to the randomness of the immersion process the CNTs are at random angles and configurations between them, thus producing a 3-dimensional potential (3-D). We have produced a method that solves the Laplace equation for this type of problem and uses the WKB formulation to calculate the transmission coefficient between CNTs. We have then shown that the tunneling currents between a pair of CNTs depend critically on their relative angle and configuration. In particular we have shown that the tunneling currents do not occur only along a CNT tip to CNT tip configuration but other more efficient paths exist which give a current higher by two orders of magnitude from what a simple 1D theory would give. On the other hand the tunneling current between non-coplanar CNTs is negligible. We conclude that such phenomena cannot be analyzed by a simple 1-dimensional WKB theory and the percolation threshold necessary for conduction may be lower than the one such a theory would predict.

  17. Occupational exposure to potential endocrine disruptors: further development of a job exposure matrix.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, M M; van Tongeren, M; Hirst, A A; Bretveld, R W; Roeleveld, N

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to develop a new up-to-date and comprehensive job exposure matrix (JEM) for estimating exposure to potential endocrine disruptors in epidemiological research. Chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties were identified from the literature and classified into 10 chemical groups: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated organic compounds, pesticides, phthalates, organic solvents, bisphenol A, alkylphenolic compounds, brominated flame retardants, metals and a miscellaneous group. Most chemical groups were divided into three to six subgroups. Focusing on the years 1996-2006, three experts scored the probability of exposure to each chemical group and subgroup for 353 job titles as "unlikely" (0), "possible" (1) or "probable" (2). Job titles with positive exposure probability scores were provided with exposure scenarios that described the reasoning behind the scores. Exposure to any chemical group was unlikely for 238 job titles (67%), whereas 102 (29%) job titles were classified as possibly (17%) or probably (12%) exposed to one or several endocrine disruptors. The remaining 13 job titles provided too little information to classify exposure. PAHs, pesticides, phthalates, organic solvents, alkylphenolic compounds and metals were often linked to a job title in the JEM. The remaining chemical groups were found to involve very few occupations. Despite some important limitations, this JEM could be a valuable tool for exposure assessment in studies on the health risks of endocrine disruptors, especially when task specific information is incorporated. The documented exposure scenarios are meant to facilitate further adjustments to the JEM to allow more widespread use.

  18. Plasma gelsolin and matrix metalloproteinase 3 as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Jia, Jianping; Qin, Wei

    2015-05-19

    Gelsolin (GSN) levels and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) activity have been found to be altered in the plasma in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this study was to determine whether a combination of these proteins with clinical data is specific and sensitive enough for AD diagnosis. In 113 non-demented controls and 113 patients with probable AD, the plasma GSN levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the plasma MMP3 activity was determined using casein zymography. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of these proteins combined with clinical data. Compared with the controls, the AD patients had significantly lower GSN levels and significantly higher MMP3 activity. Moreover, both the GSN level and MMP3 activity were significantly correlated with the MMSE scores. In AD patients, the GSN level was negatively correlated with MMP3 activity. ROC curve analysis showed that the specificity and sensitivity were 77% and 75.2%, respectively, for the combination of the following candidate biomarkers: GSN level/the total amount of Aβ42 and Aβ40, plasma MMP3 activity and clinical data. With its relatively high sensitivity and specificity, this combined biomarker panel may have potential for the screening of AD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Decellularized extracellular matrix derived from human adipose tissue as a potential scaffold for allograft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Beob Soo; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Jae Dong; Choi, Young Chan; Yang, Hyun-Jin; Park, Kinam; Lee, Hee Young; Cho, Yong Woo

    2011-06-01

    Decellularized tissues composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been clinically used to support the regeneration of various human tissues and organs. Most decellularized tissues so far have been derived from animals or cadavers. Therefore, despite the many advantages of decellularized tissue, there are concerns about the potential for immunogenicity and the possible presence of infectious agents. Herein, we present a biomaterial composed of ECM derived from human adipose tissue, the most prevalent, expendable, and safely harvested tissue in the human body. The ECM was extracted by successive physical, chemical, and enzymatic treatments of human adipose tissue isolated by liposuction. Cellular components including nucleic acids were effectively removed without significant disruption of the morphology or structure of the ECM. Major ECM components were quantified, including acid/pepsin-soluble collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and soluble elastin. In an in vivo experiment using mice, the decellularized ECM graft exhibited good compatibility to surrounding tissues. Overall results suggest that the decellularized ECM containing biological and chemical cues of native human ECM could be an ideal scaffold material not only for autologous but also for allograft tissue engineering.

  20. Bone Regenerative Potential of Enamel Matrix Protein in the Circumferential Defect Around a Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Ui-Won; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the bone regenerative potential of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) in a defect around a dental implant. Five mongrel dogs were used. A circumferential defect was created around osteotomies that had been fabricated to receive titanium implants. The defects were treated with EMD, biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), a mixture of EMD and BCP (EBCP), or blood coagulum (control). In general, the amount of new bone formation, the most-coronal level of bone-implant contact, defect fill, and bone-implant contact ratio were greater in the EMD group than in the control group, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. The EBCP group yielded no beneficial effect in new bone formation. Histologically, there was no notable difference in healing pattern between the EMD group and the control, and the EBCP and the BCP group. Few of the specimens in the EMD and EBCP groups exhibited remarkable bone regeneration. Neither EMD alone nor a mixture of BCP and EMD enhanced bone healing in a circumferential gap defect around a dental implant.

  1. Potential Applications of Matrix Organization Theory for the New Jersey Department of Education. Position Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, J. Robert

    Matrix organization focuses on the shift from cost center or process input planning to product output or results planning. Matrix organization puts the personnel and the resources where they are needed to get the job done. This management efficiency is brought about by dividing all organizational activities into two areas: (1) input or maintenance…

  2. Improved Boundary Element Methods for Poisson-Boltzmann Electrostatic Potential and Force Calculations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Benzhuo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2007-05-01

    A patch representation differing from the traditional treatments in the boundary element method (BEM) is presented, which we call the constant "node patch" method. Its application to solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) demonstrates considerable improvement in speed compared with the constant element and linear element methods. In addition, for the node-based BEMs, we propose an efficient interpolation method for the calculation of the electrostatic stress tensor and PB force on the solvated molecular surface. This force calculation is simply an O(N) algorithm (N is the number of elements). Moreover, our calculations also show that the geometric factor correction in the boundary integral equations significantly increases the accuracy of the potential solution on the boundary, and thereby the PB force calculation.

  3. Electromagnetic axisymmetric finite elements based on a gauged four-potential variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, J.; Felippa, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic finite elements are derived based on a variational principle that uses the electromagnetic four-potential as a primary variable. The Lorentz gage normalization is incorporated as a constraint condition through a Lagrange multiplier field to construct elements suitable for downstream coupling with mechanical and thermal finite elements for the analysis of high-temperature superconductor devices with aerospace applications. The main advantages are: jump discontinuities on interfaces are naturally handled; no a priori approximations are invoked; and the number of degrees of freedom per node remains modest as the problem dimensionality increases. The new elements are tested on two magnetostatic axisymmetric problems. The results are in excellent agreement with analytical solutions and previous solutions for the 1D problem of a conducting infinite wire, in which case the multiplier field has no effect. For materials of widely different permeability, jump conditions are naturally accommodated by the present formulation.

  4. Electromagnetic axisymmetric finite elements based on a gauged four-potential variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, J.; Felippa, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic finite elements are derived based on a variational principle that uses the electromagnetic four-potential as a primary variable. The Lorentz gage normalization is incorporated as a constraint condition through a Lagrange multiplier field to construct elements suitable for downstream coupling with mechanical and thermal finite elements for the analysis of high-temperature superconductor devices with aerospace applications. The main advantages are: jump discontinuities on interfaces are naturally handled; no a priori approximations are invoked; and the number of degrees of freedom per node remains modest as the problem dimensionality increases. The new elements are tested on two magnetostatic axisymmetric problems. The results are in excellent agreement with analytical solutions and previous solutions for the 1D problem of a conducting infinite wire, in which case the multiplier field has no effect. For materials of widely different permeability, jump conditions are naturally accommodated by the present formulation.

  5. Intramedullary Pressure and Matrix Strain Induced by Oscillatory Skeletal Muscle Stimulation and its Potential in Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lam, Hoyan

    2010-01-01

    Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by oscillatory muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia, i.e., hindlimb suspension (HLS). To test this hypothesis, we evaluated a) MS induced ImP and bone strain as function of stimulation frequency, and b) the adaptive responses to functional disuse, and disuse plus 1Hz and 20Hz stimulation in vivo. Femoral ImP and bone strain generated by MS were measured in the frequencies of 1Hz-100Hz in four rats. Forty retired breeder rats were used for the in vivo HLS study. The quadriceps muscle was stimulated at frequencies of 1 Hz and 20 Hz, 10min/d for 4 weeks. The metaphyseal trabecular bone quantity and microstructure at the distal femur were evaluated using μCT, while bone formation indices were analyzed using histomorphometric techniques. Oscillatory MS generated a maximum ImP of 45±9 mmHg at 20 Hz and produced a maximum matrix strain of 128±19 με at 10 Hz. Our analyses from the in vivo study showed that MS at 20 Hz was able to attenuate trabecular bone loss and partially maintain the microstructure induced by HLS. Conversely, there was no evidence of an adaptive effect of stimulation at 1 Hz on disused skeleton. The results suggested that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics and mechanical strain in bone, which serves as a critical mediator of adaptation. These results clearly demonstrated the ability of MS in attenuating bone loss from the disuse osteopenia and could hold potential in mitigating skeletal degradation imposed by conditions of disuse, which may serve as a biomechanical intervention in clinic application. PMID:19081096

  6. A fiber matrix model for fluid flow and streaming potentials in the canaliculi of an osteon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Y.; Cowin, S. C.; Weinbaum, S.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the fluid shear stress and streaming potential at the surface of osteocytic processes in the lacunar-canalicular porosity of an osteon when the osteon is subject to mechanical loads that are parallel or perpendicular to its axis. The theory developed in Weinbaum et al. (31) for the flow through a proteoglycan matrix in a canaliculus is employed in a poroelastic model for the osteon. Our formulation is a generalization of that of Petrov et al. (17). Our model predicts that, in order to satisfy the measured frequency dependence of the phase and magnitude of the SGP in macroscopic bone samples, the fiber spacing in the fluid annulus must lie in the narrow range 6-7 nm typical of the spacing of GAG sidechains along a protein monomer. The model predictions for the local SGP profiles in the osteon agree with the experimental observations of Starkebaum et al. (24). The theory predicts that the pore pressure relaxation time, tau d, for a 150-300 microns diameter osteon with the foregoing matrix structure is approximately 0.03-0.13 sec, and that the amplitude of the mean fluid shear stress on the membrane of the osteocytic process at the mean areal radius of the osteon has a maximum at 28 Hz if tau d = 0.06 sec. This maximum, which is independent of the magnitude of the loading, could be important in vivo since the recent experiments of Turner et al. (28) and McLeod et al. (15) have a peak in the strain frequency spectrum between 20 and 30 Hz that also appears to be independent of the type (magnitude) of loading. Numerical predictions for the amplitude of the average fluid shear stress on the osteocytic membrane at the mean areal radius of the osteon show that the fluid shear stress associated with the low amplitude 20-30 Hz spectral strain component is at least as large as the average fluid shear stress associated with the high amplitude 1 Hz stride component, although the latter loading is an order of magnitude larger, and has a

  7. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  8. Positive Matrix Factorization of hourly size-segregated PM elemental concentration at a street canyon: effect of street cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Fulvio; Nava, Silvia; Lucarelli, Franco; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés.

    2010-05-01

    Despite the high environmental and health burden of road dust emissions in urban environments, there is still a dearth of knowledge on the effectiveness of some possible remediation measures such as street cleaning activities. As a consequence of the recent notification from the EU commission for the exceedances of PM limit values (1999/30/EC), several EU countries (Austria, Germany and UK among others) have introduced street cleaning as one of the main measures to be taken in order to meet these limits in the next future. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of street cleaning is still far from being definitively determined since only few tests have been carried out so far and with very different local conditions. An intensive campaign was carried out during spring 2009 in the city centre of Barcelona (NE of Spain) by means of the application of innovative techniques: i) the hourly elemental composition of size segregated PM was used to investigate short term variability of specific tracers of road dust resuspension; ii) a Positive Matrix Factorization was applied in order to identify the daily pattern of each PM source. Hourly elemental concentrations were obtained by a two-stage streaker sampler, where particles are separated on different stages: an impactor deposits the aerosol coarse fraction (aerodynamic diameter between 2.5-10 µm) on a Kapton foil while the fine fraction (<2.5 µm) is collected on a Nuclepore filter having 0.4 µm pores. The two collecting plates (Kapton and Nuclepore) are paired on a cartridge which rotates at constant speed for a week: this produces a circular continuous deposition of particulate matter (streak) on both stages. Totally 349 samples were collected onto three pairs of stages and analyzed by Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) external beam facility in Florence, based on a Van de Graaff accelerator. This facility has been used several times in the past for aerosol studies. A Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied

  9. Grounded or submerged bulk carrier: the potential for leaching of coal trace elements to seawater.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Steven Andrew; Planner, John

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the potential for leaching of coal trace elements to seawater from a grounded bulk carrier. The coal type and ecological scenario was based on the grounding of the "Shen Neng" (April 2010) at Douglas Shoal located within the Great Barrier Reef (Queensland, Australia). The area is of high ecological value and the Queensland Water Quality Guidelines (2009) provided threshold limits to interpret potential impacts. Coal contains many trace elements that are of major and moderate concern to human health and the environment although many of these concerns are only realised when coal is combusted. However, "unburnt" coal contains trace elements that may be leached to natural waterways and few studies have investigated the potential ecological impact of such an occurrence. For example, coal maritime transport has increased by almost 35% over the last five reported years (Jaffrennou et al., 2007) and as a result there is an increased inherent risk of bulk carrier accidents. Upon grounding or becoming submerged, coal within a bulk carrier may become saturated with seawater and potentially leach trace elements to the environment and impact on water quality and ecological resilience. The worst case scenario is the breakup of a bulk carrier and dispersal of cargo to the seafloor.

