Science.gov

Sample records for potential mechanisms linking

  1. Linking Pesticide Exposure with Pediatric Leukemia: Potential Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Menéndez, Pablo

    2016-03-29

    Leukemia is the most common cancer in children, representing 30% of all childhood cancers. The disease arises from recurrent genetic insults that block differentiation of hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPCs) and drives uncontrolled proliferation and survival of the differentiation-blocked clone. Pediatric leukemia is phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous with an obscure etiology. The interaction between genetic factors and environmental agents represents a potential etiological driver. Although information is limited, the principal toxic mechanisms of potential leukemogenic agents (e.g., etoposide, benzene metabolites, bioflavonoids and some pesticides) include topoisomerase II inhibition and/or excessive generation of free radicals, which may induce DNA single- and double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in early HSPCs. Chromosomal rearrangements (duplications, deletions and translocations) may occur if these lesions are not properly repaired. The initiating hit usually occurs in utero and commonly leads to the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins. Subsequent cooperating hits define the disease latency and occur after birth and may be of a genetic, epigenetic or immune nature (i.e., delayed infection-mediated immune deregulation). Here, we review the available experimental and epidemiological evidence linking pesticide exposure to infant and childhood leukemia and provide a mechanistic basis to support the association, focusing on early initiating molecular events.

  2. Linking Pesticide Exposure with Pediatric Leukemia: Potential Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Antonio F.; Menéndez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common cancer in children, representing 30% of all childhood cancers. The disease arises from recurrent genetic insults that block differentiation of hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPCs) and drives uncontrolled proliferation and survival of the differentiation-blocked clone. Pediatric leukemia is phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous with an obscure etiology. The interaction between genetic factors and environmental agents represents a potential etiological driver. Although information is limited, the principal toxic mechanisms of potential leukemogenic agents (e.g., etoposide, benzene metabolites, bioflavonoids and some pesticides) include topoisomerase II inhibition and/or excessive generation of free radicals, which may induce DNA single- and double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in early HSPCs. Chromosomal rearrangements (duplications, deletions and translocations) may occur if these lesions are not properly repaired. The initiating hit usually occurs in utero and commonly leads to the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins. Subsequent cooperating hits define the disease latency and occur after birth and may be of a genetic, epigenetic or immune nature (i.e., delayed infection-mediated immune deregulation). Here, we review the available experimental and epidemiological evidence linking pesticide exposure to infant and childhood leukemia and provide a mechanistic basis to support the association, focusing on early initiating molecular events. PMID:27043530

  3. Potential Mechanisms Linking Atherosclerosis and Increased Cardiovascular Risk in COPD: Focus On Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Bianco, Andrea; Turchiarelli, Viviana; Cellurale, Michele; Fatica, Federica; Daniele, Aurora; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Ferrara, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The development of atherosclerosis is a multi-step process, at least in part controlled by the vascular endothelium function. Observations in humans and experimental models of atherosclerosis have identified monocyte recruitment as an early event in atherogenesis. Chronic inflammation is associated with ageing and its related diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Recently it has been discovered that Sirtuins (NAD+-dependent deacetylases) represent a pivotal regulator of longevity and health. They appear to have a prominent role in vascular biology and regulate aspects of age-dependent atherosclerosis. Many studies demonstrate that SIRT1 exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vitro (e.g., fatty acid-induced inflammation), in vivo (e.g., atherosclerosis, sustainment of normal immune function in knock-out mice) and in clinical studies (e.g., patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Because of a significant reduction of SIRT1 in rodent lungs exposed to cigarette smoke and in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), activation of SIRT1 may be a potential target for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. We review the inflammatory mechanisms involved in COPD-CVD coexistence and the potential role of SIRT1 in the regulation of these systems. PMID:23774840

  4. Children's Attentional Biases and "5-HTTLPR" Genotype: Potential Mechanisms Linking Mother and Child Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Brandon E.; Benas, Jessica S.; Grassia, Marie; McGeary, John

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the roles of specific cognitive (attentional bias) and genetic ("5-HTTLPR") risk factors in the intergenerational transmission of depression. Focusing first on the link between maternal history of major depressive disorder (MDD) and children's attentional biases, we found that children of mothers with a history…

  5. Children's attentional biases and 5-HTTLPR genotype: potential mechanisms linking mother and child depression.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Brandon E; Benas, Jessica S; Grassia, Marie; McGeary, John

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we examined the roles of specific cognitive (attentional bias) and genetic (5-HTTLPR) risk factors in the intergenerational transmission of depression. Focusing first on the link between maternal history of major depressive disorder (MDD) and children's attentional biases, we found that children of mothers with a history of MDD during their children's lives, compared to children of mothers with no depression history, exhibited greater attentional avoidance of sad faces. This attention bias was specific to sad, rather than happy or angry, faces. There was also preliminary evidence that this relation is stronger among children carrying the 5-HTTLPR S or L(G) allele than among those homozygous for the L(A) allele. Next, conceptualizing mothers' levels of depressive symptoms during the multi-wave prospective follow-up within a vulnerability-stress framework, we found evidence for a three-way child 5-HTTLPR x attentional bias x mother depressive symptom interaction predicting children's depressive symptoms. Specifically, the relation between mother and child depressive symptom levels over time was strongest among children carrying the 5-HTTLR S or L(G) allele who also exhibited attentional avoidance of sad faces. These findings provide initial support for role of children's 5-HTTLPR genotype and attentional biases for sad faces in the intergenerational transmission of depression.

  6. Children’s attentional biases and 5-HTTLPR genotype: Potential mechanisms linking mother and child depression

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Brandon E.; Benas, Jessica S.; Grassia, Marie; McGeary, John

    2014-01-01

    We examined the roles of specific cognitive (attentional bias) and genetic (5-HTTLPR) risk factors in the intergenerational transmission of depression. Focusing first on the link between maternal history of major depressive disorder (MDD) and children’s attentional biases, we found that children of mothers with a history of MDD during their children’s lives, compared to children of mothers with no depression history, exhibited greater attentional avoidance of sad faces. This attention bias was specific to sad, rather than happy or angry, faces. There was also preliminary evidence that this relation is stronger among children carrying the 5-HTTLPR S or LG allele than among those homozygous for the LA allele. Next, conceptualizing mothers’ levels of depressive symptoms during the multi-wave prospective follow-up within a vulnerability-stress framework, we found evidence for a three-way child 5-HTTLPR × attentional bias × mother depressive symptom interaction predicting children’s depressive symptoms. Specifically, the relation between mother and child depressive symptom levels over time was strongest among children carrying the 5-HTTLPR S or LG allele who also exhibited attentional avoidance of sad faces. These findings provide initial support for role of children’s 5-HTTLPR genotype and attentional biases for sad faces in the intergenerational transmission of depression. PMID:19437301

  7. Self-organizing maps as a model of brain mechanisms potentially linked to autism.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Gerardo

    2007-06-01

    The application of artificial neural networks in the study of psychopathological syndromes has great potential. Several computational models of acquired and developmental disorders, including autism, have been proposed recently. In this paper, we use the framework of self-organizing maps to study several aspects of autism, by modeling abnormalities in the learning process in biologically plausible manners. We then interpret the resulting feature maps with reference to autistic characteristics. The effects of manipulating the physical structure and size of self-organizing maps were measured and compared with the general characteristics of neural growth abnormalities in autistic children. We find no effect on stimuli coverage, but a negative impact on map unfolding, dependant on the intensity of the abnormality, but not the time of onset. We analyze sensory issues by introducing the concept of attention functions, used to model hypersensitivities and hyposensitivities. The issue of focus on details rather than the whole is analyzed through a model in which distant neighbors are explicitly rejected; we show the model may lead to improved coverage of finely-shaped areas or isolated stimuli, but poorer map unfolding. Finally, we consider effects of noisy communication channels on the development of maps, and show a strong sensitivity of both coverage and unfolding of maps.

  8. Linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy: identification of potential mechanisms leading to neurofibrillary tangle development.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon Peter; Turner, Ryan Coddington; Logsdon, Aric Flint; Bailes, Julian Edwin; Huber, Jason Delwyn; Rosen, Charles Lee

    2014-07-01

    Significant attention has recently been drawn to the potential link between head trauma and the development of neurodegenerative disease, namely chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The acute neurotrauma associated with sports-related concussions in athletes and blast-induced traumatic brain injury in soldiers elevates the risk for future development of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as CTE. CTE is a progressive disease distinguished by characteristic tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and, occasionally, transactive response DNA binding protein 43 (TDP43) oligomers, both of which have a predilection for perivascular and subcortical areas near reactive astrocytes and microglia. The disease is currently only diagnosed postmortem by neuropathological identification of NFTs. A recent workshop sponsored by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke emphasized the need for premortem diagnosis, to better understand disease pathophysiology and to develop targeted treatments. In order to accomplish this objective, it is necessary to discover the mechanistic link between acute neurotrauma and the development of chronic neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as CTE. In this review, we briefly summarize what is currently known about CTE development and pathophysiology, and subsequently discuss injury-induced pathways that warrant further investigation. Understanding the mechanistic link between acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration will facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic options for CTE and other related disorders.

  9. A Potential of Rail Vehicle Having Bolster with Side Bearers for Improving Curving Performance on Sharp Curves Employing Link-Type Forced Steering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, Katsuya; Yaegashi, Naoki; Soma, Hitoshi

    The air spring of bolsterless bogie trucks, which have been widely employed in railway vehicles in recent years, undergoes a large distortion when the vehicles negotiate sharp curves in lines such as subway lines, and this can deteriorate the durability of air springs. Furthermore, bolsterless trucks tend to suffer from increased wheel lateral force around sharp curves with a radius of 100 m or less. In this paper we discuss the application of a link-type forced steering mechanism to bogie trucks with a bolster as a countermeasure against the above-mentioned situation. A numerical simulation is carried out using a MBS software, SIMPACK. As a result, under the condition of reduced longitudinal stiffness in the primary suspension, a bolster truck with the link-type steering mechanism exhibits the potential to suppress the wheel lateral force occurring around sharp curves. Also, the deterioration in running stability due to the application of the steering mechanism can be recovered by adding moderate lateral damping in the secondary suspension. In addition, the obtained wear index shows that the forced steering truck has decreased flange wear resulting from passing through sharp curves.

  10. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Kasey M.; Drackley, James K.; Morin, Dawn E.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5) to better understand the mechanisms associated with NEB and risk of mastitis during the transition period. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements for 7 days, and cows assigned to PEB were fed the same diet for ad libitum intake. Five days after feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h postinoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Negative energy balance resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; false discovery rate ≤ 0.05), with 86 DEG upregulated and 201 DEG downregulated in NEB vs. PEB. Canonical pathways most affected by NEB were IL-8 signaling (10 genes), glucocorticoid receptor signaling (13), and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (10). Among the genes differentially expressed by NEB, cell growth and proliferation (48) and cellular development (36) were the most enriched functions. Regarding immune response, HLA-A was upregulated due to NEB, whereas the majority of genes involved in immune response were downregulated (e.g., AKT1, IRAK1, MAPK9, and TRAF6). This study provided new avenues for investigation into the mechanisms relating NEB and susceptibility to mastitis in lactating dairy cows. PMID:20103698

  11. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Kasey M; Drackley, James K; Morin, Dawn E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Loor, Juan J

    2010-04-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5) to better understand the mechanisms associated with NEB and risk of mastitis during the transition period. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements for 7 days, and cows assigned to PEB were fed the same diet for ad libitum intake. Five days after feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h postinoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Negative energy balance resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; false discovery rate ≤ 0.05), with 86 DEG upregulated and 201 DEG downregulated in NEB vs. PEB. Canonical pathways most affected by NEB were IL-8 signaling (10 genes), glucocorticoid receptor signaling (13), and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (10). Among the genes differentially expressed by NEB, cell growth and proliferation (48) and cellular development (36) were the most enriched functions. Regarding immune response, HLA-A was upregulated due to NEB, whereas the majority of genes involved in immune response were downregulated (e.g., AKT1, IRAK1, MAPK9, and TRAF6). This study provided new avenues for investigation into the mechanisms relating NEB and susceptibility to mastitis in lactating dairy cows.

  12. A potential psychological mechanism linking disaster-related prenatal maternal stress with child cognitive and motor development at 16 months: The QF2011 Queensland Flood Study.

    PubMed

    Moss, Katrina M; Simcock, Gabrielle; Cobham, Vanessa; Kildea, Sue; Elgbeili, Guillaume; Laplante, David P; King, Suzanne

    2017-04-01

    Fetal exposure to prenatal maternal stress can have lifelong consequences, with different types of maternal stress associated with different areas of child development. Fewer studies have focused on motor skills, even though they are strongly predictive of later development across a range of domains. Research on mechanisms of transmission has identified biological cascades of stress reactions, yet links between psychological stress reactions are rarely studied. This study investigates the relationship between different aspects of disaster-related prenatal maternal stress and child cognitive and motor development, and proposes a cascade of stress reactions as a potential mechanism of transmission. Mothers in the Queensland Flood Study (QF2011) exposed to a major flood during pregnancy completed questionnaires assessing flood exposure, symptoms of peritraumatic distress, dissociation, and posttraumatic stress (PTSD), and cognitive appraisal of the overall flood consequences. At 16 months post-partum, children's (N = 145) cognitive and motor development was assessed using the Bayley-III. Flood exposure predicted child cognitive development and maternal PTSD symptoms and negative cognitive appraisal were significantly negatively related to child motor development, with all relationships moderated by timing of exposure. Together, a cascade of stress reactions linked maternal flood exposure to poorer fine motor development. These findings suggest that the way stress reactions operate together is as important as the way they operate in isolation, and identifies a potential psychological mechanism of transmission for the effects of prenatal stress. Results have implications for conceptualizing prenatal stress research and optimizing child development in the wake of natural disasters. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Mechanical and structural response of a hybrid hydrogel based on chitosan and poly(vinyl alcohol) cross-linked with epichlorohydrin for potential use in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Palafox, I M; Sánchez-Arévalo, F M; Velasquillo, C; García-Carvajal, Z Y; García-López, J; Ortega-Sánchez, C; Ibarra, C; Luna-Bárcenas, G; Solís-Arrieta, L

    2014-01-01

    The development and characterization of a hybrid hydrogel based on chitosan (CS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) chemically cross-linked with epichlorohydrin (ECH) is presented. The mechanical response of these hydrogels was evaluated by uniaxial tensile tests; in addition, their structural properties such as average molecular weight between cross-link points (Mcrl), mesh size (DN), and volume fraction (v(s)) were determined. This was done using the equivalent polymer network theory in combination with the obtained results from tensile and swelling tests. The films showed Young's modulus values of 11 ± 2 MPa and 9 ± 1 MPa for none irradiated and ultraviolet (UV) irradiated hydrogels, respectively. The cell viability was assessed using Calcein AM and Ethidium homodimer-1 assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The 1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan thiazolyl blue formazan (MTT Formazan assay) results did not show cytotoxic effects; this was in good agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance and fourier transform infrared spectroscopies; their results did not show traces of ECH. This indicated that after the crosslinking process, there was no free ECH; furthermore, any possibility of ECH release in the construct during cell culture was discarded. The CS-PVA-ECH hybrid hydrogel allowed cell growth and extracellular matrix formation and showed adequate mechanical, structural, and biological properties for potential use in tissue engineering applications.

  14. Regulatory mechanisms link phenotypic plasticity to evolvability.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J

    2016-04-18

    Organisms have a remarkable capacity to respond to environmental change. They can either respond directly, by means of phenotypic plasticity, or they can slowly adapt through evolution. Yet, how phenotypic plasticity links to evolutionary adaptability is largely unknown. Current studies of plasticity tend to adopt a phenomenological reaction norm (RN) approach, which neglects the mechanisms underlying plasticity. Focusing on a concrete question - the optimal timing of bacterial sporulation - we here also consider a mechanistic approach, the evolution of a gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying plasticity. Using individual-based simulations, we compare the RN and GRN approach and find a number of striking differences. Most importantly, the GRN model results in a much higher diversity of responsive strategies than the RN model. We show that each of the evolved strategies is pre-adapted to a unique set of unseen environmental conditions. The regulatory mechanisms that control plasticity therefore critically link phenotypic plasticity to the adaptive potential of biological populations.

  15. Diabetes and gastric cancer: the potential links.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao; Tseng, Farn-Hsuan

    2014-02-21

    This article reviews the epidemiological evidence linking diabetes and gastric cancer and discusses some of the potential mechanisms, confounders and biases in the evaluation of such an association. Findings from four meta-analyses published from 2011 to 2013 suggest a positive link, which may be more remarkable in females and in the Asian populations. Putative mechanisms may involve shared risk factors, hyperglycemia, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, high salt intake, medications and comorbidities. Diabetes may increase the risk of gastric cancer through shared risk factors including obesity, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and smoking. Hyperglycemia, even before the clinical diagnosis of diabetes, may predict gastric cancer in some epidemiological studies, which is supported by in vitro, and in vivo studies. Patients with diabetes may also have a higher risk of gastric cancer through the higher infection rate, lower eradication rate and higher reinfection rate of H. pylori. High salt intake can act synergistically with H. pylori infection in the induction of gastric cancer. Whether a higher risk of gastric cancer in patients with diabetes may be ascribed to a higher intake of salt due to the loss of taste sensation awaits further investigation. The use of medications such as insulin, metformin, sulfonylureas, aspirin, statins and antibiotics may also influence the risk of gastric cancer, but most of them have not been extensively studied. Comorbidities may affect the development of gastric cancer through the use of medications and changes in lifestyle, dietary intake, and the metabolism of drugs. Finally, a potential detection bias related to gastrointestinal symptoms more commonly seen in patients with diabetes and with multiple comorbidities should be pointed out. Taking into account the inconsistent findings and the potential confounders and detection bias in previous epidemiological studies, it is expected that there are still more to be

  16. Mechanisms linking connexin mutations to human diseases.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J; Simek, Jamie; Laird, Dale W

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquitously expressed connexins are tetra-spanning transmembrane proteins that form intercellular gap junction channels or cell surface hemichannels. Connexins share similar topology but no sequence homology with mammalian pannexins and CALHM1 (calcium homeostasis modulator 1), which are also large-pore transmembrane channels. Of these three channel types, clinical evidence and gene sequence analysis to date have revealed that inherited human diseases are only associated with mutations in the connexin gene family. Connexin-linked diseases often present at birth or early in life and range from mild developmental abnormalities to severe organ failure such as hearing loss. Inherited connexin gene mutations can manifest as a disease by causing anomalies or defects in connexin oligomerization, folding, ability to pass quality control mechanisms or unexpected gain- or loss-of-function. This review provides examples of the way that various connexin gene mutations can cause disease via a wide range of molecular mechanisms. We also reflect on exciting strategies being explored in the connexin field and beyond with a view of translating their findings into potential connexin-disease therapeutics.

  17. Molecular Mechanics of Tip-Link Cadherins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2011-11-01

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is likely composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their complete molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects remain largely unknown. We present crystal structures of extracellular (EC) tip-link cadherin repeats involved in hereditary deafness and tip link formation. In addition, we show that the deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats EC1 and EC2 of cadherin-23, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca2+ affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tip-link cadherin repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca2+ or mutating Ca2+-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures and simulations also suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  18. Molecular mechanisms in deformation of cross-linked hydrogel nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Mathesan, Santhosh; Rath, Amrita; Ghosh, Pijush

    2016-02-01

    The self-folding behavior in response to external stimuli observed in hydrogels is potentially used in biomedical applications. However, the use of hydrogels is limited because of its reduced mechanical properties. These properties are enhanced when the hydrogels are cross-linked and reinforced with nanoparticles. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is applied to perform uniaxial tension and pull out tests to understand the mechanism contributing towards the enhanced mechanical properties. Also, nanomechanical characterization is performed using quasi static nanoindentation experiments to determine the Young's modulus of hydrogels in the presence of nanoparticles. The stress-strain responses for chitosan (CS), chitosan reinforced with hydroxyapatite (HAP) and cross-linked chitosan are obtained from uniaxial tension test. It is observed that the Young's modulus and maximum stress increase as the HAP content increases and also with cross-linking process. Load displacement plot from pullout test is compared for uncross-linked and cross-linked chitosan chains on hydroxyapatite surface. MD simulation reveals that the variation in the dihedral conformation of chitosan chains and the evolution of internal structural variables are associated with mechanical properties. Additional results reveal that the formation of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions is responsible for the above variations in different systems.

  19. Potential Effects of Corneal Cross-Linking upon the Limbus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Corneal cross-linking is nowadays the most used strategy for the treatment of keratoconus and recently it has been exploited for an increasing number of different corneal pathologies, from other ectatic disorders to keratitis. The safety of this technique has been widely assessed, but clinical complications still occur. The potential effects of cross-linking treatment upon the limbus are incompletely understood; it is important therefore to investigate the effect of UV exposure upon the limbal niche, particularly as UV is known to be mutagenic to cellular DNA and the limbus is where ocular surface tumors can develop. The risk of early induction of ocular surface cancer is undoubtedly rare and has to date not been published other than in one case after cross-linking. Nevertheless it is important to further assess, understand, and reduce where possible any potential risk. The aim of this review is to summarize all the reported cases of a pathological consequence for the limbal cells, possibly induced by cross-linking UV exposure, the studies done in vitro or ex vivo, the theoretical bases for the risks due to UV exposure, and which aspects of the clinical treatment may produce higher risk, along with what possible mechanisms could be utilized to protect the limbus and the delicate stem cells present within it. PMID:27689081

  20. Cotinine exposure increases Fallopian tube PROKR1 expression via nicotinic AChRalpha-7: a potential mechanism explaining the link between smoking and tubal ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julie L V; Oliver, Elizabeth; Lee, Kai-Fai; Entrican, Gary; Jabbour, Henry N; Critchley, Hilary O D; Horne, Andrew W

    2010-11-01

    Tubal ectopic pregnancy (EP) is the most common cause of maternal mortality in the first trimester of pregnancy; however, its etiology is uncertain. In EP, embryo retention within the Fallopian tube (FT) is thought to be due to impaired smooth muscle contractility (SMC) and alterations in the tubal microenvironment. Smoking is a major risk factor for EP. FTs from women with EP exhibit altered prokineticin receptor-1 (PROKR1) expression, the receptor for prokineticins (PROK). PROK1 is angiogenic, regulates SMC, and is involved in intrauterine implantation. We hypothesized that smoking predisposes women to EP by altering tubal PROKR1 expression. Sera/FT were collected at hysterectomy (n=21). Serum levels of the smoking metabolite, cotinine, were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. FTs were analyzed by q-RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting for expression of PROKR1 and the predicted cotinine receptor, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α-7 (AChRα-7). FT explants (n=4) and oviductal epithelial cells (cell line OE-E6/E7) were treated with cotinine and an nAChRα-7 antagonist. PROKR1 transcription was higher in FTs from smokers (P<0.01). nAChRα-7 expression was demonstrated in FT epithelium. Cotinine treatment of FT explants and OE-E6/E7 cells increased PROKR1 expression (P<0.05), which was negated by cotreatment with nAChRα-7 antagonist. Smoking targets human FTs via nAChRα-7 to increase tubal PROKR1, leading to alterations in the tubal microenvironment that could predispose to EP.

  1. Linking Mechanics and Statistics in Epidermal Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-03-01

    Disordered cellular structures, such as foams, polycrystals, or living tissues, can be characterized by quantitative measurements of domain size and topology. In recent work, we showed that correlations between size and topology in 2D systems are sensitive to the shape (eccentricity) of the individual domains: From a local model of neighbor relations, we derived an analytical justification for the famous empirical Lewis law, confirming the theory with experimental data from cucumber epidermal tissue. Here, we go beyond this purely geometrical model and identify mechanical properties of the tissue as the root cause for the domain eccentricity and thus the statistics of tissue structure. The simple model approach is based on the minimization of an interfacial energy functional. Simulations with Surface Evolver show that the domain statistics depend on a single mechanical parameter, while parameter fluctuations from cell to cell play an important role in simultaneously explaining the shape distribution of cells. The simulations are in excellent agreement with experiments and analytical theory, and establish a general link between the mechanical properties of a tissue and its structure. The model is relevant to diagnostic applications in a variety of animal and plant tissues.

  2. Gaussian effective potential: Quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. M.

    1984-10-01

    We advertise the virtues of the Gaussian effective potential (GEP) as a guide to the behavior of quantum field theories. Much superior to the usual one-loop effective potential, the GEP is a natural extension of intuitive notions familiar from quantum mechanics. A variety of quantum-mechanical examples are studied here, with an eye to field-theoretic analogies. Quantum restoration of symmetry, dynamical mass generation, and "quantum-mechanical resuscitation" are among the phenomena discussed. We suggest how the GEP could become the basis of a systematic approximation procedure. A companion paper will deal with scalar field theory.

  3. Linking properties to microstructure through multiresolution mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVeigh, Cahal James

    The macroscale mechanical and physical properties of materials are inherently linked to the underlying microstructure. Traditional continuum mechanics theories have focused on approximating the heterogeneous microstructure as a continuum, which is conducive to a partial differential equation mathematical description. Although this makes large scale simulation of material much more efficient than modeling the detailed microstructure, the relationship between microstructure and macroscale properties becomes unclear. In order to perform computational materials design, material models must clearly relate the key underlying microstructural parameters (cause) to macroscale properties (effect). In this thesis, microstructure evolution and instability events are related to macroscale mechanical properties through a new multiresolution continuum analysis approach. The multiresolution nature of this theory allows prediction of the evolving magnitude and scale of deformation as a direct function of the changing microstructure. This is achieved via a two-pronged approach: (a) Constitutive models which track evolving microstructure are developed and calibrated to direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the microstructure. (b) The conventional homogenized continuum equations of motion are extended via a virtual power approach to include extra coupled microscale stresses and stress couples which are active at each characteristic length scale within the microstructure. The multiresolution approach is applied to model the fracture toughness of a cemented carbide, failure of a steel alloy under quasi-static loading conditions and the initiation and velocity of adiabatic shear bands under high speed dynamic loading. In each case the multiresolution analysis predicts the important scale effects which control the macroscale material response. The strain fields predicted in the multiresolution continuum analyses compare well to those observed in direct numerical simulations of the

  4. Linking metacommunity paradigms to spatial coexistence mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Lauren G; Melbourne, Brett A

    2016-09-01

    Four metacommunity paradigms-usually called neutral, species sorting, mass effects, and patch dynamics, respectively-are widely used for empirical and theoretical studies of spatial community dynamics. The paradigm framework highlights key ecological mechanisms operating in metacommunities, such as dispersal limitation, competition-colonization tradeoffs, or species equivalencies. However, differences in coexistence mechanisms between the paradigms and in situations with combined influences of multiple paradigms are not well understood. Here, we create a common model for competitive metacommunities, with unique parameterizations for each metacommunity paradigm and for scenarios with multiple paradigms operating simultaneously. We derive analytical expressions for the strength of Chesson's spatial coexistence mechanisms and quantify these for each paradigm via simulation. For our model, fitness-density covariance, a concentration effect measuring the importance of intraspecific aggregation of individuals, is the dominant coexistence mechanism in all three niche-based metacommunity paradigms. Increased dispersal between patches erodes intraspecific aggregation, leading to lower coexistence strength in the mass effects paradigm compared to species sorting. Our analysis demonstrates the potential importance of aggregation of individuals (fitness-density covariance) over co-variation in abiotic environments and competition between species (the storage effect), as fitness-density covariance can be stronger than the storage effect and is the sole stabilizing mechanism in the patch dynamics paradigm. As expected, stable coexistence does not occur in the neutral paradigm, which requires species to be equal and emphasizes the role of stochasticity. We show that stochasticity also plays an important role in niche-structured metacommunities by altering coexistence strength. We conclude that Chesson's spatial coexistence mechanisms provide a flexible framework for comparing

  5. Potential mechanisms of Zika-linked microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, Emily; Ben-Avi, Lily; Kennon, Mason; Cerveny, Kara L

    2017-04-06

    A recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Brazil is associated with microcephaly in infants born of infected mothers. As this pandemic spreads, rapid scientific investigation is shedding new light on how prenatal infection with ZIKV causes microcephaly. In this analysis we provide an overview of both microcephaly and ZIKV, explore the connection between prenatal ZIKV infection and microcephaly, and highlight recent insights into how prenatal ZIKV infection depletes the pool of neural progenitors in the developing brain. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. Immune Mechanisms Linking Obesity and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Spradley, Frank T.; Palei, Ana C.; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is characterized by hypertension occurring after the twentieth week of pregnancy. It is a significant contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries and its pervasiveness is increasing within developed countries including the USA. However, the mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of this maternal disorder and its rising prevalence are far from clear. A major theory with strong experimental evidence is that placental ischemia, resulting from inappropriate remodeling and widening of the maternal spiral arteries, stimulates the release of soluble factors from the ischemic placenta causing maternal endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Aberrant maternal immune responses and inflammation have been implicated in each of these stages in the cascade leading to PE. Regarding the increased prevalence of this disease, it is becoming increasingly evident from epidemiological data that obesity, which is a state of chronic inflammation in itself, increases the risk for PE. Although the specific mechanisms whereby obesity increases the rate of PE are unclear, there are strong candidates including activated macrophages and natural killer cells within the uterus and placenta and activation in the periphery of T helper cells producing cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17 and the anti-angiogenic factor sFlt-1 and B cells producing the agonistic autoantibodies to the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1-aa). This review will focus on the immune mechanisms that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension in PE with an emphasis on the potential importance of inflammatory factors in the increased risk of developing PE in obese pregnancies. PMID:26569331

  7. Emerging evidence of ozone metabolic effects and potential mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    SOT 2014 Abstract: Invitational Emerging evidence of ozone metabolic effects and potential mechanisms U.P. Kodavanti NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC Recent evidence suggests that air pollutants are linked to metabolic syndrome and impact several key metabolic proce...

  8. Quantum mechanics without potential function

    SciTech Connect

    Alhaidari, A. D.; Ismail, M. E. H.

    2015-07-15

    In the standard formulation of quantum mechanics, one starts by proposing a potential function that models the physical system. The potential is then inserted into the Schrödinger equation, which is solved for the wavefunction, bound states energy spectrum, and/or scattering phase shift. In this work, however, we propose an alternative formulation in which the potential function does not appear. The aim is to obtain a set of analytically realizable systems, which is larger than in the standard formulation and may or may not be associated with any given or previously known potential functions. We start with the wavefunction, which is written as a bounded infinite sum of elements of a complete basis with polynomial coefficients that are orthogonal on an appropriate domain in the energy space. Using the asymptotic properties of these polynomials, we obtain the scattering phase shift, bound states, and resonances. This formulation enables one to handle not only the well-known quantum systems but also previously untreated ones. Illustrative examples are given for two- and three-parameter systems.

  9. Linking scales in sea ice mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jérôme; Dansereau, Véronique

    2017-02-01

    Mechanics plays a key role in the evolution of the sea ice cover through its control on drift, on momentum and thermal energy exchanges between the polar oceans and the atmosphere along cracks and faults, and on ice thickness distribution through opening and ridging processes. At the local scale, a significant variability of the mechanical strength is associated with the microstructural heterogeneity of saline ice, however characterized by a small correlation length, below the ice thickness scale. Conversely, the sea ice mechanical fields (velocity, strain and stress) are characterized by long-ranged (more than 1000 km) and long-lasting (approx. few months) correlations. The associated space and time scaling laws are the signature of the brittle character of sea ice mechanics, with deformation resulting from a multi-scale accumulation of episodic fracturing and faulting events. To translate the short-range-correlated disorder on strength into long-range-correlated mechanical fields, several key ingredients are identified: long-ranged elastic interactions, slow driving conditions, a slow viscous-like relaxation of elastic stresses and a restoring/healing mechanism. These ingredients constrained the development of a new continuum mechanics modelling framework for the sea ice cover, called Maxwell-elasto-brittle. Idealized simulations without advection demonstrate that this rheological framework reproduces the main characteristics of sea ice mechanics, including anisotropy, spatial localization and intermittency, as well as the associated scaling laws. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  10. Linking scales in sea ice mechanics.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jérôme; Dansereau, Véronique

    2017-02-13

    Mechanics plays a key role in the evolution of the sea ice cover through its control on drift, on momentum and thermal energy exchanges between the polar oceans and the atmosphere along cracks and faults, and on ice thickness distribution through opening and ridging processes. At the local scale, a significant variability of the mechanical strength is associated with the microstructural heterogeneity of saline ice, however characterized by a small correlation length, below the ice thickness scale. Conversely, the sea ice mechanical fields (velocity, strain and stress) are characterized by long-ranged (more than 1000 km) and long-lasting (approx. few months) correlations. The associated space and time scaling laws are the signature of the brittle character of sea ice mechanics, with deformation resulting from a multi-scale accumulation of episodic fracturing and faulting events. To translate the short-range-correlated disorder on strength into long-range-correlated mechanical fields, several key ingredients are identified: long-ranged elastic interactions, slow driving conditions, a slow viscous-like relaxation of elastic stresses and a restoring/healing mechanism. These ingredients constrained the development of a new continuum mechanics modelling framework for the sea ice cover, called Maxwell-elasto-brittle. Idealized simulations without advection demonstrate that this rheological framework reproduces the main characteristics of sea ice mechanics, including anisotropy, spatial localization and intermittency, as well as the associated scaling laws.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  11. Mechanism linking diabetes mellitus and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Goblan, Abdullah S; Al-Alfi, Mohammed A; Khan, Muhammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Body mass index has a strong relationship to diabetes and insulin resistance. In obese individuals, the amount of nonesterified fatty acids, glycerol, hormones, cytokines, proinflammatory markers, and other substances that are involved in the development of insulin resistance, is increased. The pathogenesis in the development of diabetes is based on the fact that the β-islet cells of the pancreas are impaired, causing a lack of control of blood glucose. The development of diabetes becomes more inevitable if the failure of β-islet cells of the pancreas is accompanied by insulin resistance. Weight gain and body mass are central to the formation and rising incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This literature review will demonstrate the facts that link obesity with insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. In conclusion, new approaches in managing and preventing diabetes in obese individuals must be studied and investigated based on the facts. PMID:25506234

  12. Links between microscopic and macroscopic fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    2003-01-01

    The microscopic and macroscopic versions of fluid mechanics differ qualitatively. Microscopic particles obey time-reversible ordinary differential equations. The resulting particle trajectories {q(t)} may be time-averaged or ensemble-averaged so as to generate field quantities corresponding to macroscopic variables. On the other hand, the macroscopic continuum fields described by fluid mechanics follow irreversible partial differential equations. Smooth particle methods bridge the gap separating these two views of fluids by solving the macroscopic field equations with particle dynamics that resemble molecular dynamics. Recently, nonlinear dynamics have provided some useful tools for understanding the relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic points of view. Chaos and fractals play key roles in this new understanding. Non-equilibrium phase-space averages look very different from their equilibrium counterparts. Away from equilibrium the smooth phase-space distributions are replaced by fractional-dimensional singular distributions that exhibit time irreversibility.

  13. Encoding Hydrogel Mechanics via Network Cross-Linking Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The effects of mechanical cues on cell behaviors in 3D remain difficult to characterize as the ability to tune hydrogel mechanics often requires changes in the polymer density, potentially altering the material’s biochemical and physical characteristics. Additionally, with most PEG diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels, forming materials with compressive moduli less than ∼10 kPa has been virtually impossible. Here, we present a new method of controlling the mechanical properties of PEGDA hydrogels independent of polymer chain density through the incorporation of additional vinyl group moieties that interfere with the cross-linking of the network. This modification can tune hydrogel mechanics in a concentration dependent manner from <1 to 17 kPa, a more physiologically relevant range than previously possible with PEG-based hydrogels, without altering the hydrogel’s degradation and permeability. Across this range of mechanical properties, endothelial cells (ECs) encapsulated within MMP-2/MMP-9 degradable hydrogels with RGDS adhesive peptides revealed increased cell spreading as hydrogel stiffness decreased in contrast to behavior typically observed for cells on 2D surfaces. EC-pericyte cocultures exhibited vessel-like networks within 3 days in highly compliant hydrogels as compared to a week in stiffer hydrogels. These vessel networks persisted for at least 4 weeks and deposited laminin and collagen IV perivascularly. These results indicate that EC morphogenesis can be regulated using mechanical cues in 3D. Furthermore, controlling hydrogel compliance independent of density allows for the attainment of highly compliant mechanical regimes in materials that can act as customizable cell microenvironments. PMID:26082943

  14. Clinical Science-linking basic science to disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Touyz, Rhian M

    2017-04-01

    For more than 50 years, Clinical Science has been at the interface linking basic science to disease mechanisms. Here, Rhian Touyz, the Editor-in-Chief, describes the journal, its aims and scope, and recent developments.

  15. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  16. Mechanisms Linking Excess Adiposity and Carcinogenesis Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Hernández, Ana I.; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in post-menopausal women, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15–20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: (i) inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; (ii) insulin resistance development; and (iii) adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases. PMID:24829560

  17. Mechanisms linking excess adiposity and carcinogenesis promotion.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, Ana I; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in post-menopausal women, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15-20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: (i) inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; (ii) insulin resistance development; and (iii) adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases.

  18. Chaotic Motion Of A Two-Link Planar Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokshin, Anatoly; Zak, Michail A.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses global instability in orbital motion of two-link planar mechanism. Principal objective, contributes to understanding of chaotic motions in robot manipulators and other deterministic mechanical systems. Discussion begins with brief review of previous studies of chaotic motion and introduces notion of orbital instability in nonlinear systems. Introduces geometric approach useful in representation of orbital instability.

  19. New potentials for conformal mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, G.

    2013-04-01

    We find under some mild assumptions that the most general potential of one-dimensional conformal systems with time-independent couplings is expressed as V = V0 + V1, where V0 is a homogeneous function with respect to a homothetic motion in configuration space and V1 is determined from an equation with source a homothetic potential. Such systems admit at most an SL(2,{R}) conformal symmetry which, depending on the couplings, is embedded in {Diff}({R}) in three different ways. In one case, SL(2,{R}) is also embedded in Diff(S1). Examples of such models include those with potential V = αx2 + βx-2 for arbitrary couplings α and β, the Calogero models with harmonic oscillator couplings and nonlinear models with suitable metrics and potentials. In addition, we give the conditions on the couplings for a class of gauge theories to admit a SL(2,{R}) conformal symmetry. We present examples of such systems with general gauge groups and global symmetries that include the isometries of AdS2 × S3 and AdS2 × S3 × S3 which arise as backgrounds in AdS2/CFT1.

  20. Parthanatos: mitochondrial-linked mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Fatokun, Amos A; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2014-01-01

    Cells die by a variety of mechanisms. Terminally differentiated cells such as neurones die in a variety of disorders, in part, via parthanatos, a process dependent on the activity of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP). Parthanatos does not require the mediation of caspases for its execution, but is clearly mechanistically dependent on the nuclear translocation of the mitochondrial-associated apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). The nuclear translocation of this otherwise beneficial mitochondrial protein, occasioned by poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) produced through PARP overactivation, causes large-scale DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation, leading to cell death. This review describes the multistep course of parthanatos and its dependence on PAR signalling and nuclear AIF translocation. The review also discusses potential targets in the parthanatos cascade as promising avenues for the development of novel, disease-modifying, therapeutic agents. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24684389

  1. Finite-time Control of One-link Mechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoba, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Nami; Nakamura, Hisakazu; Akiba, Hideyuki

    This paper considers finite-time position control of an one-link mechanical system. The system is modeled by discontinuous differential equations. In this paper, we prove that the Nakamura's local homogeneous controller based on a control Lyapunov function is valid to the position control of the robot manipulators, and show the effectiveness of the controller by experiments.

  2. The optics mechanical module for inter-satellite link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganok, E. A.; Dobriakov, B. N.

    2016-04-01

    Inter-satellite link (ISL) is a system of several satellites, which encircle the earth and spaced at a fixed distance from each other - of about 3000 kilometers. The optical-mechanical module (MOM) for the ISL is designed to transmit data over long distances in a small range of angles.

  3. Design and modelling of a link monitoring mechanism for the Common Data Link (CDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John W., III

    1994-09-01

    The Common Data Link (CDL) is a full duplex, point-to-point microwave communications system used in imagery and signals intelligence collection systems. It provides a link between two remote Local Area Networks (LAN's) aboard collection and surface platforms. In a hostile environment, there is an overwhelming need to dynamically monitor the link and thus, limit the impact of jamming. This work describes steps taken to design, model, and evaluate a link monitoring system suitable for the CDL. The monitoring system is based on features and monitoring constructs of the Link Control Protocol (LCP) in the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) suite. The CDL model is based on a system of two remote Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) LAN's. In particular, the policies and mechanisms associated with monitoring are described in detail. An implementation of the required mechanisms using the OPNET network engineering tool is described. Performance data related to monitoring parameters is reported. Finally, integration of the FDDI-CDL model with the OPNET Internet model is described.

  4. Analysis of Links Positions in Landing Gear Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewczyński, D.; Tora, G.

    2014-08-01

    This article contains a kinematic analysis of an aircraft chassis mechanism in a range of positions. The mechanism of the chassis is made up of several smaller subsystems with different functions. The first mechanism is used to eject the chassis before landing (touchdown) and fold it to hatchway after the lift off. The second mechanism is designed to perform rotation of the crossover with the wheel, in order to adjust the position of the wheel to fit it in the limited space in the hold. The third mechanism allows movement of the chassis resulting from the change in length of the damper. To determine the position of the following links of the mechanism calculus of vectors was applied in which unit vectors were used to represent the angular position of the links. The aim of the analysis is to determine the angle of convergence and the angle of heel wheels as a function of the variable length of hydraulic cylinder, length of the shock absorber, length of the regulations rods

  5. Links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics: a model for information in economics?

    PubMed

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2016-05-28

    This paper tallies the links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics, and attempts to show whether those links can aid in beginning to build a formal template which is usable in economics models where time is (a)symmetric and memory is absent or present. An objective of this paper is to contemplate whether those formalisms can allow us to model information in economics in a novel way.

  6. The Mechanisms Linking Health Literacy to Behavior and Health Status

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Wolf, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the mechanisms linking health literacy to physical activity and self-reported health. Methods From 2005–2007, patients (N=330) with hypertension were recruited from safety net clinics. Path analytic models tested the pathways linking health literacy to physical activity and self-reported health. Results There were significant paths from health literacy to knowledge (r=0.22, P<0.001), knowledge to self-efficacy (r=0.13, P<0.01), self-efficacy to physical activity (r=0.17, P<0.01), and physical activity to health status (r=0.17, P<0.01). Conclusions Health education interventions should be literacy sensitive and aim to enhance patient health knowledge and self-efficacy to promote self-care behavior and desirable health outcomes. PMID:20950164

  7. Homocysteine, Alcoholism, and Its Potential Epigenetic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Mallonee, Carissa J; George, Akash K; Tyagi, Suresh C; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-12-01

    Alcohol is the most socially accepted addictive drug. Alcohol consumption is associated with some health problems such as neurological, cognitive, behavioral deficits, cancer, heart, and liver disease. Mechanisms of alcohol-induced toxicity are presently not yet clear. One of the mechanisms underlying alcohol toxicity has to do with its interaction with amino acid homocysteine (Hcy), which has been linked with brain neurotoxicity. Elevated Hcy impairs with various physiological mechanisms in the body, especially metabolic pathways. Hcy metabolism is predominantly controlled by epigenetic regulation such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and acetylation. An alteration in these processes leads to epigenetic modification. Therefore, in this review, we summarize the role of Hcy metabolism abnormalities in alcohol-induced toxicity with epigenetic adaptation and their influences on cerebrovascular pathology.

  8. Novel putative mechanisms to link circadian clocks to healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Catalin, Bogdan; Buga, Ana-Maria

    2015-08-01

    The circadian clock coordinates the internal physiology to increase the homeostatic capacity thereby providing both a survival advantage to the system and an optimization of energy budgeting. Multiple-oscillator circadian mechanisms are likely to play a role in regulating human health and may contribute to the aging process. Our aim is to give an overview of how the central clock in the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks relate to aging and metabolic disorders, including hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. In particular, we unravel novel putative mechanisms to link circadian clocks to healthy aging. This review may lead to the design of large-scale interventions to help people stay healthy as they age by adjusting daily activities, such as feeding behavior, and or adaptation to age-related changes in individual circadian rhythms.

  9. AIR POLLUTION, INFLAMMATION AND PRETERM BIRTH: A POTENTIAL MECHANISTIC LINK

    PubMed Central

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G.; O´Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth. PMID:24382337

  10. Air pollution, inflammation and preterm birth: a potential mechanistic link.

    PubMed

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth.

  11. LINKING SURVEY AND ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS: MECHANISMS OF CONSENT

    PubMed Central

    Sakshaug, Joseph W.; Couper, Mick P.; Ofstedal, Mary Beth; Weir, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Survey records are increasingly being linked to administrative databases to enhance the survey data and increase research opportunities for data users. A necessary prerequisite to linking survey and administrative records is obtaining informed consent from respondents. Obtaining consent from all respondents is a difficult challenge and one that faces significant resistance. Consequently, data linkage consent rates vary widely from study-to-study. Several studies have found significant differences between consenters and non-consenters on socio-demographic variables, but no study has investigated the underlying mechanisms of consent from a theory-driven perspective. In this study, we describe and test several hypotheses related to respondents’ willingness to consent to an earnings and benefit data linkage request based on mechanisms related to financial uncertainty, privacy concerns, resistance towards the survey interview, level of attentiveness during the interview, the respondents’ preexisting relationship with the administrative data agency, and matching respondents and interviewers on observable characteristics. The results point to several implications for survey practice and suggestions for future research. PMID:27375305

  12. Oxidative stress: a potential link between emotional wellbeing and immune response.

    PubMed

    Salim, Samina

    2016-08-01

    Emotional wellbeing is central to normal health and good living. Persistent psychological stress often disrupts emotional wellbeing and triggers onset of neuropsychiatric ailments. An integrated, multisystemic stress response involving neuroinflammatory, neuroendocrine and metabolic cascades seem to have some causative links. Of particular interest are the neuroinflammatory processes. Psychological stress has been suggested to negatively affect normal functioning of the immune system contributing to the pathophysiology of some neuropsychiatric conditions. Thus examination of the interaction between the immune system and the central nervous system is likely to reveal molecular targets critical for development of potential therapeutic and preventive measures. This review is a summarized discussion of evidence linking impact of psychological stress on the immune system, with a particular emphasis on oxidative stress mechanisms by which mental stress potentially impacts immune function leading to activation of multiple cascades resulting in subsequent manifestation of psychiatric symptomologies.

  13. Cell mechanics and immune system link up to fight infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekpenyong, Andrew; Man, Si Ming; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Achouri, Sarra; Cammarota, Eugenia; Hughes, Katherine; Rizzo, Alessandro; Ng, Gilbert; Guck, Jochen; Bryant, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Infectious diseases, in which pathogens invade and colonize host cells, are responsible for one third of all mortality worldwide. Host cells use special proteins (immunoproteins) and other molecules to fight viral and bacterial invaders. The mechanisms by which immunoproteins enable cells to reduce bacterial loads and survive infections remain unclear. Moreover, during infections, some immunoproteins are known to alter the cytoskeleton, the structure that largely determines cellular mechanical properties. We therefore used an optical stretcher to measure the mechanical properties of primary immune cells (bone marrow derived macrophages) during bacterial infection. We found that macrophages become stiffer upon infection. Remarkably, macrophages lacking the immunoprotein, NLR-C4, lost the stiffening response to infection. This in vitro result correlates with our in vivo data whereby mice lacking NLR-C4 have more lesions and hence increased bacterial distribution and spread. Thus, the immune-protein-dependent increase in cell stiffness in response to bacterial infection (in vitro result) seems to have a functional role in the system level fight against pathogens (in vivo result). We will discuss how this functional link between cell mechanical properties and innate immunity, effected by actin polymerization, reduces the spread of infection.

  14. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Biomarkers Linked to Lung Metastatic Potential and Cell Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka; Herranz, Carmen; Llorente, Alicia; Boni, Jacopo; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Mateo, Francesca; Aguilar, Helena; Gómez-Baldó, Laia; Petit, Anna; Vidal, August; Climent, Fina; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Cordero, Álex; González-Suárez, Eva; Sánchez-Mut, José Vicente; Esteller, Manel; Llatjós, Roger; Varela, Mar; López, José Ignacio; García, Nadia; Extremera, Ana I.; Gumà, Anna; Ortega, Raúl; Plà, María Jesús; Fernández, Adela; Pernas, Sònia; Falo, Catalina; Morilla, Idoia; Campos, Miriam; Gil, Miguel; Román, Antonio; Molina-Molina, María; Ussetti, Piedad; Laporta, Rosalía; Valenzuela, Claudia; Ancochea, Julio; Xaubet, Antoni; Casanova, Álvaro; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung-metastasizing neoplasm caused by the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells that commonly carry loss-of-function mutations in either the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 or 2 (TSC1 or TSC2) genes. While allosteric inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has shown substantial clinical benefit, complementary therapies are required to improve response and/or to treat specific patients. However, there is a lack of LAM biomarkers that could potentially be used to monitor the disease and to develop other targeted therapies. We hypothesized that the mediators of cancer metastasis to lung, particularly in breast cancer, also play a relevant role in LAM. Analyses across independent breast cancer datasets revealed associations between low TSC1/2 expression, altered mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway signaling, and metastasis to lung. Subsequently, immunohistochemical analyses of 23 LAM lesions revealed positivity in all cases for the lung metastasis mediators fascin 1 (FSCN1) and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1). Moreover, assessment of breast cancer stem or luminal progenitor cell biomarkers showed positivity in most LAM tissue for the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), integrin-ß3 (ITGB3/CD61), and/or the sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) proteins. The immunohistochemical analyses also provided evidence of heterogeneity between and within LAM cases. The analysis of Tsc2-deficient cells revealed relative over-expression of FSCN1 and ID1; however, Tsc2-deficient cells did not show higher sensitivity to ID1-based cancer inhibitors. Collectively, the results of this study reveal novel LAM biomarkers linked to breast cancer metastasis to lung and to cell stemness, which in turn might guide the assessment of additional or complementary therapeutic opportunities for LAM. PMID:26167915

  15. Potential injury mechanisms to the climber's belayer.

    PubMed Central

    Butlin, P A

    1985-01-01

    Photographs and transparencies of the techniques used in belaying, combined with information gained from discussions amongst experienced climbers, provided evidence of the potential injury mechanisms which may be subjected to the belayer in having to arrest a falling climber, whilst moving towards the belayer. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 Plate 3 Figure 1 Plate 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:4092137

  16. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  17. Inflammatory Mechanisms Linking Periodontal Diseases to Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schenkein, Harvey A.; Loos, Bruno G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In this paper, inflammatory mechanisms that link periodontal diseases to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are reviewed. Materials and Methods and Results This paper is a literature review. Studies in the literature implicate a number of possible mechanisms that could be responsible for increased inflammatory responses in atheromatous lesions due to periodontal infections. These include increased systemic levels of inflammatory mediators stimulated by bacteria and their products at sites distant from the oral cavity, elevated thrombotic and hemostatic markers that promote a prothrombotic state and inflammation, cross-reactive systemic antibodies that promote inflammation and interact with the atheroma, promotion of dyslipidemia with consequent increases in proinflammatory lipid classes and subclasses, and common genetic susceptibility factors present in both disease leading to increased inflammatory responses. Conclusions Such mechanisms may be thought to act in concert to increase systemic inflammation in periodontal disease and to promote or exacerbate atherogenesis. However, proof that the increase in systemic inflammation attributable to periodontitis impacts inflammatory responses during atheroma development, thrombotic events, or myocardial infarction or stroke is lacking. PMID:23627334

  18. Mechanisms Linking Interparental Aggression to Child Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Lorber, M F; Maisson, D J N; Slep, A M S; Heyman, R E; Wolff, M S

    2017-01-28

    Research has garnered support for a systemic view of factors affecting child dental caries that accounts for the influence of social factors such as the family environment. Our previous work has demonstrated the association between mother-to-father emotional aggression and child caries. The present study builds on these results by evaluating pathways that might explain this relation. Families (n = 135) completed a multimethod assessment of mother-to-father emotional aggression, child caries, and several hypothesized mediators (i.e., child cariogenic snack and drink intake, child internalizing behaviors, child salivary cortisol and α-amylase reactivity, parental laxness, child oral hygiene maintenance, and parental socialization of child oral hygiene maintenance). Mediation analyses partially supported the role of the child's diet as a mechanism linking mother-to-father emotional aggression and child caries. However, children's neglect of oral hygiene, parental laxness, and child emotional and biological disturbances failed to stand as conduits for this association. Future investigations should expand upon these results to better establish the causal links that could only be suggested by the present cross-sectional findings.

  19. Mechanical behavior of highly cross-linked polymer networks and its links to microscopic structure.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Debashish; Abrams, Cameron F

    2009-06-01

    Highly cross-linked polymer (HCP) networks are becoming increasingly important as high-performance adhesives and multifunctional composite materials. Because of their cross-linked molecular architectures, HCPs can be strong but brittle. One key goal in improving the performance of an HCP is to increase toughness without sacrificing strength. Using large scale molecular-dynamics simulation, we compare and characterize the mechanical behavior of two model HCPs under tensile deformation. In the first case, bond angles among any three connected monomers are unconstrained and in the second case we impose harmonic tetrahedral bond angle constraints. We perform a detailed microstructural analysis that establishes a unique correlation between macroscopic mechanical behavior and the microscopic structure of an HCP. While, in the unconstrained system, strain-hardening behavior is observed that is attributed to the formation of microvoids, the void growth is completely arrested in the constrained system and no strain hardening is observed. Moreover, after the initial strain-hardening phase, the unconstrained system displays the same stress-strain behavior as that of a constrained network. Strain hardening makes the unconstrained system ductile while it retains the same tensile strength as the constrained system. We suggest that bond angle flexibility of cross-linkers might be a possible means to control ductility in an HCP network at a constant cross-linker density. We have also studied the effect of temperature, strain rate, and intermonomer nonbonded interaction strength on the stress-strain behavior. Interestingly at a strong intermonomer nonbonded interaction strength, no strain hardening is observed even in the unconstrained system and fracture sets in at around 1% strain, similar to what is observed in an experimental system such as epoxy and vinyl-ester based thermosets. This indicates that strong nonbonded interactions play a key role in making an HCP strong but

  20. Quantum mechanical streamlines. I - Square potential barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Christoph, A. C.; Palke, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Exact numerical calculations are made for scattering of quantum mechanical particles hitting a square two-dimensional potential barrier (an exact analog of the Goos-Haenchen optical experiments). Quantum mechanical streamlines are plotted and found to be smooth and continuous, to have continuous first derivatives even through the classical forbidden region, and to form quantized vortices around each of the nodal points. A comparison is made between the present numerical calculations and the stationary wave approximation, and good agreement is found between both the Goos-Haenchen shifts and the reflection coefficients. The time-independent Schroedinger equation for real wavefunctions is reduced to solving a nonlinear first-order partial differential equation, leading to a generalization of the Prager-Hirschfelder perturbation scheme. Implications of the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics are discussed, and cases are cited where quantum and classical mechanical motions are identical.

  1. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  2. Directed networks' different link formation mechanisms causing degree distribution distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behfar, Stefan Kambiz; Turkina, Ekaterina; Cohendet, Patrick; Burger-Helmchen, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Within undirected networks, scientists have shown much interest in presenting power-law features. For instance, Barabási and Albert (1999) claimed that a common property of many large networks is that vertex connectivity follows scale-free power-law distribution, and in another study Barabási et al. (2002) showed power law evolution in the social network of scientific collaboration. At the same time, Jiang et al. (2011) discussed deviation from power-law distribution; others indicated that size effect (Bagrow et al., 2008), information filtering mechanism (Mossa et al., 2002), and birth and death process (Shi et al., 2005) could account for this deviation. Within directed networks, many authors have considered that outlinks follow a similar mechanism of creation as inlinks' (Faloutsos et al., 1999; Krapivsky et al., 2001; Tanimoto, 2009) with link creation rate being the linear function of node degree, resulting in a power-law shape for both indegree and outdegree distribution. Some other authors have made an assumption that directed networks, such as scientific collaboration or citation, behave as undirected, resulting in a power-law degree distribution accordingly (Barabási et al., 2002). At the same time, we claim (1) Outlinks feature different degree distributions than inlinks; where different link formation mechanisms cause the distribution distinctions, (2) in/outdegree distribution distinction holds for different levels of system decomposition; therefore this distribution distinction is a property of directed networks. First, we emphasize in/outlink formation mechanisms as causal factors for distinction between indegree and outdegree distributions (where this distinction has already been noticed in Barker et al. (2010) and Baxter et al. (2006)) within a sample network of OSS projects as well as Java software corpus as a network. Second, we analyze whether this distribution distinction holds for different levels of system decomposition: open

  3. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; El Hady, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The action potential (AP) is the basic mechanism by which information is transmitted along neuronal axons. Although the excitable nature of axons is understood to be primarily electrical, many experimental studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane co-propagates with the electrical signal. While the experimental evidence for co-propagating mechanical waves is diverse and compelling, there is no consensus for their physical underpinnings. We present a model in which these mechanical displacements arise from the driving of mechanical surface waves, in which potential energy is stored in elastic deformations of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is stored in the movement of the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. Our model allows us to predict the shape of the displacement that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the well-characterized AP. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology. See Arxiv/1407.7600

  4. A Dual Pathogenic Mechanism Links Tau Acetylation to Sporadic Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Tseng, Jui-Heng; Wander, Connor M.; Madden, Victoria; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Cohen, Todd J.

    2017-01-01

    Tau acetylation has recently emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule (MT)-binding region (MTBR), suggesting acetylation could regulate both normal and pathological tau functions. Here, we combined biochemical and cell-based approaches to uncover a dual pathogenic mechanism mediated by tau acetylation. We show that acetylation specifically at residues K280/K281 impairs tau-mediated MT stabilization, and enhances the formation of fibrillar tau aggregates, highlighting both loss and gain of tau function. Full-length acetylation-mimic tau showed increased propensity to undergo seed-dependent aggregation, revealing a potential role for tau acetylation in the propagation of tau pathology. We also demonstrate that methylene blue, a reported tau aggregation inhibitor, modulates tau acetylation, a novel mechanism of action for this class of compounds. Our study identifies a potential “two-hit” mechanism in which tau acetylation disengages tau from MTs and also promotes tau aggregation. Thus, therapeutic approaches to limit tau K280/K281 acetylation could simultaneously restore MT stability and ameliorate tau pathology in AD and related tauopathies. PMID:28287136

  5. Linking continuum mechanics and 3D discrete dislocation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A. A.; Fivel, M.

    1998-10-18

    A technique is developed for linking the methods of discrete dislocation dynamics simulation and finite element to treat elasto-plasticity problems. The overall formulation views the plastically deforming crystal as an elastic crystal with continuously changing dislocation microstructure which is tracked by the numerical dynamics simulation. The FEM code needed in this regard is based on linear elasticity only. This formulation presented here is focused on a continuous updating of the outer shape of the crystal, for possible regeneration of the FEM mesh, and adjustment of the surface geometry, in particular the surface normal. The method is expected to be potentially applicable to the nano- indentation experiments, where the zone around the indenter-crystal contact undergoes significant permanent deformation, the rigorous determination of which is very important to the calculation of the indentation print area and in turn, the surface hardness. Furthermore, the technique is expected to account for the plastic history of the surface displacement under the indenter. Other potential applications are mentioned in the text.

  6. "Young at heart": Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Renata S M; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (>8weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism.

  7. Linking traits based on their shared molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Yael; Nachshon, Aharon; Frishberg, Amit; Wilentzik, Roni; Gat-Viks, Irit

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that co-morbidity and co-occurrence of disease traits are often determined by shared genetic and molecular mechanisms. In most cases, however, the specific mechanisms that lead to such trait–trait relationships are yet unknown. Here we present an analysis of a broad spectrum of behavioral and physiological traits together with gene-expression measurements across genetically diverse mouse strains. We develop an unbiased methodology that constructs potentially overlapping groups of traits and resolves their underlying combination of genetic loci and molecular mechanisms. For example, our method predicts that genetic variation in the Klf7 gene may influence gene transcripts in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells, which in turn affect 17 behavioral traits following morphine injection; this predicted effect of Klf7 is consistent with an in vitro perturbation of Klf7 in bone marrow cells. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of studying hidden causative mechanisms that lead to relationships between complex traits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04346.001 PMID:25781485

  8. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics restrained electrostatic potential fitting.

    PubMed

    Burger, Steven K; Schofield, Jeremy; Ayers, Paul W

    2013-12-05

    We present a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to evaluate the partial charges of amino acid residues for use in MM potentials based on their protein environment. For each residue of interest, the nearby residues are included in the QM system while the rest of the protein is treated at the MM level of theory. After a short structural optimization, the partial charges of the central residue are fit to the electrostatic potential using the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. The resulting charges and electrostatic potential account for the individual environment of the residue, although they lack the transferable nature of library partial charges. To evaluate the quality of the QM/MM RESP charges, thermodynamic integration is used to measure the pKa shift of the aspartic acid residues in three different proteins, turkey egg lysozyme, beta-cryptogein, and Thioredoxin. Compared to the AMBER ff99SB library values, the QM/MM RESP charges show better agreement between the calculated and experimental pK(a) values for almost all of the residues considered.

  9. Gene expression profiling in male B6C3F1 mouse livers exposed to kava identifies--changes in drug metabolizing genes and potential mechanisms linked to kava toxicity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Shi, Qiang; Dial, Stacey; Xia, Qingsu; Mei, Nan; Li, Quan-zhen; Chan, Po-Chuen; Fu, Peter

    2010-02-01

    The association of kava products with liver-related health risks has prompted regulatory action in many countries. We used a genome-wide gene expression approach to generate global gene expression profiles from the livers of male B6C3F1 mice administered kava extract by gavage for 14 weeks, and identified the differentially expressed drug metabolizing genes in response to kava treatments. Analyses of gene functions and pathways reveal that the levels of significant numbers of genes involving drug metabolism were changed and that the pathways involving xenobiotics metabolism, Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response, mitochondrial functions and others, were altered. Our results indicate that kava extract can significantly modulate drug metabolizing enzymes, potentially leading to herb-drug interactions and hepatotoxicity.

