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Sample records for potential mechanisms linking

  1. Linking Pesticide Exposure with Pediatric Leukemia: Potential Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Antonio F.; Menéndez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common cancer in children, representing 30% of all childhood cancers. The disease arises from recurrent genetic insults that block differentiation of hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPCs) and drives uncontrolled proliferation and survival of the differentiation-blocked clone. Pediatric leukemia is phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous with an obscure etiology. The interaction between genetic factors and environmental agents represents a potential etiological driver. Although information is limited, the principal toxic mechanisms of potential leukemogenic agents (e.g., etoposide, benzene metabolites, bioflavonoids and some pesticides) include topoisomerase II inhibition and/or excessive generation of free radicals, which may induce DNA single- and double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in early HSPCs. Chromosomal rearrangements (duplications, deletions and translocations) may occur if these lesions are not properly repaired. The initiating hit usually occurs in utero and commonly leads to the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins. Subsequent cooperating hits define the disease latency and occur after birth and may be of a genetic, epigenetic or immune nature (i.e., delayed infection-mediated immune deregulation). Here, we review the available experimental and epidemiological evidence linking pesticide exposure to infant and childhood leukemia and provide a mechanistic basis to support the association, focusing on early initiating molecular events. PMID:27043530

  2. Children's Attentional Biases and "5-HTTLPR" Genotype: Potential Mechanisms Linking Mother and Child Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Brandon E.; Benas, Jessica S.; Grassia, Marie; McGeary, John

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the roles of specific cognitive (attentional bias) and genetic ("5-HTTLPR") risk factors in the intergenerational transmission of depression. Focusing first on the link between maternal history of major depressive disorder (MDD) and children's attentional biases, we found that children of mothers with a history of MDD…

  3. Tipping the Balance of Autism Risk: Potential Mechanisms Linking Pesticides and Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been increasing in many parts of the world and a portion of cases are attributable to environmental exposures. Conclusive replicated findings have yet to appear on any specific exposure; however, mounting evidence suggests gestational pesticides exposures are strong candidates. Because multiple developmental processes are implicated in ASDs during gestation and early life, biological plausibility is more likely if these agents can be shown to affect core pathophysiological features. Objectives: Our objectives were to examine shared mechanisms between autism pathophysiology and the effects of pesticide exposures, focusing on neuroexcitability, oxidative stress, and immune functions and to outline the biological correlates between pesticide exposure and autism risk. Methods: We review and discuss previous research related to autism risk, developmental effects of early pesticide exposure, and basic biological mechanisms by which pesticides may induce or exacerbate pathophysiological features of autism. Discussion: On the basis of experimental and observational research, certain pesticides may be capable of inducing core features of autism, but little is known about the timing or dose, or which of various mechanisms is sufficient to induce this condition. Conclusions: In animal studies, we encourage more research on gene × environment interactions, as well as experimental exposure to mixtures of compounds. Similarly, epidemiologic studies in humans with exceptionally high exposures can identify which pesticide classes are of greatest concern, and studies focused on gene × environment are needed to determine if there are susceptible subpopulations at greater risk from pesticide exposures. PMID:22534084

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Linked to Depression and Cognitive Impairment: Evidence and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Nancy A; Roose, Steven P

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent but very frequently undiagnosed. OSA is an independent risk factor for depression and cognitive impairment/dementia. Herein the authors review studies in the literature pertinent to the effects of OSA on the cerebral microvascular and neurovascular systems and present a model to describe the key pathophysiologic mechanisms that may underlie the associations, including hypoperfusion, endothelial dysfunction, and neuroinflammation. Intermittent hypoxia plays a critical role in initiating and amplifying these pathologic processes. Hypoperfusion and impaired cerebral vasomotor reactivity lead to the development or progression of cerebral small vessel disease (C-SVD). Hypoxemia exacerbates these processes, resulting in white matter lesions, white matter integrity abnormalities, and gray matter loss. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) hyperpermeability and neuroinflammation lead to altered synaptic plasticity, neuronal damage, and worsening C-SVD. Thus, OSA may initiate or amplify the pathologic processes of C-SVD and BBB dysfunction, resulting in the development or exacerbation of depressive symptoms and cognitive deficits. Given the evidence that adequate treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure improves depression and neurocognitive functions, it is important to identify OSA when assessing patients with depression or cognitive impairment. Whether treatment of OSA changes the deteriorating trajectory of elderly patients with already-diagnosed vascular depression and cognitive impairment/dementia remains to be determined in randomized controlled trials. PMID:27139243

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Linked to Depression and Cognitive Impairment: Evidence and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Nancy A; Roose, Steven P

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent but very frequently undiagnosed. OSA is an independent risk factor for depression and cognitive impairment/dementia. Herein the authors review studies in the literature pertinent to the effects of OSA on the cerebral microvascular and neurovascular systems and present a model to describe the key pathophysiologic mechanisms that may underlie the associations, including hypoperfusion, endothelial dysfunction, and neuroinflammation. Intermittent hypoxia plays a critical role in initiating and amplifying these pathologic processes. Hypoperfusion and impaired cerebral vasomotor reactivity lead to the development or progression of cerebral small vessel disease (C-SVD). Hypoxemia exacerbates these processes, resulting in white matter lesions, white matter integrity abnormalities, and gray matter loss. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) hyperpermeability and neuroinflammation lead to altered synaptic plasticity, neuronal damage, and worsening C-SVD. Thus, OSA may initiate or amplify the pathologic processes of C-SVD and BBB dysfunction, resulting in the development or exacerbation of depressive symptoms and cognitive deficits. Given the evidence that adequate treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure improves depression and neurocognitive functions, it is important to identify OSA when assessing patients with depression or cognitive impairment. Whether treatment of OSA changes the deteriorating trajectory of elderly patients with already-diagnosed vascular depression and cognitive impairment/dementia remains to be determined in randomized controlled trials.

  6. Self-organizing maps as a model of brain mechanisms potentially linked to autism.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Gerardo

    2007-06-01

    The application of artificial neural networks in the study of psychopathological syndromes has great potential. Several computational models of acquired and developmental disorders, including autism, have been proposed recently. In this paper, we use the framework of self-organizing maps to study several aspects of autism, by modeling abnormalities in the learning process in biologically plausible manners. We then interpret the resulting feature maps with reference to autistic characteristics. The effects of manipulating the physical structure and size of self-organizing maps were measured and compared with the general characteristics of neural growth abnormalities in autistic children. We find no effect on stimuli coverage, but a negative impact on map unfolding, dependant on the intensity of the abnormality, but not the time of onset. We analyze sensory issues by introducing the concept of attention functions, used to model hypersensitivities and hyposensitivities. The issue of focus on details rather than the whole is analyzed through a model in which distant neighbors are explicitly rejected; we show the model may lead to improved coverage of finely-shaped areas or isolated stimuli, but poorer map unfolding. Finally, we consider effects of noisy communication channels on the development of maps, and show a strong sensitivity of both coverage and unfolding of maps.

  7. Linking Traumatic Brain Injury to Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Identification of Potential Mechanisms Leading to Neurofibrillary Tangle Development

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon Peter; Turner, Ryan Coddington; Logsdon, Aric Flint; Bailes, Julian Edwin; Huber, Jason Delwyn

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significant attention has recently been drawn to the potential link between head trauma and the development of neurodegenerative disease, namely chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The acute neurotrauma associated with sports-related concussions in athletes and blast-induced traumatic brain injury in soldiers elevates the risk for future development of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as CTE. CTE is a progressive disease distinguished by characteristic tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and, occasionally, transactive response DNA binding protein 43 (TDP43) oligomers, both of which have a predilection for perivascular and subcortical areas near reactive astrocytes and microglia. The disease is currently only diagnosed postmortem by neuropathological identification of NFTs. A recent workshop sponsored by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke emphasized the need for premortem diagnosis, to better understand disease pathophysiology and to develop targeted treatments. In order to accomplish this objective, it is necessary to discover the mechanistic link between acute neurotrauma and the development of chronic neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as CTE. In this review, we briefly summarize what is currently known about CTE development and pathophysiology, and subsequently discuss injury-induced pathways that warrant further investigation. Understanding the mechanistic link between acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration will facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic options for CTE and other related disorders. PMID:24499307

  8. Mechanical and structural response of a hybrid hydrogel based on chitosan and poly(vinyl alcohol) cross-linked with epichlorohydrin for potential use in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Palafox, I M; Sánchez-Arévalo, F M; Velasquillo, C; García-Carvajal, Z Y; García-López, J; Ortega-Sánchez, C; Ibarra, C; Luna-Bárcenas, G; Solís-Arrieta, L

    2014-01-01

    The development and characterization of a hybrid hydrogel based on chitosan (CS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) chemically cross-linked with epichlorohydrin (ECH) is presented. The mechanical response of these hydrogels was evaluated by uniaxial tensile tests; in addition, their structural properties such as average molecular weight between cross-link points (Mcrl), mesh size (DN), and volume fraction (v(s)) were determined. This was done using the equivalent polymer network theory in combination with the obtained results from tensile and swelling tests. The films showed Young's modulus values of 11 ± 2 MPa and 9 ± 1 MPa for none irradiated and ultraviolet (UV) irradiated hydrogels, respectively. The cell viability was assessed using Calcein AM and Ethidium homodimer-1 assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The 1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan thiazolyl blue formazan (MTT Formazan assay) results did not show cytotoxic effects; this was in good agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance and fourier transform infrared spectroscopies; their results did not show traces of ECH. This indicated that after the crosslinking process, there was no free ECH; furthermore, any possibility of ECH release in the construct during cell culture was discarded. The CS-PVA-ECH hybrid hydrogel allowed cell growth and extracellular matrix formation and showed adequate mechanical, structural, and biological properties for potential use in tissue engineering applications.

  9. Regulatory mechanisms link phenotypic plasticity to evolvability

    PubMed Central

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J.

    2016-01-01

    Organisms have a remarkable capacity to respond to environmental change. They can either respond directly, by means of phenotypic plasticity, or they can slowly adapt through evolution. Yet, how phenotypic plasticity links to evolutionary adaptability is largely unknown. Current studies of plasticity tend to adopt a phenomenological reaction norm (RN) approach, which neglects the mechanisms underlying plasticity. Focusing on a concrete question – the optimal timing of bacterial sporulation – we here also consider a mechanistic approach, the evolution of a gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying plasticity. Using individual-based simulations, we compare the RN and GRN approach and find a number of striking differences. Most importantly, the GRN model results in a much higher diversity of responsive strategies than the RN model. We show that each of the evolved strategies is pre-adapted to a unique set of unseen environmental conditions. The regulatory mechanisms that control plasticity therefore critically link phenotypic plasticity to the adaptive potential of biological populations. PMID:27087393

  10. Mechanisms linking obesity to male infertility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity in men is associated with infertility in numerous studies. The current trend for decline in semen parameters parallels the increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide. In addition to impaired semen quality, fertility among obese men may be affected by sexual dysfunction, endocrinopathy, aromatization activity, psychological and thermal effects, sleep apnea, leptin and minor toxins, and possibly the inflammatory and obstructive elements of epididymitis pathology. The variable degrees of certainty associated with these causes parallel the levels of supporting evidence. This search aims to shed lights on different conditions that obese men suffer from; as that makes the treatment of infertility more categorized. Material and methods A PubMed search was conducted to identify clinical and pathological mechanisms linking obesity to male infertility. Results Among the myriad of publications reviewed in this paper, impaired spermatogenesis and sexual dysfunction have been shown to drive other variables towards poor fertility potentials. The paper presented a new, detailed flow chart showing more factors and further interactions among conditions leading to infertility. Conclusions The prime hormonal defect in obese men is hypotestosteronaemia, which results in impaired spermatogenesis leading to poor fecundability. Studies have shown that most mechanisms accounting for reduced fertility potentials in overweight men are reversible. PMID:25914843

  11. Molecular Mechanics of Tip-Link Cadherins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2011-11-01

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is likely composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their complete molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects remain largely unknown. We present crystal structures of extracellular (EC) tip-link cadherin repeats involved in hereditary deafness and tip link formation. In addition, we show that the deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats EC1 and EC2 of cadherin-23, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca2+ affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tip-link cadherin repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca2+ or mutating Ca2+-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures and simulations also suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  12. Self-adjusting mechanical snubbing link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    All-mechanical shock-absorber concept has several advantages over hydraulic devices. Snubbing link automatically adjusts length under light loads, locks at any position when onslaught exceeds design limits for which it is set, and will not leak oil or require periodic servicing. Concept can be incorporated as safety device on material handling systems or as energy absorption device or governor for machines or equipment.

  13. Celestial mechanics - Potential torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klat, A. I.; Marchal, C.

    1981-01-01

    The mutual potential of two solid bodies is a function of the six parameters defining the relative position of these two bodies; it is not a function of only either three or five parameters as it is implicitly assumed in most studies. The sixth parameter, the potential torsion, is related to the orientation of the two bodies around the axis of the two centers; its influence is small. An upper limit is given.