  10. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements in {gamma}p --> p {omega} using CLAS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Vernarsky, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort towards a ''complete'' experiment for the ω meson, we present studies from an experiment with an unpolarized target and a circularly polarized photon beam (g1c), carried out using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The experiment was analyzed using an extended maximum likelihood fit with partial wave amplitudes. New likelihood functions were calculated to account for the polarization of the photon beam. Both circular and linear polarizations are explored. The results of these fits are then used to project out the spin density matrix for the {omega}. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements will be presented using this method.

  11. Assessment of potentially harmful elements pollution in the Calore River basin (Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Zuzolo, Daniela; Cicchella, Domenico; Catani, Vittorio; Giaccio, Lucia; Guagliardi, Ilaria; Esposito, Libera; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-06-01

    The geographical distribution of concentration values for harmful elements was determined in the Campania region, Italy. The study area consists of the drainage basin of the River Calore, a tributary of the river Volturno, the largest Southern Italian river. The results provide reliable analytical data allowing a quantitative assessment of the trace element pollution threat to the ecosystem and human health. Altogether 562 stream sediment samples were collected at a sampling density of 1 site per 5 km(2). All samples were air-dried, sieved to <100 mesh fraction and analyzed for 37 elements after an aqua regia extraction by a combination of ICP-AES and ICP-MS. In addition to elemental analysis, gamma-ray spectrometry data were collected (a total of 562 measurements) using a hand-held Scintrex GRS-500 spectrometer. Statistical analyses were performed to show the single-element distribution and the distribution of elemental association factor scores resulting from R-mode factor analyses. Maps showing element distributions were made using GeoDAS and ArcGIS software. Our study showed that, despite evidence from concentrations of many elements for enrichment over natural background values, the spatial distribution of major and trace elements in Calore River basin is determined mostly by geogenic factors. The southwestern area of the basin highlighted an enrichment of many elements potentially harmful for human health and other living organisms (Al, Fe, K, Na, As, Cd, La, Pb, Th, Tl, U); however, these anomalies are due to the presence of pyroclastic and alkaline volcanic lithologies. Even where sedimentary lithologies occur, many harmful elements (Co, Cr, Mn, Ni) showed high concentration levels due to natural origins. Conversely, a strong heavy metal contamination (Pb, Zn, Cu, Sb, Ag, Au, Hg), due to an anthropogenic contribution, is highlighted in many areas characterized by the presence of road junctions, urban settlements and industrial areas. The enrichment factor

  12. Comparison of methods used to calculate typical threshold values for potentially toxic elements in soil.

    PubMed

    McIlwaine, Rebekka; Cox, Siobhan F; Doherty, Rory; Palmer, Sherry; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; McKinley, Jennifer M

    2014-10-01

    The environmental quality of land can be assessed by calculating relevant threshold values, which differentiate between concentrations of elements resulting from geogenic and diffuse anthropogenic sources and concentrations generated by point sources of elements. A simple process allowing the calculation of these typical threshold values (TTVs) was applied across a region of highly complex geology (Northern Ireland) to six elements of interest; arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, nickel and vanadium. Three methods for identifying domains (areas where a readily identifiable factor can be shown to control the concentration of an element) were used: k-means cluster analysis, boxplots and empirical cumulative distribution functions (ECDF). The ECDF method was most efficient at determining areas of both elevated and reduced concentrations and was used to identify domains in this investigation. Two statistical methods for calculating normal background concentrations (NBCs) and upper limits of geochemical baseline variation (ULBLs), currently used in conjunction with legislative regimes in the UK and Finland respectively, were applied within each domain. The NBC methodology was constructed to run within a specific legislative framework, and its use on this soil geochemical data set was influenced by the presence of skewed distributions and outliers. In contrast, the ULBL methodology was found to calculate more appropriate TTVs that were generally more conservative than the NBCs. TTVs indicate what a "typical" concentration of an element would be within a defined geographical area and should be considered alongside the risk that each of the elements pose in these areas to determine potential risk to receptors.

  13. Calculation of subsonic and supersonic steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces using velocity potential aerodynamic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Yoo, Y. S.

    1976-01-01

    Expressions for calculation of subsonic and supersonic, steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces are derived, using the concept of aerodynamic elements applied to the downwash velocity potential method. Aerodynamic elements can be of arbitrary out of plane polygon shape, although numerical calculations are restricted to rectangular elements, and to the steady state case in the supersonic examples. It is suggested that the use of conforming, in place of rectangular elements, would give better results. Agreement with results for subsonic oscillating T tails is fair, but results do not converge as the number of collocation points is increased. This appears to be due to the form of expression used in the calculations. The methods derived are expected to facilitate automated flutter analysis on the computer. In particular, the aerodynamic element concept is consistent with finite element methods already used for structural analysis. The method is universal for the complete Mach number range, and, finally, the calculations can be arranged so that they do not have to be repeated completely for every reduced frequency.

  14. Bioavailability and health risk assessment of potentially toxic elements in Thriasio Plain, near Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Antoniadis, Vasileios; Golia, Evangelia E; Shaheen, Sabry M; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Elevated concentrations of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) are usually found in areas of intense industrial activity. Thriasio Plain is a plain near Athens, Greece, where most of the heavy industry of the country has been situated for decades, but it also is a residential and horticultural area. We aimed at measuring the levels of PTEs in soils and indigenous plant species and assessing the health risk associated with direct soil ingestion. Samples of soils at roadsides and growing plants were collected from 31 sites of that area. Concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, V and Zn were measured in both soils (as pseudo-total) and aerial plant tissues. We found that As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were higher than maximum regulatory limits. Element concentrations in plants were rather lower than expected, probably because indigenous plants have developed excluder behaviour over time. Copper and Zn soil-to-plant coefficients were highest among the other elements; for Cu this was unexpected, and probably associated with recent Cu-releasing industrial activity. Risk assessment analysis indicated that As was the element contributing more than 50 % of the health risk related to direct soil ingestion, followed by Cr, Pb, and, surprisingly, Mn. We concluded that in a multi-element contamination situation, elevated risk of PTEs (such as As, Cr and Pb) may reduce the tolerance limits of exposure to less-toxic elements (here, Mn).

  15. Abundance, distribution and potential impact of transposable elements in the genome of Mycosphaerella fijiensis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycosphaerella fijiensis is a ascomycete that causes Black Sigatoka in bananas. Recently, the M. fijiensis genome was sequenced. Repetitive sequences are ubiquitous components of fungal genomes. In most genomic analyses, repetitive sequences are associated with transposable elements (TEs). TEs are dispersed repetitive DNA sequences found in a host genome. These elements have the ability to move from one location to another within the genome, and their insertion can cause a wide spectrum of mutations in their hosts. Some of the deleterious effects of TEs may be due to ectopic recombination among TEs of the same family. In addition, some transposons are physically linked to genes and can control their expression. To prevent possible damage caused by the presence of TEs in the genome, some fungi possess TE-silencing mechanisms, such as RIP (Repeat Induced Point mutation). In this study, the abundance, distribution and potential impact of TEs in the genome of M. fijiensis were investigated. Results A total of 613 LTR-Gypsy and 27 LTR-Copia complete elements of the class I were detected. Among the class II elements, a total of 28 Mariner, five Mutator and one Harbinger complete elements were identified. The results of this study indicate that transposons were and are important ectopic recombination sites. A distribution analysis of a transposable element from each class of the M. fijiensis isolates revealed variable hybridization profiles, indicating the activity of these elements. Several genes encoding proteins involved in important metabolic pathways and with potential correlation to pathogenicity systems were identified upstream and downstream of transposable elements. A comparison of the sequences from different transposon groups suggested the action of the RIP silencing mechanism in the genome of this microorganism. Conclusions The analysis of TEs in M. fijiensis suggests that TEs play an important role in the evolution of this organism because the

  16. Abundance, distribution and potential impact of transposable elements in the genome of Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    PubMed

    Santana, Mateus F; Silva, José C F; Batista, Aline D; Ribeiro, Lílian E; da Silva, Gilvan F; de Araújo, Elza F; de Queiroz, Marisa V

    2012-12-22

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis is a ascomycete that causes Black Sigatoka in bananas. Recently, the M. fijiensis genome was sequenced. Repetitive sequences are ubiquitous components of fungal genomes. In most genomic analyses, repetitive sequences are associated with transposable elements (TEs). TEs are dispersed repetitive DNA sequences found in a host genome. These elements have the ability to move from one location to another within the genome, and their insertion can cause a wide spectrum of mutations in their hosts. Some of the deleterious effects of TEs may be due to ectopic recombination among TEs of the same family. In addition, some transposons are physically linked to genes and can control their expression. To prevent possible damage caused by the presence of TEs in the genome, some fungi possess TE-silencing mechanisms, such as RIP (Repeat Induced Point mutation). In this study, the abundance, distribution and potential impact of TEs in the genome of M. fijiensis were investigated. A total of 613 LTR-Gypsy and 27 LTR-Copia complete elements of the class I were detected. Among the class II elements, a total of 28 Mariner, five Mutator and one Harbinger complete elements were identified. The results of this study indicate that transposons were and are important ectopic recombination sites. A distribution analysis of a transposable element from each class of the M. fijiensis isolates revealed variable hybridization profiles, indicating the activity of these elements. Several genes encoding proteins involved in important metabolic pathways and with potential correlation to pathogenicity systems were identified upstream and downstream of transposable elements. A comparison of the sequences from different transposon groups suggested the action of the RIP silencing mechanism in the genome of this microorganism. The analysis of TEs in M. fijiensis suggests that TEs play an important role in the evolution of this organism because the activity of these elements, as well

  17. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  18. Thick Acellular Heart Extracellular Matrix with Inherent Vasculature: A Potential Platform for Myocardial Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sarig, Udi; Au-Yeung, Gigi C.T.; Wang, Yao; Bronshtein, Tomer; Dahan, Nitsan; Boey, Freddy Y.C.; Venkatraman, Subbu S.

    2012-01-01

    The decellularization of porcine heart tissue offers many opportunities for the production of physiologically relevant myocardial mimetic scaffolds. Earlier, we reported the successful isolation of a thin porcine cardiac extracellular matrix (pcECM) exhibiting relevant bio-mechanical properties for myocardial tissue engineering. Nevertheless, since native cardiac tissue is much thicker, such thin scaffolds may offer limited regeneration capacity. However, generation of thicker myocardial mimetic tissue constructs is hindered by diffusion limitations (∼100 μm), and the lack of a proper vascular-like network within these constructs. In our present work, we focused on optimizing the decellularization procedure for thicker tissue slabs (10–15 mm), while retaining their inherent vasculature, and on characterizing the resulting pcECM. The trypsin/Triton-based perfusion procedure that resulted in a nonimmunogenic and cell-supportive pcECM was found to be more effective in cell removal and in the preservation of fiber morphology and structural characteristics than stirring, sonication, or sodium dodecyl sulfate/Triton-based procedures. Mass spectroscopy revealed that the pcECM is mainly composed of ECM proteins with no apparent cellular protein remains. Mechanical testing indicated that the obtained pcECM is viscoelastic in nature and possesses the typical stress-strain profile of biological materials. It is stiffer than native tissue yet exhibits matched mechanical properties in terms of energy dissipation, toughness, and ultimate stress behavior. Vascular network functionality was maintained to the first three–four branches from the main coronary vessels. Taken together, these results reaffirm the efficiency of the decellularization procedure reported herein for yielding thick nonimmunogenic cell-supportive pcECM scaffolds, preserving both native tissue ultra-structural properties and an inherent vascular network. When reseeded with the appropriate progenitor

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase, hyaluronidase and elastase inhibitory potential of standardized extract of Centella asiatica.

    PubMed

    Nema, Neelesh Kumar; Maity, Niladri; Sarkar, Birendra Kumar; Mukherjee, Pulok Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Centella asiatica (L.) Urban (Apiaceae), a valuable herb described in Ayurveda, is used in the indigenous system of medicine as a tonic to treat skin diseases. Centella asiatica methanol extract and its ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fraction, were subjected for the evaluation of skin care potential through the in vitro hyaluronidase, elastase and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) inhibitory assay. The C. asiatica plant was extracted with methanol and fractionated with ethyl acetate, n-butanol and water. The enzymatic activities were evaluated using ursolic acid and oleanolic acid as standards. Isolate molecule asiaticoside was quantified in the crude extract and fractions through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and structural was characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) and ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Isolated compound was also evaluated for in vitro enzyme assays. Extract exhibited anti-hyaluronidase and anti-elastase activity with IC₅₀ of 19.27 ± 0.37 and 14.54 ± 0.39 µg/mL, respectively, as compared to ursolic acid. Centella asiatica n-butanol fraction (CAnB) and isolated compound showed significant hyaluronidase (IC₅₀ = 27.00 ± 0.43 and 18.63 ± 0.33 µg/mL) and elastase (IC₅₀ = 29.15 ± 0.31 and 19.45 ± 0.25 µg/mL) inhibitory activities, respectively, and also showed significant MMP-1 inhibition (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). n-Butanol fraction was found to be most effective among the all fractions from which asiaticoside was isolated and further quantified by HPLC. This work concludes that the asiaticoside from C. asiatica may be a prospective agent for skin care.

  20. First-principles interatomic potentials for ten elemental metals via compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Atsuto; Takahashi, Akira; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-08-01

    Interatomic potentials have been widely used in atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics. Recently, frameworks to construct accurate interatomic potentials that combine a set of density functional theory (DFT) calculations with machine learning techniques have been proposed. One of these methods is to use compressed sensing to derive a sparse representation for the interatomic potential. This facilitates the control of the accuracy of interatomic potentials. In this study, we demonstrate the applicability of compressed sensing to deriving the interatomic potential of ten elemental metals, namely, Ag, Al, Au, Ca, Cu, Ga, In, K, Li, and Zn. For each elemental metal, the interatomic potential is obtained from DFT calculations using elastic net regression. The interatomic potentials are found to have prediction errors of less than 3.5 meV/atom, 0.03 eV/Å, and 0.15 GPa for the energy, force, and the stress tensor, respectively, which enable the accurate prediction of physical properties such as lattice constants and the phonon dispersion relationship.