  10. Excess body weight during pregnancy and offspring obesity: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Paliy, Oleg; Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Kozyrskyj, Anita; Celep, Gulcin; Marotta, Francesco; Rastmanesh, Reza

    2014-03-01

    The rates of child and adult obesity have increased in most developed countries over the past several decades. The health consequences of obesity affect both physical and mental health, and the excess body weight can be linked to an elevated risk for developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular problems, and depression. Among the factors that can influence the development of obesity are higher infant weights and increased weight gain, which are associated with higher risk for excess body weight later in life. In turn, mother's excess body weight during and after pregnancy can be linked to the risk for offspring overweight and obesity through dietary habits, mode of delivery and feeding, breast milk composition, and through the influence on infant gut microbiota. This review considers current knowledge of these potential mechanisms that threaten to create an intergenerational cycle of obesity.

  11. Investigating the work-family conflict and health link: Repetitive thought as a mechanism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kelly D; Gere, Judith; Sliwinski, Martin J

    2016-10-06

    Research is needed to investigate mechanisms linking work-family conflict to poor health in working adults. We took a novel approach to build on extant studies by testing a potential mechanism in these associations - repetitive thought. Data came from a sample of 203 partnered working adults. There were significant direct effects of work-family conflict with lower life satisfaction, positive affect, and perceived health as well as greater fatigue. As for total effects, work-family conflict was significantly associated with all health outcomes - life satisfaction, positive affect, negative affect, fatigue, perceived health, and chronic health conditions - in the expected directions through repetitive thought. This study provides support that repetitive thought is one potential mechanism of how work-family conflict can take a toll on psychological and physical health. Findings are discussed in relation to improving workplace policies to improve the health of working adults managing work-family conflict.

  12. Electro-Mechanical Actuator. DC Resonant Link Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on the 68 HP electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) system developed on NASA contract for the Electrical Actuation (ELA) Technology Bridging Program. The system was designed to demonstrate the capability of large, high power linear ELAs for applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC) on rocket engines. It consists of a motor controller, drive electronics and a linear actuator capable of up to 32,00 lbs loading at 7.4 inches/second. The drive electronics are based on the Resonant DC link concept and operate at a nominal frequency of 55 kHz. The induction motor is a specially designed high speed, low inertia motor capable of a 68 peak HP. The actuator was originally designed by MOOG Aerospace under an internal R & D program to meet Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) TVC requirements. The design was modified to meet this programs linear rate specification of 7.4 inches/second. The motor and driver were tested on a dynamometer at the Martin Marietta Space Systems facility. System frequency response, step response and force-velocity tests were conducted at the MOOG Aerospace facility. A complete description of the system and all test results can be found in the body of the report.

  13. Links between the mechanics of ventilation and spine stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Simon; McGill, Stuart M

    2008-05-01

    Spine stability is ensured through isometric coactivation of the torso muscles; however, these same muscles are used cyclically to assist ventilation. Our objective was to investigate this apparent paradoxical role (isometric contraction for stability or rhythmic contraction for ventilation) of some selected torso muscles that are involved in both ventilation and support of the spine. Eight, asymptomatic, male subjects provided data on low back moments, motion, muscle activation, and hand force. These data were input to an anatomically detailed, biologically driven model from which spine load and a lumbar spine stability index was obtained. Results revealed that subjects entrained their torso stabilization muscles to breathe during demanding ventilation tasks. Increases in lung volume and back extensor muscle activation coincided with increases in spine stability, whereas declines in spine stability were observed during periods of low lung inflation volume and simultaneously low levels of torso muscle activation. As a case study, aberrant ventilation motor patterns (poor muscle entrainment), seen in one subject, compromised spine stability. Those interested in rehabilitation of patients with lung compromise and concomitant back troubles would be assisted with knowledge of the mechanical links between ventilation during tasks that impose spine loading.

  14. Overview of the postulated mechanisms linking cancer and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Hugo; Falanga, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Blood coagulation appears to play an important role in the occurrence of cancer and its effects may be twofold. First, in patients with cancer, blood coagulation is activated in the direction of a prothrombotic state. Second, a procoagulant environment may promote cancer in different ways. In this chapter we discuss some of the mechanisms that may be involved in this interplay between coagulation and cancer. Blood coagulation proteins interact with cells in the vasculature to maintain hemostasis. However, many proteins that are involved in coagulation and anticoagulation, as well as fibrinolysis, are also found in extravascular tissues. In different organs, these proteins may be involved in cell-signaling mechanisms, through interaction with cell receptors like protease-activated receptors (PARs). Such interactions may drive inflammation, angiogenesis and cell proliferation. The potential procarcinogenic actions of proteases like thrombin may be counteracted by the anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory actions of the protein C-thrombomodulin mechanism. In the blood of cancer patients, the balance is usually shifted towards a procoagulant direction. The resulting excess thrombin- and fibrin-forming activity promotes venous thrombosis and may in the extravascular compartment stimulate cancer progression. The activation of platelets and their interaction with leukocytes may propagate this process. In addition to the therapeutic modulation of the prothrombotic environment, the induction of specific anticoagulant proteins including thrombomodulin may have effects on tumor growth or dissemination, but the nature of these effects still remains hard to predict. The interplay between cancer and blood coagulation merits further experimental and clinical research.

  15. On the link between martian total ozone and potential vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, James A.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that total ozone in the martian atmosphere is highly correlated with the dynamical tracer, potential vorticity, under certain conditions. The degree of correlation is investigated using a Mars global circulation model including a photochemical model. Potential vorticity is the quantity of choice to explore the dynamical nature of polar vortices because it contains information on winds and temperature in a single scalar variable. The correlation is found to display a distinct seasonal variation, with a strong positive correlation in both northern and southern winter at poleward latitudes in the northern and southern hemisphere respectively. The identified strong correlation implies variations in polar total ozone during winter are predominantly controlled by dynamical processes in these spatio-temporal regions. The weak correlation in northern and southern summer is due to the dominance of photochemical reactions resulting from extended exposure to sunlight. The total ozone/potential vorticity correlation is slightly weaker in southern winter due to topographical variations and the preference for ozone to accumulate in Hellas basin. In northern winter, total ozone can be used to track the polar vortex edge. The ozone/potential vorticity ratio is calculated for both northern and southern winter on Mars for the first time. Using the strong correlation in total ozone and potential vorticity in northern winter inside the polar vortex, it is shown that potential vorticity can be used as a proxy to deduce the distribution of total ozone where satellites cannot observe for the majority of northern winter. Where total ozone observations are available on the fringes of northern winter at poleward latitudes, the strong relationship of total ozone and potential vorticity implies that total ozone anomalies in the surf zone of the northern polar vortex can potentially be used to determine the origin of potential vorticity filaments.

  16. Neurocomputational mechanisms of prosocial learning and links to empathy

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Matthew A. J.; Valton, Vincent; Viding, Essi; Roiser, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement learning theory powerfully characterizes how we learn to benefit ourselves. In this theory, prediction errors—the difference between a predicted and actual outcome of a choice—drive learning. However, we do not operate in a social vacuum. To behave prosocially we must learn the consequences of our actions for other people. Empathy, the ability to vicariously experience and understand the affect of others, is hypothesized to be a critical facilitator of prosocial behaviors, but the link between empathy and prosocial behavior is still unclear. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) participants chose between different stimuli that were probabilistically associated with rewards for themselves (self), another person (prosocial), or no one (control). Using computational modeling, we show that people can learn to obtain rewards for others but do so more slowly than when learning to obtain rewards for themselves. fMRI revealed that activity in a posterior portion of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex/basal forebrain (sgACC) drives learning only when we are acting in a prosocial context and signals a prosocial prediction error conforming to classical principles of reinforcement learning theory. However, there is also substantial variability in the neural and behavioral efficiency of prosocial learning, which is predicted by trait empathy. More empathic people learn more quickly when benefitting others, and their sgACC response is the most selective for prosocial learning. We thus reveal a computational mechanism driving prosocial learning in humans. This framework could provide insights into atypical prosocial behavior in those with disorders of social cognition. PMID:27528669

  17. Neurocomputational mechanisms of prosocial learning and links to empathy.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Patricia L; Apps, Matthew A J; Valton, Vincent; Viding, Essi; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2016-08-30

    Reinforcement learning theory powerfully characterizes how we learn to benefit ourselves. In this theory, prediction errors-the difference between a predicted and actual outcome of a choice-drive learning. However, we do not operate in a social vacuum. To behave prosocially we must learn the consequences of our actions for other people. Empathy, the ability to vicariously experience and understand the affect of others, is hypothesized to be a critical facilitator of prosocial behaviors, but the link between empathy and prosocial behavior is still unclear. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) participants chose between different stimuli that were probabilistically associated with rewards for themselves (self), another person (prosocial), or no one (control). Using computational modeling, we show that people can learn to obtain rewards for others but do so more slowly than when learning to obtain rewards for themselves. fMRI revealed that activity in a posterior portion of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex/basal forebrain (sgACC) drives learning only when we are acting in a prosocial context and signals a prosocial prediction error conforming to classical principles of reinforcement learning theory. However, there is also substantial variability in the neural and behavioral efficiency of prosocial learning, which is predicted by trait empathy. More empathic people learn more quickly when benefitting others, and their sgACC response is the most selective for prosocial learning. We thus reveal a computational mechanism driving prosocial learning in humans. This framework could provide insights into atypical prosocial behavior in those with disorders of social cognition.

  18. Potential application of gene therapy to X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thomas; Calmels, Boris; Barlogis, Vincent; Michel, Gérard; Tonnelle, Cécile; Chabannon, Christian

    2007-08-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), or Bruton's disease, is the most common human primary humoral immunodeficiency. XLA is caused by mutations of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key regulator of B-cell physiology. Since the mid 80's, substitutive therapy by intravenous gammaglobulin infusions has significantly improved XLA patient survival and quality of life. Nevertheless, some frequent affections persist despite treatment, and lead to handicapping and further to morbid clinical complications for XLA individuals. Development of gene therapy by transfer of the BTK gene into hematopoietic progenitors could represent an alternative strategy for the treatment of Bruton's disease, with the advantage of a definitive cure for XLA patients. Gene therapy of XLA could be considered as a paradigm for future expansion of gene therapy approaches for many other diseases, since future utilization may be strictly dependent on a marked improvement of risk-benefit ratio compared to pre-existing treatments.

  19. Mechanisms Linking Colorectal Cancer to the Consumption of (Processed) Red Meat: A Review.

    PubMed

    Demeyer, Daniel; Mertens, Birgit; De Smet, Stefaan; Ulens, Michèle

    2016-12-09

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world. The vast majority of CRC cases have been linked to environmental causes rather than to heritable genetic changes. Over the last decades, epidemiological evidence linking the consumption of red and, more convincingly, of processed red meat to CRC has accumulated. In parallel, hypotheses on carcinogenic mechanisms underlying an association between CRC and the intake of red and processed red meat have been proposed and investigated in biological studies. The hypotheses that have received most attention until now include (1) the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines, two groups of compounds recognized as carcinogenic, (2) the enhancing effect of (nitrosyl)heme on the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and lipid peroxidation. However, none of these hypotheses completely explains the link between red and processed red meat intake and the CRC risk. Consequently, scientists have proposed additional mechanisms or refined their hypotheses. This review first briefly summarizes the development of CRC followed by an in-depth overview and critical discussion of the different potential carcinogenic mechanisms underlying the increased CRC risk associated with the consumption of red and processed red meat.

  20. Sarcopenia--consequences, mechanisms, and potential therapies.

    PubMed

    Greenlund, L J S; Nair, K S

    2003-03-01

    Increasingly, the worldwide population is growing older. Sarcopenia occurs with age and is characterized by loss of muscle mass, strength and endurance. Mechanisms that underlie this process are beginning to be understood. These include age-related loss and atrophy of individual muscle fibers, decreased synthesis of muscle proteins, and reduced mitochondrial function. The role of decreased anabolic hormone production in causing these changes remains to be clearly defined. Anabolic hormone replacement is a potential strategy currently being investigated for treatment of sarcopenia. Combinations of aerobic, resistance, and stretching exercise programs have well established beneficial effects. Further understanding of the molecular processes involved in the aging of muscle both at the level of gene expression and protein modification will be important for discovering novel treatment strategies.

  1. Exosomes: The Link between GPCR Activation and Metastatic Potential?

    PubMed Central

    Isola, Allison L.; Chen, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    The activation of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) by their respective ligands initiates a cascade of multiple signaling processes within the cell, regulating growth, metabolism and other essential cellular functions. Dysregulation and aberrant expression of these GPCRs and their subsequent signaling cascades are associated with many different types of pathologies, including cancer. The main life threatening complication in patients diagnosed with cancer is the dissemination of cells from the primary tumor to distant vital organs within the body, metastasis. Communication between the primary tumor, immune system, and the site of future metastasis are some of the key events in the early stages of metastasis. It has been postulated that the communication is mediated by nanovesicles that, under non-pathological conditions, are released by normal cells to relay signals to other cells in the body. These nanovesicles are called exosomes, and are utilized by the tumor cell to influence changes within the recipient cell, such as bone marrow progenitor cells, and cells within the site of future metastatic growth, in order to prepare the site for colonization. Tumor cells have been shown to release an increased number of exosomes when compared to their normal cell counterpart. Exosome production and release are regulated by proteins involved in localization, degradation and size of the multivesicular body, whose function may be altered within cancer cells, resulting in the release of an increased number of these vesicles. This review investigates the possibility of GPCR signaling cascades acting as the upstream activator of proteins involved in exosome production and release, linking a commonly targeted trans-membrane protein class with cellular communication utilized by tumor cells in early stages of metastasis. PMID:27092178

  2. Persistent organic pollutants & obesity: potential mechanisms for breast cancer promotion?

    PubMed Central

    Reaves, Denise K.; Ginsburg, Erika; Bang, John J.; Fleming, Jodie M.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary ingestion of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) correlates with developing obesity. Obesity alters metabolism, induces an inflammatory tissue microenvironment, and is also linked with diabetes and breast cancer risk/promotion of the disease. However, no direct evidence exists exploring the correlation among all three of these factors (POPs, obesity, and breast cancer). Herein, we present current correlative studies suggesting a causal link between POPs exposure through diet and their bioaccumulation in adipose that promotes the development of obesity and ultimately influences breast cancer development and/or progression. Furthermore, as endocrine disruptors, POPs can potentially interfere with hormonally responsive tissue functions causing dysregulation in hormone signaling and cell function. This review highlights the critical need for advanced in vitro and in vivo model systems to understand the complex relationship between obesity, POPs, breast cancer, and, more importantly, to delineate their multifaceted molecular, cellular, and biochemical mechanisms. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies directly testing the observed correlations as well as detailing their molecular mechanisms are vital to cancer research and, ultimately, public health. PMID:25624167

  3. Tank tread assemblies with track-linking mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The proposed tank tread assembly has adjacent tank tread segments joined by a link bearing tapered pins retained by clips inserted through the tread shells perpendicular to the axes of the pin. It also has highway pads attached by a release rod bearing tapered, grooved cams which interlockingly engage tabs inserted into the tread shells.

  4. Immune mechanisms linked to depression via oxidative stress and neuroprogression.

    PubMed

    Bakunina, Nataliia; Pariante, Carmine M; Zunszain, Patricia A

    2015-01-10

    Emerging evidence suggests the significant role of inflammation and oxidative stress as main contributors to the neuroprogression that is observed in major depressive disorder (MDD), where patients show increased inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. The process of neuroprogression includes stage-related neurodegeneration, cell death, reduced neurogenesis, reduced neuronal plasticity and increased autoimmune responses. Oxidative stress is a consequence of the biological imbalance between Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and antioxidants, leading to the alteration of biomolecules and the loss of control of the intracellular redox-related signaling pathways. ROS serve as crucial secondary messengers in signal transduction and significantly affect inflammatory pathways by activating NF-κB and MAPK family stress kinases. When present in excess, ROS inflict damage, affecting cellular constituents with the formation of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as malondialdehyde, 4-Hydroxynonenal, neoepitopes and damage-associated molecular patterns promoting immune response, and ultimately leading to cell death. The failure of cells to adapt to the changes in redox homeostasis and the subsequent cell death, together with the damage caused by inflammatory mediators, have been considered as major causes of neuroprogression and hence MDD. Both an activated immune-inflammatory system and increased oxidative stress act synergistically, complicating our understanding of the pathogenesis of depression. The cascade of antioxidative and inflammatory events is orchestrated by several transcription factors, with Nrf2 and NF-κB having particular relevance to MDD. This review focuses on potential molecular mechanisms through which impaired redox homeostasis and neuroinflammation can affect the neuronal environment and contribute to depression This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  6. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  7. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  8. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  9. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  10. Chemical, Physical, and Mechanical Characterization of Isocyanate Cross-linked Amine-Modified Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Atul; Shimpi, Nilesh; Roy, Samit; Lu, Hongbing; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Dass, Amala; Capadona, Lynn A.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    We describe a new mechanically strong lightweight porous composite material obtained by encapsulating the skeletal framework of amine-modified silica aerogels with polyurea. The conformal polymer coating preserves the mesoporous structure of the underlying silica framework and the thermal conductivity remains low at 0.041 plus or minus 0.001 W m(sup -1 K(sup -1). The potential of the new cross-linked silica aerogels for load-carrying applications was determined through characterization of their mechanical behavior under compression, three-point bending, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). A primary glass transition temperature of 130 C was identified through DMA. At room temperature, results indicate a hyperfoam behavior where in compression cross-linked aerogels are linearly elastic under small strains (less than 4%) and then exhibit yield behavior (until 40% strain), followed by densification and inelastic hardening. At room temperature the compressive Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio were determined to be 129 plus or minus 8 MPa and 0.18, respectively, while the strain at ultimate failure is 77% and the average specific compressive stress at ultimate failure is 3.89 x 10(exp 5) N m kg(sup -1). The specific flexural strength is 2.16 x 10(exp 4) N m kg(sup -1). Effects on the compressive behavior of strain rate and low temperature were also evaluated.

  11. Quantum mechanics of the inverted oscillator potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, G.

    1986-02-01

    The Hamiltonian ( 1/2m)p 2 - 1/2mω 2x 2 yields equations solvable in closed form; one is led to them by questions about the longest mean sojourn time T allowed by quantum mechanics to a system near unstable equilibrium. These equations are then studied further in their own right. After criticism of earlier arguments, one finds, by aid of the Green's function, that T ˜ ω -1log{ l/( {h̷}/{mω) 1/2}} for sojourn in the region | x| < l, where l is the resolving power of the detector. Without appeal to some parameter like l one would get nonsense estimates T ˜ ω-1 (e.g., from the nondecay probability familiar in the decay of metastable states). in this potential wavepackets Gaussian in position do not split on impact: their peaks are either transmitted or reflected, depending on the sign of the energy E ≷ 0; however, they spread so fast that not all the probability ends up on the same side of the origin as the peak. The energy eigenfunctions (parabolic cylinder functions) identify the transmission and reflection amplitudes as T = (1 + e -2πE) -1/2eiφ, R = -i(1 + e -2πE) -1/2 e -πE e iφ, where φ = arg Γ( 1/2 - iE) (in units where 2m = 1 = ω = h̷). The density of states for the interval | x| ≤ L is 2π -1 log L + π -1ϕ'( E). Wavepackets that are peaked sharply enough in energy travel without dispersion in the asymptotic region | x| > | E|, and do split on impact in the usual way. The travel times and time delays of these packets are determined. For both reflection and transmission, and for both E ≷ 0, the time delays are given by φ'( E), which is a symmetric function of E, with a positive maximum at E = 0. In particular, packets tunneling under the barrier reemerge sooner if their energy is more negative. This paradox (which occurs also in other tunneling problems) is elucidated as far as possible. Coherent states are constructed by analogy to those of the ordinary oscillator. Though not integrable, their probability distributions do have a

  12. [Physiologic and molecular mechanisms linking physical activity to cancer risk and progression].

    PubMed

    Ulrich, C M; Wiskemann, J; Steindorf, K

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of colon, breast, endometrial, lung, and pancreatic cancer. Evidence for mediating molecular mechanisms from experimental studies substantially strengthens the causal inference for this relationship. Randomized controlled trials indicate that exercise affects metabolic profiles, including hormone levels (estrogen, insulin signaling), inflammation (e.g., C-reactive protein), and adipokine concentrations (e.g., leptin). The size of the effect depends frequently on concurrent changes in body composition. There is also initial evidence for effects on immune function, oxidative stress, and possibly DNA repair capacity. Finally, outdoor physical activity can directly increase 25(OH)-vitamin D levels, providing another potential mechanism for linking physical activity to cancer risk. Randomized controlled studies with biomarker measurements are essential to increase evidence for causality and to identify the most effective intervention strategies and pharmacologic targets.

  13. Relationship between cross-linking conditions of ethylene vinyl acetate and potential induced degradation for crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonai, Sachiko; Hara, Kohjiro; Tsutsui, Yuji; Nakahama, Hidenari; Masuda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship in crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules between the cross-linking level of copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate (EVA) as the encapsulant and the degree of degradation due to potential induced degradation (PID) phenomenon. We used three methods for the determination of cross-linking level of EVA: xylene method, which is one of the solvent extraction methods (SEM), curing degree by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and viscoelastic properties by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results indicate that degradation of PV modules by PID test depends on the cross-linking level of EVA. The PV modules encapsulated by EVA with higher cross-linking level show lower degradation degree due to PID phenomenon. Also we showed that EVA with higher cross-linking level tended to be higher volume resistivity. This tendency is similar to that for electrical resistance value during the PID test. The PID test was also done by changing thickness of EVA between front cover glass and c-Si with the same cross-linking level. The PV modules encapsulated by thicker EVA between front cover glass and c-Si cell show lower degradation by PID. From these results, the PV modules encapsulated by EVA with higher cross-linking level, higher volume resistivity and increased thickness would be tolerant of PID phenomenon.

  14. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  15. Linking Inverse Square Law with Quantum Mechanical Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-03-01

    (2007 by S Goradia) I modify the Newtonian inverse square law with a postulate that the probability of interaction between two elementary particles varies inversely as the statistical number of Planck lengths separating them. For two nucleons a million Planck lengths apart, the probability of an interaction is a trillionth (almost never), seemingly contradicting gravity. Likewise, statistical expression of the size of the universe implicitly addresses the issue of dark energy by linking fine-structure constant α = 1/137 with the cosmological constant λ = 1/R^2 (abstract submitted 11/11/07 for APS APR2008 meeting). Since light travels one Planck length per Planck time, the radius R of the spherical shape of the universe is 10^60 Planck lengths, linking the cosmological constant λ = 1/10^120 (see equation 14 in Einstein's 1917 paper) with α by the relationship 1/α ln(1/ λ). Intuitive answers to the questions raised suggest that the elementary particles interact via Planck scale mouths ^(1), with higher probabilities at smaller distances. This intuition may be supported by genetics, explaining issues such DNA -- nucleosome interaction ^(2) (3). [1] http://www.arxiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040 [v. 3] [2] www.gravityresearchinstitute.org [3] Segal E. et al, A genomic code for nucleosome positioning. Nature 442, pp. 772-778, 2006.

  16. Mechanisms linking the social environment to health in African Americans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The social environment may influence health directly or indirectly through psychosocial factors, such as perceived stress, depressive symptoms and discrimination. This study explored potential psychosocial mediators of the associations between the social environment and physical and mental health in...

  17. Mechanisms linking energy balance and reproduction: impact of prenatal environment.

    PubMed

    Rhinehart, Erin M

    2016-01-01

    The burgeoning field of metabolic reproduction regulation has been gaining momentum due to highly frequent discoveries of new neuroendocrine factors regulating both energy balance and reproduction. Universally throughout the animal kingdom, energy deficits inhibit the reproductive axis, which demonstrates that reproduction is acutely sensitive to fuel availability. Entrainment of reproductive efforts with energy availability is especially critical for females because they expend large amounts of energy on gestation and lactation. Research has identified an assortment of both central and peripheral factors involved in the metabolic regulation of reproduction. From an evolutionary perspective, these mechanisms likely evolved to optimize reproductive fitness in an environment with an unpredictable food supply and regular bouts of famine. To be effective, however, the mechanisms responsible for the metabolic regulation of reproduction must also retain developmental plasticity to allow organisms to adapt their reproductive strategies to their particular niche. In particular, the prenatal environment has emerged as a critical developmental window for programming the mechanisms responsible for the metabolic control of reproduction. This review will discuss the current knowledge about hormonal and molecular mechanisms that entrain reproduction with prevailing energy availability. In addition, it will provide an evolutionary, human life-history framework to assist in the interpretation of findings on gestational programming of the female reproductive function, with a focus on pubertal timing as an example. Future research should aim to shed light on mechanisms underlying the prenatal modulation of the adaptation to an environment with unstable resources in a way that optimizes reproductive fitness.

  18. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk. PMID:25710019

  19. Mechanisms linking red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mozos, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  20. Potential singularity mechanism for the Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Hormoz, Sahand; Pumir, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Singular solutions to the Euler equations could provide essential insight into the formation of very small scales in highly turbulent flows. Previous attempts to find singular flow structures have proven inconclusive. We reconsider the problem of interacting vortex tubes, for which it has long been observed that the flattening of the vortices inhibits sustained self-amplification of velocity gradients. Here we consider an iterative mechanism, based on the transformation of vortex filaments into sheets and their subsequent instability back into filaments. Elementary fluid mechanical arguments are provided to support the formation of a singular structure via this iterated mechanism, which we analyze based on a simplified model of filament interactions.

  1. Bioinspired composites from cross-linked galactoglucomannan and microfibrillated cellulose: Thermal, mechanical and oxygen barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Oinonen, Petri; Krawczyk, Holger; Ek, Monica; Henriksson, Gunnar; Moriana, Rosana

    2016-01-20

    In this study, new wood-inspired films were developed from microfibrillated cellulose and galactoglucomannan-lignin networks isolated from chemothermomechanical pulping side streams and cross-linked using laccase enzymes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that cross-linked galactoglucomannan-lignin networks have been used for the potential development of composite films inspired by woody-cell wall formation. Their capability as polymeric matrices was assessed based on thermal, structural, mechanical and oxygen permeability analyses. The addition of different amounts of microfibrillated cellulose as a reinforcing agent and glycerol as a plasticizer on the film performances was evaluated. In general, an increase in microfibrillated cellulose resulted in a film with better thermal, mechanical and oxygen barrier performance. However, the presence of glycerol decreased the thermal stability, stiffness and oxygen barrier properties of the films but improved their elongation. Therefore, depending on the application, the film properties can be tailored by adjusting the amounts of reinforcing agent and plasticizer in the film formulation.

  2. Commonness of Amazonian palm (Arecaceae) species: Cross-scale links and potential determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, Thea; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Grández, César; Salo, Jukka; Balslev, Henrik

    2009-07-01

    The mechanisms that cause variation in commonness (abundances and range sizes) of species remain debated in ecology, and a repeatedly observed pattern is the positive relation between local abundances and larger scale range sizes. We used the Amazonian palm species (Arecaceae) to investigate the dependence between and potential determinants of commonness across three (local, landscape, continental) spatial scales. Commonness at the smaller scales (local abundance, landscape frequency) was estimated using data from 57 transects (5 × 500 m) in primary, non-inundated ( terra firme) rainforest in a western Amazonian landscape, while commonness at the largest scale (continental range size) was estimated from digitized distribution maps. Landscape frequency was positively related to both local abundance and continental range size, which, however, were not related to each other. Landscape frequency was positively related to topographic niche breadth. Stem height correlated with continental range size and was the only species life-history trait related to any commonness measure. Distance from the study area to a species' range centre did not influence any of the commonness measures. The factors determining commonness in the Amazonian palm flora appear to be scale-dependent, with the unrelated local scale abundance and continental range size probably being controlled by different driving factors. Interestingly, commonness at the intermediate, landscape scale seems linked to both the smaller and the larger scale. Our results point towards topographic niche breadth at the smaller scales and stem height, possibly reflecting species' dispersal potential, at the continental scale as important determinants of commonness.

  3. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength. PMID:25153614

  4. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength.

  5. Mechanisms of gender-linked ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyue; Dziennis, Suzan; Hurn, Patricia D.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2010-01-01

    Biological sex is an important determinant of stroke risk and outcome. Women are protected from cerebrovascular disease relative to men, an observation commonly attributed to the protective effect of female sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone. However, sex differences in brain injury persist well beyond the menopause and can be found in the pediatric population, suggesting that the effects of reproductive steroids may not completely explain sexual dimorphism in stroke. We review recent advances in our understanding of sex steroids (estradiol, progesterone and testosterone) in the context of ischemic cell death and neuroprotection. Understanding the molecular and cell-based mechanisms underlying sex differences in ischemic brain injury will lead to a better understanding of basic mechanisms of brain cell death and is an important step toward designing more effective therapeutic interventions in stroke. PMID:19531872

  6. Ecological mechanisms linking protected areas to surrounding lands.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Andrew J; DeFries, Ruth

    2007-06-01

    Land use is expanding and intensifying in the unprotected lands surrounding many of the world's protected areas. The influence of this land use change on ecological processes is poorly understood. The goal of this paper is to draw on ecological theory to provide a synthetic framework for understanding how land use change around protected areas may alter ecological processes and biodiversity within protected areas and to provide a basis for identifying scientifically based management alternatives. We first present a conceptual model of protected areas embedded within larger ecosystems that often include surrounding human land use. Drawing on case studies in this Invited Feature, we then explore a comprehensive set of ecological mechanisms by which land use on surrounding lands may influence ecological processes and biodiversity within reserves. These mechanisms involve changes in ecosystem size, with implications for minimum dynamic area, species-area effect, and trophic structure; altered flows of materials and disturbances into and out of reserves; effects on crucial habitats for seasonal and migration movements and population source/sink dynamics; and exposure to humans through hunting, poaching, exotics species, and disease. These ecological mechanisms provide a basis for assessing the vulnerability of protected areas to land use. They also suggest criteria for designing regional management to sustain protected areas in the context of surrounding human land use. These design criteria include maximizing the area of functional habitats, identifying and maintaining ecological process zones, maintaining key migration and source habitats, and managing human proximity and edge effects.

  7. Computational rationality: linking mechanism and behavior through bounded utility maximization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard L; Howes, Andrew; Singh, Satinder

    2014-04-01

    We propose a framework for including information-processing bounds in rational analyses. It is an application of bounded optimality (Russell & Subramanian, 1995) to the challenges of developing theories of mechanism and behavior. The framework is based on the idea that behaviors are generated by cognitive mechanisms that are adapted to the structure of not only the environment but also the mind and brain itself. We call the framework computational rationality to emphasize the incorporation of computational mechanism into the definition of rational action. Theories are specified as optimal program problems, defined by an adaptation environment, a bounded machine, and a utility function. Such theories yield different classes of explanation, depending on the extent to which they emphasize adaptation to bounds, and adaptation to some ecology that differs from the immediate local environment. We illustrate this variation with examples from three domains: visual attention in a linguistic task, manual response ordering, and reasoning. We explore the relation of this framework to existing "levels" approaches to explanation, and to other optimality-based modeling approaches.

  8. Mechanisms linking obesity to altered metabolism in mice colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nimri, Lili; Saadi, Janan; Peri, Irena; Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Schwartz, Betty

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of reports on obesity being a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Our goal in this study was to explore the metabolic networks and molecular signaling pathways linking obesity, adipose tissue and colon cancer. Using in-vivo experiments, we found that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and injected with MC38 colon cancer cells develop significantly larger tumors than their counterparts fed a control diet. In ex-vivo experiments, MC38 and CT26 colon cancer cells exposed to conditioned media (CM) from the adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice demonstrated significantly lower oxygen consumption rate as well as lower maximal oxygen consumption rate after carbonyl cyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone treatment. In addition, in-vitro assays showed downregulated expression of mitochondrial genes in colon cancer cells exposed to CM prepared from the visceral fat of HFD-fed mice or to leptin. Interestingly, leptin levels detected in the media of adipose tissue explants co-cultured with MC38 cancer cells were higher than in adipose tissue explants cultures, indicating cross talk between the adipose tissue and the cancer cells. Salient findings of the present study demonstrate that this crosstalk is mediated at least partially by the JNK/STAT3-signaling pathway. PMID:26472027

  9. Cross Linking and Degradation Mechanisms in Model Sealant Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Kaufman, J.; Ito, T. I.; Nakahara, J. H.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Model compounds were investigated as to which type of heterocyclic ring is the most advantageous for curing sealants based on perfluoroalkylether chains. The relative thermal, thermal oxidative, hydrolytic, and fuel stability of potential crosslinks were determined. Specifically substituted materials were synthesized and evaluation of their stabilities in air, inert atmosphere, water, and Jet-A fuel at 235 and 325 C was made. Three heterocyclic ring systems were considered, namely, triazine, 1,2,4- and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles.

  10. Nonextensive Statistical Mechanics: Some Links with Astronomical Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsallis, Constantino; Tsallis, Constantino; Prato, Domingo; Plastino, Angel R.; Plastino, Angel R.

    2004-04-01

    A variety of astronomical phenomena appear to not satisfy the ergodic hypothesis in the relevant stationary state, if any. As such, there is no reason for expecting the applicability of Boltzmann Gibbs (BG) statistical mechanics. Some of these phenomena appear to follow, instead, nonextensive statistical mechanics. In the same manner that the BG formalism is based on the entropy S BG=-k∑ i p i ln p i, the nonextensive one is based on the form S q=k(1 -∑ i p i q)/(q- 1) (with S 1=S BG). The stationary states of the former are characterized by an exponential dependence on the energy, whereas those of the latter are characterized by an (asymptotic) power law. A brief review of this theory is given here, as well as of some of its applications, such as the solar neutrino problem, polytropic self-gravitating systems, galactic peculiar velocities, cosmic rays and some cosmological aspects. In addition to these, an analogy with the Keplerian elliptic orbits versus the Ptolemaic epicycles is developed, where we show that optimizing S q with a few constraints is equivalent to optimizing S BG with an infinite number of constraints.

  11. Zinc and diabetes--clinical links and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Judith; Karges, Wolfram; Rink, Lothar

    2009-06-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element crucial for the function of more than 300 enzymes and it is important for cellular processes like cell division and apoptosis. Hence, the concentration of zinc in the human body is tightly regulated and disturbances of zinc homeostasis have been associated with several diseases including diabetes mellitus, a disease characterized by high blood glucose concentrations as a consequence of decreased secretion or action of insulin. Zinc supplementation of animals and humans has been shown to ameliorate glycemic control in type 1 and 2 diabetes, the two major forms of diabetes mellitus, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have only slowly been elucidated. Zinc seems to exert insulin-like effects by supporting the signal transduction of insulin and by reducing the production of cytokines, which lead to beta-cell death during the inflammatory process in the pancreas in the course of the disease. Furthermore, zinc might play a role in the development of diabetes, since genetic polymorphisms in the gene of zinc transporter 8 and in metallothionein (MT)-encoding genes could be demonstrated to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The fact that antibodies against this zinc transporter have been detected in type 1 diabetic patients offers new diagnostic possibilities. This article reviews the influence of zinc on the diabetic state including the molecular mechanisms, the role of the zinc transporter 8 and MT for diabetes development and the resulting diagnostic and therapeutic options.

  12. Epigenetic mechanisms linking early nutrition to long term health.

    PubMed

    Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C

    2012-10-01

    Traditionally it has been widely accepted that our genes together with adult lifestyle factors determine our risk of developing non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and obesity in later life. However, there is now substantial evidence that the pre and early postnatal environment plays a key role in determining our susceptible to such diseases in later life. Moreover the mechanism by which the environment can alter long term disease risk may involve epigenetic processes. Epigenetic processes play a central role in regulating tissue specific gene expression and hence alterations in these processes can induce long-term changes in gene expression and metabolism which persist throughout the lifecourse. This review will focus on how nutritional cues in early life can alter the epigenome, producing different phenotypes and altered disease susceptibilities.

  13. Potential Mechanisms of Exercise in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed during pregnancy. This condition shares same array of underlying abnormalities as occurs in diabetes outside of pregnancy, for example, genetic and environmental causes. However, the role of a sedentary lifestyle and/or excess energy intake is more prominent in GDM. Physically active women are less likely to develop GDM and other pregnancy-related diseases. Weight gain in pregnancy causes increased release of adipokines from adipose tissue; many adipokines increase oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Increased intramyocellular lipids also increase cellular oxidative stress with subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species. A well-planned program of exercise is an important component of a healthy lifestyle and, in spite of old myths, is also recommended during pregnancy. This paper briefly reviews the role of adipokines in gestational diabetes and attempts to shed some light on the mechanisms by which exercise can be beneficial as an adjuvant therapy in GDM. In this regard, we discuss the mechanisms by which exercise increases insulin sensitivity, changes adipokine profile levels, and boosts antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:23691290

  14. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  15. Depression and cardiovascular disease: Epidemiological evidence on their linking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2017-03-01

    Depression's burden of disease goes beyond functioning and quality of life and extends to somatic health. Results from longitudinal cohort studies converge in illustrating that major depressive disorder (MDD) subsequently increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with about 80%. The impact of MDD on cardiovascular health may be partly explained by mediating mechanisms such as unhealthy lifestyle (smoking, excessive alcohol use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, therapy non-compliance) and unfavorable pathophysiological disturbances (autonomic, HPA-axis, metabolic and immuno-inflammatory dysregulations). A summary of the literature findings as well as relevant results from the large-scale Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (N=2981) are presented. Persons with MDD have significantly worse lifestyles as well as more pathophysiological disturbances as compared to healthy controls. Some of these differences seem to be specific for (typical versus 'atypical', or antidepressant treated versus drug-naive) subgroups of MDD patients. Alternative explanations are also present, namely undetected confounding, iatrogenic effects or 'third factors' such as genetics.

  16. Vitamin D and bone health: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Laird, Eamon; Ward, Mary; McSorley, Emeir; Strain, J J; Wallace, Julie

    2010-07-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and significant economic and health costs. Vitamin D is a secosteriod hormone essential for calcium absorption and bone mineralization which is positively associated with bone mineral density [BMD]. It is well-established that prolonged and severe vitamin D deficiency leads to rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Sub-optimal vitamin D status has been reported in many populations but it is a particular concern in older people; thus there is clearly a need for effective strategies to optimise bone health. A number of recent studies have suggested that the role of vitamin D in preventing fractures may be via its mediating effects on muscle function (a defect in muscle function is one of the classical signs of rickets) and inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation can improve muscle strength which in turn contributes to a decrease in incidence of falls, one of the largest contributors to fracture incidence. Osteoporosis is often considered to be an inflammatory condition and pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with increased bone metabolism. The immunoregulatory mechanisms of vitamin D may thus modulate the effect of these cytokines on bone health and subsequent fracture risk. Vitamin D, therefore, may influence fracture risk via a number of different mechanisms.

  17. Complex Classical Mechanics of a QES Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhabani Prasad, Mandal; Sushant, S. Mahajan

    2015-10-01

    We study a combined parity (P) and time reversal (T) invariant non-Hermitian quasi-exactly solvable (QES) potential, which exhibits PT phase transition, in the complex plane classically to demonstrate different quantum effects. The particle with real energy makes closed orbits around one of the periodic wells of the complex potential depending on the initial condition. However interestingly the particle escapes to an open orbits even with real energy if it is placed beyond a certain distance from the center of the well. On the other hand when the particle energy is complex the trajectory is open and the particle tunnels back and forth between two wells which are separated by a classically forbidden path. The tunneling time is calculated for different pair of wells and is shown to vary inversely with the imaginary component of energy. Our study reveals that spontaneous PT symmetry breaking does not affect the qualitative features of the particle trajectories in the analogous complex classical model. Support from Department of Science and Technology (DST), Govt. of India under SERC Project Sanction Grant No. SR/S2/HEP-0009/2012

  18. Mechanically Strong, Polymer Cross-linked Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels comprise a class of low-density, high porous solid objects consisting of dimensionally quasi-stable self-supported three-dimensional assemblies of nanoparticles. Aerogels are pursued because of properties above and beyond those of the individual nanoparticles, including low thermal conductivity, low dielectric constant and high acoustic impedance. Possible applications include thermal and vibration insulation, dielectrics for fast electronics, and hosting of functional guests for a wide variety of optical, chemical and electronic applications. Aerogels, however, are extremely fragile materials, hence they have found only limited application in some very specialized environments, for example as Cerenkov radiation detectors in certain types of nuclear reactors, aboard spacecraft as collectors of hypervelocity particles (refer to NASA's Stardust program) and as thermal insulators on planetary vehicles on Mars (refer to Sojourner Rover in 1997 and Spirit and Opportunity in 2004). Along these lines, the X-Aerogel is a new NASA-developed strong lightweight material that has resolved the fragility problem of traditional (native) aerogels. X-Aerogels are made by applying a conformal polymer coating on the surfaces of the skeletal nanoparticles of native aerogels (see Scanning Electron Micrographs). Since the relative amounts of the polymeric crosslinker and the backbone are comparable, X-Aerogels can be viewed either as aerogels modified by the templated accumulation of polymer on the skeletal nanoparticles, or as nanoporous polymers made by remplated casting of polymer on a nanostructured framework. The most striking feature of X-Aerogels is that for a nominal 3-fold increase in density (still a ultralighweight material), the mechanical strength can be up to 300 times higher than the strength of the underlying native aerogel. Thus, X-Aerogels combine a multiple of the specific compressive strength of steel, with the the thermal conductivity of styrofoam. X

  19. Time with friends and physical activity as mechanisms linking obesity and television viewing among youth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Though bivariate relationships between childhood obesity, physical activity, friendships and television viewing are well documented, empirical assessment of the extent to which links between obesity and television may be mediated by these factors is scarce. This study examines the possibility that time with friends and physical activity are potential mechanisms linking overweight/obesity to television viewing in youth. Methods Data were drawn from children ages 10-18 years old (M = 13.81, SD = 2.55) participating in the 2002 wave of Child Development Supplement (CDS) to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) (n = 1,545). Data were collected both directly and via self-report from children and their parents. Path analysis was employed to examine a model whereby the relationships between youth overweight/obesity and television viewing were mediated by time spent with friends and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Results Overweight/obesity was directly related to less time spent with friends, but not to MVPA. Time spent with friends was directly and positively related to MVPA, and directly and negatively related to time spent watching television without friends. In turn, MVPA was directly and negatively related to watching television without friends. There were significant indirect effects of both overweight/obesity and time with friends on television viewing through MVPA, and of overweight/obesity on MVPA through time with friends. Net of any indirect effects, the direct effect of overweight/obesity on television viewing remained. The final model fit the data extremely well (χ2 = 5.77, df = 5, p<0.0001, RMSEA = 0.01, CFI = 0.99, TLI =0.99). Conclusions We found good evidence that the positive relationships between time with friends and physical activity are important mediators of links between overweight/obesity and television viewing in youth. These findings highlight the importance of moving from examinations of bivariate relationships

  20. Neonatal diabetes mellitus: a disease linked to multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Michel; Cavé, Hélène

    2007-01-01

    Transient (TNDM) and Permanent (PNDM) Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus are rare conditions occurring in 1:300,000–400,000 live births. TNDM infants develop diabetes in the first few weeks of life but go into remission in a few months, with possible relapse to a permanent diabetes state usually around adolescence or as adults. The pancreatic dysfunction in this condition may be maintained throughout life, with relapse initiated at times of metabolic stress such as puberty or pregnancy. In PNDM, insulin secretory failure occurs in the late fetal or early post-natal period and does not go into remission. Patients with TNDM are more likely to have intrauterine growth retardation and less likely to develop ketoacidosis than patients with PNDM. In TNDM, patients are younger at the diagnosis of diabetes and have lower initial insulin requirements. Considerable overlap occurs between the two groups, so that TNDM cannot be distinguished from PNDM based on clinical features. Very early onset diabetes mellitus seems to be unrelated to autoimmunity in most instances. A number of conditions are associated with PNDM, some of which have been elucidated at the molecular level. Among these, the very recently elucidated mutations in the KCNJ11 and ABCC8 genes, encoding the Kir6.2 and SUR1 subunit of the pancreatic KATP channel involved in regulation of insulin secretion, account for one third to half of the PNDM cases. Molecular analysis of chromosome 6 anomalies (found in more than 60% in TNDM), and the KCNJ11 and ABCC8 genes encoding Kir6.2 and SUR1, provides a tool to identify TNDM from PNDM in the neonatal period. This analysis also has potentially important therapeutic consequences leading to transfer some patients, those with mutations in KCNJ11 and ABCC8 genes, from insulin therapy to sulfonylureas. Recurrent diabetes is common in patients with "transient" neonatal diabetes mellitus and, consequently, prolonged follow-up is imperative. Realizing how difficult it is to take care

  1. Molecular mechanisms linking adipokines to obesity-related colon cancer: focus on leptin.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is linked to increased risk of colon cancer, currently the third most common cancer. Consequently rising levels of obesity worldwide are likely to significantly impact on obesity-related colon cancers in the decades to come. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby obesity increases colon cancer risk is thus a focus for research to inform strategies to prevent the increasing trend in obesity-related cancers. This review will consider research on deregulation of adipokine signalling, a consequence of altered adipokine hormone secretion from excess adipose tissue, with a focus on leptin, which has been studied extensively as a potential mediator of obesity-related colon cancer. Numerous investigations using colon cell lines in vitro, in vivo studies in rodents and investigations of colon cancer patients illuminate the complexity of the interactions of leptin with colon tissues via leptin receptors expressed by the colon epithelium. Although evidence indicates a role for leptin in proliferation of colon epithelial cells in vitro, this has been contradicted by studies in rodent models. However, recent studies have indicated that leptin may influence inflammatory mediators linked with colon cancer and also promote cell growth dependent on genotype and is implicated in growth promotion of colon cancer cells. Studies in human cancer patients indicate that there may be different tumour sub-types with varying levels of leptin receptor expression, indicating the potential for leptin to induce variable responses in the different tumour types. These studies have provided insights into the complex interplay of adipokines with responsive tissues prone to obesity-related colon cancer. Deregulation of adipokine signalling via adipokine receptors located in the colon appears to be a significant factor in obesity-related colon cancer. Molecular profiling of colon tumours will be a useful tool in future strategies to characterise the influence that adipokines may have

  2. Killing mechanism of stable N-halamine cross-linked polymethacrylamide nanoparticles that selectively target bacteria.

    PubMed

    Natan, Michal; Gutman, Ori; Lavi, Ronit; Margel, Shlomo; Banin, Ehud

    2015-02-24

    Increased resistance of bacteria to disinfection and antimicrobial treatment poses a serious public health threat worldwide. This has prompted the search for agents that can inhibit both bacterial growth and withstand harsh conditions (e.g., high organic loads). In the current study, N-halamine-derivatized cross-linked polymethacrylamide nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by copolymerization of the monomer methacrylamide (MAA) and the cross-linker monomer N,N-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBAA) and were subsequently loaded with oxidative chlorine using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The chlorinated NPs demonstrated remarkable stability and durability to organic reagents and to repetitive bacterial loading cycles as compared with the common disinfectant NaOCl (bleach), which was extremely labile under these conditions. The antibacterial mechanism of the cross-linked P(MAA-MBAA)-Cl NPs was found to involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) only upon exposure to organic media. Importantly, ROS were not generated upon suspension in water, revealing that the mode of action is target-specific. Further, a unique and specific interaction of the chlorinated NPs with Staphylococcus aureus was discovered, whereby these microorganisms were all specifically targeted and marked for destruction. This bacterial encircling was achieved without using a targeting module (e.g., an antibody or a ligand) and represents a highly beneficial, natural property of the P(MAA-MBAA)-Cl nanostructures. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism of action of P(MAA-MBAA)-Cl NPs and demonstrate the superior efficacy of the NPs over bleach (i.e., stability, specificity, and targeting). This work underscores the potential of developing sustainable P(MAA-MBAA)-Cl NP-based devices for inhibiting bacterial colonization and growth.

  3. Dynamic analysis and control of lightweight manipulators with flexible parallel link mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeh Won

    1991-01-01

    The flexible parallel link mechanism is designed for increased rigidity to sustain the buckling when it carries a heavy payload. Compared to a one link flexible manipulator, a two link flexible manipulator, especially the flexible parallel mechanism, has more complicated characteristics in dynamics and control. The objective of this research is the theoretical analysis and the experimental verification of dynamics and control of a two link flexible manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism. Nonlinear equations of motion of the lightweight manipulator are derived by the Lagrangian method in symbolic form to better understand the structure of the dynamic model. A manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism is a constrained dynamic system whose equations are sensitive to numerical integration error. This constrained system is solved using singular value decomposition of the constraint Jacobian matrix. The discrepancies between the analytical model and the experiment are explained using a simplified and a detailed finite element model. The step response of the analytical model and the TREETOPS model match each other well. The nonlinear dynamics is studied using a sinusoidal excitation. The actuator dynamic effect on a flexible robot was investigated. The effects are explained by the root loci and the Bode plot theoretically and experimentally. For the base performance for the advanced control scheme, a simple decoupled feedback scheme is applied.

  4. Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Chen, Jiejin; Glynn, Steven E; Nager, Andrew R; Grant, Robert A; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2017-04-07

    The HslUV proteolytic machine consists of HslV, a double-ring self-compartmentalized peptidase, and one or two AAA+ HslU ring hexamers that hydrolyze ATP to power the unfolding of protein substrates and their translocation into the proteolytic chamber of HslV. Here, we use genetic tethering and disulfide bonding strategies to construct HslU pseudohexamers containing mixtures of ATPase active and inactive subunits at defined positions in the hexameric ring. Genetic tethering impairs HslV binding and degradation, even for pseudohexamers with six active subunits, but disulfide-linked pseudohexamers do not have these defects, indicating that the peptide tether interferes with HslV interactions. Importantly, pseudohexamers containing different patterns of hydrolytically active and inactive subunits retain the ability to unfold protein substrates and/or collaborate with HslV in their degradation, supporting a model in which ATP hydrolysis and linked mechanical function in the HslU ring operate by a probabilistic mechanism.

  5. Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Mama, Scherezade K; Li, Yisheng; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Lee, Rebecca E; Thompson, Deborah; Wetter, David W; Nguyen, Nga T; Reitzel, Lorraine R; McNeill, Lorna H

    2016-01-01

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African American adults. African American men and women (n = 1467) completed questionnaires on the social environment, psychosocial factors (stress, depressive symptoms, and racial discrimination), and mental health. Multiple-mediator models were used to assess direct and indirect effects of the social environment on mental health. Low social status in the community (p < .001) and U.S. (p < .001) and low social support (p < .001) were associated with poor mental health. Psychosocial factors significantly jointly mediated the relationship between the social environment and mental health in multiple-mediator models. Low social status and social support were associated with greater perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and perceived racial discrimination, which were associated with poor mental health. Results suggest the relationship between the social environment and mental health is mediated by psychosocial factors and revealed potential mechanisms through which social status and social support influence the mental health of African American men and women. Findings from this study provide insight into the differential effects of stress, depression and discrimination on mental health. Ecological approaches that aim to improve the social environment and psychosocial mediators may enhance health-related quality of life and reduce health disparities in African Americans.

  6. Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Basen-Engquist, Karen; Lee, Rebecca E.; Thompson, Deborah; Wetter, David W.; Reitzel, Lorraine R.

    2016-01-01

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African American adults. African American men and women (n = 1467) completed questionnaires on the social environment, psychosocial factors (stress, depressive symptoms, and racial discrimination), and mental health. Multiple-mediator models were used to assess direct and indirect effects of the social environment on mental health. Low social status in the community (p < .001) and U.S. (p < .001) and low social support (p < .001) were associated with poor mental health. Psychosocial factors significantly jointly mediated the relationship between the social environment and mental health in multiple-mediator models. Low social status and social support were associated with greater perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and perceived racial discrimination, which were associated with poor mental health. Results suggest the relationship between the social environment and mental health is mediated by psychosocial factors and revealed potential mechanisms through which social status and social support influence the mental health of African American men and women. Findings from this study provide insight into the differential effects of stress, depression and discrimination on mental health. Ecological approaches that aim to improve the social environment and psychosocial mediators may enhance health-related quality of life and reduce health disparities in African Americans. PMID:27119366

  7. Potential of commercial microwave link network derived rainfall for river runoff simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiatek, Gerhard; Keis, Felix; Chwala, Christian; Fersch, Benjamin; Kunstmann, Harald

    2017-03-01

    Commercial microwave link networks allow for the quantification of path integrated precipitation because the attenuation by hydrometeors correlates with rainfall between transmitter and receiver stations. The networks, operated and maintained by cellphone companies, thereby provide completely new and country wide precipitation measurements. As the density of traditional precipitation station networks worldwide is significantly decreasing, microwave link derived precipitation estimates receive increasing attention not only by hydrologists but also by meteorological and hydrological services. We investigate the potential of microwave derived precipitation estimates for streamflow prediction and water balance analyses, exemplarily shown for an orographically complex region in the German Alps (River Ammer). We investigate the additional value of link derived rainfall estimations combined with station observations compared to station and weather radar derived values. Our river runoff simulation system employs a distributed hydrological model at 100 × 100 m grid resolution. We analyze the potential of microwave link derived precipitation estimates for two episodes of 30 days with typically moderate river flow and an episode of extreme flooding. The simulation results indicate the potential of this novel precipitation monitoring method: a significant improvement in hydrograph reproduction has been achieved in the extreme flooding period that was characterized by a large number of local strong precipitation events. The present rainfall monitoring gauges alone were not able to correctly capture these events.

  8. Link between the potentially hazardous Asteroid (86039) 1999 NC43 and the Chelyabinsk meteoroid tenuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Vokrouhlický, David; Bottke, William F.; Pravec, Petr; Sanchez, Juan A.; Gary, Bruce L.; Klima, Rachel; Cloutis, Edward A.; Galád, Adrián; Guan, Tan Thiam; Hornoch, Kamil; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Kušnirák, Peter; Le Corre, Lucille; Mann, Paul; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Skiff, Brian; Vraštil, Jan

    2015-05-01

    We explored the statistical and compositional link between Chelyabinsk meteoroid and potentially hazardous Asteroid (86039) 1999 NC43 to investigate their proposed relation proposed by Borovička et al. (Borovička, J., et al. [2013]. Nature 503, 235-237). First, using a slightly more detailed computation we confirm that the orbit of the Chelyabinsk impactor is anomalously close to the Asteroid 1999 NC43. We find ∼(1-3) × 10-4 likelihood of that to happen by chance. Taking the standpoint that the Chelyabinsk impactor indeed separated from 1999 NC43 by a cratering or rotational fission event, we run a forward probability calculation, which is an independent statistical test. However, we find this scenario is unlikely at the ∼(10-3-10-2) level. Secondly, we note that efforts to conclusively prove separation of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid from (86039) 1999 NC43 in the past needs to meet severe criteria: relative velocity ≃1-10 m/s or smaller, and ≃100 km distance (i.e. about the Hill sphere distance from the parent body). We conclude that, unless the separation event was an extremely recent event, these criteria present an insurmountable difficulty due to the combination of strong orbital chaoticity, orbit uncertainty and incompleteness of the dynamical model with respect to thermal accelerations. This situation leaves the link of the two bodies unresolved and calls for additional analyses. With that goal, we revisit the presumed compositional link between (86039) 1999 NC43 and the Chelyabinsk body. Borovička et al. (Borovička, J., et al. [2013]. Nature 503, 235-237) noted that given its Q-type taxonomic classification, 1999 NC43 may pass this test. However, here we find that while the Q-type classification of 1999 NC43 is accurate, assuming that all Q-types are LL chondrites is not. Our experiment shows that not all ordinary chondrites fall under Q-taxonomic type and not all LL chondrites are Q-types. Spectral curve matching between laboratory spectra of

  9. Dynamic Analysis and Control of Lightweight Manipulators with Flexible Parallel Link Mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeh Won

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the theoretical analysis and the experimental verification of dynamics and control of a two link flexible manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism. Nonlinear equations of motion of the lightweight manipulator are derived by the Lagrangian method in symbolic form to better understand the structure of the dynamic model. The resulting equation of motion have a structure which is useful to reduce the number of terms calculated, to check correctness, or to extend the model to higher order. A manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism is a constrained dynamic system whose equations are sensitive to numerical integration error. This constrained system is solved using singular value decomposition of the constraint Jacobian matrix. Elastic motion is expressed by the assumed mode method. Mode shape functions of each link are chosen using the load interfaced component mode synthesis. The discrepancies between the analytical model and the experiment are explained using a simplified and a detailed finite element model.

  10. Cross-linked chitosan improves the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate-chitosan cement.

    PubMed

    Aryaei, Ashkan; Liu, Jason; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H; Jayasuriya, A Champa

    2015-09-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) cements are highly applicable and valuable materials for filling bone defects by minimally invasive procedures. The chitosan (CS) biopolymer is also considered as one of the promising biomaterial candidates in bone tissue engineering. In the present study, some key features of CaP-CS were significantly improved by developing a novel CaP-CS composite. For this purpose, CS was the first cross-linked with tripolyphosphate (TPP) and then mixed with CaP matrix. A group of CaP-CS samples without cross-linking was also prepared. Samples were fabricated and tested based on the known standards. Additionally, the effect of different powder (P) to liquid (L) ratios was also investigated. Both cross-linked and uncross-linked CaP-CS samples showed excellent washout resistance. The most significant effects were observed on Young's modulus and compressive strength in wet condition as well as surface hardness. In dry conditions, the Young's modulus of cross-linked samples was slightly improved. Based on the presented results, cross-linking does not have a significant effect on porosity. As expected, by increasing the P/L ratio of a sample, ductility and injectability were decreased. However, in the most cases, mechanical properties were enhanced. The results have shown that cross-linking can improve the mechanical properties of CaP-CS and hence it can be used for bone tissue engineering applications.

  11. Linking perception to neural activity as measured by visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Norcia, Anthony M

    2013-11-01

    Linking propositions have played an important role in refining our understanding of the relationship between neural activity and perception. Over the last 40 years, visual evoked potentials (VEPs) have been used in many different ways to address questions of the relationship between neural activity and perception. This review organizes and discusses this research within the linking proposition framework developed by Davida Teller, and her colleagues. A series of examples from the VEP literature illustrates each of the five classes of linking propositions originally proposed by Davida Teller. The related concept of the bridge locus-the site at which neural activity can be said to first be proscriptive of perception-is discussed and a suggestion is made that the concept be expanded to include an evolution over time and cortical area.

  12. Cross-linking cellulose nanofibrils for potential elastic cryo-structured gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syverud, Kristin; Kirsebom, Harald; Hajizadeh, Solmaz; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary

    2011-12-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils were produced from P. radiata kraft pulp fibers. The nanofibrillation was facilitated by applying 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl-mediated oxidation as pretreatment. The oxidized nanofibrils were cross-linked with polyethyleneimine and poly N-isopropylacrylamide- co-allylamine- co-methylenebisacrylamide particles and were frozen to form cryo-structured gels. Samples of the gels were critical-point dried, and the corresponding structures were assessed with scanning electron microscopy. It appears that the aldehyde groups in the oxidized nanofibrils are suitable reaction sites for cross-linking. The cryo-structured materials were spongy, elastic, and thus capable of regaining their shape after a given pressure was released, indicating a successful cross-linking. These novel types of gels are considered potential candidates in biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  13. Energy transmission in a mechanically-linked double-wall structure coupled to an acoustic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Li, Y. Y.; Gao, J. X.

    2005-05-01

    The energy transmission in a mechanically linked double-wall structure into an acoustic enclosure is studied in this paper. Based on a fully coupled vibro-acoustic formulation, focus is put on investigating the effect of the air gap and mechanical links between the two panels on the energy transmission and noise insulation properties of such structures. An approximate formula reflecting the gap effect on the lower-order coupled frequencies of the system is proposed. A criterion, based on the ratio between the aerostatic stiffness of the gap cavity and the stiffness of the link, is proposed to predict the dominant transmitting path, with a view to provide guidelines for the design of appropriate control strategies. Numerical results reveal the existence of three distinct zones, within which energy transmission takes place following different mechanisms and transmitting paths. Corresponding effects on noise insulation properties of the double-wall structure are also investigated. .

  14. Use of concatemers of ligand-gated ion channel subunits to study mechanisms of steroid potentiation.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2011-12-01

    Synaptic receptors of the nicotinic receptor gene family are pentamers of subunits. This modular structure creates problems in studies of drug actions, related to the number of copies of a subunit that are present and their position. A separate issue concerns the mechanism of action of many anesthetics, which involves potentiation of responses to neurotransmitters. Potentiation requires an interaction between a transmitter and a potentiator, mediated through the target receptor. We have studied the mechanism by which neurosteroids potentiate transmitter responses, using concatemers of covalently linked subunits to control the number and position of subunits in the assembled receptor and to selectively introduce mutations into positionally defined copies of a subunit. We found that the steroid needs to interact with only one site to produce potentiation, that the native sites for steroid interaction have indistinguishable properties, and that steroid potentiation appears to result from a global effect on receptor function.