  14. Order in Gravitation Potentially Linked to Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2006-04-01

    Darwin, in the concluding remark of his text, On the Origin of Species (1859), referred to ``the fixed law of gravity'', which implies an assumption that the gravitational constant and the Newtonian the inverse square logic are potentially fixed. Therefore, they cannot influence evolution. My substantiation of the Dirac's Large Number Hypothesis (LNH) (In version 1 of http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040) predicting the decreasing value of gravitational constant theorizes that all coupling constants are increasing with time. This is also backed by the recent observations. Consequently, it is logical that the orderly increase of coupling constants imparts an orderly influence on mutations assumed uninfluenced otherwise. This orderly influence is unidirectional, clearly in the direction of increasing intelligence, looking at the evolutionary history, whether or not in the sense of a religion. On the horizon, I see that the order in gravitation is linked to the order in entropy as well.

  15. Mechanisms Linking Advanced Airway Management and Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Prince, David K.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced airway management – such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion – is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. PMID:26073275

  16. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: linking mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, José A.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief review of current concepts in the mechanisms potentially linking type-2-diabetes (T2D) with cognitive impairment. Existing epidemiologic studies, imaging studies, autopsy studies and clinical trials provide insights into the mechanisms linking T2D and cognitive impairment. There seems to be little dispute that T2D can cause cerebrovascular disease and thus cause vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Whether T2D can cause late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) remains to be elucidated. Many epidemiologic studies show an association between T2D and cognitive impairment, but the association with VCI seems to be stronger compared to LOAD, suggesting that cerebrovascular disease may be the main mechanism linking T2D and cognitive impairment. Imaging studies show an association between T2D and imaging markers of LOAD, but these observations could still be explained by cerebrovascular mechanisms. Autopsy studies are few and conflicting, with some suggesting a predominantly cerebrovascular mechanism, and others providing support for a neurodegenerative mechanism. Thus far, the evidence from clinical trials is mixed in supporting a causal association between T2D and cognitive impairment, and most clinical trials that can answer this question are yet to be reported or finished. Given the epidemic of T2D in the world, it is important to elucidate whether the association between T2D and cognitive impairment, particularly LOAD, is causal, and if so, what are the mechanisms. PMID:22433668

  17. Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment: linking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, José A

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief review of current concepts in the mechanisms potentially linking type-2-diabetes (T2D) with cognitive impairment. Existing epidemiologic studies, imaging studies, autopsy studies, and clinical trials provide insights into the mechanisms linking T2D and cognitive impairment. There seems to be little dispute that T2D can cause cerebrovascular disease and thus cause vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Whether T2D can cause late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) remains to be elucidated. Many epidemiologic studies show an association between T2D and cognitive impairment, but the association with VCI seems to be stronger compared to LOAD, suggesting that cerebrovascular disease may be the main mechanism linking T2D and cognitive impairment. Imaging studies show an association between T2D and imaging markers of LOAD, but these observations could still be explained by cerebrovascular mechanisms. Autopsy studies are few and conflicting, with some suggesting a predominantly cerebrovascular mechanism, and others providing support for a neurodegenerative mechanism. Thus far, the evidence from clinical trials is mixed in supporting a causal association between T2D and cognitive impairment, and most clinical trials that can answer this question are yet to be reported or finished. Given the epidemic of T2D in the world, it is important to elucidate whether the association between T2D and cognitive impairment, particularly LOAD, is causal, and if so, what the mechanisms are.

  18. Potential Effects of Corneal Cross-Linking upon the Limbus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Corneal cross-linking is nowadays the most used strategy for the treatment of keratoconus and recently it has been exploited for an increasing number of different corneal pathologies, from other ectatic disorders to keratitis. The safety of this technique has been widely assessed, but clinical complications still occur. The potential effects of cross-linking treatment upon the limbus are incompletely understood; it is important therefore to investigate the effect of UV exposure upon the limbal niche, particularly as UV is known to be mutagenic to cellular DNA and the limbus is where ocular surface tumors can develop. The risk of early induction of ocular surface cancer is undoubtedly rare and has to date not been published other than in one case after cross-linking. Nevertheless it is important to further assess, understand, and reduce where possible any potential risk. The aim of this review is to summarize all the reported cases of a pathological consequence for the limbal cells, possibly induced by cross-linking UV exposure, the studies done in vitro or ex vivo, the theoretical bases for the risks due to UV exposure, and which aspects of the clinical treatment may produce higher risk, along with what possible mechanisms could be utilized to protect the limbus and the delicate stem cells present within it. PMID:27689081

  19. Potential Effects of Corneal Cross-Linking upon the Limbus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Corneal cross-linking is nowadays the most used strategy for the treatment of keratoconus and recently it has been exploited for an increasing number of different corneal pathologies, from other ectatic disorders to keratitis. The safety of this technique has been widely assessed, but clinical complications still occur. The potential effects of cross-linking treatment upon the limbus are incompletely understood; it is important therefore to investigate the effect of UV exposure upon the limbal niche, particularly as UV is known to be mutagenic to cellular DNA and the limbus is where ocular surface tumors can develop. The risk of early induction of ocular surface cancer is undoubtedly rare and has to date not been published other than in one case after cross-linking. Nevertheless it is important to further assess, understand, and reduce where possible any potential risk. The aim of this review is to summarize all the reported cases of a pathological consequence for the limbal cells, possibly induced by cross-linking UV exposure, the studies done in vitro or ex vivo, the theoretical bases for the risks due to UV exposure, and which aspects of the clinical treatment may produce higher risk, along with what possible mechanisms could be utilized to protect the limbus and the delicate stem cells present within it.

  20. Linking Mechanics and Statistics in Epidermal Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-03-01

    Disordered cellular structures, such as foams, polycrystals, or living tissues, can be characterized by quantitative measurements of domain size and topology. In recent work, we showed that correlations between size and topology in 2D systems are sensitive to the shape (eccentricity) of the individual domains: From a local model of neighbor relations, we derived an analytical justification for the famous empirical Lewis law, confirming the theory with experimental data from cucumber epidermal tissue. Here, we go beyond this purely geometrical model and identify mechanical properties of the tissue as the root cause for the domain eccentricity and thus the statistics of tissue structure. The simple model approach is based on the minimization of an interfacial energy functional. Simulations with Surface Evolver show that the domain statistics depend on a single mechanical parameter, while parameter fluctuations from cell to cell play an important role in simultaneously explaining the shape distribution of cells. The simulations are in excellent agreement with experiments and analytical theory, and establish a general link between the mechanical properties of a tissue and its structure. The model is relevant to diagnostic applications in a variety of animal and plant tissues.

  1. Oocyte activation and latent HIV-1 reactivation: AMPK as a common mechanism of action linking the beginnings of life and the potential eradication of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2016-08-01

    stress (e.g. increase in Ca(2+) concentration, reactive oxygen species generation, increase in AMP/ATP ratio) is essential for oocyte maturation, T cell activation, and mitochondrial function. In addition to the AMPK kinase LKB1, CaMKK2, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase that also activates AMPK, is present in and activated on T cell activation and is also present in mouse oocytes and persists until the zygote and two-cell stages. It is our hypothesis that AMPK activation represents a central node linking T cell activation-induced latent HIV-1 reactivation and both physiological and artificial oocyte activation. We further propose the novel observation that various compounds that have been shown to reactivate latent HIV-1 (e.g. PMA, ionomycin, metformin, bryostatin, resveratrol, etc.) or activate oocytes (PMA, ionomycin, ethanol, puromycin, etc.) either alone or in combination likely do so via stress-induced activation of AMPK. PMID:27372854

  2. Gaussian effective potential: Quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. M.

    1984-10-01

    We advertise the virtues of the Gaussian effective potential (GEP) as a guide to the behavior of quantum field theories. Much superior to the usual one-loop effective potential, the GEP is a natural extension of intuitive notions familiar from quantum mechanics. A variety of quantum-mechanical examples are studied here, with an eye to field-theoretic analogies. Quantum restoration of symmetry, dynamical mass generation, and "quantum-mechanical resuscitation" are among the phenomena discussed. We suggest how the GEP could become the basis of a systematic approximation procedure. A companion paper will deal with scalar field theory.

  3. Immune Mechanisms Linking Obesity and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Spradley, Frank T.; Palei, Ana C.; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is characterized by hypertension occurring after the twentieth week of pregnancy. It is a significant contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries and its pervasiveness is increasing within developed countries including the USA. However, the mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of this maternal disorder and its rising prevalence are far from clear. A major theory with strong experimental evidence is that placental ischemia, resulting from inappropriate remodeling and widening of the maternal spiral arteries, stimulates the release of soluble factors from the ischemic placenta causing maternal endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Aberrant maternal immune responses and inflammation have been implicated in each of these stages in the cascade leading to PE. Regarding the increased prevalence of this disease, it is becoming increasingly evident from epidemiological data that obesity, which is a state of chronic inflammation in itself, increases the risk for PE. Although the specific mechanisms whereby obesity increases the rate of PE are unclear, there are strong candidates including activated macrophages and natural killer cells within the uterus and placenta and activation in the periphery of T helper cells producing cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17 and the anti-angiogenic factor sFlt-1 and B cells producing the agonistic autoantibodies to the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1-aa). This review will focus on the immune mechanisms that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension in PE with an emphasis on the potential importance of inflammatory factors in the increased risk of developing PE in obese pregnancies. PMID:26569331

  4. Quantum mechanics without potential function

    SciTech Connect

    Alhaidari, A. D.; Ismail, M. E. H.

    2015-07-15

    In the standard formulation of quantum mechanics, one starts by proposing a potential function that models the physical system. The potential is then inserted into the Schrödinger equation, which is solved for the wavefunction, bound states energy spectrum, and/or scattering phase shift. In this work, however, we propose an alternative formulation in which the potential function does not appear. The aim is to obtain a set of analytically realizable systems, which is larger than in the standard formulation and may or may not be associated with any given or previously known potential functions. We start with the wavefunction, which is written as a bounded infinite sum of elements of a complete basis with polynomial coefficients that are orthogonal on an appropriate domain in the energy space. Using the asymptotic properties of these polynomials, we obtain the scattering phase shift, bound states, and resonances. This formulation enables one to handle not only the well-known quantum systems but also previously untreated ones. Illustrative examples are given for two- and three-parameter systems.

  5. Mechanisms Linking Excess Adiposity and Carcinogenesis Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Hernández, Ana I.; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in post-menopausal women, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15–20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: (i) inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; (ii) insulin resistance development; and (iii) adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases. PMID:24829560

  6. Mechanisms linking excess adiposity and carcinogenesis promotion.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, Ana I; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in post-menopausal women, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15-20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: (i) inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; (ii) insulin resistance development; and (iii) adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases.

  7. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  8. Molecular mechanisms linking sodium to hypertension: report of a symposium.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bruce P; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2006-03-01

    There is abundant clinical and epidemiologic data linking excess body sodium with hypertension. The mechanism(s) at the molecular level to explain this relationship are unknown. Recent studies by multiple investigators, have identified several ion transport mechanisms in the vascular wall that interact to control vascular tone and contractility. These new data include 1) biochemical, pharmacologic, and molecule structural studies, 2) experiments in transgenic and knockout mice, and 3) results in clinical hypertension. The overall results provide compelling evidence for the concept that salt-dependent hypertension involves the secretion of endogenous ouabain (EO), an adrenal steroid synthesized with the same initial steps as aldosterone and secreted by the zona glomerulosa. Circulating EO inhibits arterial smooth muscle Na+ pumps with alpha 2 subunits. These are functionally coupled to the type 1 Na/Ca exchanger (NCX1). Thus when a2 Na pumps are inhibited in arterial smooth muscle, the resulting subplasma membrane increase in Na+ concentration triggers, via NCX1 Ca2+ entry, a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and increased myogenic tone and contractility. The ultimate result is a rise in peripheral vascular resistance-the hemodynamic hallmark of hypertension. The elucidation of this pathway has facilitated the development of pharmacologic agents that have therapeutic potential for hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. These include agents that compete with EO for binding to the Na+ pump and inhibitors of NCX1. PMID:16472478

  9. Mechanisms underlying the link between cannabis use and prospective memory.

    PubMed

    Cuttler, Carrie; McLaughlin, Ryan J; Graf, Peter

    2012-01-01

    While the effects of cannabis use on retrospective memory have been extensively examined, only a limited number of studies have focused on the links between cannabis use and prospective memory. We conducted two studies to examine the links between cannabis use and both time-based and event-based prospective memory as well as potential mechanisms underlying these links. For the first study, 805 students completed an online survey designed to assess cannabis consumption, problems with cannabis use indicative of a disorder, and frequency of experiencing prospective memory failures. The results showed small to moderate sized correlations between cannabis consumption, problems with cannabis use, and prospective memory. However, a series of mediation analyses revealed that correlations between problems with cannabis use and prospective memory were driven by self-reported problems with retrospective memory. For the second study, 48 non-users (who had never used cannabis), 48 experimenters (who had used cannabis five or fewer times in their lives), and 48 chronic users (who had used cannabis at least three times a week for one year) were administered three objective prospective memory tests and three self-report measures of prospective memory. The results revealed no objective deficits in prospective memory associated with chronic cannabis use. In contrast, chronic cannabis users reported experiencing more internally-cued prospective memory failures. Subsequent analyses revealed that this effect was driven by self-reported problems with retrospective memory as well as by use of alcohol and other drugs. Although our samples were not fully characterized with respect to variables such as neurological disorders and family history of substance use disorders, leaving open the possibility that these variables may play a role in the detected relationships, the present findings indicate that cannabis use has a modest effect on self-reported problems with prospective memory, with a

  10. Reliable Hydrogel with Mechanical "Fuse Link" in an Aqueous Environment.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shinji; Hiroi, Takashi; Han, Young-Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Chung, Ung-il; Sakai, Takamasa

    2015-12-01

    A robust hydrogel with a reliable deformation region in an aqueous environment is proposed. The gel has a homogeneous network where hydrophilic/hydrophobic components are uniformly distributed. In an aqueous environment, aggregated hydrophobic segments serve as "mechanical fuse links," inhibiting sudden macroscopic fracture. The gel endures threefold stretching for more than 100 cycles in water without mechanical hysteresis.