  1. Element analysis and calculation of the attenuation coefficients for gold, bronze and water matrixes using MCNP, WinXCom and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, M.; Shirmardi, S. P.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, element analysis and the mass attenuation coefficient for matrixes of gold, bronze and water with various impurities and the concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) are evaluated and calculated by the MCNP simulation code for photons emitted from Barium-133, Americium-241 and sources with energies between 1 and 100 keV. The MCNP data are compared with the experimental data and WinXCom code simulated results by Medhat. The results showed that the obtained results of bronze and gold matrix are in good agreement with the other methods for energies above 40 and 60 keV, respectively. However for water matrixes with various impurities, there is a good agreement between the three methods MCNP, WinXCom and the experimental one in low and high energies.

  2. Potential health and environmental effects of trace elements and radionuclides from increased coal utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hook, R I

    1979-01-01

    This report addresses the effects of coal-derived trace and radioactive elements. A summary of our current understanding of health and environmental effects of trace and radioactive elements released during coal mining, cleaning, combustion, and ash disposal is presented. Physical and biological transport phenomena which are important in determining organism exposure are also discussed. Biological concentration and transformation as well as synergistic and antagonistic actions among trace contaminants are discussed in terms of their importance in mobility, persistence, availability, and ultimate toxicity. The consequences of implementing the President's National Energy Plan are considered in terms of the impact of the NEP in 1985 and 2000 on the potential effects of trace and radioactive elements from the coal fuel cycle. Areas of needed research are identified in specific recommendations. PMID:540619

  3. New calculations of the parity nonconservation matrix element for the JπT 0+1, 0-1 doublet in 14N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoi, Mihai; Clausnitzer, Günther; Brown, B. Alex; Warburton, E. K.

    1994-08-01

    A new calculation of the predominantly isoscalar PNC matrix element between the JπT 0+1,0-1 (Ex~=8.7 MeV) states in 14N has been carried out in a (0+1+2+3+4)ħω model space with the Warburton-Brown interaction. The magnitude of the PNC matrix element of 0.22 to 0.54 eV obtained with the DDH PNC interaction is substantially suppressed compared with previous calculations in smaller model spaces but shows agreement with the preliminary Seattle experimental data. The calculated sign is opposite to that obtained experimentally, and the implications of this are discussed.

  4. Determination of the reduced matrix elements using accurate ab initio wavefunctions: Formalism and its application to the vibrational ground state (000) of H216O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouroux, J.; Gamache, R. R.; Schwenke, D. W.

    2014-11-01

    The calculations of the reduced matrix elements for 441 rotational collisional transitions for rotational quantum numbers of the lower state up to J″=20 in the vibrational ground state of H216O are presented using effective and ab initio wavefunctions. Effective wavefunctions are derived from a Watson A-reduced Hamiltonian with the effective parameters determined by Matsushima et al. [Matsushima et al., J Mol Struct 1995;352-353:371]. The ab initio wavefunctions used in this study are from the work of Partridge and Schwenke [Partridge, H, Schwenke, DW. J Chem Phys 1997;106:4618]. The comparison of the reduced matrix elements obtained by both methods is described. It is demonstrated that, even for the rotational band, the effective wavefunctions show problems for some states.

  5. Neutral kaon mixing beyond the Standard Model with nf = 2 + 1 chiral fermions. Part 1: bare matrix elements and physical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garron, Nicolas; Hudspith, Renwick J.; Lytle, Andrew T.

    2016-11-01

    We compute the hadronic matrix elements of the four-quark operators relevant for {K}^0-{overline{K}}^0 mixing beyond the Standard Model. Our results are from lattice QCD simulations with n f = 2 + 1 flavours of domain-wall fermion, which exhibit continuum-like chiral-flavour symmetry. The simulations are performed at two different values of the lattice spacing ( a ˜ 0 .08 and a ˜ 0 .11 fm) and with lightest unitary pion mass ˜ 300 MeV. For the first time, the full set of relevant four-quark operators is renormalised non-perturbatively through RI-SMOM schemes; a detailed description of the renormalisation procedure is presented in a companion paper. We argue that the intermediate renormalisation scheme is responsible for the discrepancies found by different collaborations. We also study different normalisations and determine the matrix elements of the relevant four-quark operators with a precision of ˜ 5% or better.

  6. In situ soil moisture and matrix potential - what do we measure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture and matric potential are often regarded as state variables that are simple to monitor at the Darcy-scale. At the same time unproven believes about the capabilities and reliabilities of specific sensing methods or sensor systems exist. A consortium of ten institutions conducted a comparison study of currently available sensors for soil moisture and matrix potential at a specially homogenised field site with sandy loam soil, which was kept free of vegetation. In total 57 probes of 15 different systems measuring soil moisture, and 50 probes of 14 different systems measuring matric potential have been installed in a 0.5 meter grid to monitor the moisture state in 0.2 meter depth. The results give rise to a series of substantial questions about the state of the art in hydrological monitoring, the heterogeneity problem and the meaning of soil water retention at the field scale: A) For soil moisture, most sensors recorded highly plausible data. However, they do not agree in absolute values and reaction timing. For matric potential, only tensiometers were able to capture the quick reactions during rainfall events. All indirect sensors reacted comparably slowly and thus introduced a bias with respect to the sensing of soil water state under highly dynamic conditions. B) Under natural field conditions, a better homogeneity than in our setup can hardly be realised. While the homogeneity assumption held for the first weeks, it collapsed after a heavy storm event. The event exceeded the infiltration capacity, initiated the generation of redistribution networks at the surface, which altered the local surface properties on a very small scale. If this is the reality at a 40 m2 plot, what representativity have single point observations referencing the state of whole basins? C) A comparison of in situ and lab-measured retention curves marks systematic differences. Given the general practice of soil water retention parameterisation in almost any hydrological model this

  7. Evaluation of Matrix Metalloproteinases, Cytokines and Their Potential Role in the Development of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Basit Ashraf, Muhammad Abdul; Parveen, Gulshan; Iqbal, Shazia; Ali, Irfan; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Asif, Muhammad; Kamran, Kashif; Iqbal, Asim; Iram, Saima; Khan, Sami Ullah; Mustafa, Mohammad Zahid; Zaheer, Ahmad; Shaikh, Rozeena; Choudhry, Hani; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar

    2016-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cause of deaths in the women among gynecological tumors. There are many growing evidences that stress and other behavioral factors may affect cancer progression and patient survival. The purpose of this study is to determine the key role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and cytokines in the aggregation and progression of ovarian cancer. Methodology Stress variables (MDA, AGEs, AOPPs, NO), profile of antioxidants (SOD, Catalase, Vitamin E & A, GSH, GRx, GPx) and inflammatory biomarkers (MMP-9, MMP-2, MMP-11, IL-1α and TNF-α) were biochemically assessed from venous blood of fifty ovarian cancer patients and twenty healthy control subjects. The results of all parameters were analyzed statistically by independent sample t-test. Results The results of the study demonstrated that the levels of stress variables like MDA (3.38±1.12nmol/ml), AGEs (2.72±0.22 ng/ml), AOPPs (128.48±27.23 ng/ml) and NO (58.71±8.67 ng/ml) were increased in the patients of ovarian cancer as compared to control individuals whereas the profile of antioxidants like SOD, Catalase, Vitamin E, Vitamin A, GSH and GRx were decreased in ovarian cancer patients (0.11±0.08 μg/ml, 2.41±1.01μmol/mol of protein, 0.22±0.04 μg/ml, 45.84±9.07μg/ml, 4.88±1.18μg/ml, 5.33±1.26 μmol/ml respectively). But the level of GPx antioxidant was increased in ovarian cancer patients (6.58±0.21μmol/ml). Moreover the levels of MMP-9 (64.87±5.35 ng/ml), MMP-2 (75.87±18.82 ng/ml) and MMP-11 (63.58±8.48 ng/ml) were elevated in the patients. Similarly, the levels of various cytokines TNF-α and IL-1α were also increased in the patients of ovarian cancer (32.17±3.52 pg/ml and 7.04±0.85 pg/ml respectively). Conclusion MMPs are commonly expressed in ovarian cancer which are potential extrapolative biomarkers and have a major role in metastasis. Due to oxidative stress, different cytokines are released by tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) that result in the

  8. Characterization of a Pi transport system in cartilage matrix vesicles. Potential role in the calcification process.

    PubMed

    Montessuit, C; Caverzasio, J; Bonjour, J P

    1991-09-25

    acid. Associated with the expression of a facilitated Na(+)-coupled Pi transport in MV, in vitro calcification assessed by 45Ca2+ uptake also showed a marked dependence on extravesicular sodium. This relationship was markedly attenuated in MV isolated from normal chicken growth plate cartilage expressing a weak Na(+)-facilitated Pi transport activity. In conclusion, a saturable Na(+)-dependent Pi carrier has been characterized which facilitates Pi transport in MV. Its potential role for Ca-Pi accumulation into MV and subsequent development of vesicular calcification followed by mineralization of the osteogenic matrix is proposed and remains to be further investigated.

  9. The potential of comparative genomic hybridization as a tool in the differential diagnosis of matrix-producing bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Carsten; Brinkschmidt, Christian; Bielack, Stefan; Bernhardt, Thomas; Jürgens, Heribert; Böcker, Werner; Winkelmann, Winfried; Bürger, Horst; Gosheger, Georg

    2006-07-01

    Matrix-producing bone lesions consist of a wide variety of benign and malignant conditions. With respect to morphology, an overlap exists between benign and malignant bone tumors that causes difficulties in the final determination of the tumor. This study was conducted to show the potential of comparative genomic hybridization as a tool in the differential diagnosis of matrix-producing bone lesions. Thirty benign bone tumors were evaluated by conventional comparative genomic hybridization. To test its diagnostic reliability, 5 additional cases were analyzed, all with differential diagnostic difficulties related to morphology and radiology. All were ultimately diagnosed as malignant sarcomas, and unbalanced alterations were detected. In contrast benign tumors or tumor-like lesions did not reveal any chromosomal alterations. Comparative genomic hybridization is a useful adjunct in the complicated differential diagnostic algorithms of matrix-producing bone tumors.

  10. Effect of residue combinations on plant uptake of nutrients and potentially toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Brännvall, Evelina; Nilsson, Malin; Sjöblom, Rolf; Skoglund, Nils; Kumpiene, Jurate

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the plant pot experiment was to evaluate potential environmental impacts of combined industrial residues to be used as soil fertilisers by analysing i) element availability in fly ash and biosolids mixed with soil both individual and in combination, ii) changes in element phytoavailability in soil fertilised with these materials and iii) impact of the fertilisers on plant growth and element uptake. Plant pot experiments were carried out, using soil to which fresh residue mixtures had been added. The results showed that element availability did not correlate with plant growth in the fertilised soil with. The largest concentrations of K (3534 mg/l), Mg (184 mg/l), P (1.8 mg/l), S (760 mg/l), Cu (0.39 mg/l) and Zn (0.58 mg/l) in soil pore water were found in the soil mixture with biosolids and MSWI fly ashes; however plants did not grow at all in mixtures containing the latter, most likely due to the high concentration of chlorides (82 g/kg in the leachate) in this ash. It is known that high salinity of soil can reduce germination by e.g. limiting water absorption by the seeds. The concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in grown plants were negligible in most of the soils and were below the instrument detection limit values. The proportions of biofuel fly ash and biosolids can be adjusted in order to balance the amount and availability of macronutrients, while the possible increase of potentially toxic elements in biomass is negligible seeing as the plant uptake of such elements was low. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A combined three-dimensional finite element and scattering matrix method for the analysis of plane wave diffraction by bi-periodic, multilayered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dossou, Kokou B.; Botten, Lindsay C.

    2012-08-15

    A three-dimensional finite element method (FEM) for the analysis of plane wave diffraction by a bi-periodic slab is described and implemented. A scattering matrix formalism based on the FEM allows the efficient treatment of light reflection and transmission by multilayer bi-periodic structures, and the computation of Bloch modes of three-dimensional arrays. Numerical simulations, which show the accuracy and flexibility of the FEM, are presented.

  12. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the D0 Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeninger, Kevin Alexander; /Bonn U.

    2004-04-01

    Using a data set of 158 and 169 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run-II data in the electron and muon plus jets channel, respectively, the top quark mass has been measured using the Matrix Element Method. The method and its implementation are described. Its performance is studied in Monte Carlo using ensemble tests and the method is applied to the Moriond 2004 data set.

  13. Genomic matrix attachment region and chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays identify novel putative regulatory elements at the imprinted Dlk1/Gtl2 locus.

    PubMed

    Braem, Caroline; Recolin, Bénédicte; Rancourt, Rebecca C; Angiolini, Christopher; Barthès, Pauline; Branchu, Priscillia; Court, Franck; Cathala, Guy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Forné, Thierry

    2008-07-04

    We previously showed that genomic imprinting regulates matrix attachment region activities at the mouse Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) locus and that these activities are functionally linked to neighboring differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Here, we investigate the similarly structured Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinted domain and show that in the mouse liver, the G/C-rich intergenic germ line-derived DMR, a sequence involved in domain-wide imprinting, is highly retained within the nuclear matrix fraction exclusively on the methylated paternal copy, reflecting its differential function on that chromosome. Therefore, not only "classical" A/T-rich matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences but also other important regulatory DNA elements (such as DMRs) can be recovered from genomic MAR assays following a high salt treatment. Interestingly, the recovery of one A/T-rich sequence (MAR4) from the "nuclear matrix" fraction is strongly correlated with gene expression. We show that this element possesses an intrinsic activity that favors transcription, and using chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays, we demonstrate that the MAR4 interacts with the intergenic germ line-derived DMR specifically on the paternal allele but not with the Dlk1/Gtl2 promoters. Altogether, our findings shed a new light on gene regulation at this locus.

  14. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.