  15. O-Linked Glycosylation Determines the Nephritogenic Potential of IgA Rheumatoid Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Masao; Ito, Kiyoaki; Nakata, Junichiro; Otani, Masako; Tran, Ngoc Lan; Morito, Naoki; Takahashi, Satoru; Wada, Yoshinao

    2014-01-01

    Deficient glycosylation of O-linked glycans in the IgA1 hinge region is associated with IgA nephropathy in humans, but the pathogenic contribution of the underlying structural aberrations remains incompletely understood. We previously showed that mice implanted with cells secreting the class-switch variant 6-19 IgA anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor, but not 46-42 IgA anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor, develop glomerular lesions resembling IgA nephropathy. Because the levels of O-linked glycosylation in the hinge region and the structures of N-linked glycans in the CH1 domain differ in 6-19 IgA and 46-42 IgA, we determined the respective contributions of O- and N-linked glycans to the nephritogenic potential of the 6-19 IgA rheumatoid factor in mice. Wild-type 6-19 IgA secreted by implanted cells induced significant formation of glomerular lesions, whereas poorly O-glycosylated 6-19 IgA glycovariants or a 6-19 IgA hinge mutant lacking O-linked glycans did not. However, we observed no apparent heterogeneity in the structure of N-linked glycans attached to three different sites of the Fc regions of nephritogenic and non-nephritogenic 6-19 IgAs. Collectively, our data suggest a critical role of O-linked glycans attached to the hinge region in the development of IgA nephropathy–like GN induced by 6-19 IgA rheumatoid factor in mice. PMID:24511137

  16. Phylogenetic and functional potential links pH and N2O emissions in pasture soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, M. D. Sainur; Biswas, Ambarish; Bakken, Lars R.; Clough, Timothy J.; de Klein, Cecile A. M.; Richards, Karl G.; Lanigan, Gary J.; Morales, Sergio E.

    2016-10-01

    Denitrification is mediated by microbial, and physicochemical, processes leading to nitrogen loss via N2O and N2 emissions. Soil pH regulates the reduction of N2O to N2, however, it can also affect microbial community composition and functional potential. Here we simultaneously test the link between pH, community composition, and the N2O emission ratio (N2O/(NO + N2O + N2)) in 13 temperate pasture soils. Physicochemical analysis, gas kinetics, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, metagenomic and quantitative PCR (of denitrifier genes: nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII) analysis were carried out to characterize each soil. We found strong evidence linking pH to both N2O emission ratio and community changes. Soil pH was negatively associated with N2O emission ratio, while being positively associated with both community diversity and total denitrification gene (nir & nos) abundance. Abundance of nosZII was positively linked to pH, and negatively linked to N2O emissions. Our results confirm that pH imposes a general selective pressure on the entire community and that this results in changes in emission potential. Our data also support the general model that with increased microbial diversity efficiency increases, demonstrated in this study with lowered N2O emission ratio through more efficient conversion of N2O to N2.

  17. Phylogenetic and functional potential links pH and N2O emissions in pasture soils

    PubMed Central

    Samad, M. d. Sainur; Biswas, Ambarish; Bakken, Lars R.; Clough, Timothy J.; de Klein, Cecile A. M.; Richards, Karl G.; Lanigan, Gary J.; Morales, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is mediated by microbial, and physicochemical, processes leading to nitrogen loss via N2O and N2 emissions. Soil pH regulates the reduction of N2O to N2, however, it can also affect microbial community composition and functional potential. Here we simultaneously test the link between pH, community composition, and the N2O emission ratio (N2O/(NO + N2O + N2)) in 13 temperate pasture soils. Physicochemical analysis, gas kinetics, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, metagenomic and quantitative PCR (of denitrifier genes: nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII) analysis were carried out to characterize each soil. We found strong evidence linking pH to both N2O emission ratio and community changes. Soil pH was negatively associated with N2O emission ratio, while being positively associated with both community diversity and total denitrification gene (nir & nos) abundance. Abundance of nosZII was positively linked to pH, and negatively linked to N2O emissions. Our results confirm that pH imposes a general selective pressure on the entire community and that this results in changes in emission potential. Our data also support the general model that with increased microbial diversity efficiency increases, demonstrated in this study with lowered N2O emission ratio through more efficient conversion of N2O to N2. PMID:27782174

  18. A maintenance scheme of communication link in mobile robot ad hoc networks based on potential field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Jin, WenPing; Yang, GyoYing; Li, LeiMin

    2007-12-01

    Maintaining communication link in mobile robot networks between task robots and a control center is very important in some urgent application occasions such as remote danger detections. To offer a reliable multi-hop communication link, a link maintaining scheme based on artificial potential field is presented. The scheme is achieved by a task robot and communication relay ones. The task robot performs predefined tasks, and relay ones are simple robots which form a communication relay chain. When robots move towards destination in formation, a kind of attractive force created by communication quality is added to traditional potential field, and relay robots follow the task robot and automatically stop at adequate locations to form a relay chain from the control station to the task robot. In order to increase relay usage efficiency, when some relays are replaced by other short cut relays, the redundant relays can be reused by initiating another moving toward specified location. Simulation results show that the scheme can provide a reliable multi-hop communication link, and that the communication connection can be obtained through minimal number of relays.

  19. Computational exploration of polymer nanocomposite mechanical property modification via cross-linking topology.

    PubMed

    Lacevic, Naida; Gee, Richard H; Saab, Andrew; Maxwell, Robert

    2008-09-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in order to study the effects of nanoscale filler cross-linking topologies and loading levels on the mechanical properties of a model elastomeric nanocomposite. The model system considered here is constructed from octafunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) dispersed in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix. Shear moduli, G, have been computed for pure and for filled and unfilled PDMS as a function of cross-linking density, POSS fill loading level, and polymer network topology. The results reported here show that G increases as the cross-linking (covalent bonds formed between the POSS and the PDMS network) density increases. Further, G is found to have a strong dependence on cross-linking topology. The increase in shear modulus, G, for POSS filled PDMS is significantly higher than that for unfilled PDMS cross-linked with standard molecular species, suggesting an enhanced reinforcement mechanism for POSS. In contrast, in blended systems (POSS/PDMS mixture with no cross-linking) G was not observed to significantly increase with POSS loading. Finally, we find intriguing differences in the structural arrangement of bond strains between the cross-linked and the blended systems. In the unfilled PDMS the distribution of highly strained bonds appears to be random, while in the POSS filled system, the strained bonds form a netlike distribution that spans the network. Such a distribution may form a structural network "holding" the composite together and resulting in increases in G compared to an unfilled, cross-linked system. These results are of importance for engineering of new POSS-based multifunctional materials with tailor-made mechanical properties.

  20. Computational exploration of polymer nanocomposite mechanical property modification via cross-linking topology

    SciTech Connect

    Lacevic, N; Gee, R; Saab, A; Maxwell, R

    2008-04-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in order to study the effects of nanoscale filler cross-linking topologies and loading levels on the mechanical properties of a model elastomeric nanocomposite. The model system considered here is constructed from octa-functional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) dispersed in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix. Shear moduli, G, have been computed for pure and for filled and unfilled PDMS as a function of cross-linking density, POSS fill loading level, and polymer network topology. The results reported here show that G increases as the cross-linking (covalent bonds formed between the POSS and the PDMS network) density increases. Further, G is found to have a strong dependence on cross-linking topology. The increase in shear modulus, G, for POSS filled PDMS is significantly higher than that for unfilled PDMS cross-linked with standard molecular species, suggesting an enhanced reinforcement mechanism for POSS. In contrast, in blended systems (POSS/PDMS mixture with no cross-linking) G was not observed to significantly increase with POSS loading. Finally, we find intriguing differences in the structural arrangement of bond strains between the cross-linked and the blended systems. In the unfilled PDMS the distribution of highly strained bonds appears to be random, while in the POSS filled system, the strained bonds form a net-like distribution that spans the network. Such a distribution may form a structural network 'holding' the composite together and resulting in increases in G compared to an unfilled, cross-linked system. These results are of importance for engineering of new POSS-based multifunctional materials with tailor-made mechanical properties.

  1. Possible Links between Intestinal Permeablity and Food Processing: A Potential Therapeutic Niche for Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Rapin, Jean Robert; Wiernsperger, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a likely cause of various pathologies, such as allergies and metabolic or even cardiovascular disturbances. Intestinal permeability is found in many severe clinical situations and in common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. In these conditions, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic circulation. To illustrate the potential harmfulness of leaky gut, we present an argument based on examples linked to protein or lipid glycation induced by modern food processing. Increased intestinal permeability should be largely improved by dietary addition of compounds, such as glutamine or curcumin, which both have the mechanistic potential to inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress linked to tight junction opening. This brief review aims to increase physician awareness of this common, albeit largely unrecognized, pathology, which may be easily prevented or improved by means of simple nutritional changes. PMID:20613941

  2. Tuning of cross-linking and mechanical properties of laser-deposited poly (methyl methacrylate) films

    SciTech Connect

    Sueske, Erik; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Panchenko, Elena; Junkers, Thomas; Egorov, Mark; Buback, Michael; Kijewski, Harald

    2005-03-15

    The chemical composition, amount of cross-linking and its influence on the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at a wavelength of 248 nm under ultrahigh vacuum were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, thermogravimetric analysis, and nanoindentation experiments. The films consist of two components, one fraction with a molecular weight well below that of the target material and a second fraction, which is cross-linked. Compared to bulk material, the Young's modulus of the film is increased. The amount of cross-linking in the film can be tuned by the applied laser fluence leading to changes of the mechanical properties.

  3. Tuning of cross-linking and mechanical properties of laser-deposited poly (methyl methacrylate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süske, Erik; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Panchenko, Elena; Junkers, Thomas; Egorov, Mark; Buback, Michael; Kijewski, Harald

    2005-03-01

    The chemical composition, amount of cross-linking and its influence on the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at a wavelength of 248nm under ultrahigh vacuum were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, thermogravimetric analysis, and nanoindentation experiments. The films consist of two components, one fraction with a molecular weight well below that of the target material and a second fraction, which is cross-linked. Compared to bulk material, the Young's modulus of the film is increased. The amount of cross-linking in the film can be tuned by the applied laser fluence leading to changes of the mechanical properties.

  4. Students' Conceptual Difficulties in Quantum Mechanics: Potential Well Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozcan, Ozgur; Didis, Nilufer; Tasar, Mehmet Fatih

    2009-01-01

    In this study, students' conceptual difficulties about some basic concepts in quantum mechanics like one-dimensional potential well problems and probability density of tunneling particles were identified. For this aim, a multiple choice instrument named Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Test has been developed by one of the researchers of this study…

  5. Psychosocial mechanisms linking the social environment to mental health in African Americans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African Amer...

  6. Insect mandibles--comparative mechanical properties and links with metal incorporation.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Bronwen W; Stewart, Aaron; Huang, Han; Truss, Rowan; Noller, Barry; Rasch, Ronald; Zalucki, Myron P

    2008-01-01

    A number of arthropod taxa contain metals in their mandibles (jaws), such as zinc, manganese, iron, and calcium. The occurrence of zinc and its co-located halogen chlorine have been studied in relation to the mechanical properties and shown to be linked in a direct fashion with increasing concentration. Hardness along with elastic modulus (stiffness) has also been linked to zinc and halogen concentration in some marine polychaete worms. The metal appears to be incorporated within the biological matrix, possibly bonding with proteins. However, the comparative advantage of metal inclusion has not been tested. It is possible that without metals, alternative mechanisms are used to achieve hardness of equal value in similar 'tools' such as mandibles. This question has direct bearing on the significance of metal hardening. In the present article, we compare across mandibles from six termite species, including samples with major zinc concentration, minor manganese, and no metals. Nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and electron microanalysis are used to assess metal concentration, form, and mechanical properties. The data demonstrate that termite mandibles lacking metals when fully developed have lower values for hardness and elastic modulus. Zinc is linked to a relative 20% increase in hardness when compared with mandibles devoid of metals. The similar transition metal, manganese, found in minor concentrations, is not linked to any significant increase in these mechanical properties. This raises the question of the function of manganese, which is as commonly found in insect mandibles as zinc and often located in the same mandibles.

  7. A New Realistic Evaluation Analysis Method: Linked Coding of Context, Mechanism, and Outcome Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Suzanne F.; Kolla, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    In attempting to use a realistic evaluation approach to explore the role of Community Parents in early parenting programs in Toronto, a novel technique was developed to analyze the links between contexts (C), mechanisms (M) and outcomes (O) directly from experienced practitioner interviews. Rather than coding the interviews into themes in terms of…

  8. Exactly Solvable Quantum Mechanical Potentials: An Alternative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronchik, Jeremy N.; Williams, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an alternative approach to finding exactly solvable, one-dimensional quantum mechanical potentials. Differs from the usual approach in that instead of starting with a particular potential and seeking solutions to the related Schrodinger equations, it begins with known solutions to second-order ordinary differential equations and seeks to…

  9. Maturation of Collagen Ketoimine Cross-links by an Alternative Mechanism to Pyridinoline Formation in Cartilage*

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, David R.; Weis, Mary Ann; Wu, Jiann-Jiu

    2010-01-01

    The tensile strength of fibrillar collagens depends on stable intermolecular cross-links formed through the lysyl oxidase mechanism. Such cross-links based on hydroxylysine aldehydes are particularly important in cartilage, bone, and other skeletal tissues. In adult cartilages, the mature cross-linking structures are trivalent pyridinolines, which form spontaneously from the initial divalent ketoimines. We examined whether this was the complete story or whether other ketoimine maturation products also form, as the latter are known to disappear almost completely from mature tissues. Denatured, insoluble, bovine articular cartilage collagen was digested with trypsin, and cross-linked peptides were isolated by copper chelation chromatography, which selects for their histidine-containing sequence motifs. The results showed that in addition to the naturally fluorescent pyridinoline peptides, a second set of cross-linked peptides was recoverable at a high yield from mature articular cartilage. Sequencing and mass spectral analysis identified their origin from the same molecular sites as the initial ketoimine cross-links, but the latter peptides did not fluoresce and were nonreducible with NaBH4. On the basis of their mass spectra, they were identical to their precursor ketoimine cross-linked peptides, but the cross-linking residue had an M+188 adduct. Considering the properties of an analogous adduct of identical added mass on a glycated lysine-containing peptide from type II collagen, we predicted that similar dihydroxyimidazolidine structures would form from their ketoimine groups by spontaneous oxidation and free arginine addition. We proposed the trivial name arginoline for the ketoimine cross-link derivative. Mature bovine articular cartilage contains about equimolar amounts of arginoline and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline based on peptide yields. PMID:20363745

  10. The Potential Link between Gut Microbiota and IgE-Mediated Food Allergy in Early Life

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, John; Allen, Katrina; Collier, Fiona; Tang, Mimi L. K.; Ward, Alister C.; Vuillermin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The coevolution of the human gastrointestinal tract and commensal microbiota has resulted in a symbiotic relationship in which gut microbiota play a vital role in early life immune development and function, as well as maintenance of gut wall epithelial integrity. Since IgE mediated food allergy is associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut epithelial integrity there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergy. Although the exact link between gut microbiota and food allergy is yet to be established in humans, recent experimental evidence suggests that specific patterns of gut microbiota colonization may influence the risk and manifestations of food allergy. An understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and food allergy has the potential to inform both the prevention and treatment of food allergy. In this paper we review the theory and evidence linking gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. We then consider the implications and challenges for future research, including the techniques of measuring and analyzing gut microbiota, and the types of studies required to advance knowledge in the field. PMID:24351744

  11. "Bridge Proteins" Link Inflammation and Metabolic Diseases: Potential Targets for Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hailong; Qin, Guixin; Zhang, Xuefeng; Che, Dongsheng

    2016-06-26

    Clinical observations support the postulate that chronic low-grade inflammation underlies metabolic diseases and inflammatory mediators can trigger some metabolic diseases. In disorder condition, what is the first one: metabolic diseases cause inflammation or conversely? This "chicken or egg" type question was hard to answer. However, instead of focusing on this difficult issue, we should ask another challenging question: what are the links between inflammation and metabolic diseases? Seizing the key from this chaos may be the best way to solve the problem and break the cycle. To answer this question, we review the regulators (such as NF-κB, PPARs, mTOR, and STAT3) that have important roles in both metabolism and inflammation. These "bridge proteins" that link metabolic diseases and inflammation not only increase our understanding of these two diseases, but also provide potential targets for therapeutics and practical clinical applications.

  12. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells and prognosis: the potential link between conventional cancer therapy and immunity.

    PubMed

    Jochems, Caroline; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies have now documented a link between the immune infiltrate in several human carcinoma types and prognosis and response to therapy. The most comprehensive of these studies were in colorectal cancer with similar conclusions by numerous groups. Analyses of immune infiltrate of several other carcinoma types also showed general correlations between immune infiltrate and prognosis, but with some conflicting results. This review will attempt to summarize the current state of this field and point out what factors may be responsible for some of the conflicting findings. Nonetheless, the breadth of reports drawing similar conclusions for some cancer cell types leads one to more seriously consider the link between immune cell infiltrate and tumor prognosis and/or response to therapy, and the potential for combining conventional cancer therapy with active immunotherapy employing therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  13. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils: influence of natural cross-links.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko; Magnusson, S Peter

    2013-06-04

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human collagen fibrils. There was an initial rise in modulus followed by a plateau with reduced modulus, which was finally followed by an even greater increase in stress and modulus before failure. The RTTs also displayed the initial increase and plateau phase, but the third region was virtually absent and the plateau continued until failure. The importance of cross-link lability was investigated by NaBH₄ reduction of the rat-tail fibrils, which did not alter their behavior. These findings shed light on the function of cross-links at the fibril level, but further studies will be required to establish the underlying mechanisms.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of highly cross-linked polymer networks: prediction of thermal and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenogina, Natalia; Tsige, Mesfin; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila; Patnaik, Soumya

    2012-02-01

    We use all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the mechanical and thermal properties of thermosetting polymers. Atomistic simulation is a promising tool which can provide detailed structure-property relationships of densely cross-linked polymer networks. In this work we study the thermo-mechanical properties of thermosetting polymers based on amine curing agents and epoxy resins and have focused on the DGEBA/DETDA epoxy system. At first we describe the modeling approach to construction of realistic all-atom models of densely cross-linked polymer matrices. Subsequently, a series of atomistic simulations was carried out to examine the simulation cell size effect as well as the role of cross-linking density and chain length of the resin strands on thermo-mechanical properties at different temperatures. Two different methods were used to deform the polymer networks. Both static and dynamic approaches to calculating the mechanical properties were considered and the thermo-mechanical properties obtained from our simulations were found in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  15. Can interactive educational technologies support the link between ultrasound theory and practice via feedback mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Linking theory to practice is an area of concern for ultrasound students, clinical mentors and academic staff. The link between theory and practice requires a robust clinical mentorship scheme in addition to careful curricula design considerations to improve student outcomes. The introduction of interactive technology in education provides ripe opportunity to improve feedback to students to support the link between theory and practice. A series of three interactive learning and teaching activities were designed and delivered to a PostGraduate Ultrasound cohort, after which, evaluation was performed to answer the research question: Which interactive technologies support the link between theory and practice through improved feedback mechanisms? An action research methodology was adopted involving an enquiry based literature review, planning, design and action process. Data were collected following action of three interactive teaching and learning sessions within the Medical Ultrasound cohort of 2013/2014 at Glasgow Caledonian University via a paper based questionnaire. A 100% response rate was achieved (n = 14). All three interactive learning and teaching sessions were considered with 100% highest point agreement to support the link between ultrasound theory and practice via feedback. Students found all three designed and facilitated sessions valuable and relevant to their learning, which in turn provided positive experiences which were perceived to support the link between theory and practice through feedback. These activities can be considered valuable in Postgraduate Ultrasound education. PMID:27433244

  16. Mechanical and biocompatible characterization of a cross-linked collagen-hyaluronic acid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Kirk, James F; Ritter, Gregg; Finger, Isaac; Sankar, Dhyana; Reddy, Joseph D; Talton, James D; Nataraj, Chandra; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Cobb, Ronald R

    2013-01-01

    Collagen scaffolds have been widely employed as a dermal equivalent to induce fibroblast infiltrations and dermal regeneration in the treatment of chronic wounds and diabetic foot ulcers. Cross-linking methods have been developed to address the disadvantages of the rapid degradation associated with collagen-based scaffolds. To eliminate the potential drawbacks associated with glutaraldehyde cross-linking, methods using a water soluble carbodiimide have been developed. In the present study, the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hyaluronic acid (HA), was covalently attached to an equine tendon derived collagen scaffold using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) to create ntSPONGE The HA was shown to be homogeneously distributed throughout the collagen matrix. In vitro analyses of the scaffold indicated that the cross-linking enhanced the biological stability by decreasing the enzymatic degradation and increasing the thermal denaturation temperature. The material was shown to support the attachment and proliferation of mouse L929 fibroblast cells. In addition, the cross-linking decreased the resorption rate of the collagen as measured in an intramuscular implant model in rabbits. The material was also shown to be biocompatible in a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays. These results indicate that this cross-linked collagen-HA scaffold, ntSPONGE has the potential for use in chronic wound healing.

  17. Nanomechanical characterization and molecular mechanism study of nanoparticle reinforced and cross-linked chitosan biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Rath, Amrita; Mathesan, Santhosh; Ghosh, Pijush

    2015-03-01

    Chitosan (CS) is a biomaterial that offers many sophisticated and innovative applications in the biomedical field owing to its excellent characteristics of biodegradability, biocompatibility and non-toxicity. However, very low mechanical properties of chitosan polymer impose restriction on its further development. Cross-linking and nanoparticle reinforcement are the two possible methods to improve the mechanical properties of chitosan films. In this research, these two methods are adopted individually by using tripolyphosphate as cross-linker and nano-hydroxyapatite as particle reinforcement. The nanomechanical characterizations under static loading conditions are performed on these modified chitosan films. It is observed that nanoparticle reinforcement provided necessary mechanical properties such as ductility and modulus. The mechanisms involved in improvement of mechanical properties due to particle reinforcement are studied by molecular dynamics (MD). Further, improvement in mechanical properties due to combination of particle reinforcement and cross-linking agent with chitosan is investigated. The stress relaxation behavior for all these types of films is characterized under dynamic loading conditions using dynamic mechanical analysis (nanoDMA) experiment. A viscoelastic solid like response is observed for all types of film with modulus relaxing by 3-6% of its initial value. A suitable generalized Maxwell model is fitted with the obtained viscoelastic response of these films. The response to nano-scratch behavior is also studied for particle reinforced composite films.

  18. Design of a deterministic link initialization mechanism for serial LVDS interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatral, S.; Lemke, F.; Bruening, U.

    2014-03-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR in Darmstadt has special requirements for the Data Acquisition Network. One of them is deterministic latency for all the links from the back-end to the front-end, which enables synchronization in the whole read-out tree. Since the front-end electronics (FEE) contain mixed-signal circuits for processing the raw detector data, special ASICs were developed. DDR LVDS links are used to interconnect the FEEs and readout controllers. An adapted link initialization mechanism ensures determinism for them by balancing cable lengths, adjusting for phase differences, and handling environmental behavior. After re-initialization, timing must be accurate to the bit-clock level.

  19. An Investigation of Siloxane Cross-linked Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin/Copolymer Composites for Potential Orthopedic Applications†

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, Jason Christopher; Knight, Kelly Jane; Zhou, Huaxing; Chiu, Chi-Kai; Ko, Ching-Chang; You, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Causes of bone deficiency are numerous, but biomimetic alloplastic grafts provide an alternative to repair tissue naturally. Previously, a hydroxyapatite-gelatin modified siloxane (HAp-Gemosil) composite was prepared by cross-linking (N, N′-bis[(3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylene diamine (enTMOS) around the HAp-Gel nanocomposite particles, to mimic the natural composition and properties of bone. However, the tensile strength remained too low for many orthopedic applications. It was hypothesized that incorporating a polymer chain into the composite could help improve long range interaction. Furthermore, designing this polymer to interact with the enTMOS siloxane cross-linked matrix would provide improved adhesion between the polymer and the ceramic composite, and improve mechanical properties. To this end, copolymers of L-Lactide (LLA), and a novel alkyne derivatized trimethylene carbonate, propargyl carbonate (PC), were synthesized. Incorporation of PC during copolymerization affects properties of copolymers such as molecular weight, Tg, and % PC incorporation. More importantly, PC monomers bear a synthetic handle, allowing copolymers to undergo post-polymerization functionalization with graft monomers to specifically tailor the properties of the final composite. For our investigation, P(LLA-co-PC) copolymers were functionalized by an azido-silane (AS) via copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) through terminal alkyne on PC monomers. The new functionalized polymer, P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) was blended with HAp-Gemosil, with the azido-silane linking the copolymer to the silsesquioxane matrix within the final composite. These HAp-Gemosil/P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) composites were subjected to mechanical and biological testing, and the results were compared with those from the HAp-Gemosil composites. This study revealed that incorporating a cross-linkable polymer served to increase the flexural strength of the composite by 50%, while maintaining the biocompatibility of

  20. Improving the mechanical and thermal properties of gelatin hydrogels cross-linked by cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Dash, Rajalaxmi; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2013-01-16

    This study demonstrates the preparation of a renewable and biocompatible hydrogel with superior mechanical properties consisting of a gelatin matrix cross-linked with oxidized cellulose nanowhiskers. We found an increased degree of chemical cross-linking (0.14-17%) between gelatin and nanowhiskers with the increased amount of aldehyde contents (0.062-0.230mmolg(-1)). (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T(2) relaxation experiments on D(2)O swollen hydrogels demonstrated systems consisting of both gelatin and cellulose nanowhiskers displayed a higher percentage of "ridge" protons, attributed in part to increasing chemical cross-linking junction points between gelatin and nanowhiskers. This increase in hydrogel rigidity not only modified local chain dynamics but also influenced gel swelling, showing relatively reduced water uptake ability than that of the neat gelatin. Rheological measurements confirmed a 150% improvement in storage modulus (G') of the cross-linked hydrogels compared to neat gelatin. Chemical cross-linking also increased the resistance of the gels towards thermal degradation above the melting temperature of gelatin as observed by thermal scanning experiments.

  1. Effects of alginate hydrogel cross-linking density on mechanical and biological behaviors for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinah; Seol, Young-Joon; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Kundu, Joydip; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-09-01

    An effective cross-linking of alginate gel was made through reaction with calcium carbonate (CaCO3). We used human chondrocytes as a model cell to study the effects of cross-linking density. Three different pore size ranges of cross-linked alginate hydrogels were fabricated. The morphological, mechanical, and rheological properties of various alginate hydrogels were characterized and responses of biosynthesis of cells encapsulated in each gel to the variation in cross-linking density were investigated. Desired outer shape of structure was maintained when the alginate solution was cross-linked with the applied method. The properties of alginate hydrogel could be tailored through applying various concentrations of CaCO3. The rate of synthesized GAGs and collagens was significantly higher in human chondrocytes encapsulated in the smaller pore structure than that in the larger pore structure. The expression of chondrogenic markers, including collagen type II and aggrecan, was enhanced in the smaller pore structure. It was found that proper structural morphology is a critical factor to enhance the performance and tissue regeneration.

  2. Organically linked iron oxide nanoparticle supercrystals with exceptional isotropic mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Axel; Feld, Artur; Kornowski, Andreas; Yilmaz, Ezgi D.; Noei, Heshmat; Meyer, Andreas; Krekeler, Tobias; Jiao, Chengge; Stierle, Andreas; Abetz, Volker; Weller, Horst; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2016-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that the combination of the anisotropic shape and nanoscale dimensions of the mineral constituents of natural biological composites underlies their superior mechanical properties when compared to those of their rather weak mineral and organic constituents. Here, we show that the self-assembly of nearly spherical iron oxide nanoparticles in supercrystals linked together by a thermally induced crosslinking reaction of oleic acid molecules leads to a nanocomposite with exceptional bending modulus of 114 GPa, hardness of up to 4 GPa and strength of up to 630 MPa. By using a nanomechanical model, we determined that these exceptional mechanical properties are dominated by the covalent backbone of the linked organic molecules. Because oleic acid has been broadly used as nanoparticle ligand, our crosslinking approach should be applicable to a large variety of nanoparticle systems.

  3. Monogenic mouse models of autism spectrum disorders: Common mechanisms and missing links.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S W; Jiang, Y-H

    2016-05-03

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) present unique challenges in the fields of genetics and neurobiology because of the clinical and molecular heterogeneity underlying these disorders. Genetic mutations found in ASD patients provide opportunities to dissect the molecular and circuit mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors using animal models. Ongoing studies of genetically modified models have offered critical insight into possible common mechanisms arising from different mutations, but links between molecular abnormalities and behavioral phenotypes remain elusive. The challenges encountered in modeling autism in mice demand a new analytic paradigm that integrates behavioral assessment with circuit-level analysis in genetically modified models with strong construct validity.

  4. Modulation of mechanical resonance by chemical potential oscillation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Koshino, Mikito; Lee, Sunwoo; Gondarenko, Alexander; MacDonald, Allan H.; Kim, Philip; Hone, James

    2016-03-01

    The classical picture of the force on a capacitor assumes a large density of electronic states, such that the electrochemical potential of charges added to the capacitor is given by the external electrostatic potential and the capacitance is determined purely by geometry. Here we consider capacitively driven motion of a nano-mechanical resonator with a low density of states, in which these assumptions can break down. We find three leading-order corrections to the classical picture: the first of which is a modulation in the static force due to variation in the internal chemical potential; the second and third are changes in the static force and dynamic spring constant due to the rate of change of chemical potential, expressed as the quantum (density of states) capacitance. As a demonstration, we study capacitively driven graphene mechanical resonators, where the chemical potential is modulated independently of the gate voltage using an applied magnetic field to manipulate the energy of electrons residing in discrete Landau levels. In these devices, we observe large periodic frequency shifts consistent with the three corrections to the classical picture. In devices with extremely low strain and disorder, the first correction term dominates and the resonant frequency closely follows the chemical potential. The theoretical model fits the data with only one adjustable parameter representing disorder-broadening of the Landau levels. The underlying electromechanical coupling mechanism is not limited by the particular choice of material, geometry, or mechanism for variation in the chemical potential, and can thus be extended to other low-dimensional systems.

  5. Graphene mechanics: I. Efficient first principles based Morse potential.

    PubMed

    Costescu, Bogdan I; Baldus, Ilona B; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-06-28

    We present a computationally efficient pairwise potential for use in molecular dynamics simulations of large graphene or carbon nanotube systems, in particular, for those under mechanical deformation, and also for mixed systems including biomolecules. Based on the Morse potential, it is only slightly more complex and computationally expensive than a harmonic bond potential, allowing such large or mixed simulations to reach experimentally relevant time scales. By fitting to data obtained from quantum mechanics (QM) calculations to represent bond breaking in graphene patches, we obtain a dissociation energy of 805 kJ mol(-1) which reflects the steepness of the QM potential up to the inflection point. A distinctive feature of our potential is its truncation at the inflection point, allowing a realistic treatment of ruptured C-C bonds without relying on a bond order model. The results obtained from equilibrium MD simulations using our potential compare favorably with results obtained from experiments and from similar simulations with more complex and computationally expensive potentials.

  6. New Potentials for Old: The Darboux Transformation in Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brian Wesley; Celius, Tevye C.

    2008-01-01

    The Darboux transformation in quantum mechanics is reviewed at a basic level. Examples of how this transformation leads to exactly solvable potentials related to the "particle in a box" and the harmonic oscillator are shown in detail. The connection between the Darboux transformation and some modern operator based approaches to quantum mechanics…

  7. Evidence for Prion-Like Mechanisms in Several Neurodegenerative Diseases: Potential Implications for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal, untreatable neurodegenerative diseases. While the impact of TSEs on human health is relatively minor, these diseases are having a major influence on how we view, and potentially treat, other more common neurodegenerative disorders. Until recently, TSEs encapsulated a distinct category of neurodegenerative disorder, exclusive in their defining characteristic of infectivity. It now appears that similar mechanisms of self-propagation may underlie other proteinopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. This link is of scientific interest and potential therapeutic importance as this route of self-propagation offers conceptual support and guidance for vaccine development efforts. Specifically, the existence of a pathological, self-promoting isoform offers a rational vaccine target. Here, we review the evidence of prion-like mechanisms within a number of common neurodegenerative disorders and speculate on potential implications and opportunities for vaccine development. PMID:24228054

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  9. Potential of D-Octaarginine-Linked Polymers as an in Vitro Transfection Tool for Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Mohri, Kohta; Morimoto, Naoki; Maruyama, Megumi; Nakamoto, Norimasa; Hayashi, Emi; Nagata, Kengo; Miyata, Kohei; Ochiai, Kyohei; Hiwatari, Ken-ichiro; Tsubaki, Kazufumi; Tobita, Etsuo; Ishimaru, Yuki; Maeda, Sadaaki; Sakuma, Shinji

    2015-08-19

    We have been investigating the potential use of cell-penetrating peptide-linked polymers as a novel penetration enhancer. Since previous in vivo studies demonstrated that poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) bearing D-octaarginine, a typical cell-penetrating peptide, enhanced membrane permeation of biomolecules, its potential as an in vitro transfection tool was evaluated in this study. A plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pGFP-C1), β-galactosidase, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used as model biomolecules. Anionic pGFP-C1 interacted electrostatically with cationic d-octaarginine-linked polymers. When the ratio of mass concentration of polymers to that of pGFP-C1 reached 2.5, complexes whose size and zeta potential were approximately 200 nm and 15 mV, respectively, were obtained. GFP expression was observed in cells incubated with complexes prepared under conditions in which the polymer/pDNA concentration ratio exceeded 2.5. The expression level elevated with an increase in the concentration ratio, but physicochemical properties of the complexes remained unchanged. Results suggested that free polymers contributed to pGFP-C1 internalization. Another cell study demonstrated that β-galactosidase premixed with polymers was taken up into cells in its active tetrameric form. Similar electrostatic interaction-driven complex formation was observed for BSA charged negatively in neutral solution. However, it appeared that the internalization processes of BSA differed from those of pGFP-C1. A mass concentration-dependent increase in internalized BSA was observed, irrespective of the polymer/protein concentration ratio. Due to frail interactions, polymers that were released from the complexes and subsequently immobilized on cell membranes might also contribute to membrane permeation of BSA.

  10. Dissecting the Mechanisms of Tissue Transglutaminase-induced Cross-linking of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Adrien W.; Chiappe, Diego; Pignat, Vérène; Grimminger, Valerie; Hang, Ivan; Moniatte, Marc; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). However, exactly how tTG modulates the structural and functional properties of α-synuclein (α-syn) and contributes to the pathogenesis of PD remains unknown. Using site-directed mutagenesis combined with detailed biophysical and mass spectrometry analyses, we sought to identify the exact residues involved in tTG-catalyzed cross-linking of wild-type α-syn and α-syn mutants associated with PD. To better understand the structural consequences of each cross-linking reaction, we determined the effect of tTG-catalyzed cross-linking on the oligomerization, fibrillization, and membrane binding of α-syn in vitro. Our findings show that tTG-catalyzed cross-linking of monomeric α-syn involves multiple cross-links (specifically 2-3). We subjected tTG-catalyzed cross-linked monomeric α-syn composed of either wild-type or Gln → Asn mutants to sequential proteolysis by multiple enzymes and peptide mapping by mass spectrometry. Using this approach, we identified the glutamine and lysine residues involved in tTG-catalyzed intramolecular cross-linking of α-syn. These studies demonstrate for the first time that Gln79 and Gln109 serve as the primary tTG reactive sites. Mutating both residues to asparagine abolishes tTG-catalyzed cross-linking of α-syn and tTG-induced inhibition of α-syn fibrillization in vitro. To further elucidate the sequence and structural basis underlying these effects, we identified the lysine residues that form isopeptide bonds with Gln79 and Gln109. This study provides mechanistic insight into the sequence and structural basis of the inhibitory effects of tTG on α-syn fibrillogenesis in vivo, and it sheds light on the potential role of tTG cross-linking on modulating the physiological and pathogenic properties of α-syn. PMID:19164286

  11. Beyond Failure: Potentially Mitigating Failed Author Searches in the Online Library Catalog through the Use of Linked Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulaison, Heather Lea; Stanley, Susan Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Linked data stores house vetted content that can supplement the information available through online library catalogs, potentially mitigating failed author searches if information about the author exists in linked data formats. In this case study, a total of 689 failed author index queries from a large Midwestern academic library's online library…

  12. Superresolution imaging reveals activity-dependent plasticity of axon morphology linked to changes in action potential conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Chéreau, Ronan; Saraceno, G Ezequiel; Angibaud, Julie; Cattaert, Daniel; Nägerl, U Valentin

    2017-02-07

    Axons convey information to nearby and distant cells, and the time it takes for action potentials (APs) to reach their targets governs the timing of information transfer in neural circuits. In the unmyelinated axons of hippocampus, the conduction speed of APs depends crucially on axon diameters, which vary widely. However, it is not known whether axon diameters are dynamic and regulated by activity-dependent mechanisms. Using time-lapse superresolution microscopy in brain slices, we report that axons grow wider after high-frequency AP firing: synaptic boutons undergo a rapid enlargement, which is mostly transient, whereas axon shafts show a more delayed and progressive increase in diameter. Simulations of AP propagation incorporating these morphological dynamics predicted bidirectional effects on AP conduction speed. The predictions were confirmed by electrophysiological experiments, revealing a phase of slowed down AP conduction, which is linked to the transient enlargement of the synaptic boutons, followed by a sustained increase in conduction speed that accompanies the axon shaft widening induced by high-frequency AP firing. Taken together, our study outlines a morphological plasticity mechanism for dynamically fine-tuning AP conduction velocity, which potentially has wide implications for the temporal transfer of information in the brain.

  13. Comparative study on the mechanism of bradykinin potentiation induced by bradykinin-potentiating peptide 9a, enalaprilat and kinin-potentiating peptide.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M S; Schaffel, R; Assreuy, J

    1992-06-17

    The action of a kinin-potentiating peptide (KPP) obtained from tryptic digestion of human serum proteins was compared with that of bradykinin-potentiating peptide 9a (BPP9a; obtained from snake venom) and enalaprilat (a synthetic inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme; ACE) as a means of understanding the mechanism of action of KPP on smooth muscle. KPP potentiated bradykinin-induced contractile effects in guinea-pig ileum and rat uterus, but not the bradykinin-induced relaxation of pre-contracted ileum, whereas BPP9a and enalaprilat potentiated both bradykinin effects. The receptor mediating both the contraction and the relaxation elicited by bradykinin in the ileum was found to be of the B2 type. KPP retained its potentiating effect in the presence of enalaprilat in the guinea-pig ileum and rat uterus, whereas the potentiation evoked by BPP9a was abolished. Enalaprilat inhibited the activity of purified ACE, whereas KPP was completely devoid of such an effect. The potentiating effect of KPP, but not that of BPP9a or enalaprilat, was blocked by compounds that inhibit phospholipase A2 and lipoxygenase activity but not by inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase or phosphodiesterases. The results suggest that the potentiating effect of KPP (i) does not involve inhibition of ACE; (ii) is not due to an increased affinity of the receptor for bradykinin, and (iii) probably involves post-receptor events linked to phospholipase A2 and to the lipoxygenase pathway.

  14. A Potential Link Between the Cosmological Constant and the Fine-structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-04-01

    The age of the universe, about 10^60 Planck times, makes the spherical radius (R) of its space 10^60 Planck lengths, as the light moves one Planck length per one Planck time. The fine-structure constant (α) closely equals the natural logarithm of the square root of the reciprocal of the cosmological constant (λ), making α ln (1/λ), where λ = 1/ R^2 as originally introduced by Einstein in equation number (14) in his 1917 paper: Cosmological Considerations on the General Theory of Relativity. This confirms the time-dependent variation of fine-structure constant in [1], but does not address the issue of dark energy. While [1] invokes negative entropy (-Q/T), so it also invokes dark energy simply. The problem still remains that no theory, as yet, combines the probabilistic aspect of quantum mechanics with gravity. In the meanwhile, we can link [1] with the quantum information theory as information links to entropy. [1] Goradia S. Preprint at (http://www.arxiv.org/physics/0210040 v3 (Jan 2007).

  15. Post-extrasystolic Potentiation: Link between Ca2+ Homeostasis and Heart Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Sprenkeler, David J; Vos, Marc A

    2016-01-01

    Post-extrasystolic potentiation (PESP) describes the phenomenon of increased contractility of the beat following an extrasystole and has been attributed to changes in Ca2+ homeostasis. While this effect has long been regarded to be a normal physiological phenomenon, a number of reports describe an enhanced potentiation of the post-extrasystolic beat in heart failure patients. The exact mechanism of this increased PESP is unknown, but disruption of normal Ca2+ handling in heart failure may be the underlying cause. The use of PESP as a prognostic marker or therapeutic intervention have recently regained new attention, however, the value of the application of PESP in the clinic is still under debate. In this review, the mechanism of PESP with regard to Ca2+ in the normal and failing heart will be discussed and the possible diagnostic and therapeutic role of this phenomenon will be explored. PMID:27403289

  16. Variation potential in higher plants: Mechanisms of generation and propagation

    PubMed Central

    Vodeneev, Vladimir; Akinchits, Elena; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Long-distance intercellular electrical signals, including variation potential (VP) in higher plants, are a potential mechanism of coordinate functional responses in different plant cells under action of stressors. VP, which is caused by damaging factors (e.g., heating, crushing), is transient depolarization with an irregular shape. It can include a long-term depolarization and fast impulse depolarization (‘AP-like’ spikes). Mechanisms of VP generation and propagation are still under investigation. It is probable that VP is a local electrical response induced by propagation of hydraulic wave and (or) chemical agent. Both hypotheses are based on numerous experimental results but they predict VP velocities which are not in a good accordance with speed of variation potential propagation. Thus combination of hydraulic and chemical signals is the probable mechanism of VP propagation. VP generation is traditionally connected with transient H+-ATPase inactivation, but AP-like spikes are also connected with passive ions fluxes. Ca2+ influx is a probable mechanism which triggers H+-ATPase inactivation and ions channels activation at VP. PMID:26313506

  17. Clinical consequences of urea cycle enzyme deficiencies and potential links to arginine and nitric oxide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kleppe, Soledad; Marini, Juan; Carter, Susan; Garlick, Peter; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Lee, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are human conditions caused by the dysregulation of nitrogen transfer from ammonia nitrogen into urea. The biochemistry and the genetics of these disorders were well elucidated. Earlier diagnosis and improved treatments led to an emerging, longer-lived cohort of patients. The natural history of some of these disorders began to point to pathophysiological processes that may be unrelated to the primary cause of acute morbidity and mortality, i.e., hyperammonemia. Carbamyl phosphate synthetase I single nucleotide polymorphisms may be associated with altered vascular resistance that becomes clinically relevant when specific environmental stressors are present. Patients with argininosuccinic aciduria due to a deficiency of argininosuccinic acid lyase are uniquely prone to chronic hepatitis, potentially leading to cirrhosis. Moreover, our recent observations suggest that there may be an increased prevalence of essential hypertension. In contrast, hyperargininemia found in patients with arginase 1 deficiency is associated with pyramidal tract findings and spasticity, without significant hyperammonemia. An intriguing potential pathophysiological link is the dysregulation of intracellular arginine availability and its potential effect on nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. By combining detailed natural history studies with the development of tissue-specific null mouse models for urea cycle enzymes and measurement of nitrogen flux through the cycle to urea and NO in UCD patients, we may begin to dissect the contribution of different sources of arginine to NO production and the consequences on both rare genetic and common multifactorial diseases.

  18. Synthesis and anticancer potential of benzothiazole linked phenylpyridopyrimidinones and their diones as mitochondrial apoptotic inducers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Ashraf, Md; Vishnu Vardhan, M V P S; Faazil, Shaikh; Nayak, V Lakshma

    2014-01-01

    A series of benzothiazole linked phenylpyridopyrimidinones (8a-g) and their diones (9a-g) have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activity. Among the series one of the conjugate 8b showed significant cytotoxicity against human cervical cancer cell line ME-180 with IC50 value of 4.01μM. This compound was tested on the cell cycle perturbations and DNA damage. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the compound 8b showed drastic cell cycle perturbations due to concentration dependent increase in the sub-G0 phase in ME-180 cell line. DNA fragmentation and Hoechst staining reveals that this compound induced cell death by apoptosis. Further caspase-3 and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that the compound induces cell death by apoptosis.

  19. Assessing the potential of using telecommunication microwave links in urban drainage modelling.

    PubMed

    Fencl, M; Rieckermann, J; Schleiss, M; Stránský, D; Bareš, V

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict the runoff response of an urban catchment to rainfall is crucial for managing drainage systems effectively and controlling discharges from urban areas. In this paper we assess the potential of commercial microwave links (MWL) to capture the spatio-temporal rainfall dynamics and thus improve urban rainfall-runoff modelling. Specifically, we perform numerical experiments with virtual rainfall fields and compare the results of MWL rainfall reconstructions to those of rain gauge (RG) observations. In a case study, we are able to show that MWL networks in urban areas are sufficiently dense to provide good information on spatio-temporal rainfall variability and can thus considerably improve pipe flow prediction, even in small subcatchments. In addition, the better spatial coverage also improves the control of discharges from urban areas. This is especially beneficial for heavy rainfall, which usually has a high spatial variability that cannot be accurately captured by RG point measurements.

  20. Membrane formation mechanism of cross-linked polyurea microcapsules by phase separation method.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, H; Kamio, E; Hirabayashi, N; Jacobson, J; Kitamura, Y

    2004-05-01

    This research was conducted to clarify the membrane formation mechanism of cross-linked polyurea microcapsules by phase separation method, especially the role of polymeric surfactant, such as poly(ethylene-alt-maleic anhydride) (poly(E-MA)) at the interface of O/W emulsion. It was found that poly(E-MA) was necessary for the formation of cross-linked polyurea membrane. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) prohibited the membrane formation reaction at the interface, even in the case of poly(E-MA) concentration enough for polymeric microcapsule formation. From the results in this study, poly(E-MA) was found to be adsorbed on the O/W emulsion and provide the reaction site for the membrane formation of polymeric microcapsules.

  1. May spina bifida result from an X-linked defect in a selective abortion mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Burn, J; Gibbens, D

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that the major genetic factor in determining the birth of children with neural tube defects may be a single X-linked gene. It acts as an X-linked dominant, not by producing neural tube defects, but by enabling the affected fetus to survive selective spontaneous abortion. This mechanism, mediated at the deciduoplacental junction, may be under the control of both maternal and fetal genes. With more mutant alleles, survival would become more likely, reaching a maximum in the homozygous affected female fetus of a homozygous affected mother. The female excess in anancephaly is greater than that in spina bifida because of its prenatal severity, thus requiring relatively more mutant alleles for survival. PMID:381663

  2. Dynamic modelling and link mechanism design of four-legged mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Ho

    In order to apply the advanced biological phenomena to the leg design of mobile robots, the structural and locomotive characteristics of several selected animals and insects are studied, and the four-legged mobile robot which can cover all existing leg arrangements and locomotion patterns is modeled by a rigid multibody system consisting of links and joints. The model is simulated to prove that the given structure or locomotive conditions satisfy the requirement of minimum energy expenditure. According to the first simulation, there exist ideal forward and backward stroke distances for each pair leg. Therefore, the walking volume and link lengths of existing legged mobile robots should be modified. Also, for other structural and locomotive characteristics which have been used by living creatures, the model is simulated to determine whether or not the actual or possible biological phenomena can be applied to the leg mechanism design of mobile robot.

  3. Complex mechanisms linking neurocognitive dysfunction to insulin resistance and other metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckel, Luke E.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Gandy, Sam; Small, Dana; Kahn, C. Ronald; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Pawlyk, Aaron; Sherwin, Robert; Smith, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Scientific evidence has established several links between metabolic and neurocognitive dysfunction, and epidemiologic evidence has revealed an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia in patients with diabetes. In July 2015, the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases gathered experts from multiple clinical and scientific disciplines, in a workshop entitled “The Intersection of Metabolic and Neurocognitive Dysfunction”, to clarify the state-of-the-science on the mechanisms linking metabolic dysfunction, and insulin resistance and diabetes in particular, to neurocognitive impairment and dementia. This perspective is intended to serve as a summary of the opinions expressed at this meeting, which focused on identifying gaps and opportunities to advance research in this emerging area with important public health relevance. PMID:27303627

  4. Regulation Mechanism of Salt Ions for Superlubricity of Hydrophilic Polymer Cross-Linked Networks on Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caixia; Liu, Yuhong; Liu, Zhifeng; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheng, Qiang; Yang, Congbin

    2017-03-07

    Poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA) cross-linked networks on Ti6Al4V show superlubricity behavior when sliding against polytetrafluoroethylene in water-based lubricants. The superlubricity can occur but only with the existence of salt ions in the polymer cross-linked networks. This is different from the phenomenon in most polymer brushes. An investigation into the mechanism revealed that cations and anions in the lubricants worked together to yield the superlubricity even under harsh conditions. It is proposed that the preferential interactions of cations with PVPA molecules rather than water molecules are the main reason for the superlubricity in water-based lubricants. The interaction of anions with water molecules regulates the properties of the tribological interfaces, which influences the magnitude of the friction coefficient. Owing to the novel cross-linked networks and the interactions between cations and polymer molecules, their superlubricity can be maintained even at a high salt ion concentration of 5 M. These excellent properties make PVPA-modified Ti6Al4V a potential candidate for application in artificial implants.

  5. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer: underlying mechanisms and potential targets

    PubMed Central

    Kolodecik, Thomas; Shugrue, Christine; Ashat, Munish; Thrower, Edwin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review: Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer. Recent findings: Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-κB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis (AP). Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogenic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16) can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary: Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions. PMID:24474939

  6. Aliphatic β-Nitroalcohols for Therapeutic Corneoscleral Cross-linking: Chemical Mechanisms and Higher Order Nitroalcohols

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Marissa R.; Wen, Quan; Turro, Nicholas J.; Trokel, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The recent tissue cross-linking studies indicate that aliphatic β-nitroalcohols (BNAs) may be useful as pharmacologic corneoscleral cross-linking agents. The present study was performed to identify the specific chemistry involved under physiologic conditions, with the intent of identifying more effective agents. Methods. The mechanism of chemical cross-linking at pH 7.4 and 37°C was studied using three techniques. The colorimetric Griess assay was used to follow the release of nitrite from three mono-nitroalcohols (2-nitroethanol [2ne], 2-nitro-1-propanol [2nprop]), and 3-nitro-2-pentanol [3n2pent]). Second, the evolution of 2nprop in 0.2 M NaH2PO4/Na2HPO4/D2O was studied using 1H-NMR. Third, thermal shrinkage temperature analysis (Ts), a measure of tissue cross-linking, was used to support information from 1the H-NMR studies. Results. A time-dependent release of nitrite was observed for all three mono-nitroalcohols studied. The maximum levels were comparable using either 2ne or 2nprop (∼30%). However, much less (∼10%) was observed from 3n2pent. Using 1H-NMR, 2nprop evolved into a unique splitting pattern. No match was observed with reference spectra from three possible products of denitration. In contrast, 2-methyl-2-nitro-1,3-propanediol (MNPD), a nitro-diol, was identified, implying the formation of formaldehyde from a retro-nitroaldol (i.e., reverse Henry) reaction. In support of this mechanism, Ts shifts induced by the nitro-triol 2-hydroxymethyl-2-nitro-1,3-propanediol (HNPD) were superior to the nitro-diol MNPD which were superior to the mono nitroalcohol 2nprop. Conclusions. BNAs function as both formaldehyde and nitrite donors under physiologic conditions to cross-link collagenous tissue. Higher order BNAs are more effective than mono nitroalcohols, raising the possibility of using these agents for therapeutic corneoscleral cross-linking. PMID:19797229

  7. Apoptotic Pathways Linked to Endocrine System as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Minutoli, Letteria; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Marini, Herbert; Irrera, Natasha; Crea, Giovanni; Lorenzini, Cesare; Puzzolo, Domenico; Valenti, Andrea; Pisani, Antonina; Adamo, Elena B.; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco; Micali, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a chronic condition common in older men that can result in bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms. The molecular mechanisms and networks underlying the development and the progression of the disease are still far from being fully understood. BPH results from smooth muscle cell and epithelial cell proliferation, primarily within the transition zone of the prostate. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in the control of cell growth and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in molecular mechanisms of apoptosis machinery have been linked to BPH. Increased levels of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-related protein 3 in BPH cause an inhibition of the apoptosis machinery through a reduction in B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins influence cell death by direct inhibition of caspases and modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Current pharmacotherapy targets either the static component of BPH, including finasteride and dutasteride, or the dynamic component of BPH, including α-adrenoceptor antagonists such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin. Both these classes of drugs significantly interfere with the apoptosis machinery. Furthermore, phytotherapic supplements and new drugs may also modulate several molecular steps of apoptosis. PMID:27529214

  8. Sleep in the ICU: potential mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Kimberly A

    2009-07-01

    Patients in the ICU are known to have severely disrupted sleep with disturbed circadian pattern, decreased nocturnal sleep time, abnormally increased stages 1 and 2 sleep, and reduced or absent deep sleep. Recent data reveal that a subpopulation of critically ill patients manifests unique EEG sleep patterns. The etiology of sleep disruption in the ICU includes the inherent nature of the environment, medications, ventilator-patient interaction, and the effect of acute illness. How sleep disruption contributes to outcomes in critically ill patients, such as recovery time and weaning from mechanical ventilation, is unknown. This article reviews the literature describing sleep in ICU patients, including recent investigations in patients who require mechanical ventilation, factors that affect sleep in critically ill patients, and the potential mechanisms and clinical implications of disturbed sleep in the ICU setting with directions to consider for future investigations.

  9. Nonlinear optical collagen cross-linking and mechanical stiffening: a possible photodynamic therapeutic approach to treating corneal ectasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Dongyul; Juhasz, Tibor; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2013-03-01

    In this study we test the hypothesis that nonlinear optical (NLO) multiphoton photoactivation of riboflavin using a focused femtosecond (FS) laser light can be used to induce cross-linking (CXL) and mechanically stiffen collagen as a potential clinical therapy for the treatment of keratoconus and corneal ectasia. Riboflavin-soaked, compressed collagen hydrogels are cross-linked using a FS laser tuned to 760 nm and set to either 100 mW (NLO CXL I) or 150 mW (NLO CXL II) of laser power. FS pulses are focused into the hydrogel using a 0.75 NA objective lens, and the hydrogel is three-dimensionally scanned. Measurement of hydrogel stiffness by indentation testing show that the calculated elastic modulus (E) values are significantly increased over twofold following NLO CXL I and II compared with baseline values (P<0.05). Additionally, no significant differences are detected between NLO CXL and single photon, UVA CXL (P>0.05). This data suggests that NLO CXL has a comparable effect to conventional UVA CXL in mechanically stiffening collagen and may provide a safe and effective approach to localize CXL at different regions and depths within the cornea.

  10. 5-HTTLPR polymorphism is linked to neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschoolers from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Elif; Stevens, Courtney; Hampton Wray, Amanda; Bell, Theodore; Neville, Helen J

    2016-12-01

    While a growing body of research has identified experiential factors associated with differences in selective attention, relatively little is known about the contribution of genetic factors to the skill of sustained selective attention, especially in early childhood. Here, we assessed the association between the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotypes and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in young children from lower socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a dichotic listening task from 121 children (76 females, aged 40-67 months), who were also genotyped for the short and long allele of 5-HTTLPR. The effect of selective attention was measured as the difference in ERP mean amplitudes elicited by identical probe stimuli embedded in stories when they were attended versus unattended. Compared to children homozygous for the long allele, children who carried at least one copy of the short allele showed larger effects of selective attention on neural processing. These findings link the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR to enhanced neural mechanisms of selective attention and lay the groundwork for future studies of gene-by-environment interactions in the context of key cognitive skills.

  11. Towards aging mechanisms of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable insulation materials in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuaishuai; Fifield, Leonard S.; Bowler, Nicola

    2016-12-19

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable insulation material undergoes simultaneous, accelerated thermal and gamma-radiation aging to simulate the long-term aging environment within nuclear power plants (NPPs). A variety of materials characterization tests, including scanning electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, oxidation induction time, gel-fraction and dielectric properties measurement, are conducted on pristine and differently aged XLPE samples. A preliminary model of one possible aging mechanism of XLPE cable insulation material under gamma radiation at elevated temperature of 115 °C is suggested.

  12. The carboxy-terminus of p63 links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sahu, Raju; Leu, N. Adrian; Senoo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 (Trp63) plays a key role in homeostasis and regeneration of the skin. The p63 gene is transcribed from dual promoters, generating TAp63 isoforms with growth suppressive functions and dominant-negative ΔNp63 isoforms with opposing properties. p63 also encodes multiple carboxy (C)-terminal variants. Although mutations of C-terminal variants have been linked to the pathogenesis of p63-associated ectodermal disorders, the physiological role of the p63 C-terminus is poorly understood. We report here that deletion of the p63 C-terminus in mice leads to ectodermal malformation and hypoplasia, accompanied by a reduced proliferative capacity of epidermal progenitor cells. Notably, unlike the p63-null condition, we find that p63 C-terminus deficiency promotes expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a), a factor associated with reduced proliferative capacity of both hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells. These data suggest that the p63 C-terminus plays a key role in the cell cycle progression required to maintain the proliferative potential of stem cells of many different lineages. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Cα, the predominant C-terminal p63 variant in epithelia, promotes the transcriptional activity of TAp63 and also impairs the dominant-negative activity of ΔNp63, thereby controlling p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We propose that the p63 C-terminus links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells via mechanisms that equilibrate TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoform function. PMID:25503409

  13. Comparing Chemical Mechanisms using Tagged Ozone Production Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. It is produced by reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight [Atkinson,2000]. The chemistry of intermediate species formed during VOC degradation show a time dependence and impacts the amount of O3 produced by the VOC [Butler et al., 2011]. Representing the intricacies of these reactions is not viable for chemical mechanisms used in global and regional models due to the computational resources available. Thus, chemical mechanisms reduce the amount of reactions either by lumping chemical species together as a model species, reducing the number of reaction pathways or both. As different chemical mechanisms use varying reduction techniques and assumptions especially with respect to the intermediate degradation species, it is important to compare the temporal evolution of ozone production obtained from differing chemical mechanisms. In this study, chemical mechanisms are compared using Tagged Ozone Production Potentials (TOPP) [Butler et al.,2011]. TOPPs measure the effect of a VOC on the odd oxygen family (Ox), which includes O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and other species whose cycling effect O3 and NO2 production. TOPP values are obtained via a boxmodel run lasting seven diurnal cycles and tagging all species produced during VOC degradation; this enables the Ox production to be attributed to the VOC. This technique enables the temporal evolution of a VOCs' Ox production to be compared between the mechanisms. Comparing the TOPP profiles of the VOCs obtained using different mechanisms shows the effect of reduction techniques implemented by the mechanism and also allows a comparison of the tropospheric chemistry represented in the mechanisms. [Atkinson,2000] Atkinson, R. (2000). Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx. Atmospheric Environment, 34:2063-2101 [Butler et al., 2011] Butler, T. M

  14. Simple relations for different stomatal control mechanisms link partially drying soil and transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Katrin; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Stomata can close to regulate plant water loss under unfavourable water availability. This closure can be triggered by hydraulic ('H') and/or chemical signals ('C', 'H+C'). By combining plant hydraulic relations with a model for stomatal conductance, including chemical signalling, our aim was to derive a simple relation that links soil water availability, expressed as the fraction of roots in dry soil, to transpiration. We used the detailed mechanistic soil-root water flow model R-SWMS to verify this relation. Virtual split root experiments were simulated, comparing horizontally and vertically split domains with varying fractions of roots in dry soil and comparing different strengths of stomatal regulation by chemical and hydraulic signals. Transpiration predicted by the relation was in good agreement with numerical simulations. Under certain conditions H+C control leads to isohydric plant behaviour, which means that stomata close to keep leaf water potential constant after reaching a certain level. C control on the other hand exerts anisohydric behaviour, meaning that stomata remain fully open during changes in leaf water potential. For C control the relation between transpiration reduction and fraction of roots in dry soil becomes independent of transpiration rate whereas H+C control results in stronger reduction for higher transpiration rates. Simple relations that link effective soil and leaf water potential can describe different stomatal control resulting in contrasting behaviour.

  15. The Potential of School-Linked Centers To Promote Adolescent Health and Development. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Susan G.

    The future of school-linked adolescent health centers cannot be determined without further evaluation. The recent development of school-linked health centers stems from concerns about the special health needs of adolescents. Currently there are 125 school-based and school-linked centers in operation. Characteristics include the following: (1) most…

  16. Explicating the Social Mechanisms Linking Alcohol Use Behaviors and Ecology to Child Maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Freisthler, Bridget; Holmes, Megan R

    2012-12-01

    This paper begins to describe and explicate the specific mechanisms by which alcohol use and the alcohol use environment contribute to specific types of child maltreatment. These mechanisms relating alcohol outlet densities to child maltreatment described here include effects on social disorganization, parent's drinking behaviors, and parental supervision. By investigating potential mechanisms, new information could be obtained on the importance and role of alcohol and their availability in the etiology of child maltreatment. This knowledge can be used to further tailor interventions to those conditions most likely to prevent and reduce maltreatment.

  17. Mechanics of semiflexible chains formed by poly(ethylene glycol)-linked paramagnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Sibani Lisa; Gast, Alice P

    2003-08-01

    Magnetorheological particles, permanently linked into chains, provide a magnetically actuated means to manipulate microscopic fluid flow. Paramagnetic colloidal particles form reversible chains by acquiring dipole moments in the presence of an external magnetic field. By chemically connecting paramagnetic colloidal particles, flexible magnetoresponsive chains can be created. We link the paramagnetic microspheres using streptavidin-biotin binding. Streptavidin coated microspheres are placed in a flow cell and a magnetic field is applied, causing the particles to form chains. Then a solution of polymeric linkers of bis-biotin-poly(ethylene glycol) molecules is added in the presence of the field. These linked chains remain responsive to a magnetic field; however, in the absence of an external magnetic field these chains bend and flex due to thermal motion. The chain flexibility is determined by the length of the spacer molecule between particles and is quantified by the flexural rigidity or bending stiffness. To understand the mechanical properties of the chains, we use a variety of optical trapping experiments to measure the flexural rigidity. Increasing the length of the poly(ethylene glycol) chain in the linker increases the flexibility of the chains.