  11. Chaotic Motion Of A Two-Link Planar Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokshin, Anatoly; Zak, Michail A.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses global instability in orbital motion of two-link planar mechanism. Principal objective, contributes to understanding of chaotic motions in robot manipulators and other deterministic mechanical systems. Discussion begins with brief review of previous studies of chaotic motion and introduces notion of orbital instability in nonlinear systems. Introduces geometric approach useful in representation of orbital instability.

  12. Reliable Hydrogel with Mechanical "Fuse Link" in an Aqueous Environment.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shinji; Hiroi, Takashi; Han, Young-Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Chung, Ung-il; Sakai, Takamasa

    2015-12-01

    A robust hydrogel with a reliable deformation region in an aqueous environment is proposed. The gel has a homogeneous network where hydrophilic/hydrophobic components are uniformly distributed. In an aqueous environment, aggregated hydrophobic segments serve as "mechanical fuse links," inhibiting sudden macroscopic fracture. The gel endures threefold stretching for more than 100 cycles in water without mechanical hysteresis. PMID:26443000

  13. Parthanatos: mitochondrial-linked mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Fatokun, Amos A; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2014-01-01

    Cells die by a variety of mechanisms. Terminally differentiated cells such as neurones die in a variety of disorders, in part, via parthanatos, a process dependent on the activity of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP). Parthanatos does not require the mediation of caspases for its execution, but is clearly mechanistically dependent on the nuclear translocation of the mitochondrial-associated apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). The nuclear translocation of this otherwise beneficial mitochondrial protein, occasioned by poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) produced through PARP overactivation, causes large-scale DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation, leading to cell death. This review describes the multistep course of parthanatos and its dependence on PAR signalling and nuclear AIF translocation. The review also discusses potential targets in the parthanatos cascade as promising avenues for the development of novel, disease-modifying, therapeutic agents. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24684389

  14. Finite-time Control of One-link Mechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoba, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Nami; Nakamura, Hisakazu; Akiba, Hideyuki

    This paper considers finite-time position control of an one-link mechanical system. The system is modeled by discontinuous differential equations. In this paper, we prove that the Nakamura's local homogeneous controller based on a control Lyapunov function is valid to the position control of the robot manipulators, and show the effectiveness of the controller by experiments.

  15. Analysis of Links Positions in Landing Gear Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewczyński, D.; Tora, G.

    2014-08-01

    This article contains a kinematic analysis of an aircraft chassis mechanism in a range of positions. The mechanism of the chassis is made up of several smaller subsystems with different functions. The first mechanism is used to eject the chassis before landing (touchdown) and fold it to hatchway after the lift off. The second mechanism is designed to perform rotation of the crossover with the wheel, in order to adjust the position of the wheel to fit it in the limited space in the hold. The third mechanism allows movement of the chassis resulting from the change in length of the damper. To determine the position of the following links of the mechanism calculus of vectors was applied in which unit vectors were used to represent the angular position of the links. The aim of the analysis is to determine the angle of convergence and the angle of heel wheels as a function of the variable length of hydraulic cylinder, length of the shock absorber, length of the regulations rods

  16. Mechanism of potentiation of a dysfunctional epilepsy-linked mutated GABA(A) receptor by a neurosteroid (3alpha, 21-dihydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one): transient kinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Hess, George P

    2010-09-14

    The malfunction of a mutated GABA(A) receptor (alpha1beta2gamma2L(K289M)) in an inheritable form of epilepsy (GEFS+, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus) in humans [Baulac, S., Huberfeld, G., Gourfinkel-An, I., Mitropoulou, G., Beranger, A., Prud'homme, J. F., Baulac, M., Brice, A., Bruzzone, R., and LeGuern, E. (2001) Nat. Genet. 28, 46-48] has been accounted for by a 5-fold decrease in the channel-opening equilibrium of the mutated receptor compared to the wild type [Ramakrishnan, L., and Hess, G. P. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 7534-7540]. Here we describe the mechanism by which the neurosteroid 3alpha, 21-dihydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one (5alpha-THDOC) alleviates this malfunction of the mutated receptor transiently expressed in HEK293 cells. Two rapid reaction techniques, the cell-flow and the laser-pulse photolysis methods, were used in combination with whole-cell current recordings. 150-muM 5alpha-THDOC does not affect the rate constant for channel opening (k(op)) of approximately 250 s(-1) but does decrease the rate constant for channel closing (k(cl)) from 121 +/- 11 s(-1) to 56 +/- 21 s(-1). This results in an increase in the channel-opening equilibrium constant ((Phi(-1) = k(op)/k(cl)) by a factor of about 2, leading to about 50% alleviation of the malfunction of the inheritable mutated (alpha1beta2gamma2L(K289M)) GABA(A) receptor linked to GEFS+.

  17. Links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics: a model for information in economics?

    PubMed

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2016-05-28

    This paper tallies the links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics, and attempts to show whether those links can aid in beginning to build a formal template which is usable in economics models where time is (a)symmetric and memory is absent or present. An objective of this paper is to contemplate whether those formalisms can allow us to model information in economics in a novel way.

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms Linking Pain and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Swiergiel, Artur H; Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Stankiewicz, Adrian M

    2015-01-01

    The neurophysiological link between neuropathic pain and depression remains unknown despite evident high comorbidity of these two disorders. However, there is convincing evidence that genotype plays a role in both pain and depression. Using various types of genetic analysis - population genetics, cytogenetics and molecular technologies - specific genes have been implicated in mediating almost all aspects of nociception and mood disorders. The current review attempts to identify specific genes and epigenetic mechanisms common to both disorders. It is concluded that external and internal factors (inflammation, stress, gender, etc.) that contribute to the pathologies may do so through epigenetic mechanisms that may affect expression of these particular genes. The possible involvement of epigenetic regulation in pain and psychiatric disorders suggests that treatments targeting epigenetic mechanisms that mediate adverse life events should be considered. PMID:26436761

  19. Frailty and Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Mechanisms Behind the Link.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Navarro, Sara Gloria; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto José; Anaya-Escamilla, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between frailty and cognitive impairment has been recognized for decades, but it was not until a few years ago that the interest in this relationship increased and is now being understood. Epidemiological evidence suggests that physical frailty may be linked to cognitive impairment since both conditions share pathophysiological mechanisms at the cellular and systemic levels. Aging itself promotes multiple vascular changes, making the brain susceptible to cognitive decline through mechanisms such as thinning of blood vessels, increased collagen accumulation, rupture of the blood-brain barrier, inflammation, and oxidative damage. The prevalence of frailty and cognitive decline increases as individuals become older, and cognitive impairment attributable to cerebrovascular disease has become a major public health problem since vascular dementia is now the second most common subtype of dementia. However, full understanding of the mechanisms underlying the relationship between frailty and vascular cognitive impairment remains fragmented. This review examines the link between frailty and vascular cognitive decline and also explores the role of vascular changes in the genesis of both conditions. PMID:27028174

  20. Cell mechanics and immune system link up to fight infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekpenyong, Andrew; Man, Si Ming; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Achouri, Sarra; Cammarota, Eugenia; Hughes, Katherine; Rizzo, Alessandro; Ng, Gilbert; Guck, Jochen; Bryant, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Infectious diseases, in which pathogens invade and colonize host cells, are responsible for one third of all mortality worldwide. Host cells use special proteins (immunoproteins) and other molecules to fight viral and bacterial invaders. The mechanisms by which immunoproteins enable cells to reduce bacterial loads and survive infections remain unclear. Moreover, during infections, some immunoproteins are known to alter the cytoskeleton, the structure that largely determines cellular mechanical properties. We therefore used an optical stretcher to measure the mechanical properties of primary immune cells (bone marrow derived macrophages) during bacterial infection. We found that macrophages become stiffer upon infection. Remarkably, macrophages lacking the immunoprotein, NLR-C4, lost the stiffening response to infection. This in vitro result correlates with our in vivo data whereby mice lacking NLR-C4 have more lesions and hence increased bacterial distribution and spread. Thus, the immune-protein-dependent increase in cell stiffness in response to bacterial infection (in vitro result) seems to have a functional role in the system level fight against pathogens (in vivo result). We will discuss how this functional link between cell mechanical properties and innate immunity, effected by actin polymerization, reduces the spread of infection.

  1. Air pollution, inflammation and preterm birth: a potential mechanistic link.

    PubMed

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth. PMID:24382337

  2. AIR POLLUTION, INFLAMMATION AND PRETERM BIRTH: A POTENTIAL MECHANISTIC LINK

    PubMed Central

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G.; O´Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth. PMID:24382337

  3. Air pollution, inflammation and preterm birth: a potential mechanistic link.

    PubMed

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth.

  4. Linking transient storage parameters to exchange mechanisms and reach characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morén, Ida; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2015-04-01

    transient storage model. Important geomorphologic and hydraulic features used as classification parameters are those that that can be directly linked to specific management measures implemented in streams to increase natural remediation of nutrients and other contaminants. Only field data from reaches where measurements independent of the tracer tests have been done is included in this study in order to correctly analyse dominating mechanisms and combination of mechanisms and to be able to link the retention times to relevant and measurable reach characteristics.

  5. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport. PMID:22782543

  6. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  7. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  8. Directed networks' different link formation mechanisms causing degree distribution distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behfar, Stefan Kambiz; Turkina, Ekaterina; Cohendet, Patrick; Burger-Helmchen, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Within undirected networks, scientists have shown much interest in presenting power-law features. For instance, Barabási and Albert (1999) claimed that a common property of many large networks is that vertex connectivity follows scale-free power-law distribution, and in another study Barabási et al. (2002) showed power law evolution in the social network of scientific collaboration. At the same time, Jiang et al. (2011) discussed deviation from power-law distribution; others indicated that size effect (Bagrow et al., 2008), information filtering mechanism (Mossa et al., 2002), and birth and death process (Shi et al., 2005) could account for this deviation. Within directed networks, many authors have considered that outlinks follow a similar mechanism of creation as inlinks' (Faloutsos et al., 1999; Krapivsky et al., 2001; Tanimoto, 2009) with link creation rate being the linear function of node degree, resulting in a power-law shape for both indegree and outdegree distribution. Some other authors have made an assumption that directed networks, such as scientific collaboration or citation, behave as undirected, resulting in a power-law degree distribution accordingly (Barabási et al., 2002). At the same time, we claim (1) Outlinks feature different degree distributions than inlinks; where different link formation mechanisms cause the distribution distinctions, (2) in/outdegree distribution distinction holds for different levels of system decomposition; therefore this distribution distinction is a property of directed networks. First, we emphasize in/outlink formation mechanisms as causal factors for distinction between indegree and outdegree distributions (where this distinction has already been noticed in Barker et al. (2010) and Baxter et al. (2006)) within a sample network of OSS projects as well as Java software corpus as a network. Second, we analyze whether this distribution distinction holds for different levels of system decomposition: open

  9. Quantum mechanical streamlines. I - Square potential barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Christoph, A. C.; Palke, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Exact numerical calculations are made for scattering of quantum mechanical particles hitting a square two-dimensional potential barrier (an exact analog of the Goos-Haenchen optical experiments). Quantum mechanical streamlines are plotted and found to be smooth and continuous, to have continuous first derivatives even through the classical forbidden region, and to form quantized vortices around each of the nodal points. A comparison is made between the present numerical calculations and the stationary wave approximation, and good agreement is found between both the Goos-Haenchen shifts and the reflection coefficients. The time-independent Schroedinger equation for real wavefunctions is reduced to solving a nonlinear first-order partial differential equation, leading to a generalization of the Prager-Hirschfelder perturbation scheme. Implications of the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics are discussed, and cases are cited where quantum and classical mechanical motions are identical.

  10. Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness.