  15. On the Use of Finite Difference Matrix-Vector Products in Newton-Krylov Solvers for Implicit Climate Dynamics with Spectral Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, David; Woodward, Carol S.; Evans, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solution of global climate models requires effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a time step dictated by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability governed by the fastest of the time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton s method is applied for these systems. Each iteration of the Newton s method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite-difference which may show a loss of accuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite-difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral-element based shallow-water dynamical-core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM).

  16. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    DOE PAGES

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but thismore » Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.« less

  17. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography.

    PubMed

    Somodi, P K; Twitchett-Harrison, A C; Midgley, P A; Kardynał, B E; Barnes, C H W; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p-n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p-n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices.

  18. Shapes of the 16N and 15C beta spectra and extraction of matrix elements for 15C(β-)15N(g.s.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, E. K.; Alburger, D. E.; Millener, D. J.

    1984-06-01

    The 16N and 15C spectra measured by Alburger, Gallmann, and Wilkinson were reanalyzed to obtain more accurate branching ratios as well as a shape factor for the first-forbidden, nonunique 15C(12+)-->15N(12-) decay. 16N β- branches were derived to the levels at 0 and 6.13 MeV of 27.9(5)% and 66.3(6)%, respectively; 15C β- branches were found to 15N levels at 0 and 5.30 MeV of 36.8(8)% and 63.2(8)%, respectively. The 15C shape factor was found to deviate significantly from the allowed shape. Analysis of the shape factor results in the determination of the rank zero component of the transition and determination of the two independent matrix elements which contribute to the rank one component. The possible role of muon capture in determining the rank zero matrix elements is considered. Comparisons, for both the 15C(12+)-->15N(12-) and 16N(0-)-->16O(0+) transitions, are made to shell-model calculations with particular emphasis on the sensitivity of the nuclear matrix elements to the choice of the single particle wave function. It is found that rank zero rates calculated with Woods-Saxon wave functions are much smaller than those calculated with harmonic oscillator wave functions. Possible meson-exchange contributions to the rank zero rates are discussed in light of this finding.

  19. High-Energy Anomaly in the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectra of Nd2-xCexCuO4: Evidence for a Matrix Element Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rienks, E. D. L.; ńrrälä, M.; Lindroos, M.; Roth, F.; Tabis, W.; Yu, G.; Greven, M.; Fink, J.

    2014-09-01

    We use polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the high-energy anomaly (HEA) in the dispersion of Nd2-xCexCuO4, x =0.123. We find that at particular photon energies the anomalous, waterfall-like dispersion gives way to a broad, continuous band. This suggests that the HEA is a matrix element effect: it arises due to a suppression of the intensity of the broadened quasiparticle band in a narrow momentum range. We confirm this interpretation experimentally, by showing that the HEA appears when the matrix element is suppressed deliberately by changing the light polarization. Calculations of the matrix element using atomic wave functions and simulation of the ARPES intensity with one-step model calculations provide further evidence for this scenario. The possibility to detect the full quasiparticle dispersion further allows us to extract the high-energy self-energy function near the center and at the edge of the Brillouin zone.

  20. Targeting heterochromatin formation to transposable elements in Drosophila: potential roles of the piRNA system.

    PubMed

    Sentmanat, M; Wang, S H; Elgin, S C R

    2013-06-01

    Successful heterochromatin formation is critical for genome stability in eukaryotes, both to maintain structures needed for mitosis and meiosis and to silence potentially harmful transposable elements. Conversely, inappropriate heterochromatin assembly can lead to inappropriate silencing and other deleterious effects. Hence targeting heterochromatin assembly to appropriate regions of the genome is of utmost importance. Here we focus on heterochromatin assembly in Drosophila melanogaster, the model organism in which variegation, or cell-to-cell variable gene expression resulting from heterochromatin formation, was first described. In particular, we review the potential role of transposable elements as genetic determinants of the chromatin state and examine how small RNA pathways may participate in the process of targeted heterochromatin formation.

  1. Fatigue Crack Growth and Retardation Due to Overloads in Metal-Matrix Composites. Volume 2. Finite Element Analysis of Cracks in Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    ALUNIUNI, ELASTOPLASTIC IL I 04 I BEHAVIOR, ORTHOTROPIC .MATERIAL, PLASTIC ZONES, CRACKS, | i I FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSTq 19 ABSTRACT ’Continue on FrI, if...n,,earý, a.d idantify blo bioc ,number# The general three dimensional flow rule for aisotropic plasticity is derived and explicitly defined for the...elemet program, ANFIAST, is developed to analyze nom-linear orthotropic elastic- plastic problems. An in depth elastoplastic study of a sheet with a

  2. The use of Ixaru's method in locating the poles of the S-matrix in strictly finite-range potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Vertse, Tamas; Lovas, R. G.; Racz, A.; Salamon, P.

    2012-09-26

    Energies of the S-matrix poles are calculated by solving the radial Schroedinger equation numerically by using Ixaru's CPM(2) method. The trajectories of the poles in the complex wave number plane are determined for two nuclear potentials that are zero beyond finite distances. These are the Woods-Saxon form with cutoff and the Salamon-Vertse potential, which goes to zero smoothly at a finite distance. Properties of the trajectories are analyzed for real and complex values of the depths of the corresponding potentials.

  3. Influence of irradiation on the osteoinductive potential of demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Wientroub, S; Reddi, A H

    1988-04-01

    Samples of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) were exposed to graduated doses of radiation (1-15 Megarad) (Mrad) utilizing a linear accelerator and then implanted into the thoracic region of Long-Evans rats. Subcutaneous implantation of DBM into allogenic rats induces endochondral bone. In response to matrix implantation, a cascade of events ensues; mesenchymal cell proliferation on day 3 postimplantation, chondrogenesis on day 7, calcification of the cartilagenous matrix and chondrolysis on day 9, and osteogenesis on day 11 resulting in formation of an ossicle containing active hemopoietic tissue. Bone formation was assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity, the rate of mineralization was determined by measuring 45Ca incorporation to bone mineral, and 40Ca content measured the extent of mineralization; acid phosphatase activity was used as a parameter for bone resorption. The dose of radiation (2.5 Mrad) currently used by bone banks for sterilization of bone tissue did not destroy the bone induction properties of DBM. Furthermore, radiation of 3-5 Mrad even enhanced bone induction, insofar as it produced more bone at the same interval of time than was obtained from unirradiated control samples. None of the radiation doses used in these experiments abolished bone induction, although the response induced by matrix irradiated with doses higher than 5 Mrad was delayed.

  4. Fractionation of the Gulf Toadfish Intestinal Precipitate Organic Matrix Reveals Potential Functions of Individual Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Kevin L; Grosell, Martin

    2017-03-15

    The regulatory mechanisms behind the production of CaCO3 in the marine teleost intestine are poorly studied despite being essential for osmoregulation and responsible for a conservatively estimated 3-15% of annual oceanic CaCO3 production. It has recently been reported that the intestinally derived precipitates produced by fish as a byproduct of their osmoregulatory strategy form in conjunction with a proteinaceous matrix containing nearly 150 unique proteins. The individual functions of these proteins have not been the subject of investigation until now. Here, organic matrix was extracted from precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) and the matrix proteins were fractionated by their charge using strong anion exchange chromatography. The precipitation regulatory abilities of the individual fractions were then analyzed using a recently developed in vitro calcification assay, and the protein constituents of each fraction were determined by mass spectrometry. The different fractions were found to have differing effects on both the rate of carbonate mineral production, as well as the morphology of the crystals that form. Using data collected from the calcification assay as well as the mass spectrometry experiments, individual calcification promotional indices were calculated for each protein, giving the first insight into the functions each of these matrix proteins may play in regulating precipitation.

  5. Potentially toxic elements in foodcrops: Triticum aestivum L., Zea mays L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Claudio; Fontana, Silvia; Squizzato, Stefania; Minello, Fabiola; Fornasier, Flavio; Wahsha, Mohammad

    2013-04-01

    Soil is the basis of the ecosystems and of our system of food production. Crops can uptake heavy metals and potentially toxic elements from the soil and store them in the roots or translocate them to the aerial parts. Excessive content of these elements in edible parts can produce toxic effects and, through the food chain and food consumption, result in a potential hazard for human health. In this study soils and plants (spring wheat, Triticum aestivum L. and maize, Zea mays L.) from a tannery district in North-East Italy were analyzed to determine pedological characters, soil microbial indicators and the content of some major and micro-nutrients and potentially toxic elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, S, Zn, V). The soils of the area are moderately polluted; Cr is the most important inorganic contaminant, followed by Ni, Cu and V. Factor analysis evidenced that the contaminants are in part anthropogenic and in part geogenic. Major anthropogenic origin was detected for Cr, Ni (from industrial activities), Zn, Cu, Cd (from agriculture practices). Biological Absorption Coefficient (BAC) from soil to plant roots and Translocation factor (TF) within the plant were calculated; major nutrients (K, P, S) and some micronutrients (Cu, Zn, Mg, Mn) are easily absorbed and translocated, whilst other nutrients (Ca, Fe) and potentially toxic elements or micronutrients (Al, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, V) are not accumulated in the seeds of the two considered species. However, the two edible species proved differently able to absorb and translocate elements, and this suggests to consider separately every species as potential PHEs transporter to the food chain and to humans. Cr concentrations in seeds and other aerial parts (stem and leaves) of the examined plants are higher than the values found for the same species and for other cereals grown on unpolluted soils. Comparing the Cr levels in edible parts with recommended dietary intake, besides other possible Cr sources

  6. Spin-multipole nuclear matrix elements in the p n quasiparticle random-phase approximation: Implications for β and β β half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostensalo, Joel; Suhonen, Jouni

    2017-01-01

    Half-lives for 148 potentially measurable 2nd-, 3rd-, 4th-, 5th-, 6th-, and 7th-forbidden unique beta transitions are predicted. To achieve this, the ratio of the nuclear matrix elements (NMEs), calculated by the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA), MpnQRPA, and a two-quasiparticle (two-qp) model, Mqp, is studied and compared with earlier calculations for the allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) 1+ and first-forbidden spin-dipole (SD) 2- transitions. The present calculations are done using realistic single-particle model spaces and G -matrix based microscopic two-body interactions. In terms of the ratio k =MpnQRPA/Mqp the studied decays fall into two groups: for GROUP 1, which consists of transitions involving non-magic nuclei, the ratio turns out to be k =0.29 ±0.15 . For GROUP 2, consisting of transitions involving semimagic nuclei, the ratio is 0.5-0.8 for half of the decays and less than 5 ×10-3 for the other half. The magnitudes of the NMEs for several nuclei of GROUP 2 depend sensitively on the size of the used single-particle space and the energies of few key single-particle orbitals used in the pnQRPA calculation, while no such dependence is found for the transitions involving nuclei of GROUP 1. Comparing the NME ratios k of GROUP 1 with those of the earlier GT and SD calculations, where also experimental data are available, the expected "experimental" half-lives for the decays between the 0+ ground state of the even-even reference nuclei and the Jπ=3+,4-,5+,6-,7+,8- states of the neighboring odd-odd nuclei are derived for possible experimental verification. The present results could also shed light to the magnitudes of the NMEs corresponding to the high-forbidden unique 0+→Jπ=3+,4-,5+,6-,7+,8- virtual transitions taking part in the neutrinoless double beta decays.

  7. Arabidopsis and the Genetic Potential for the Phytoremediation of Toxic Elemental and Organic Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Cobbett, Christopher S.; Meagher, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    In a process called phytoremediation, plants can be used to extract, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic pollutants from soil, water, and air. Phytoremediation may become an essential tool in cleaning the environment and reducing human and animal exposure to potential carcinogens and other toxins. Arabidopsis has provided useful information about the genetic, physiological, and biochemical mechanisms behind phytoremediation, and it is an excellent model genetic organism to test foreign gene expression. This review focuses on Arabidopsis studies concerning: 1) the remediation of elemental pollutants; 2) the remediation of organic pollutants; and 3) the phytoremediation genome. Elemental pollutants include heavy metals and metalloids (e.g., mercury, lead, cadmium, arsenic) that are immutable. The general goal of phytoremediation is to extract, detoxify, and hyperaccumulate elemental pollutants in above-ground plant tissues for later harvest. A few dozen Arabidopsis genes and proteins that play direct roles in the remediation of elemental pollutants are discussed. Organic pollutants include toxic chemicals such as benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, polychlorinated biphenyls, trichloroethylene, trinitrotoluene, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane. Phytoremediation of organic pollutants is focused on their complete mineralization to harmless products, however, less is known about the potential of plants to act on complex organic chemicals. A preliminary survey of the Arabidopsis genome suggests that as many as 700 genes encode proteins that have the capacity to act directly on environmental pollutants or could be modified to do so. The potential of the phytoremediation proteome to be used to reduce human exposure to toxic pollutants appears to be enormous and untapped. PMID:22303204

  8. Simulation of 2D Brain's Potential Distribution Based on Two Electrodes ECVT Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirait, S. H.; Edison, R. E.; Baidillah, M. R.; Taruno, W. P.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to simulate the potential distribution of 2D brain geometry based on two electrodes ECVT. ECVT (electrical capacitance tomography) is a tomography modality which produces dielectric distribution image of a subject from several capacitance electrodes measurements. This study begins by producing the geometry of 2D brain based on MRI image and then setting the boundary conditions on the boundaries of the geometry. The values of boundary conditions follow the potential values used in two electrodes brain ECVT, and for this reason the first boundary is set to 20 volt and 2.5 MHz signal and another boundary is set to ground. Poisson equation is implemented as the governing equation in the 2D brain geometry and finite element method is used to solve the equation. Simulated Hodgkin-Huxley action potential is applied as disturbance potential in the geometry. We divide this study into two which comprises simulation without disturbance potential and simulation with disturbance potential. From this study, each of time dependent potential distributions from non-disturbance and disturbance potential of the 2D brain geometry has been generated.