  18. Structural Analysis and Mechanical Characterization of Hyaluronic Acid-Based Doubly Cross-Linked Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Amit K.; Hule, Rohan A.; Jiao, Tong; Teller, Sean S.; Clifton, Rodney J.; Duncan, Randall L.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2009-01-01

    We have created a new class of hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel materials with HA hydrogel particles (HGPs) embedded in and covalently cross-linked to a secondary network. HA HGPs with an average diameter of ∼900 nm and narrow particle size distribution were synthesized using a refined reverse micelle polymerization technique. The average mesh size of the HGPs was estimated to be approximately 5.5 to 7.0 nm by a protein uptake experiment. Sodium periodate oxidation not only introduced aldehyde groups to the particles but also reduced the average particle size. The aldehyde groups generated were used as reactive handles for subsequent cross-linking with an HA derivative containing hydrazide groups. The resulting macroscopic gels contain two distinct hierarchical networks (doubly cross-linked networks, DXNs): one within individual particles and another among different particles. Bulk gels (BGs) formed by direct mixing of HA derivatives with mutually reactive groups were included for comparison. The hydrogel microstructures were collectively characterized by microscopy and neutron scattering techniques. Their viscoelasticity was quantified at low frequencies (0.1−10 Hz) using a controlled stress rheometer and at high frequencies (up to 200 Hz) with a home-built torsional wave apparatus. Both BGs and DXNs are stable elastic gels that become stiffer at higher frequencies. The HA-based DXN offers unique structural hierarchy and mechanical properties that are suitable for soft tissue regeneration. PMID:20046226

  19. Cross-linked demineralized dentin maintains its mechanical stability when challenged by bacterial collagenase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Changqi; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The molecular structure, weight loss and mechanical properties of demineralized dentin of non-crosslinked/crosslinked by glutaraldehyde (GA) were investigated when being challenged by bacterial collagenase solution over time in the present study. Raman spectra proved that cross-linking occurred in demineralized dentin matrices after being treated with GA. Meanwhile, the weight of the cross-linked demineralized dentin matrices didn’t change after being challenged by bacterial collagenase solution up to one week. However, the weight of non-crosslinked dentin collagen fell by almost 45% after degradation for 5 hr, and up to 100% after 19 hr. The tensile strength of demineralized dentin matrices didn’t show a significant change after being crosslinked, while the stiffness of demineralized dentin matrices showed more improvement than that of non-crosslinked collagen. The toughness of demineralized dentin matrices decreased slightly after being crosslinked. Importantly, neither the tensile strength of GA-crosslinked demineralized dentin nor its stiffness changed over time in either control buffer or collagenase solution compared to that of noncrosslinked controls. These results suggested that improving the degree of cross-linking in dentin collagen could be one method to inhibit its biodegradation and further to increase the durability of dental restorations. PMID:21210503

  20. The potential role of neuropathic mechanisms in dry eye syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mcmonnies, Charles W

    Dry eye syndromes can involve both nociceptive and neuropathic symptoms. Nociceptive symptoms are the normal physiological responses to noxious stimuli. Neuropathic symptoms are caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system and can be the result of hypersensitisation of peripheral or central corneal and conjunctival somatosensory nerves. For example, inflammation could induce neuroplastic peripheral sensitisation of the ocular surface or lid wiper and exacerbate nociceptive symptoms. Neuropathic symptoms may explain the incommensurate relation between signs and symptoms in some dry eye syndromes although absence of signs of a dry eye syndrome may also be a consequence of inappropriate methods used when examining for them. Involvement of neuropathic mechanisms may also help explain dry eye symptoms which occur in association with reduced corneal sensitivity. This review includes a discussion of the potential for ocular symptoms involving neuropathic mechanisms to contribute to psychosocial problems such as depression, stress, anxiety and sleep disorders as well as for these types of psychosocial problems to contribute to neuropathic mechanisms and dry eye syndromes. Failure to consider the possibility that neuropathic mechanisms can contribute to dry eye syndromes may reduce accuracy of diagnosis and the suitability of treatment provided. Dry eye symptoms in the absence of commensurate evidence of tear dysfunction, and unsatisfactory response to tear dysfunction therapies should prompt consideration of neuropathic mechanisms being involved. Symptoms which persist after local anaesthetic instillation are more likely to be neuropathic in origin. Reducing inflammation may help limit any associated neuroplastic hypersensitivity.

  1. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links.

    PubMed

    Ares, P; Garcia-Doval, C; Llauró, A; Gómez-Herrero, J; van Raaij, M J; de Pablo, P J

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ∼ 0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ∼ 120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ∼ 20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  2. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, P.; Garcia-Doval, C.; Llauró, A.; Gómez-Herrero, J.; van Raaij, M. J.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ˜0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ˜120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ˜20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  3. Role of insulin signaling in the interaction between Alzheimer disease and diabetes mellitus: a missing link to therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoyuki; Takeda, Shuko; Uchio-Yamada, Kozue; Ueda, Hironori; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the major non-genetic risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the mechanism by which DM increases the risk of AD has not been elucidated. Here, we summarize recent findings to address this question. Whereas neuropathological studies in humans suggest that DM does not increase Aβ accumulation in the brain (a major hallmark of AD), earlier works in animal models show that Aβ does accumulate. Therefore, alternate mechanisms might exist. Recent studies using the human brain indicate that insulin signaling is impaired in the AD brain. In neurons, this insulin signaling plays a key role in modulating synaptic function and neuronal senescence besides regulating tau phosphorylation, another hallmark of AD. On the other hand, in cerebrovessels, DM causes vascular remodeling, which involves increased RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation endproducts) expression, and AD is associated with cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Our recent study involving AD mice with DM has revealed that a vicious circle underlies the interaction between AD and DM. Interestingly, in our mouse model, AD increased RAGE expression, and DM worsened CAA. The contribution of vascular factors such as RAGE expression and CAA to the impairment of insulin signaling will be discussed. This impaired insulin signaling might be a possible link between AD and DM. Moreover, insulin signaling is also involved in the mechanism of aging, decreasing with an increase in age. An identification of the mechanism whereby DM modifies the pathological condition of AD through the modulation of insulin signaling is required to develop potential therapeutics for AD not only with but also without DM.

  4. Prestressed F-actin networks cross-linked by hinged filamins replicate mechanical properties of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, M. L.; Nakamura, F.; Hartwig, J. H.; Crocker, J. C.; Stossel, T. P.; Weitz, D. A.

    2006-02-01

    We show that actin filaments, shortened to physiological lengths by gelsolin and cross-linked with recombinant human filamins (FLNs), exhibit dynamic elastic properties similar to those reported for live cells. To achieve elasticity values of comparable magnitude to those of cells, the in vitro network must be subjected to external prestress, which directly controls network elasticity. A molecular requirement for the strain-related behavior at physiological conditionsis a flexible hinge found in FLNa and some FLNb molecules. Basic physical properties of the in vitro filamin-F-actin network replicate the essential mechanical properties of living cells. This physical behavior could accommodate passive deformation and internal organelle trafficking at low strains yet resist externally or internally generated high shear forces. cytoskeleton | cell mechanics | nonlinear rheology

  5. Y-linked variation for autosomal immune gene regulation has the potential to shape sexually dimorphic immunity.

    PubMed

    Kutch, Ian C; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2015-12-07

    Sexually dimorphic phenotypes arise from the differential expression of male and female shared genes throughout the genome. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which dimorphic regulation manifests and evolves are unclear. Recent work suggests that Y-chromosomes may play an important role, given that Drosophila melanogaster Ys were shown to influence the regulation of hundreds of X and autosomal genes. For Y-linked regulatory variation (YRV) to facilitate sexually dimorphic evolution, however, it must exist within populations (where selection operates) and influence male fitness. These criteria have seldom been investigated, leaving the potential for dimorphic evolution via YRV unclear. Interestingly, male and female D. melanogaster differ in immune gene regulation. Furthermore, immune gene regulation appears to be influenced by the Y-chromosome, suggesting it may contribute to dimorphic immune evolution. We address this possibility by introgressing Y-chromosomes from a single wild population into an isogenic background (to create Y-lines) and assessing immune gene regulation and bacterial defence. We found that Y-line males differed in their immune gene regulation and their ability to defend against Serratia marcescens. Moreover, gene expression and bacterial defence were positively genetically correlated. These data indicate that the Y-chromosome has the potential to shape the evolution of sexually dimorphic immunity in this system.

  6. Y-linked variation for autosomal immune gene regulation has the potential to shape sexually dimorphic immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kutch, Ian C.; Fedorka, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic phenotypes arise from the differential expression of male and female shared genes throughout the genome. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which dimorphic regulation manifests and evolves are unclear. Recent work suggests that Y-chromosomes may play an important role, given that Drosophila melanogaster Ys were shown to influence the regulation of hundreds of X and autosomal genes. For Y-linked regulatory variation (YRV) to facilitate sexually dimorphic evolution, however, it must exist within populations (where selection operates) and influence male fitness. These criteria have seldom been investigated, leaving the potential for dimorphic evolution via YRV unclear. Interestingly, male and female D. melanogaster differ in immune gene regulation. Furthermore, immune gene regulation appears to be influenced by the Y-chromosome, suggesting it may contribute to dimorphic immune evolution. We address this possibility by introgressing Y-chromosomes from a single wild population into an isogenic background (to create Y-lines) and assessing immune gene regulation and bacterial defence. We found that Y-line males differed in their immune gene regulation and their ability to defend against Serratia marcescens. Moreover, gene expression and bacterial defence were positively genetically correlated. These data indicate that the Y-chromosome has the potential to shape the evolution of sexually dimorphic immunity in this system. PMID:26631557

  7. From Fragmented Knowledge to a Knowledge Structure: Linking the Domains of Mechanics and Electromagnetism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagno, Esther; Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Ganiel, Uri

    2000-01-01

    Describes the MAOF physics education program which is designed to relate large parts of mechanics and electromagnetism to each other via the key concepts of field and potential, while at the same time treat students' conceptual difficulties. Finds that students who studied with the MAOF program significantly improved their physics knowledge…

  8. Molecular mechanisms linking diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer disease: beta-amyloid peptide, insulin signaling, and neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuko; Sato, Naoyuki; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-06-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing at an alarming rate and has become a major public health concern worldwide. Recent epidemiological studies have provided direct evidence that DM is a strong risk factor for AD; this finding is now attracting attention. However, the underlying mechanisms for this association remain largely unknown. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies reported that diabetic conditions could cause an increase in the beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) levels, which exhibits neurotoxic properties and plays a causative role in AD. However, unexpectedly, recent clinicopathological studies have shown no evidence that the pathological hallmarks of AD, including amyloid plaque, were increased in the brains of diabetic patients, suggesting that DM could affect the pathogenesis of AD through mechanisms other than modulation of Aβ metabolism. One possible mechanism is the alteration in brain insulin signaling. It has been shown that insulin signaling is involved in a variety of neuronal functions, and that it also plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of AD. Thus, the modification of neuronal insulin signaling by diabetic conditions may contribute to AD progression. Another possible mechanism is cerebrovascular alteration, a common pathological change observed in both diseases. Accumulating evidence has suggested the importance of Aβ-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction in AD, and indicated that pathological interactions between the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and Aβ peptides may play a role in this dysfunction. Our study has provided a further understanding of the potential underlying mechanisms linking DM and AD by establishing novel mouse models showing pathological manifestations of both diseases. The current review summarizes the results from recent studies on the pathological relationship between DM and AD while focusing on brain insulin signaling and cerebrovascular alteration

  9. Extracurricular Activity Participation in High School: Mechanisms Linking Participation to Math Achievement and 4-Year College Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Extracurricular activity participation (EAP) has been positively linked with increased academic achievement and college attendance. However, the mechanisms linking EAP to educational outcomes are poorly understood. Using the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS), this study contributes to our understanding of the relationship between EAP and…

  10. The potential mechanistic link between allergy and obesity development and infant formula feeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a new view of the cellular mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the links between infant formula feeding and the development of atopy and obesity. Epidemiological evidence points to an allergy- and obesity-preventive effect of breastfeeding. Both allergy and obesity development have been traced back to accelerated growth early in life. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is the master regulator of cell growth, which is predominantly activated by amino acids. In contrast to breastfeeding, artificial infant formula feeding bears the risk of uncontrolled excessive protein intake overactivating the infant’s mTORC1 signalling pathways. Overactivated mTORC1 enhances S6K1-mediated adipocyte differentiation, but negatively regulates growth and differentiation of FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs), which are deficient in atopic individuals. Thus, the “early protein hypothesis” not only explains increased mTORC1-mediated infant growth but also the development of mTORC1-driven diseases such as allergy and obesity due to a postnatal deviation from the appropriate axis of mTORC1-driven metabolic and immunologic programming. Remarkably, intake of fresh unpasteurized cow’s milk exhibits an allergy-preventive effect in farm children associated with increased FoxP3+ Treg numbers. In contrast to unprocessed cow’s milk, formula lacks bioactive immune-regulatory microRNAs, such as microRNA-155, which plays a major role in FoxP3 expression. Uncontrolled excessive protein supply by formula feeding associated with the absence of bioactive microRNAs and bifidobacteria in formula apparently in a synergistic way result in insufficient Treg maturation. Treg deficiency allows Th2-cell differentiation promoting the development of allergic diseases. Formula-induced mTORC1 overactivation is thus the critical mechanism that explains accelerated postnatal growth, allergy and obesity development on one aberrant pathway. PMID:25071855

  11. Ballistocardiogram: Mechanism and Potential for Unobtrusive Cardiovascular Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Ober, Stephanie L.; McMurtry, M. Sean; Finegan, Barry A.; Inan, Omer T.; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that the body recoils each time the heart ejects blood into the arteries. These subtle cardiogenic body movements have been measured with increasingly convenient ballistocardiography (BCG) instruments over the years. A typical BCG measurement shows several waves, most notably the “I”, “J”, and “K” waves. However, the mechanism for the genesis of these waves has remained elusive. We formulated a simple mathematical model of the BCG waveform. We showed that the model could predict the BCG waves as well as physiologic timings and amplitudes of the major waves. The validated model reveals that the principal mechanism for the genesis of the BCG waves is blood pressure gradients in the ascending and descending aorta. This new mechanistic insight may be exploited to allow BCG to realize its potential for unobtrusive monitoring and diagnosis of cardiovascular health and disease. PMID:27503664

  12. Photo-cross-linked hydrogels from thermoresponsive PEGMEMA-PPGMA-EGDMA copolymers containing multiple methacrylate groups: mechanical property, swelling, protein release, and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tai, Hongyun; Howard, Daniel; Takae, Seiji; Wang, Wenxin; Vermonden, Tina; Hennink, Wim E; Stayton, Patrick S; Hoffman, Allan S; Endruweit, Andreas; Alexander, Cameron; Howdle, Steven M; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2009-10-12

    Photo-cross-linked hydrogels from thermoresponsive polymers can be used as advanced injectable biomaterials via a combination of physical interaction (in situ thermal gelation) and covalent cross-links (in situ photopolymerization). This can lead to gels with significantly enhanced mechanical properties compared to non-photo-cross-linked thermoresponsive hydrogels. Moreover, the thermally phase-separated gels have attractive advantages over non-thermoresponsive gels because thermal gelation upon injection allows easy handling and holds the shape of the gels prior to photopolymerization. In this study, water-soluble thermoresponsive copolymers containing multiple methacrylate groups were synthesized via one-step deactivation enhanced atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEMA, M(n) = 475), poly(propylene glycol) methacrylate (PPGMA, M(n) = 375), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and were used to form covalent cross-linked hydrogels by photopolymerization. The cross-linking density was found to have a significant influence on the mechanical and swelling properties of the photo-cross-linked gels. Release studies using lysozyme as a model protein demonstrated a sustained release profile that varied dependent on the copolymer composition, cross-linking density, and the temperature. Mouse C2C12 myoblast cells were cultured in the presence of the copolymers at concentrations up to 1 mg/mL. It was found that the majority of the cells remained viable, as assessed by Alamar Blue, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and Live/Dead cell viability/cytotoxicity assays. These studies demonstrate that thermoresponsive PEGMEMA-PPGMA-EGDMA copolymers offer potential as in situ photopolymerizable materials for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications through a combination of facile synthesis, enhanced mechanical properties, tunable cross-linking density, low cytotoxicity, and accessible functionality for further

  13. Potential pathophysiological mechanisms in osteonecrosis of the jaw

    PubMed Central

    Landesberg, Regina; Woo, Victoria; Cremers, Serge; Cozin, Matthew; Marolt, Darja; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Kousteni, Stavroula; Raghavan, Srikala

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are used in the treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy, skeletal complications associated with metastastic bone disease, Paget’s disease, and osteoporosis. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a recently described clinical condition that has been associated with the use of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates. Reports describing this entity first appeared in the literature in 2003. While there have been significant numbers of case reports and a limited number of retrospective and prospective studies examining risk factors associated with ONJ, the pathophysiology of this condition remains elusive. In this review, we explore proposed mechanisms underlying ONJ development and identify potential areas for future investigation. PMID:21291478

  14. Uncertainty Propagation in Nerve Impulses Through the Action Potential Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Torres Valderrama, Aldemar; Witteveen, Jeroen; Navarro, Maria; Blom, Joke

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the propagation of probabilistic uncertainty through the action potential mechanism in nerve cells. Using the Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H) model and Stochastic Collocation on Sparse Grids, we obtain an accurate probabilistic interpretation of the deterministic dynamics of the transmembrane potential and gating variables. Using Sobol indices, out of the 11 uncertain parameters in the H-H model, we unravel two main uncertainty sources, which account for more than 90 % of the fluctuations in neuronal responses, and have a direct biophysical interpretation. We discuss how this interesting feature of the H-H model allows one to reduce greatly the probabilistic degrees of freedom in uncertainty quantification analyses, saving CPU time in numerical simulations and opening possibilities for probabilistic generalisation of other deterministic models of great importance in physiology and mathematical neuroscience.

  15. Probiotics and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Treatment and Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengyuan; Duan, Kangmin; Wang, Cuiling; McClain, Craig; Feng, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive research, alcohol remains one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders, including steatosis, steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis. Although many agents and approaches have been tested in patients with ALD and in animals with experimental ALD in the past, there is still no FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved therapy for any stage of ALD. With the increasing recognition of the importance of gut microbiota in the onset and development of a variety of diseases, the potential use of probiotics in ALD is receiving increasing investigative and clinical attention. In this review, we summarize recent studies on probiotic intervention in the prevention and treatment of ALD in experimental animal models and patients. Potential mechanisms underlying the probiotic function are also discussed. PMID:26839540

  16. Diabetes mellitus and atrial remodeling: mechanisms and potential upstream therapies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qitong; Liu, Tong; Ng, Chee Y; Li, Guangping

    2014-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, and its prevalence has increasing substantially over the last decades. Recent data suggest that there is an increased risk of AF among the patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the potential molecular mechanisms regarding DM-related AF and diabetic atrial remodeling are not fully understood. In this comprehensive review, we would like to summarize the potential relationship between diabetes and atrial remodeling, including structural, electrical, and autonomic remodeling. Also, some upstream therapies, such as thiazolidinediones, probucol, ACEI/ARBs, may play an important role in the prevention and treatment of AF. Therefore, large prospective randomized, controlled trials and further experimental studies should be challengingly continued.

  17. Possibility and potential of clean development mechanisms inChina

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Weijun; Zhou, Nan; Li, Haifeng; Kammen, Daniel

    2007-10-30

    China has become the world's second largest greenhouse gas(GHG) emitter behind the United States. It emits approximately threebillion tons of CO2 equivalents every year. Its growing economy and largepopulation are making a wealthier, more consumption-oriented country.Energy demand is expected to grow 5?10 percent per year through 2030.Therefore, a large potential of GHG emission reduction in Chinacan beexpected. The clean development mechanism (CDM) put forward in the KyotoProtocol for reductions of GHGs can support the sustainable developmentof developing countries and help developed countries to achieve theiremission reduction targets at low cost. However, there are still manydisagreements to be resolved between developing and developed countries.In this letter, we try to introduce the current development of CDMprojects in China and discuss its potential and opportunities in thefuture decades.

  18. Potential mediators linking gut bacteria to metabolic health: a critical view

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Aafke W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Growing evidence suggests that the bacteria present in our gut may play a role in mediating the effect of genetics and lifestyle on obesity and metabolic diseases. Most of the current literature on gut bacteria consists of cross‐sectional and correlative studies, rendering it difficult to make any causal inferences as to the influence of gut bacteria on obesity and related metabolic disorders. Interventions with germ‐free animals, treatment with antibiotic agents, and microbial transfer experiments have provided some evidence that disturbances in gut bacteria may causally contribute to obesity‐related insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. Several potential mediators have been hypothesized to link the activity and composition of gut bacteria to insulin resistance and adipose tissue function, including lipopolysaccharide, angiopoietin‐like protein 4, bile acids and short‐chain fatty acids. In this review we critically evaluate the current evidence related to the direct role of gut bacteria in obesity‐related metabolic perturbations, with a focus on insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. It is concluded that the knowledge base in support of a role for the gut microbiota in metabolic regulation and in particular insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation needs to be strengthened. PMID:27418465

  19. Novel Magnetic Cross-Linked Cellulase Aggregates with a Potential Application in Lignocellulosic Biomass Bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Jia, Junqi; Zhang, Weiwei; Yang, Zengjie; Yang, Xianling; Wang, Na; Yu, Xiaoqi

    2017-02-10

    The utilization of renewable biomass resources to produce high-value chemicals by enzymatic processes is beneficial for alternative energy production, due to the accelerating depletion of fossil fuels. As immobilization techniques can improve enzyme stability and reusability, a novel magnetic cross-linked cellulase aggregate has been developed and applied for biomass bioconversion. The crosslinked aggregates could purify and immobilize enzymes in a single operation, and could then be combined with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which provides easy separation of the materials. The immobilized cellulase showed a better activity at a wider temperature range and pH values than that of the free cellulase. After six cycles of consecutive reuse, the immobilized cellulase performed successful magnetic separation and retained 74% of its initial activity when carboxylmethyl cellulose (CMC) was used as the model substrate. Furthermore, the structure and morphology of the immobilized cellulase were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the immobilized cellulase was shown to hydrolyze bamboo biomass with a yield of 21%, and was re-used in biomass conversion up to four cycles with 38% activity retention, which indicated that the immobilized enzyme has good potential for biomass applications.

  20. Attitude similarity and familiarity and their links to mental health: An examination of potential interpersonal mediators.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shannon M; Uchino, Bert N; Baucom, Brian R W; Behrends, Arwen A; Sanbonmatsu, David

    2017-01-01

    Similarity and familiarity with partner's attitudes are linked to positive relationship outcomes, while interpersonal variables have been linked to mental health. Using multilevel models (MLMs), we modeled the associations between these attitudinal variables and mental health outcomes in 74 married couples. We found that higher levels of attitude similarity in couples were linked to lower depression, while higher levels of attitude familiarity in couples were associated with greater satisfaction with life. Mediational analyses indicated marital satisfaction and interpersonal stress mediated the link between attitude similarity and depression. Marital satisfaction also mediated the link between familiarity and satisfaction with life. This study is the first linking attitude familiarity to mental health and provides evidence that familiarity and similarity have mental health effects partly due to their interpersonal consequences.

  1. Quantum mechanics of effective potential at a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomatin, Alexander

    In this thesis we study the nonuniform electron density system at a metal-vacuum interface via the corresponding local effective potential confining the electrons, the metal being represented by the jellium and structureless pseudopotential models. The study is performed within conventional Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory and its recently derived quantum-mechanical interpretation. In the latter, properties are determined in terms of the separate electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion and the correlation contribution to the kinetc energy. We have derived the exact analytical structure, valid for self-consistent orbitals, of the KS theory exchange potential in the classically forbidden region. This structure is image-potential-like of the form -alphasb{KS,x}(beta)chi where the parameter betasp2 is the ratio of the surface barrier height to the metal Fermi energy. For a Wigner-Seitz radius of rsb{s} = 4.1, which is approximately that for which jellium metal is stable, the decay coefficient is precisely 1/4. Over the metallic range of densities rsb{s} = 2-6, the coefficient ranges from 0.195 to 0.274. Thus, if the asymptotic structure of the KS exchange-correlation potential is the image potential, then this structure is due principally to KS exchange effects, the KS correlation contribution being an order of magnitude smaller. These results, then lead to the concept of an 'image' charge localized to the surface region for asymptotic positions of the electron. We have further derived the exact analytical structure in the vacuum of the Slater exchange potential, and of the Pauli-correlation and correlation-kinetic components of the KS exchange potential. These structures are all image-potential-like, decaying respectively as -alphasb{S}(beta)chi,\\ -alphasb{W}(beta)chi and alphasbsp{tsb{c}}{(1)}(beta)/chi. The Pauli-correlation component constitutes the major fraction of the KS exchange potential asymptotically, but there

  2. A Grinding Apparatus For Making A Middle-Size Parabolic Mirror Using The Link Mechanism Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishido, Kora; Sugiura, Masao

    1987-01-01

    A large solar furnace that has a parabolic mirror with a diameter of 10m, a focal length of 3.2m and a heliostat mirror with an area of 15x15m was made by the authors at T6hoku University in 1962, and subsequently a small solar furnace having a parabolic mirror with a diameter of 1.5m, a focal -length of 0.5m and a heliostat mirror with an area of 2x2m was constructed at T6hoku Gakuin University in 1986. The large solar furnace could melt tungsten with a melting point of 3400°C, and the small solar furnace drove a stirling engine made in West Germany that had a rated power of 400W. The parabolic mirror of the segment type at TohokU University was made by a grinding apparatus that used a cam mechanism, and the parabolic mirror at T6hoku Gakuin University was made by an apparatus (hand-made by students)which employed a link mechanism to draw the parabolic curve. In this paper, the grinding apparatus used for making the segmental parabolic mirror with a diameter of 2-3m and a focal length of 0.5-1.0 m is reported. This mirror was used in a middle-size solar heat engine. The heat engine in this system was a Stirling engine with a rated power of 1-3KW, and the grinding apparatus (the precision parts moved in a linear track ) employed a compact link mechanism.

  3. Potential Mechanisms of Cancer Prevention by Weight Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Wang, Weiqun

    Weight control via dietary caloric restriction and/or physical activity has been demonstrated in animal models for cancer prevention. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Body weight loss due to negative energy balance significantly reduces some metabolic growth factors and endocrinal hormones such as IGF-1, leptin, and adiponectin, but enhances glucocorticoids, that may be associated with anti-cancer mechanisms. In this review, we summarized the recent studies related to weight control and growth factors. The potential molecular targets focused on those growth factors- and hormones-dependent cellular signaling pathways are further discussed. It appears that multiple factors and multiple signaling cascades, especially for Ras-MAPK-proliferation and PI3K-Akt-anti-apoptosis, could be involved in response to weight change by dietary calorie restriction and/or exercise training. Considering prevalence of obesity or overweight that becomes apparent over the world, understanding the underlying mechanisms among weight control, endocrine change and cancer risk is critically important. Future studies using "-omics" technologies will be warrant for a broader and deeper mechanistic information regarding cancer prevention by weight control.

  4. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  5. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    SciTech Connect

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  6. Link between the enzymatic kinetics and mechanical behavior in an actomyosin motor.

    PubMed Central

    Amitani, I; Sakamoto, T; Ando, T

    2001-01-01

    We have attempted to link the solution actomyosin ATPase with the mechanical properties of in vitro actin filament sliding over heavy meromyosin. To accomplish this we perturbed the system by altering the substrate with various NTPs and divalent cations, and by altering ionic strength. A wide variety of enzymatic and mechanical measurements were made under very similar solution conditions. Excellent correlations between the mechanical and enzymatic quantities were revealed. Analysis of these correlations based on a force-balance model led us to two fundamental equations, which can be described approximately as follows: the maximum sliding velocity is proportional to square root of V(max)K(m)(A), where K(m)(A) is the actin concentration at which the substrate turnover rate is half of its maximum (V(max)). The active force generated by a cross-bridge under no external load or under a small external load is proportional to square root of V(max)/K(m)(A). The equations successfully accounted for the correlations observed in the present study and observations in other laboratories. PMID:11159410

  7. Integrin-linked kinase regulates cellular mechanics facilitating the motility in 3D extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Kunschmann, Tom; Puder, Stefanie; Fischer, Tony; Perez, Jeremy; Wilharm, Nils; Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2017-03-01

    The motility of cells plays an important role for many processes such as wound healing and malignant progression of cancer. The efficiency of cell motility is affected by the microenvironment. The connection between the cell and its microenvironment is facilitated by cell-matrix adhesion receptors and upon their activation focal adhesion proteins such as integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are recruited to sites of focal adhesion formation. In particular, ILK connects cell-matrix receptors to the actomyosin cytoskeleton. However, ILK's role in cell mechanics regulating cellular motility in 3D collagen matrices is still not well understood. We suggest that ILK facilitates 3D motility by regulating cellular mechanical properties such as stiffness and force transmission. Thus, ILK wild-type and knock-out cells are analyzed for their ability to migrate on 2D substrates serving as control and in dense 3D extracellular matrices. Indeed, ILK wild-type cells migrated faster on 2D substrates and migrated more numerous and deeper in 3D matrices. Hence, we analyzed cellular deformability, Young's modulus (stiffness) and adhesion forces. We found that ILK wild-type cells are less deformable (stiffer) and produce higher cell-matrix adhesion forces compared to ILK knock-out cells. Finally, ILK is essential for providing cellular mechanical stiffness regulating 3D motility.

  8. Gut to Brain Dysbiosis: Mechanisms Linking Western Diet Consumption, the Microbiome, and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Emily E.; Hsu, Ted M.; Kanoski, Scott E.

    2017-01-01

    Consumption of a Western Diet (WD) that is high in saturated fat and added sugars negatively impacts cognitive function, particularly mnemonic processes that rely on the integrity of the hippocampus. Emerging evidence suggests that the gut microbiome influences cognitive function via the gut-brain axis, and that WD factors significantly alter the proportions of commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Here we review mechanisms through which consuming a WD negatively impacts neurocognitive function, with a particular focus on recent evidence linking the gut microbiome with dietary- and metabolic-associated hippocampal impairment. We highlight evidence linking gut bacteria to altered intestinal permeability and blood brain barrier integrity, thus making the brain more vulnerable to the influx of deleterious substances from the circulation. WD consumption also increases production of endotoxin by commensal bacteria, which may promote neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction. Recent findings also show that diet-induced alterations in gut microbiota impair peripheral insulin sensitivity, which is associated with hippocampal neuronal derrangements and associated mnemonic deficits. In some cases treatment with specific probiotics or prebiotics can prevent or reverse some of the deleterious impact of WD consumption on neuropsychological outcomes, indicating that targeting the microbiome may be a successful strategy for combating dietary- and metabolic-associated cognitive impairment. PMID:28194099

  9. Star/linear polymer topology transformation facilitated by mechanical linking of polymer chains.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Daisuke; Uchida, Satoshi; Takata, Toshikazu

    2015-06-01

    Topology transformation of a star polymer to a linear polymer is demonstrated for the first time. A three-armed star polymer possessing a mechanical linking of two polymer chains was synthesized by the living ring-opening polymerization of δ-valerolactone initiated by a pseudo[2]rotaxane having three hydroxy groups as the initiator sites on the wheel component and at both axle termini. The polymerization was followed by the propagation end-capping reaction with a bulky isocyanate not only to prevent the wheel component deslippage but also to introduce the urethane moiety at the axle terminal. The resulting rotaxane-linked star polymer with a fixed rotaxane linkage based on the ammonium/crown ether interaction was subjected to N-acetylation of the ammonium moiety, which liberated the components from the interaction to move the wheel component to the urethane terminal as the interaction site, eventually affording the linear polymer. The physical property change caused by the present topology transformation was confirmed by the hydrodynamic volume and viscosity.

  10. Interpersonal stress generation as a mechanism linking rumination to internalizing symptoms in early adolescents.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Rumination is a risk factor for depressive and anxiety symptoms in adolescents. Previous investigations of the mechanisms linking rumination to internalizing problems have focused primarily on cognitive factors. We investigated whether interpersonal stress generation plays a role in the longitudinal relationship between rumination and internalizing symptoms in young adolescents. Adolescents (Grades 6-8, N = 1,065) from an ethnically diverse community completed measures of depressive and anxiety symptoms, perceived friendship quality, and peer victimization at two assessments, 7 months apart. We determined whether rumination predicted increased exposure to peer victimization and whether changes in perceived friendship quality mediated this relationship. We also evaluated whether peer victimization mediated the association between rumination and internalizing symptoms. Adolescents who engaged in high levels of rumination at baseline were more likely to experience overt, relational, and reputational victimization at a subsequent time point 7 months later, controlling for baseline internalizing symptoms and victimization. Increased communication with peers was a significant partial mediator of this association for relational (z = 1.98, p = .048) and reputational (z = 2.52, p = .024) victimization. Exposure to overt (z = 3.37, p = .014), relational (z = 3.67, p < .001), and reputational (z = 3.78, p < .001) victimization fully mediated the association between baseline rumination and increases in internalizing symptoms over the study period. These findings suggest that interpersonal stress generation is a mechanism linking rumination to internalizing problems in adolescents and highlight the importance of targeting interpersonal factors in treatment and preventive interventions for adolescents who engage in rumination.

  11. Interpersonal Stress Generation as a Mechanism Linking Rumination to Internalizing Symptoms in Early Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Rumination is a risk factor for depressive and anxiety symptoms in adolescents. Previous investigations of the mechanisms linking rumination to internalizing problems have focused primarily on cognitive factors. We investigated whether interpersonal stress generation plays a role in the longitudinal relationship between rumination and internalizing symptoms in young adolescents. Adolescents (Grades 6–8, N =1,065) from an ethnically diverse community completed measures of depressive and anxiety symptoms, perceived friendship quality, and peer victimization at two assessments, 7 months apart. We determined whether rumination predicted increased exposure to peer victimization and whether changes in perceived friendship quality mediated this relationship. We also evaluated whether peer victimization mediated the association between rumination and internalizing symptoms. Adolescents who engaged in high levels of rumination at baseline were more likely to experience overt, relational, and reputational victimization at a subsequent time point 7 months later, controlling for baseline internalizing symptoms and victimization. Increased communication with peers was a significant partial mediator of this association for relational (z =1.98, p =.048) and reputational (z =2.52, p =.024) victimization. Exposure to overt (z = 3.37, p =.014), relational (z =3.67, p <.001), and reputational (z = 3.78, p < .001) victimization fully mediated the association between baseline rumination and increases in internalizing symptoms over the study period. These findings suggest that interpersonal stress generation is a mechanism linking rumination to internalizing problems in adolescents and highlight the importance of targeting interpersonal factors in treatment and preventive interventions for adolescents who engage in rumination. PMID:22867280

  12. Drought-Adaptation Potential in Fagus sylvatica: Linking Moisture Availability with Genetic Diversity and Dendrochronology

    PubMed Central

    Pluess, Andrea R.; Weber, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Background Microevolution is essential for species persistence especially under anticipated climate change scenarios. Species distribution projection models suggested that the dominant tree species of lowland forests in Switzerland, European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), might disappear from most areas due to expected longer dry periods. However, if genotypes at the moisture boundary of the species climatic envelope are adapted to lower moisture availability, they can serve as seed source for the continuation of beech forests under changing climates. Methodology/Principal Findings With an AFLP genome scan approach, we studied neutral and potentially adaptive genetic variation in Fagus sylvatica in three regions containing a dry and a mesic site each (nind. = 241, nmarkers = 517). We linked this dataset with dendrochronological growth measures and local moisture availabilities based on precipitation and soil characteristics. Genetic diversity decreased slightly at dry sites. Overall genetic differentiation was low (Fst = 0.028) and Bayesian cluster analysis grouped all populations together suggesting high (historical) gene flow. The Bayesian outlier analyses indicated 13 markers with three markers differing between all dry and mesic sites and the others between the contrasting sites within individual regions. A total of 41 markers, including seven outlier loci, changed their frequency with local moisture availability. Tree height and median basal growth increments were reduced at dry sites, but marker presence/absence was not related to dendrochronological characteristics. Conclusion and Their Significance The outlier alleles and the makers with changing frequencies in relation to moisture availability indicate microevolutionary processes occurring within short geographic distances. The general genetic similarity among sites suggests that ‘preadaptive’ genes can easily spread across the landscape. Yet, due to the long live span of trees, fostering

  13. DNA methylation: a mechanism linking environmental chemical exposures to risk of autism spectrum disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Kimberly P.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that gene by environment interactions are important in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, the mechanisms by which environmental factors interact with genetic susceptibilities to confer individual risk for ASD remain a significant knowledge gap in the field. The epigenome, and in particular DNA methylation, is a critical gene expression regulatory mechanism in normal and pathogenic brain development. DNA methylation can be influenced by environmental factors such as diet, hormones, stress, drugs, or exposure to environmental chemicals, suggesting that environmental factors may contribute to adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes of relevance to ASD via effects on DNA methylation in the developing brain. In this review, we describe epidemiological and experimental evidence implicating altered DNA methylation as a potential mechanism by which environmental chemicals confer risk for ASD, using polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and bisphenol A (BPA) as examples. Understanding how environmental chemical exposures influence DNA methylation and how these epigenetic changes modulate the risk and/or severity of ASD will not only provide mechanistic insight regarding gene-environment interactions of relevance to ASD but may also suggest potential intervention strategies for these and potentially other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27158529

  14. A potential mechanism for allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Patrik; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Trabecular bone microstructural parameters, including trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, have been reported to scale with animal size with negative allometry, whereas bone volume fraction is animal size-invariant in terrestrial mammals. As for the majority of scaling patterns described in animals, its underlying mechanism is unknown. However, it has also been found that osteocyte density is inversely related to animal size, possibly adapted to metabolic rate, which shows a negative relationship as well. In addition, the signalling reach of osteocytes is limited by the extent of the lacuno-canalicular network, depending on trabecular dimensions and thus also on animal size. Here we propose animal size-dependent variations in osteocyte density and their signalling influence distance as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. Using an established and tested computational model of bone modelling and remodelling, we run simulations with different osteocyte densities and influence distances mimicking six terrestrial mammals covering a large range of body masses. Simulated trabecular structures revealed negative allometric scaling for trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, constant bone volume fraction, and bone turnover rates inversely related to animal size. These results are in agreement with previous observations supporting our proposal of osteocyte density and influence distance variation as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. The inverse relationship between bone turnover rates and animal size further indicates that trabecular bone scaling may be linked to metabolic rather than mechanical adaptations. PMID:25655770

  15. A potential mechanism for allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    Christen, Patrik; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2015-03-01

    Trabecular bone microstructural parameters, including trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, have been reported to scale with animal size with negative allometry, whereas bone volume fraction is animal size-invariant in terrestrial mammals. As for the majority of scaling patterns described in animals, its underlying mechanism is unknown. However, it has also been found that osteocyte density is inversely related to animal size, possibly adapted to metabolic rate, which shows a negative relationship as well. In addition, the signalling reach of osteocytes is limited by the extent of the lacuno-canalicular network, depending on trabecular dimensions and thus also on animal size. Here we propose animal size-dependent variations in osteocyte density and their signalling influence distance as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. Using an established and tested computational model of bone modelling and remodelling, we run simulations with different osteocyte densities and influence distances mimicking six terrestrial mammals covering a large range of body masses. Simulated trabecular structures revealed negative allometric scaling for trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, constant bone volume fraction, and bone turnover rates inversely related to animal size. These results are in agreement with previous observations supporting our proposal of osteocyte density and influence distance variation as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. The inverse relationship between bone turnover rates and animal size further indicates that trabecular bone scaling may be linked to metabolic rather than mechanical adaptations.

  16. Quantum mechanics on phase space and the Coulomb potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, P.; Martins, M. G. R.; Vianna, J. D. M.

    2017-04-01

    Symplectic quantum mechanics (SMQ) makes possible to derive the Wigner function without the use of the Liouville-von Neumann equation. In this formulation of the quantum theory the Galilei Lie algebra is constructed using the Weyl (or star) product with Q ˆ = q ⋆ = q +iħ/2∂p , P ˆ = p ⋆ = p -iħ/2∂q, and the Schrödinger equation is rewritten in phase space; in consequence physical applications involving the Coulomb potential present some specific difficulties. Within this context, in order to treat the Schrödinger equation in phase space, a procedure based on the Levi-Civita (or Bohlin) transformation is presented and applied to two-dimensional (2D) hydrogen atom. Amplitudes of probability in phase space and the correspondent Wigner quasi-distribution functions are derived and discussed.

  17. Esophageal foreign bodies as child abuse. Potential fatal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nolte, K B

    1993-12-01

    Foreign bodies being forced into the esophagus as a form of fatal child abuse is rare. A 4.5-month-old female infant presented to clinicians with respiratory distress. Several coins were recovered from the esophagus. One month later, she was found dead in her crib. At autopsy, there were three coins in the esophagus. In addition, there were cutaneous contusions of various ages, acute and partially healed fractures of the extremities, old aspirated foreign material in the lungs, and pulmonary fat emboli. Although the fat emboli may have contributed to the death, several potentially fatal mechanisms from the esophageal foreign bodies deserve consideration. These include vagal stimulation from esophageal distention, aspiration of swallowed fluids after esophageal obstruction, compression of the trachea or the heart by the coins, and cardiac compression or airway occlusion by the introducing finger.

  18. OXIDATIVE INACTIVATION OF THE PROTEASOME IN RPE: A POTENTIAL LINK BETWEEN OXIDATIVE STRESS AND UPREGULATION OF IL-8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are implicated in the pathogenesis of several age-related diseases. Stress-induced overproduction of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), is one of the early events of inflammation. The objective of this study was to determine potential links betwee...

  19. Vitamin D in Autoimmunity: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Dankers, Wendy; Colin, Edgar M.; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Lubberts, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Over the last three decades, it has become clear that the role of vitamin D goes beyond the regulation of calcium homeostasis and bone health. An important extraskeletal effect of vitamin D is the modulation of the immune system. In the context of autoimmune diseases, this is illustrated by correlations of vitamin D status and genetic polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor with the incidence and severity of the disease. These correlations warrant investigation into the potential use of vitamin D in the treatment of patients with autoimmune diseases. In recent years, several clinical trials have been performed to investigate the therapeutic value of vitamin D in multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, type I diabetes, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Additionally, a second angle of investigation has focused on unraveling the molecular pathways used by vitamin D in order to find new potential therapeutic targets. This review will not only provide an overview of the clinical trials that have been performed but also discuss the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D and how these advances can be used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:28163705

  20. Potential links between porphyry copper deposits and exhumed metamorphic basement complexes in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Frances; Docherty, Alistair; Perkins, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    Porphyry copper deposits (PCDs) are typically associated with magmatic arcs in compressional subduction zone settings where thickened crust and fractionated calc-alkaline magmas produce favourable conditions for copper mineralisation. A classic example is the Eocene-Oligocene PCD belt of Chile, the world's leading copper producing country. In other parts of the world, older late Cretaceous to early Tertiary PCDs are found in regions of former subduction-related magmatism that have undergone subsequent post-orogenic crustal extension, such as the Basin and Range province of western North America, and the Eurasian Balkan-Carpathian-Dinaride belt. In the Basin and Range there is a striking correlation between the location of many PCDs and exhumed metamorphic core complexes (isolated remnants of the middle to lower crust exhumed during extensional normal faulting). This close spatial relationship raises questions about the links between the two. For example, are their exhumation histories related? Could the presence of impermeable metamorphic rocks at depth affect and localise mineralising fluids? In Chile there appears to be a similar spatial relationship between PCDs and isolated outcrops of exhumed metamorphic basement. In northern Chile, isolated exposures of high-grade metamorphic gneisses and amphibolites are thought to be exhumed remnants of the pre-subduction Proterozoic-Paleozoic continental margin of Gondwana [2], although little is known about when they were exhumed and by what mechanism. For example, the Limón Verde metamorphic complex, exhumed from a depth of ca. 50 km, is situated adjacent to Chuquicamata, the largest open pit copper mine in the world. In northernmost Chile, another metamorphic exposure, the Belén complex, sits close to the Dos Hermanos PCD, a small deposit that is not actively mined. Comprising garnet-bearing gneisses and amphibolites, the Belén is thought to have been exhumed from a depth of ca. 25 km, but when and how is unclear [3

  1. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  2. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christine M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  3. Neuron-specific chromatin remodeling: a missing link in epigenetic mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, memory, and intellectual disability disorders.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Wood, Marcelo A

    2014-05-01

    Long-term memory formation requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression. Until recently nucleosome remodeling, one of the major epigenetic mechanisms for controlling gene expression, had been largely unexplored in the field of neuroscience. Nucleosome remodeling is carried out by chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) that interact with DNA and histones to physically alter chromatin structure and ultimately regulate gene expression. Human exome sequencing and gene wide association studies have linked mutations in CRC subunits to intellectual disability disorders, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, how mutations in CRC subunits were related to human cognitive disorders was unknown. There appears to be both developmental and adult specific roles for the neuron specific CRC nBAF (neuronal Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor). nBAF regulates gene expression required for dendritic arborization during development, and in the adult, contributes to long-term potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We propose that the nBAF complex is a novel epigenetic mechanism for regulating transcription required for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory processes and that impaired nBAF function may result in human cognitive disorders.

  4. Aromatic nitrogen mustard-based prodrugs: activity, selectivity, and the mechanism of DNA cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbing; Han, Yanyan; Peng, Xiaohua

    2014-06-10

    Three novel H2O2-activated aromatic nitrogen mustard prodrugs (6-8) are reported. These compounds contain a DNA alkylating agent connected to a H2O2-responsive trigger by different electron-withdrawing linkers so that they are inactive towards DNA but can be triggered by H2O2 to release active species. The activity and selectivity of these compounds towards DNA were investigated by measuring DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) formation in the presence or absence of H2O2. An electron-withdrawing linker unit, such as a quaternary ammonia salt (6), a carboxyamide (7), and a carbonate group (8), is sufficient to deactivate the aromatic nitrogen mustard resulting in less than 1.5 % cross-linking formation. However, H2O2 can restore the activity of the effectors by converting a withdrawing group to a donating group, therefore increasing the cross-linking efficiency (>20 %). The stability and reaction sites of the ICL products were determined, which revealed that alkylation induced by 7 and 8 not only occurred at the purine sites but also at the pyrimidine site. For the first time, we isolated and characterized the monomer adducts formed between the canonical nucleosides and the aromatic nitrogen mustard (15) which supported that nitrogen mustards reacted with dG, dA, and dC. The activation mechanism was studied by NMR spectroscopic analysis. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that compound 7 with a carboxyamide linker dramatically inhibited the growth of various cancer cells with a GI50 of less than 1 μM, whereas compound 6 with a charged linker did not show any obvious toxicity in all cell lines tested. These data indicated that a neutral carboxyamide linker is preferable for developing nitrogen mustard prodrugs. Our results showed that 7 is a potent anticancer prodrug that can serve as a model compound for further development. We believe these novel aromatic nitrogen mustards will inspire further and effective applications.

  5. Evaluation of underlying mechanisms in the link between childhood ADHD symptoms and risk for early initiation of substance use.

    PubMed

    Vitulano, Michael L; Fite, Paula J; Hopko, Derek R; Lochman, John; Wells, Karen; Asif, Irfan

    2014-09-01

    Although there has been support for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as a risk for early substance use, this link is not fully established or understood. Furthermore, the potential mechanisms explaining these associations are unclear. The current study examined peer rejection, school bonding, and internalizing problems as potential mediators of the association between childhood ADHD symptoms and risk for early initiation of substance use. The sample included a control group of 126 students with problematic aggression (79% African American, 66% male) from an intervention study following children from fourth to ninth grade. Results suggested that ADHD symptoms follow a path to early initiation of tobacco use through the combined effects of peer rejection and internalizing problems as well as through internalizing problems alone. ADHD symptoms were also associated with the cubic slope of marijuana use initiation, such that increased ADHD symptoms were associated with a strong cubic trend (e.g., a more rapid acceleration of risk for initiation). ADHD symptoms were not associated with risk for early initiation of alcohol use. Identification of important vulnerability factors in children with ADHD symptoms highlight the need for primary prevention and psychological interventions that target these factors and decrease the likelihood of early tobacco and marijuana use initiation.

  6. Motivation by potential gains and losses affects control processes via different mechanisms in the attentional network.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Lena M; Walter, Henrik; Steimke, Rosa; Ludwig, Vera U; Gaschler, Robert; Schubert, Torsten; Stelzel, Christine

    2015-05-01

    Attentional control in demanding cognitive tasks can be improved by manipulating the motivational state. Motivation to obtain gains and motivation to avoid losses both usually result in faster reaction times and stronger activation in relevant brain areas such as the prefrontal cortex, but little is known about differences in the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms of these types of motivation in an attentional control context. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we tested whether potential gain and loss as motivating incentives lead to overlapping or distinct neural effects in the attentional network, and whether one of these conditions is more effective than the other. A Flanker task with word stimuli as targets and distracters was performed by 115 healthy participants. Using a mixed blocked and event-related design allowed us to investigate transient and sustained motivation-related effects. Participants could either gain money (potential gain) or avoid losing money (potential loss) in different task blocks. Participants showed a congruency effect with increased reaction times for incongruent compared to congruent trials. Potential gain led to generally faster responses compared to the neutral condition and to stronger improvements than potential loss. Potential loss also led to shorter response times compared to the neutral condition, but participants improved mainly during incongruent and not during congruent trials. The event-related fMRI data revealed a main effect of congruency with increased activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and inferior frontal junction area (IFJ), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), bilateral insula, intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and visual word form area (VWFA). While potential gain led to increased activity in a cluster of the IFJ and the VWFA only during incongruent trials, potential loss was linked to activity increases in these regions during incongruent and congruent trials. The

  7. Zeroing in on LRRK2-Linked Pathogenic Mechanisms in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Saskia; West, Andrew B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The frequency and potency of mutations in the LRRK2 gene redefine the role of genetic susceptibility in Parkinson’s disease. Dominant missense mutations that fulfill initial criteria for potential gain of function mechanisms coupled with enzymatic activity likely amenable to small molecule inhibition position LRRK2 as a promising therapeutic target. Herein, key observations from the clinic to the test tube are highlighted together with points of contention and outstanding critical issues. Resolution of the critical issues will expedite the development of therapies that exploit LRRK2 activity for neuroprotection strategies. PMID:18973807

  8. Building Student Networks with LinkedIn: The Potential for Connections, Internships, and Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Robert M.; Dover, Howard F.

    2014-01-01

    Networking is a chance to interact with people, build friendships or business partners, identify opportunities, and create value. Technology has made this process easier, since individuals can readily contact others who were previously unknown. In the professional world, LinkedIn has become the standard way to build virtual and personal networks.…

  9. Emotion dysregulation as a mechanism linking child maltreatment exposure and self-harm behaviors in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Peh, Chao Xu; Shahwan, Shazana; Fauziana, Restria; Mahesh, Mithila V; Sambasivam, Rajeswari; Zhang, YunJue; Ong, Say How; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-03-31

    Although child maltreatment exposure is a recognized risk factor for self-harm, mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. Self-harm may function as a compensatory strategy to regulate distressing emotions. This cross-sectional study examines if emotion dysregulation mediates between the severity of maltreatment exposure and self-harm, adjusting for demographic variables and depressive symptoms. Participants were 108 adolescent patients recruited from a psychiatric hospital in Singapore (mean age 17.0 years, SD=1.65; 59.3% female). Study measures included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-SF), Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (FASM), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8). Path analysis was conducted to examine the direct and indirect effects of maltreatment exposure on self-harm via emotion dysregulation, controlling for demographic variables and depressive symptoms. Indirect effects were tested using bootstrapped confidence intervals (CI). Results showed that self-harm was highly prevalent in our sample (75.9%). Emotion dysregulation and depressive symptoms were found to be associated with higher self-harm frequency. In addition, results from path analysis showed that the association between the severity of maltreatment exposure and self-harm frequency was significantly mediated by emotion dysregulation B=0.07, p<0.05, 95% CI [0.02, 0.16]. Thus, emotion dysregulation may be a proximal mechanism linking maltreatment exposure and adolescent self-harm. Notably, self-harm may represent maladaptive attempts to manage emotion dysregulation that may have resulted from maltreatment. Findings from the study have implications for the prevention and treatment of self-harm in maltreated youth.

  10. “Young at heart”: Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Renata S.M.; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B.; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R.; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C.; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (> 8 weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18 months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4 days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism. PMID:26827899

  11. Mechanism by which caffeine potentiates lethality of nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, C C; Pardee, A B

    1982-01-01

    Caffeine is synergistic with many DNA-damaging agents in increasing lethality to mammalian cells. The mechanism is not well understood. Our results show that caffeine potentiates the lethality of the nitrogen mustard 2-chloro-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-methylethanamine (HN2) by inducing damaged cells to undergo mitosis before properly repairing lesions in their DNA. Treatment with low doses of HN2 (0.5 microM for 1 hr) caused little lethality in baby hamster kidney cells (90% survival). These cells were arrested in G2 shortly after treatment with HN2 as shown by flow microfluorimetry and autoradiography. After an arrest of 6 hr, HN2-treated cells began to move into mitosis and from then on behaved like normal cells. Repair synthesis was shown to continue during the G2 arrest by using synchronized cells pulse labeled with [3H]thymidine after HN2 treatment and autoradiography. Caffeine (2mM) increased the lethality of HN2 by 5- to 10-fold. It prevented the G2 arrest. Caffeine did not prevent these HN2-treated cells from entering or completing S phase but rather allowed them to divide without finishing the repair processes and as a consequence caused nuclear fragmentation after mitosis. Caffeine-induced nuclear fragmentation and enhanced lethality were proportional, as shown with dose--response curves and time dependence. In addition, both lethality and nuclear fragmentation were abolished by low doses of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. Images PMID:6953438

  12. Characterization and performance evaluation of a vertical seismic isolator using link and crank mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiuchi, N.; Ito, A.; Sekiya, Y.; Nan, C.; Yasuda, M.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, various seismic isolators have been developed to prevent earthquake damage to valuable art and other rare objects. Many seismic isolators only defend against horizontal motions, which are the usual cause of falling objects. However, the development of a seismic isolator designed for vertical vibration is necessary since such great vertical vibration earthquakes as the 2004 Niigata Prefecture Chuetsu Earthquake have occurred, and their increased height characteristics are undesirable. In this study, we developed a vertical seismic isolator that can be installed at a lower height and can support loads using a horizontal spring without requiring a vertical spring. It has a mechanism that combines links and cranks. The dynamic model was proposed and the frequency characteristics were simulated when the sine waves were the input. Shaking tests were also performed. The experimental value of the natural frequency was 0.57 Hz, and the theoretical values of the frequency characteristics were close to the experimental values. In addition, we verified this vertical seismic isolator's performance through shaking tests and simulation for typical seismic waves in Japan. We verified the seismic isolation's performance from the experimental result because the average reduction rate of the acceleration was 0.21.

  13. ATRX ADD Domain Links an Atypical Histone Methylation Recognition Mechanism to Human Mental-Retardation Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    S Iwase; B Xiang; S Ghosh; T Ren; P Lewis; J Cochrane; C Allis; D Picketts; D Patel; et al.

    2011-12-31

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  14. ATRX ADD domain links an atypical histone methylation recognition mechanism to human mental-retardation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Iwase, Shigeki; Xiang, Bin; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Ren, Ting; Lewis, Peter W.; Cochrane, Jesse C.; Allis, C. David; Picketts, David J.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Li, Haitao; Shi, Yang

    2011-07-19

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  15. Classifying compound mechanism of action for linking whole cell phenotypes to molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Christina R.; Wakeham, Nancy; Bunce, Richard A.; Berlin, K. Darrell; Barrow, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Drug development programs have proven successful when performed at a whole cell level, thus incorporating solubility and permeability into the primary screen. However, linking those results to the target within the cell has been a major set-back. The Phenotype Microarray system, marketed and sold by Biolog, seeks to address this need by assessing the phenotype in combination with a variety of chemicals with known mechanism of action (MOA). We have evaluated this system for usefulness in deducing the MOA for three test compounds. To achieve this, we constructed a database with 21 known antimicrobials, which served as a comparison for grouping our unknown MOA compounds. Pearson correlation and Ward linkage calculations were used to generate a dendrogram that produced clustering largely by known MOA, although there were exceptions. Of the three unknown compounds, one was definitively placed as an anti-folate. The second and third compounds’ MOA were not clearly identified, likely due to unique MOA not represented within the commercial database. The availability of the database generated in this report for S. aureus ATCC 29213 will increase the accessibility of this technique to other investigators. From our analysis, the Phenotype Microarray system can group compounds with clear MOA, but distinction of unique or broadly acting MOA at this time is less clear. PMID:22434711

  16. Hormones and phenotypic plasticity in an ecological context: linking physiological mechanisms to evolutionary processes.

    PubMed

    Lema, Sean C

    2014-11-01

    Hormones are chemical signaling molecules that regulate patterns of cellular physiology and gene expression underlying phenotypic traits. Hormone-signaling pathways respond to an organism's external environment to mediate developmental stage-specific malleability in phenotypes, so that environmental variation experienced at different stages of development has distinct effects on an organism's phenotype. Studies of hormone-signaling are therefore playing a central role in efforts to understand how plastic phenotypic responses to environmental variation are generated during development. But, how do adaptive, hormonally mediated phenotypes evolve if the individual signaling components (hormones, conversion enzymes, membrane transporters, and receptors) that comprise any hormone-signaling pathway show expressional flexibility in response to environmental variation? What relevance do these components hold as molecular targets for selection to couple or decouple correlated hormonally mediated traits? This article explores how studying the endocrine underpinnings of phenotypic plasticity in an ecologically relevant context can provide insights into these, and other, crucial questions into the role of phenotypic plasticity in evolution, including how plasticity itself evolves. These issues are discussed in the light of investigations into how thyroid hormones mediate morphological plasticity in Death Valley's clade of pupfishes (Cyprinodon spp.). Findings from this work with pupfish illustrate that the study of hormone-signaling from an ecological perspective can reveal how phenotypic plasticity contributes to the generation of phenotypic novelty, as well as how physiological mechanisms developmentally link an organism's phenotype to its environmental experiences.

  17. Mechanical properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of cross-linked cellulose acetate-reinforced polyester composites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-San

    2014-05-25

    Composites of treated (cross-linked) cellulose acetate (t-CA) and acrylic acid-grafted poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA-g-AA/t-CA) exhibited noticeably superior mechanical properties compared with PHA/CA composites due to greater compatibility between the two components. The dispersion covering of t-CA in the PHA-g-AA matrix was highly homogeneous as a result of condensation reactions. Human lung fibroblasts (FBs) were seeded on these two series of composites to characterize the biocompatibility properties. In a time-dependent course, the FB proliferation results demonstrated higher performance from the PHA/CA series of composites than from the PHA-g-AA/t-CA composites. The water resistance of PHA-g-AA/t-CA was higher than that of PHA/CA, although the weight loss of both composites buried in Acetobacter pasteurianus (A. pasteurianus) indicated that they were both biodegradable, especially at higher levels of cellulose acetate substitution. The PHA/CA and PHA-g-AA/t-CA composites were more biodegradable than pure PHA, implying a strong connection between cellulose acetate content and biodegradability.

  18. Plantar Fasciitis and the Windlass Mechanism: A Biomechanical Link to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Terry R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Plantar fasciitis is a prevalent problem, with limited consensus among clinicians regarding the most effective treatment. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a systematic approach to the treatment of plantar fasciitis based on the windlass mechanism model. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and CINAHL from 1966 to 2003 using the key words plantar fasciitis, windlass mechanism, pronation, heel pain, and heel spur. Data Synthesis: We offer a biomechanical application for the evaluation and treatment of plantar fasciitis based on a review of the literature for the windlass mechanism model. This model provides a means for describing plantar fasciitis conditions such that clinicians can formulate a potential causal relationship between the conditions and their treatments. Conclusions/Recommendations: Clinicians' understanding of the biomechanical causes of plantar fasciitis should guide the decision-making process concerning the evaluation and treatment of heel pain. Use of this approach may improve clinical outcomes because intervention does not merely treat physical symptoms but actively addresses the influences that resulted in the condition. Principles from this approach might also provide a basis for future research investigating the efficacy of plantar fascia treatment. PMID:16558682

  19. Effect of cross-linking on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa

    2005-11-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene is a semicrystalline polymer, which means that a portion of the molecules is in a solid crystalline phase and the remaining portion is in a rubbery amorphous phase. Varying the polymer chemistry in the two phases can alter the mechanical properties of the material. When highly cross-linked polyethylene is formed, the cross-links occur in the amorphous but not the crystalline region. Remelting after irradiation-induced cross-linking neutralizes the free radicals that are caused by irradiation but also decreases the amount of crystallinity. Decreased crystallinity can contribute to a decrease in mechanical properties. Annealing below the melt temperature after irradiation retains a higher level of crystallinity. However, heating below the melt temperature does not neutralize irradiation-induced free radicals that can then react with oxygen, causing oxidative degradation. Newer "second-generation" highly cross-linked polyethylenes have been developed that are annealed below the melt temperature, but use either a pharmacologic antioxidant, mechanical deformation, or sequential low-dose irradiation and annealing treatments rather than heating above the melt point to neutralize residual free radicals. High-pressure treatment at elevated temperatures also can increase crystallinity. However, increased crystallinity is associated with an increase in modulus and contact stress, which can increase wear. Although cross-linking ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene can reduce wear, currently available highly cross-linked polyethylenes also decrease mechanical properties when compared with conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, so that use of these materials in total knee arthroplasty may contribute to mechanical failure of the bearing surface.

  20. Oxidative stress associated to dysfunctional adipose tissue: a potential link between obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Crujeiras, A B; Díaz-Lagares, A; Carreira, M C; Amil, M; Casanueva, F F

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus and breast cancer are two important health problems. Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obesity are closely linked with both being associated with breast cancer. Despite abundant epidemiological data, there is no definitive evidence regarding the mechanisms responsible for this association. The proposed mechanisms by which diabetes affects breast cancer risk and prognosis are the same as the mechanisms hypothesised for the contribution of obesity to breast cancer risk. The obesity-induced inflammation promoted by adipose tissue dysfunction is a key feature, which is thought to be an important link between obesity and cancer. Inflammation induces an increase in free radicals and subsequently promotes oxidative stress, which may create a microenvironment favourable to the tumor development in obese persons. Oxidative stress is also proposed as the link between obesity and diabetes mellitus. Therefore, obesity-related oxidative stress could be a direct cause of neoplastic transformation associated with obesity and T2DM in breast cancer cells. This review is focused on the role of obesity-related oxidative stress in the context of chronic inflammation, on the time of breast cancer onset and progression, which provide targets for preventive and therapeutic strategies in the fields of diabetes and obesity-related breast cancer.