    PubMed

    Grace, James B; Anderson, T Michael; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Adler, Peter B; Harpole, W Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M; Pärtel, Meelis; Bakker, Jonathan D; Buckley, Yvonne M; Crawley, Michael J; Damschen, Ellen I; Davies, Kendi F; Fay, Philip A; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S; Hector, Andy; Knops, Johannes M H; MacDougall, Andrew S; Melbourne, Brett A; Morgan, John W; Orrock, John L; Prober, Suzanne M; Smith, Melinda D

    2016-01-21

    How ecosystem productivity and species richness are interrelated is one of the most debated subjects in the history of ecology. Decades of intensive study have yet to discern the actual mechanisms behind observed global patterns. Here, by integrating the predictions from multiple theories into a single model and using data from 1,126 grassland plots spanning five continents, we detect the clear signals of numerous underlying mechanisms linking productivity and richness. We find that an integrative model has substantially higher explanatory power than traditional bivariate analyses. In addition, the specific results unveil several surprising findings that conflict with classical models. These include the isolation of a strong and consistent enhancement of productivity by richness, an effect in striking contrast with superficial data patterns. Also revealed is a consistent importance of competition across the full range of productivity values, in direct conflict with some (but not all) proposed models. The promotion of local richness by macroecological gradients in climatic favourability, generally seen as a competing hypothesis, is also found to be important in our analysis. The results demonstrate that an integrative modelling approach leads to a major advance in our ability to discern the underlying processes operating in ecological systems. PMID:26760203

  11. Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, James B.; Anderson, T. Michael; Seabloom, Eric W.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Adler, Peter B.; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M.; Pärtel, Meelis; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Buckley, Yvonne M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Damschen, Ellen I.; Davies, Kendi F.; Fay, Philip A.; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hector, Andy; Knops, Johannes M. H.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Morgan, John W.; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Smith, Melinda D.

    2016-01-01

    How ecosystem productivity and species richness are interrelated is one of the most debated subjects in the history of ecology. Decades of intensive study have yet to discern the actual mechanisms behind observed global patterns. Here, by integrating the predictions from multiple theories into a single model and using data from 1,126 grassland plots spanning five continents, we detect the clear signals of numerous underlying mechanisms linking productivity and richness. We find that an integrative model has substantially higher explanatory power than traditional bivariate analyses. In addition, the specific results unveil several surprising findings that conflict with classical models. These include the isolation of a strong and consistent enhancement of productivity by richness, an effect in striking contrast with superficial data patterns. Also revealed is a consistent importance of competition across the full range of productivity values, in direct conflict with some (but not all) proposed models. The promotion of local richness by macroecological gradients in climatic favourability, generally seen as a competing hypothesis, is also found to be important in our analysis. The results demonstrate that an integrative modelling approach leads to a major advance in our ability to discern the underlying processes operating in ecological systems.

  12. Linking continuum mechanics and 3D discrete dislocation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A. A.; Fivel, M.

    1998-10-18

    A technique is developed for linking the methods of discrete dislocation dynamics simulation and finite element to treat elasto-plasticity problems. The overall formulation views the plastically deforming crystal as an elastic crystal with continuously changing dislocation microstructure which is tracked by the numerical dynamics simulation. The FEM code needed in this regard is based on linear elasticity only. This formulation presented here is focused on a continuous updating of the outer shape of the crystal, for possible regeneration of the FEM mesh, and adjustment of the surface geometry, in particular the surface normal. The method is expected to be potentially applicable to the nano- indentation experiments, where the zone around the indenter-crystal contact undergoes significant permanent deformation, the rigorous determination of which is very important to the calculation of the indentation print area and in turn, the surface hardness. Furthermore, the technique is expected to account for the plastic history of the surface displacement under the indenter. Other potential applications are mentioned in the text.

  13. Linking traits based on their shared molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Yael; Nachshon, Aharon; Frishberg, Amit; Wilentzik, Roni; Gat-Viks, Irit

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that co-morbidity and co-occurrence of disease traits are often determined by shared genetic and molecular mechanisms. In most cases, however, the specific mechanisms that lead to such trait–trait relationships are yet unknown. Here we present an analysis of a broad spectrum of behavioral and physiological traits together with gene-expression measurements across genetically diverse mouse strains. We develop an unbiased methodology that constructs potentially overlapping groups of traits and resolves their underlying combination of genetic loci and molecular mechanisms. For example, our method predicts that genetic variation in the Klf7 gene may influence gene transcripts in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells, which in turn affect 17 behavioral traits following morphine injection; this predicted effect of Klf7 is consistent with an in vitro perturbation of Klf7 in bone marrow cells. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of studying hidden causative mechanisms that lead to relationships between complex traits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04346.001 PMID:25781485

  14. Potential antitumor mechanisms of phenothiazine drugs.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lu; Ding, Yanqing

    2013-11-01

    In this study, three kinds of phenothiazine drugs were analyzed to explore their potential antitumor mechanisms. First, target proteins that could interact with chlorpromazine, fluphenazine and trifluoperazine were predicted. Then, the target proteins of the three drugs were intersected. Cell signaling pathway enrichment and related disease enrichment were conducted for the intersected proteins to extract the enrichment categories associated with tumors. By regulation network analysis of the protein interactions, the mechanisms of action of these target proteins in tumor tissue were clarified, thus confirming the potential antitumor mechanisms of the phenothiazine drugs. The final results of cell signaling pathway enrichment and related disease enrichment showed that the categories with the highest score were all found in tumors. Target proteins belonging to the tumor category included signaling pathway members such as Wnt, MAPK and retinoic acid receptor. Moreover, another target protein, MAPK8, could indirectly act on target proteins CDK2, IGF1R, GSK3B, RARA, FGFR2 and MAPK10, thereby affecting tumor cell division and proliferation. Therefore, phenothiazine drugs may have potential antitumor effects, and tumor-associated target proteins play important roles in the process of cell signaling transduction cascades.

  15. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics restrained electrostatic potential fitting.

    PubMed

    Burger, Steven K; Schofield, Jeremy; Ayers, Paul W

    2013-12-01

    We present a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to evaluate the partial charges of amino acid residues for use in MM potentials based on their protein environment. For each residue of interest, the nearby residues are included in the QM system while the rest of the protein is treated at the MM level of theory. After a short structural optimization, the partial charges of the central residue are fit to the electrostatic potential using the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. The resulting charges and electrostatic potential account for the individual environment of the residue, although they lack the transferable nature of library partial charges. To evaluate the quality of the QM/MM RESP charges, thermodynamic integration is used to measure the pKa shift of the aspartic acid residues in three different proteins, turkey egg lysozyme, beta-cryptogein, and Thioredoxin. Compared to the AMBER ff99SB library values, the QM/MM RESP charges show better agreement between the calculated and experimental pK(a) values for almost all of the residues considered.

  16. Electro-Mechanical Actuator. DC Resonant Link Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on the 68 HP electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) system developed on NASA contract for the Electrical Actuation (ELA) Technology Bridging Program. The system was designed to demonstrate the capability of large, high power linear ELAs for applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC) on rocket engines. It consists of a motor controller, drive electronics and a linear actuator capable of up to 32,00 lbs loading at 7.4 inches/second. The drive electronics are based on the Resonant DC link concept and operate at a nominal frequency of 55 kHz. The induction motor is a specially designed high speed, low inertia motor capable of a 68 peak HP. The actuator was originally designed by MOOG Aerospace under an internal R & D program to meet Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) TVC requirements. The design was modified to meet this programs linear rate specification of 7.4 inches/second. The motor and driver were tested on a dynamometer at the Martin Marietta Space Systems facility. System frequency response, step response and force-velocity tests were conducted at the MOOG Aerospace facility. A complete description of the system and all test results can be found in the body of the report.

  17. Excess body weight during pregnancy and offspring obesity: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Paliy, Oleg; Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Kozyrskyj, Anita; Celep, Gulcin; Marotta, Francesco; Rastmanesh, Reza

    2014-03-01

    The rates of child and adult obesity have increased in most developed countries over the past several decades. The health consequences of obesity affect both physical and mental health, and the excess body weight can be linked to an elevated risk for developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular problems, and depression. Among the factors that can influence the development of obesity are higher infant weights and increased weight gain, which are associated with higher risk for excess body weight later in life. In turn, mother's excess body weight during and after pregnancy can be linked to the risk for offspring overweight and obesity through dietary habits, mode of delivery and feeding, breast milk composition, and through the influence on infant gut microbiota. This review considers current knowledge of these potential mechanisms that threaten to create an intergenerational cycle of obesity.

  18. Direct mechanical stimulation of tip links in hair cells through DNA tethers

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Aakash; Lagier, Samuel; Vologodskaia, Maria; Fabella, Brian A; Hudspeth, AJ

    2016-01-01

    Mechanoelectrical transduction by hair cells commences with hair-bundle deflection, which is postulated to tense filamentous tip links connected to transduction channels. Because direct mechanical stimulation of tip links has not been experimentally possible, this hypothesis has not been tested. We have engineered DNA tethers that link superparamagnetic beads to tip links and exert mechanical forces on the links when exposed to a magnetic-field gradient. By pulling directly on tip links of the bullfrog's sacculus we have evoked transduction currents from hair cells, confirming the hypothesis that tension in the tip links opens transduction channels. This demonstration of direct mechanical access to tip links additionally lays a foundation for experiments probing the mechanics of individual channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16041.001 PMID:27331611

  19. Neurocomputational mechanisms of prosocial learning and links to empathy.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Patricia L; Apps, Matthew A J; Valton, Vincent; Viding, Essi; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2016-08-30

    Reinforcement learning theory powerfully characterizes how we learn to benefit ourselves. In this theory, prediction errors-the difference between a predicted and actual outcome of a choice-drive learning. However, we do not operate in a social vacuum. To behave prosocially we must learn the consequences of our actions for other people. Empathy, the ability to vicariously experience and understand the affect of others, is hypothesized to be a critical facilitator of prosocial behaviors, but the link between empathy and prosocial behavior is still unclear. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) participants chose between different stimuli that were probabilistically associated with rewards for themselves (self), another person (prosocial), or no one (control). Using computational modeling, we show that people can learn to obtain rewards for others but do so more slowly than when learning to obtain rewards for themselves. fMRI revealed that activity in a posterior portion of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex/basal forebrain (sgACC) drives learning only when we are acting in a prosocial context and signals a prosocial prediction error conforming to classical principles of reinforcement learning theory. However, there is also substantial variability in the neural and behavioral efficiency of prosocial learning, which is predicted by trait empathy. More empathic people learn more quickly when benefitting others, and their sgACC response is the most selective for prosocial learning. We thus reveal a computational mechanism driving prosocial learning in humans. This framework could provide insights into atypical prosocial behavior in those with disorders of social cognition. PMID:27528669

  20. Neurocomputational mechanisms of prosocial learning and links to empathy.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Patricia L; Apps, Matthew A J; Valton, Vincent; Viding, Essi; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2016-08-30

    Reinforcement learning theory powerfully characterizes how we learn to benefit ourselves. In this theory, prediction errors-the difference between a predicted and actual outcome of a choice-drive learning. However, we do not operate in a social vacuum. To behave prosocially we must learn the consequences of our actions for other people. Empathy, the ability to vicariously experience and understand the affect of others, is hypothesized to be a critical facilitator of prosocial behaviors, but the link between empathy and prosocial behavior is still unclear. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) participants chose between different stimuli that were probabilistically associated with rewards for themselves (self), another person (prosocial), or no one (control). Using computational modeling, we show that people can learn to obtain rewards for others but do so more slowly than when learning to obtain rewards for themselves. fMRI revealed that activity in a posterior portion of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex/basal forebrain (sgACC) drives learning only when we are acting in a prosocial context and signals a prosocial prediction error conforming to classical principles of reinforcement learning theory. However, there is also substantial variability in the neural and behavioral efficiency of prosocial learning, which is predicted by trait empathy. More empathic people learn more quickly when benefitting others, and their sgACC response is the most selective for prosocial learning. We thus reveal a computational mechanism driving prosocial learning in humans. This framework could provide insights into atypical prosocial behavior in those with disorders of social cognition.

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Linking High Dose Medroxyprogesterone with HIV-1 Risk

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Susan C.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) may increase the risk of HIV-1. The current studies were designed to identify potential underlying biological mechanisms. Methods Human vaginal epithelial (VK2/E6E7), peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMC), and polarized endometrial (HEC-1-A) cells were treated with a range of concentrations of MPA (0.015-150 μg/ml) and the impact on gene expression, protein secretion, and HIV infection was evaluated. Results Treatment of VK2/E6E7 cells with high doses (>15μg/ml] of MPA significantly upregulated proinflammatory cytokines, which resulted in a significant increase in HIV p24 levels secreted by latently infected U1 cells following exposure to culture supernatants harvested from MPA compared to mock-treated cells. MPA also increased syndecan expression by VK2/E6E7 cells and cells treated with 15 μg/ml of MPA bound and transferred more HIV-1 to T cells compared to mock-treated cells. Moreover, MPA treatment of epithelial cells and PBMC significantly decreased cell proliferation resulting in disruption of the epithelial barrier and decreased cytokine responses to phytohaemagglutinin, respectively. Conclusion We identified several molecular mechanisms that could contribute to an association between DMPA and HIV including proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses that could activate the HIV promoter and recruit immune targets, increased expression of syndecans to facilitate the transfer of virus from epithelial to immune cells and decreased cell proliferation. The latter could impede the ability to maintain an effective epithelial barrier and adversely impact immune cell function. However, these responses were observed primarily following exposure to high (15-150 μg/ml) MPA concentrations. Clinical correlation is needed to determine whether the prolonged MPA exposure associated with contraception activates these mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25798593

  2. Mechanisms Linking Colorectal Cancer to the Consumption of (Processed) Red Meat: A Review.

    PubMed

    Demeyer, Daniel; Mertens, Birgit; De Smet, Stefaan; Ulens, Michèle

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world. The vast majority of CRC cases have been linked to environmental causes rather than to heritable genetic changes. Over the last decades, epidemiological evidence linking the consumption of red and, more convincingly, of processed red meat to CRC has accumulated. In parallel, hypotheses on carcinogenic mechanisms underlying an association between CRC and the intake of red and processed red meat have been proposed and investigated in biological studies. The hypotheses that have received most attention until now include (1) the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines, two groups of compounds recognized as carcinogenic, (2) the enhancing effect of (nitrosyl)heme on the formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and lipid peroxidation. However, none of these hypotheses completely explains the link between red and processed red meat intake and the CRC risk. Consequently, scientists have proposed additional mechanisms or refined their hypotheses. This review first briefly summarizes the development of CRC followed by an in-depth overview and critical discussion of the different potential carcinogenic mechanisms underlying the increased CRC risk associated with the consumption of red and processed red meat.