  9. Non-negative matrix factorization for the near real-time interpretation of absorption effects in elemental distribution images acquired by X-ray fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfeld, Matthias; Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Bauckhage, Christian; Kersting, Kristian; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Barriobero-Vila, Pere; Requena, Guillermo; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Elemental distribution images acquired by imaging X-ray fluorescence analysis can contain high degrees of redundancy and weakly discernible correlations. In this article near real-time non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is described for the analysis of a number of data sets acquired from samples of a bi-modal α+β Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn alloy. NMF was used for the first time to reveal absorption artefacts in the elemental distribution images of the samples, where two phases of the alloy, namely α and β, were in superposition. The findings and interpretation of the NMF results were confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation of the layered alloy system. Furthermore, it is shown how the simultaneous factorization of several stacks of elemental distribution images provides uniform basis vectors and consequently simplifies the interpretation of the representation.

  10. Potentially hazardous elements in coal: Modes of occurrence and summary of concentration data for coal components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Mode-of-occurrence data are summarized for 13 potentially hazardous elements (Be, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Hg, Pb, Th, U) in coal. Recent work has refined mode-of-occurrence data for Ni, Cr, and As, as compared to previous summaries. For Cr, dominant modes of occurrence include the clay mineral illite, an amorphous CrO(OH) phase, and Cr-bearing spinels. Nickel is present in Fe-sulfides (pyrite and marcasite) and is also organically bound. Arsenic-bearing pyrite may be the dominant host of As in bituminous coals. Concentration data for the 13 HAPs, obtained primarily by quantitative microanalysis techniques, are compiled for mineral and organic portions of coal. HAPs element concentrations are greatest in Fe-sulfides, and include maxima of 2,300 ppm (Co), 4,500 ppm (Ni), 4.9wt.% (As), 2,000 ppm (Se), 171 ppm (Hg), and 5,500 ppm (Pb). Trace-element microanalysis is a significant refinement over bulk methods, and shows that there is considerable trace-element variation on a fine scale for a given coal, and from one coal to another. ?? 1998 OPA (Overseas Publishers Association) N.V. Published by license under the Gordon and Breach Science Publishers imprint.

  11. Microplastics and potentially toxic elements in coastal sediments of Iran's main oil terminal (Khark Island).

    PubMed

    Akhbarizadeh, Razegheh; Moore, Farid; Keshavarzi, Behnam; Moeinpour, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Marine pollutants are becoming a growing concern due to their ecological consequences. This study investigates the potential risk posed by microplastics and toxic elements in coastal sediments of Khark Island, the main oil export hub of Iran. Principal component biplots exhibited a significant positive correlation between microplastic quantities (ranging in shape and color) and concentration of heavy metals with industrial activity. Source identification of the heavy metals indicated both natural and anthropogenic origin. Quality and risk assessment of the sediments revealed low to moderate pollution of Zn, Mo, Pb, Cu, Cd and As in some stations. Results of metal fractionation in sediments demonstrated that Cd, Mn, Zn, As and Pb are capable of posing a serious ecological risk due to potential bioavailability. Microplastics, mostly fragments and fibers, were detected in all sediment samples (ranging from 59 to 217 items/200 g dry sediment). A relatively good significant linear relationship exists between microplastic quantities and potentially toxic element/polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in coastal sediments. The results of this study confirmed the key role of microplastics as a "potential contaminant vector" for other types of pollutants.

  12. Long-term analysis of elemental content in airborne particulate matter by PIXE and positive matrix factorization: Annual trends and seasonal variability during 2003 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pražnikar, Jure; Cepak, Franka; Žibert, Janez

    2014-09-01

    In the presented study a comprehensive statistical analysis of the chemical composition of atmospheric particulate matter was carried out. The data were collected from April 2003 to August 2008 with a 7-day time resolution in the Northern Adriatic Port of Koper and analyzed by the Proton Induced X-ray method (PIXE). The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of fifteen chemical elements identified six source factors, three natural-regional sources and three local-anthropogenic sources. Heavy machinery, industry and iron ore factor were marked as anthropogenic sources. Heavy machinery source was represented by the elements V, Ni and Cu. The elements Fe and Mn are attributed to the Iron ore source and were explained by the proximity of the bulk-cargo warehouse and the intense handling of iron ore in Port of Koper. The heavy industry source represented by Pb and Zn was the only anthropogenic factor, which shows clear seasonal pattern. In contrast to the local-anthropogenic source factors, natural and regional source factors show significant negative trend. The reduction of the crustal elements Ca, Ti and Sr, joined in a soil source, and sulfur-biomass source, represented by elements K and S, have been attributed to more intense precipitation and to the negative trend of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. The negative trend of the Cl and Br elements was in line with the negative trend of the wind speed above the sea surface and the significant sea-wave height.

  13. Detection of Matrix Elements and Trace Impurities in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Photovoltaic Absorbers Using Surface Analytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Haidong; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-10-01

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films are well known as the next-generation solar cell materials notable for their high absorption coefficient for solar radiation, suitable band gap, and ability for deposition on flexible substrate materials, allowing the production of highly flexible and lightweight solar panels. To improve solar cell performances, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is much needed. In this study, Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin films were prepared on molybdenum back contacts deposited on soda-lime glass substrates via three-stage evaporation. Surface analyses via AES and SIMS were used to characterize the CIGS thin films and compare their depth profiles. We determined the average concentration of the matrix elements, Cu, In, Ga, and Se, using ICP-AES, XRF, and EPMA. We also obtained depth profiling results using TOF-SIMS, magnetic sector SIMS and AES, and APT, a sub-nanometer resolution characterization technique that enables three-dimensional elemental mapping. The SIMS technique, with its high detection limit and ability to obtain the profiles of elements in parallel, is a powerful tool for monitoring trace elements in CIGS thin films. To identify impurities in a CIGS layer, the distribution of trace elements was also observed according to depth by SIMS and APT.

  14. Preliminary Assessment of Health Risks of Potentially Toxic Elements in Settled Dust over Beijing Urban Area.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dejun; Zhan, Changlin; Yang, Guanglin; Liu, Xingqi; Yang, Jinsong

    2016-05-11

    To examine levels, health risks, sources, and spatial distributions of potentially toxic elements in settled dust over Beijing urban area, 62 samples were collected mostly from residential building outdoor surfaces, and their <63 μm fractions were measured for 12 potentially toxic elements. The results show that V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Ba in dust are from predominantly natural sources, whereas Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, and Pb mostly originate from anthropogenic sources. Exposure to these elements in dust has significant non-cancer risks to children but insignificant to adults. Cancer risks of Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Cd via inhalation and dermal contact are below the threshold of 10(-6)-10(-4) but As via dust ingestion shows a tolerable risk. The non-cancer risks to children are contributed mainly (75%) by As, Pb, and Sb, and dominantly (92%) via dust ingestion, with relatively higher risks mainly occurring in the eastern and northeastern Beijing urban areas. Although Cd, Zn, and Cu in dust are heavily affected by anthropogenic sources, their health risks are insignificant. Source appointments suggest that coal burning emissions, the dominant source of As, are likely the largest contributors to the health risk, and traffic-related and industrial emissions are also important because they contribute most of the Pb and Sb in dust.

  15. Potentially-toxic and essential elements profile of AH1N1 patients in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Mireya; Bautista, Edgar G.; Velázquez-González, Antonio; Vázquez-Gutiérrez, Felipe; Tzintzun, Guadalupe; García-Arreola, María Elena; Castillejos, Manuel; Hernández, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    During spring of 2009, a new influenza virus AH1N1 spread in the world causing acute respiratory illness and death, resulting in the first influenza pandemic since 1968. Blood levels of potentially-toxic and essential elements of 40 pneumonia and confirmed AH1N1 were evaluated against two different groups of controls, both not infected with the pandemic strain. Significant concentrations of potentially-toxic elements (lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, arsenic) along with deficiency of selenium or increased Zn/Cu ratios characterized AH1N1 cases under study when evaluated versus controlled cases. Deficiency of selenium is progressively observed from controls I (influenza like illness) through controls II (pneumonia) and finally pneumonia -AH1N1 infected patients. Cases with blood Se levels greater than the recommended for an optimal cut-off to activate glutathione peroxidase (12.5 μg/dL) recovered from illness and survived. Evaluation of this essential element in critical pneumonia patients at the National Institutes is under evaluation as a clinical trial. PMID:23422930

  16. Coupling Finite Element and Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Methods for Two-Dimensional Potential Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T.; Raju, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) method and meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method for analyzing two-dimensional potential problems is presented in this paper. The analysis domain is subdivided into two regions, a finite element (FE) region and a meshless (MM) region. A single weighted residual form is written for the entire domain. Independent trial and test functions are assumed in the FE and MM regions. A transition region is created between the two regions. The transition region blends the trial and test functions of the FE and MM regions. The trial function blending is achieved using a technique similar to the 'Coons patch' method that is widely used in computer-aided geometric design. The test function blending is achieved by using either FE or MM test functions on the nodes in the transition element. The technique was evaluated by applying the coupled method to two potential problems governed by the Poisson equation. The coupled method passed all the patch test problems and gave accurate solutions for the problems studied.

  17. Study of road dust magnetic phases as the main carrier of potentially harmful trace elements.

    PubMed

    Bourliva, Anna; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Aidona, Elina

    2016-05-15

    Mineralogical and morphological characteristics and heavy metal content of different fractions (bulk, non-magnetic fraction-NMF and magnetic fraction-MF) of road dusts from the city of Thessaloniki (Northern Greece) were investigated. Main emphasis was given on the magnetic phases extracted from these dusts. High magnetic susceptibility values were presented, whereas the MFs content of road dust samples ranged in 2.2-14.7 wt.%. Thermomagnetic analyses indicated that the dominating magnetic carrier in all road dust samples was magnetite, while the presence of hematite and iron sulphides in the investigated samples cannot be excluded. SEM/EDX analyses identified two groups of ferrimagnetic particles: spherules with various surface morphologies and textures and angular/aggregate particles with elevated heavy metal contents, especially Cr. The road dusts (bulk samples) were dominated by calcium, while the mean concentrations of trace elements decreased in the order Zn > Mn > Cu > Pb > Cr > Ni > V > Sn > As > Sb > Co > Mo > W > Cd. MFs exhibited significantly higher concentrations of trace elements compared to NMFs indicating that these potentially harmful elements (PHEs) are preferentially enriched in the MFs and highly associated with the ferrimagnetic particles. Hazard Index (HI) obtained for both adults and children through exposure to bulk dust samples were lower or close to the safe level (=1). On the contrary, the HIs for the magnetic phases indicated that both children and adults are experiencing potential health risk since HI for Cr was significantly higher than safe level. Cancer risk due to road dust exposure is low.

  18. Preliminary Assessment of Health Risks of Potentially Toxic Elements in Settled Dust over Beijing Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Dejun; Zhan, Changlin; Yang, Guanglin; Liu, Xingqi; Yang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    To examine levels, health risks, sources, and spatial distributions of potentially toxic elements in settled dust over Beijing urban area, 62 samples were collected mostly from residential building outdoor surfaces, and their <63 μm fractions were measured for 12 potentially toxic elements. The results show that V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Ba in dust are from predominantly natural sources, whereas Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Sb, and Pb mostly originate from anthropogenic sources. Exposure to these elements in dust has significant non-cancer risks to children but insignificant to adults. Cancer risks of Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Cd via inhalation and dermal contact are below the threshold of 10−6–10−4 but As via dust ingestion shows a tolerable risk. The non-cancer risks to children are contributed mainly (75%) by As, Pb, and Sb, and dominantly (92%) via dust ingestion, with relatively higher risks mainly occurring in the eastern and northeastern Beijing urban areas. Although Cd, Zn, and Cu in dust are heavily affected by anthropogenic sources, their health risks are insignificant. Source appointments suggest that coal burning emissions, the dominant source of As, are likely the largest contributors to the health risk, and traffic-related and industrial emissions are also important because they contribute most of the Pb and Sb in dust. PMID:27187427

  19. Trace element speciation by ICP-MS in large biomolecules and its potential for proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Montes-Bayón, María; Luisa Fernández Sánchez, María

    2003-09-01

    Latest studies on the chemical association of trace elements to large biomolecules and their importance on the bioinorganic and clinical fields are examined. The complexity of the speciation of metal-biomolecules associations in various biological fluids is stressed. Analytical strategies to tackle speciation analysis and the-state-of-the-art of the instrumentation employed for this purpose are critically reviewed. Hyphenated techniques based on coupling chromatographic separation techniques with ICP-MS detection are now established as the most realistic and potent analytical tools available for real-life speciation analysis. Therefore, the status and potential of metal and semimetals elemental speciation in large biocompounds using ICP-MS detection is mainly focused here by reviewing reported metallo-complexes separations using size-exclusion (SEC), ion-exchange (IE), reverse phase chromatography (RP) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Species of interest include coordination complexes of metals with larger proteins (e.g. in serum, breat milk, etc.) and metallothioneins (e.g. in cytosols from animals and plants) as well as selenoproteins (e.g. in nutritional supplements), DNA-cisplatin adducts and metal/semimetal binding to carbohydrates. An effort is made to assess the potential of present trace elements speciation knowledge and techniques for "heteroatom-tagged" (via ICP-MS) proteomics.

  20. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, Petra

    2008-07-31

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with theW boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t $\\bar{t}$ →W±W b$\\bar{b}$ →q $\\bar{t}$lnb$\\bar{b}$ is the ”golden channel” for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: mt = (169.2±3.5(stat.)±1.0(syst.)) GeV . The

  1. Matrix metalloproteinases: their potential role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, R. Clay; Fowlkes, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of proteinases including collagenases, gelatinases, stromely-sins, matrilysins, and membrane-type MMPs, affect the breakdown and turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM).Moreover, they are major physiologic determinants of ECM degradation and turnover in the glomerulus. Renal hypertrophy and abnormal ECM deposition are hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy (DN), suggesting that altered MMP expression or activation contributes to renal injury in DN. Herein, we review and summarize recent information supporting a role for MMPs in the pathogenesis of DN. Specifically, studies describing dysregulated activity of MMPs and/or their tissue inhibitors in various experimental models of diabetes, including animal models of type 1 or type 2 diabetes, clinical investigations of human type 1 or type 2 diabetes, and kidney cell culture studies are reviewed. PMID:18972226

  2. B s → Kℓν ℓ and B ( s) → π( K) ℓ + ℓ - decays at large recoil and CKM matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodjamirian, Alexander; Rusov, Aleksey V.