  1. Biochar Mechanisms of Heavy Metal Sorption and Potential Utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ippolito, J.

    2015-12-01

    Mining-affected lands are a global issue; in the USA alone there are an estimated 500,000 abandoned mines encompassing hundreds of thousands of hectares. Many of these sites generate acidic mine drainage that causes release of heavy metals, and subsequently degradation in environmental quality. Because of its potential liming characteristics, biochar may play a pivotal role as a soil amendment in future mine land reclamation. However, to date, most studies have focused on the use of biochar to sorb metals from solution. Previous studies suggest that metals are complexed by biochar surface function groups (leading to ion exchange, complexation), coordination with Pi electrons (C=C) of carbon, and precipitation of inorganic mineral phases. Several recent studies have focused on the use of biochar for amending mine land soils, showing that biochar can indeed reduce heavy metal lability, yet the mechanism(s) behind labile metal reduction have yet to be established. In a proof-of-concept study, we added lodgepole pine, tamarisk, and switchgrass biochar (0, 5, 10, 15% by weight; 500 oC) to four different western US mine land soils affected by various heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn). Extraction with 0.01M CaCl2 showed that increasing biochar application rate significantly decreased 'bioaccessible' metals in almost all instances. A concomitant increase in solution pH was observed, suggesting that metals may be rendered bio-inaccessible through precipitation as carbonate or (hydr)oxide phases, or sorbed onto mineral surfaces. However, this was only supposition and required further research. Thus, following the 0.01M CaCl2 extraction, biochar-soil mixtures were air-dried and metals were further extracted using the four-step BCR sequential removal procedure. Results from selective extraction suggest that, as compared to the controls, most metals in the biochar-amended mine land soils were associated with exchange sites, carbonate, and oxide phases. Biochar may play a

  2. Smoking and increased Alzheimer’s disease risk: A review of potential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mattsson, Niklas; Weiner, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking has been linked with both increased and decreased risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This is relevant for the US military because the prevalence of smoking in the military is approximately 11% higher than in civilians. Methods Systematic review of published studies on the association between smoking and increased risk for AD, and preclinical and human literature on the relationships between smoking, nicotine exposure and AD-related neuropathology. Original data from comparisons of smoking and never-smoking cognitively normal elders on in vivo amyloid imaging are also presented. Results Overall, the literature indicates that former/active smoking is related to a significantly increased risk for AD. Cigarette smoke/smoking is associated with AD neuropathology in preclinical models and humans. Smoking-related cerebral oxidative stress is a potential mechanism promoting AD pathophysiology and increased risk for AD. Conclusions A reduction in the incidence of smoking will likely reduce the future prevalence of AD. PMID:24924665

  3. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  4. Corneal Cross-Linking: Evaluating the Potential for a Lower Power, Shorter Duration Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Ciro; Barbaro, Gaetano; Tronino, Diana; Ostacolo, Carmine; Sacchi, Antonia; Pacente, Luigi; Del Prete, Antonio; Sala, Marina; Troisi, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the cross-linking effect of a riboflavin ultraviolet-A (UV-A) corneal cross-linking treatment that is both shorter and has lower energy than the Dresden protocol. Methods: In a first experiment, 12 human corneas were presoaked with riboflavin and then irradiated with UV-A at 3 mW/cm2 after clearing the surface of riboflavin, with no added riboflavin during irradiation. Percent UV-A transmission through the corneas was measured at intervals up to 30 minutes. A second experiment involved 24 porcine corneas. Eight were de-epithelialized, presoaked in riboflavin for 30 minutes, and irradiated at 1.5 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes. An additional 8 were riboflavin treated and similarly irradiated, but with epithelium intact and a final 8 corneas were not treated. Young modulus was measured in all 24 corneas at the end of the experiment. Results: The first experiment showed essentially complete riboflavin oxidation after only 10 minutes. Based on these results, a shortened UV-A exposure cross-linking experiment was designed using a reduced UV-A fluence of 1.5 mW/cm2, an endothelial exposure within safety limits in humans. With this protocol Young modulus was the same in the irradiated porcine corneas but with epithelium intact as in the untreated corneas. In contrast, Young modulus increased by a factor of 1.99 in the UV-A cross-linked corneas at 1.5 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes with the epithelium removed. Conclusions: A shorter, lower energy protocol than the Dresden protocol seems to provide a significant increase in Young modulus, similar to published results with higher energy, longer exposure protocols. PMID:26989958

  5. The potential of using enzyme-linked immunospot to diagnose cephalosporin-induced maculopapular exanthems.

    PubMed

    Tanvarasethee, Boonthorn; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong

    2013-01-01

    There is no reliable test to diagnose cephalosporin-induced maculopapular exanthems (MPE). This study aimed to evaluate the role of enzyme-linked immunospot assay in the diagnosis of cephalosporin-induced MPE compared with skin testing. A total of 25 patients with a history of cephalosporin-induced MPE were skin tested and the frequencies of cephalosporin-specific interferon-γ-, interleukin-5-, and interleukin-10-releasing cells/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells were measured after stimulating with the culprit drug, compared with 20 non-allergic controls. Values greater than means+2 standard deviations of the values in non-allergic controls were considered diagnostic. The study showed that the combination of interferon-γ and interleukin-5 enzyme-linked immunospot assays was more sensitive than skin testing to diagnose cephalosporin allergy (40% vs. 8%, p = 0.008) and sensitivity increased to 57.1% when the test was performed within 2 years of the drug reaction. Enzyme-linked immunospot assay is a promising tool for confirming the diagnosis of cephalosporin-induced MPE.

  6. The effect of cross linking density on the mechanical properties and structure of the epoxy polymers: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Shokuhfar, Ali; Arab, Behrouz

    2013-09-01

    Recently, great attention has been focused on using epoxy polymers in different fields such as aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, and electronics, owing to their superior properties. In this study, the classical molecular dynamics (MD) was used to simulate the cross linking of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) with diethylenetriamine (DETA) curing agent, and to study the behavior of resulted epoxy polymer with different conversion rates. The constant-strain (static) approach was then applied to calculate the mechanical properties (Bulk, shear and Young's moduli, elastic stiffness constants, and Poisson's ratio) of the uncured and cross-linked systems. Estimated material properties were found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. Moreover, the dependency of mechanical properties on the cross linking density was investigated and revealed improvements in the mechanical properties with increasing the cross linking density. The radial distribution function (RDF) was also used to study the evolution of local structures of the simulated systems as a function of cross linking density.

  7. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to (18)O and (13)C-isotopes of human breath CO2.

    PubMed

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-06-03

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 ((18)O) and carbon-13 ((13)C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of (18)O/(16)O and (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the (13)C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to (13)C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the (18)O and (13)C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath (12)C(18)O(16)O and (13)C(16)O(16)O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen's physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection.

  8. Mechanisms That Link Parenting Practices to Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior: A Test of Six Competing Theories.

    PubMed

    Simons, Leslie Gordon; Sutton, Tara E; Simons, Ronald L; Gibbons, Frederick X; Murry, Velma McBride

    2016-02-01

    Risky sexual behavior, particularly among adolescents, continues to be a major source of concern. In order to develop effective education and prevention programs, there is a need for research that identifies the antecedents of such behavior. This study investigated the mediators that link parenting experiences during early adolescence to subsequent risky sexual behaviors among a diverse sample of African American youth (N = 629, 55 % female). While there is ample evidence that parenting practices (e.g., supportive parenting, harsh parenting, parental management) are antecedent to risky sexual behavior, few studies have examined whether one approach to parenting is more strongly related to risky sex than others. Using a developmental approach, the current study focused on factors associated with six theories of risky sexual behavior. While past research has provided support for all of the theories, few studies have assessed the relative contribution of each while controlling for the processes proposed by the others. The current study addresses these gaps in the literature and reports results separately by gender. Longitudinal analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that the mediating mechanisms associated with social learning and attachment theories were significantly related to the risky sexual behavior of males and females. Additionally, there was support for social control and self-control theories only for females and for life history theory only for males. We did not find support for problem behavior theory, a perspective that dominates the risky sex literature, after controlling for the factors associated with the other theories. Finally, supportive parenting emerged as the parenting behavior most influential with regard to adolescents' risky sexual behavior. These results provide insight regarding efficacious approaches to education and preventative programs designed to reduce risky sexual behaviors among adolescents.

  9. Ion transport mechanisms linked to bicarbonate secretion in the esophageal submucosal glands

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Hani N.; Kalliny, Medhat I.; Gyftopoulos, Alex; Rabon, Edd; Doetjes, Rienk; Brown, Karen; Nakhoul, Nazih L.

    2011-01-01

    The esophageal submucosal glands (SMG) secrete HCO3− and mucus into the esophageal lumen, where they contribute to acid clearance and epithelial protection. This study characterized the ion transport mechanisms linked to HCO3− secretion in SMG. We localized ion transporters using immunofluorescence, and we examined their expression by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. We measured HCO3− secretion by using pH stat and the isolated perfused esophagus. Using double labeling with Na+-K+-ATPase as a marker, we localized Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NBCe1) and Cl−-HCO3− exchanger (SLC4A2/AE2) to the basolateral membrane of duct cells. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator channel (CFTR) was confirmed by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization. We identified anion exchanger SLC26A6 at the ducts' luminal membrane and Na+-K+-2Cl− (NKCC1) at the basolateral membrane of mucous and duct cells. pH stat experiments showed that elevations in cAMP induced by forskolin or IBMX increased HCO3− secretion. Genistein, an activator of CFTR, which does not increase intracellular cAMP, also stimulated HCO3− secretion, whereas glibenclamide, a Cl− channel blocker, and bumetanide, a Na+-K+-2Cl− blocker, decreased it. CFTRinh-172, a specific CFTR channel blocker, inhibited basal HCO3− secretion as well as stimulation of HCO3− secretion by IBMX. This is the first report on the presence of CFTR channels in the esophagus. The role of CFTR in manifestations of esophageal disease in cystic fibrosis patients remains to be determined. PMID:21474426

  10. Ion transport mechanisms linked to bicarbonate secretion in the esophageal submucosal glands.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Nakhoul, Hani N; Kalliny, Medhat I; Gyftopoulos, Alex; Rabon, Edd; Doetjes, Rienk; Brown, Karen; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2011-07-01

    The esophageal submucosal glands (SMG) secrete HCO(3)(-) and mucus into the esophageal lumen, where they contribute to acid clearance and epithelial protection. This study characterized the ion transport mechanisms linked to HCO(3)(-) secretion in SMG. We localized ion transporters using immunofluorescence, and we examined their expression by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. We measured HCO(3)(-) secretion by using pH stat and the isolated perfused esophagus. Using double labeling with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase as a marker, we localized Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NBCe1) and Cl(-)-HCO(3)(-) exchanger (SLC4A2/AE2) to the basolateral membrane of duct cells. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator channel (CFTR) was confirmed by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization. We identified anion exchanger SLC26A6 at the ducts' luminal membrane and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) (NKCC1) at the basolateral membrane of mucous and duct cells. pH stat experiments showed that elevations in cAMP induced by forskolin or IBMX increased HCO(3)(-) secretion. Genistein, an activator of CFTR, which does not increase intracellular cAMP, also stimulated HCO(3)(-) secretion, whereas glibenclamide, a Cl(-) channel blocker, and bumetanide, a Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) blocker, decreased it. CFTR(inh)-172, a specific CFTR channel blocker, inhibited basal HCO(3)(-) secretion as well as stimulation of HCO(3)(-) secretion by IBMX. This is the first report on the presence of CFTR channels in the esophagus. The role of CFTR in manifestations of esophageal disease in cystic fibrosis patients remains to be determined.

  11. Mechanisms of DNA strand breakage and interstrand cross-linking by diaziridinylbenzoquinone (diaziquone) in isolated nuclei from human cells.

    PubMed

    Szmigiero, L; Kohn, K W

    1984-10-01

    AZQ had been found to produce DNA strand breaks and interstrand cross-links in intact cells; evidence had indicated that these two DNA lesions arise by different chemical mechanisms and vary independently in degree in different cell types. In the present work, the mechanisms of the production of DNA strand breaks and interstrand cross-links by AZQ were studied in isolated cell nuclei. This system avoided the problem of poor penetration of test substances into cells. The DNA lesions were measured by means of the alkaline elution technique. It was found that the production of DNA strand breaks by AZQ in isolated nuclei required the addition of a reducing agent such as NADPH and was almost completely prevented by superoxide dismutase. This indicates that the mechanism of DNA strand breakage involves transfer of an electron from a reduced form of AZQ to molecular oxygen. Unexpectedly, interstrand cross-linking also was enhanced greatly by previous reduction of AZQ by NADPH or NaBH4. However, this reaction was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase. General alkylating activity of AZQ also was stimulated by reduction; the pH-dependence of this reaction was determined. The mechanism of DNA interstrand cross-linking by AZQ was surmised to stem from alkylation reactions of the two aziridine groups. The findings suggest the possibility that AZQ or related compounds may function as bioreductive alkylating agents which might be selectively toxic to hypoxic tissues.

  12. Family Socioeconomic Status and Academic Achievement among Korean Adolescents: Linking Mechanisms of Family Processes and Adolescents' Time Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Dayoung; Wickrama, K. A. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined pathways through which family socioeconomic status may influence adolescents' academic achievement. We focused on parental monitoring and adolescents' after-school time-use patterns as linking mechanisms. Participants were 441 twelve- to fourteen-year-old Korean adolescents who participated in the Korea Welfare Panel Study.…

  13. Quantum mechanics of graphene with a one-dimensional potential

    SciTech Connect

    Miserev, D. S.; Entin, M. V.

    2012-10-15

    Electron states in graphene with a one-dimensional potential have been studied. An approximate solution has been obtained for a small angle between vectors of the incident electron momentum and potential gradient. Exactly solvable problems with a potential of the smoothened step type U(x) Utanh(x/a) and a potential with a singularity U(x) = -U/(|x| + d) are considered. The transmission/reflection coefficients and phases for various potential barriers are determined. A quasi-classical solution is obtained.

  14. The potentiality of cross-linked fungal chitosan to control water contamination through bioactive filtration.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F; Elguindy, Nihal M

    2016-07-01

    Water contamination, with heavy metals and microbial pathogens, is among the most dangerous challenges that confront human health worldwide. Chitosan is a bioactive biopolymer that could be produced from fungal mycelia to be utilized in various applied fields. An attempt to apply fungal chitosan for heavy metals chelation and microbial pathogens inhibition, in contaminated water, was performed in current study. Chitosan was produced from the mycelia of Aspergillus niger, Cunninghamella elegans, Mucor rouxii and from shrimp shells, using unified production conditions. The FT-IR spectra of produced chitosans were closely comparable. M. rouxii chitosan had the highest deacetylation degree (91.3%) and the lowest molecular weight (33.2kDa). All chitosan types had potent antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus; the most forceful type was C. elegans chitosan. Chitosan beads were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GLA) and ethylene-glycol-diglycidyl ether (EGDE); linked beads became insoluble in water, acidic and alkaline solutions and could effectively adsorb heavy metals ions, e.g. copper, lead and zinc, in aqueous solution. The bioactive filter, loaded with EGDE- A. niger chitosan beads, was able to reduce heavy metals' concentration with >68%, and microbial load with >81%, after 6h of continuous water flow in the experimentally designed filter.

  15. APOBEC3G-Mediated G-to-A Hypermutation of the HIV-1 Genome: The Missing Link in Antiviral Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Ayaka; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a member of the cellular polynucleotide cytidine deaminases, which catalyze the deamination of cytosine (dC) to uracil (dU) in single-stranded DNA. These enzymes potently inhibit the replication of a variety of retroviruses and retrotransposons, including HIV-1. A3G is incorporated into vif-deficient HIV-1 virions and targets viral reverse transcripts, particularly minus-stranded DNA products, in newly infected cells. It is well established that the enzymatic activity of A3G is closely correlated with the potential to greatly inhibit HIV-1 replication in the absence of Vif. However, the details of the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. One potential mechanism of A3G antiviral activity is that the A3G-dependent deamination may trigger degradation of the dU-containing reverse transcripts by cellular uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs). More recently, another mechanism has been suggested, in which the virion-incorporated A3G generates lethal levels of the G-to-A hypermutation in the viral DNA genome, thus potentially driving the viruses into “error catastrophe” mode. In this mini review article, we summarize the deaminase-dependent and deaminase-independent molecular mechanisms of A3G and discuss how A3G-mediated deamination is linked to antiviral mechanisms. PMID:28066353

  16. Potential of 13 linked autosomal short tandem repeat loci in pairwise kinship analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ling; Xue, Li; Wu, Wei-Wei; He, Xin; Liu, Kai-Yan; Zhao, Hu; Lu, De-Jian

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a panel of 13 STR loci locate on chromosome 3, 4, and 17 (D3S2402, D3S2452, D3S1766, D3S4554, D3S2388, D3S3051, D3S3053, D4S2404, D4S2364, AC001348A, AC001348B, D17S975, and D17S1294) were assessed for pairwise kinship analysis. Map distances between these STR loci ranged from 0.07 cM to 97.03 cM. The population genetic study of Chinese Han population showed that linkage disequilibrium exists in two clusters of closely linked markers (D4S2404-D4S2364 and D17S975-D17S1294), in which the recombination fractions were 0.0026 and 0.0001, respectively. The recombination fractions derived from the Rutgers Map for the closely linked markers (genetic distance < 0.5 cM) were significant underestimates in comparison to those of direct observation of STR transmissions in families. When effect of linkage on pairwise kinship testing was evaluated by comparing likelihood ratio (LR) values taking linkage into account, overall LR values increased. But extremely low LRs were also observed. Finally, the power of the 13 STR loci to discriminate relationship among full-sibs, half-sibs, grandparent-grandchild, uncle-niece, and unrelated pairs was assessed with a category fraction. The results showed that about 72.64% of full-sib pairs and about 82.84% of unrelated pairs could be classified correctly. But the category fractions of second-degree relationships drastically reduced to 7.34-35.48%. If only pairs of grandparent-grandchild, half-sibs, and uncle-niece were distinguished, the category fraction was 0.5512, 0.1147, and 0.4362, respectively. Our study results demonstrated that linked STRs were helpful to differentiate the most frequent relationships in pairwise kinship analysis.

  17. Compassionate love as a mechanism linking sacred qualities of marriage to older couples' marital satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sabey, Allen K; Rauer, Amy J; Jensen, Jakob F

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has underscored the robust links between sanctification of marriage and marital outcomes, and recent developments in the literature suggest that compassionate love, which is important for intimate relationships, may act as a mediator of that relationship. Accordingly, the current study used actor-partner interdependence models to examine the relationship between a spiritual cognition (i.e., perceived sacred qualities of marriage) and marital satisfaction, and to determine whether that relationship is mediated by compassionate love, in a sample of older married couples (N = 64). Results revealed that wives' greater sacred qualities of marriage were significantly and positively linked to marital satisfaction on the part of both spouses, and that these links were partially mediated by couples' reports of compassionate love. These findings highlight the importance of moving beyond simply establishing the existence of the link between global markers of involvement of religion and marriage to understanding how specific spiritual cognitions may foster better relationship quality, especially among older couples.

  18. Astrocytes and Microglia and Their Potential Link with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Petrelli, Francesco; Pucci, Luca; Bezzi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The cellular mechanism(s) underlying autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are not fully understood although it has been shown that various genetic and environmental factors contribute to their etiology. As increasing evidence indicates that astrocytes and microglial cells play a major role in synapse maturation and function, and there is evidence of deficits in glial cell functions in ASDs, one current hypothesis is that glial dysfunctions directly contribute to their pathophysiology. The aim of this review is to summarize microglia and astrocyte functions in synapse development and their contributions to ASDs. PMID:26903806

  19. Aluminum-induced dreierketten chain cross-links increase the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline calcium aluminosilicate hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Guoqing; Myers, Rupert J.; Li, Jiaqi; Maboudian, Roya; Carraro, Carlo; Shapiro, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2017-03-01

    The incorporation of Al and increased curing temperature promotes the crystallization and cross-linking of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C-(A-)S-H), which is the primary binding phase in most contemporary concrete materials. However, the influence of Al-induced structural changes on the mechanical properties at atomistic scale is not well understood. Herein, synchrotron radiation-based high-pressure X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the influence of dreierketten chain cross-linking on the anisotropic mechanical behavior of C-(A-)S-H. We show that the ab-planar stiffness is independent of dreierketten chain defects, e.g. vacancies in bridging tetrahedra sites and Al for Si substitution. The c-axis of non-cross-linked C-(A-)S-H is more deformable due to the softer interlayer opening but stiffens with decreased spacing and/or increased zeolitic water and Ca2+ of the interlayer. Dreierketten chain cross-links act as ‘columns’ to resist compression, thus increasing the bulk modulus of C-(A-)S-H. We provide the first experimental evidence on the influence of the Al-induced atomistic configurational change on the mechanical properties of C-(A-)S-H. Our work advances the fundamental knowledge of C-(A-)S-H on the lowest level of its hierarchical structure, and thus can impact the way that innovative C-(A-)S-H-based cementitious materials are developed using a ‘bottom-up’ approach.

  20. The Perception of Time: Basic Research and Some Potential Links to the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearden, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The article first discusses some recent work in time perception--in particular the distinction among prospective timing, retrospective timing, and passage of time judgments. The history and application of an "internal clock" model as an explanation of prospective timing performance is reviewed and contrasted with the different mechanisms needed…

  1. Investigating the Mechanisms and Potential of Silk Fiber Metallization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    molecular mechanisms underlying the metallization-induced mechanical enhancement of spider silk fibers. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A...properties of biological materials1. Native spider silk fibers are unparalleled in their combination of 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND...ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS silk, spider , fiber

  2. Examining Potential Moderators of the Link between Heterosexist Events and Gay and Bisexual Men's Psychological Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) the relationship between heterosexist events and psychological distress and (b) the potential moderating roles of social support, avoidant coping, and self-esteem in the relationship between heterosexist events and psychological distress among 210 gay and bisexual men. Findings from the Web-based…

  3. Exposure to Potentially Traumatic Events in Early Childhood: Differential Links to Emergent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Carter, Alice S.; Clark, Roseanne; Augustyn, Marilyn; McCarthy, Kimberly J.; Ford, Julian D.

    2010-01-01

    Research NeedsObjective: To examine associations between exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs) and clinical patterns of symptoms and disorders in preschool children. Method: Two hundred and thirteen referred and non-referred children, ages 24 to 48 months (MN = 34.9, SD = 6.7 months) were studied. Lifetime exposure to PTEs (family…

  4. [Potential protective role of nitric oxide and Hsp70 linked to functional foods in the atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Camargo, Alejandra B; Manucha, Walter

    Atherosclerosis, one of the main pathologic entities considered epidemic and a worldwide public health problem, is currently under constant review as regards its basic determining mechanisms and therapeutic possibilities. In this regard, all patients afflicted with the disease exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation. Interestingly, nitric oxide - a known vasoactive messenger gas - has been closely related to the inflammatory, oxidative and mitochondrial dysfunctional process that characterizes atherosclerosis. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that alterations in the bioavailability of nitric oxide would induce the expression of heat shock proteins. This agrees with the use of functional foods as a strategy to prevent both vascular aging and the development of atherosclerosis. Finally, a greater knowledge regarding the mechanisms implied in the development of atherosclerosis will enable proposing new and possible hygiene, health and therapeutic interventions.

  5. Test of a potential link between analytic and nonanalytic category learning and automatic, effortful processing.

    PubMed

    Tracy, J I; Pinsk, M; Helverson, J; Urban, G; Dietz, T; Smith, D J

    2001-08-01

    The link between automatic and effortful processing and nonanalytic and analytic category learning was evaluated in a sample of 29 college undergraduates using declarative memory, semantic category search, and pseudoword categorization tasks. Automatic and effortful processing measures were hypothesized to be associated with nonanalytic and analytic categorization, respectively. Results suggested that contrary to prediction strong criterion-attribute (analytic) responding on the pseudoword categorization task was associated with strong automatic, implicit memory encoding of frequency-of-occurrence information. Data are discussed in terms of the possibility that criterion-attribute category knowledge, once established, may be expressed with few attentional resources. The data indicate that attention resource requirements, even for the same stimuli and task, vary depending on the category rule system utilized. Also, the automaticity emerging from familiarity with analytic category exemplars is very different from the automaticity arising from extensive practice on a semantic category search task. The data do not support any simple mapping of analytic and nonanalytic forms of category learning onto the automatic and effortful processing dichotomy and challenge simple models of brain asymmetries for such procedures.

  6. The oncogenic potential of BK-polyomavirus is linked to viral integration into the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kenan, Daniel J; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Singh, Harsharan K; Nickeleit, Volker

    2015-11-01

    It has been suggested that BK-polyomavirus is linked to oncogenesis via high expression levels of large T-antigen in some urothelial neoplasms arising following kidney transplantation. However, a causal association between BK-polyomavirus, large T-antigen expression and oncogenesis has never been demonstrated in humans. Here we describe an investigation using high-throughput sequencing of tumour DNA obtained from an urothelial carcinoma arising in a renal allograft. We show that a novel BK-polyomavirus strain, named CH-1, is integrated into exon 26 of the myosin-binding protein C1 gene (MYBPC1) on chromosome 12 in tumour cells but not in normal renal cells. Integration of the BK-polyomavirus results in a number of discrete alterations in viral gene expression, including: (a) disruption of VP1 protein expression and robust expression of large T-antigen; (b) preclusion of viral replication; and (c) deletions in the non-coding control region (NCCR), with presumed alterations in promoter feedback loops. Viral integration disrupts one MYBPC1 gene copy and likely alters its expression. Circular episomal BK-polyomavirus gene sequences are not found, and the renal allograft shows no productive polyomavirus infection or polyomavirus nephropathy. These findings support the hypothesis that integration of polyomaviruses is essential to tumourigenesis. It is likely that dysregulation of large T-antigen, with persistent over-expression in non-lytic cells, promotes cell growth, genetic instability and neoplastic transformation.

  7. Investigations into the Mechanisms of Cell Death: The Common Link between Anticancer Nanotherapeutics and Nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shalini

    Nanotoxicology and anticancer nanotherapeutics are essentially two sides of the same coin. The nanotoxicology discipline deals with the nanoparticle (NP)-induced toxicity and mechanisms of cell death in healthy cells, whereas anticancer agents delivered via nano-based approaches aim to induce cell death in abnormally proliferating cancer cells. The objectives of the studies presented herein were two-fold; to (a) systematically study the physico-chemical properties and cell death mechanisms of model NPs and (b) utilize the knowledge gained from cell death-nanotoxicity studies in developing a potentially novel anticancer nanotherapeutic agent. For the first objective, the effect of a distinguishing characteristic, i.e., surface carbon coating on the matched pairs of carbon-coated and non-coated copper and nickel NPs (Cu, C-Cu, Ni and C-Ni) on the physico-chemical properties and toxicity in A549 alveolar epithelial cells were evaluated. The effect of carbon coating on particle size, zeta potential, oxidation state, cellular uptake, release of soluble metal and concentration dependent toxicity of Cu and Ni NPs was systematically evaluated. A significant effect of carbon coating was observed on the physico-chemical properties, interaction with cellular membranes, and overall toxicity of the NPs. C-Cu NPs, compared to Cu NPs, showed four-fold lower release of soluble copper, ten-fold higher cellular uptake and protection against surface oxidation. In toxicity assays, C-Cu NPs induced higher mitochondrial damage than Cu NPs whereas Cu NPs were associated with a significant damage to plasma membrane integrity. Nickel and carbon coated nickel NPs were less toxic compared to Cu and C-Cu NPs. Thus, by studying the effect of carbon coating, correlations between physico-chemical properties and toxicity of NPs were established. The second objective was focused on utilizing nano-based approaches for the intracellular delivery of an anticancer agent, Cytochrome c (Cyt c), to

  8. Enhanced Mechanical Properties in Cellulose Nanocrystal-Poly(oligoethylene glycol methacrylate) Injectable Nanocomposite Hydrogels through Control of Physical and Chemical Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    De France, Kevin J; Chan, Katelyn J W; Cranston, Emily D; Hoare, Todd

    2016-02-08

    While injectable hydrogels have several advantages in the context of biomedical use, their generally weak mechanical properties often limit their applications. Herein, we describe in situ-gelling nanocomposite hydrogels based on poly(oligoethylene glycol methacrylate) (POEGMA) and rigid rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) that can overcome this challenge. By physically incorporating CNCs into hydrazone cross-linked POEGMA hydrogels, macroscopic properties including gelation rate, swelling kinetics, mechanical properties, and hydrogel stability can be readily tailored. Strong adsorption of aldehyde- and hydrazide-modified POEGMA precursor polymers onto the surface of CNCs promotes uniform dispersion of CNCs within the hydrogel, imparts physical cross-links throughout the network, and significantly improves mechanical strength overall, as demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance gravimetry and rheometry. When POEGMA hydrogels containing mixtures of long and short ethylene oxide side chain precursor polymers were prepared, transmission electron microscopy reveals that phase segregation occurs with CNCs hypothesized to preferentially locate within the stronger adsorbing short side chain polymer domains. Incorporating as little as 5 wt % CNCs results in dramatic enhancements in mechanical properties (up to 35-fold increases in storage modulus) coupled with faster gelation rates, decreased swelling ratios, and increased stability versus hydrolysis. Furthermore, cell viability can be maintained within 3D culture using these hydrogels independent of the CNC content. These properties collectively make POEGMA-CNC nanocomposite hydrogels of potential interest for various biomedical applications including tissue engineering scaffolds for stiffer tissues or platforms for cell growth.

  9. Potential Biochemical Mechanisms of Lung Injury in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that the lung is one of the target organs for microangiopathy in patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Diabetes is associated with physiological and structural abnormalities in the diabetic lung concurrent with attenuated lung function. Despite intensive investigations in recent years, the pathogenic mechanisms of diabetic lung injury remain largely elusive. In this review, we summarize currently postulated mechanisms of diabetic lung injury. We mainly focus on the pathogenesis of diabetic lung injury that implicates key pathways, including oxidative stress, non-enzymatic protein glycosylation, polyol pathway, NF-κB pathway, and protein kinase c pathway. We also highlight that while numerous studies have mainly focused on tissue or cell damage in the lung, studies focusing on mitochondrial dysfunction in the diabetic lung have remained sketchy. Hence, further understanding of mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic lung injury should provide invaluable insights into future therapeutic approaches for diabetic lung injury. PMID:28203478

  10. Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells: A Potential Developmental Link Between Germinal Lineage and Hematopoiesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Virant-Klun, Irma

    2016-01-15

    It has been suggested that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) could become specified from a population of migrating primordial germ cells (PGCs), precursors of gametes, during embryogenesis. Some recent experimental data demonstrated that the cell population that is usually considered to be PGCs, moving toward the gonadal ridges of an embryo, contains a subset of cells coexpressing several germ cell and hematopoietic markers and possessing hematopoietic activity. Experimental data showed that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) generates PGCs from mouse bone marrow-derived pluripotent stem cells. Interestingly, functional reproductive hormone receptors have been identified in HSPCs, thus indicating their potential role in reproductive function. Several reports have demonstrated fertility restoration and germ cell generation after bone marrow transplantation in both animal models and humans. A potential link between HSPCs and germinal lineage might be represented by very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which have been found in adult human bone marrow, peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood, express a specific pattern of pluripotency, germinal lineage, and hematopoiesis, and are proposed to persist in adult tissues and organs from the embryonic period of life. Stem cell populations, similar to VSELs, expressing several genes related to pluripotency and germinal lineage, especially to PGCs, have been discovered in adult human reproductive organs, ovaries and testicles, and were related to primitive germ cell-like cell development in vitro, thus supporting the idea of VSELs as a potential link between germinal lineage and hematopoiesis.

  11. System Voltage Potential-Induced Degradation Mechanisms in PV Modules and Methods for Test: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Smith, R.; Glick, S.; Pankow, J.; Kempe, M.; Kurtz, S.; Bennett, I.; Kloos, M.

    2011-07-01

    Over the past decade, degradation and power loss have been observed in PV modules resulting from the stress exerted by system voltage bias. This is due in part to qualification tests and standards that do not adequately evaluate for the durability of modules to the long-term effects of high voltage bias experienced in fielded arrays. High voltage can lead to module degradation by multiple mechanisms. The extent of the voltage bias degradation is linked to the leakage current or coulombs passed from the silicon active layer through the encapsulant and glass to the grounded module frame, which can be experimentally determined; however, competing processes make the effect non-linear and history-dependent. Appropriate testing methods and stress levels are described that demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. This information, along with outdoor testing that is in progress, is used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. Na-rich precipitates are observed on the cell surface after stressing the module to induce PID in damp heat with negative bias applied to the active layer.

  12. System Voltage Potential-Induced Degradation Mechanisms in PV Modules and Methods for Test

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Smith, R.; Glick, S.; Pankow, J.; Kempe, M.; Kurtz, S.; Bennett, I.; Kloos, M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, degradation and power loss have been observed in PV modules resulting from the stress exerted by system voltage bias. This is due in part to qualification tests and standards that do not adequately evaluate for the durability of modules to the long-term effects of high voltage bias experienced in fielded arrays. High voltage can lead to module degradation by multiple mechanisms. The extent of the voltage bias degradation is linked to the leakage current or culombs passed from the silicon active layer through the encapsulant and glass to the grounded module frame, which can be experimentally determined; however, competing processes make the effect non-linear and history-dependent. Appropriate testing methods and stress levels are described that demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. This information, along with outdoor testing that is in progress, is used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. Na-rich precipitates are observed on the cell surface after stressing the module to induce PID in damp heat with negative bias applied to the active layer.

  13. Physiological mechanisms and therapeutic potential of bone mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhousheng

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal loading is an important physiological regulator of bone mass. Theoretically, mechanical forces or administration of drugs that activate bone mechanosensors would be a novel treatment for osteoporotic disorders, particularly age-related osteoporosis and other bone loss caused by skeletal unloading. Uncertainty regarding the identity of the molecular targets that sense and transduce mechanical forces in bone, however, has limited the therapeutic exploitation of mechanosesning pathways to control bone mass. Recently, two evolutionally conserved mechanosensing pathways have been shown to function as “physical environment” sensors in cells of the osteoblasts lineage. Indeed, polycystin–1 (Pkd1, or PC1) and polycystin–2 (Pkd2, or PC2, or TRPP2), which form a flow sensing receptor channel complex, and TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, or WWTR1), which responds to the extracellular matrix microenvironment act in concert to reciprocally regulate osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis through co-activating Runx2 and a co-repressing PPARγ activities. Interactions of polycystins and TAZ with other putative mechanosensing mechanism, such as primary cilia, integrins and hemichannels, may create multifaceted mechanosensing networks in bone. Moreover, modulation of polycystins and TAZ interactions identify novel molecular targets to develop small molecules that mimic the effects of mechanical loading on bone. PMID:26038304

  14. Child Care Subsidy Use and Child Development: Potential Causal Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkinson, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Research using an experimental design is needed to provide firm causal evidence on the impacts of child care subsidy use on child development, and on underlying causal mechanisms since subsidies can affect child development only indirectly via changes they cause in children's early experiences. However, before costly experimental research is…

  15. Decoupling of mechanical systems based on in-situ frequency response functions: The link-preserving, decoupling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keersmaekers, Laurent; Mertens, Luc; Penne, Rudi; Guillaume, Patrick; Steenackers, Gunther

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical structures often consist of active and passive parts, the former containing the sources, the latter the transfer paths and the targets. The active and passive parts are connected to each other by means of links. In this paper, an innovative theoretical model has been developed to achieve the mathematical decoupling of such structures without disassembling the substructures, when the links connecting the structures are resilient enough. This procedure is required to identify components causing a specific Noise, Vibration and Harsh-ness (NVH) problem. The links are regarded as a parallel connection of springs and dampers, ignoring some physical properties. However, the new procedure will provide a powerful construction in which different link models can be investigated. Therefore, this procedure will be called the Link-Preserving, Decoupling Method (LPD method). The absence of a time-consuming physical decoupling procedure distinguishes the LPD method from all known methods such as the classical TPA method. The LPD method is validated by two numerical simulations using linear and nonlinear lumped parameter models and by an experimental case study.

  16. Polyextremotolerant black fungi: oligotrophism, adaptive potential, and a link to lichen symbioses.

    PubMed

    Gostinčar, Cene; Muggia, Lucia; Grube, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Black meristematic fungi can survive high doses of radiation and are resistant to desiccation. These adaptations help them to colonize harsh oligotrophic habitats, e.g., on the surface and subsurface of rocks. One of their most characteristic stress-resistance mechanisms is the accumulation of melanin in the cell walls. This, production of other protective molecules and a plastic morphology further contribute to ecological flexibility of black fungi. Increased growth rates of some species after exposure to ionizing radiation even suggest yet unknown mechanisms of energy production. Other unusual metabolic strategies may include harvesting UV or visible light or gaining energy by forming facultative lichen-like associations with algae or cyanobacteria. The latter is not entirely surprising, since certain black fungal lineages are phylogenetically related to clades of lichen-forming fungi. Similar to black fungi, lichen-forming fungi are adapted to growth on exposed surfaces with low availability of nutrients. They also efficiently use protective molecules to tolerate frequent periods of extreme stress. Traits shared by both groups of fungi may have been important in facilitating the evolution and radiation of lichen-symbioses.

  17. Polyextremotolerant black fungi: oligotrophism, adaptive potential, and a link to lichen symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Gostinčar, Cene; Muggia, Lucia; Grube, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Black meristematic fungi can survive high doses of radiation and are resistant to desiccation. These adaptations help them to colonize harsh oligotrophic habitats, e.g., on the surface and subsurface of rocks. One of their most characteristic stress-resistance mechanisms is the accumulation of melanin in the cell walls. This, production of other protective molecules and a plastic morphology further contribute to ecological flexibility of black fungi. Increased growth rates of some species after exposure to ionizing radiation even suggest yet unknown mechanisms of energy production. Other unusual metabolic strategies may include harvesting UV or visible light or gaining energy by forming facultative lichen-like associations with algae or cyanobacteria. The latter is not entirely surprising, since certain black fungal lineages are phylogenetically related to clades of lichen-forming fungi. Similar to black fungi, lichen-forming fungi are adapted to growth on exposed surfaces with low availability of nutrients. They also efficiently use protective molecules to tolerate frequent periods of extreme stress. Traits shared by both groups of fungi may have been important in facilitating the evolution and radiation of lichen-symbioses. PMID:23162543

  18. Linking Seismicity at Depth to the Mechanics of a Lava Dome Failure - a Forecasting Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvage, R. O.; Neuberg, J. W.; Murphy, W.

    2014-12-01

    Soufriere Hills volcano (SHV), Montserrat has been in a state of ongoing unrest since 1995. Prior to eruptions, an increase in the number of seismic events has been observed. We use the Material Failure Law (MFL) (Voight, 1988) to investigate how an accelerating number of low frequency seismic events are related to the timing of a large scale dome collapse in June 1997. We show that although the forecasted timing of a dome collapse may coincide with the known timing, the accuracy of the application of the MFL to the data is poor. Using a cross correlation technique we show how characterising seismicity into similar waveform "families'' allows us to focus on a single process at depth and improve the reliability of our forecast. A number of families are investigated to assess their relative importance. We show that despite the timing of a forecasted dome collapse ranging between several hours of the known timing of collapse, each of the families produces a better forecast in terms of fit to the seismic acceleration data than when using all low frequency seismicity. In addition, we investigate the stability of such families between major dome collapses (1997 and 2003), assessing their potential for use in real-time forecasting. Initial application of Grey's Incidence Analysis suggests that a key parameter influencing the potential for a large scale slumping on the dome of SHV is the rate of low frequency seismicity associated with magma movement and dome growth. We undertook numerical modelling of an andesitic dome with a hydrothermally altered layer down to 800m. The geometry of the dome is based on SHV prior to the collapse of 2003. We show that a critical instability is reached once slope angles exceed 25°, corresponding to a summit height of just over 1100m a.s.l.. The geometry of failure is in close agreement with the identified failure plane suggesting that the input mechanical properties are broadly consistent with reality. We are therefore able to compare

  19. Ladder Operators for Some Spherically Symmetric Potentials in Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmarch, J. D.; Golding, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The energy levels of the free field, Coulomb potential, and the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator are found using the Dirac operator formalism by the construction of suitable ladder operators. The degeneracy of each level is also discussed. (Author/GA)

  20. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to 18O and 13C-isotopes of human breath CO2

    PubMed Central

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B.; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 (18O) and carbon-13 (13C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of 18O/16O and 13C/12C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the 13C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to 13C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath 13C/12C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the 18O and 13C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath 12C18O16O and 13C16O16O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen’s physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection. PMID:26039789

  1. Microbial response to simulated global change is phylogenetically conserved and linked with functional potential.

    PubMed

    Amend, Anthony S; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D; Berlemont, Renaud; Goulden, Michael L; Lu, Ying; Treseder, Kathleen K; Weihe, Claudia; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2016-01-01

    The high diversity of microbial communities hampers predictions about their responses to global change. Here we investigate the potential for using a phylogenetic, trait-based framework to capture the response of bacteria and fungi to global change manipulations. Replicated grassland plots were subjected to 3+ years of drought and nitrogen fertilization. The responses of leaf litter bacteria and fungi to these simulated changes were significantly phylogenetically conserved. Proportional changes in abundance were highly correlated among related organisms, such that relatives with approximately 5% ribosomal DNA genetic distance showed similar responses to the treatments. A microbe's change in relative abundance was significantly correlated between the treatments, suggesting a compromise between numerical abundance in undisturbed environments and resistance to change in general, independent of disturbance type. Lineages in which at least 90% of the microbes shared the same response were circumscribed at a modest phylogenetic depth (τD 0.014-0.021), but significantly larger than randomized simulations predict. In several clades, phylogenetic depth of trait consensus was higher. Fungal response to drought was more conserved than was response to nitrogen fertilization, whereas bacteria responded equally to both treatments. Finally, we show that a bacterium's response to the manipulations is correlated with its potential functional traits (measured here as the number of glycoside hydrolase genes encoding the capacity to degrade different types of carbohydrates). Together, these results suggest that a phylogenetic, trait-based framework may be useful for predicting shifts in microbial composition and functioning in the face of global change.

  2. The real-time link between person perception and action: brain potential evidence for dynamic continuity.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jonathan B; Ambady, Nalini; Midgley, Katherine J; Holcomb, Phillip J

    2011-01-01

    Using event-related potentials, we investigated how the brain extracts information from another's face and translates it into relevant action in real time. In Study 1, participants made between-hand sex categorizations of sex-typical and sex-atypical faces. Sex-atypical faces evoked negativity between 250 and 550 ms (N300/N400 effects), reflecting the integration of accumulating sex-category knowledge into a coherent sex-category interpretation. Additionally, the lateralized readiness potential revealed that the motor cortex began preparing for a correct hand response while social category knowledge was still gradually evolving in parallel. In Study 2, participants made between-hand eye-color categorizations as part of go/no-go trials that were contingent on a target's sex. On no-go trials, although the hand did not actually move, information about eye color partially prepared the motor cortex to move the hand before perception of sex had finalized. Together, these findings demonstrate the dynamic continuity between person perception and action, such that ongoing results from face processing are immediately and continuously cascaded into the motor system over time. The preparation of action begins based on tentative perceptions of another's face before perceivers have finished interpreting what they just saw.

  3. The real-time link between person perception and action: Brain potential evidence for dynamic continuity

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jonathan B.; Ambady, Nalini; Midgley, Katherine J.; Holcomb, Phillip J.

    2010-01-01

    Using event-related potentials, we investigated how the brain extracts information from another’s face and translates it into relevant action in real-time. In Study 1, participants made between-hand sex categorizations of sex-typical and sex-atypical faces. Sex-atypical faces evoked negativity between 250-550 ms (N300/N400 effects), reflecting the integration of accumulating sex-category knowledge into a coherent sex-category interpretation. Additionally, the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) revealed that the motor cortex began preparing for a correct hand response while social category knowledge was still gradually evolving in parallel. In Study 2, participants made between-hand eye-color categorizations as part of go/no-go trials that were contingent on a target’s sex. On no-go trials, although the hand did not actually move, information about eye color partially prepared the motor cortex to move the hand before perception of sex had finalized. Together, these findings demonstrate the dynamic continuity between person perception and action, such that ongoing results from face processing are immediately and continuously cascaded into the motor system over time. The preparation of action begins based on tentative perceptions of another’s face before perceivers have finished interpreting what they just saw. PMID:20602284

  4. Vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular disease: potential mechanisms and novel perspectives.

    PubMed

    Abu el Maaty, Mohamed A; Gad, Mohamed Z

    2013-01-01

    Interest in contemporary vitamin D research has been sparked in recent years, stemming from the identification of vitamin D receptors in virtually all cells as well as the enzymatic machinery necessary to produce its active form. Both epidemiological and in-vitro studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to enigmatic diseases including cardiovascular disease; however, a clear mechanistic link remains missing. This review highlights conclusions of observational studies, in-vitro experiments and randomized-controlled trials that aimed to link deficiency of the sunshine vitamin to one of the leading causes of death in the world, cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, putative mechanisms viewed from a novel perspective are also discussed.

  5. Mental Imagery in Depression: Phenomenology, Potential Mechanisms, and Treatment Implications.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Emily A; Blackwell, Simon E; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Renner, Fritz; Raes, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Mental imagery is an experience like perception in the absence of a percept. It is a ubiquitous feature of human cognition, yet it has been relatively neglected in the etiology, maintenance, and treatment of depression. Imagery abnormalities in depression include an excess of intrusive negative mental imagery; impoverished positive imagery; bias for observer perspective imagery; and overgeneral memory, in which specific imagery is lacking. We consider the contribution of imagery dysfunctions to depressive psychopathology and implications for cognitive behavioral interventions. Treatment advances capitalizing on the representational format of imagery (as opposed to its content) are reviewed, including imagery rescripting, positive imagery generation, and memory specificity training. Consideration of mental imagery can contribute to clinical assessment and imagery-focused psychological therapeutic techniques and promote investigation of underlying mechanisms for treatment innovation. Research into mental imagery in depression is at an early stage. Work that bridges clinical psychology and neuroscience in the investigation of imagery-related mechanisms is recommended.

  6. Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels and Their Link with Cardio/Cerebro-Vascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiong; Liu, Hui-Xia; Shen, Kuo; Cao, Wei; Li, Xiao-Qiang

    2017-03-10

    The canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) constitute a series of nonselective cation channels with variable degrees of Ca²⁺ selectivity. TRPCs consist of seven mammalian members, TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7, which are further divided into four subtypes, TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC4/5, and TRPC3/6/7. These channels take charge of various essential cell functions such as contraction, relaxation, proliferation, and dysfunction. This review, organized into seven main sections, will provide an overview of current knowledge about the underlying pathogenesis of TRPCs in cardio/cerebrovascular diseases, including hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, arrhythmia, and cerebrovascular ischemia reperfusion injury. Collectively, TRPCs could become a group of drug targets with important physiological functions for the therapy of human cardio/cerebro-vascular diseases.

  7. Sodium arsenite potentiates the clastogenicity and mutagenicity of DNA cross linking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Lee, K.C.; Tzeng, Y.J.; Huang, R.Y.; Jan, K.Y.

    1986-01-01

    To see if sodium arsenite enhances the clastogenicity and the mutagenicity of DNA crosslinking agents, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human skin fibroblasts were exposed to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-Pt(II)) or 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus long-wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and then to sodium arsenite. The results indicate that the clastogenicity of cis-Pt(II) and 8-MOP pllus UVA are enhanced by the post-treatment with sodium arsenite. Chromatid breaks and exchanges are predominantly increased in doubly treated cells. Furthermore, the mutagenicity of cis-Pt(II) at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus is also potentiated by sodium arsenite in CHO cells

  8. Potentially preventable events: an actionable set of measures for linking quality improvement and cost savings.

    PubMed

    Goldfield, Norbert; Kelly, William P; Patel, Kavita

    2012-01-01

    Rising health care costs will result in reduced payments to providers, but across-the-board provider payment reductions are not the answer. Instead, existing payment systems should be reformed to strengthen value for the dollars spent. This can be accomplished by increasing efficiency, improving quality and outcomes, and lowering costs. Payment system reforms must be practical, transparent, identify opportunities for care improvement, and demonstrate material cost savings. Most importantly, because the current growth in health care costs is unsustainable, these reforms must be able to be implemented today. A set of comprehensive measures is being used by state government and private payers in the United States to adjust payment, based on improved outcomes quality. This article details the use of this set of measures, referred to as potentially preventable events, and demonstrates how they are being applied to achieve health care value.

  9. Early signs of visual perception and evoked potentials in radiologically asymptomatic boys with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Furushima, Wakana; Inagaki, Masumi; Gunji, Atsuko; Inoue, Yuki; Kaga, Makiko; Mizutani, Shuki

    2009-08-01

    The aim was to identify the electrophysiological and psychological signs at a very early stage in asymptomatic boys with childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Flash visual evoked potentials, pattern reversal, and visual event-related potentials were recorded in 6 radiologically asymptomatic boys with adrenoleukodystrophy and 22 control boys. The latency and amplitude of P100 of visual evoked potentials and P1 of event-related potentials were evaluated. Though all patients had normal intelligence quotient, performance intelligence quotient was significantly lower than verbal intelligence quotient in 2 patients. Both P100 and P1 amplitudes were significantly greater in adrenoleukodystrophy than in controls. The difference between performance intelligence quotient and verbal intelligence quotient exhibited significant correlation with P100 amplitude. Enlargement of visual evoked potentials might be a sign of cerebral involvement preceding the appearance of abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging. Follow-up of asymptomatic boys with both electrophysiological and neuropsychological tests may serve as an aid for deciding the timing of therapeutic intervention.

  10. Links between Ammonia Oxidizer Community Structure, Abundance, and Nitrification Potential in Acidic Soils ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huaiying; Gao, Yangmei; Nicol, Graeme W.; Campbell, Colin D.; Prosser, James I.; Zhang, Limei; Han, Wenyan; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). However, the environmental drivers controlling the abundance, composition, and activity of AOA and AOB communities are not well characterized, and the relative importance of these two groups in soil nitrification is still debated. Chinese tea orchard soils provide an excellent system for investigating the long-term effects of low pH and nitrogen fertilization strategies. AOA and AOB abundance and community composition were therefore investigated in tea soils and adjacent pine forest soils, using quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequence analysis of respective ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. There was strong evidence that soil pH was an important factor controlling AOB but not AOA abundance, and the ratio of AOA to AOB amoA gene abundance increased with decreasing soil pH in the tea orchard soils. In contrast, T-RFLP analysis suggested that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure, but a significant relationship between community abundance and nitrification potential was observed only for AOA. High potential nitrification rates indicated that nitrification was mainly driven by AOA in these acidic soils. Dominant AOA amoA sequences in the highly acidic tea soils were all placed within a specific clade, and one AOA genotype appears to be well adapted to growth in highly acidic soils. Specific AOA and AOB populations dominated in soils at particular pH values and N content, suggesting adaptation to specific niches. PMID:21571885

  11. Microbial response to simulated global change is phylogenetically conserved and linked with functional potential

    PubMed Central

    Amend, Anthony S; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D; Berlemont, Renaud; Goulden, Michael L; Lu, Ying; Treseder, Kathleen K; Weihe, Claudia; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2016-01-01

    The high diversity of microbial communities hampers predictions about their responses to global change. Here we investigate the potential for using a phylogenetic, trait-based framework to capture the response of bacteria and fungi to global change manipulations. Replicated grassland plots were subjected to 3+ years of drought and nitrogen fertilization. The responses of leaf litter bacteria and fungi to these simulated changes were significantly phylogenetically conserved. Proportional changes in abundance were highly correlated among related organisms, such that relatives with approximately 5% ribosomal DNA genetic distance showed similar responses to the treatments. A microbe's change in relative abundance was significantly correlated between the treatments, suggesting a compromise between numerical abundance in undisturbed environments and resistance to change in general, independent of disturbance type. Lineages in which at least 90% of the microbes shared the same response were circumscribed at a modest phylogenetic depth (τD 0.014–0.021), but significantly larger than randomized simulations predict. In several clades, phylogenetic depth of trait consensus was higher. Fungal response to drought was more conserved than was response to nitrogen fertilization, whereas bacteria responded equally to both treatments. Finally, we show that a bacterium's response to the manipulations is correlated with its potential functional traits (measured here as the number of glycoside hydrolase genes encoding the capacity to degrade different types of carbohydrates). Together, these results suggest that a phylogenetic, trait-based framework may be useful for predicting shifts in microbial composition and functioning in the face of global change. PMID:26046258

  12. Mechanisms, detection, and potential management of microcirculatory disturbances in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Imran; Nonas, Stephanie A

    2010-04-01

    Despite improvements in resuscitation and treatment of sepsis, the morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. Microvascular dysfunction has been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of sepsis and is a potential new target in the management of sepsis. Clinical studies, aided by new techniques that allow for real-time assessment of the microcirculation, have shown that disturbances in microcirculatory flow are common in sepsis and correlate with worse outcomes. Bedside measurement of microcirculatory perfusion has become simpler and more accessible, and may provide key insights into prognosis in sepsis and guide future therapeutics, much like mean arterial pressure (MAP), lactate, and mixed central oxygen saturation (SvO(2)) do now. The authors review here the role of microcirculatory dysfunction in sepsis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in sepsis.

  13. (Metabolic mechanisms of plant growth at low-water potentials)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    For the year 1989, the progress made on this DOE sponsored research will be described by considering the questions presented in the original proposal and describing the work on each one. We used soybean seedlings grown in vermiculite in a dark, humid environment because they are convenient to grow, undergo most of the physiological changes induced by low water potentials in large plants, and have exposed growing regions on which molecular experiments can be done.

  14. Cap buckling as a potential mechanism of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Abdelali, Maria; Reiter, Steven; Mongrain, Rosaire; Bertrand, Michel; L'Allier, Philippe L; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2014-04-01

    Plaque rupture in atherosclerosis is the primary cause of potentially deadly coronary events, yet about 40% of ruptures occur away from the plaque cap shoulders and cannot be fully explained with the current biomechanical theories. Here, cap buckling is considered as a potential destabilizing factor which increases the propensity of the atherosclerotic plaque to rupture and which may also explain plaque failure away from the cap shoulders. To investigate this phenomenon, quasistatic 2D finite element simulations are performed, considering the salient geometrical and nonlinear material properties of diverse atherosclerotic plaques over the range of physiological loads. The numerical results indicate that buckling may displace the location of the peak von Mises stresses in the deflected caps. Plaque buckling, together with its deleterious effects is further observed experimentally in plaque caps using a physical model of deformable mock coronary arteries with fibroatheroma. Moreover, an analytical approach combining quasistatic equilibrium equations with the Navier-Bresse formulas is used to demonstrate the buckling potential of a simplified arched slender cap under intraluminal pressure and supported by foundations. This analysis shows that plaque caps - calcified, fibrotic or cellular - may buckle in specific undulated shapes once submitted to critical loads. Finally, a preliminary analysis of intravascular ultrasonography recordings of patients with atherosclerotic coronary arteries corroborates the numerical, experimental and theoretical findings and shows that various plaque caps buckle in vivo. By displacing the sites of high stresses in the plaque cap, buckling may explain the atherosclerotic plaque cap rupture at various locations, including cap shoulders.

  15. Linking potential denitrification rates to microbial gene abundances in multiple boreal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D. G.; Blazewicz, S.; Herman, D. J.; Firestone, M. K.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    The composition and functioning of boreal ecosystems are vulnerable to changes in climate, leading to changes in season length, fire regimes, and soil moisture status. To investigate the influence of vegetation and soil moisture on microbial nitrogen cycling several disparate boreal ecosystems was studied. The two primary objectives were to: (1) determine whether process rates could be predicted solely from soil physical and chemical characteristics and (2) determine if the abundance of functional genes could be an additional explanatory variable. Surface soils were sampled along an elevation-driven hydrologic gradient at the Bonanza Creek LTER that corresponds with five plant communities typical of interior Alaska. The plant communities included a black spruce stand, a deciduous stand, a tussock grassland, an emergent fen, and a rich fen. We examined the chemical composition of the surface organic moss and soil, measured gross N-mineralization, potential rates of nitrification and denitrification (DEA), and abundances of several functional groups of microorganisms from soil cores collected in mid summer. We used quantitative PCR to assess the gene abundances of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers based on a functional gene approach. Here, we focus on potential denitrification rates (PDR), and abundance of denitrifyers carrying NirS and NirK genes (nitrate reductase) and NosZ genes (nitrous oxide reductase). PDR increased dramatically with increasing soil moisture along the gradient, from 1 mg N/m2/h at the dry black spruce site to 300 mg N/m2/h in the rich fen, which is very high compared to other poorly drained soil environments. PDR were linearly related to the abundance of functional genes from the microorganisms responsible for this process. Abundances of NirS, NirK and NosZ genes correlated significantly to PDR (r2 = 0.61 p < 0.0001, r2 = 0.45 p < 0.0003, r2 = 0.81 p < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, PDR were better explained by functional gene abundances

  16. Mechanism of RAD51-dependent DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Long, David T; Räschle, Markus; Joukov, Vladimir; Walter, Johannes C

    2011-07-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are toxic DNA lesions whose repair in S phase of eukaryotic cells is incompletely understood. In Xenopus egg extracts, ICL repair is initiated when two replication forks converge on the lesion. Dual incisions then create a DNA double-strand break (DSB) in one sister chromatid, whereas lesion bypass restores the other sister. We report that the broken sister chromatid is repaired via RAD51-dependent strand invasion into the regenerated sister. Recombination acts downstream of FANCI-FANCD2, yet RAD51 binds ICL-stalled replication forks independently of FANCI-FANCD2 and before DSB formation. Our results elucidate the functional link between the Fanconi anemia pathway and the recombination machinery during ICL repair. In addition, they demonstrate the complete repair of a DSB via homologous recombination in vitro.

  17. Emerging Anticancer Potentials of Goniothalamin and Its Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of most cancers is still inadequate, despite tremendous steady progress in drug discovery and effective prevention. Nature is an attractive source of new therapeutics. Several medicinal plants and their biomarkers have been widely used for the treatment of cancer with less known scientific basis of their functioning. Although a wide array of plant derived active metabolites play a role in the prevention and treatment of cancer, more extensive scientific evaluation of their mechanisms is still required. Styryl-lactones are a group of secondary metabolites ubiquitous in the genus Goniothalamus that have demonstrated to possess antiproliferative activity against cancer cells. A large body of evidence suggests that this activity is associated with the induction of apoptosis in target cells. In an effort to promote further research on the genus Goniothalamus, this review offers a broad analysis of the current knowledge on Goniothalamin (GTN) or 5, 6, dihydro-6-styryl-2-pyronone (C13H12O2), a natural occurring styryl-lactone. Therefore, it includes (i) the source of GTN and other metabolites; (ii) isolation, purification, and (iii) the molecular mechanisms of actions of GTN, especially the anticancer properties, and summarizes the role of GTN which is crucial for drug design, development, and application in future for well-being of humans. PMID:25247178

  18. Antidiabetic potentials of Momordica charantia: multiple mechanisms behind the effects.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Padmaja

    2012-02-01

    Momordica charantia fruits are used as a vegetable in many countries. From time immemorial, it has also been used for management of diabetes in the Ayurvedic and Chinese systems of medicine. Information regarding the standardization of this vegetable for its usage as an antidiabetic drug is scanty. There are many reports on its effects on glucose and lipid levels in diabetic animals and some in clinical trials. Reports regarding its mechanism of action are limited. So in the present review all the information is considered to produce some concrete findings on the mechanism behind its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects. Studies have shown that M. charantia repairs damaged β-cells, increases insulin levels, and also enhance the sensitivity of insulin. It inhibits the absorption of glucose by inhibiting glucosidase and also suppresses the activity of disaccharidases in the intestine. It stimulates the synthesis and release of thyroid hormones and adiponectin and enhances the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Effects of M. charantia like transport of glucose in the cells, transport of fatty acids in the mitochondria, modulation of insulin secretion, and elevation of levels of uncoupling proteins in adipose and skeletal muscles are similar to those of AMPK and thyroxine. Therefore it is proposed that effects of M. charantia on carbohydrate and fat metabolism are through thyroxine and AMPK.

  19. A potential link among antioxidant enzymes, histopathology and trace elements in canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Carolina C; Barreto, Tatiane de O; da Silva, Sydnei M; Pinto, Aldair W J; Figueiredo, Maria M; Rocha, Olguita G Ferreira; Cangussú, Silvia D; Tafuri, Wagner L

    2014-08-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is a severe and fatal systemic chronic inflammatory disease. We investigated the alterations in, and potential associations among, antioxidant enzymes, trace elements and histopathology in CVL. Blood and tissue levels of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured in mixed-breed dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum chagasi, symptomatic (n = 19) and asymptomatic (n = 11). Serum levels of copper, iron, zinc, selenium and nitric oxide, and plasma lipid peroxidation were measured. Histological and morphometric analyses were conducted of lesions in liver, spleen and lymph nodes. We found lower blood catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity to be correlated with lower iron and selenium respectively. However, higher activity of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase was not correlated with the increase in copper and decreased in zinc observed in infected animals compared to controls. Organ tissue was characterized by lower enzyme activity in infected dogs than in controls, but this was not correlated with trace elements. Lipid peroxidation was higher in symptomatic than in asymptomatic and control dogs and was associated with lesions such as chronic inflammatory reaction, congestion, haemosiderin and fibrosis. Systemic iron deposition was observed primarily in the symptomatic dogs showing a higher tissue parasite load. Dogs with symptomatic CVL displayed enhanced LPO and Fe tissue deposition associated with decreased levels of antioxidant enzymes. These results showed new points in the pathology of CVL and might open new treatment perspectives associated with antioxidants and the role of iron in the pathogenesis of CVL.