  3. Exosomes: The Link between GPCR Activation and Metastatic Potential?

    PubMed Central

    Isola, Allison L.; Chen, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    The activation of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) by their respective ligands initiates a cascade of multiple signaling processes within the cell, regulating growth, metabolism and other essential cellular functions. Dysregulation and aberrant expression of these GPCRs and their subsequent signaling cascades are associated with many different types of pathologies, including cancer. The main life threatening complication in patients diagnosed with cancer is the dissemination of cells from the primary tumor to distant vital organs within the body, metastasis. Communication between the primary tumor, immune system, and the site of future metastasis are some of the key events in the early stages of metastasis. It has been postulated that the communication is mediated by nanovesicles that, under non-pathological conditions, are released by normal cells to relay signals to other cells in the body. These nanovesicles are called exosomes, and are utilized by the tumor cell to influence changes within the recipient cell, such as bone marrow progenitor cells, and cells within the site of future metastatic growth, in order to prepare the site for colonization. Tumor cells have been shown to release an increased number of exosomes when compared to their normal cell counterpart. Exosome production and release are regulated by proteins involved in localization, degradation and size of the multivesicular body, whose function may be altered within cancer cells, resulting in the release of an increased number of these vesicles. This review investigates the possibility of GPCR signaling cascades acting as the upstream activator of proteins involved in exosome production and release, linking a commonly targeted trans-membrane protein class with cellular communication utilized by tumor cells in early stages of metastasis. PMID:27092178

  4. Applications of Laminar Weak-Link Mechanisms for Ultraprecision Synchrotron Radiation Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.; Maser, J.; Ilavsky, J.; Shastri, S. D.; Lee, P. L.; Narayanan, S.; Long, G. G.

    2007-01-19

    Unlike traditional kinematic flexure mechanisms, laminar overconstrained weak-link mechanisms provide much higher structure stiffness and stability. Using a laminar structure configured and manufactured by chemical etching and lithography techniques, we are able to design and build linear and rotary weak-link mechanisms with ultrahigh positioning sensitivity and stability for synchrotron radiation applications. Applications of laminar rotary weak-link mechanism include: high-energy-resolution monochromators for inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray analyzers for ultra-small-angle scattering and powder-diffraction experiments. Applications of laminar linear weak-link mechanism include high-stiffness piezo-driven stages with subnanometer resolution for an x-ray microscope. In this paper, we summarize the recent designs and applications of the laminar weak-link mechanisms at the Advanced Photon Source.

  5. Tank tread assemblies with track-linking mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The proposed tank tread assembly has adjacent tank tread segments joined by a link bearing tapered pins retained by clips inserted through the tread shells perpendicular to the axes of the pin. It also has highway pads attached by a release rod bearing tapered, grooved cams which interlockingly engage tabs inserted into the tread shells.

  6. Persistent organic pollutants & obesity: potential mechanisms for breast cancer promotion?

    PubMed Central

    Reaves, Denise K.; Ginsburg, Erika; Bang, John J.; Fleming, Jodie M.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary ingestion of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) correlates with developing obesity. Obesity alters metabolism, induces an inflammatory tissue microenvironment, and is also linked with diabetes and breast cancer risk/promotion of the disease. However, no direct evidence exists exploring the correlation among all three of these factors (POPs, obesity, and breast cancer). Herein, we present current correlative studies suggesting a causal link between POPs exposure through diet and their bioaccumulation in adipose that promotes the development of obesity and ultimately influences breast cancer development and/or progression. Furthermore, as endocrine disruptors, POPs can potentially interfere with hormonally responsive tissue functions causing dysregulation in hormone signaling and cell function. This review highlights the critical need for advanced in vitro and in vivo model systems to understand the complex relationship between obesity, POPs, breast cancer, and, more importantly, to delineate their multifaceted molecular, cellular, and biochemical mechanisms. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies directly testing the observed correlations as well as detailing their molecular mechanisms are vital to cancer research and, ultimately, public health. PMID:25624167

  7. A Potential link between Bacterial Pathogens and Allergic Conjunctivitis by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruzhi; Su, Zhitao; Lu, Fan; Zhang, Lili; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Xiaobo; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2014-01-01

    The association and mechanism of bacteria linking to the allergic inflammation have not been well elucidated. This study was to explore a potential link between bacterial pathogens and allergic conjunctivitis by dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs from BALB/c and MyD88 knockout mice were treated with or without bacterial pathogens or thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Two murine models of the topical challenge with LPS or flagellin and experimental allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) were used for in vivo study. The mRNA expression was determined by reverse transcription and real time PCR, and protein production was evaluated by ELISA, Western blotting, immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. TSLP mRNA and protein were found to be largely induced by DCs challenged with microbial pathogens, highly by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagellin. The expression of MyD88, NFκB1, NFκB2 and RelA accompanied by NFκB p65 nuclear translocation and TSLP induction were significantly stimulated by flagellin, but blocked by TLR5 antibody or NFκB inhibitor in DCs from MyD88+/+ but not MyD88−/− mice. TSLP promoted the expression of CD40, CD80, OX40 ligand (OX40L), IL-13 and CCL17 by DCs. TSLP-producing DCs were identified in vivo in ocular surface conjunctiva and draining cervical lymph nodes from two murine models of topical challenge with LPS or flagellin, and EAC in BALB/c mice. TSLP/TSLPR/OX40L signaling was observed in DCs of EAC mice. Our findings demonstrate that DCs not only respond to TSLP, but also produce TSLP via TLR/MyD88/NFκB pathways in response to bacterial pathogens, suggesting a potential link between bacteria and allergic disease. PMID:24486456

  8. Potential Dynamical Mechanisms Behind Global Mantle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Loddoch, A.; Stein, C.

    2007-05-01

    By numerical models we have investigated three potential mechanisms behind global mantle events. Plumes, originating in the thermal boundary layers of the mantle convection system can exhibit a significant episodicity, once a strong temperature-dependence of the viscosity of the mantle material is taken into account. An increase of the viscosity with pressure, as sometimes believed to suppress plumes, acts in fact to focus buoyancy into a few strong upwellings, which are potentially able to generate events on global scale. Plumes originating self- consistently from a thermal boundary layer, transport mostly material from their source region, while they entrain only little material during ascent. Compositionally dense material at the Core-mantle boundary has been proposed to explain seismological observed anomalies. The stability of such heterogeneities against entrainment by the overlying mantle-flow is determined by a complex set of properties, rather than by the density difference alone. Model calculations, taking into account a combined dependence of viscosity on temperature, pressure and , as mostly neglected; on composition, demonstrate, that under such conditions the D", can function as an isolated reservoir form some time, that however the destruction of the compositionally distinct layer, shielding the Earth'core can take place rapidly., with a profound effect also on the surface heat flow.. Finally we observe that episodic mobilization events of the surface are dynamically plausible for appropriate rheologies. A combination of temperature- and stress-dependent viscosity leads to an intermittent type of temporal behavior, where periods showing no surface motion (stagnant lid) are interrupted by phases with strong plate motions at the top. It seems at least possible that plate motion is not a continuously operating process.

  9. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  10. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  11. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  12. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  13. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body....

  14. Emotion Dysregulation as a Mechanism Linking Peer Victimization to Internalizing Symptoms in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Hilt, Lori M.

    2009-01-01

    Peer victimization experiences represent developmentally salient stressors among adolescents and are associated with the development of internalizing symptoms. However, the mechanisms linking peer victimization to adolescent psychopathology remain inadequately understood. This study examined emotion dysregulation as a mechanism linking peer stress…

  15. Modeling and Simulation of a Slider Crank Mechanism with a Flexible Extensible Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupac, M.; Noroozi, S.

    In this paper the modelling of a slider-crank mechanism with an extensible flexible link is presented and its dynamical behaviour analyzed. The link flexibility is modelled using extensible rigid links and rotational springs. The equations of motion with and without slider clearance are written. Accurate simulation of the extensible mechanism is performed to study its possible performance and behaviour under the combined effect of different parameters. A dynamic analysis is carried out in order to understand its behaviour under motion reconfiguration.

  16. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  17. Chemical, Physical, and Mechanical Characterization of Isocyanate Cross-linked Amine-Modified Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Atul; Shimpi, Nilesh; Roy, Samit; Lu, Hongbing; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Dass, Amala; Capadona, Lynn A.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    We describe a new mechanically strong lightweight porous composite material obtained by encapsulating the skeletal framework of amine-modified silica aerogels with polyurea. The conformal polymer coating preserves the mesoporous structure of the underlying silica framework and the thermal conductivity remains low at 0.041 plus or minus 0.001 W m(sup -1 K(sup -1). The potential of the new cross-linked silica aerogels for load-carrying applications was determined through characterization of their mechanical behavior under compression, three-point bending, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). A primary glass transition temperature of 130 C was identified through DMA. At room temperature, results indicate a hyperfoam behavior where in compression cross-linked aerogels are linearly elastic under small strains (less than 4%) and then exhibit yield behavior (until 40% strain), followed by densification and inelastic hardening. At room temperature the compressive Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio were determined to be 129 plus or minus 8 MPa and 0.18, respectively, while the strain at ultimate failure is 77% and the average specific compressive stress at ultimate failure is 3.89 x 10(exp 5) N m kg(sup -1). The specific flexural strength is 2.16 x 10(exp 4) N m kg(sup -1). Effects on the compressive behavior of strain rate and low temperature were also evaluated.

  18. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  19. Relationship between cross-linking conditions of ethylene vinyl acetate and potential induced degradation for crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonai, Sachiko; Hara, Kohjiro; Tsutsui, Yuji; Nakahama, Hidenari; Masuda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship in crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules between the cross-linking level of copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate (EVA) as the encapsulant and the degree of degradation due to potential induced degradation (PID) phenomenon. We used three methods for the determination of cross-linking level of EVA: xylene method, which is one of the solvent extraction methods (SEM), curing degree by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and viscoelastic properties by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results indicate that degradation of PV modules by PID test depends on the cross-linking level of EVA. The PV modules encapsulated by EVA with higher cross-linking level show lower degradation degree due to PID phenomenon. Also we showed that EVA with higher cross-linking level tended to be higher volume resistivity. This tendency is similar to that for electrical resistance value during the PID test. The PID test was also done by changing thickness of EVA between front cover glass and c-Si with the same cross-linking level. The PV modules encapsulated by thicker EVA between front cover glass and c-Si cell show lower degradation by PID. From these results, the PV modules encapsulated by EVA with higher cross-linking level, higher volume resistivity and increased thickness would be tolerant of PID phenomenon.

  20. Mechanisms linking the social environment to health in African Americans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The social environment may influence health directly or indirectly through psychosocial factors, such as perceived stress, depressive symptoms and discrimination. This study explored potential psychosocial mediators of the associations between the social environment and physical and mental health in...

  1. Mechanisms linking energy balance and reproduction: impact of prenatal environment.

    PubMed

    Rhinehart, Erin M

    2016-01-01

    The burgeoning field of metabolic reproduction regulation has been gaining momentum due to highly frequent discoveries of new neuroendocrine factors regulating both energy balance and reproduction. Universally throughout the animal kingdom, energy deficits inhibit the reproductive axis, which demonstrates that reproduction is acutely sensitive to fuel availability. Entrainment of reproductive efforts with energy availability is especially critical for females because they expend large amounts of energy on gestation and lactation. Research has identified an assortment of both central and peripheral factors involved in the metabolic regulation of reproduction. From an evolutionary perspective, these mechanisms likely evolved to optimize reproductive fitness in an environment with an unpredictable food supply and regular bouts of famine. To be effective, however, the mechanisms responsible for the metabolic regulation of reproduction must also retain developmental plasticity to allow organisms to adapt their reproductive strategies to their particular niche. In particular, the prenatal environment has emerged as a critical developmental window for programming the mechanisms responsible for the metabolic control of reproduction. This review will discuss the current knowledge about hormonal and molecular mechanisms that entrain reproduction with prevailing energy availability. In addition, it will provide an evolutionary, human life-history framework to assist in the interpretation of findings on gestational programming of the female reproductive function, with a focus on pubertal timing as an example. Future research should aim to shed light on mechanisms underlying the prenatal modulation of the adaptation to an environment with unstable resources in a way that optimizes reproductive fitness.