    2017-08-01

    We provide hadronic input for the B-meson semileptonic transitions to a light pseudoscalar meson at large recoil. The B s → K form factor calculated from QCD light-cone sum rule is updated, to be used for a | V ub | determination from the B s → Kℓν width. Furthermore, we calculate the hadronic input for the binned observables of B → πℓ + ℓ - and B → Kℓ + ℓ -. In addition to the form factors, the nonlocal hadronic matrix elements are obtained, combining QCD factorization and light-cone sum rules with hadronic dispersion relations. We emphasize that, due to nonlocal effects, the ratio of branching fractions of these decays is not sufficient for an accurate extraction of the | V td /V ts | ratio. Instead, we suggest to determine the Wolfenstein parameters A, ρ, η of the CKM matrix, combining the branching fractions of B → Kℓ + ℓ - and B → πℓ + ℓ - with the direct CP -asymmetry in the latter decay. We also obtain the hadronic matrix elements for a yet unexplored channel B s → Kℓ + ℓ -.

  3. Feature extraction and recognition for rolling element bearing fault utilizing short-time Fourier transform and non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huizhong; Liang, Lin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Xu, Guanghua

    2015-01-01

    Due to the non-stationary characteristics of vibration signals acquired from rolling element bearing fault, the time-frequency analysis is often applied to describe the local information of these unstable signals smartly. However, it is difficult to classify the high dimensional feature matrix directly because of too large dimensions for many classifiers. This paper combines the concepts of time-frequency distribution(TFD) with non-negative matrix factorization(NMF), and proposes a novel TFD matrix factorization method to enhance representation and identification of bearing fault. Throughout this method, the TFD of a vibration signal is firstly accomplished to describe the localized faults with short-time Fourier transform(STFT). Then, the supervised NMF mapping is adopted to extract the fault features from TFD. Meanwhile, the fault samples can be clustered and recognized automatically by using the clustering property of NMF. The proposed method takes advantages of the NMF in the parts-based representation and the adaptive clustering. The localized fault features of interest can be extracted as well. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the 9 kinds of the bearing fault on a test bench is performed. The proposed method can effectively identify the fault severity and different fault types. Moreover, in comparison with the artificial neural network(ANN), NMF yields 99.3% mean accuracy which is much superior to ANN. This research presents a simple and practical resolution for the fault diagnosis problem of rolling element bearing in high dimensional feature space.

  4. EFFECT OF COULOMB COLLISIONS ON THE GRAVITATIONAL SETTLING OF LOW AND HIGH FIRST IONIZATION POTENTIAL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Iselin M. Th.; Esser, Ruth; Lie-Svendsen, Oystein E-mail: ruth.esser@uit.no

    2013-05-20

    We model the effect of gravitational settling in the upper chromosphere on O, Fe, Si, and Ne, studying whether Coulomb collisions between ionized low First Ionization Potential (FIP) elements and protons is sufficient to cause abundance enhancements relative to oxygen. We find that low-FIP abundance enhancements comparable to observed values can be obtained provided the hydrogen ionization degree lies in the approximate range 10%-30%, which agrees with chromospheric models. Lower or higher hydrogen ionization causes the FIP-effect to become smaller or absent (depletion of all heavy elements). Iron must be almost fully ionized in order to become enriched relative to high-FIP elements, and this requires a high iron photoionization rate. The time scale necessary to produce the enrichment increases rapidly with increasing H ionization. For iron in a background from a semiempirical chromospheric model, with an H ion fraction of the order of 30%-40% in the upper chromosphere, 1-2 hr of settling is required to produce enhancements comparable to observations. The absolute abundance (relative to H), which monotonically decreases with time during settling, has by that time decreased by less than 50% in the same altitude region. With the same background conditions, the silicon abundance is more strongly enhanced by the settling than the iron abundance. The high-FIP element neon is depleted, relative to O and low-FIP elements, in the same background and altitude region where iron is enhanced, typically by 50% or more relative to O after 1-2 hr of settling.

  5. Individual complex Dirac eigenvalue distributions from random matrix theory and comparison to quenched lattice QCD with a quark chemical potential.

    PubMed

    Akemann, G; Bloch, J; Shifrin, L; Wettig, T

    2008-01-25

    We analyze how individual eigenvalues of the QCD Dirac operator at nonzero quark chemical potential are distributed in the complex plane. Exact and approximate analytical results for both quenched and unquenched distributions are derived from non-Hermitian random matrix theory. When comparing these to quenched lattice QCD spectra close to the origin, excellent agreement is found for zero and nonzero topology at several values of the quark chemical potential. Our analytical results are also applicable to other physical systems in the same symmetry class.

  6. Individual Complex Dirac Eigenvalue Distributions from Random Matrix Theory and Comparison to Quenched Lattice QCD with a Quark Chemical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Akemann, G.; Shifrin, L.; Bloch, J.; Wettig, T.

    2008-01-25

    We analyze how individual eigenvalues of the QCD Dirac operator at nonzero quark chemical potential are distributed in the complex plane. Exact and approximate analytical results for both quenched and unquenched distributions are derived from non-Hermitian random matrix theory. When comparing these to quenched lattice QCD spectra close to the origin, excellent agreement is found for zero and nonzero topology at several values of the quark chemical potential. Our analytical results are also applicable to other physical systems in the same symmetry class.

  7. Bioconcentration potential of metallic elements by Poison Pax (Paxillus involutus) mushroom.

    PubMed

    Brzostowski, Andrzej; Falandysz, Jerzy; Jarzyńska, Grazyna; Zhang, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Bioconcentration potential of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sr, Pb, Rb and Zn by Pioson Pax (Paxillus involutus) fungus was investigated in field collections of mushrooms from 12 geographically distant sites in Poland. Caps, stipes and soil (0-15 cm layer) underneath to the fruiting bodies were examined. Inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the total metallic elements content. Both "labile" (cold 20% HNO(3) extraction) and "pseudo-total" (cold and hot 65% HNO(3) extraction) fractions of metallic elements of soil were determined. K, Rb and Cu were effectively bio-concentrated by Poison Pax in caps and their BCF values were 1000 ± 520, 740 ± 540 and 100 ± 79, and less were Zn, Na, Mg and Ni with BCF of 40 ± 28, 33 ± 23, 18 ± 10 and 1.9 ± 1.4, respectively. Al, Ba, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Sr and Pb were bio-excluded (BCF < 1 in caps and stipes). The "labile" Ag, Cd and Hg content of soil was below detection limit of the analytical method. Ba, Ca, Mn, Na and Sr were more eficiently bio-concentrated in stipes of Poison Pax, while Fe, Mg, Pb and Rb in caps, and Al, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Ni and Zn similarly in caps and stipes. Also Ag and Cd (and Hg) were more effectively bio-concentrated in caps than stipes. Al, Ba, Fe and Pb were bio-excluded by Poison Pax (BCF < 0.2) but were abundant minerals of soil and more or less abundant also in carpophores. Some intermetallic relationships (co-uptake and binding) are evident for Poison Pax. The amount of "labile" fraction of metallic elements contained in soil doesn't seem to explain the Poisson's Pax accumulation potential for these elements. Biological features of species, which are related to its ability to enable, enhance or reduce uptake of metallic elements by mycelium and further translocation and binding in carpophores but in parallel also translocation to symbiotic plant can be major forces impacting amounts accumulated in caps and stipes

  8. Minor and potentially toxic trace elements in milk and blood serum of dairy donkeys.

    PubMed

    Fantuz, F; Ferraro, S; Todini, L; Piloni, R; Mariani, P; Malissiova, E; Salimei, E

    2015-08-01

    Cs. In the current experimental conditions, in agreement with the low levels in drinking water and feedstuff, donkey milk concentration of potentially toxic elements was very low and did not raise health concerns for human consumption.

  9. Mobile genetic elements of the human gastrointestinal tract: potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Broaders, Eileen; Gahan, Cormac G M; Marchesi, Julian R

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine is an important location for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) due to the presence of a densely populated community of microorganisms which are essential to the health of the human superorganism. HGT in this niche has the potential to influence the evolution of members of this microbial community and to mediate the spread of antibiotic resistance genes from commensal organisms to potential pathogens. Recent culture-independent techniques and metagenomic studies have provided an insight into the distribution of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and the extent of HGT in the human gastrointestinal tract. In this mini-review, we explore the current knowledge of mobile genetic elements in the gastrointestinal tract, the progress of research into the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in the gut and the potential role of MGEs in the spread of antibiotic resistance. In the face of reduced treatment options for many clinical infections, understanding environmental and commensal antibiotic resistance and spread is critical to the future development of meaningful and long lasting anti-microbial therapies.

  10. Complex Source and Radiation Behaviors of Small Elements of Linear and Matrix Flexible Ultrasonic Phased-Array Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amory, V.; Lhémery, A.

    2008-02-01

    Inspection of irregular components is problematical: maladjustment of transducer shoes to surfaces causes aberrations. Flexible phased-arrays (FPAs) designed at CEA LIST to maximize contact are driven by adapted delay laws to compensate for irregularities. Optimizing FPA requires simulation tools. The behavior of one element computed by FEM is observed at the surface and its radiation experimentally validated. Efforts for one element prevent from simulating a FPA by FEM. A model is proposed where each element behaves as nonuniform source of stresses. Exact and asymptotic formulas for Lamb problem are used as convolution kernels for longitudinal, transverse and head waves; the latter is of primary importance for angle-T-beam inspections.

  11. Human predisposition to cognitive impairment and its relation with environmental exposure to potentially toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Cabral Pinto, Marina M S; Marinho-Reis, A Paula; Almeida, Agostinho; Ordens, Carlos M; Silva, Maria M V G; Freitas, Sandra; Simões, Mário R; Moreira, Paula I; Dinis, Pedro A; Diniz, M Luísa; Ferreira da Silva, Eduardo A; Condesso de Melo, M Teresa

    2017-03-09

    New lines of evidence suggest that less than 10% of neurodegenerative diseases have a strict genetic aetiology and other factors may be prevalent. Environmental exposures to potentially toxic elements appear to be a risk factor for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and sclerosis diseases. This study proposes a multidisciplinary approach combining neurosciences, psychology and environmental sciences while integrating socio-economic, neuropsychological, environmental and health data. We present the preliminary results of a neuropsychological assessment carried out in elderly residents of the industrial city of Estarreja. A battery of cognitive tests and a personal questionnaire were administered to the participants. Multivariate analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used to identify potential relationships between the cognitive status of the participants and environmental exposure to potentially toxic elements. The results suggest a relationship between urinary PTEs levels and the incidence of cognitive disorders. They also point towards water consumption habits and profession as relevant factors of exposure. Linear regression models show that aluminium (R (2) = 38%), cadmium (R (2) = 11%) and zinc (R (2) = 6%) are good predictors of the scores of the Mini-Mental State Examination cognitive test. Median contents (µg/l) in groundwater are above admissible levels for drinking water for aluminium (371), iron (860), manganese (250), and zinc (305). While the World Health Organization does not provide health-based reference values for aluminium, results obtained from this study suggest that it may have an important role in the cognitive status of the elderly. Urine proved to be a suitable biomarker of exposure both to elements with low and high excretion rates.

  12. Electrospun Yarn Reinforced NanoHA Composite Matrix as a Potential Bone Substitute for Enhanced Regeneration of Segmental Defects.

    PubMed

    Anitha, A; Joseph, John; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar V; Nair, Manitha B

    2017-04-01

    Nanohydroxyapatite (nanoHA) is a well-established synthetic bone substitute with excellent osteoconduction and osteointegration. However, brittleness coupled with slow degradation curtails its load-bearing and bone regeneration potential, respectively. To address these limitations, nanoHA composite matrix reinforced with electrospun fibrous yarns was fabricated and tested in vitro and in vivo. Different weight percentages (5, 10, 15 wt%) and varying lengths (short and continuous) of poly(l-lactic acid) yarns were randomly dispersed in a gelatinous matrix containing nanoHA. This significantly improved the compressive strength as well as work of fracture, especially for continuous yarns at high weight percentages (10 and 15 wt%). Incorporation of yarns did not adversely affect the pore size (50-350 μm) or porosity of the scaffolds as well as the in vitro cellular response. Finally, when tested in a critical-sized femoral segmental defect in rat, the nanocomposite scaffolds induced osteoblast cell infiltration at 2 months that subsequently underwent increased mature lamellar bone formation at 4 months, in both the mid and peripheral defect regions. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that new bone formation and biomaterial degradation were significantly enhanced in the composite scaffold when compared to commercially available HA. Overall, the composite matrix reinforced with electrospun yarns proved to be a potential bone substitute having an appropriate balance between mechanical strength, porosity, biodegradation, and bone regeneration ability.

  13. Assessment of concentration in contaminated soil by potentially toxic elements using electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Son, Younghwan

    2011-05-01

    Soils contaminated by potentially toxic elements (PTEs) which affect human health, such as zinc, lead, mercury, cadmium, and arsenic, were applied. The aims of this study are to judge contamination of soil and also to evaluate concentration of contaminated soil using electrical properties such as electrical resistivity and permittivity. The frequency was applied in the experiment ranged from 100 Hz to 10 MHz. As a result, the values of electrical resistivity and permittivity of each soil contaminated by PTEs could be presented as a function related to frequency and could determine whether the soil was contaminated. Also, results indicated that electrical properties give a reliable estimation of concentrations of PTEs contamination in soil.

  14. The structure of the human peripherin gene (PRPH) and identification of potential regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, J.; Ley, C.A.; Parysek, L.M.