  20. A potential link among antioxidant enzymes, histopathology and trace elements in canine visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Carolina C; Barreto, Tatiane de O; da Silva, Sydnei M; Pinto, Aldair W J; Figueiredo, Maria M; Ferreira Rocha, Olguita G; Cangussú, Silvia D; Tafuri, Wagner L

    2014-01-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is a severe and fatal systemic chronic inflammatory disease. We investigated the alterations in, and potential associations among, antioxidant enzymes, trace elements and histopathology in CVL. Blood and tissue levels of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured in mixed-breed dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum chagasi, symptomatic (n = 19) and asymptomatic (n = 11). Serum levels of copper, iron, zinc, selenium and nitric oxide, and plasma lipid peroxidation were measured. Histological and morphometric analyses were conducted of lesions in liver, spleen and lymph nodes. We found lower blood catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity to be correlated with lower iron and selenium respectively. However, higher activity of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase was not correlated with the increase in copper and decreased in zinc observed in infected animals compared to controls. Organ tissue was characterized by lower enzyme activity in infected dogs than in controls, but this was not correlated with trace elements. Lipid peroxidation was higher in symptomatic than in asymptomatic and control dogs and was associated with lesions such as chronic inflammatory reaction, congestion, haemosiderin and fibrosis. Systemic iron deposition was observed primarily in the symptomatic dogs showing a higher tissue parasite load. Dogs with symptomatic CVL displayed enhanced LPO and Fe tissue deposition associated with decreased levels of antioxidant enzymes. These results showed new points in the pathology of CVL and might open new treatment perspectives associated with antioxidants and the role of iron in the pathogenesis of CVL. PMID:24766461

  1. Developing food allergy: a potential immunologic pathway linking skin barrier to gut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergy is an adverse reaction to foods and is driven by uncontrolled type-2 immune responses. Current knowledge cannot explain why only some individuals among those with food allergy are prone to develop life-threatening anaphylaxis. It is increasingly evident that the immunologic mechanisms involved in developing IgE-mediated food allergy are far more complex than allergic sensitization. Clinical observations suggest that patients who develop severe allergic reactions to food are often sensitized through the skin in early infancy. Environmental insults trigger epidermal thymic stromal lymphopoietin and interleukin-33 (IL-33) production, which endows dendritic cells with the ability to induce CD4 +TH2 cell-mediated allergic inflammation. Intestinal IL-25 propagates the allergic immune response by enhancing collaborative interactions between resident type-2 innate lymphoid cells and CD4 +TH2 cells expanded by ingested antigens in the gastrointestinal tract. IL-4 signaling provided by CD4 +TH2 cells induces emigrated mast cell progenitors to become multi-functional IL-9-producing mucosal mast cells, which then expand greatly after repeated food ingestions. Inflammatory cytokine IL-33 promotes the function and maturation of IL-9-producing mucosal mast cells, which amplify intestinal mastocytosis, resulting in increased clinical reactivity to ingested food allergens. These findings provide the plausible view that the combinatorial signals from atopic status, dietary allergen ingestions, and inflammatory cues may govern the perpetuation of allergic reactions from the skin to the gut and promote susceptibility to life-threatening anaphylaxis. Future in-depth studies of the molecular and cellular factors composing these stepwise pathways may facilitate the discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets for diagnosing, preventing, and treating food allergy. PMID:27853507

  2. Inflammation and lithium: clues to mechanisms contributing to suicide-linked traits.

    PubMed

    Beurel, E; Jope, R S

    2014-12-16

    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, yet it remains difficult to understand the mechanistic provocations and to intervene therapeutically. Stress is recognized as a frequent precursor to suicide. Psychological stress is well established to cause activation of the inflammatory response, including causing neuroinflammation, an increase of inflammatory molecules in the central nervous system (CNS). Neuroinflammation is increasingly recognized as affecting many aspects of CNS functions and behaviors. In particular, much evidence demonstrates that inflammatory markers are elevated in traits that have been linked to suicidal behavior, including aggression, impulsivity and depression. Lithium is recognized as significantly reducing suicidal behavior, is anti-inflammatory and diminishes aggression, impulsivity and depression traits, each of which is associated with elevated inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of lithium result from its inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). GSK3 has been demonstrated to strongly promote inflammation, aggressive behavior in rodents and depression-like behaviors in rodents, whereas regulation of impulsivity by GSK3 has not yet been investigated. Altogether, evidence is building supporting the hypothesis that stress activates GSK3, which in turn promotes inflammation, and that inflammation is linked to behaviors associated with suicide, including particularly aggression, impulsivity and depression. Further investigation of these links may provide a clearer understanding of the causes of suicidal behavior and provide leads for the development of effective preventative interventions, which may include inhibitors of GSK3.

  3. Aluminum-induced dreierketten chain cross-links increase the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline calcium aluminosilicate hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Guoqing; Myers, Rupert J.; Li, Jiaqi; Maboudian, Roya; Carraro, Carlo; Shapiro, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of Al and increased curing temperature promotes the crystallization and cross-linking of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C-(A-)S-H), which is the primary binding phase in most contemporary concrete materials. However, the influence of Al-induced structural changes on the mechanical properties at atomistic scale is not well understood. Herein, synchrotron radiation-based high-pressure X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the influence of dreierketten chain cross-linking on the anisotropic mechanical behavior of C-(A-)S-H. We show that the ab-planar stiffness is independent of dreierketten chain defects, e.g. vacancies in bridging tetrahedra sites and Al for Si substitution. The c-axis of non-cross-linked C-(A-)S-H is more deformable due to the softer interlayer opening but stiffens with decreased spacing and/or increased zeolitic water and Ca2+ of the interlayer. Dreierketten chain cross-links act as ‘columns’ to resist compression, thus increasing the bulk modulus of C-(A-)S-H. We provide the first experimental evidence on the influence of the Al-induced atomistic configurational change on the mechanical properties of C-(A-)S-H. Our work advances the fundamental knowledge of C-(A-)S-H on the lowest level of its hierarchical structure, and thus can impact the way that innovative C-(A-)S-H-based cementitious materials are developed using a ‘bottom-up’ approach. PMID:28281635

  4. Childhood abuse and migraine: epidemiology, sex differences, and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, Gretchen E; Peterlin, B Lee

    2011-06-01

    Migraine and maltreatment are both common conditions that are more prevalent in women. Epidemiological evidence supports an association between childhood abuse and headache, as well as pain in general, although some controversy exists based on methodological concerns of studying the influence of remote, traumatic, stigmatizing events in an often depressed population. There is a growing scientific body of knowledge regarding the neurobiological effects of abuse on brain function and structure that suggest a possible role of early life stress in the pathogenesis of migraine, and a differential impact based on sex. Advances in our understanding of the basic mechanisms by which an adverse environment interacts with and changes the genome, may suggest new treatment strategies.

  5. Comparing potential copper chelation mechanisms in Parkinson's disease protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented the nudged elastic band (NEB) as a guided dynamics framework for our real-space multigrid method of DFT-based quantum simulations. This highly parallel approach resolves a minimum energy pathway (MEP) on the energy hypersurface by relaxing intermediates in a chain-of-states. As an initial application we present an investigation of chelating agents acting on copper ion bound to α -synuclein, whose misfolding is implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD). Copper ions are known to act as highly effective misfolding agents in a-synuclein and are thus an important target in understanding PD. Furthermore, chelation therapy has shown promise in the treatment of Alzheimer's and other neuro-degenerative diseases with similar metal-correlated pathologies. At present, our candidate chelating agents include nicotine, curcumin and clioquinol. We examine their MEP activation barriers in the context of a PD onset mechanism to assess the viability of various chelators for PD remediation.

  6. Intravenous nitroglycerin for rest angina. Potential pathophysiologic mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Herling, I M; Kotler, M N; Hakki, A H; Spielman, S R; Segal, B L

    1982-10-01

    Twenty patients with refractory rest angina pectoris were treated with intravenously (IV) administered nitroglycerin (mean dosage, 72.4 micrograms/min; range, 15 to 226 micrograms/min). There was a considerable reduction or abolition in the number of ischemic episodes in 85% of patients without overall substantial changes in heart rate, mean arterial BP, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), and pulmonary arterial mean pressure. However, those patients with an initial PCWP of more than 12 mm Hg or a systolic pressure of more than 130 mm Hg had a substantial reduction in PCWP and systolic BP following IV nitroglycerin. We conclude that IV nitroglycerin may relieve rest angina by different pathophysiologic mechanisms. In some patients, IV nitroglycerin favorably altered the hemodynamic determinants of myocardial oxygen consumption. In others, however, no change in these determinants occurred, suggesting a direct effect on the coronary circulation.

  7. Mitochondrial Mechanisms of Neuronal Cell Death: Potential Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2017-01-06

    Mitochondria lie at the crossroads of neuronal survival and cell death. They play important roles in cellular bioenergetics, control intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, and participate in key metabolic pathways. Mutations in genes involved in mitochondrial quality control cause a myriad of neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondria have evolved strategies to kill cells when they are not able to continue their vital functions. This review provides an overview of the role of mitochondria in neurologic disease and the cell death pathways that are mediated through mitochondria, including their role in accidental cell death, the regulated cell death pathways of apoptosis and parthanatos, and programmed cell death. It details the current state of parthanatic cell death and discusses potential therapeutic strategies targeting initiators and effectors of mitochondrial-mediated cell death in neurologic disorders.

  8. Potential Mechanism Leading to Impaired Thermoregulation Following Microgravity Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Etzel, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity or its analogues impairs thermoregulation in humans evidenced by higher internal temperatures following the exposure during a thermal challenge. Although the mechanism leading to this response has not been clearly delineated, we identified that prolonged head-down tilt (HDT) markedly impairs thermoregulatory reflex control of skin blood flow, as demonstrated by an increased internal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation, and by a reduced slope of the relationship between the elevation in skin blood flow relative to the elevation in internal temperature. Recently, Fortney et al. identified similar responses in two individuals following 115 days of microgravity exposure. One possible mechanism leading to altered cutaneous vasodilation during a thermal challenge following actual or simulated microgravity exposure may be associated with baroreflex-mediated attenuation in the elevation of skin blood flow. During a heat stress the elevation in skin blood flow is accomplished through a combination of increased cutaneous vascular conductance and cardiac output, both of which result in central venous pressure (CVP) decreasing 2-6 mmHg. Reductions in CVP of this magnitude in normothermia decrease muscle blood flow and skin blood flow presumably through unloading the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. It is unclear whether the reduction in CVP, and accompanying cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading, during passive heating buffers the elevation in skin blood flow. That is, would the elevation in skin blood flow be greater if CVP did not decrease, or decreased to a lesser extent during the heat stress? Conversely, if CVP decreased to a greater extend during a thermal challenge following a perturbation such as prolonged HDT, would the elevation in skin blood flow be attenuated during that thermal challenge? Given that prolonged HDT decreases plasma volume and central venous pressure, such a finding would provide a plausible hypothesis

  9. Elucidating the mechanisms linking early pubertal timing, sexual activity, and substance use for maltreated versus nonmaltreated adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Negriff, Sonya; Brensilver, Matthew; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test models linking pubertal timing, peer substance use, sexual behavior, and substance use for maltreated versus comparison adolescents. Three theoretical mechanisms were tested: 1) peer influence links early pubertal timing to later sexual behavior and substance use, 2) early maturers engage in substance use on their own and then select substance-using friends, or 3) early maturers initiate sexual behaviors which leads them to substance-using peers. Methods The data came from a longitudinal study of the effects of child maltreatment on adolescent development (303 maltreated and 151 comparison adolescents; age: 9–13 years at initial wave). Multiple-group structural equation models tested the hypotheses across three timepoints including variables of pubertal timing, perception of peer substance use, sexual behavior, and self-reported substance use. Results Early pubertal timing was associated with substance-using peers only for maltreated adolescents, indicating the mediation path from early pubertal timing through substance-using peers to subsequent adolescent substance use and sexual behavior only holds for maltreated adolescents. Mediation via sexual behavior was significant for both maltreated and comparison adolescents. This indicates that sexual behavior may be a more universal mechanism linking early maturation with risky friends regardless of adverse life experiences. Conclusions The findings are a step toward elucidating the developmental pathways from early puberty to risk behavior and identifying early experiences that may alter mediation effects. PMID:26003577

  10. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  11. Import of Soluble Proteins into Chloroplasts and Potential Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sjuts, Inga; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from an endosymbiotic event in which a free-living cyanobacterium was engulfed by an ancestral eukaryotic host. During evolution the majority of the chloroplast genetic information was transferred to the host cell nucleus. As a consequence, proteins formerly encoded by the chloroplast genome are now translated in the cytosol and must be subsequently imported into the chloroplast. This process involves three steps: (i) cytosolic sorting procedures, (ii) binding to the designated receptor-equipped target organelle and (iii) the consecutive translocation process. During import, proteins have to overcome the two barriers of the chloroplast envelope, namely the outer envelope membrane (OEM) and the inner envelope membrane (IEM). In the majority of cases, this is facilitated by two distinct multiprotein complexes, located in the OEM and IEM, respectively, designated TOC and TIC. Plants are constantly exposed to fluctuating environmental conditions such as temperature and light and must therefore regulate protein composition within the chloroplast to ensure optimal functioning of elementary processes such as photosynthesis. In this review we will discuss the recent models of each individual import stage with regard to short-term strategies that plants might use to potentially acclimate to changes in their environmental conditions and preserve the chloroplast protein homeostasis. PMID:28228773

  12. The Effects of Calorie Restriction in Depression and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Changhong; Zhao, Yinghao; Zhang, Xingyi; Li, Bingjin; Cui, Ranji

    2015-01-01

    Depression, also called major depressive disorder, is a neuropsychiatric disorder jeopardizing an increasing number of the population worldwide. To date, a large number of studies have devoted great attention to this problematic condition and raised several hypotheses of depression. Based on these theories, many antidepressant drugs were developed for the treatment of depression. Yet, the depressed patients are often refractory to the antidepressant therapies. Recently, increasing experimental evidences demonstrated the effects of calorie restriction in neuroendocrine system and in depression. Both basic and clinical investigations indicated that short-term calorie restriction might induce an antidepressant efficacy in depression, providing a novel avenue for treatment. Molecular basis underlying the antidepressant actions of calorie restriction might involve multiple physiological processes, primarily including orexin signaling activation, increased CREB phosphorylation and neurotrophic effects, release of endorphin and ketone production. However, the effects of chronic calorie restriction were quite controversial, in the cases that it often resulted in the long-term detrimental effects via inhibiting the function of 5-HT system and decreasing leptin levels. Here we review such dual effects of calorie restriction in depression and potential molecular basis behind these effects, especially focusing on antidepressant effects.

  13. Evaluating molecular mechanical potentials for helical peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Erik J; DePaul, Allison J; Patel, Sarav S; Sorin, Eric J

    2010-04-07

    Multiple variants of the AMBER all-atom force field were quantitatively evaluated with respect to their ability to accurately characterize helix-coil equilibria in explicit solvent simulations. Using a global distributed computing network, absolute conformational convergence was achieved for large ensembles of the capped A(21) and F(s) helical peptides. Further assessment of these AMBER variants was conducted via simulations of a flexible 164-residue five-helix-bundle protein, apolipophorin-III, on the 100 ns timescale. Of the contemporary potentials that had not been assessed previously, the AMBER-99SB force field showed significant helix-destabilizing tendencies, with beta bridge formation occurring in helical peptides, and unfolding of apolipophorin-III occurring on the tens of nanoseconds timescale. The AMBER-03 force field, while showing adequate helical propensities for both peptides and stabilizing apolipophorin-III, (i) predicts an unexpected decrease in helicity with ALA-->ARG(+) substitution, (ii) lacks experimentally observed 3(10) helical content, and (iii) deviates strongly from average apolipophorin-III NMR structural properties. As is observed for AMBER-99SB, AMBER-03 significantly overweighs the contribution of extended and polyproline backbone configurations to the conformational equilibrium. In contrast, the AMBER-99phi force field, which was previously shown to best reproduce experimental measurements of the helix-coil transition in model helical peptides, adequately stabilizes apolipophorin-III and yields both an average gyration radius and polar solvent exposed surface area that are in excellent agreement with the NMR ensemble.

  14. Potential mechanism for Calvados-related oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Linderborg, Klas; Joly, Jean Pierre; Visapää, Jukka-Pekka; Salaspuro, Mikko

    2008-02-01

    The old Normandian habit of consumption of hot Calvados is associated with an increased risk of oesophageal cancer compared to other alcoholic beverages. The role of alcohol consumption in the risk of oesophageal cancer is well established. The first metabolite of alcohol, acetaldehyde is a potential local carcinogen in humans. Accordingly, different acetaldehyde concentrations in different beverages could account for some of the variations in cancer risk with regard to the type of alcoholic beverage. Eighteen samples of farm-made Calvados were collected in Normandy. Samples of commercially available beverages were purchased, including factory-made Calvados, other spirits, wines, beer and cider. The samples were analysed gas-chromatically for acetaldehyde and ethanol concentrations. All results are expressed as mean+/-SD. The mean acetaldehyde concentration of all Calvados samples (1781+/-861 microM, n =25) differed highly significantly (p<0.001) from that of all wine samples (275+/-236 microM), from all other spirits samples (1251+/-1155 microM, p<0.05), and from all beer and cider samples (233+/-281 microM, p<0.001). Farm-made Calvados and farm-made cognac had the highest mean acetaldehyde concentration of the measured beverages. The high concentration of acetaldehyde combined with possible effects of the high temperature at which Calvados is consumed could account for the increased risk of Calvados-related oesophageal cancer.

  15. Oxidative Stress in COPD: Sources, Markers, and Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Adam John Anthony; Sapey, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Markers of oxidative stress are increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are able to alter biological molecules, signaling pathways and antioxidant molecule function, many of which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD. However, the involvement of ROS in the development and progression of COPD is not proven. Here, we discuss the sources of ROS, and the defences that have evolved to protect against their harmful effects. We address the role that ROS may have in the development and progression of COPD, as well as current therapeutic attempts at limiting the damage they cause. Evidence has indicated that the function of several key cells appears altered in COPD patients, and expression levels of important oxidant and antioxidant molecules may be abnormal. Therapeutic trials attempting to restore equilibrium to these molecules have not impacted upon all facets of disease and whilst the theory behind ROS influence in COPD appears sound, current models testing relevant pathways to tissue damage are limited. The heterogeneity seen in COPD patients presents a challenge to our understanding, and further research is essential to identify potential targets and stratified COPD patient populations where ROS therapies may be maximally efficacious. PMID:28212273

  16. Isoprene suppression of new particle formation: Potential mechanisms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Uin, Janek; Guenther, Alex B.; Gouw, Joost A.; Yu, Fangqun; Nadykto, Alex B.; Herb, Jason; Ng, Nga L.; Koss, Abigail; Brune, William H.; Baumann, Karsten; Kanawade, Vijay P.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Nenes, Athanasios; Olsen, Kevin; Goldstein, Allen; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    Secondary aerosols formed from anthropogenic pollutants and natural emissions have substantial impacts on human health, air quality, and the Earth's climate. New particle formation (NPF) contributes up to 70% of the global production of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but the effects of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and their oxidation products on NPF processes in forests are poorly understood. Observations show that isoprene, the most abundant BVOC, suppresses NPF in forests. But the previously proposed chemical mechanism underlying this suppression process contradicts atmospheric observations. By reviewing observations made in other forests, it is clear that NPF rarely takes place during the summer when emissions of isoprene are high, even though there are sufficient concentrations of monoterpenes. But at present it is not clear how isoprene and its oxidation products may change the oxidation chemistry of terpenes and how NOx and other atmospheric key species affect NPF in forest environments. Future laboratory experiments with chemical speciation of gas phase nucleation precursors and clusters and chemical composition of particles smaller than 10 nm are required to understand the role of isoprene in NPF. Our results show that climate models can overpredict aerosol's first indirect effect when not considering the absence of NPF in the southeastern U.S. forests during the summer using the current nucleation algorithm that includes only sulfuric acid and total concentrations of low-volatility organic compounds. This highlights the importance of understanding NPF processes as function of temperature, relative humidity, and BVOC compositions to make valid predictions of NPF and CCN at a wide range of atmospheric conditions.

  17. Galanin: neurobiologic mechanisms and therapeutic potential for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Counts, S E; Perez, S E; Kahl, U; Bartfai, T; Bowser, R P; Deecher, D C; Mash, D C; Crawley, J N; Mufson, E J

    2001-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin (GAL) is widely distributed in the mammalian CNS. Several lines of evidence suggest that GAL may play a critical role in cognitive processes such as memory and attention through an inhibitory modulation of cholinergic basal forebrain activity. Furthermore, GAL fibers hyperinnervate remaining cholinergic basal forebrain neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This suggests that GAL activity impacts cholinergic dysfunction in advanced AD. Pharmacological and in vitro autoradiographic studies indicate the presence of heterogeneous populations of GAL receptor (GALR) sites in the basal forebrain which bind GAL with both high and low affinity. Interestingly, we have recently observed that GALR binding sites increase in the anterior basal forebrain in late-stage AD. Three G protein-coupled GALRs have been identified to date that signal through a diverse array of effector pathways in vitro, including adenylyl cyclase inhibition and phospholipase C activation. The repertoire and distribution of GALR expression in the basal forebrain remains unknown, as does the nature of GAL and GALR plasticity in the AD basal forebrain. Recently, GAL knockout and overexpressing transgenic mice have been generated to facilitate our understanding of GAL activity in basal forebrain function. GAL knockout mice result in fewer cholinergic basal forebrain neurons and memory deficits. On the other hand, mice overexpressing GAL display hyperinnervation of basal forebrain and memory deficits. These data highlight the need to explore further the putative mechanisms by which GAL signaling might be beneficial or deleterious for cholinergic cell survival and activity within basal forebrain. This information will be critical to understanding whether pharmacological manipulation of GALRs would be effective for the amelioration of cognitive deficits in AD.

  18. Ambient particle inhalation and the cardiovascular system: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, K; Stone, V; Seaton, A; MacNee, W

    2001-01-01

    Well-documented air pollution episodes throughout recent history have led to deaths among individuals with cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Although the components of air pollution that cause the adverse health effects in these individuals are unknown, a small proportion by mass but a large proportion by number of the ambient air particles are ultrafine, i.e., less than 100 nm in diameter. This ultrafine component of particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm (PM(10) may mediate some of the adverse health effects reported in epidemiologic studies and for which there is toxicologic evidence to support this contention. The exact mechanism by which ultrafine particles have adverse effects is unknown, but these particles have recently been shown to enhance calcium influx on contact with macrophages. Oxidative stress is also to be anticipated at the huge particle surface; this can be augmented by oxidants generated by recruited inflammatory leukocytes. Atheromatous plaques form in the coronary arteries and are major causes of morbidity and death associated epidemiologically with particulate air pollution. In populations exposed to air pollution episodes, blood viscosity, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were higher. More recently, increases in heart rate in response to rising air pollution have been described and are most marked in individuals who have high blood viscosity. In our study of elderly individuals, there were significant rises in CRP, an index of inflammation. In this present review, we consider the likely interactions between the ultrafine particles the acute phase response and cardiovascular disease. PMID:11544157

  19. Potential self-regulatory mechanisms of yoga for psychological health

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Tim; Noggle, Jessica J.; Park, Crystal L.; Vago, David R.; Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Research suggesting the beneficial effects of yoga on myriad aspects of psychological health has proliferated in recent years, yet there is currently no overarching framework by which to understand yoga’s potential beneficial effects. Here we provide a theoretical framework and systems-based network model of yoga that focuses on integration of top-down and bottom-up forms of self-regulation. We begin by contextualizing yoga in historical and contemporary settings, and then detail how specific components of yoga practice may affect cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and autonomic output under stress through an emphasis on interoception and bottom-up input, resulting in physical and psychological health. The model describes yoga practice as a comprehensive skillset of synergistic process tools that facilitate bidirectional feedback and integration between high- and low-level brain networks, and afferent and re-afferent input from interoceptive processes (somatosensory, viscerosensory, chemosensory). From a predictive coding perspective we propose a shift to perceptual inference for stress modulation and optimal self-regulation. We describe how the processes that sub-serve self-regulation become more automatized and efficient over time and practice, requiring less effort to initiate when necessary and terminate more rapidly when no longer needed. To support our proposed model, we present the available evidence for yoga affecting self-regulatory pathways, integrating existing constructs from behavior theory and cognitive neuroscience with emerging yoga and meditation research. This paper is intended to guide future basic and clinical research, specifically targeting areas of development in the treatment of stress-mediated psychological disorders. PMID:25368562

  20. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion.

  1. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Tornés, Jesús; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, María; Denaro, Renata; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakimov, Michail M; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  2. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  3. Comorbidity Factors and Brain Mechanisms Linking Chronic Stress and Systemic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Duric, Vanja; Clayton, Sarah; Leong, Mai Lan; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms and mental illness are commonly present in patients with chronic systemic diseases. Mood disorders, such as depression, are present in up to 50% of these patients, resulting in impaired physical recovery and more intricate treatment regimen. Stress associated with both physical and emotional aspects of systemic illness is thought to elicit detrimental effects to initiate comorbid mental disorders. However, clinical reports also indicate that the relationship between systemic and psychiatric illnesses is bidirectional, further increasing the complexity of the underlying pathophysiological processes. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence linking chronic stress and systemic illness, such as activation of the immune response system and release of common proinflammatory mediators. Altogether, discovery of new targets is needed for development of better treatments for stress-related psychiatric illnesses as well as improvement of mental health aspects of different systemic diseases. PMID:26977323

  4. Associations between dairy foods, diabetes, and metabolic health: potential mechanisms and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Hirahatake, Kristin M.; Slavin, Joanne; Maki, Kevin C.; Adams, Sean H.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports an inverse relationship between adequate intake of dairy foods and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D). The biological mechanisms responsible for this association remain to be established. This review provides a current perspective on proposed mechanisms that may underlie these effects, and highlights how randomized clinical trials can be applied to investigate these relationships. Results from epidemiological studies generally support that consumption of milk and dairy products is associated with a lower incidence of T2D or improvements in glucose homeostasis indices, and studies of animal and cell models support a positive effect of dairy-rich diets or components on metabolic and inflammation factors relevant to T2D and insulin resistance. Emerging evidence indicates that dairy components that alter mitochondrial function (e.g., leucine actions on silent information regulator transcript 1 (SIRT1)-associated pathways), promote gut microbial population shifts, or influence inflammation and cardiovascular function (e.g., Ca-regulated peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide [CGRP] or calcitonin) should be considered as possible mechanistic factors linking dairy intake with lower risk for T2D. The possibility that dairy-derived trans-palmitoleic acid (tC16:1) has metabolic bioactivities has also been proposed. Pre-clinical and clinical studies focusing specifically on these parameters are needed to validate hypotheses regarding the potential roles of dairy products and their components on the determinants of glucose tolerance, particularly insulin sensitivity, pancreatic endocrine function, and inflammation in individuals at-risk for T2D development. Such experiments would complement epidemiological studies and add to the evidence base for recommendations regarding consumption of dairy products and their individual components. PMID:24636056

  5. Potential Mechanisms for Microbial Energy Acquisition in Oxic Deep-Sea Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberg, John F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) possesses the lowest rates of sedimentation, surface chlorophyll concentration, and primary productivity in the global oceans. As a direct result, deep-sea sediments are thin and contain small amounts of labile organic carbon. It was recently shown that the entire SPG sediment column is oxygenated and may be representative of up to a third of the global marine environment. To understand the microbial processes that contribute to the removal of the labile organic matter at the water-sediment interface, a sediment sample was collected and subjected to metagenomic sequencing and analyses. Analysis of nine partially reconstructed environmental genomes, which represent approximately one-third of the microbial community, revealed that the members of the SPG surface sediment microbial community are phylogenetically distinct from surface/upper-ocean organisms. These genomes represent a wide distribution of novel organisms, including deep-branching Alphaproteobacteria, two novel organisms within the Proteobacteria, and new members of the Nitrospirae, Nitrospinae, and candidate phylum NC10. These genomes contain evidence for microbially mediated metal (iron/manganese) oxidation and carbon fixation linked to nitrification. Additionally, despite hypothesized energy limitation, members of the SPG microbial community had motility and chemotaxis genes and possessed mechanisms for the degradation of high-molecular-weight organic matter. This study contributes to our understanding of the metabolic potential of microorganisms in deep-sea oligotrophic sediments and their impact on local carbon geochemistry. IMPORTANCE This research provides insight into the microbial metabolic potential of organisms inhabiting oxygenated deep-sea marine sediments. Current estimates suggest that these environments account for up to a third of the global marine sediment habitat. Nine novel deep-sea microbial genomes were reconstructed from a metagenomic data set

  6. The role of hexokinase in cardioprotection – mechanism and potential for translation

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gonçalo C; Pasdois, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening plays a critical role in cardiac reperfusion injury and its prevention is cardioprotective. Tumour cell mitochondria usually have high levels of hexokinase isoform 2 (HK2) bound to their outer mitochondrial membranes (OMM) and HK2 binding to heart mitochondria has also been implicated in resistance to reperfusion injury. HK2 dissociates from heart mitochondria during ischaemia, and the extent of this correlates with the infarct size on reperfusion. Here we review the mechanisms and regulations of HK2 binding to mitochondria and how this inhibits mPTP opening and consequent reperfusion injury. Major determinants of HK2 dissociation are the elevated glucose‐6‐phosphate concentrations and decreased pH in ischaemia. These are modulated by the myriad of signalling pathways implicated in preconditioning protocols as a result of a decrease in pre‐ischaemic glycogen content. Loss of mitochondrial HK2 during ischaemia is associated with permeabilization of the OMM to cytochrome c, which leads to greater reactive oxygen species production and mPTP opening during reperfusion. Potential interactions between HK2 and OMM proteins associated with mitochondrial fission (e.g. Drp1) and apoptosis (B‐cell lymphoma 2 family members) in these processes are examined. Also considered is the role of HK2 binding in stabilizing contact sites between the OMM and the inner membrane. Breakage of these during ischaemia is proposed to facilitate cytochrome c loss during ischaemia while increasing mPTP opening and compromising cellular bioenergetics during reperfusion. We end by highlighting the many unanswered questions and discussing the potential of modulating mitochondrial HK2 binding as a pharmacological target. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Conditioning the Heart – Pathways to Translation. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue‐8 PMID

  7. Emotion Dysregulation as a Mechanism Linking Stress Exposure to Adolescent Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herts, Kate L.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to stress is associated with a wide range of internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents, including aggressive behavior. Extant research examining mechanisms underlying the associations between stress and youth aggression has consistently identified social information processing pathways that are disrupted by exposure to…

  8. Linking Basic Skills to Entry-Level Auto Mechanic & Auto Body Worker Tasks. Instructional Resources. Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavidez, Charlotte; Miyatake, George

    This project first identified the duties and tasks required of an entry-level auto mechanic (AM) and an auto body worker (ABW), using a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) occupational analysis process. In this process, a panel of local, expert workers determined the essential duties and tasks of their occupations. Next, the panel identified…

  9. Linking Cellular and Mechanical Processes in Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Kapitanov, Georgi I.; Wang, Xiayi; Ayati, Bruce P.; Brouillette, Marc J.; Martin, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis affects almost 20% of the adult US population. An injurious impact applies a significant amount of physical stress on articular cartilage and can initiate a cascade of biochemical reactions that can lead to the development of osteoarthritis. In our effort to understand the underlying biochemical mechanisms of this debilitating disease, we have constructed a multiscale mathematical model of the process with three components: cellular, chemical, and mechanical. The cellular component describes the different chondrocyte states according to the chemicals these cells release. The chemical component models the change in concentrations of those chemicals. The mechanical component contains a simulation of a blunt impact applied onto a cartilage explant and the resulting strains that initiate the biochemical processes. The scales are modeled through a system of partial-differential equations and solved numerically. The results of the model qualitatively capture the results of laboratory experiments of drop-tower impacts on cartilage explants. The model creates a framework for incorporating explicit mechanics, simulated by finite element analysis, into a theoretical biology framework. The effort is a step toward a complete virtual platform for modeling the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis, which will be used to inform biomedical researchers on possible non-invasive strategies for mitigating the disease. PMID:27843894

  10. Linking hydrologic, physical and chemical habitat environments for the potential assessment of fish community rehabilitation in a developing city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C. S.; Yang, S. T.; Liu, C. M.; Dou, T. W.; Yang, Z. L.; Yang, Z. Y.; Liu, X. L.; Xiang, H.; Nie, S. Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Mitrovic, S. M.; Yu, Q.; Lim, R. P.

    2015-04-01

    Aquatic ecological rehabilitation is increasingly attracting considerable public and research attention. An effective method that requires less data and expertise would help in the assessment of rehabilitation potential and in the monitoring of rehabilitation activities as complicated theories and excessive data requirements on assemblage information make many current assessment models expensive and limit their wide use. This paper presents an assessment model for restoration potential which successfully links hydrologic, physical and chemical habitat factors to fish assemblage attributes drawn from monitoring datasets on hydrology, water quality and fish assemblages at a total of 144 sites, where 5084 fish were sampled and tested. In this model three newly developed sub-models, integrated habitat index (IHSI), integrated ecological niche breadth (INB) and integrated ecological niche overlap (INO), are established to study spatial heterogeneity of the restoration potential of fish assemblages based on gradient methods of habitat suitability index and ecological niche models. To reduce uncertainties in the model, as many fish species as possible, including important native fish, were selected as dominant species with monitoring occurring over several seasons to comprehensively select key habitat factors. Furthermore, a detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) was employed prior to a canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of the data to avoid the "arc effect" in the selection of key habitat factors. Application of the model to data collected at Jinan City, China proved effective reveals that three lower potential regions that should be targeted in future aquatic ecosystem rehabilitation programs. They were well validated by the distribution of two habitat parameters: river width and transparency. River width positively influenced and transparency negatively influenced fish assemblages. The model can be applied for monitoring the effects of fish assemblage restoration

  11. A link between LEAFY and B-gene homologues in Welwitschia mirabilis sheds light on ancestral mechanisms prefiguring floral development.

    PubMed

    Moyroud, Edwige; Monniaux, Marie; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Dumas, Renaud; Scutt, Charles P; Frohlich, Michael W; Parcy, François

    2017-02-24

    Flowering plants evolved from an unidentified gymnosperm ancestor. Comparison of the mechanisms controlling development in angiosperm flowers and gymnosperm cones may help to elucidate the mysterious origin of the flower. We combined gene expression studies with protein behaviour characterization in Welwitschia mirabilis to test whether the known regulatory links between LEAFY and its MADS-box gene targets, central to flower development, might also contribute to gymnosperm reproductive development. We found that WelLFY, one of two LEAFY-like genes in Welwitschia, could be an upstream regulator of the MADS-box genes APETALA3/PISTILLATA-like (B-genes). We demonstrated that, even though their DNA-binding domains are extremely similar, WelLFY and its paralogue WelNDLY exhibit distinct DNA-binding specificities, and that, unlike WelNDLY, WelLFY shares with its angiosperm orthologue the capacity to bind promoters of Welwitschia B-genes. Finally, we identified several cis-elements mediating these interactions in Welwitschia and obtained evidence that the link between LFY homologues and B-genes is also conserved in two other gymnosperms, Pinus and Picea. Although functional approaches to investigate cone development in gymnosperms are limited, our state-of-the-art biophysical techniques, coupled with expression studies, provide evidence that crucial links, central to the control of floral development, may already have existed before the appearance of flowers.

  12. A dual analysis for recycled particulate composites: linking micro- and macro-mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Antonio F.; Rodrigues, Paulo C.M.; Santos, Dagoberto B.; Faria, Ana C.A

    2003-06-15

    The large amount of disposable bottles produced nowadays makes imperative the search for alternative procedures for recycling them since they are not biodegradable. This paper takes into consideration the thermomechanical recycling of post-consumed plastic bottles, especially the ones made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and their use as composite materials for engineering applications. As changes on the composite's microstructure can have an influence on macroscopic behavior, a new type of analysis is needed. To be able to evaluate the composite performance, a dual analysis procedure was developed. It consists of a micro-mechanical analysis where the microstructure is observed by optical microscopy, and variations in morphology are related to composite overall mechanical behavior. The macro-mechanical analysis is performed by ASTM D 3039/3039 M tensile tests. By doing this, the composite effective moduli can be determined. The new composite seems to be encouraging, i.e., an HDPE/PET composite with 40:60 ratio, in weight, experiments a stiffness recovery from the third to the fourth recycle. Moreover, the dual analysis was able to capture this variation.

  13. Mechanically strong, flexible polyimide aerogels cross-linked with aromatic triamine.

    PubMed

    Meador, Mary Ann B; Malow, Ericka J; Silva, Rebecca; Wright, Sarah; Quade, Derek; Vivod, Stephanie L; Guo, Haiquan; Guo, Jiao; Cakmak, Miko

    2012-02-01

    Polyimide gels are produced by cross-linking anhydride capped polyamic acid oligomers with aromatic triamine in solution and chemically imidizing. The gels are then supercritically dried to form nanoporous polyimide aerogels with densities as low as 0.14 g/cm(3) and surface areas as high as 512 m(2)/g. To understand the effect of the polyimide backbone on properties, aerogels from several combinations of diamine and dianhydride, and formulated oligomer chain length are examined. Formulations made from 2,2'-dimethylbenzidine as the diamine shrink the least but have among the highest compressive modulus. Formulations made using 4,4'-oxydianiline or 2,2'dimethylbenzidine can be fabricated into continuous thin films using a roll to roll casting process. The films are flexible enough to be rolled or folded back on themselves and recover completely without cracking or flaking, and have tensile strengths of 4-9 MPa. Finally, the highest onset of decomposition (above 600 °C) of the polyimide aerogels was obtained using p-phenylene diamine as the backbone diamine with either dianhydride studied. All of the aerogels are suitable candidates for high-temperature insulation with glass transition temperatures ranging from 270-340 °C and onsets of decomposition from 460-610 °C.

  14. Pathological relationships involving iron and myelin may constitute a shared mechanism linking various rare and common brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Moones; Gerami, Sam H.; Bassett, Brianna; Graham, Ross M.; Chua, Anita C.G.; Aryal, Ritambhara; House, Michael J.; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Ryten, Mina; Olynyk, John K.; Trinder, Debbie; Johnstone, Daniel M.; Milward, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously demonstrated elevated brain iron levels in myelinated structures and associated cells in a hemochromatosis Hfe−/−xTfr2mut mouse model. This was accompanied by altered expression of a group of myelin-related genes, including a suite of genes causatively linked to the rare disease family ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation’ (NBIA). Expanded data mining and ontological analyses have now identified additional myelin-related transcriptome changes in response to brain iron loading. Concordance between the mouse transcriptome changes and human myelin-related gene expression networks in normal and NBIA basal ganglia testifies to potential clinical relevance. These analyses implicate, among others, genes linked to various rare central hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and peripheral neuropathies including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease as well as genes linked to other rare neurological diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease. The findings may help understand interrelationships of iron and myelin in more common conditions such as hemochromatosis, multiple sclerosis and various psychiatric disorders. PMID:27500074

  15. Diminished swelling of cross-linked aromatic oligoamide surfaces revealing a new fouling mechanism of reverse-osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wang; Kumar, Rajender; Herzberg, Moshe; Kasher, Roni

    2015-06-02

    Swelling of the active layer of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has an important effect on permeate water flux. The effects of organic- and biofouling on the swelling of the RO membrane active layer and the consequent changes of permeate flux are examined here. A cross-linked aromatic oligoamide film that mimics the surface chemistry of an RO polyamide membrane was synthesized stepwise on gold-coated surfaces. Foulant adsorption to the oligoamide film and its swelling were measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, and the effects of fouling on the membrane's performance were evaluated. The foulants were extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from fouled RO membranes and organic compounds of ultrafiltration permeate (UFP) from a membrane bioreactor used to treat municipal wastewater. The adsorbed foulants affected the swelling of the cross-linked oligoamide film differently. EPS had little effect on the swelling of the oligoamide film, whereas UFP significantly impaired swelling. Permeate flux declined more rapidly under UFP fouling than it did under EPS. Foulant adsorption was shown to diminish swelling of the aromatic oligoamide surfaces. Among the already known RO membrane fouling mechanisms, a novel RO fouling mechanism is proposed, in which foulant-membrane interactions hinder membrane swelling and thus increase hydraulic resistance.

  16. A lost link between a flightless parrot and a parasitic plant and the potential role of coprolites in conservation paleobiology.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jamie R; Wilmshurst, Janet M; Worthy, Trevor H; Holzapfel, Avi S; Cooper, Alan

    2012-12-01

    approach of linking paleobiology with neoecology offers significant untapped potential to help inform conservation and restoration plans.

  17. Tomographic, kinematic and gravitational evidence for a slab under Greenland and its potential links to Arctic magmatism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Grace; Spakman, Wim; Panet, Isabelle; Gaina, Carmen; Trønnes, Reidar

    2015-04-01

    Seismic tomography and recent satellite gravity data reveal regions of anomalous structure within Earth's present-day mantle. On scales of some tens to hundreds of kilometers in wavelength, individual subducted slabs and mantle plumes can be resolved. When linked with global plate reconstructions and models of mantle convection, subducted slabs of lithosphere can be related to distinct periods of ocean basin closure. Here we explore the origins for a distinct fast seismic feature under present-day Greenland that is apparent across several P and S-wave tomography models. The sub-rounded seismic anomaly of interest is distinct from the more westerly "Farallon" slab, and is located in the mid mantle between ~1000-1600 km depth. We include a discussion of mantle sinking rates, showing that taking 1600 km slab base depth and applying sinking rate of 1.2 cm/yr implies a subduction age of ~133 Ma. We supplement the tomographic evidence for this slab with independent, satellite-derived vertical gravity gradients. Preliminary analysis of the gravity reveals a possible mantle anomaly in the SW Greenland region, complementary in spatial extent to that inferred from tomography. Considering absolute and relative plate reference frames, we suggest that palaeo-Arctic subduction related to the opening of the Amerasia Basin in the Jurassic, may account for this mantle feature. We finally investigate potential geochemical links of this slab feature with high arctic magmatism in the Cretaceous, showing that a time-dependent consideration of surface kinematics and mantle dynamics may reveal new insights into the geodynamic evolution of the Arctic.

  18. Colony Failure Linked to Low Sperm Viability in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queens and an Exploration of Potential Causative Factors.

    PubMed

    Pettis, Jeffery S; Rice, Nathan; Joselow, Katie; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Chaimanee, Veeranan

    2016-01-01

    Queen health is closely linked to colony performance in honey bees as a single queen is normally responsible for all egg laying and brood production within the colony. In the U. S. in recent years, queens have been failing at a high rate; with 50% or greater of queens replaced in colonies within 6 months when historically a queen might live one to two years. This high rate of queen failure coincides with the high mortality rates of colonies in the US, some years with >50% of colonies dying. In the current study, surveys of sperm viability in US queens were made to determine if sperm viability plays a role in queen or colony failure. Wide variation was observed in sperm viability from four sets of queens removed from colonies that beekeepers rated as in good health (n = 12; average viability = 92%), were replacing as part of normal management (n = 28; 57%), or where rated as failing (n = 18 and 19; 54% and 55%). Two additional paired set of queens showed a statistically significant difference in viability between colonies rated by the beekeeper as failing or in good health from the same apiaries. Queens removed from colonies rated in good health averaged high viability (ca. 85%) while those rated as failing or in poor health had significantly lower viability (ca. 50%). Thus low sperm viability was indicative of, or linked to, colony performance. To explore the source of low sperm viability, six commercial queen breeders were surveyed and wide variation in viability (range 60-90%) was documented between breeders. This variability could originate from the drones the queens mate with or temperature extremes that queens are exposed to during shipment. The role of shipping temperature as a possible explanation for low sperm viability was explored. We documented that during shipment queens are exposed to temperature spikes (<8 and > 40°C) and these spikes can kill 50% or more of the sperm stored in queen spermathecae in live queens. Clearly low sperm viability is linked

  19. Colony Failure Linked to Low Sperm Viability in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queens and an Exploration of Potential Causative Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pettis, Jeffery S.; Rice, Nathan; Joselow, Katie; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Chaimanee, Veeranan

    2016-01-01

    linked to colony performance and laboratory and field data provide evidence that temperature extremes are a potential causative factor. PMID:26863438

  20. Calcium-linked adjustment of myocardial metabolism to changing mechanical demands in the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Rubányi, G; Kovách, A G

    1980-01-01

    Isolated rat hearts perfused by the modified Langendorff technique were used to study the effects of changes in perfusate calcium concentration (Cap2+) on left ventricular mechanical performance, O2-consumption, NADH-fluorescence and lactate release in the presence of glucose or pyruvate as the sole exogenous substrate. Stepwise elevation of Ca2+ from 0.31 to 7.8 mM resulted in a continuous increase of contractile activity and O2-consumption independent of the substrate present. Redox changes similar to State 3 to 4 transition (NAD+ reduction) were observed when mechanical activity was reduced by perfusing the hearts with 0.65 or 0.31 mM Cap2+, which was also substrate independent. At high Cap2+ (2.6--7.8 mM) increase of contractile activity and O2-consumption was accompanied by Cap2+ dependent NAD+ reduction in the presence of glucose. Inhibition of glycolisis by pyruvate reversed the direction of NADH response (NADH oxidation following Cap2+ elevation). Myocardial lactate relealse was increased by elevation of Cap2+ from 1.3 to 5.2 mM in the presence of glucose, but this effect was significantly inhibited in the pyruvate perfused hearts. It is concluded that NADH signal originates from both the cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH compartment. The direction of NAD+/NADH redox state changes following Cap2+ elevation is grately influenced by the substrate preferentially consumed by the heart. The data suggest that calcium increases the availability of reducing equivalents to the respiratory chain thereby ensuring adequate supply of ATP when myocardial mechanical demands are changing.

  1. Water Vapor Feedback and Links to Mechanisms of Recent Tropical Climate Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Miller, Tim L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent variations of tropical climate on interannual to near-decadal scales have provided a useful target for studying feedback processes. A strong warm/cold ENSO couplet (e.g. 1997-2000) along with several subsequent weaker events are prominent interannual signals that are part of an apparent longer term strengthening of the Walker circulation during the mid to late1990 s with some weakening thereafter. Decadal scale changes in tropical SST structure during the 1990s are accompanied by focusing of precipitation over the Indo-Pacific warm pool and an increase in tropical ocean evaporation of order 1.0 %/decade. Here we use a number of diverse satellite measurements to explore connections between upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) variations on these time scales and changes in other water and energy fluxes. Precipitation (GPCP, TRMM), turbulent fluxes (OAFlux), and radiative fluxes (ERBE / CERES, SRB) are use to analyze vertically-integrated divergence of moist static energy, divMSE, and its dry and moist components. Strong signatures of MSE flux transport linking ascending and descending regions of tropical circulations are found. Relative strengths of these transports compared to radiative flux changes are interpreted as a measure of efficiency in the overall process of heat rejection during episodes of warm or cold SST forcing. In conjunction with the diagnosed energy transports we explore frequency distributions of upper-tropospheric humidity as inferred from SSM/T-2 and AMSU-B passive microwave measurements. Relating these variations to SST changes suggests positive water vapor feedback, but at a level reduced from constant relative humidity.

  2. Consumer trophic diversity as a fundamental mechanism linking predation and ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Hines, Jes; Gessner, Mark O

    2012-11-01

    1. Primary production and decomposition, two fundamental processes determining the functioning of ecosystems, may be sensitive to changes in biodiversity and food web interactions. 2. The impacts of food web interactions on ecosystem functioning are generally quantified by experimentally decoupling these linked processes and examining either primary production-based (green) or decomposition-based (brown) food webs in isolation. This decoupling may strongly limit our ability to assess the importance of food web interactions on ecosystem processes. 3. To evaluate how consumer trophic diversity mediates predator effects on ecosystem functioning, we conducted a mesocosm experiment and a field study using an assemblage of invertebrates that naturally co-occur on North Atlantic coastal saltmarshes. We measured the indirect impact of predation on primary production and leaf decomposition as a result of prey communities composed of herbivores alone, detritivores alone or both prey in combination. 4. We find that primary consumers can influence ecosystem process rates not only within, but also across green and brown sub-webs. Moreover, by feeding on a functionally diverse consumer assemblage comprised of both herbivores and detritivores, generalist predators can diffuse consumer effects on decomposition, primary production and feedbacks between the two processes. 5. These results indicate that maintaining functional diversity among primary consumers can alter the consequences of traditional trophic cascades, and they emphasize the role of the detritus-based sub-web when seeking key biotic drivers of plant production. Clearly, traditional compartmentalization of empirical food webs can limit our ability to predict the influence of food web interactions on ecosystem functioning.

  3. Molecular and cellular mechanisms linking inflammation to insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Khodabandehloo, Hadi; Gorgani-Firuzjaee, Sattar; Panahi, Ghodratollah; Meshkani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide, and it is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It is now commonly accepted that chronic inflammation associated with obesity induces insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction in diabetic patients. Obesity-associated inflammation is characterized by increased abundance of macrophages and enhanced production of inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue. Adipose tissue macrophages are suggested to be the major source of local and systemic inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. These cytokines induce insulin resistance in insulin target tissues by activating the suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins, several kinases such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase, IκB kinase β, and protein kinase C, inducible nitric oxide synthase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and protein tyrosine phosphatases such as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. These activated factors impair the insulin signaling at the insulin receptor and the insulin receptor substrates levels. The same process most likely occurs in the pancreas as it contains a pool of tissue-resident macrophages. High concentrations of glucose or palmitate via the chemokine production promote further immune cell migration and infiltration into the islets. These events ultimately induce inflammatory responses leading to the apoptosis of the pancreatic β cells. In this review, the cellular and molecular players that participate in the regulation of obesity-induced inflammation are discussed, with particular attention being placed on the roles of the molecular players linking inflammation to insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction.

  4. Linking chlorophyll a fluorescence to photosynthesis for remote sensing applications: mechanisms and challenges.

    PubMed

    Porcar-Castell, Albert; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Atherton, Jon; van der Tol, Christiaan; Flexas, Jaume; Pfündel, Erhard E; Moreno, Jose; Frankenberg, Christian; Berry, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF) has been used for decades to study the organization, functioning, and physiology of photosynthesis at the leaf and subcellular levels. ChlF is now measurable from remote sensing platforms. This provides a new optical means to track photosynthesis and gross primary productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Importantly, the spatiotemporal and methodological context of the new applications is dramatically different compared with most of the available ChlF literature, which raises a number of important considerations. Although we have a good mechanistic understanding of the processes that control the ChlF signal over the short term, the seasonal link between ChlF and photosynthesis remains obscure. Additionally, while the current understanding of in vivo ChlF is based on pulse amplitude-modulated (PAM) measurements, remote sensing applications are based on the measurement of the passive solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), which entails important differences and new challenges that remain to be solved. In this review we introduce and revisit the physical, physiological, and methodological factors that control the leaf-level ChlF signal in the context of the new remote sensing applications. Specifically, we present the basis of photosynthetic acclimation and its optical signals, we introduce the physical and physiological basis of ChlF from the molecular to the leaf level and beyond, and we introduce and compare PAM and SIF methodology. Finally, we evaluate and identify the challenges that still remain to be answered in order to consolidate our mechanistic understanding of the remotely sensed SIF signal.

  5. Linking optics and mechanics in an in vivo model of airway fibrosis and epithelial injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raub, Christopher B.; Mahon, Sari; Narula, Navneet; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Brenner, Matthew; George, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucosal and submucosal injury can lead to persistent inflammation and tissue remodeling. We hypothesized that microstructural and mechanical properties of the airway wall could be derived from multiphoton images. New Zealand White rabbits were intubated, and the tracheal epithelium gently denuded every other day for five days (three injuries). Three days following the last injury, the tracheas were excised for multiphoton imaging, mechanical compression testing, and histological analysis. Multiphoton imaging and histology confirm epithelial denudation, mucosal ulceration, subepithelial thickening, collagen deposition, immune cell infiltration, and a disrupted elastin network. Elastase removes the elastin network and relaxes the collagen network. Purified collagenase removes epithelium with subtle subepithelial changes. Young's modulus [(E) measured in kiloPascal] was significantly elevated for the scrape injured (9.0+/-3.2) trachea, and both collagenase (2.6+/-0.4) and elastase (0.8+/-0.3) treatment significantly reduced E relative to control (4.1+/-0.7). E correlates strongly with second harmonic generation (SHG) signal depth decay for enzyme-treated and control tracheas (R2=0.77), but not with scrape-injured tracheas. We conclude that E of subepithelial connective tissue increases on repeated epithelial wounding, due in part to changes in elastin and collagen microstructure and concentration. SHG depth decay is sensitive to changes in extracellular matrix content and correlates with bulk Young's modulus.

  6. Fast Prediction of HCCI Combustion with an Artificial Neural Network Linked to a Fluid Mechanics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Chen, J; Babaimopoulos, A

    2006-08-29

    We have developed an artificial neural network (ANN) based combustion model and have integrated it into a fluid mechanics code (KIVA3V) to produce a new analysis tool (titled KIVA3V-ANN) that can yield accurate HCCI predictions at very low computational cost. The neural network predicts ignition delay as a function of operating parameters (temperature, pressure, equivalence ratio and residual gas fraction). KIVA3V-ANN keeps track of the time history of the ignition delay during the engine cycle to evaluate the ignition integral and predict ignition for each computational cell. After a cell ignites, chemistry becomes active, and a two-step chemical kinetic mechanism predicts composition and heat generation in the ignited cells. KIVA3V-ANN has been validated by comparison with isooctane HCCI experiments in two different engines. The neural network provides reasonable predictions for HCCI combustion and emissions that, although typically not as good as obtained with the more physically representative multi-zone model, are obtained at a much reduced computational cost. KIVA3V-ANN can perform reasonably accurate HCCI calculations while requiring only 10% more computational effort than a motored KIVA3V run. It is therefore considered a valuable tool for evaluation of engine maps or other performance analysis tasks requiring multiple individual runs.

  7. Intermediate strain rate behaviour of cancellous bone: Links between microstructural and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prot, Marianne; Cloete, Trevor; Saletti, Dominique; Laporte, Sebastien

    2015-09-01

    Relationships between the micro-architecture description of cancellous bone, obtained from medical imaging, and its mechanical properties can be used to assess the compression fracture risk at high and low strain rate. This study extends the rupture prediction to the intermediate strain rate regime. The micro-architecture description was obtained with a CT-scan, for which geometry, topology, connectivity and anisotropy parameters were computed and compared to mechanical identified parameters in order to confirm their usefulness. Three strain rates were investigated: 1/s, 10/s and 100/s using two different devices: a Wedge-Bar apparatus and a conventional split Hopkinson pressure bar implemented with a Cone-in-Tube striker and a tandem momentum trap. This setup provides a constant strain rate loading with routine specimen recovery allowing the fracture zone to be investigated. This study reveals that a transition in the response behaviour occurred in the intermediate regime and confirms the significant porous organization influence through the regimes.

  8. Evolution of antibiotic resistance is linked to any genetic mechanism affecting bacterial duration of carriage

    PubMed Central

    Lehtinen, Sonja; Blanquart, François; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Turner, Paul; Lipsitch, Marc; Fraser, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how changes in antibiotic consumption affect the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is important for public health. In a number of bacterial species, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the prevalence of resistance has remained relatively stable despite prolonged selection pressure from antibiotics. The evolutionary processes allowing the robust coexistence of antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains are not fully understood. While allelic diversity can be maintained at a locus by direct balancing selection, there is no evidence for such selection acting in the case of resistance. In this work, we propose a mechanism for maintaining coexistence at the resistance locus: linkage to a second locus that is under balancing selection and that modulates the fitness effect of resistance. We show that duration of carriage plays such a role, with long duration of carriage increasing the fitness advantage gained from resistance. We therefore predict that resistance will be more common in strains with a long duration of carriage and that mechanisms maintaining diversity in duration of carriage will also maintain diversity in antibiotic resistance. We test these predictions in S. pneumoniae and find that the duration of carriage of a serotype is indeed positively correlated with the prevalence of resistance in that serotype. These findings suggest heterogeneity in duration of carriage is a partial explanation for the coexistence of sensitive and resistant strains and that factors determining bacterial duration of carriage will also affect the prevalence of resistance. PMID:28096340

  9. Statistical analysis of crystallization database links protein physico-chemical features with crystallization mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Diana; Barnum, Timothy J; Bruno, Andrew E; Luft, Joseph R; Snell, Edward H; Mukherjee, Sayan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis.

  10. Statistical Analysis of Crystallization Database Links Protein Physico-Chemical Features with Crystallization Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Diana; Barnum, Timothy J.; Bruno, Andrew E.; Luft, Joseph R.; Snell, Edward H.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis. PMID:24988076

  11. Evolution of antibiotic resistance is linked to any genetic mechanism affecting bacterial duration of carriage.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Sonja; Blanquart, François; Croucher, Nicholas J; Turner, Paul; Lipsitch, Marc; Fraser, Christophe

    2017-01-31

    Understanding how changes in antibiotic consumption affect the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is important for public health. In a number of bacterial species, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the prevalence of resistance has remained relatively stable despite prolonged selection pressure from antibiotics. The evolutionary processes allowing the robust coexistence of antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains are not fully understood. While allelic diversity can be maintained at a locus by direct balancing selection, there is no evidence for such selection acting in the case of resistance. In this work, we propose a mechanism for maintaining coexistence at the resistance locus: linkage to a second locus that is under balancing selection and that modulates the fitness effect of resistance. We show that duration of carriage plays such a role, with long duration of carriage increasing the fitness advantage gained from resistance. We therefore predict that resistance will be more common in strains with a long duration of carriage and that mechanisms maintaining diversity in duration of carriage will also maintain diversity in antibiotic resistance. We test these predictions in S. pneumoniae and find that the duration of carriage of a serotype is indeed positively correlated with the prevalence of resistance in that serotype. These findings suggest heterogeneity in duration of carriage is a partial explanation for the coexistence of sensitive and resistant strains and that factors determining bacterial duration of carriage will also affect the prevalence of resistance.

  12. Linking governance mechanisms to health outcomes: a review of the literature in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Dana Karen; Vian, Taryn; Maurer, Lydia; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a synthesis of peer-reviewed literature to shed light on links between governance mechanisms and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. Our review yielded 30 studies, highlighting four key governance mechanisms by which governance may influence health outcomes in these settings: Health system decentralization that enables responsiveness to local needs and values; health policymaking that aligns and empowers diverse stakeholders; enhanced community engagement; and strengthened social capital. Most, but not all, studies found a positive association between governance and health. Additionally, the nature of the association between governance mechanisms and health differed across studies. In some studies (N = 9), the governance effect was direct and positive, while in others (N = 5), the effect was indirect or modified by contextual factors. In still other studies (N = 4), governance was found to have a moderating effect, indicating that governance mechanisms influenced other system processes or structures that improved health. The remaining studies reported mixed findings about the association between governance and health (N = 6), no association between governance and health (N = 4), or had inconclusive results (N = 2). Further exploration is needed to fully understand the relationship between governance and health and to inform the design and delivery of evidence-based, effective governance interventions around the world.

  13. Remarkable Improvement in the Mechanical Properties and CO2 Uptake of MOFs Brought About by Covalent Linking to Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ram; Raut, Devaraj; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Rao, C N R

    2016-06-27

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are exceptional as gas adsorbents but their mechanical properties are poor. We present a successful strategy to improve the mechanical properties along with gas adsorption characteristics, wherein graphene (Gr) is covalently bonded with M/DOBDC (M=Mg(2+) , Ni(2+) , or Co(2+) , DOBDC=2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzene dicarboxylate) MOFs. The surface area of the graphene-MOF composites increases up to 200-300 m(2)  g(-1) whereas the CO2 uptake increases by ca. 3-5 wt % at 0.15 atm and by 6-10 wt % at 1 atm. What is significant is that the composites exhibit improved mechanical properties. In the case of Mg/DOBDC, a three-fold increase in both the elastic modulus and hardness with 5 wt % graphene reinforcement is observed. Improvement in both the mechanical properties and gas adsorption characteristics of porous MOFs on linking them to graphene is a novel observation and suggests a new avenue for the design and synthesis of porous materials.

  14. Toward molecular mechanism of xenon anesthesia: a link to studies of xenon complexes with small aromatic molecules.

    PubMed

    Andrijchenko, Natalya N; Ermilov, Alexander Yu; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Räsänen, Markku; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2015-03-19

    The present study illustrates the steps toward understanding molecular mechanism of xenon anesthesia by focusing on a link to the structures and spectra of intermolecular complexes of xenon with small aromatic molecules. A primary cause of xenon anesthesia is attributed to inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by an unknown mechanism. Following the results of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations we report plausible xenon action sites in the ligand binding domain of the NMDA receptor, which are due to interaction of xenon atoms with aromatic amino-acid residues. We rely in these calculations on computational protocols adjusted in combined experimental and theoretical studies of intermolecular complexes of xenon with phenol. Successful reproduction of vibrational shifts in molecular species upon complexation with xenon measured in low-temperature matrices allowed us to select a proper functional form in density functional theory (DFT) approach for use in QM subsystems, as well as to calibrate force field parameters for MD simulations. The results of molecular modeling show that xenon atoms can compete with agonists for a place in the corresponding protein cavity, thus indicating their active role in anesthetic action.