  2. Piezo1 links mechanical forces to red blood cell volume

    PubMed Central

    Cahalan, Stuart M; Lukacs, Viktor; Ranade, Sanjeev S; Chien, Shu; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) experience significant mechanical forces while recirculating, but the consequences of these forces are not fully understood. Recent work has shown that gain-of-function mutations in mechanically activated Piezo1 cation channels are associated with the dehydrating RBC disease xerocytosis, implicating a role of mechanotransduction in RBC volume regulation. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations result in RBC dehydration are unknown. In this study, we show that RBCs exhibit robust calcium entry in response to mechanical stretch and that this entry is dependent on Piezo1 expression. Furthermore, RBCs from blood-cell-specific Piezo1 conditional knockout mice are overhydrated and exhibit increased fragility both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Yoda1, a chemical activator of Piezo1, causes calcium influx and subsequent dehydration of RBCs via downstream activation of the KCa3.1 Gardos channel, directly implicating Piezo1 signaling in RBC volume control. Therefore, mechanically activated Piezo1 plays an essential role in RBC volume homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07370.001 PMID:26001274

  3. Piezo1 links mechanical forces to red blood cell volume.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Stuart M; Lukacs, Viktor; Ranade, Sanjeev S; Chien, Shu; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) experience significant mechanical forces while recirculating, but the consequences of these forces are not fully understood. Recent work has shown that gain-of-function mutations in mechanically activated Piezo1 cation channels are associated with the dehydrating RBC disease xerocytosis, implicating a role of mechanotransduction in RBC volume regulation. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations result in RBC dehydration are unknown. In this study, we show that RBCs exhibit robust calcium entry in response to mechanical stretch and that this entry is dependent on Piezo1 expression. Furthermore, RBCs from blood-cell-specific Piezo1 conditional knockout mice are overhydrated and exhibit increased fragility both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Yoda1, a chemical activator of Piezo1, causes calcium influx and subsequent dehydration of RBCs via downstream activation of the KCa3.1 Gardos channel, directly implicating Piezo1 signaling in RBC volume control. Therefore, mechanically activated Piezo1 plays an essential role in RBC volume homeostasis. PMID:26001274

  4. Biological mechanisms linking Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Gohar; Khan, Jalaluddin A; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    The emerging data suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can contribute significantly to the onset or progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) either directly or as a cofactor. Various in vitro and in vivo animal and human clinical studies have provided evidence that T2DM is a major risk factor in the pathology of AD and the two diseases share common biological mechanisms at the molecular level. The biological mechanisms that are common in the pathology of both T2DM and AD include insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, β-amyloid formation, oxidative stress, and the presence of advanced glycation end products. With better understanding of the degree of association between AD and T2DM and the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining this relationship, it is hoped that researchers will be able to develop effective therapeutic interventions to treat or control T2DM and, as a consequence, delay the onset or progression of AD.

  5. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-02-15

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host's metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer.

  6. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength.

  7. Influence of cross-link structure, density and mechanical properties in the mesoscale deformation mechanisms of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is a ubiquitous protein with remarkable mechanical properties. It is highly elastic, shows large fracture strength and enables substantial energy dissipation during deformation. Most of the connective tissue in humans consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of tropocollagen molecules, which are connected by intermolecular cross-links. In this study, we report a three-dimensional coarse-grained model of collagen and analyze the influence of enzymatic cross-links on the mechanics of collagen fibrils. Two representatives immature and mature cross-links are implemented in the mesoscale model using a bottom-up approach. By varying the number, type and mechanical properties of cross-links in the fibrils and performing tensile test on the models, we systematically investigate the deformation mechanisms of cross-linked collagen fibrils. We find that cross-linked fibrils exhibit a three phase behavior, which agrees closer with experimental results than what was obtained using previous models. The fibril mechanical response is characterized by: (i) an initial elastic deformation corresponding to the collagen molecule uncoiling, (ii) a linear regime dominated by molecule sliding and (iii) the second stiffer elastic regime related to the stretching of the backbone of the tropocollagen molecules until the fibril ruptures. Our results suggest that both cross-link density and type dictate the stiffness of large deformation regime by increasing the number of interconnected molecules while cross-links mechanical properties determine the failure strain and strength of the fibril. These findings reveal that cross-links play an essential role in creating an interconnected fibrillar material of tunable toughness and strength. PMID:25153614

  8. Computational rationality: linking mechanism and behavior through bounded utility maximization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard L; Howes, Andrew; Singh, Satinder

    2014-04-01

    We propose a framework for including information-processing bounds in rational analyses. It is an application of bounded optimality (Russell & Subramanian, 1995) to the challenges of developing theories of mechanism and behavior. The framework is based on the idea that behaviors are generated by cognitive mechanisms that are adapted to the structure of not only the environment but also the mind and brain itself. We call the framework computational rationality to emphasize the incorporation of computational mechanism into the definition of rational action. Theories are specified as optimal program problems, defined by an adaptation environment, a bounded machine, and a utility function. Such theories yield different classes of explanation, depending on the extent to which they emphasize adaptation to bounds, and adaptation to some ecology that differs from the immediate local environment. We illustrate this variation with examples from three domains: visual attention in a linguistic task, manual response ordering, and reasoning. We explore the relation of this framework to existing "levels" approaches to explanation, and to other optimality-based modeling approaches.

  9. Mechanisms linking obesity to altered metabolism in mice colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nimri, Lili; Saadi, Janan; Peri, Irena; Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Schwartz, Betty

    2015-11-10

    There are an increasing number of reports on obesity being a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Our goal in this study was to explore the metabolic networks and molecular signaling pathways linking obesity, adipose tissue and colon cancer. Using in-vivo experiments, we found that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and injected with MC38 colon cancer cells develop significantly larger tumors than their counterparts fed a control diet. In ex-vivo experiments, MC38 and CT26 colon cancer cells exposed to conditioned media (CM) from the adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice demonstrated significantly lower oxygen consumption rate as well as lower maximal oxygen consumption rate after carbonyl cyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone treatment. In addition, in-vitro assays showed downregulated expression of mitochondrial genes in colon cancer cells exposed to CM prepared from the visceral fat of HFD-fed mice or to leptin. Interestingly, leptin levels detected in the media of adipose tissue explants co-cultured with MC38 cancer cells were higher than in adipose tissue explants cultures, indicating cross talk between the adipose tissue and the cancer cells. Salient findings of the present study demonstrate that this crosstalk is mediated at least partially by the JNK/STAT3-signaling pathway. PMID:26472027

  10. Mechanisms linking obesity to altered metabolism in mice colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nimri, Lili; Saadi, Janan; Peri, Irena; Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Schwartz, Betty

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of reports on obesity being a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Our goal in this study was to explore the metabolic networks and molecular signaling pathways linking obesity, adipose tissue and colon cancer. Using in-vivo experiments, we found that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and injected with MC38 colon cancer cells develop significantly larger tumors than their counterparts fed a control diet. In ex-vivo experiments, MC38 and CT26 colon cancer cells exposed to conditioned media (CM) from the adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice demonstrated significantly lower oxygen consumption rate as well as lower maximal oxygen consumption rate after carbonyl cyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone treatment. In addition, in-vitro assays showed downregulated expression of mitochondrial genes in colon cancer cells exposed to CM prepared from the visceral fat of HFD-fed mice or to leptin. Interestingly, leptin levels detected in the media of adipose tissue explants co-cultured with MC38 cancer cells were higher than in adipose tissue explants cultures, indicating cross talk between the adipose tissue and the cancer cells. Salient findings of the present study demonstrate that this crosstalk is mediated at least partially by the JNK/STAT3-signaling pathway. PMID:26472027

  11. Cross Linking and Degradation Mechanisms in Model Sealant Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Kaufman, J.; Ito, T. I.; Nakahara, J. H.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Model compounds were investigated as to which type of heterocyclic ring is the most advantageous for curing sealants based on perfluoroalkylether chains. The relative thermal, thermal oxidative, hydrolytic, and fuel stability of potential crosslinks were determined. Specifically substituted materials were synthesized and evaluation of their stabilities in air, inert atmosphere, water, and Jet-A fuel at 235 and 325 C was made. Three heterocyclic ring systems were considered, namely, triazine, 1,2,4- and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles.

  12. Modeling behavior: the quest to link mechanisms to function.

    PubMed

    Janus, C; Dubnau, J

    2003-02-01

    T. Dobzhansky (1973) has been credited with saying: 'nothing in biology makes sense, except in the light of evolution'. The evolutionary conservation of gene function, as well as remarkable conservation of elemental behavioral mechanisms, guarantees that much of what we learn in one organism will inform our understanding of behavior in all animals, including humans. This insight has permitted behavior-geneticists to choose organisms based on experimental tractability for a given scientific question. IBANGS as a society has clearly embraced this Dobzhanskian worldview. As a result, the intellectual synergy of cross-species behavior-genetic analysis was palpable at the IBANGS meeting in Tours, France.

  13. Nonextensive Statistical Mechanics: Some Links with Astronomical Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsallis, Constantino; Tsallis, Constantino; Prato, Domingo; Plastino, Angel R.; Plastino, Angel R.

    2004-04-01

    A variety of astronomical phenomena appear to not satisfy the ergodic hypothesis in the relevant stationary state, if any. As such, there is no reason for expecting the applicability of Boltzmann Gibbs (BG) statistical mechanics. Some of these phenomena appear to follow, instead, nonextensive statistical mechanics. In the same manner that the BG formalism is based on the entropy S BG=-k∑ i p i ln p i, the nonextensive one is based on the form S q=k(1 -∑ i p i q)/(q- 1) (with S 1=S BG). The stationary states of the former are characterized by an exponential dependence on the energy, whereas those of the latter are characterized by an (asymptotic) power law. A brief review of this theory is given here, as well as of some of its applications, such as the solar neutrino problem, polytropic self-gravitating systems, galactic peculiar velocities, cosmic rays and some cosmological aspects. In addition to these, an analogy with the Keplerian elliptic orbits versus the Ptolemaic epicycles is developed, where we show that optimizing S q with a few constraints is equivalent to optimizing S BG with an infinite number of constraints.

  14. Potential mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing

    2003-03-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Epidemiological investigations have indicated that the moderate consumption of anthocyanin products such as red wine or bilberry extract is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and improvement of visual functions. Recently, there is increasing interesting in the pharmaceutical function of anthocyanins. This review summarizes current knowledge on the various molecular evidences of cancer chemoprevention by anthocyanins. These mechanisms can be subdivided into the following aspects: 1) the antioxidation; 2) the molecular mechanisms involved in anticarcinogenesis; 3) the molecular mechanisms involved in the apoptosis induction of tumor cells. Finally, the bioavailability and structure-activity relationship of anthocyanins are also summarized. PMID:12630561

  15. Potential mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing

    2003-03-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Epidemiological investigations have indicated that the moderate consumption of anthocyanin products such as red wine or bilberry extract is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and improvement of visual functions. Recently, there is increasing interesting in the pharmaceutical function of anthocyanins. This review summarizes current knowledge on the various molecular evidences of cancer chemoprevention by anthocyanins. These mechanisms can be subdivided into the following aspects: 1) the antioxidation; 2) the molecular mechanisms involved in anticarcinogenesis; 3) the molecular mechanisms involved in the apoptosis induction of tumor cells. Finally, the bioavailability and structure-activity relationship of anthocyanins are also summarized.

  16. Thermoplastics as engineering materials: The mechanics, materials, design, processing link

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, V.K.

    1995-10-01

    While the use of plastics has been growing at a significant pace because of weight reduction, ease of fabrication of complex shapes, and cost reduction resulting from function integration, the engineering applications of plastics have only become important in the past fifteen years. An inadequate understanding of the mechanics issues underlying the close coupling among the design, the processing (fabrication), and the assembly with these materials is a barrier to their use in structural applications. Recent progress on some issues relating to the engineering uses of plastics is surveyed, highlighting the need for a better understanding of plastics and how processing affects the performance of plastic parts. Topics addressed include the large deformation behavior of ductile resins, fiber orientation in chopped-fiber filled materials, structural foams, random glass mat composites, modeling of thickness distributions in blow-molded and thermoformed parts, dimensional stability (shrinkage, warpage, and residual stresses) in injection-molded parts, and welding of thermoplastics.

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms linking early nutrition to long term health.

    PubMed

    Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C

    2012-10-01

    Traditionally it has been widely accepted that our genes together with adult lifestyle factors determine our risk of developing non-communicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and obesity in later life. However, there is now substantial evidence that the pre and early postnatal environment plays a key role in determining our susceptible to such diseases in later life. Moreover the mechanism by which the environment can alter long term disease risk may involve epigenetic processes. Epigenetic processes play a central role in regulating tissue specific gene expression and hence alterations in these processes can induce long-term changes in gene expression and metabolism which persist throughout the lifecourse. This review will focus on how nutritional cues in early life can alter the epigenome, producing different phenotypes and altered disease susceptibilities.