    1994-07-15

    The authors determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the human peripherin gene (PRPH), as well as 742 bp 5{prime} to the cap site and 584 bp 3{prime} to the stop codon, and compared its structure and sequence to the rat and mouse genes. The overall structure of 9 exons separated by 8 introns is conserved among these three mammalian species. The nucleotide sequences of the human peripherin gene exons were 90% identical to the rat gene sequences, and the predicted human peripherin protein differed from rat peripherin at only 18 of 475 amino acid residues. Comparison of the 5{prime} flanking regions of the human peripherin gene and rodent genes revealed extensive areas of high homology. Additional conserved segments were found in introns 1 and 2. Within the 5{prime} region, potential regulatory sequences, including a nerve growth factor negative regulatory element, a Hox protein binding site, and a heat shock element, were identified in all peripherin genes. The positional conservation of each element suggests that they may be important in the tissue-specific, developmental-specific, and injury-specific expression of the peripherin gene. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Redox potential trend with transition metal elements in lithium-ion battery cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenlian; Li, Jun

    2013-03-01

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate the relationship between the intrinsic voltage and element-lattice for the popular transition metal oxides and polyoxyanionic compounds as cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A V-shape redox potential in olivine phosphates LiMPO4 and orthogonal silicates Li2MSiO4 (M =Mn, Fe, Co, Ni), and an N-shape one in layered oxides LiMO2 (M =Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) relative to transition metal M elements are found to be inversely characteristic of electronic energy contribution, which costs energy in the lithiation process and is defined as electron affinity. The maxima of electron affinity, locating at different elements for different types of crystal lattices are determined by delectronic configurations that cross the turning point of a full occupancy of electronic bands, which is determined by the cooperative effect of crystal field splitting and intraionic exchange interactions. The Ningbo Key Innovation Team, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Postdoctoral Foundation of China

  16. Establishment of a matrix-associated transepithelial resistance invasion assay to precisely measure the invasive potential of synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wunrau, Christina; Schnaeker, Eva-Maria; Freyth, Katharina; Pundt, Noreen; Wendholt, Doreen; Neugebauer, Katja; Hansen, Uwe; Pap, Thomas; Dankbar, Berno

    2009-09-01

    Synovial fibroblasts (SFs) contribute to several aspects of the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and have been implicated most prominently in the progressive destruction of articular cartilage. Targeting the invasive phenotype of RASFs has therefore gained increasing attention, but the precise measurement of their invasive capacity and the evaluation of potential treatment effects constitute a challenge that needs to be addressed. This study used a novel in vitro invasion assay based on the breakdown of transepithelial electrical resistance to determine the course of fibroblast invasion into extracellular matrix. A matrix-associated transepithelial resistance invasion (MATRIN) assay was used to assess SFs from patients with RA in comparison with SFs from patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The SFs were grown on a commercially available collagen mix that was placed onto the upper side of a Transwell polycarbonate membrane. In addition, freshly isolated cartilage extracts were studied to assess the conditions in vivo. Under this membrane, a monolayer of MDCK-C7 cells was seeded to create a high electrical resistance. Invasion of fibroblasts into the matrix affected the integrity of the MDCK-C7 monolayer and led to a measurable decrease and subsequent breakdown of electrical resistance. Unlike in the assay with OASFs, which did not achieve a breakdown of resistance up to 72 hours, RASFs exhibited a pronounced invasiveness in this assay, with a 50% breakdown after 42 hours. Treatment of fibroblasts with either a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor or antibodies against beta1 integrin significantly reduced the invasiveness of RASFs. The MATRIN assay is a valuable and sensitive biologic assay system that can be used to determine precisely the invasive potential of RASFs in vitro, and thus would be suitable for screening anti-invasion compounds.

  17. Demineralized bone matrix as an osteoinductive biomaterial and in vitro predictors of its biological potential.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jordan M; Nataraj, Chandra; Jaw, Rebecca; Deigl, Elizabeth; Bursac, Predrag

    2009-04-01

    The osteoinductivity of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) varies from donor to donor as a result of varying levels of multiple growth factors, matrix integrity, and artifacts from material processing. Many in vitro assays are currently used for screening the osteoinductivity of DBM. The objectives of this study were to determine the correlation of specific growth factors and in vitro mitotic stimulation to in vivo ectopic bone formation capacity with a large number of DBM samples. Samples were assayed using ELISA methods for BMP-2/4 and TGF-beta1 (n = 304) and cell proliferation using SAOS-2 osteoblasts (n = 239). All samples were then implanted intramuscularly in the abdomen of nude rats. All in vitro assays showed significant variability for any particular level of ostoinductivity determined by in vivo model. A significant, but only very weak, positive correlation to in vivo results was found for TGF-beta1 (r(2) = 0.016), BMP 2/4 (r(2) = 0.065), and SAOS-2 cell proliferation (r(2) = 0.053). The results of this study amplify the notion that a multitude of factors and their relative interplay, rather than a single factor are likely to determine the potency of any particular lot of DBM.

  18. LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) is a potential carrier protein for matrix metalloproteinase-9 glycoprotein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Duellman, Tyler; Burnett, John; Shin, Alice; Yang, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a secreted glycoprotein with a major role in shaping the extra-cellular matrix and a detailed understanding of the secretory mechanism could help identify methods to correct diseases resulting from dysregulation of secretion. MMP-9 appears to follow a canonical secretory pathway through a quality control cycle in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before transport of the properly folded protein to the Golgi apparatus and beyond for secretion. Through a complementation assay, we determined that LMAN1, a well-studied lectin-carrier protein, interacts with a secretion-competent N-glycosylated MMP-9 in the ER while N-glycosylation-deficient secretion-compromised MMP-9 does not. In contrast, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated protein interaction between LMAN1 and secretion-compromised N-glycosylation-deficient MMP-9. MMP-9 secretion was reduced in the LMAN1 knockout cell line compared to control cells confirming the functional role of LMAN1. These observations support the role of LMAN1 as a lectin-carrier protein mediating efficient MMP-9 secretion. PMID:26150355

  19. Prenatal urinary matrix metalloproteinase profiling as a potential diagnostic tool in fetal obstructive uropathy.

    PubMed

    Nicksa, Grace A; Yu, David C; Curatolo, Adam S; McNeish, Brendan L; Barnewolt, Carol E; Valim, Clarissa; Buchmiller, Terry L; Moses, Marsha A; Fauza, Dario O

    2010-01-01

    The diagnostic evaluation, patient stratification, and prenatal counseling for congenital obstructive uropathy remain sub-optimal. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression profiles are emerging as a valuable diagnostic tool in assorted disease processes. We sought to determine whether congenital obstructive uropathy impacts MMP expression in fetal urine. Fetal lambs (n = 25) were divided in two groups: group I (n = 12) underwent a sham operation and group II (n = 13) underwent creation of a complete urinary tract obstruction. Gelatin zymography panels for 4 MMP species were performed on fetal urine in both groups at comparable times post-operatively. Statistical analysis was by the Fisher's exact test (P < .05). Overall fetal survival was 80% (20/25). A variety of significant differences in MMP expression between the two groups were identified. The following profiles were present only in obstructed animals: any MMP other than MMP-2 (P = .029), including any MMP other than 63 kDa and 65 kDa (P = .009); 2 or more MMPs excluding MMP-2s (0.029); and 3 or more MMPs (P = .029). Limited matrix metalloproteinase expression is present in the urine of normal ovine fetuses. Fetal obstructive uropathy impacts urinary MMP expression in various distinguishable patterns. Prenatal urinary MMP profiling may become a practical and valuable diagnostic tool in the evaluation of congenital obstructive uropathy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) is a potential carrier protein for matrix metalloproteinase-9 glycoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Duellman, Tyler; Burnett, John; Shin, Alice; Yang, Jay

    2015-08-28

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a secreted glycoprotein with a major role in shaping the extracellular matrix and a detailed understanding of the secretory mechanism could help identify methods to correct diseases resulting from dysregulation of secretion. MMP-9 appears to follow a canonical secretory pathway through a quality control cycle in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before transport of the properly folded protein to the Golgi apparatus and beyond for secretion. Through a complementation assay, we determined that LMAN1, a well-studied lectin-carrier protein, interacts with a secretion-competent N-glycosylated MMP-9 in the ER while N-glycosylation-deficient secretion-compromised MMP-9 does not. In contrast, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated protein interaction between LMAN1 and secretion-compromised N-glycosylation-deficient MMP-9. MMP-9 secretion was reduced in the LMAN1 knockout cell line compared to control cells confirming the functional role of LMAN1. These observations support the role of LMAN1 as a lectin-carrier protein mediating efficient MMP-9 secretion.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinases and protein tyrosine kinases: potential novel targets in acute lung injury and ARDS.

    PubMed

    Aschner, Yael; Zemans, Rachel L; Yamashita, Cory M; Downey, Gregory P

    2014-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS fall within a spectrum of pulmonary disease that is characterized by hypoxemia, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, and dysregulated and excessive inflammation. While mortality rates have improved with the advent of specialized ICUs and lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies, few other therapies have proven effective in the management of ARDS, which remains a significant clinical problem. Further development of biomarkers of disease severity, response to therapy, and prognosis is urgently needed. Several novel pathways have been identified and studied with respect to the pathogenesis of ALI and ARDS that show promise in bridging some of these gaps. This review will focus on the roles of matrix metalloproteinases and protein tyrosine kinases in the pathobiology of ALI in humans, and in animal models and in vitro studies. These molecules can act independently, as well as coordinately, in a feed-forward manner via activation of tyrosine kinase-regulated pathways that are pivotal in the development of ARDS. Specific signaling events involving proteolytic processing by matrix metalloproteinases that contribute to ALI, including cytokine and chemokine activation and release, neutrophil recruitment, transmigration and activation, and disruption of the intact alveolar-capillary barrier, will be explored in the context of these novel molecular pathways.

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinases As Novel Biomarkers and Potential Therapeutic Targets in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Roopali; Yang, Jiang; Moses, Marsha A.

    2009-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of enzymes is comprised of critically important extracellular matrix remodeling proteases whose activity has been implicated in a number of key normal and pathologic processes. The latter include tumor growth, progression, and metastasis as well as the dysregulated angiogenesis that is associated with these events. As a result, these proteases have come to represent important therapeutic and diagnostic targets for the treatment and detection of human cancers. In this review, we summarize the literature that establishes these enzymes as important clinical targets, discuss the complexity surrounding their choice as such, and chronicle the development strategies and outcomes of their clinical testing to date. The status of the MMP inhibitors currently in US Food and Drug Administration approved clinical trials is presented and reviewed. We also discuss the more recent and successful targeting of this enzyme family as diagnostic and prognostic predictors of human cancer, its status, and its stage. This analysis includes a wide variety of human cancers and a number of human sample types including tissue, plasma, serum, and urine. PMID:19738110

  3. Tests on the extracted current density of negative hydrogen ions from a single element of the matrix source

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, St.; Yordanov, D. Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-08

    Concepts for the extraction of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions from a rf matrix source (a matrix of small-radius discharges with a planar-coil inductive driving) are presented and discussed based on experimental results for the current densities of the extracted ions and the co-extracted electrons. The experiment has been carried out in a single discharge of the source: a rf discharge with a radius of 2.25 cm inductively driven by a 3.5-turn planar coil. The length of the discharge tube, the area of the reference electrode inserted in the discharge volume, the discharge modes, the magnetic filter and its position along the discharge length, the position of the permanent magnets for the separation of the co-extracted electrons from the extracted ions in the extraction device and the bias applied to its first electrode are considered as factors influencing the extracted currents of negative ions.

  4. Potentially toxic elements in lignite and its combustion residues from a power plant.

    PubMed

    Ram, L C; Masto, R E; Srivastava, N K; George, J; Selvi, V A; Das, T B; Pal, S K; Maity, S; Mohanty, D

    2015-01-01

    The presence of potentially toxic elements in lignite and coal is a matter of global concern during energy extraction from them. Accordingly, Barsingsar lignite from Rajasthan (India), a newly identified and currently exploited commercial source of energy, was evaluated for the presence of these elements and their fate during its combustion. Mobility of these elements in Barsingsar lignite and its ashes from a power plant (Bikaner-Nagaur region of Thar Desert, India) is presented in this paper. Kaolinite, quartz, and gypsum are the main minerals in lignite. Both the fly ash and bottom ash of lignite belong to class-F with SiO₂ > Al₂O₃ > CaO > MgO. Both the ashes contain quartz, mullite, anhydrite, and albite. As, In, and Sr have higher concentration in the feed than the ashes. Compared to the feed lignite, Ba, Co, U, Cu, Cd, and Ni are enriched (10-5 times) in fly ash and Co, Pb, Li, Ga, Cd, and U in bottom ash (9-5 times). Earth crust-normalization pattern showed enrichment of Ga, U, B, Ag, Cd, and Se in the lignite; Li, Ba, Ga, B, Cu, Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se, in fly ash; and Li, Sr, Ga, U, B, Cu, Ag, Cd, Pb, and Se in bottom ash. Hg, Ag, Zn, Ni, Ba, and Se are possibly associated with pyrite. Leaching test by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) showed that except B all the elements are within the safe limits prescribed by Indian Standards.

  5. Nuclear matrix elements for 0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays: Comparative analysis of the QRPA, shell model and IBM predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Civitarese, Osvaldo; Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    In this work we report on general properties of the nuclear matrix elements involved in the neutrinoless double β{sup −} decays (0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays) of several nuclei. A summary of the values of the NMEs calculated along the years by the Jyväskylä-La Plata collaboration is presented. These NMEs, calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), are compared with those of the other available calculations, like the Shell Model (ISM) and the interacting boson model (IBA-2)

  6. Matrix elements for the ground-state to ground-state 2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -} decay of Te isotopes in a hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, D. R.; Civitarese, O.

    2010-01-15

    Theoretical matrix elements, for the ground-state to ground-state two-neutrino double-{beta}-decay mode (2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -}gs->gs) of {sup 128,130}Te isotopes, are calculated within a formalism that describes interactions between neutrons in a superfluid phase and protons in a normal phase. The elementary degrees of freedom of the model are proton-pair modes and pairs of protons and quasineutrons. The calculation is basically a parameter-free one, because all relevant parameters are fixed from the phenomenology. A comparison with the available experimental data is presented.

  7. A unified derivation of Hamiltonian and optical transition matrix elements for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules using transformation tools of modern quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenke, David W.