  15. Sarcomere mechanics in uniform and nonuniform cardiac muscle: a link between pump function and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ter Keurs, Henk E D J; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Ying Ming; Wakayama, Yuji; Sugai, Yoshinao; Kagaya, Yutaka; Miura, Masahito; Boyden, Penelope A; Stuyvers, Bruno D M; Landesberg, Amir

    2008-03-01

    Starling's law and the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship (ESPVR) reflect the effect of sarcomere length (SL) on the development of stress (sigma) and shortening by myocytes in the uniform ventricle. We show here that tetanic contractions of rat cardiac trabeculae exhibit a sigma-SL relationship at saturating [Ca2+] that depends on sarcomere geometry in a manner similar to that of skeletal sarcomeres and the existence of opposing forces in cardiac muscle shortened below slack length. The sigma-SL -[Ca2+](free) relationships (sigma-SL-Ca relationships) at submaximal [Ca2+] in intact and skinned trabeculae were similar, although the sensitivity for Ca2+ of intact muscle was higher. We analyzed the mechanisms underlying the sigma-SL-Ca relationship by using a kinetic model assuming that the rates of Tn-C Ca2+ binding and/or cross-bridge (XB) cycling are determined by either the SL, [Ca2+], or sigma. We analyzed the correlation between the model results and steady-state sigma measurements at varied SL at [Ca2+] from skinned rat cardiac trabeculae to test the hypotheses that the dominant feedback mechanism is SL-, sigma-, or [Ca2+]-dependent, and that the feedback mechanism regulates Tn-C Ca2+ affinity, XB kinetics, or the unitary XB force. The analysis strongly suggests that the feedback of the number of strong XBs to cardiac Tn-C Ca2+ affinity is the dominant mechanism regulating XB recruitment. Using this concept in a model of twitch-sigma accurately reproduced the sigma-SL-Ca relationship and the time courses of twitch sigma and the intracellular [Ca2+]i. The foregoing concept has equally important repercussions for the nonuniformly contracting heart, in which arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves arise from weakened areas in the cardiac muscle. These Ca2+ waves can reversibly be induced with nonuniform excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) by the cycle of stretch and release in the border zone between the damaged and intact regions. Stimulus trains induced propagating

  16. Linking definitions, mechanisms, and modeling of drought-induced tree death.

    PubMed

    Anderegg, William R L; Berry, Joseph A; Field, Christopher B

    2012-12-01

    Tree death from drought and heat stress is a critical and uncertain component in forest ecosystem responses to a changing climate. Recent research has illuminated how tree mortality is a complex cascade of changes involving interconnected plant systems over multiple timescales. Explicit consideration of the definitions, dynamics, and temporal and biological scales of tree mortality research can guide experimental and modeling approaches. In this review, we draw on the medical literature concerning human death to propose a water resource-based approach to tree mortality that considers the tree as a complex organism with a distinct growth strategy. This approach provides insight into mortality mechanisms at the tree and landscape scales and presents promising avenues into modeling tree death from drought and temperature stress.

  17. Frequency-specific mechanism links human brain networks for spatial attention.

    PubMed

    Daitch, Amy L; Sharma, Mohit; Roland, Jarod L; Astafiev, Serguei V; Bundy, David T; Gaona, Charles M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Shulman, Gordon L; Leuthardt, Eric C; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2013-11-26

    Selective attention allows us to filter out irrelevant information in the environment and focus neural resources on information relevant to our current goals. Functional brain-imaging studies have identified networks of broadly distributed brain regions that are recruited during different attention processes; however, the dynamics by which these networks enable selection are not well understood. Here, we first used functional MRI to localize dorsal and ventral attention networks in human epileptic subjects undergoing seizure monitoring. We subsequently recorded cortical physiology using subdural electrocorticography during a spatial-attention task to study network dynamics. Attention networks become selectively phase-modulated at low frequencies (δ, θ) during the same task epochs in which they are recruited in functional MRI. This mechanism may alter the excitability of task-relevant regions or their effective connectivity. Furthermore, different attention processes (holding vs. shifting attention) are associated with synchrony at different frequencies, which may minimize unnecessary cross-talk between separate neuronal processes.

  18. Linking Ventilation Heterogeneity Quantified via Hyperpolarized 3He MRI to Dynamic Lung Mechanics and Airway Hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lui, Justin K; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Albert, Mitchell S; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI (HP 3He-MRI) have introduced the ability to render and quantify ventilation patterns throughout the anatomic regions of the lung. The goal of this study was to establish how ventilation heterogeneity relates to the dynamic changes in mechanical lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic subjects. In four healthy and nine mild-to-moderate asthmatic subjects, we measured dynamic lung resistance and lung elastance from 0.1 to 8 Hz via a broadband ventilation waveform technique. We quantified ventilation heterogeneity using a recently developed coefficient of variation method from HP 3He-MRI imaging. Dynamic lung mechanics and imaging were performed at baseline, post-challenge, and after a series of five deep inspirations. AHR was measured via the concentration of agonist that elicits a 20% decrease in the subject's forced expiratory volume in one second compared to baseline (PC20) dose. The ventilation coefficient of variation was correlated to low-frequency lung resistance (R = 0.647, P < 0.0001), the difference between high and low frequency lung resistance (R = 0.668, P < 0.0001), and low-frequency lung elastance (R = 0.547, P = 0.0003). In asthmatic subjects with PC20 values <25 mg/mL, the coefficient of variation at baseline exhibited a strong negative trend (R = -0.798, P = 0.02) to PC20 dose. Our findings were consistent with the notion of peripheral rather than central involvement of ventilation heterogeneity. Also, the degree of AHR appears to be dependent on the degree to which baseline airway constriction creates baseline ventilation heterogeneity. HP 3He-MRI imaging may be a powerful predictor of the degree of AHR and in tracking the efficacy of therapy.

  19. Epigenetic mechanisms: A possible link between autism spectrum disorders and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Varadinova, Miroslava; Boyadjieva, Nadka

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) still remains unclear and seems to involve a considerable overlap between polygenic, epigenetic and environmental factors. We have summarized the current understanding of the interplay between gene expression dysregulation via epigenetic modifications and the potential epigenetic impact of environmental factors in neurodevelopmental deficits. Furthermore, we discuss the scientific controversies of the relationship between prenatal exposure to alcohol and alcohol-induced epigenetic dysregulations, and gene expression alterations which are associated with disrupted neural plasticity and causal pathways for ASDs. The review of the literature suggests that a better understanding of developmental epigenetics should contribute to furthering our comprehension of the etiology and pathogenesis of ASDs and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

  20. A systematic SNP selection approach to identify mechanisms underlying disease aetiology: linking height to post-menopausal breast and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Elands, Rachel J. J.; Simons, Colinda C. J. M.; Riemenschneider, Mona; Isaacs, Aaron; Schouten, Leo J.; Verhage, Bas A.; Van Steen, Kristel; Godschalk, Roger W. L.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Stoll, Monika; Weijenberg, Matty P.

    2017-01-01

    Data from GWAS suggest that SNPs associated with complex diseases or traits tend to co-segregate in regions of low recombination, harbouring functionally linked gene clusters. This phenomenon allows for selecting a limited number of SNPs from GWAS repositories for large-scale studies investigating shared mechanisms between diseases. For example, we were interested in shared mechanisms between adult-attained height and post-menopausal breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, because height is a risk factor for these cancers, though likely not a causal factor. Using SNPs from public GWAS repositories at p-values < 1 × 10−5 and a genomic sliding window of 1 mega base pair, we identified SNP clusters including at least one SNP associated with height and one SNP associated with either post-menopausal BC or CRC risk (or both). SNPs were annotated to genes using HapMap and GRAIL and analysed for significantly overrepresented pathways using ConsensuspathDB. Twelve clusters including 56 SNPs annotated to 26 genes were prioritised because these included at least one height- and one BC risk- or CRC risk-associated SNP annotated to the same gene. Annotated genes were involved in Indian hedgehog signalling (p-value = 7.78 × 10−7) and several cancer site-specific pathways. This systematic approach identified a limited number of clustered SNPs, which pinpoint potential shared mechanisms linking together the complex phenotypes height, post-menopausal BC and CRC. PMID:28117334

  1. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  2. Event-related potential study of dynamic neural mechanisms of semantic organizational strategies in verbal learning.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Sophie; Gagnon, Geneviève; Bastien, Célyne

    2007-09-19

    Neuroimaging and neuropsychological data indicate that the frontal regions are implicated in semantic organizational strategies in verbal learning. Whereas these approaches tend to adopt a localizationist view, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the dynamic neural mechanisms involved in these strategies. We recorded ERPs using a 128-channel system in 12 young adults (23.75+/-3.02 years) during 3 encoding conditions that manipulated the levels of semantic organization demands. In the Unrelated condition, the words to encode did not share any semantic attributes. For both Spontaneous and Guided conditions, the words in each list were drawn from four semantic categories. In the Spontaneous condition, participants were not informed about the semantic relationship between items. In contrast, in the Guided condition, participants were instructed to improve their subsequent recall by mentally regrouping related items with the aid of category labels. Results indicated that the P200 amplitude increased with the greater organizational demand of semantic strategies. In contrast, the late positive component (LPC) amplitude was larger in both encoding conditions with semantic related words regardless of their instructions as compared to the Unrelated condition. Finally, there was greater right frontal sustained activity in the Spontaneous condition than in the Unrelated condition. Thus, our data indicate that the P200 is sensitive to attentional processes that increase with the organizational semantic demand. The LPC indexes associative processes voluntarily involved in linking related items together. Finally, the right frontal region appears to play an important role in the self-initiation of semantic organizational strategies.

  3. The evolutionary ecology of complex lifecycle parasites: linking phenomena with mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Auld, S K J R; Tinsley, M C

    2015-02-01

    Many parasitic infections, including those of humans, are caused by complex lifecycle parasites (CLPs): parasites that sequentially infect different hosts over the course of their lifecycle. CLPs come from a wide range of taxonomic groups-from single-celled bacteria to multicellular flatworms-yet share many common features in their life histories. Theory tells us when CLPs should be favoured by selection, but more empirical studies are required in order to quantify the costs and benefits of having a complex lifecycle, especially in parasites that facultatively vary their lifecycle complexity. In this article, we identify ecological conditions that favour CLPs over their simple lifecycle counterparts and highlight how a complex lifecycle can alter transmission rate and trade-offs between growth and reproduction. We show that CLPs participate in dynamic host-parasite coevolution, as more mobile hosts can fuel CLP adaptation to less mobile hosts. Then, we argue that a more general understanding of the evolutionary ecology of CLPs is essential for the development of effective frameworks to manage the many diseases they cause. More research is needed identifying the genetics of infection mechanisms used by CLPs, particularly into the role of gene duplication and neofunctionalisation in lifecycle evolution. We propose that testing for signatures of selection in infection genes will reveal much about how and when complex lifecycles evolved, and will help quantify complex patterns of coevolution between CLPs and their various hosts. Finally, we emphasise four key areas where new research approaches will provide fertile opportunities to advance this field.

  4. Air pollution, vascular disease and thrombosis: linking clinical data and pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M; Guida, A; Tufano, A; Coppola, A

    2012-12-01

    The public health burden of air pollution has been increasingly recognized over the last decades. Following the first assessed adverse effects on respiratory diseases and lung cancer, a large body of epidemiologic and clinical studies definitely documented an even stronger association of air pollution exposure with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, particularly related to atherothrombotic (coronary and cerebrovascular) disease. Particulate matter (PM), mainly that with lower aerodynamic diameter (fine and ultrafine PM), is responsible for the most severe effects, due to its capacity to transport toxic substances deep into the lower airways. These effects have been shown to occur not only after short-term exposure to elevated concentrations of pollutants, but even after long-term relatively low levels of exposure. Vulnerable subjects (elderly persons and those with preexisting cardiopulmonary diseases) show the highest impact. Fewer and conflicting data also suggest an association with venous thromboembolism. Although not completely elucidated, a series of mechanisms have been hypothesized and tested in experimental settings. These phenomena, including vasomotor and cardiac autonomic dysfunction, hemostatic unbalance, oxidative stress and inflammatory response, have been shown to change over time and differently contribute to the short-term and long-term adverse effects of pollution exposure. Beyond environmental health policies, crucial for improving air quality and reducing the impact of such an elusive threat to public health, the recognition and assessment of the individual risk, together with specific advice, should be routinely implemented in the strategies of primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention.

  5. Link of the mechanisms of action of glatiramer acetate to its long-term clinical data.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thibault

    2009-02-01

    A consequence of the long-term nature of progression in multiple sclerosis is that treatment needs to be provided over the long term. Gathering evidence for long term clinical efficacy, safety and patient acceptance of immunomodulatory therapies is thus a critically important issue. However, pivotal trials, which generally last no more than two years, cannot address this issue. Glatiramer acetate is the only immunomodulatory treatment for which prospective data is available covering a treatment period of over a decade. In the long-term extension of the pivotal trial of glatiramer acetate, 108 patients have been followed for a mean treatment duration of 10.1 years. At the end of the treatment period, patients were experiencing a relapse only once every five years and 92% remained ambulatory throughout. Similar findings have been made in observational studies in the long-term follow-up of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis treated with glatiramer acetate under a compassionate use programme in France and in a patient registry in Argentina. Such data strongly suggest that a reduced risk of relapse represents a real long-term treatment effect. The cumulative evidence for the long-term clinical efficacy of glatiramer acetate is consistent with its dual mechanism of action, reassures the physician that glatiramer acetate can really help improve patient care over the long term, and may contribute to a more positive view of prognosis for patients with multiple sclerosis.

  6. Linking Genomo- and Pathotype: Exploiting the Zebrafish Embryo Model to Investigate the Divergent Virulence Potential among Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Eshwar, Athmanya K.; Tall, Ben D.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Patel, Isha R.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections primarily in premature, low-birth weight and immune-compromised neonates. Apparently not all Cronobacter species are linked to infantile infections and it has been proposed that virulence varies among strains. Whole genome comparisons and in silico analysis have proven to be powerful tools in elucidating potential virulence determinants, the presence/absence of which may explain the differential virulence behaviour of strains. However, validation of these factors has in the past been hampered by the availability of a suitable neonatal animal model. In the present study we have used zebrafish embryos to model Cronobacter infections in vivo using wild type and genetically engineered strains. Our experiments confirmed the role of the RepF1B-like plasmids as “virulence plasmids” in Cronobacter and underpinned the importantce of two putative virulence factors—cpa and zpx—in in vivo pathogenesis. We propose that by using this model in vivo infection studies are now possible on a large scale level which will boost the understanding on the virulence strategies employed by these pathogens. PMID:27355472

  7. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Tornés, Jesús; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V.; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, María; Denaro, Renata; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A.; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Golyshina, Olga V.; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R.; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I.; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakimov, Michail M.; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills. PMID:26119183

  8. The N-linking glycosylation system from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is required for adhesion and has potential use in glycoengineering

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, Janine T.; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Li, Yanwen; Lin, Chia-Wei; Vohra, Prerna; Tucker, Alexander W.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Aebi, Markus; Langford, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a mucosal respiratory pathogen causing contagious porcine pleuropneumonia. Pathogenesis studies have demonstrated a major role for the capsule, exotoxins and outer membrane proteins. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae can also glycosylate proteins, using a cytoplasmic N-linked glycosylating enzyme designated NGT, but its transcriptional arrangement and role in virulence remains unknown. We investigated the NGT locus and demonstrated that the putative transcriptional unit consists of rimO, ngt and a glycosyltransferase termed agt. From this information we used the A. pleuropneumoniae glycosylation locus to decorate an acceptor protein, within Escherichia coli, with a hexose polymer that reacted with an anti-dextran antibody. Mass spectrometry analysis of a truncated protein revealed that this operon could add up to 29 repeat units to the appropriate sequon. We demonstrated the importance of NGT in virulence, by creating deletion mutants and testing them in a novel respiratory cell line adhesion model. This study demonstrates the importance of the NGT glycosylation system for pathogenesis and its potential biotechnological application for glycoengineering. PMID:28077594

  9. Design and synthesis of pyrazole/isoxazole linked arylcinnamides as tubulin polymerization inhibitors and potential antiproliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Shaik, Anver Basha; Rao, Bala Bhaskara; Khan, Irfan; Bharath Kumar, G; Jain, Nishant

    2015-10-28

    As pyrazole and isoxazole based derivatives are well-known for displaying a considerable biological profile, an attempt has been made to unravel their cytotoxic potential. In this context, a number of pyrazole/isoxazole linked arylcinnamide conjugates (15a-o and 21a-n) have been synthesized by employing a straight forward route. The basic structure comprised three ring scaffolds (A, B and C): methoxyphenyl rings as A and C rings and a five membered heterocyclic ring (pyrazole or isoxazole) as the B-ring. To achieve clear understanding, these derivatives are categorized as pyrazole-phenylcinnamides (PP) and isoxazole-phenylcinnamides (IP). These compounds have been evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of various human cancer cell lines such as HeLa, DU-145, A549 and MDA-MB231 and most of them exhibit considerable cytotoxic effects. Some of them like 15a, 15b, 15e, 15i and 15l exhibit promising cytotoxicity in HeLa cells (IC50 = 0.4, 1.8, 1.2, 2.7 and 1.7 μM). Amongst them 15a, 15b and 15e were taken up for detailed biological studies, they were found to arrest the cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, they were investigated for their effect on the microtubular cytoskeletal system by using a tubulin polymerization assay, immunofluroscence and molecular docking studies; interestingly they demonstrate a significant inhibition of tubulin polymerization.

  10. Detection and effects of harmful algal toxins in Scottish harbour seals and potential links to population decline.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Silje-Kristin; Lacaze, Jean-Pierre; Hermann, Guillaume; Kershaw, Joanna; Brownlow, Andrew; Turner, Andrew; Hall, Ailsa

    2015-04-01

    Over the past 15 years or so, several Scottish harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) populations have declined in abundance and several factors have been considered as possible causes, including toxins from harmful algae. Here we explore whether a link could be established between two groups of toxins, domoic acid (DA) and saxitoxins (STXs), and the decline in the harbour seal populations in Scotland. We document the first evidence that harbour seals are exposed to both DA and STXs from consuming contaminated fish. Both groups of toxins were found in urine and faeces sampled from live captured (n = 162) and stranded animals (n = 23) and in faecal samples collected from seal haul-out sites (n = 214) between 2008 and 2013. The proportion of positive samples and the toxins levels measured in the excreta were significantly higher in areas where harbour seal abundance is in decline. There is also evidence that DA has immunomodulatory effects in harbour seals, including lymphocytopenia and monocytosis. Scottish harbour seals are exposed to DA and STXs through contaminated prey at potentially lethal levels and with this evidence we suggest that exposure to these toxins are likely to be important factors driving the harbour seal decline in some regions of Scotland.

  11. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND LEUKOCYTE TELOMERE LENGTH: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS LINKING MENTAL ILLNESS WITH CELLULAR AGING

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Daniel; Epel, Elissa S.; Mellon, Synthia H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Révész, Dóra; Verhoeven, Josine E.; Reus, Victor I.; Lin, Jue; Mahan, Laura; Hough, Christina M.; Rosser, Rebecca; Bersani, F. Saverio; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric illnesses are associated with early mortality and with an increased risk of developing physical diseases that are more typically seen in the elderly. Moreover, certain psychiatric illnesses may be associated with accelerated cellular aging, evidenced by shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which could underlie this association. Shortened LTL reflects a cell’s mitotic history and cumulative exposure to inflammation and oxidation as well as the availability of telomerase, a telomere-lengthening enzyme. Critically short telomeres can cause cells to undergo senescence, apoptosis or genomic instability, and shorter LTL correlates with poorer health and predicts mortality. Emerging data suggest that LTL may be reduced in certain psychiatric illnesses, perhaps in proportion to exposure to the psychiatric illnesses, although conflicting data exist. Telomerase has been less well characterized in psychiatric illnesses, but a role in depression and in antidepressant and neurotrophic effects has been suggested by preclinical and clinical studies. In this article, studies on LTL and telomerase activity in psychiatric illnesses are critically reviewed, potential mediators are discussed, and future directions are suggested. A deeper understanding of cellular aging in psychiatric illnesses could lead to re-conceptualizing them as systemic illnesses with manifestations inside and outside the brain and could identify new treatment targets. PMID:25999120

  12. Psychiatric disorders and leukocyte telomere length: Underlying mechanisms linking mental illness with cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Daniel; Epel, Elissa S; Mellon, Synthia H; Penninx, Brenda W; Révész, Dóra; Verhoeven, Josine E; Reus, Victor I; Lin, Jue; Mahan, Laura; Hough, Christina M; Rosser, Rebecca; Bersani, F Saverio; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Wolkowitz, Owen M

    2015-08-01

    Many psychiatric illnesses are associated with early mortality and with an increased risk of developing physical diseases that are more typically seen in the elderly. Moreover, certain psychiatric illnesses may be associated with accelerated cellular aging, evidenced by shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which could underlie this association. Shortened LTL reflects a cell's mitotic history and cumulative exposure to inflammation and oxidation as well as the availability of telomerase, a telomere-lengthening enzyme. Critically short telomeres can cause cells to undergo senescence, apoptosis or genomic instability, and shorter LTL correlates with poorer health and predicts mortality. Emerging data suggest that LTL may be reduced in certain psychiatric illnesses, perhaps in proportion to exposure to the psychiatric illnesses, although conflicting data exist. Telomerase has been less well characterized in psychiatric illnesses, but a role in depression and in antidepressant and neurotrophic effects has been suggested by preclinical and clinical studies. In this article, studies on LTL and telomerase activity in psychiatric illnesses are critically reviewed, potential mediators are discussed, and future directions are suggested. A deeper understanding of cellular aging in psychiatric illnesses could lead to re-conceptualizing them as systemic illnesses with manifestations inside and outside the brain and could identify new treatment targets.

  13. A Prospective Examination of the Mechanisms Linking Childhood Physical Abuse to Body Mass Index in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Francis, Melville M; Nikulina, Valentina; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2015-08-01

    Previous research has reported associations between childhood physical abuse and body mass index (BMI) in adulthood. This article examined the role of four potential mediators (anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and coping) hypothesized to explain this relationship. Using data from a prospective cohort design, court-substantiated cases of childhood physical abuse (N = 78) and nonmaltreated comparisons (N = 349) were followed up and assessed in adulthood at three time points (1989-1995, 2000-2002, and 2003-2005) when participants were of age 29.2, 39.5, and 41.2, respectively. At age 41, average BMI of the current sample was 29.97, falling between overweight and obese categories. Meditation analyses were conducted, controlling for age, sex, race, smoking, and self-reported weight. Childhood physical abuse was positively associated with subsequent generalized anxiety, major depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms at age 29.2 and higher levels of depression and posttraumatic stress predicted higher BMI at age 41.2. In contrast, higher levels of anxiety predicted lower BMI. Coping did not mediate between physical abuse and BMI. Anxiety symptoms mediated the relationship between physical abuse and BMI for women, but not for men. These findings illustrate the complexity of studying the consequences of physical abuse, particularly the relationship between psychiatric symptoms and adult health outcomes.

  14. A Link between ORC-Origin Binding Mechanisms and Origin Activation Time Revealed in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hoggard, Timothy; Shor, Erika; Müller, Carolin A.; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication origins are selected in G1-phase when the origin recognition complex (ORC) binds chromosomal positions and triggers molecular events culminating in the initiation of DNA replication (a.k.a. origin firing) during S-phase. Each chromosome uses multiple origins for its duplication, and each origin fires at a characteristic time during S-phase, creating a cell-type specific genome replication pattern relevant to differentiation and genome stability. It is unclear whether ORC-origin interactions are relevant to origin activation time. We applied a novel genome-wide strategy to classify origins in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on the types of molecular interactions used for ORC-origin binding. Specifically, origins were classified as DNA-dependent when the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo could be explained by the affinity of ORC for origin DNA in vitro, and, conversely, as ‘chromatin-dependent’ when the ORC-DNA interaction in vitro was insufficient to explain the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo. These two origin classes differed in terms of nucleosome architecture and dependence on origin-flanking sequences in plasmid replication assays, consistent with local features of chromatin promoting ORC binding at ‘chromatin-dependent’ origins. Finally, the ‘chromatin-dependent’ class was enriched for origins that fire early in S-phase, while the DNA-dependent class was enriched for later firing origins. Conversely, the latest firing origins showed a positive association with the ORC-origin DNA paradigm for normal levels of ORC binding, whereas the earliest firing origins did not. These data reveal a novel association between ORC-origin binding mechanisms and the regulation of origin activation time. PMID:24068963

  15. The evolutionary ecology of complex lifecycle parasites: linking phenomena with mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Auld, S KJR; Tinsley, M C

    2015-01-01

    Many parasitic infections, including those of humans, are caused by complex lifecycle parasites (CLPs): parasites that sequentially infect different hosts over the course of their lifecycle. CLPs come from a wide range of taxonomic groups—from single-celled bacteria to multicellular flatworms—yet share many common features in their life histories. Theory tells us when CLPs should be favoured by selection, but more empirical studies are required in order to quantify the costs and benefits of having a complex lifecycle, especially in parasites that facultatively vary their lifecycle complexity. In this article, we identify ecological conditions that favour CLPs over their simple lifecycle counterparts and highlight how a complex lifecycle can alter transmission rate and trade-offs between growth and reproduction. We show that CLPs participate in dynamic host–parasite coevolution, as more mobile hosts can fuel CLP adaptation to less mobile hosts. Then, we argue that a more general understanding of the evolutionary ecology of CLPs is essential for the development of effective frameworks to manage the many diseases they cause. More research is needed identifying the genetics of infection mechanisms used by CLPs, particularly into the role of gene duplication and neofunctionalisation in lifecycle evolution. We propose that testing for signatures of selection in infection genes will reveal much about how and when complex lifecycles evolved, and will help quantify complex patterns of coevolution between CLPs and their various hosts. Finally, we emphasise four key areas where new research approaches will provide fertile opportunities to advance this field. PMID:25227255

  16. Acute-Phase Serum Amyloid A: An Inflammatory Adipokine and Potential Link between Obesity and Its Metabolic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong-Ze; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Hu, Hong; Pollin, Toni I; Ryan, Alice S; Nicklas, Barbara J; Snitker, Soren; Horenstein, Richard B; Hull, Kristen; Goldberg, Nelson H; Goldberg, Andrew P; Shuldiner, Alan R; Fried, Susan K; Gong, Da-Wei

    2006-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation, and serum markers of inflammation are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that link obesity to chronic inflammation and CVD are poorly understood. Methods and Findings Acute-phase serum amyloid A (A-SAA) mRNA levels, and A-SAA adipose secretion and serum levels were measured in obese and nonobese individuals, obese participants who underwent weight-loss, and persons treated with the insulin sensitizer rosiglitazone. Inflammation-eliciting activity of A-SAA was investigated in human adipose stromal vascular cells, coronary vascular endothelial cells and a murine monocyte cell line. We demonstrate that A-SAA was highly and selectively expressed in human adipocytes. Moreover, A-SAA mRNA levels and A-SAA secretion from adipose tissue were significantly correlated with body mass index ( r = 0.47; p = 0.028 and r = 0.80; p = 0.0002, respectively). Serum A-SAA levels decreased significantly after weight loss in obese participants ( p = 0.006), as well as in those treated with rosiglitazone ( p = 0.033). The magnitude of the improvement in insulin sensitivity after weight loss was significantly correlated with decreases in serum A-SAA ( r = −0.74; p = 0.034). SAA treatment of vascular endothelial cells and monocytes markedly increased the production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. In addition, SAA increased basal lipolysis in adipose tissue culture by 47%. Conclusions A-SAA is a proinflammatory and lipolytic adipokine in humans. The increased expression of A-SAA by adipocytes in obesity suggests that it may play a critical role in local and systemic inflammation and free fatty acid production and could be a direct link between obesity and its comorbidities, such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Accordingly, improvements in

  17. Dose effects of cross-linking polyethylene for total knee arthroplasty on wear performance and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Asano, Taiyo; Akagi, Masao; Clarke, Ian C; Masuda, Shingo; Ishii, Tsunehiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2007-11-01

    Wear performance and mechanical properties of cross-linking polyethylene (XLPE) tibial inserts were investigated using a knee simulator, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a small punch test (SPT). Ultrahigh molecular weight PE made from GUR1050 resin was irradiated at doses ranging from 0 to 200 kGy and then machined into tibial inserts followed by annealing. The knee simulator was run for up to four million cycles. As the radiation dose increased from 0 to 100 kGy, the wear rate decreased dramatically, yielding 95% wear reduction at 100 kGy. The microwear features observed by SEM supported the dose-dependent wear reduction. The SPT for XLPE after the simulation test showed that, as the radiation dose increased from 0 to 200 kGy, the ultimate displacement decreased dose-dependently, while the ultimate load increased from 0 to 75 kGy and decreased from 75 to 200 kGy. The resulting toughness of the PE increased to its maximum at a dose of 50 kGy and then decreased with higher doses up to 200 kGy. PE cross-linked with radiation doses from 25 to 75 kGy had greater toughness than virgin, nonirradiated PE. However, PE irradiated with 100 kGy or more had lower toughness than virgin PE. These data suggest that a certain amount of irradiation enhances both wear performance and toughness of PE tibial inserts. Although a certain amount of cross-linking would be effective for clinical application of PE tibial inserts, an optimal radiation dose should be much smaller than that used in current XLPE in total hip arthroplasty.

  18. Subclinical atherosclerosis is linked to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth via vitamin K2-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Pompili, Maurizio; Di Stasio, Enrico; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Flore, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the rate of matrix Gla-protein carboxylation in patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and to decipher its association with subclinical atherosclerosis. METHODS Patients with suspected SIBO who presented with a low risk for cardiovascular disease and showed no evidence of atherosclerotic plaques were included in the study. A glucose breath test was performed in order to confirm the diagnosis of SIBO and vascular assessment was carried out by ultrasound examination. Plasma levels of the inactive form of MGP (dephosphorylated-uncarboxylated matrix Gla-protein) were quantified by ELISA and vitamin K2 intake was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS Thirty-nine patients were included in the study. SIBO was confirmed in 12/39 (30.8%) patients who also presented with a higher concentration of dephosphorylated-uncarboxylated matrix Gla-protein (9.5 μg/L vs 4.2 μg/L; P = 0.004). Arterial stiffness was elevated in the SIBO group (pulse-wave velocity 10.25 m/s vs 7.68 m/s; P = 0.002) and this phenomenon was observed to correlate linearly with the levels of dephosphorylated-uncarboxylated matrix Gla-protein (β = 0.220, R2 = 0.366, P = 0.03). Carotid intima-media thickness and arterial calcifications were not observed to be significantly elevated as compared to controls. CONCLUSION SIBO is associated with reduced matrix Gla-protein activation as well as arterial stiffening. Both these observations are regarded as important indicators of subclinical atherosclerosis. Hence, screening for SIBO, intestinal decontamination and supplementation with vitamin K2 has the potential to be incorporated into clinical practice as additional preventive measures. PMID:28275304

  19. Bio-Based Artificial Nacre with Excellent Mechanical and Barrier Properties Realized by a Facile In Situ Reduction and Cross-Linking Reaction.

    PubMed

    Shahzadi, Kiran; Mohsin, Imran; Wu, Lin; Ge, Xuesong; Jiang, Yijun; Li, Hui; Mu, Xindong

    2017-01-24

    Demands for high strength integrated materials have substantially increased across various kinds of industries. Inspired by the relationship of excellent integration of mechanical properties and hierarchical nano/microscale structure of the natural nacre, a simple and facile method to fabricate high strength integrated artificial nacre based on sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and borate cross-linked graphene oxide (GO) sheets has been developed. The tensile strength and toughness of cellulose-based hybrid material reached 480.5 ± 13.1 MPa and 11.8 ± 0.4 MJm(-3) by a facile in situ reduction and cross-linking reaction between CMC and GO (0.7%), which are 3.55 and 6.55 times that of natural nacre. This hybrid film exhibits better thermal stability and flame retardancy. More interestingly, the hybrid material showed good water stability compared to that in the original water-soluble CMC. This type of hybrid has great potential applications in aerospace, artificial muscle, and tissue engineering.

  20. Mammary blood flow and metabolic activity are linked by a feedback mechanism involving nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cieslar, S R L; Madsen, T G; Purdie, N G; Trout, D R; Osborne, V R; Cant, J P

    2014-01-01

    To test which, if any, of the major milk precursors can elicit a rapid change in the rate of mammary blood flow (MBF) and to define the time course and magnitude of such changes, 4 lactating cows were infused with glucose, amino acids, or triacylglycerol into the external iliac artery feeding one udder half while iliac plasma flow (IPF) was monitored continuously by dye dilution. Adenosine and saline were infused as positive and negative controls, respectively, and insulin was infused to characterize the response to a centrally produced anabolic hormone. To test the roles of cyclooxygenase, NO synthase and ATP-sensitive K (KATP) channels in nutrient-mediated changes in blood flow, their respective inhibitors-indomethacin, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), and glibenclamide-were infused simultaneously with glucose. Each day, 1 infusate was given twice to each cow, over a 20-min period each time, separated by a 20-min washout period. In addition, each treatment protocol was administered on 2 separate days. A 73% increase in IPF during adenosine infusion showed that the mammary vasodilatory response was quadratic in time, with most changes occurring in the first 5min. Glucose infusion decreased IPF by 9% in a quadratic manner, most rapidly in the first 5min, indicating that a feedback mechanism of local blood flow control, likely through adenosine release, was operative in the mammary vasculature. Amino acid infusion increased IPF 9% in a linear manner, suggesting that mammary ATP utilization was stimulated more than ATP production. This could reflect a stimulation of protein synthesis. Triacylglycerol only tended to decrease IPF and insulin did not affect IPF. A lack of IPF response to glibenclamide indicates that KATP channels are not involved in MBF regulation. Indomethacin and L-NAME both depressed IPF. In the presence of indomethacin, glucose infusion caused a quadratic 9% increase in IPF. Indomethacin is an inhibitor of mitochondrial

  1. Mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to model biomaterial surfaces: Establising a link between thrombosis and infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Julie Miyo

    Infections involving Staphylococcus epidermidis remain a life threatening complication associated with the use of polymer based cardiovascular devices. One of the critical steps in infection pathogenesis is the adhesion of the bacteria to the device surface. Currently, mechanisms of S. epidermidis adhesion are incompletely understood, but are thought to involve interactions between bacteria, device surface, and host blood elements in the form of adsorbed plasma proteins and surface adherent platelets. Our central hypothesis is that elements participating in thrombosis also promote S. epidermidis adhesion by specifically binding to the bacterial surface. The adhesion kinetics of S. epidermidis RP62A to host modified model biomaterial surface octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) under hydrodynamic shear conditions were characterized. Steady state adhesion to adsorbed proteins and surface adherent platelets was achieved at 90-120 minutes and 60-90 minutes, respectively. A dose response curve of S. epidermidis adhesion in the concentration range of 10sp7{-}10sp9 bac/mL resembled a multilayer adsorption isotherm. Increasing shear stress was found to LTA, and other LTA blocking agents significantly decreased S. epidermidis adhesion to the fibrin-platelet clots, suggesting that this interaction between S. epidermidis and fibrin-platelet clots is specific. Studies evaluated the adhesion of S. epidermidis to polymer immobilized heparin report conflicting results. Paulsson et al., showed that coagulase negative staphylococci adhered in comparable numbers to both immobilized heparin and nonheparinized surfaces, while exhibiting significantly greater adhesion to both surfaces than S. aureus. Preadsorption of the surfaces with specific heparin binding plasma proteins vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen significantly increased adhesion. It was postulated that immobilized heparin contained binding sites for the plasma proteins, exposing bacteria binding domains of the

  2. Linking rapid magma reservoir assembly and eruption trigger mechanisms at evolved Yellowstone-type supervolcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wotzlaw, J.F.; Bindeman, I.N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, A.K.; Caricchi, L.; Schaltegger, U.

    2014-01-01

    reservoir configurations inferred from seismic data at active supervolcanoes. The connection of magma batches vertically distributed over several kilometers in the upper crust would cause a substantial increase of buoyancy overpressure, providing an eruption trigger mechanism that is the direct consequence of the reservoir assembly process.

  3. The Double-Well Potential in Quantum Mechanics: A Simple, Numerically Exact Formulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelic, V.; Marsiglio, F.

    2012-01-01

    The double-well potential is arguably one of the most important potentials in quantum mechanics, because the solution contains the notion of a state as a linear superposition of "classical" states, a concept which has become very important in quantum information theory. It is therefore desirable to have solutions to simple double-well potentials…

  4. Use of next generation sequence to investigate potential novel macrolide resistance mechanisms in a population of Moraxella catarrhalis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Li; Li, Dong-Fang; Xu, He-Ping; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Ge; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Gong, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Yin-Xin; Wu, Hong-Long; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have confirmed that 23S rRNA gene mutation could be responsible for most of macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis, a recent study suggested otherwise. Next generation sequence based comparative genomics has revolutionized the mining of potential novel drug resistant mechanisms. In this study, two pairs of resistant and susceptible M. catarrhalis isolates with different multilocus sequence types, were investigated for potential differential genes or informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The identified genes and SNPs were evaluated in 188 clinical isolates. From initially 12 selected differential genes and 12 informative SNPs, 10 differential genes (mboIA, mcbC, mcbI, mboIB, MCR_1794, MCR_1795, lgt2B/C, dpnI, mcbB, and mcbA) and 6 SNPs (C619T of rumA, T140C of rplF, G643A of MCR_0020, T270G of MCR_1465, C1348A of copB, and G238A of rrmA) were identified as possibly linked to macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis. Most of the identified differential genes and SNPs are related to methylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or DNA, especially MCR_0020 and rrmA. Further studies are needed to determine the function and/or evolution process, of the identified genes or SNPs, to establish whether some novel or combined mechanisms are truly involved in M. catarrhalis macrolide resistance mechanism. PMID:27774989

  5. (Metabolic mechanisms of plant growth at low-water potentials): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    We used soybean seedlings grown in vermiculite in a dark, humid environment because they are convenient to grow, undergo most of the physiological changes induced by low water potentials in large plants, and have exposed growing regions. We studied how growth-induced water potentials originate; which of the parameters regulating cell enlargement are the cause of the decreased rate of stem growth observed at low water potentials; molecular changes that occur in the cell wall at low water potentials; and the mechanism of differential root and shoot growth at low water potential.

  6. Step potential problem and harmonic oscillator problem in the minimum length quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soyeon; Woo, Byeong Hyo; Jung, Min; Jang, Eun Ji; Chung, Won Sang

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we use the quasi-position representation of the minimum length quantum mechanics (MLQM) to study the effects of minimum length uncertainty principle (MLUP) on the quantum mechanical system up to a first-order in β. We introduce the probability density and the probability flux to discuss two problems such as particle in a box and step potential problem. For the step potential, we compute the transmission coefficient and the reflection coefficient and compare them with those of the ordinary quantum mechanics. We also discuss the harmonic oscillator problem in MLQM.

  7. Tuning heterogeneous poly(dopamine) structures and mechanics: in silico covalent cross-linking and thin film nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shangchao; Chen, Chun-Teh; Bdikin, Igor; Ball, Vincent; Grácio, José; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-01-21

    Mussel-inspired synthetic poly(dopamine) thin films from dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and lysine, structurally similar to natural melanin, have drawn extensive interest as a versatile surface functionalization and coating material for use in a broad range of applications. In order to gain a better understanding of its complex and heterogeneous polymeric structure and mechanical properties, we report a computational model of poly(dopamine) by mimicking the polymerization process of the intermediate oxidized product of dopamine, 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI), via controlled in silico covalent cross-linking under the two most possible reaction schemes proposed in experiments. To validate our results using experiment, we synthesize poly(dopamine) thin films and perform experimental nanoindentations on the film. We observe an overall linear behavior for Young's modulus as a function of the degree of cross-linking, demonstrating the possibility of enhancing the mechanical robustness of poly(dopamine) materials by increasing the extent of polymerization. At the highest degree of polymerization considered (70%), the model mimics the linear tetrameric model for poly(dopamine) and melanin. At this degree of polymerization, we find a Young's modulus of 4.1-4.4 GPa, in agreement with our nanoindentation results of 4.3-10.5 GPa, previous experiments for natural melanin, as well as simulation results for the cyclic tetrameric melanin model (Chen et al., ACS Nano, 2013). Our results suggest that the non-covalent DHI aggregate model might not be appropriate to represent the structure of poly(dopamine) and melanin-like materials, since it gives a much smaller Young's modulus than the experimental lower bound. Our model not only nicely complements the previous computational work, but also provides new computational tools to study the heterogeneous structural and physicochemical properties of poly(dopamine) and melanin, as well as their formation pathways.

  8. Juvenile flatfish in the northern Baltic Sea - long-term decline and potential links to habitat characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, Henri; Wennhage, Håkan; Ollus, Victoria; Aro, Eero; Norkko, Alf

    2016-01-01

    Flatfish in the northern Baltic Sea are facing multiple environmental pressures due to on-going large-scale ecosystem changes linked to eutrophication and climate change. Shallow juvenile habitats of flatfishes are expected to be especially susceptible to these environmental pressures. Using previously unpublished historical and present-state data on juvenile flatfish in nursery areas along the Finnish coast we demonstrate a drastic (up to 40 ×) decline in 1-Y-O flounder densities since the 1980s and a particularly low current occurrence of both flounders and turbots in several known juvenile habitats. As a consequence of ongoing coastal eutrophication vegetation coverage and filamentous algae have generally increased in shallow areas. We examined the predicted negative effect of vegetation/algae by exploring quantitative relationships between juvenile flatfish (flounder and turbot) occurrence and vegetation/algae among other environmental factors in shallow juvenile habitats. Despite sparse occurrence of juveniles we found a significant negative relationship between flatfish abundance and vegetation cover, implicating eutrophication as a potential major driver affecting the value of juvenile habitat. Shallow littoral habitats play a particularly central role for flatfish due to the spatial concentration of fish in these areas during the critical juvenile stage. Despite their importance, these areas have been relatively poorly studied in the northern Baltic Sea, which makes it difficult to quantify overall changes in environmental conditions and to relate these changes to flatfish recruitment. The low present-state flatfish densities recorded preclude strong inferences of the role of habitat quality to be drawn. Our study does, however, provide a baseline for future assessment. Based on existing evidence, we cannot thus establish any bottlenecks but hypothesize that the current low occurrence of juvenile flatfish, and the population decline of flounder on the

  9. Flour mill stream blending affects sugar snap cookie and Japanese sponge cake quality and oxidative cross-linking potential of soft white wheat.

    PubMed

    Ramseyer, Daniel D; Bettge, Arthur D; Morris, Craig F

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the functional differences between straight grade (75% extraction rate) and patent (60% extraction rate) flour blends from 28 genetically pure soft white and club wheat grain lots, as evidenced by variation in sugar snap cookie and Japanese sponge cake quality. Functional differences were examined relative to arabinoxylan content, protein content, and oxidative cross-linking potential of flour slurries. Oxidative cross-linking measurements were obtained on flour slurries with a low shear Bostwick consistometer and considered endogenous oxidative cross-linking potential (water alone) or enhanced oxidative cross-linking potential (with added hydrogen peroxide-peroxidase). A 2-way ANOVA indicated that flour blend was the greater source of variation compared to grain lot for all response variables except water-extractable arabinoxylan content. Patent flours produced larger sugar snap cookies and Japanese sponge cakes, and contained significantly less total and water-unextractable arabinoxylans, protein, and ash than did straight grade flours. Patent flours produced more viscous slurries for endogenous and enhanced cross-linking measurements compared to the straight grade flours. The functional differences between patent and straight grade flours appear to be related to the particular mill streams that were utilized in the formulation of the 2 flour blends and compositional differences among those streams.

  10. Exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat as a mechanism linking anxiety with increased risk for diseases of aging.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Aoife; Slavich, George M; Epel, Elissa S; Neylan, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders increase risk for the early development of several diseases of aging. Elevated inflammation, a common risk factor across diseases of aging, may play a key role in the relationship between anxiety and physical disease. However, the neurobiological mechanisms linking anxiety with elevated inflammation remain unclear. In this review, we present a neurobiological model of the mechanisms by which anxiety promotes inflammation. Specifically we propose that exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat in anxious individuals may lead to sustained threat perception, which is accompanied by prolonged activation of threat-related neural circuitry and threat-responsive biological systems including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, autonomic nervous system (ANS), and inflammatory response. Over time, this pattern of responding can promote chronic inflammation through structural and functional brain changes, altered sensitivity of immune cell receptors, dysregulation of the HPA axis and ANS, and accelerated cellular aging. Chronic inflammation, in turn, increases risk for diseases of aging. Exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat may thus be a treatment target for reducing disease risk in anxious individuals.

  11. The cytotoxicity of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin is linked to an endocytotic mechanism equivalent to transport-P.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Robert; Stracke, Anika; Ebner, Nadine; Zeller, Christian Wolfgang; Raninger, Anna Maria; Schittmayer, Matthias; Kueznik, Tatjana; Absenger-Novak, Markus; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2015-12-02

    Since the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin (PRZ) was introduced into medicine as a treatment for hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia, several studies have shown that PRZ induces apoptosis in various cell types and interferes with endocytotic trafficking. Because PRZ is also able to induce apoptosis in malignant cells, its cytotoxicity is a focus of interest in cancer research. Besides inducing apoptosis, PRZ was shown to serve as a substrate for an amine uptake mechanism originally discovered in neurones called transport-P. In line with our hypothesis that transport-P is an endocytotic mechanism also present in non-neuronal tissue and linked to the cytotoxicity of PRZ, we tested the uptake of QAPB, a fluorescent derivative of PRZ, in cancer cell lines in the presence of inhibitors of transport-P and endocytosis. Early endosomes and lysosomes were visualised by expression of RAB5-RFP and LAMP1-RFP, respectively; growth and viability of cells in the presence of PRZ and uptake inhibitors were also tested. Cancer cells showed co-localisation of QAPB with RAB5 and LAMP1 positive vesicles as well as tubulation of lysosomes. The uptake of QAPB was sensitive to transport-P inhibitors bafilomycin A1 (inhibits v-ATPase) and the antidepressant desipramine. Endocytosis inhibitors pitstop(®) 2 (general inhibitor of endocytosis), dynasore (dynamin inhibitor) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (cholesterol chelator) inhibited the uptake of QAPB. Bafilomycin A1 and methyl-β-cyclodextrin but not desipramine were able to preserve growth and viability of cells in the presence of PRZ. In summary, we confirmed the hypothesis that the cellular uptake of QAPB/PRZ represents an endocytotic mechanism equivalent to transport-P. Endocytosis of QAPB/PRZ depends on a proton gradient, dynamin and cholesterol, and results in reorganisation of the LAMP1 positive endolysosomal system. Finally, the link seen between the cellular uptake of PRZ and cell death implies a still unknown pro

  12. Molecular mechanism linking BDNF/TrkB signaling with the NMDA receptor in memory: the role of Girdin in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Norimichi; Enomoto, Atsushi; Nagai, Taku; Takahashi, Masahide; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that synaptic plasticity is the cellular mechanism underlying learning and memory. Activity-dependent synaptic changes in electrical properties and morphology, including synaptogenesis, lead to alterations of synaptic strength, which is associated with long-term potentiation (LTP). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) signaling is involved in learning and memory formation by regulating synaptic plasticity. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt pathway is one of the key signaling cascades downstream BDNF/TrkB and is believed to modulate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the connection between these two key players in synaptic plasticity remains largely unknown. Girders of actin filament (Girdin), an Akt substrate that directly binds to actin filaments, has been shown to play a role in neuronal migration and neuronal development. Recently, we identified Girdin as a key molecule involved in regulating long-term memory. It was demonstrated that phosphorylation of Girdin by Akt contributed to the maintenance of LTP by linking the BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway with NMDA receptor activity. These findings indicate that Girdin plays a pivotal role in a variety of processes in the CNS. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding about the roles of Girdin in the CNS and focus particularly on neuronal migration and memory.

  13. Mechanisms of plastic deformation in highly cross-linked UHMWPE for total hip components--the molecular physics viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Plastic deformation is an unavoidable event in biomedical polymeric implants for load-bearing application during long-term in-vivo service life, which involves a mass transfer process, irreversible chain motion, and molecular reorganization. Deformation-induced microstructural alterations greatly affect mechanical properties and durability of implant devices. The present research focused on evaluating, from a molecular physics viewpoint, the impact of externally applied strain (or stress) in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) prostheses, subjected to radiation cross-linking and subsequent remelting for application in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Two different types of commercial acetabular liners, which belong to the first-generation highly cross-linked UHMWPE (HXLPE), were investigated by means of confocal/polarized Raman microprobe spectroscopy. The amount of crystalline region and the spatial distribution of molecular chain orientation were quantitatively analyzed according to a combined theory including Raman selection rules for the polyethylene orthorhombic structure and the orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical approach. The structurally important finding was that pronounced recrystallization and molecular reorientation increasingly appeared in the near-surface regions of HXLPE liners with increasing the amount of plastic (compressive) deformation stored in the microstructure. Such molecular rearrangements, occurred in response to external strains, locally increase surface cross-shear (CS) stresses, which in turn trigger microscopic wear processes in HXLPE acetabular liners. Thus, on the basis of the results obtained at the molecular scale, we emphasize here the importance of minimizing the development of irrecoverable deformation strain in order to retain the pristine and intrinsically high wear performance of HXLPE components.

  14. ForceFit: a code to fit classical force fields to quantum mechanical potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Waldher, Benjamin; Kuta, Jadwiga; Chen, Samuel; Henson, Neil; Clark, Aurora E

    2010-09-01

    The ForceFit program package has been developed for fitting classical force field parameters based upon a force matching algorithm to quantum mechanical gradients of configurations that span the potential energy surface of the system. The program, which runs under UNIX and is written in C++, is an easy-to-use, nonproprietary platform that enables gradient fitting of a wide variety of functional force field forms to quantum mechanical information obtained from an array of common electronic structure codes. All aspects of the fitting process are run from a graphical user interface, from the parsing of quantum mechanical data, assembling of a potential energy surface database, setting the force field, and variables to be optimized, choosing a molecular mechanics code for comparison to the reference data, and finally, the initiation of a least squares minimization algorithm. Furthermore, the code is based on a modular templated code design that enables the facile addition of new functionality to the program.

  15. Biomass Carbon in the South Mexican Pacific Coast: Exploring Mangrove Potential to REDD+ Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano, M.; Amezcua-Torrijos, I.

    2014-12-01

    Mangroves have the highest carbon stocks amongst tropical forests. In Mexico, however, little is known about their potential to mitigate climate change. In this work, we estimated biomass carbon stocks in the Southern Mexican Pacific Coast (~69,000 ha). We quantified above and belowground biomass carbon stocks at (1) the regional scale along two environmental strata (i.e. dry and wet), and (2) at the local scale along three geomorphological types of mangroves (i.e. fringe, estuarine and basin). Regional strata were defined using intensity and influence of rivers and, the mean annual precipitation and evapotranspiration ratio (i.e., wet < 1 > dry). By lowering the stressing environmental conditions (e.g., low salinity and high sediment accumulation), we expected the highest stocks in mangroves growing in wet and estuarine strata at the regional scale and local scale, respectively. Quantifications were carried out in sixty-six sites chosen through stratified randomized design in which six strata were obtained by a full combination of regional and local strata. In all strata, aboveground carbon represents 64-67% of total carbon. Total biomass carbon was higher in wet than dry stratum (W: 87.3 ± 6.9, D: 47.0 ± 5.0, p<0.001). While at local scale, total biomass carbon was high in estuarine mangroves of both wet and dry regions (W: 91.6 ± 7.8, D: 77.6 ± 14.8, p<0.001), and these were statistically similar to fringe wet mangroves (110.9 ± 24.2, p<0.001), the stratum with the highest total carbon. Following a conservative approach, the Mexican Southern Pacific Coast is storing near 20,344 Gg CO2e. If the historical annual deforestation rate of 0.54% continues, this region could emit between 0.03 and 14.4 Gg of CO2e ha/year, out of which wet estuarine mangroves would have the highest emission values. Evidence suggests that these mangroves are the most important strata in which REDD+ mechanisms could be implemented due to (1) their carbon stocks, and (2) their highest

  16. Posttraumatic torsional injury as an indirect cause of fibular intraneural ganglion cysts: case illustrations and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Robert J; Ibrahim Elshiekh, Mohanad Ahmed; Tubbs, R Shane; Turner, Norman S; Amrami, Kimberly K

    2012-07-01

    Trauma has been loosely associated with the development of fibular intraneural ganglion cysts. Sporadic reports of direct trauma to the proximal lateral leg in the region of the superior tibiofibular joint (STFJ) capsule support the development of a capsular rent and the subsequent egress of joint fluid from the articular joint. This report provides evidence to suggest that indirect trauma from torsion can link concomitant ankle injury and fibular nerve palsy (foot drop) and fibular intraneural ganglion cysts. We present two cases to illustrate different potential mechanisms. One patient sustained an ankle ligamentous injury which was translated through the interosseous membrane (IOM) to the proximal leg region, affecting the STFJ and the fibular nerve (ascending pathway). The second patient had blunt injury to the popliteal fossa in combination with a twisting injury to the leg. In this latter case we offer two plausible explanations: (1) combined knee and ankle injury resulting in an ascending pathway mechanism; and (2) a knee injury which disrupted the STFJ, resulting in a translational force down the leg (descending pathway). We believe that fibular intraneural cysts from the STFJ result from direct and indirect trauma. Additional reports of similar cases and sophisticated biomechanical testing will allow us to delineate the exact mechanisms for these injury patterns.

  17. Comparative investigation of thermal and mechanical properties of cross-linked epoxy polymers with different curing agents by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jeyranpour, F; Alahyarizadeh, Gh; Arab, B

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to predict the thermal and mechanical properties of the cross-linked epoxy system composed of DGEBA resin and the curing agent TETA. To investigate the effects of curing agents, a comprehensive and comparative study was also performed on the thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA epoxy systems such as density, glass transition temperature (Tg), coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and elastic properties of different cross-linking densities and different temperatures. The results indicated that the glass transition temperature of DGEBA/TETA system calculated through density-temperature data, ∼ 385-395 °K, for the epoxy system with the cross-linking density of 62.5% has a better agreement with the experimental value (Tg, ∼ 400 °K) in comparison to the value calculated through the variation of cell volume in terms of temperature, 430-440 °K. They also indicated that CTE related parameters and elastic properties including Young, Bulk, and shear's moduli, and Poisson's ratio have a relative agreement with the experimental results. Comparison between the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy systems of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA showed that the DGEBA/DETDA has a higher Tg in all cross linking densities than that of DGEBA/TETA, while higher mechanical properties was observed in the case of DGEBA/TETA in almost all cross linking densities.

  18. Bacteriophage resistance mechanisms in the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum: linking genomic mutations to changes in bacterial virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger; Madsen, Lone; Middelboe, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Due to increased antibiotic resistance, pathogen control using bacteriophages has been explored as a possible alternative treatment. However, the effective use of bacteriophages in pathogen control requires overcoming the selection for phage resistance in the bacterial populations. Here, we analyzed resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum after phage exposure using whole-genome sequencing of the ancestral phage-sensitive strain 950106-1/1 and six phage-resistant isolates. The phage-resistant strains had all obtained unique insertions and/or deletions and point mutations distributed among intergenic and genic regions. Mutations in genes related to cell surface properties, gliding motility, and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides and cell wall were found. The observed links between phage resistance and the genetic modifications were supported by direct measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, biofilm formation, and secretion of extracellular enzymes, which were all impaired in the resistant strains, probably due to superficial structural changes. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) region was unaffected in the resistant isolates and thus did not play a role as a resistance mechanism for F. psychrophilum under the current conditions. All together, the results suggest that resistance in F. psychrophilum was driven by spontaneous mutations, which were associated with a number of derived effects on the physiological properties of the pathogen, including reduced virulence under in vitro conditions. Consequently, phage-driven physiological changes associated with resistance may have implications for the impact of the pathogen in aquaculture, and these effects of phage resistance on host properties are therefore important for the ongoing exploration of phage-based control of F. psychrophilum.

  19. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  20. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A; Johnson, Matthew S; Danielache, Sebastian O; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-10-29

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of (32)SO2, (33)SO2, (34)SO2, and (36)SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ(33)S/δ(34)S and Δ(36)S/Δ(33)S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events.

  1. A selective Gβγ-linked intracellular mechanism for modulation of a ligand-gated ion channel by ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Yevenes, Gonzalo E.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Peoples, Robert W.; Schmalzing, Günther; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2008-01-01

    The current understanding about ethanol effects on the ligand-gated ion channel (LGIC) superfamily has been restricted to identify potential binding sites within transmembrane (TM) domains in the Cys-loop family. Here, we demonstrate a key role of the TM3–4 intracellular loop and Gβγ signaling for potentiation of glycine receptors (GlyRs) by ethanol. We discovered 2 motifs within the large intracellular loop of the GlyR α1 subunit that are critical for the actions of pharmacological concentrations of ethanol. Significantly, the sites were ethanol-specific because they did not alter the sensitivity to general anesthetics, neurosteroids, or longer n-alcohols. Furthermore, Gβγ scavengers selectively attenuated the ethanol effects on recombinant and native neuronal GlyRs. These results show a selective mechanism for low-ethanol concentration effects on the GlyR and provide a mechanism on ethanol pharmacology, which may be applicable to other LGIC members. Moreover, these data provide an opportunity to develop new genetically modified animal models and novel drugs to treat alcohol-related medical concerns. PMID:19074265

  2. POTENTIAL MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR CHLOROTRIAZINE-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CATECHOLAMINES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Potential Mechanisms Responsible for Chlorotriazine-induced Changes in Catecholamine Metabolism in Pheochromocytoma (PC12) Cells*
    PARIKSHIT C. DAS1, WILLIAM K. McELROY2 , AND RALPH L. COOPER2+
    1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chape...

  3. An Introductory Organic Chemistry Review Homework Exercise: Deriving Potential Mechanisms for Glucose Ring Opening in Mutarotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Margaret; Holman, R. W.; Slade, Tyler; Clark, Shelley L. D.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    A unique homework assignment has been designed as a review exercise to be implemented near the end of the one-year undergraduate organic chemistry sequence. Within the framework of the exercise, students derive potential mechanisms for glucose ring opening in the aqueous mutarotation process. In this endeavor, 21 general review principles are…

  4. Colony failure linked to low sperm viability in honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens and an exploration of potential causative factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Queen health is closely linked to colony performance in honey bees as a single queen is normally responsible for all egg laying and brood production within the colony. In the U. S. in recent years, queens have been failing at a high rate; with 50% or greater of queens replaced in colonies within 6 m...

  5. FKBP65-dependent peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity potentiates the lysyl hydroxylase 2-driven collagen cross-link switch

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Banerjee, Priyam; Guo, Houfu; Liu, Xin; Yu, Jiang; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Bruck Syndrome is a connective tissue disease associated with inactivating mutations in lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2/PLOD2) or FK506 binding protein 65 (FKBP65/FKBP10). However, the functional relationship between LH2 and FKBP65 remains unclear. Here, we postulated that peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity of FKBP65 positively modulates LH2 enzymatic activity and is critical for the formation of hydroxylysine-aldehyde derived intermolecular collagen cross-links (HLCCs). To test this hypothesis, we analyzed collagen cross-links in Fkbp10-null and –wild-type murine embryonic fibroblasts. Although LH2 protein levels did not change, FKBP65 deficiency significantly diminished HLCCs and increased the non-hydroxylated lysine-aldehyde–derived collagen cross-links (LCCs), a pattern consistent with loss of LH2 enzymatic activity. The HLCC-to-LCC ratio was rescued in FKBP65-deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts by reconstitution with wild-type but not mutant FKBP65 that lacks intact PPIase domains. Findings from co-immunoprecipitation, protein-fragment complementation, and co-immunofluorescence assays showed that LH2 and FKBP65 are part of a common protein complex. We conclude that FKBP65 regulates LH2-mediated collagen cross-linking. Because LH2 promotes fibrosis and cancer metastasis, our findings suggest that pharmacologic strategies to target FKBP65 and LH2 may have complementary therapeutic activities. PMID:28378777

  6. Lifelong bilingualism and neural reserve against Alzheimer's disease: a review of findings and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gold, Brian T

    2015-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain disorder that initially affects medial temporal lobe circuitry and memory functions. Current drug treatments have only modest effects on the symptomatic course of the disease. In contrast, a growing body of evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may delay the onset of clinical AD symptoms by several years. The purpose of the present review is to summarize evidence for bilingualism as a reserve variable against AD and discuss potential underlying neurocognitive mechanisms. Evidence is reviewed suggesting that bilingualism may delay clinical AD symptoms by protecting frontostriatal and frontoparietal executive control circuitry rather than medial temporal lobe memory circuitry. Cellular and molecular mechanisms that may contribute to bilingual cognitive reserve effects are discussed, including those that may affect neuronal metabolic functions, dynamic neuronal-glial interactions, vascular factors, myelin structure and neurochemical signaling. Future studies that may test some of these potential mechanisms of bilingual CR effects are proposed.

  7. The Development of Effective Classical Potentials and the Quantum Statistical Mechanical Second Virial Coefficient of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Schenter, Gregory K.

    2002-10-08

    The second virial coefficient of water is calculated at low temperature by considering full quantum statistical mechanical effects. At low enough temperatures experimental results are limited and molecular models can be used for accurate extrapolation. In doing so, one must separate inaccuracies of the intermolecular potential from limitations of simulation such as the neglect of higher-order quantum corrections. Effective classical potentials may be used to understand the limitations of classical simulation. In this work we calculate the exact quantum statistical mechanical second virial coefficient and find that using a simple form for the effective classical potential introduced by Miller we are able to reproduce the exact quantum statistical results. This approach provides a significant improvement to conventional first order expansions of the second virial coefficient.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation: Mechanisms, Pathophysiology, and Potential Therapies in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Steven J; Kawai, Tatsuo; O'Brien, Shannon; Thomas, Walter; Harris, Raymond C; Eguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation impacts the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, and inhibition of EGFR activity is emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat diseases including hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, renal fibrosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm. The capacity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, such as angiotensin II (AngII), to promote EGFR signaling is called transactivation and is well described, yet delineating the molecular processes and functional relevance of this crosstalk has been challenging. Moreover, these critical findings are dispersed among many different fields. The aim of our review is to highlight recent advancements in defining the signaling cascades and downstream consequences of EGFR transactivation in the cardiovascular renal system. We also focus on studies that link EGFR transactivation to animal models of the disease, and we discuss potential therapeutic applications.