  18. Mechanisms linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nseir, W; Shalata, A; Marmor, A; Assy, N

    2011-12-01

    The most common cause of death in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is coronary artery disease (CAD), not chronic liver disease. Fatty liver increases cardiovascular risk by classical (dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes) and by less conventional mechanisms. Common pathways involved in the pathogenesis of fatty liver and CAD includes hepatic insulin resistance and sub clinical inflammation. The hepatic insulin resistance state of fatty liver infiltration is characterized by increased FFA, which causes lipotoxicity and impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, increases oxidative stress, and has a cardio toxic effect. Additional metabolic risk factors include leptin, adiponectin, pro inflammatory cytokines [such as IL-6, C-reactive protein and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)], which together lead to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, finally promoting coronary artery disease (CAD). When classical risk factors are superimposed on fatty liver accumulation, they may further increase the new metabolic risk factors, exacerbating CAD. The clinical implication is that patients with NAFLD are at higher risk (steatohepatitis, diabetes, obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia) and should undergo periodic cardiovascular risk assessment including the Framingham score, cardiac effort test, and measurement of intimae-media thickening of the carotids arteries. This may improve risk stratification for CAD. PMID:21655948

  19. Cognitive aspects of frailty: mechanisms behind the link between frailty and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Halil, M; Cemal Kizilarslanoglu, M; Emin Kuyumcu, M; Yesil, Y; Cruz Jentoft, A J

    2015-03-01

    Whereas physical impairment is the main hallmark of frailty, evidence suggests that other dimensions, such as psychological, cognitive and social factors also contribute to this multidimensional condition. Cognition is now considered a relevant domain of frailty. Cognitive and physical frailty interact: cognitive problems and dementia are more prevalent in physically frail individuals, and those with cognitive impairment are more prone to become frail. Disentangling the relationship between cognition and frailty may lead to new intervention strategies for the prevention and treatment of both conditions. Both frailty and cognitive decline share common potential mechanisms. This review examines the relationship between frailty and cognitive decline and explores the role of vascular changes, hormones, vitamin D, inflammation, insulin resistance, and nutrition in the development of physical frailty and cognitive problems, as potential underlying mechanisms behind this link. Dual tasking studies may be a useful way to explore and understand the relation between cognitive and physical frailty. Further studies are needed to elucidate this complex relation to improve the outcomes of frailty.

  20. Mechanically Strong, Polymer Cross-linked Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels comprise a class of low-density, high porous solid objects consisting of dimensionally quasi-stable self-supported three-dimensional assemblies of nanoparticles. Aerogels are pursued because of properties above and beyond those of the individual nanoparticles, including low thermal conductivity, low dielectric constant and high acoustic impedance. Possible applications include thermal and vibration insulation, dielectrics for fast electronics, and hosting of functional guests for a wide variety of optical, chemical and electronic applications. Aerogels, however, are extremely fragile materials, hence they have found only limited application in some very specialized environments, for example as Cerenkov radiation detectors in certain types of nuclear reactors, aboard spacecraft as collectors of hypervelocity particles (refer to NASA's Stardust program) and as thermal insulators on planetary vehicles on Mars (refer to Sojourner Rover in 1997 and Spirit and Opportunity in 2004). Along these lines, the X-Aerogel is a new NASA-developed strong lightweight material that has resolved the fragility problem of traditional (native) aerogels. X-Aerogels are made by applying a conformal polymer coating on the surfaces of the skeletal nanoparticles of native aerogels (see Scanning Electron Micrographs). Since the relative amounts of the polymeric crosslinker and the backbone are comparable, X-Aerogels can be viewed either as aerogels modified by the templated accumulation of polymer on the skeletal nanoparticles, or as nanoporous polymers made by remplated casting of polymer on a nanostructured framework. The most striking feature of X-Aerogels is that for a nominal 3-fold increase in density (still a ultralighweight material), the mechanical strength can be up to 300 times higher than the strength of the underlying native aerogel. Thus, X-Aerogels combine a multiple of the specific compressive strength of steel, with the the thermal conductivity of styrofoam. X

  1. Exploitation of wireless link QoS mechanisms in IP QoS architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manner, Jukka; Kojo, Markku; Laukkanen, Aki; Liljeberg, Mika; Suihko, Tapio; Raatikainen, Kimmo

    2001-07-01

    TCP/IP protocols make minimal assumptions about the capabilities of a link layer used to carry IP packets between nodes. The recent evolution of IP-based mobile and wireless communication has driven the design of wireless link layers and new features, including support for different QoS levels, are being included in the new link layer designs. The current IP QoS architectures are based purely on IP-layer decision making, packet buffering and scheduling through a single link-layer service access point. However, mobile wireless networks pose new challenges for IP QoS architecture implementations. In this paper, we introduce a generic convergence layer interface for controlling the capabilities of wireless network interfaces. Emphasis is on discovering the link layer functionalities and mapping IP QoS mechanisms to the available link layer features. Issues such as packet buffering and scheduling are discussed.

  2. Time with friends and physical activity as mechanisms linking obesity and television viewing among youth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Though bivariate relationships between childhood obesity, physical activity, friendships and television viewing are well documented, empirical assessment of the extent to which links between obesity and television may be mediated by these factors is scarce. This study examines the possibility that time with friends and physical activity are potential mechanisms linking overweight/obesity to television viewing in youth. Methods Data were drawn from children ages 10-18 years old (M = 13.81, SD = 2.55) participating in the 2002 wave of Child Development Supplement (CDS) to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) (n = 1,545). Data were collected both directly and via self-report from children and their parents. Path analysis was employed to examine a model whereby the relationships between youth overweight/obesity and television viewing were mediated by time spent with friends and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Results Overweight/obesity was directly related to less time spent with friends, but not to MVPA. Time spent with friends was directly and positively related to MVPA, and directly and negatively related to time spent watching television without friends. In turn, MVPA was directly and negatively related to watching television without friends. There were significant indirect effects of both overweight/obesity and time with friends on television viewing through MVPA, and of overweight/obesity on MVPA through time with friends. Net of any indirect effects, the direct effect of overweight/obesity on television viewing remained. The final model fit the data extremely well (χ2 = 5.77, df = 5, p<0.0001, RMSEA = 0.01, CFI = 0.99, TLI =0.99). Conclusions We found good evidence that the positive relationships between time with friends and physical activity are important mediators of links between overweight/obesity and television viewing in youth. These findings highlight the importance of moving from examinations of bivariate relationships

  3. Enhanced mechanical properties and blood compatibility of PDMS/liquid crystal cross-linked membrane materials.

    PubMed

    Rao, Huaxin; Zhang, Ziyong; Liu, Fanna

    2013-04-01

    A novel polydimethylsiloxane/liquid crystal cross-linked membrane (PDMS/LC) was prepared by using PDMS containing vinyl groups and LCs containing unsaturated linkages as matrix materials. Mechanical properties, liquid crystalline performance and blood compatibility of the PDMS/LC cross-linked membrane containing different LC contents and LC groups were investigated, respectively. The results showed that mechanical properties of the membrane increased more significantly than those of pure PDMS membranes. The PDMS/LC cross-linked membrane also possessed better membrane-forming ability, lower hemolysis rate, less platelets adhesion and more favorable anti-coagulant properties. Additionally, mechanical properties and blood compatibility of the membrane can be enhanced simultaneously and obviously due to the introduction of the cholesteric liquid crystals and the application of the preferred cross-linked reaction without byproducts.

  4. Vitamin D and Bone Health; Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Eamon; Ward, Mary; McSorley, Emeir; Strain, J.J.; Wallace, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and significant economic and health costs. Vitamin D is a secosteriod hormone essential for calcium absorption and bone mineralization which is positively associated with bone mineral density [BMD]. It is well-established that prolonged and severe vitamin D deficiency leads to rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Sub-optimal vitamin D status has been reported in many populations but it is a particular concern in older people; thus there is clearly a need for effective strategies to optimise bone health. A number of recent studies have suggested that the role of vitamin D in preventing fractures may be via its mediating effects on muscle function (a defect in muscle function is one of the classical signs of rickets) and inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation can improve muscle strength which in turn contributes to a decrease in incidence of falls, one of the largest contributors to fracture incidence. Osteoporosis is often considered to be an inflammatory condition and pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with increased bone metabolism. The immunoregulatory mechanisms of vitamin D may thus modulate the effect of these cytokines on bone health and subsequent fracture risk. Vitamin D, therefore, may influence fracture risk via a number of different mechanisms. PMID:22254049

  5. Molecular mechanisms linking adipokines to obesity-related colon cancer: focus on leptin.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is linked to increased risk of colon cancer, currently the third most common cancer. Consequently rising levels of obesity worldwide are likely to significantly impact on obesity-related colon cancers in the decades to come. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby obesity increases colon cancer risk is thus a focus for research to inform strategies to prevent the increasing trend in obesity-related cancers. This review will consider research on deregulation of adipokine signalling, a consequence of altered adipokine hormone secretion from excess adipose tissue, with a focus on leptin, which has been studied extensively as a potential mediator of obesity-related colon cancer. Numerous investigations using colon cell lines in vitro, in vivo studies in rodents and investigations of colon cancer patients illuminate the complexity of the interactions of leptin with colon tissues via leptin receptors expressed by the colon epithelium. Although evidence indicates a role for leptin in proliferation of colon epithelial cells in vitro, this has been contradicted by studies in rodent models. However, recent studies have indicated that leptin may influence inflammatory mediators linked with colon cancer and also promote cell growth dependent on genotype and is implicated in growth promotion of colon cancer cells. Studies in human cancer patients indicate that there may be different tumour sub-types with varying levels of leptin receptor expression, indicating the potential for leptin to induce variable responses in the different tumour types. These studies have provided insights into the complex interplay of adipokines with responsive tissues prone to obesity-related colon cancer. Deregulation of adipokine signalling via adipokine receptors located in the colon appears to be a significant factor in obesity-related colon cancer. Molecular profiling of colon tumours will be a useful tool in future strategies to characterise the influence that adipokines may have

  6. Sodium-glucose linked transporter-2 inhibitors: potential for renoprotection beyond blood glucose lowering?

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    The proximal tubule's sodium-glucose linked transporter-2 (SGLT2) accounts for the vast majority of glucose reabsorption by the kidney. Its selective inhibition, accordingly, leads to substantial glycosuria, lowering blood glucose, and facilitating weight loss in individuals with diabetes. During the past year, two SGLT2 inhibitors, canagliflozin and dapagliflozin, have been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Beyond their anti-hyperglycemic properties, however, this new class of drugs has several other attributes that provide a theoretical basis for kidney protection. Like agents that block the renin-angiotensin system, SGLT2 inhibitors also reduce single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) in the chronically diseased kidney, though by quite different mechanisms. Additional potentially beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibition include modest reductions in blood pressure and plasma uric acid. Finally, cell culture studies indicate that glucose uptake from the tubular lumen, as well as from the basolateral compartment, can contribute to proximal tubular production of extracellular matrix proteins. Whether such attributes will translate into reducing the progression of chronic kidney disease will require the undertaking of long-term, dedicated studies.

  7. Killing mechanism of stable N-halamine cross-linked polymethacrylamide nanoparticles that selectively target bacteria.

    PubMed

    Natan, Michal; Gutman, Ori; Lavi, Ronit; Margel, Shlomo; Banin, Ehud

    2015-02-24

    Increased resistance of bacteria to disinfection and antimicrobial treatment poses a serious public health threat worldwide. This has prompted the search for agents that can inhibit both bacterial growth and withstand harsh conditions (e.g., high organic loads). In the current study, N-halamine-derivatized cross-linked polymethacrylamide nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by copolymerization of the monomer methacrylamide (MAA) and the cross-linker monomer N,N-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBAA) and were subsequently loaded with oxidative chlorine using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The chlorinated NPs demonstrated remarkable stability and durability to organic reagents and to repetitive bacterial loading cycles as compared with the common disinfectant NaOCl (bleach), which was extremely labile under these conditions. The antibacterial mechanism of the cross-linked P(MAA-MBAA)-Cl NPs was found to involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) only upon exposure to organic media. Importantly, ROS were not generated upon suspension in water, revealing that the mode of action is target-specific. Further, a unique and specific interaction of the chlorinated NPs with Staphylococcus aureus was discovered, whereby these microorganisms were all specifically targeted and marked for destruction. This bacterial encircling was achieved without using a targeting module (e.g., an antibody or a ligand) and represents a highly beneficial, natural property of the P(MAA-MBAA)-Cl nanostructures. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism of action of P(MAA-MBAA)-Cl NPs and demonstrate the superior efficacy of the NPs over bleach (i.e., stability, specificity, and targeting). This work underscores the potential of developing sustainable P(MAA-MBAA)-Cl NP-based devices for inhibiting bacterial colonization and growth.