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we systematically derive the matrix elements of the nuclear rotation operators for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules in a parity adapted Hund’s case (a) basis. Our expressions are valid for an arbitrary number of electrons and arbitrary electronic configurations. The common ad hoc sign changes of angular momentum operators are shown to be equivalent to a change in phase of basis functions. We show how to relate this basis to that required for scattering calculations. We also give the expressions for Einstein A coefficients for electric dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic dipole transitions.

  8. A unified derivation of Hamiltonian and optical transition matrix elements for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules using transformation tools of modern quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, David W

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we systematically derive the matrix elements of the nuclear rotation operators for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules in a parity adapted Hund's case (a) basis. Our expressions are valid for an arbitrary number of electrons and arbitrary electronic configurations. The common ad hoc sign changes of angular momentum operators are shown to be equivalent to a change in phase of basis functions. We show how to relate this basis to that required for scattering calculations. We also give the expressions for Einstein A coefficients for electric dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic dipole transitions.

  9. FMO3-LCMO study of electron transfer coupling matrix element and pathway: Application to hole transfer between two tryptophans through cis- and trans-polyproline-linker systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2016-09-01

    The linear-combination of fragment molecular orbitals with three-body correction (FMO3-LCMO) is examined for electron transfer (ET) coupling matrix elements and ET pathway analysis, with application to hole transfer between two tryptophans bridged by cis- and trans-polyproline linker conformations. A projection to the minimal-valence-plus-core FMO space was found to give sufficient accuracy with significant reduction of computational cost while avoiding the problem of linear dependence of FMOs stemming from involvement of bond detached atoms.

  10. Reconstruction of the Higgs mass in events with Higgs bosons decaying into a pair of τ leptons using matrix element techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Lorenzo; Calpas, Betty; Conway, John; Fowlie, Andrew; Marzola, Luca; Perrini, Lucia; Veelken, Christian

    2017-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the reconstruction of the Higgs mass in events with Higgs bosons decaying into a pair of τ leptons. The algorithm is based on matrix element (ME) techniques and achieves a relative resolution on the Higgs boson mass of typically 15-20%. A previous version of the algorithm has been used in analyses of Higgs boson production performed by the CMS collaboration during LHC Run 1. The algorithm is described in detail and its performance on simulated events is assessed. The development of techniques to handle τ decays in the ME formalism represents an important result of this paper.

  11. Whole-genome cartography of p53 response elements ranked on transactivation potential.

    PubMed

    Tebaldi, Toma; Zaccara, Sara; Alessandrini, Federica; Bisio, Alessandra; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto

    2015-06-17

    Many recent studies using ChIP-seq approaches cross-referenced to trascriptome data and also to potentially unbiased in vitro DNA binding selection experiments are detailing with increasing precision the p53-directed gene regulatory network that, nevertheless, is still expanding. However, most experiments have been conducted in established cell lines subjected to specific p53-inducing stimuli, both factors potentially biasing the results. We developed p53retriever, a pattern search algorithm that maps p53 response elements (REs) and ranks them according to predicted transactivation potentials in five classes. Besides canonical, full site REs, we developed specific pattern searches for non-canonical half sites and 3/4 sites and show that they can mediate p53-dependent responsiveness of associated coding sequences. Using ENCODE data, we also mapped p53 REs in about 44,000 distant enhancers and identified a 16-fold enrichment for high activity REs within those sites in the comparison with genomic regions near transcriptional start sites (TSS). Predictions from our pattern search were cross-referenced to ChIP-seq, ChIP-exo, expression, and various literature data sources. Based on the mapping of predicted functional REs near TSS, we examined expression changes of thirteen genes as a function of different p53-inducing conditions, providing further evidence for PDE2A, GAS6, E2F7, APOBEC3H, KCTD1, TRIM32, DICER, HRAS, KITLG and TGFA p53-dependent regulation, while MAP2K3, DNAJA1 and potentially YAP1 were identified as new direct p53 target genes. We provide a comprehensive annotation of canonical and non-canonical p53 REs in the human genome, ranked on predicted transactivation potential. We also establish or corroborate direct p53 transcriptional control of thirteen genes. The entire list of identified and functionally classified p53 REs near all UCSC-annotated genes and within ENCODE mapped enhancer elements is provided. Our approach is distinct from, and complementary

  12. DEPPDB - DNA electrostatic potential properties database. Electrostatic properties of genome DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Osypov, Alexander A; Krutinin, Gleb G; Krutinina, Eugenia A; Kamzolova, Svetlana G

    2012-04-01

    Electrostatic properties of genome DNA are important to its interactions with different proteins, in particular, related to transcription. DEPPDB - DNA Electrostatic Potential (and other Physical) Properties Database - provides information on the electrostatic and other physical properties of genome DNA combined with its sequence and annotation of biological and structural properties of genomes and their elements. Genomes are organized on taxonomical basis, supporting comparative and evolutionary studies. Currently, DEPPDB contains all completely sequenced bacterial, viral, mitochondrial, and plastids genomes according to the NCBI RefSeq, and some model eukaryotic genomes. Data for promoters, regulation sites, binding proteins, etc., are incorporated from established DBs and literature. The database is complemented by analytical tools. User sequences calculations are available. Case studies discovered electrostatics complementing DNA bending in E.coli plasmid BNT2 promoter functioning, possibly affecting host-environment metabolic switch. Transcription factors binding sites gravitate to high potential regions, confirming the electrostatics universal importance in protein-DNA interactions beyond the classical promoter-RNA polymerase recognition and regulation. Other genome elements, such as terminators, also show electrostatic peculiarities. Most intriguing are gene starts, exhibiting taxonomic correlations. The necessity of the genome electrostatic properties studies is discussed.

  13. A linear-scaling spectral-element method for computing electrostatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Watson, Mark A; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2008-11-14

    A new linear-scaling method is presented for the fast numerical evaluation of the electronic Coulomb potential. Our approach uses a simple real-space partitioning of the system into cubic cells and a spectral-element representation of the density in a tensorial basis of high-order Chebyshev polynomials. Electrostatic interactions between non-neighboring cells are described using the fast multipole method. The remaining near-field interactions are computed in the tensorial basis as a sum of differential contributions by exploiting the numerical low-rank separability of the Coulomb operator. The method is applicable to arbitrary charge densities, avoids the Poisson equation, and does not involve the solution of any systems of linear equations. Above all, an adaptive resolution of the Chebyshev basis in each cell facilitates the accurate and efficient treatment of molecular systems. We demonstrate the performance of our implementation for quantum chemistry with benchmark calculations on the noble gas atoms, long-chain alkanes, and diamond fragments. We conclude that the spectral-element method can be a competitive tool for the accurate computation of electrostatic potentials in large-scale molecular systems.

  14. Influence of waterborne arsenic on nutritive and potentially harmful elements in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martínez-Sánchez, Maria José; López, Salvadora Martínez; Del Carmen Gómez Martínez, Maria; Guardiola, Francisco A; Esteban, María Ángeles

    2016-11-01

    Fish are an important source of nutrients in human nutrition. Although arsenic (As) is considered potentially carcinogenic for human being, very little is known about its toxicity in fish biology. To increase our knowledge of the effect of exposure to waterborne As on fish, gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) were exposed to 5 μM As2O3 and the bioaccumulation of macronutrients (Ca, K, Mg, Na, P), micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Zn) and Potentially Harmful Elements (As, Cd) was determined using spectrometric techniques. All elements were determined in the muscle and liver of non-exposed fish and those exposed to As for 2, 10 or 30 days. The concentrations of K, Na, Mg, Mn and Zn (in muscle) and Fe and Mn (in liver) of control (non-exposed) fish were higher than those determined in exposed fish. Furthermore, neither As nor Cd accumulated in the edible part (muscle) of seabream and were only evident in liver after 30 days of continuous exposure to As, but both concentrations remained below legally established limits.

  15. Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of Matrix-Isolated Molecules with Potential Astrophysical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehlburg, Christine Marie

    1997-08-01

    Many of the molecules purported to exist in interstellar space can only be generated in high temperature processes or are ions that are difficult to produce at high enough concentrations for spectroscopic analysis. The molecules investigated in this study, specifically, were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ions, carbon chain water complexes and carbon chain anions. PAHs are the proposed carriers of the unidentified interstellar (UIR) emission. The infrared investigation of pentacene and tetracene ions was pursued to provide data concerning the possibility that PAH cations were the source of the UIR emission. In this study, infrared features corresponding to both cation and anions for both molecules were observed for the first time. The most intense features for the neutral molecules were the CH out-of-plane wagging modes while the most intense cationic and anionic features were in the CC stretch and CH bending regions. The relative intensities from theoretical calculations were in reasonable agreement with experimental values with the exception of an overestimation for the intensities of the CH stretch in both neutral pentacene and tetracene. Carbon chain water complexes are very weakly bound species that are observed when graphite is vaporized at low power. The infrared features increase in intensity and new ones appear after annealing a matrix containing carbon chain molecules and H2O. The current study involved assignment of infrared features at 1959.4 and 2014.4 cm-1 to C6ċ H2O and C9ċ H2O, respectively. Assignments were based on the fact that both bands increased relative to the C9 and C6 bands when the concentration of H2O increased. The band assignments were further justified by a 12,13C study for C6/cdotH2O and the agreement of the theoretical shift, relative to the asymmetric stretch band of C9, for C9ċ H2O. In addition a new feature at 1550.4 cm-1 was tentatively assigned to C4ċ H2O. Finally, an isotopic study of a feature at 1721.8 cm-1

  16. Extracellular matrix and cell shape: potential control points for inhibition of angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary endothelial (CE) cells require two extracellular signals in order to switch from quiescence to growth and back to differentiation during angiogenesis: soluble angiogenic factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble endothelial mitogens, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), act over large distances to trigger capillary growth, whereas ECM molecules act locally to modulate cell responsiveness to these soluble cues. Recent studies reveal that ECM molecules regulate CE cell growth and differentiation by modulating cell shape and by activating intracellular chemical signaling pathways inside the cell. Recognition of the importance of ECM and cell shape during capillary morphogenesis has led to the identification of a series of new angiogenesis inhibitors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of capillary regulation may result in development of even more potent angiogenesis modulators in the future.

  17. Extracellular matrix and cell shape: potential control points for inhibition of angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary endothelial (CE) cells require two extracellular signals in order to switch from quiescence to growth and back to differentiation during angiogenesis: soluble angiogenic factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble endothelial mitogens, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), act over large distances to trigger capillary growth, whereas ECM molecules act locally to modulate cell responsiveness to these soluble cues. Recent studies reveal that ECM molecules regulate CE cell growth and differentiation by modulating cell shape and by activating intracellular chemical signaling pathways inside the cell. Recognition of the importance of ECM and cell shape during capillary morphogenesis has led to the identification of a series of new angiogenesis inhibitors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of capillary regulation may result in development of even more potent angiogenesis modulators in the future.

  18. Psychosocial exposures at work and mental health: potential utility of a job-exposure matrix.

    PubMed

    Cohidon, Christine; Santin, Gaëlle; Chastang, Jean-François; Imbernon, Ellen; Niedhammer, Isabelle

    2012-02-01

    To examine the associations between psychosocial exposures at work and depressive symptoms by using two independent French national databases. A job-exposure matrix of psychosocial work exposures was constructed from data collected by the national medical monitoring of occupational risks survey in 2003. Depressive symptoms came from the 2002 to 2003 decennial health survey. Data were linked by age, occupational group, and economic activity. The crude and adjusted results showed small but significant and systematic associations between job strain and depressive symptoms among men. These associations were much weaker for psychological demands and decision latitude. No statistical associations were observed among women. The results suggest that, among men, using independent data on exposure and health, there is a robust association between job strain and depressive symptoms. They contribute to the debate about the causal nature of associations between psychosocial exposures at work and mental health.

  19. Extracellular matrix macromolecules: potential tools and targets in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sainio, Annele; Järveläinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Tumour cells create their own microenvironment where they closely interact with a variety of soluble and non-soluble molecules, different cells and numerous other components within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Interaction between tumour cells and the ECM is bidirectional leading to either progression or inhibition of tumourigenesis. Therefore, development of novel therapies targeted primarily to tumour microenvironment (TME) is highly rational. Here, we give a short overview of different macromolecules of the ECM and introduce mechanisms whereby they contribute to tumourigenesis within the TME. Furthermore, we present examples of individual ECM macromolecules as regulators of cell behaviour during tumourigenesis. Finally, we focus on novel strategies of using ECM macromolecules as tools or targets in cancer gene therapy in the future.

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinase-10 Is Required for Lung Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance, Tumor Initiation and Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, I-Chu; Walsh, Michael P.; Batra, Jyotica; Radisky, Evette S.; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (Mmps) stimulate tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the extracellular matrix. Here we reveal an unexpected role for Mmp10 (stromelysin 2) in the maintenance and tumorigenicity of mouse lung cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Mmp10 is highly expressed in oncosphere cultures enriched in CSCs and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mmp10 leads to a loss of stem cell marker gene expression and inhibition of oncosphere growth, clonal expansion, and transformed growth in vitro. Interestingly, clonal expansion of Mmp10 deficient oncospheres can be restored by addition of exogenous Mmp10 protein to the culture medium, demonstrating a direct role for Mmp10 in the proliferation of these cells. Oncospheres exhibit enhanced tumor-initiating and metastatic activity when injected orthotopically into syngeneic mice, whereas Mmp10-deficient cultures show a severe defect in tumor initiation. Conversely, oncospheres implanted into syngeneic non-transgenic or Mmp10−/− mice show no significant difference in tumor initiation, growth or metastasis, demonstrating the importance of Mmp10 produced by cancer cells rather than the tumor microenvironment in lung tumor initiation and maintenance. Analysis of gene expression data from human cancers reveals a strong positive correlation between tumor Mmp10 expression and metastatic behavior in many human tumor types. Thus, Mmp10 is required for maintenance of a highly tumorigenic, cancer-initiating, metastatic stem-like cell population in lung cancer. Our data demonstrate for the first time that Mmp10 is a critical lung cancer stem cell gene and novel therapeutic target for lung cancer stem cells. PMID:22545096