  9. Mitigating thermal mechanical damage potential during two-photon dermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Masters, Barry R; So, Peter T C; Buehler, Christof; Barry, Nicholas; Sutin, Jason D; Mantulin, William W; Gratton, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy allows in vivo high-resolution imaging of human skin structure and biochemistry with a penetration depth over 100 microm. The major damage mechanism during two-photon skin imaging is associated with the formation of cavitation at the epidermal-dermal junction, which results in thermal mechanical damage of the tissue. In this report, we verify that this damage mechanism is of thermal origin and is associated with one-photon absorption of infrared excitation light by melanin granules present in the epidermal-dermal junction. The thermal mechanical damage threshold for selected Caucasian skin specimens from a skin bank as a function of laser pulse energy and repetition rate has been determined. The experimentally established thermal mechanical damage threshold is consistent with a simple heat diffusion model for skin under femtosecond pulse laser illumination. Minimizing thermal mechanical damage is vital for the potential use of two-photon imaging in noninvasive optical biopsy of human skin in vivo. We describe a technique to mitigate specimen thermal mechanical damage based on the use of a laser pulse picker that reduces the laser repetition rate by selecting a fraction of pulses from a laser pulse train. Since the laser pulse picker decreases laser average power while maintaining laser pulse peak power, thermal mechanical damage can be minimized while two-photon fluorescence excitation efficiency is maximized.

  10. Mechanical strain promotes osteoblast ECM formation and improves its osteoinductive potential

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a supportive microenvironment for cells, which is suitable as a tissue engineering scaffold. Mechanical stimulus plays a significant role in the fate of osteoblast, suggesting that it regulates ECM formation. Therefore, we investigated the influence of mechanical stimulus on ECM formation and bioactivity. Methods Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured in cell culture dishes and stimulated with mechanical tensile strain. After removing the cells, the ECMs coated on dishes were prepared. The ECM protein and calcium were assayed and MC3T3-E1 cells were re-seeded on the ECM-coated dishes to assess osteoinductive potential of the ECM. Results The cyclic tensile strain increased collagen, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), BMP-4, and calcium levels in the ECM. Compared with the ECM produced by unstrained osteoblasts, those of mechanically stimulated osteoblasts promoted alkaline phosphatase activity, elevated BMP-2 and osteopontin levels and mRNA levels of runt-related transcriptional factor 2 (Runx2) and osteocalcin (OCN), and increased secreted calcium of the re-seeded MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusion Mechanical strain promoted ECM production of osteoblasts in vitro, increased BMP-2/4 levels, and improved osteoinductive potential of the ECM. This study provided a novel method to enhance bioactivity of bone ECM in vitro via mechanical strain to osteoblasts. PMID:23098360

  11. Selective activation of mitomycin A by thiols to form DNA cross-links and monoadducts: biochemical basis for the modulation of mitomycin cytotoxicity by the quinone redox potential.

    PubMed

    Paz, M M; Das, A; Palom, Y; He, Q Y; Tomasz, M

    2001-08-16

    Mitomycin A (MA) but not mitomycin C (MC) cross-linked linearized (32)P-pBR322 DNA in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) or glutathione (GSH), as shown by a sensitive DNA cross-link assay. Incubation of calf-thymus DNA with MA and DTT or mercaptoethanol (MER) resulted in the formation of MA-DNA adducts, which were isolated from nuclease digests of the drug-DNA complexes by HPLC. The adducts were characterized by their UV absorption spectra, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS), and facile conversion from 7-methoxy- to 7-amino-substituted mitosene type adducts upon 10% NH(4)OH treatment, which were identical with known adducts of MC. Both DNA interstrand and intrastrand cross-link adducts, linking two deoxyguanosine residues at N(2), as well as several deoxyguanosine-N(2) monoadducts of MA, were identified. No DNA adducts were formed with MC under the same conditions. A specificity of DNA cross-link formation for the CpG sequence was observed using 12-mer synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as substrates and as DNA sequence models, in analogy to the known CpG sequence specificity of MC-induced DNA cross-links. MA is known to be more cytotoxic by 2-3 orders of magnitude than MC, and this property correlates with redox potentials of MA (-0.19 V) and MA analogues that are higher than those of MC (-0.40 V) and its analogues. It is suggested that the biochemical basis for the higher cytotoxic potency of MA is MA's propensity to be reductively activated by cellular thiols while MC is resistant to thiol activation. This distinction is probably derived from the large difference between the quinone redox potentials of the two drugs.

  12. Quantum mechanics of a constrained particle and the problem of prescribed geometry-induced potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Luiz C. B.; Bastos, Cristiano C.; Ribeiro, Fábio G.

    2017-04-01

    The experimental techniques have evolved to a stage where various examples of nanostructures with non-trivial shapes have been synthesized, turning the dynamics of a constrained particle and the link with geometry into a realistic and important topic of research. Some decades ago, a formalism to deduce a meaningful Hamiltonian for the confinement was devised, showing that a geometry-induced potential (GIP) acts upon the dynamics. In this work we study the problem of prescribed GIP for curves and surfaces in Euclidean space R3, i.e., how to find a curved region with a potential given a priori. The problem for curves is easily solved by integrating Frenet equations, while the problem for surfaces involves a non-linear 2nd order partial differential equation (PDE). Here, we explore the GIP for surfaces invariant by a 1-parameter group of isometries of R3, which turns the PDE into an ordinary differential equation (ODE) and leads to cylindrical, revolution, and helicoidal surfaces. Helicoidal surfaces are particularly important, since they are natural candidates to establish a link between chirality and the GIP. Finally, for the family of helicoidal minimal surfaces, we prove the existence of geometry-induced bound and localized states and the possibility of controlling the change in the distribution of the probability density when the surface is subjected to an extra charge.

  13. Early life stress interactions with the epigenome: potential mechanisms driving vulnerability towards psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    Olive, Michael Foster

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the 20th century a body of literature concerning the long lasting effects of early environment was produced. Adverse experiences in early life, or early life stress (ELS), is associated with a higher risk for developing various psychiatric illnesses. The mechanisms driving the complex interplay between ELS and adult phenotype has baffled many investigators for decades. Over the last decade, the new field of neuroepigenetics has emerged as one possible mechanism by which ELS can have far reaching effects on adult phenotype, behavior, and risk for psychiatric illness. Here we review two commonly investigated epigenetic mechanisms, histone modifications and DNA methylation, and the emerging field of neuroepigenetics as they relate to ELS. We discuss the current animal literature demonstrating ELS induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression that results in altered adult phenotypes. We also briefly discuss other areas in which neuroepigenetics has emerged as a potential mechanism underlying environmental and genetic interactions. PMID:25003947

  14. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN. PMID:25826110

  15. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Ocular Infection after Corneal Cross-Linking for Keratoconus: Potential Association with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Fasciani, Romina; Agresta, Antonio; Caristia, Alice; Mosca, Luigi; Scupola, Andrea; Caporossi, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ocular infection after UVA-riboflavin corneal collagen cross-linking in a patient with atopic dermatitis. Methods. A 22-year-old man, with bilateral evolutive keratoconus and atopic dermatitis, underwent UVA-riboflavin corneal cross-linking and presented with rapidly progressive corneal abscesses and cyclitis in the treated eye five days after surgery. The patient was admitted to the hospital and treated with broad-spectrum antimicrobic therapy. Results. The patient had positive cultures for MRSA, exhibiting a strong resistance to antibiotics. Antibiotic therapy was modified and targeted accordingly. The intravitreal reaction is extinguished, but severe damage of ocular structures was unavoidable. Conclusion. Riboflavin/UVA corneal cross-linking is considered a safe procedure and is extremely effective in halting keratoconus' progression. However, this procedure is not devoid of infectious complications, due to known risk factors and/or poor patients' hygiene compliance in the postoperative period. Atopic dermatitis is a common disease among patients with keratoconus and Staphylococcus aureus colonization is commonly found in patients with atopic dermatitis. Therefore, comorbidity with atopic dermatitis should be thoroughly assessed through clinical history before surgery. A clinical evaluation within three days after surgery and the imposition of strict personal hygiene rules are strongly recommended. PMID:25866692

  16. Mechanical behaviour of dacite from Mount St. Helens (USA): A link between porosity and lava dome extrusion mechanism (dome or spine)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Russell, J. K.; Kennedy, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    There is a rich diversity in lava dome morphology, from blocky domes and lobes to imposing spine and whaleback structures. The latter extrude via seismically active, gouge-rich conduit-margin faults, a manifestation of a brittle failure mode. Brittle versus ductile behaviour in volcanic rocks is known to be porosity dependent, and therefore offers a tantalising link between the properties of the material near the conduit margin and the extrusion mechanism (dome or spine). We test this hypothesis by complementing published data on the mechanical behaviour of dacites from the 2004-2008 spine-forming eruption at Mount St. Helens (MSH) with new data on dacite lavas collected from the 1980 dome. The 1980 dacite samples were deformed at room temperature under a range of pressures (i.e., depths) to investigate their mechanical behaviour and failure mode (brittle or ductile). Low-porosity dacite (porosity 0.19) is brittle up to an effective pressure of 30 MPa (depth 1 km) and is ductile at 40 MPa (depth 1.5 km). High-porosity dacite (porosity 0.32) is ductile above an effective pressure of 5 MPa (depth 200 m). Samples deformed in the brittle regime show well-developed ( 1 mm) shear fracture zones comprising broken glass and crystal fragments. Samples deformed in the ductile regime feature anastomosing bands of collapsed pores. The combined dataset is used to explore the influence of strain rate, temperature, and porosity on the mechanical behaviour and failure mode of dacite. A decrease in strain rate does not influence the strength of dacite at low temperature, but reduces strength at high temperature (850 °C). Due to the extremely low glass content of these materials, such weakening is attributed to the increased efficiency of subcritical crack growth at high temperature. However, when strain rate is kept constant, temperature does not significant impact strength reflecting the highly crystallised nature of dacite from MSH. Dacite from the 2004-2008 eruption is stronger

  17. Accurate Modelling of a Flexible-Link Planar Mechanism by Means of a Linearized Model in the State-Space Form for Design of a Vibration Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GASPARETTO, A.

    2001-02-01

    Vibration control of flexible link mechanisms with more than two flexible links is still an open question, mainly because defining a model that is adequate for the designing of a controller is a rather difficult task. In this work, an accurate dynamic non-linear model of a flexible-link planar mechanism is presented. In order to bring the system into a form that is suitable for the design of a vibration controller, the model is then linearized about an operating point, so as to achieve a linear model of the system in the standard state-space form of system theory. The linear model obtained, which is valid for whatever planar mechanism with any number of flexible link, is then applied to a four-bar planar linkage. Extensive simulation is carried out, aimed at comparing the system dynamic evolution, both in the open- and in the closed-loop case, using the non-linear model and the linearized one. The results prove that the error made by using the linearized system instead of the non-linear one is small. Therefore, it can be concluded that the model proposed in this work can constitute an effective basis for designing and testing many types of vibration controllers for flexible planar mechanisms.

  18. Potential mechanisms for a role of metabolic stress in hypertrophic adaptations to resistance training.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2013-03-01

    It is well established that regimented resistance training can promote increases in muscle hypertrophy. The prevailing body of research indicates that mechanical stress is the primary impetus for this adaptive response and studies show that mechanical stress alone can initiate anabolic signalling. Given the dominant role of mechanical stress in muscle growth, the question arises as to whether other factors may enhance the post-exercise hypertrophic response. Several researchers have proposed that exercise-induced metabolic stress may in fact confer such an anabolic effect and some have even suggested that metabolite accumulation may be more important than high force development in optimizing muscle growth. Metabolic stress pursuant to traditional resistance training manifests as a result of exercise that relies on anaerobic glycolysis for adenosine triphosphate production. This, in turn, causes the subsequent accumulation of metabolites, particularly lactate and H(+). Acute muscle hypoxia associated with such training methods may further heighten metabolic buildup. Therefore, the purpose of this paper will be to review the emerging body of research suggesting a role for exercise-induced metabolic stress in maximizing muscle development and present insights as to the potential mechanisms by which these hypertrophic adaptations may occur. These mechanisms include increased fibre recruitment, elevated systemic hormonal production, alterations in local myokines, heightened production of reactive oxygen species and cell swelling. Recommendations are provided for potential areas of future research on the subject.

  19. Simultaneous Measurement of [Ca2+]i and Membrane Potential under Mechanical or Biochemical Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Minoru; Imura, Katsuaki; Ushida, Takashi; Tateishi, Tetsuya

    In human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC), mechanical stress is known to induce transients of [Ca2+]i that lead to the regulation of vascular functions in vivo. The transmembraneous influx of Ca2+ is thought to be mediated by voltage-dependent ion channels or stretch-activated ion channels. In order to elucidate the correlation of [Ca2+]i and membrane potential under mechanical stress, the influences of mechanical or biochemical stimulation on endothelial cells stained with both fura-2 and DiBAC4(3) were studied in vitro, by constructing an imaging system that could capture four kinds of fluorescence images simultaneously at real-time. In the application of thrombin, [Ca2+]i transients were accompanied with preceding depolarization, while mechanical stress that were loaded on a single cell with a micropipette did not evoke dramatic changes of membrane potential. These results indicate that the signaling pathway initiated by mechanical stress could be independent of electrochemical activation, and different from that by biochemical stimulation in HUVEC.

  20. The Effects of Puerarin on Rat Ventricular Myocytes and the Potential Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Zhao, Manxi; Liang, Shenghui; Huang, Quanshu; Xiao, Yunchuan; Ye, Liang; Wang, Qinyi; He, Longmei; Ma, Lanxiang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Hui; Ke, Xiao; Gu, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    Puerarin, a known isoflavone, is commonly found as a Chinese herb medicine. It is widely used in China to treat cardiac diseases such as angina, cardiac infarction and arrhythmia. However, its cardioprotective mechanism remains unclear. In this study, puerarin significantly prolonged ventricular action potential duration (APD) with a dosage dependent manner in the micromolar range on isolated rat ventricular myocytes. However, submicromolar puerarin had no effect on resting membrane potential (RMP), action potential amplitude (APA) and maximal velocity of depolarization (Vmax) of action potential. Only above the concentration of 10 mM, puerarin exhibited more aggressive effect on action potential, and shifted RMP to the positive direction. Millimolar concentrations of puerarin significantly inhibited inward rectified K+ channels in a dosage dependent manner, and exhibited bigger effects upon Kir2.1 vs Kir2.3 in transfected HEK293 cells. As low as micromolar range concentrations of puerarin significantly inhibited Kv7.1 and IKs. These inhibitory effects may due to the direct inhibition of puerarin upon channels not via the PKA-dependent pathway. These results provided direct preclinical evidence that puerarin prolonged APD via its inhibitory effect upon Kv7.1 and IKs, contributing to a better understanding the mechanism of puerarin cardioprotection in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27762288

  1. The mechanics of the gibbon foot and its potential for elastic energy storage during bipedalism.

    PubMed

    Vereecke, Evie E; Aerts, Peter

    2008-12-01

    The mechanics of the modern human foot and its specialization for habitual bipedalism are well understood. The windlass mechanism gives it the required stability for propulsion generation, and flattening of the arch and stretching of the plantar aponeurosis leads to energy saving. What is less well understood is how an essentially flat and mobile foot, as found in protohominins and extant apes, functions during bipedalism. This study evaluates the hypothesis that an energy-saving mechanism, by stretch and recoil of plantar connective tissues, is present in the mobile gibbon foot and provides a two-dimensional analysis of the internal joint mechanics of the foot during spontaneous bipedalism of gibbons using a four-link segment foot model. Available force and pressure data are combined with detailed foot kinematics, recorded with a high-speed camera at 250 Hz, to calculate the external joint moments at the metatarsophalangeal (MP), tarsometatarsal (TM) and talocrural (TC) joints. In addition, instantaneous joint powers are estimated to obtain insight into the propulsion-generating capacities of the internal foot joints. It is found that, next to a wide range of motion at the TC joint, substantial motion is observed at the TM and MP joint, underlining the importance of using a multi-segment foot model in primate gait analyses. More importantly, however, this study shows that although a compliant foot is less mechanically effective for push-off than a ;rigid' arched foot, it can contribute to the generation of propulsion in bipedal locomotion via stretch and recoil of the plantarflexor tendons and plantar ligaments.

  2. The Electrokinetic Mechanism of Hydrothermal-Circulation-Related and Production-Induced Self-Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ishido, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Sugihara, M.

    1987-01-20

    Self-potential (SP) surveys were carried out on a number of geothermal areas in Japan during the last decade. In most cases SP anomalies of positive polarity are found to overlie high temperature upflow zones. Streaming potential generated by hydrothermal circulation (Ishido, 1981) is considered to be the most likely cause of the observed positive anomalies. Repeated surveys conducted on the Nigorikawa caldera in Japan detected a change in SP induced by production of geothermal fluids. The observed change is dipolar in waveform and can also be attributed to an electrokinetic mechanism. 6 figs., 14 refs.

  3. Proinflammatory cytokines in breast cancer: mechanisms of action and potential targets for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Jodi E; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2010-09-01

    Inflammation within the tumor microenvironment correlates with increased invasiveness and poor prognosis in many types of cancer, including breast cancer. The cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) are critical mediators of the inflammatory response. Numerous studies have also linked these cytokines to breast cancer progression. As a result, the mechanisms by which these cytokines promote breast cancer have been recently explored using both in vitro and in vivo models. The results from these studies have led to speculation regarding the possible usefulness of targeting these cytokines in breast cancer patients. This review summarizes the most recent studies pertaining to the mechanisms by which proinflammatory cytokines promote breast cancer. Furthermore, the possibilities of targeting these inflammatory mediators in breast cancer patients using inhibitors that are currently being used in the clinic for other inflammatory conditions are discussed. Understanding both the mechanisms by which inflammatory mediators promote breast cancer and the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory drugs in treating breast cancer will lead to novel therapeutic regimens to treat this devastating disease.

  4. The role of autophagy in liver cancer: molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianzhou; Gong, Zhiyuan; Shen, Han-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway for degradation of cytoplasmic proteins and organelles via lysosome. Proteins coded by the autophagy-related genes (Atgs) are the core molecular machinery in control of autophagy. Among the various biological functions of autophagy identified so far, the link between autophagy and cancer is probably among the most extensively studied and is often viewed as controversial. Autophagy might exert a dual role in cancer development: autophagy can serve as an anti-tumor mechanism, as defective autophagy (e.g., heterozygous knockdown Beclin 1 and Atg7 in mice) promotes the malignant transformation and spontaneous tumors. On the other hand, autophagy functions as a protective or survival mechanism in cancer cells against cellular stress (e.g., nutrient deprivation, hypoxia and DNA damage) and hence promotes tumorigenesis and causes resistance to therapeutic agents. Liver cancer is one of the common cancers with well-established etiological factors including hepatitis virus infection and environmental carcinogens such as aflatoxin and alcohol exposure. In recent years, the involvement of autophagy in liver cancer has been increasingly studied. Here, we aim to provide a systematic review on the close cross-talks between autophagy and liver cancer, and summarize the current status in development of novel liver cancer therapeutic approaches by targeting autophagy. It is believed that understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the autophagy modulation and liver cancer development may provoke the translational studies that ultimately lead to new therapeutic strategies for liver cancer.

  5. Potential Mechanisms for IgG4 Inhibition of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K; Till, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    IgG4 is the least abundant IgG subclass in human serum, representing less than 5% of all IgG. Increases in IgG4 occur following chronic exposure to antigen and are generally associated with states of immune tolerance. In line with this, IgG4 is regarded as an anti-inflammatory antibody with a limited ability to elicit effective immune responses. Furthermore, IgG4 attenuates allergic responses by inhibiting the activity of IgE. The mechanism by which IgG4 inhibits IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has been investigated using a variety of model systems leading to two proposed mechanisms. First by sequestering antigen, IgG4 can function as a blocking antibody, preventing cross-linking of receptor bound IgE. Second IgG4 has been proposed to co-stimulate the inhibitory IgG receptor FcγRIIb, which can negatively regulate FcεRI signaling and in turn inhibit effector cell activation. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural features of human IgG4 have shed light on the unique functional and immunologic properties of IgG4. The aim of this review is to evaluate our current understanding of IgG4 biology and reassess the mechanisms by which IgG4 functions to inhibit IgE-mediated allergic responses.

  6. Relipidated tissue factor linked to collagen surfaces potentiates platelet adhesion and fibrin formation in a microfluidic model of vessel injury

    PubMed Central

    Colace, Thomas V.; Jobson, Jennielle; Diamond, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic devices allow for the controlled perfusion of human or mouse blood over defined prothrombotic surfaces at venous and arterial shear rates. To mimic in vivo injuries such a plaque rupture, the need exists to link lipidated tissue factor (TF) to surface bound collagen fibers. Recombinant TF was relipidated in liposomes of phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylcholine/biotin-linked phosphatidylethanolamine (20:79:1 PS:PC:bPE molar ratio). Collagen was patterned in a 250-micron wide stripe and labeled with biotinylated anti-collagen antibody which was then bound with streptavidin, allowing the subsequent capture of the TF liposomes. To verify and detect the TF liposome-collagen assembly, individual molecular complexes of TF-factor VIIa on collagen were visualized using the Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA) to produce discretely localized fluorescent events that were strictly dependent on the presence of factor VIIa and primary antibodies against TF or factor VIIa. Perfusion for 450 sec (wall shear rate, 200 s−1) of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI, a factor XIIa inhibitor) treated whole blood over the stripe of TF-collagen enhanced platelet adhesion by 30 ± 8% (p < 0.001) and produced measurable fibrin (>50-fold increase) as compared to surfaces lacking TF. PS:PC:bPE liposomes lacking TF resulted in no enhancement of platelet deposition. Essentially no fibrin was formed during perfusion over collagen surfaces or collagen surfaces with liposomes lacking TF despite the robust platelet deposition, indicating a lack of kinetically significant platelet-borne tissue factor in healthy donor blood. This study demonstrates a reliable approach to link functionally-active TF to collagen for microfluidic thrombosis studies. PMID:21902184

  7. Molecular mechanism of antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cell line.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Muhammad; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Farooq, Ahsana D; Rasheed, Huma; Mesaik, Ahmed M; Choudhary, Muhammad I; Channa, Iffat S; Khan, Salman A; Erukainure, Ochuko L

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. We investigated the molecular mechanism of antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cells by cell cycle, viability, cytokines, calcium ion and gene expression analysis. Acacia honey inhibited cells proliferation, arrested G0/G1 phase, stimulated cytokines, calcium ion release as well as suppressed p53 and Bcl-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. We proposed that the molecular mechanism of the antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cell line is due to cell cycle arrest, stimulation of cytokines and calcium ion as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 and p53 genes.

  8. Naloxone potentiates the inotropic effects of isoproterenol in vitro by a nonopiate receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lechner, R B

    1992-11-01

    Naloxone potentiates the effects of adrenergic agonists when administered to hypovolemic dogs, and it has been assumed that this effect is due to naloxone's action at opiate receptors. To help determine the site and mechanism of this interaction, we administered naloxone and its "d" stereo-isomer (which does not bind to opiate receptors) to guinea pig papillary muscles in the presence and absence of pharmacologic (isoproterenol) and physiologic (treppe) inotropic stimulation. In control muscles and in rapidly paced muscles, naloxone was without significant inotropic effect. In the presence of isoproterenol, d- and l-naloxone exerted significant positive inotropic effects that were dose dependent. We conclude that, since both d- and l-naloxone potentiated the inotropic effects of isoproterenol and this was seen in the absence of opioids, naloxone may increase contractility by a nonopiate receptor-mediated mechanism.

  9. Music and Memory in Alzheimer's Disease and The Potential Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peck, Katlyn J; Girard, Todd A; Russo, Frank A; Fiocco, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    With population aging and a projected exponential expansion of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the development of treatment and prevention programs has become a fervent area of research and discovery. A growing body of evidence suggests that music exposure can enhance memory and emotional function in persons with AD. However, there is a paucity of research that aims to identify specific underlying neural mechanisms associated with music's beneficial effects in this particular population. As such, this paper reviews existing anecdotal and empirical evidence related to the enhancing effects of music exposure on cognitive function and further provides a discussion on the potential underlying mechanisms that may explain music's beneficial effect. Specifically, this paper will outline the potential role of the dopaminergic system, the autonomic nervous system, and the default network in explaining how music may enhance memory function in persons with AD.

  10. Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury (IDILI): Potential Mechanisms and Predictive Assays

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Alexander D.

    2017-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) is a significant source of drug recall and acute liver failure (ALF) in the United States. While current drug development processes emphasize general toxicity and drug metabolizing enzyme- (DME-) mediated toxicity, it has been challenging to develop comprehensive models for assessing complete idiosyncratic potential. In this review, we describe the enzymes and proteins that contain polymorphisms believed to contribute to IDILI, including ones that affect phase I and phase II metabolism, antioxidant enzymes, drug transporters, inflammation, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA). We then describe the various assays that have been developed to detect individual reactions focusing on each of the mechanisms described in the background. Finally, we examine current trends in developing comprehensive models for examining these mechanisms. There is an urgent need to develop a panel of multiparametric assays for diagnosing individual toxicity potential. PMID:28133614

  11. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  12. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP.

  13. Potential effects of the introduction of the discrete address beacon system data link on air/ground information transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    This study of Aviation Safety Reporting System reports suggests that benefits should accure from implementation of discrete address beacon system data link. The phase enhanced terminal information system service is expected to provide better terminal information than present systems by improving currency and accuracy. In the exchange of air traffic control messages, discrete address insures that only the intended recipient receives and acts on a specific message. Visual displays and printer copy of messages should mitigate many of the reported problems associated with voice communications. The problems that remain unaffected include error in addressing the intended recipient and messages whose content is wrong but are otherwise correct as to format and reasonableness.

  14. ER-stress and apoptosis: molecular mechanisms and potential relevance in infection.

    PubMed

    Häcker, Georg

    2014-10-01

    During ER-stress, one of the responses a cell can choose is apoptosis. Apoptosis generally is a cell's preferred response when other control mechanisms are overwhelmed. We now have a reasonably clear molecular picture what is happening once the apoptotic apparatus has been started. Unclear however are the majority of the upstream pathways that connect other signalling to apoptosis. During ER-stress, confirmed apoptosis-regulating targets are pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2-family, whose concerted action induces apoptosis. I will here discuss how mitochondrial apoptosis is triggered, how this is linked to the ER-stress response and in what way this may be relevant during microbial infections.

  15. An exploration of the potential mechanisms and translational potential of five medicinal plants for applications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Taner; Coulibaly, Ahmed Y; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia, and represents a vast worldwide socio-economic burden, and in the absence of a current cure, effective therapeutic strategies are still needed. Cholinergic and cerebral blood flow deficits, excessive levels of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and glutamate excitatory mechanisms are all believed to contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Scoparia dulcis, Catharanthus roseus, Sesamum indicum, Erythrina senegalensis and Vigna unguiculata represent five plants that have been used as traditional medicines for the treatment of AD in certain cultures. Review of the scientific literature was conducted to explore the properties of these plants that might be beneficial and explain what would be perceived by many to be largely anecdotal evidence of their benefit. All plants were found to possess varying levels of anti-oxidant capability. Scoparia dulcis was also found to potentiate nerve growth factor-like effects upon cell lines. Catharanthus roseus appears to inhibit acetylcholinesterase with relatively high potency, while Sesamum indicum demonstrated the strongest antioxidant ability. Comparisons with currently used plant derived therapeutics illustrate how these plants may be likely to have some therapeutic benefits in AD. The evidence presented also highlights how appropriate dietary supplementation with some of these plants in various cultural settings might have effects analogous or complementary to the so-called protective Mediterranean diet. However, prior to embarking on making any formal recommendations to this end, further rigorous evaluation is needed to better elucidate the breadth and potential toxicological aspects of medicinal properties harboured by these plants. This would be vital to ensuring a more informed and safe delivery of preparations of these plants if they were to be considered as a form of dietary supplementation and where appropriate, how these might interact

  16. An exploration of the potential mechanisms and translational potential of five medicinal plants for applications in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Taner; Coulibaly, Ahmed Y; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia, and represents a vast worldwide socio-economic burden, and in the absence of a current cure, effective therapeutic strategies are still needed. Cholinergic and cerebral blood flow deficits, excessive levels of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and glutamate excitatory mechanisms are all believed to contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Scoparia dulcis, Catharanthus roseus, Sesamum indicum, Erythrina senegalensis and Vigna unguiculata represent five plants that have been used as traditional medicines for the treatment of AD in certain cultures. Review of the scientific literature was conducted to explore the properties of these plants that might be beneficial and explain what would be perceived by many to be largely anecdotal evidence of their benefit. All plants were found to possess varying levels of anti-oxidant capability. Scoparia dulcis was also found to potentiate nerve growth factor-like effects upon cell lines. Catharanthus roseus appears to inhibit acetylcholinesterase with relatively high potency, while Sesamum indicum demonstrated the strongest antioxidant ability. Comparisons with currently used plant derived therapeutics illustrate how these plants may be likely to have some therapeutic benefits in AD. The evidence presented also highlights how appropriate dietary supplementation with some of these plants in various cultural settings might have effects analogous or complementary to the so-called protective Mediterranean diet. However, prior to embarking on making any formal recommendations to this end, further rigorous evaluation is needed to better elucidate the breadth and potential toxicological aspects of medicinal properties harboured by these plants. This would be vital to ensuring a more informed and safe delivery of preparations of these plants if they were to be considered as a form of dietary supplementation and where appropriate, how these might

  17. A novel communication mechanism based on node potential multi-path routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Youjun; Zhang, Chuanhao; Jiang, YiMing; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    With the network scales rapidly and new network applications emerge frequently, bandwidth supply for today's Internet could not catch up with the rapid increasing requirements. Unfortunately, irrational using of network sources makes things worse. Actual network deploys single-next-hop optimization paths for data transmission, but such "best effort" model leads to the imbalance use of network resources and usually leads to local congestion. On the other hand Multi-path routing can use the aggregation bandwidth of multi paths efficiently and improve the robustness of network, security, load balancing and quality of service. As a result, multi-path has attracted much attention in the routing and switching research fields and many important ideas and solutions have been proposed. This paper focuses on implementing the parallel transmission of multi next-hop data, balancing the network traffic and reducing the congestion. It aimed at exploring the key technologies of the multi-path communication network, which could provide a feasible academic support for subsequent applications of multi-path communication networking. It proposed a novel multi-path algorithm based on node potential in the network. And the algorithm can fully use of the network link resource and effectively balance network link resource utilization.

  18. A review of potential neurotoxic mechanisms among three chlorinated organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Ambuja S. Barone, Stan; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Cooper, Glinda S.

    2011-08-15

    The potential for central nervous system depressant effects from three widely used chlorinated solvents, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PERC), and dichloromethane (DCM), has been shown in human and animal studies. Commonalities of neurobehavioral and neurophysiological changes for the chlorinated solvents in in vivo studies suggest that there is a common mechanism(s) of action in producing resultant neurotoxicological consequences. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanistic studies conducted with these chlorinated solvents and to propose potential mechanisms of action for the different neurological effects observed. Mechanistic studies indicate that this solvent class has several molecular targets in the brain. Additionally, there are several pieces of evidence from animal studies indicating this solvent class alters neurochemical functions in the brain. Although earlier evidence indicated that these three chlorinated solvents perturb the lipid bilayer, more recent data suggest an interaction between several specific neuronal receptors produces the resultant neurobehavioral effects. Collectively, TCE, PERC, and DCM have been reported to interact directly with several different classes of neuronal receptors by generally inhibiting excitatory receptors/channels and potentiating the function of inhibitory receptors/channels. Given this mechanistic information and available studies for TCE, DCM, and PERC, we provide hypotheses on primary targets (e.g. ion channel targets) that appear to be most influential in producing the resultant neurological effects. - Research Highlights: > Comparison of neurological effects among TCE, PERC, and DCM. > Correlation of mechanistic findings to neurological effects. > Data support that TCE, PERC, and DCM interact with several ion channels to produce neurological changes.

  19. Shifts in a single muscle's control potential of body dynamics are determined by mechanical feedback

    PubMed Central

    Sponberg, Simon; Libby, Thomas; Mullens, Chris H.; Full, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Muscles are multi-functional structures that interface neural and mechanical systems. Muscle work depends on a large multi-dimensional space of stimulus (neural) and strain (mechanical) parameters. In our companion paper, we rewrote activation to individual muscles in intact, behaving cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis L.), revealing a specific muscle's potential to control body dynamics in different behaviours. Here, we use those results to provide the biologically relevant parameters for in situ work measurements. We test four hypotheses about how muscle function changes to provide mechanisms for the observed control responses. Under isometric conditions, a graded increase in muscle stress underlies its linear actuation during standing behaviours. Despite typically absorbing energy, this muscle can recruit two separate periods of positive work when controlling running. This functional change arises from mechanical feedback filtering a linear increase in neural activation into nonlinear work output. Changing activation phase again led to positive work recruitment, but at different times, consistent with the muscle's ability to also produce a turn. Changes in muscle work required considering the natural sequence of strides and separating swing and stance contributions of work. Both in vivo control potentials and in situ work loops were necessary to discover the neuromechanical coupling enabling control. PMID:21502130

  20. Mechanical properties of polyvinylalcohol/hydroxyapatite cryogel as potential artificial cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jimena S; Alvarez, Vera A

    2014-06-01

    The technological advances in material science are not enough to overcome the challenge of construct a material be able to replace the cartilage. The designed material has to meet the mechanical properties of cartilage and has to be also capable to be integrated with the articulation. Articular cartilage damage is a persistent and increasing problem which affects millions of people worldwide. Poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogels are promising implants, due to their similar properties as soft tissue; however their low mechanical resistance and durability together with its lack to integrate with the surrounding tissue restrict their application in this area. The poor adhesion can be solved by the development a composite hydrogel with bioactive and biocompatible filler, as hydroxyapatite (HA). The aim of this work was to obtain and characterize (physically, chemically and mechanically) PVA/HA composite hydrogels for potential application as articular replacement. Hence, composite hydrogels were prepared by adding of different amounts of HA in an aqueous solution of PVA and subsequent freezing-thawing cycles. It was observed that the addition of HA modified the physical and chemical features of the hydrogel and promoted the material crosslinking and stability. Moreover, it was found that the mechanical properties (compression, tension and nanoindentation) of the hydrogels were improved by the addition of HA. All these result indicate that these materials could be used as a potential cartilage replacement. However, further in vitro and in vivo studies are mandatory for future possible clinical applications and are actually being carried out.

  1. Cadmium transfer and detoxification mechanisms in a soil-mulberry-silkworm system: phytoremediation potential.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Shuifeng

    2015-11-01

    Phytoremediation has been proven to be an environmentally sound alternative for the recovery of contaminated soils, and the economic profit that comes along with the process might stimulate its field use. This study investigated cadmium (Cd) transfer and detoxification mechanisms in a soil-mulberry-silkworm system to estimate the suitability of the mulberry and silkworm as an alternative method for the remediation of Cd-polluted soil; it also explored the underlying mechanisms regulating the trophic transfer of Cd. The results show that both the mulberry and silkworm have high Cd tolerance. The transfer factor suggests that the mulberry has high potential for Cd extraction from polluted soil. The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in mulberry leaves show that cell wall deposition and vacuolar compartmentalization play important role in Cd tolerance. In the presence of increasing Cd concentrations in silkworm food, detoxification mechanisms (excretion and homeostasis) were activated so that excess Cd was excreted in fecal balls, and metallothionein levels in the mid-gut, the posterior of the silk gland, and the fat body of silkworms were enhanced. And, the Cd concentrations in silk are at a low level, ranging from 0.02 to 0.21 mg kg(-1). Therefore, these mechanisms of detoxification can regulate Cd trophic transfer, and mulberry planting and silkworm breeding has high phytoremediation potential for Cd-contaminated soil.

  2. Exploring the Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Using Somatosensory and Laser Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew D.; Taylor, Janet L.; Booth, John; Barry, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is well described, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials, laser evoked potentials, pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds. These were recorded before and after 3-min of isometric elbow flexion exercise at 40% of the participant's maximal voluntary force, or an equivalent period of rest. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia was confirmed in two experiments (Experiment 1–SEPs; Experiment 2–LEPs) by increased pressure pain thresholds at biceps brachii (24.3 and 20.6% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.84 and p < 0.001) and first dorsal interosseous (18.8 and 21.5% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.57 and p < 0.001). In contrast, heat pain thresholds were not significantly different after exercise (forearm: 10.8% increase, d = 0.35, p = 0.10; hand: 3.6% increase, d = 0.06, p = 0.74). Contrasting effects of exercise on the amplitude of laser evoked potentials (14.6% decrease, d = −0.42, p = 0.004) and somatosensory evoked potentials (10.9% increase, d = −0.02, p = 1) were also observed, while an equivalent period of rest showed similar habituation (laser evoked potential: 7.3% decrease, d = −0.25, p = 0.14; somatosensory evoked potential: 20.7% decrease, d = −0.32, p = 0.006). The differential response of pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds to exercise is consistent with relative insensitivity of thermal nociception to the acute hypoalgesic effects of exercise. Conflicting effects of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials and laser evoked potentials were observed. This may reflect non-nociceptive contributions to the somatosensory evoked potential, but could also indicate that peripheral nociceptors contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia. PMID:27965587

  3. Exploring the Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Using Somatosensory and Laser Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew D; Taylor, Janet L; Booth, John; Barry, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced hypoalgesia is well described, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials, laser evoked potentials, pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds. These were recorded before and after 3-min of isometric elbow flexion exercise at 40% of the participant's maximal voluntary force, or an equivalent period of rest. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia was confirmed in two experiments (Experiment 1-SEPs; Experiment 2-LEPs) by increased pressure pain thresholds at biceps brachii (24.3 and 20.6% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.84 and p < 0.001) and first dorsal interosseous (18.8 and 21.5% increase in Experiment 1 and 2, respectively; both d > 0.57 and p < 0.001). In contrast, heat pain thresholds were not significantly different after exercise (forearm: 10.8% increase, d = 0.35, p = 0.10; hand: 3.6% increase, d = 0.06, p = 0.74). Contrasting effects of exercise on the amplitude of laser evoked potentials (14.6% decrease, d = -0.42, p = 0.004) and somatosensory evoked potentials (10.9% increase, d = -0.02, p = 1) were also observed, while an equivalent period of rest showed similar habituation (laser evoked potential: 7.3% decrease, d = -0.25, p = 0.14; somatosensory evoked potential: 20.7% decrease, d = -0.32, p = 0.006). The differential response of pressure pain thresholds and heat pain thresholds to exercise is consistent with relative insensitivity of thermal nociception to the acute hypoalgesic effects of exercise. Conflicting effects of exercise on somatosensory evoked potentials and laser evoked potentials were observed. This may reflect non-nociceptive contributions to the somatosensory evoked potential, but could also indicate that peripheral nociceptors contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia.

  4. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra”

    PubMed Central

    Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y.; Prosser, James I.; Nicol, Graeme W.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra” provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization. PMID:26896134

  5. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra".

    PubMed

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2016-05-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra" provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization.

  6. Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Corsini, Emanuela; Williams, Marc A; Decker, William; Manjili, Masoud H; Otsuki, Takemi; Singh, Neetu; Al-Mulla, Faha; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Colacci, Anna Maria; Vaccari, Monica; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, A Ivana; Raju, Jayadev; Hamid, Roslida A; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano; Roy, Rabindra; Woodrick, Jordan; Salem, Hosni K; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Brown, Dustin G; Bisson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-β, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1α, IL-6, IL-1α, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicalscan simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression.

  7. Spinal mechanisms underlying potentiation of hindpaw responses observed after transient hindpaw ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Mika; Komagata, Seiji; Tsukano, Hiroaki; Hishida, Ryuichi; Kohno, Tatsuro; Baba, Hiroshi; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemia produces postischemic tingling sensation. Ischemia also produces nerve conduction block that may modulate spinal neural circuits. In the present study, reduced mechanical thresholds for hindpaw-withdrawal reflex were found in mice after transient hindpaw ischemia, which was produced by a high pressure applied around the hindpaw for 30 min. The reduction in the threshold was blocked by spinal application of LY354740, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Neural activities in the spinal cord and the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) were investigated using activity-dependent changes in endogenous fluorescence derived from mitochondrial flavoproteins. Ischemic treatment induced potentiation of the ipsilateral spinal and contralateral S1 responses to hindpaw stimulation. Both types of potentiation were blocked by spinal application of LY354740. The contralateral S1 responses, abolished by lesioning the ipsilateral dorsal column, reappeared after ischemic treatment, indicating that postischemic tingling sensation reflects a sensory modality shift from tactile sensation to nociception in the spinal cord. Changes in neural responses were investigated during ischemic treatment in the contralateral spinal cord and the ipsilateral S1. Potentiation already appeared during ischemic treatment for 30 min. The present findings suggest that the postischemic potentiation shares spinal mechanisms, at least in part, with neuropathic pain. PMID:26165560

  8. Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko, Julia; Corsini, Emanuela; Williams, Marc A.; Decker, William; Manjili, Masoud H.; Otsuki, Takemi; Singh, Neetu; Al-Mulla, Faha; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Colacci, Anna Maria; Vaccari, Monica; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Raju, Jayadev; Hamid, Roslida A.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano; Roy, Rabindra; Woodrick, Jordan; Salem, Hosni K.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Brown, Dustin G.; Lowe, Leroy; Lyerly, H.Kim

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-β, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1α, IL-6, IL-1α, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicalscan simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression. PMID:26002081

  9. [Mechanism of the generation of evoked potentials in the rabbit neocortex].

    PubMed

    Pockberger, H; Rappelsberger, P

    1983-12-01

    This paper describes the analyses of evoked potentials recorded in different neocortical areas (Area precentralis 1 and 2, occipitalis 1 and 2) and elicited by different stimulation techniques (antidromic stimulation of the pyramidal tract, electrical stimulation of thalamic nuclei, the optic nerve and finally random dot stimulation of the retina). Field potentials were recorded intracortically with a 16-fold electrode. The analyses of field potentials with the current-source-density method yielded an estimation of the current source and sink density distributions within the six neocortical layers. Hence spatio-temporal patterns of layer specific activation processes (sinks and sources) can be described for the various evoked potentials. The results can be summarized as follows: every evoked potential shows a spatio-temporal pattern of sources and sinks which is independent of the neocortical area and the mode of stimulation. However, the late components of the evoked potentials show great variations in their generation mechanisms, thus indicating regional differences in neocortical architectonics. These observations are discussed with regard to morphology, electrical activity and functional properties of the studied neocortical areas.

  10. Pulsed magnetic stimulation modifies amplitude of action potentials in vitro via ionic channels-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zaghloul; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the influence of pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs) on amplitude of evoked, compound action potential (CAP) recorded from the segments of sciatic nerve in vitro. PMFs were applied for 30 min at frequency of 0.16 Hz and intensity of 15 mT. In confirmation of our previous reports, PMF exposure enhanced amplitude of CAPs. The effect persisted beyond PMF activation period. As expected, CAP amplitude was attenuated by antagonists of sodium channel, lidocaine, and tetrodotoxin. Depression of the potential by sodium channels antagonists was reversed by subsequent exposure to PMFs. The effect of elevated potassium concentration and veratridine on the action potential was modified by exposure to PMFs as well. Neither inhibitors of protein kinase C and protein kinase A, nor known free radicals scavengers had any effects on PMF action. Possible mechanisms of PMF action are discussed.

  11. A model of the mechanism of cooperativity and associativity of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus: a fundamental mechanism of associative memory and learning.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, T; Hara, K

    1991-01-01

    Long-Term Potentiation (LTP) has three properties: (1) input specificity, (2) cooperativity and (3) associativity. In a previous paper, we proposed an integrated model of the mechanisms of the induction and maintenance of LTP with input specificity. In this paper, a model of the mechanism of cooperative and associative LTP is described. According to computer simulations of the model, its mechanism is based on the spread of synaptic potentials.

  12. Archaeal Ubiquitin-like SAMP3 is Isopeptide-linked to Proteins via a UbaA-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Hugo V.; Antelmann, Haike; Hepowit, Nathaniel; Chavarria, Nikita E.; Krause, David J.; Pritz, Jonathan R.; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Humbard, Matthew A.; Brocchieri, Luciano; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    SAMP1 and SAMP2 are ubiquitin-like proteins that function as protein modifiers and are required for the production of sulfur-containing biomolecules in the archaeon Haloferax volcanii. Here we report a novel small archaeal modifier protein (named SAMP3) with a β-grasp fold and C-terminal diglycine motif characteristic of ubiquitin that is functional in protein conjugation in Hfx. volcanii. SAMP3 conjugates were dependent on the ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA) for synthesis and were cleaved by the JAMM/MPN+ domain metalloprotease HvJAMM1. Twenty-three proteins (28 lysine residues) were found to be isopeptide-linked to the C-terminal carboxylate of SAMP3, and 331 proteins were reproducibly found associated with SAMP3 in a UbaA-dependent manner based on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. The molybdopterin (MPT) synthase large subunit homolog MoaE, found samp3ylated at conserved active site lysine residues in MS/MS analysis, was also shown to be covalently bound to SAMP3 by immunoprecipitation and tandem affinity purifications. HvJAMM1 was demonstrated to catalyze the cleavage of SAMP3 from MoaE, suggesting a mechanism of controlling MPT synthase activity. The levels of samp3ylated proteins and samp3 transcripts were found to be increased by the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide to aerobically growing cells. Thus, we propose a model in which samp3ylation is covalent and reversible and controls the activity of enzymes such as MPT synthase. Sampylation of MPT synthase may govern the levels of molybdenum cofactor available and thus facilitate the scavenging of oxygen prior to the transition to respiration with molybdenum-cofactor-containing terminal reductases that use alternative electron acceptors such as dimethyl sulfoxide. Overall, our study of SAMP3 provides new insight into the diversity of functional ubiquitin-like protein modifiers and the network of ubiquitin-like protein targets in Archaea. PMID:24097257

  13. Efficient attentional selection predicts distractor devaluation: event-related potential evidence for a direct link between attention and emotion.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Monika; Goolsby, Brian A; Raymond, Jane E; Shapiro, Kimron L; Silvert, Laetitia; Nobre, Anna C; Fragopanagos, Nickolaos; Taylor, John G; Eimer, Martin

    2007-08-01

    Links between attention and emotion were investigated by obtaining electrophysiological measures of attentional selectivity together with behavioral measures of affective evaluation. Participants were asked to rate faces that had just been presented as targets or distractors in a visual search task. Distractors were rated as less trustworthy than targets. To study the association between the efficiency of selective attention during visual search and subsequent emotional responses, the N2pc component was quantified as a function of evaluative judgments. Evaluation of distractor faces (but not target faces) covaried with selective attention. On trials where distractors were later judged negatively, the N2pc emerged earlier, demonstrating that attention was strongly biased toward target events, and distractors were effectively inhibited. When previous distractors were judged positively, the N2pc was delayed, indicating unfocused attention to the target and less distractor suppression. Variations in attentional selectivity across trials can predict subsequent emotional responses, strongly suggesting that attention is closely associated with subsequent affective evaluation.

  14. Perchlorate formation on Mars through surface radiolysis-initiated atmospheric chemistry: A potential mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eric H; Atreya, Sushil K; Kaiser, Ralf I; Mahaffy, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars indicate the presence of perchlorate (ClO4(-)). The abundance and isotopic composition of these perchlorates suggest that the mechanisms responsible for their formation in the Martian environment may be unique in our solar system. With this in mind, we propose a potential mechanism for the production of Martian perchlorate: the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays, followed by the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4) in the atmosphere, and the surface deposition and subsequent mineralization of HClO4 in the regolith to form surface perchlorates. To evaluate the viability of this mechanism, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model, examining chlorine chemistry in the context of Martian atmospheric chemistry. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find that an OClO flux as low as 3.2 × 10(7) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  15. Perchlorate formation on Mars through surface radiolysis-initiated atmospheric chemistry: A potential mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eric H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars indicate the presence of perchlorate (ClO4-). The abundance and isotopic composition of these perchlorates suggest that the mechanisms responsible for their formation in the Martian environment may be unique in our solar system. With this in mind, we propose a potential mechanism for the production of Martian perchlorate: the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays, followed by the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4) in the atmosphere, and the surface deposition and subsequent mineralization of HClO4 in the regolith to form surface perchlorates. To evaluate the viability of this mechanism, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model, examining chlorine chemistry in the context of Martian atmospheric chemistry. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find that an OClO flux as low as 3.2 × 107 molecules cm-2 s-1 sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  16. A large prospective study of meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: an investigation of potential mechanisms underlying this association.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Ferrucci, Leah M; Risch, Adam; Graubard, Barry I; Ward, Mary H; Park, Yikyung; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Sinha, Rashmi

    2010-03-15

    Although the relation between red and processed meat intake and colorectal cancer has been reported in several epidemiologic studies, very few investigated the potential mechanisms. This study examined multiple potential mechanisms in a large U.S. prospective cohort with a detailed questionnaire on meat type and meat cooking methods linked to databases for estimating intake of mutagens formed in meats cooked at high temperatures (heterocyclic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), heme iron, nitrate, and nitrite. During 7 years of follow-up, 2,719 colorectal cancer cases were ascertained from a cohort of 300,948 men and women. The hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) comparing the fifth to the first quintile for both red (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.09-1.42; P(trend) < 0.001) and processed meat (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01-1.32; P(trend) = 0.017) intakes indicated an elevated risk for colorectal cancer. The potential mechanisms for this relation include heme iron (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.99-1.29; P(trend) = 0.022), nitrate from processed meats (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.02-1.32; P(trend) = 0.001), and heterocyclic amine intake [HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05-1.34; P(trend) < 0.001 for 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.05-1.29; P(trend) <0.001 for 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx)]. In general, the elevated risks were higher for rectal cancer than for colon cancer, with the exception of MeIQx and DiMeIQx, which were only associated with colon cancer. In conclusion, we found a positive association for red and processed meat intake and colorectal cancer; heme iron, nitrate/nitrite, and heterocyclic amines from meat may explain these associations.

  17. Transplant Tolerance Induction in Newborn Infants: Mechanisms, Advantages, and Potential Strategies.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hua; Gazarian, Aram; Dubernard, Jean-Michel; Belot, Alexandre; Michallet, Marie-Cécile; Michallet, Mauricette

    2016-01-01

    Although several tolerance induction protocols have been successfully implemented in adult renal transplantation, no tolerance induction approach has, as yet, been defined for solid organ transplantations in young infants. Pediatric transplant recipients have a pressing demand for the elaboration of tolerance induction regimens. Indeed, since they display a longer survival time, they are exposed to a higher level of risks linked to long-term immunosuppression (IS) and to chronic rejection. Interestingly, central tolerance induction may be of great interest in newborns, because of their immunological immaturity and the important role of the thymus at this early stage in life. The present review aims to clarify mechanisms and strategies of tolerance induction in these immunologically premature recipients. We first introduce the discovery and mechanisms of neonatal tolerance in murine experimental models and subsequently analyze tolerance induction in human newborn infants. Hematopoietic mixed chimerism in neonates is also discussed based on in utero hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant studies. Then, we review the recent advances in tolerance induction approaches in adults, including the infusion of HSCs associated with less toxic conditioning regimens, regulatory T cells/facilitating cells/mesenchymal stem cells transplantation, costimulatory blockade, and thymus manipulation. Finally, IS withdrawal in pediatric solid organ transplant is discussed. In conclusion, the establishment of transplant tolerance induction in infants is promising and deserves further investigations. Future studies could focus on the selection of patients, on less toxic conditioning regimens, and on biomarkers for IS minimization or withdrawal.

  18. Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Moreira, Fabricio Araújo; Gomes, Felipe Villela; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-12-05

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major phytocannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant. It lacks the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic effects that the main plant compound Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being able, on the contrary, to antagonize these effects. This property, together with its safety profile, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Although the pharmacological effects of CBD in different biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still not clear. Here, we review recent in vivo studies indicating that these mechanisms are not unitary but rather depend on the behavioural response being measured. Acute anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects seem to rely mainly on facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in key brain areas related to defensive responses, including the dorsal periaqueductal grey, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial prefrontal cortex. Other effects, such as anti-compulsive, increased extinction and impaired reconsolidation of aversive memories, and facilitation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis could depend on potentiation of anandamide-mediated neurotransmission. Finally, activation of TRPV1 channels may help us to explain the antipsychotic effect and the bell-shaped dose-response curves commonly observed with CBD. Considering its safety profile and wide range of therapeutic potential, however, further studies are needed to investigate the involvement of other possible mechanisms (e.g. inhibition of adenosine uptake, inverse agonism at CB2 receptor, CB1 receptor antagonism, GPR55 antagonism, PPARγ receptors agonism, intracellular (Ca(2+)) increase, etc.), on CBD behavioural effects.

  19. Photo-cross-linked poly(ethylene carbonate) elastomers: synthesis, in vivo degradation, and determination of in vivo degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cornacchione, L A; Qi, B; Bianco, J; Zhou, Z; Amsden, B G

    2012-10-08

    Low-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate) diols of varying molecular weight were generated through catalyzed thermal degradation of high-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate). These polymers were then end functionalized with acrylate groups. The resulting α,ω-diacrylates were effectively photo-cross-linked upon exposure to long-wave UV light in the presence of a photoinitiator to yield rubbery networks of low sol content. The degree of cross-linking effectively controlled the in vivo degradation rate of the networks by adherent macrophages; higher cross-link densities yielded slower degradation rates. The cross-link density did not affect the number of adherent macrophages at the elastomer/tissue interface, indicating that cross-linking affected the susceptibility of the elastomer to degradative species released by the macrophages. The reactive species likely responsible for in vivo degradation appears to be superoxide anion, as the in vivo results were in agreement with in vitro degradation via superoxide anion, while cholesterol esterase, known to degrade similar poly(alkylene carbonate)s, had no affect on elastomer degradation.

  20. Potential link between excess added sugar intake and ectopic fat: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: The effect of added sugar intake on ectopic fat accumulation is a subject of debate. Objective: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to examine the potential effect of added sugar intake on ectopic fat depots. Data Sources: MEDLINE, CA...

  1. Fear potentiated startle increases phospholipase D (PLD) expression/activity and PLD-linked metabotropic glutamate receptor mediated post-tetanic potentiation in rat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Balaji; Scott, Michael T; Pollandt, Sebastian; Schroeder, Bradley; Kurosky, Alexander; Shinnick-Gallagher, Patricia

    2016-02-01

    Long-term memory (LTM) of fear stores activity dependent modifications that include changes in amygdala signaling. Previously, we identified an enhanced probability of release of glutamate mediated signaling to be important in rat fear potentiated startle (FPS), a well-established translational behavioral measure of fear. Here, we investigated short- and long-term synaptic plasticity in FPS involving metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and associated downstream proteomic changes in the thalamic-lateral amygdala pathway (Th-LA). Aldolase A, an inhibitor of phospholipase D (PLD), expression was reduced, concurrent with significantly elevated PLD protein expression. Blocking the PLD-mGluR signaling significantly reduced PLD activity. While transmitter release probability increased in FPS, PLD-mGluR agonist and antagonist actions were occluded. In the unpaired group (UNP), blocking the PLD-mGluR increased while activating the receptor decreased transmitter release probability, consistent with decreased synaptic potentials during tetanic stimulation. FPS Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) immediately following long-term potentiation (LTP) induction was significantly increased. Blocking PLD-mGluR signaling prevented PTP and reduced cumulative PTP probability but not LTP maintenance in both groups. These effects are similar to those mediated through mGluR7, which is co-immunoprecipitated with PLD in FPS. Lastly, blocking mGluR-PLD in the rat amygdala was sufficient to prevent behavioral expression of fear memory. Thus, our study in the Th-LA pathway provides the first evidence for PLD as an important target of mGluR signaling in amygdala fear-associated memory. Importantly, the PLD-mGluR provides a novel therapeutic target for treating maladaptive fear memories in posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders.

  2. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics: Engineered hierarchies of integrable potentials and related orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balondo Iyela, Daddy; Govaerts, Jan; Hounkonnou, M. Norbert

    2013-09-01

    Within the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and its related hierarchies of integrable quantum Hamiltonians and potentials, a general programme is outlined and applied to its first two simplest illustrations. Going beyond the usual restriction of shape invariance for intertwined potentials, it is suggested to require a similar relation for Hamiltonians in the hierarchy separated by an arbitrary number of levels, N. By requiring further that these two Hamiltonians be in fact identical up to an overall shift in energy, a periodic structure is installed in the hierarchy which should allow for its resolution. Specific classes of orthogonal polynomials characteristic of such periodic hierarchies are thereby generated, while the methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics then lead to generalised Rodrigues formulae and recursion relations for such polynomials. The approach also offers the practical prospect of quantum modelling through the engineering of quantum potentials from experimental energy spectra. In this paper, these ideas are presented and solved explicitly for the cases N = 1 and N = 2. The latter case is related to the generalised Laguerre polynomials, for which indeed new results are thereby obtained. In the context of dressing chains and deformed polynomial Heisenberg algebras, some partial results for N ⩾ 3 also exist in the literature, which should be relevant to a complete study of the N ⩾ 3 general periodic hierarchies.

  3. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics: Engineered hierarchies of integrable potentials and related orthogonal polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Balondo Iyela, Daddy; Govaerts, Jan; Hounkonnou, M. Norbert

    2013-09-15

    Within the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and its related hierarchies of integrable quantum Hamiltonians and potentials, a general programme is outlined and applied to its first two simplest illustrations. Going beyond the usual restriction of shape invariance for intertwined potentials, it is suggested to require a similar relation for Hamiltonians in the hierarchy separated by an arbitrary number of levels, N. By requiring further that these two Hamiltonians be in fact identical up to an overall shift in energy, a periodic structure is installed in the hierarchy which should allow for its resolution. Specific classes of orthogonal polynomials characteristic of such periodic hierarchies are thereby generated, while the methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics then lead to generalised Rodrigues formulae and recursion relations for such polynomials. The approach also offers the practical prospect of quantum modelling through the engineering of quantum potentials from experimental energy spectra. In this paper, these ideas are presented and solved explicitly for the cases N= 1 and N= 2. The latter case is related to the generalised Laguerre polynomials, for which indeed new results are thereby obtained. In the context of dressing chains and deformed polynomial Heisenberg algebras, some partial results for N⩾ 3 also exist in the literature, which should be relevant to a complete study of the N⩾ 3 general periodic hierarchies.

  4. Coagulation-flocculation mechanisms in wastewater treatment plants through zeta potential measurements.

    PubMed

    López-Maldonado, E A; Oropeza-Guzman, M T; Jurado-Baizaval, J L; Ochoa-Terán, A

    2014-08-30

    Based on the polyelectrolyte-contaminant physical and chemical interactions at the molecular level, this article analyzed and discussed the coagulation-flocculation and chemical precipitation processes in order to improve their efficiency. Bench experiments indicate that water pH, polyelectrolyte (PE) dosing strategy and cationic polyelectrolyte addition are key parameters for the stability of metal-PE complexes. The coagulation-flocculation mechanism is proposed based on zeta potential (ζ) measurement as the criteria to define the electrostatic interaction between pollutants and coagulant-flocculant agents. Polyelectrolyte and wastewater dispersions are exposed to an electrophoretic effect to determine ζ. Finally, zeta potential values are compared at pH 9, suggesting the optimum coagulant dose at 162mg/L polydadmac and 67mg/L of flocculant, since a complete removal of TSS and turbidity is achieved. Based on the concentration of heavy metals (0.931mg/L Sn, 0.7mg/L Fe and 0.63mg/L Pb), treated water met the Mexican maximum permissible limits. In addition, the treated water has 45mg O2/L chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 45mg C/L total organic carbon (TOC). The coagulation-flocculation mechanism is proposed taking into account both: zeta potential (ζ)-pH measurement and chemical affinity, as the criteria to define the electrostatic and chemical interaction between pollutants and polyelectrolytes.

  5. Generalization of classical mechanics for nuclear motions on nonadiabatically coupled potential energy surfaces in chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2007-10-18

    Classical trajectory study of nuclear motion on the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces is now one of the standard methods of chemical dynamics. In particular, this approach is inevitable in the studies of large molecular systems. However, as soon as more than a single potential energy surface is involved due to nonadiabatic coupling, such a naive application of classical mechanics loses its theoretical foundation. This is a classic and fundamental issue in the foundation of chemistry. To cope with this problem, we propose a generalization of classical mechanics that provides a path even in cases where multiple potential energy surfaces are involved in a single event and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down. This generalization is made by diagonalization of the matrix representation of nuclear forces in nonadiabatic dynamics, which is derived from a mixed quantum-classical representation of the electron-nucleus entangled Hamiltonian [Takatsuka, K. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 064111]. A manifestation of quantum fluctuation on a classical subsystem that directly contacts with a quantum subsystem is discussed. We also show that the Hamiltonian thus represented gives a theoretical foundation to examine the validity of the so-called semiclassical Ehrenfest theory (or mean-field theory) for electron quantum wavepacket dynamics, and indeed, it is pointed out that the electronic Hamiltonian to be used in this theory should be slightly modified.

  6. Proton cellular influx as a probable mechanism of variation potential influence on photosynthesis in pea.

    PubMed

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Sherstneva, Oksana; Surova, Lyubov; Katicheva, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    Electrical signals (action potential and variation potential, VP) caused by environmental stimuli are known to induce various physiological responses in plants, including changes in photosynthesis; however, their functional mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, the influence of VP on photosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum L.) was investigated and the proton participation in this process analysed. VP, induced by local heating, inactivated photosynthesis and activated respiration, with the initiation of the photosynthetic response connected with inactivation of the photosynthetic dark stage; however, direct VP influence on the light stage was also probable. VP generation was accompanied with pH increases in apoplasts (0.17-0.30 pH unit) and decreases in cytoplasm (0.18-0.60 pH unit), which probably reflected H(+) -ATPase inactivation and H(+) influx during this electrical event. Imitation of H(+) influx using the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) induced a photosynthetic response that was similar with a VP-induced response. Experiments on chloroplast suspensions showed that decreased external pH also induced an analogous response and that its magnitude depended on the magnitude of pH change. Thus, the present results showed that proton cellular influx was the probable me