  8. Dynamic analysis and control of lightweight manipulators with flexible parallel link mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeh Won

    1991-01-01

    The flexible parallel link mechanism is designed for increased rigidity to sustain the buckling when it carries a heavy payload. Compared to a one link flexible manipulator, a two link flexible manipulator, especially the flexible parallel mechanism, has more complicated characteristics in dynamics and control. The objective of this research is the theoretical analysis and the experimental verification of dynamics and control of a two link flexible manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism. Nonlinear equations of motion of the lightweight manipulator are derived by the Lagrangian method in symbolic form to better understand the structure of the dynamic model. A manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism is a constrained dynamic system whose equations are sensitive to numerical integration error. This constrained system is solved using singular value decomposition of the constraint Jacobian matrix. The discrepancies between the analytical model and the experiment are explained using a simplified and a detailed finite element model. The step response of the analytical model and the TREETOPS model match each other well. The nonlinear dynamics is studied using a sinusoidal excitation. The actuator dynamic effect on a flexible robot was investigated. The effects are explained by the root loci and the Bode plot theoretically and experimentally. For the base performance for the advanced control scheme, a simple decoupled feedback scheme is applied.

  9. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  10. Emotion Dysregulation as a Mechanism Linking Stress Exposure to Adolescent Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to stress is associated with a wide range of internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents, including aggressive behavior. Extant research examining mechanisms underlying the associations between stress and youth aggression has consistently identified social information processing pathways that are disrupted by exposure to violence and increase risk of aggressive behavior. In the current study, we use longitudinal data to examine emotion dysregulation as a potential mechanism linking a broader range of stressful experiences to aggressive behavior in a diverse sample of early adolescents (N=1065). Specifically, we examined the longitudinal associations of peer victimization and stressful life events with emotion dysregulation and aggressive behavior. Structural equation modeling was used to create latent constructs of emotion dysregulation and aggression. Both stressful life events and peer victimization predicted subsequent increases in emotion dysregulation over a 4-month period. These increases in emotion dysregulation, in turn, were associated with increases in aggression over the subsequent 3 months. Longitudinal mediation models showed that emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship of both peer victimization (z=2.35, p=0.019) and stressful life events (z=2.32, p=0.020) with aggressive behavior. Increasing the use of adaptive emotion regulation strategies is an important target for interventions aimed at preventing the onset of adolescent aggressive behavior. PMID:22466516

  11. Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Mama, Scherezade K; Li, Yisheng; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Lee, Rebecca E; Thompson, Deborah; Wetter, David W; Nguyen, Nga T; Reitzel, Lorraine R; McNeill, Lorna H

    2016-01-01

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African American adults. African American men and women (n = 1467) completed questionnaires on the social environment, psychosocial factors (stress, depressive symptoms, and racial discrimination), and mental health. Multiple-mediator models were used to assess direct and indirect effects of the social environment on mental health. Low social status in the community (p < .001) and U.S. (p < .001) and low social support (p < .001) were associated with poor mental health. Psychosocial factors significantly jointly mediated the relationship between the social environment and mental health in multiple-mediator models. Low social status and social support were associated with greater perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and perceived racial discrimination, which were associated with poor mental health. Results suggest the relationship between the social environment and mental health is mediated by psychosocial factors and revealed potential mechanisms through which social status and social support influence the mental health of African American men and women. Findings from this study provide insight into the differential effects of stress, depression and discrimination on mental health. Ecological approaches that aim to improve the social environment and psychosocial mediators may enhance health-related quality of life and reduce health disparities in African Americans. PMID:27119366

  12. Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Basen-Engquist, Karen; Lee, Rebecca E.; Thompson, Deborah; Wetter, David W.; Reitzel, Lorraine R.

    2016-01-01

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African American adults. African American men and women (n = 1467) completed questionnaires on the social environment, psychosocial factors (stress, depressive symptoms, and racial discrimination), and mental health. Multiple-mediator models were used to assess direct and indirect effects of the social environment on mental health. Low social status in the community (p < .001) and U.S. (p < .001) and low social support (p < .001) were associated with poor mental health. Psychosocial factors significantly jointly mediated the relationship between the social environment and mental health in multiple-mediator models. Low social status and social support were associated with greater perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and perceived racial discrimination, which were associated with poor mental health. Results suggest the relationship between the social environment and mental health is mediated by psychosocial factors and revealed potential mechanisms through which social status and social support influence the mental health of African American men and women. Findings from this study provide insight into the differential effects of stress, depression and discrimination on mental health. Ecological approaches that aim to improve the social environment and psychosocial mediators may enhance health-related quality of life and reduce health disparities in African Americans. PMID:27119366

  13. Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Mama, Scherezade K; Li, Yisheng; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Lee, Rebecca E; Thompson, Deborah; Wetter, David W; Nguyen, Nga T; Reitzel, Lorraine R; McNeill, Lorna H

    2016-01-01

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African American adults. African American men and women (n = 1467) completed questionnaires on the social environment, psychosocial factors (stress, depressive symptoms, and racial discrimination), and mental health. Multiple-mediator models were used to assess direct and indirect effects of the social environment on mental health. Low social status in the community (p < .001) and U.S. (p < .001) and low social support (p < .001) were associated with poor mental health. Psychosocial factors significantly jointly mediated the relationship between the social environment and mental health in multiple-mediator models. Low social status and social support were associated with greater perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and perceived racial discrimination, which were associated with poor mental health. Results suggest the relationship between the social environment and mental health is mediated by psychosocial factors and revealed potential mechanisms through which social status and social support influence the mental health of African American men and women. Findings from this study provide insight into the differential effects of stress, depression and discrimination on mental health. Ecological approaches that aim to improve the social environment and psychosocial mediators may enhance health-related quality of life and reduce health disparities in African Americans.

  14. Dynamic Analysis and Control of Lightweight Manipulators with Flexible Parallel Link Mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeh Won

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the theoretical analysis and the experimental verification of dynamics and control of a two link flexible manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism. Nonlinear equations of motion of the lightweight manipulator are derived by the Lagrangian method in symbolic form to better understand the structure of the dynamic model. The resulting equation of motion have a structure which is useful to reduce the number of terms calculated, to check correctness, or to extend the model to higher order. A manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism is a constrained dynamic system whose equations are sensitive to numerical integration error. This constrained system is solved using singular value decomposition of the constraint Jacobian matrix. Elastic motion is expressed by the assumed mode method. Mode shape functions of each link are chosen using the load interfaced component mode synthesis. The discrepancies between the analytical model and the experiment are explained using a simplified and a detailed finite element model.

  15. Cross-linked chitosan improves the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate-chitosan cement

    PubMed Central

    Aryaei, Ashkan; Liu, Jason; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya. H.; Jayasuriya, A. Champa

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) cements are highly applicable and valuable materials for filling bone defects by minimally invasive procedures. Chitosan (CS) biopolymer is also considered as one of the promising biomaterial candidates in bone tissue engineering. In the present study, some key features of CaP-CS were significantly improved by developing a novel CaP-CS composite. For this purpose, CS was the first cross-linked with tripolyphosphate (TPP) and then mixed with CaP matrix. A group of CaP-CS samples without cross-linking was also prepared. Samples were fabricated and tested based on the known standards. Additionally, the effect of different powder (P) to liquid (L) ratios was also investigated. Both cross-linked and uncross-linked CaP-CS samples showed excellent washout resistance. The most significant effects were observed on Young's modulus and compressive strength in wet condition as well as surface hardness. In dry conditions, the Young's modulus of cross-linked samples were slightly improved. Based on the presented results, cross-linking does not have significant effect on porosity. As expected, by increasing the P/L ratio of sample, ductility and injectabilty were decreased. However, in the most cases, mechanical properties were enhanced. The results have shown that cross-linking can be improved the mechanical properties of CaP-CS and hence it can be used for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26046262

  16. Computational exploration of polymer nanocomposite mechanical property modification via cross-linking topology

    SciTech Connect

    Lacevic, N; Gee, R; Saab, A; Maxwell, R

    2008-04-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in order to study the effects of nanoscale filler cross-linking topologies and loading levels on the mechanical properties of a model elastomeric nanocomposite. The model system considered here is constructed from octa-functional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) dispersed in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix. Shear moduli, G, have been computed for pure and for filled and unfilled PDMS as a function of cross-linking density, POSS fill loading level, and polymer network topology. The results reported here show that G increases as the cross-linking (covalent bonds formed between the POSS and the PDMS network) density increases. Further, G is found to have a strong dependence on cross-linking topology. The increase in shear modulus, G, for POSS filled PDMS is significantly higher than that for unfilled PDMS cross-linked with standard molecular species, suggesting an enhanced reinforcement mechanism for POSS. In contrast, in blended systems (POSS/PDMS mixture with no cross-linking) G was not observed to significantly increase with POSS loading. Finally, we find intriguing differences in the structural arrangement of bond strains between the cross-linked and the blended systems. In the unfilled PDMS the distribution of highly strained bonds appears to be random, while in the POSS filled system, the strained bonds form a net-like distribution that spans the network. Such a distribution may form a structural network 'holding' the composite together and resulting in increases in G compared to an unfilled, cross-linked system. These results are of importance for engineering of new POSS-based multifunctional materials with tailor-made mechanical properties.

  17. Computational exploration of polymer nanocomposite mechanical property modification via cross-linking topology.

    PubMed

    Lacevic, Naida; Gee, Richard H; Saab, Andrew; Maxwell, Robert

    2008-09-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in order to study the effects of nanoscale filler cross-linking topologies and loading levels on the mechanical properties of a model elastomeric nanocomposite. The model system considered here is constructed from octafunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) dispersed in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix. Shear moduli, G, have been computed for pure and for filled and unfilled PDMS as a function of cross-linking density, POSS fill loading level, and polymer network topology. The results reported here show that G increases as the cross-linking (covalent bonds formed between the POSS and the PDMS network) density increases. Further, G is found to have a strong dependence on cross-linking topology. The increase in shear modulus, G, for POSS filled PDMS is significantly higher than that for unfilled PDMS cross-linked with standard molecular species, suggesting an enhanced reinforcement mechanism for POSS. In contrast, in blended systems (POSS/PDMS mixture with no cross-linking) G was not observed to significantly increase with POSS loading. Finally, we find intriguing differences in the structural arrangement of bond strains between the cross-linked and the blended systems. In the unfilled PDMS the distribution of highly strained bonds appears to be random, while in the POSS filled system, the strained bonds form a netlike distribution that spans the network. Such a distribution may form a structural network "holding" the composite together and resulting in increases in G compared to an unfilled, cross-linked system. These results are of importance for engineering of new POSS-based multifunctional materials with tailor-made mechanical properties. PMID:19045061

  18. Flight tests show potential benefits of data link as primary communication medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.; Knox, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    Message exchange for air traffic control (ATC) purposes via data link offers the potential benefits of increasing the airspace system safety and efficiency. This is accomplished by reducing communication errors and relieving the overloaded ATC radio frequencies, which hamper efficient message exchanges during peak traffic periods in many busy terminal areas. However, the many uses and advantages of data link create additional questions concerning the interface among the human-users and the cockpit and ground systems. A flight test was conducted in the NASA Langley B-737 airplane to contrast flight operations using current voice communications with the use of data link for transmitting both strategic and tactical ATC clearances during a typical commercial airline flight from takeoff to landing. Commercial airplane pilots were used as test subjects.

  19. Effects of mechanical stretch on collagen and cross-linking in engineered blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Solan, Amy; Dahl, Shannon L M; Niklason, Laura E

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that mechanical stimulation affects the physical properties of multiple types of engineered tissues. However, the optimum regimen for applying cyclic radial stretch to engineered arteries is not well understood. To this end, the effect of mechanical stretch on the development of engineered blood vessels was analyzed in constructs grown from porcine vascular smooth muscle cells. Cyclic radial distension was applied during vessel culture at three rates: 0 beats per minute (bpm), 90 bpm, and 165 bpm. At the end of the 7-week culture period, harvested vessels were analyzed with respect to physical characteristics. Importantly, mechanical stretch at 165 bpm resulted in a significant increase in rupture strength in engineered constructs over nonstretched controls. Stress-strain data and maximal elastic moduli from vessels grown at the three stretch rates indicate enhanced physical properties with increasing pulse rate. In order to investigate the role of collagen cross-linking in the improved mechanical characteristics, collagen cross-link density was quantified by HPLC. Vessels grown with mechanical stretch had somewhat more collagen and higher burst pressures than nonpulsed control vessels. Pulsation did not increase collagen cross-link density. Thus, increased wall thickness and somewhat elevated collagen concentrations, but not collagen cross-link density, appeared to be responsible for increased burst strength.

  20. Phylogenetic and functional potential links pH and N2O emissions in pasture soils

    PubMed Central

    Samad, M. d. Sainur; Biswas, Ambarish; Bakken, Lars R.; Clough, Timothy J.; de Klein, Cecile A. M.; Richards, Karl G.; Lanigan, Gary J.; Morales, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is mediated by microbial, and physicochemical, processes leading to nitrogen loss via N2O and N2 emissions. Soil pH regulates the reduction of N2O to N2, however, it can also affect microbial community composition and functional potential. Here we simultaneously test the link between pH, community composition, and the N2O emission ratio (N2O/(NO + N2O + N2)) in 13 temperate pasture soils. Physicochemical analysis, gas kinetics, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, metagenomic and quantitative PCR (of denitrifier genes: nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII) analysis were carried out to characterize each soil. We found strong evidence linking pH to both N2O emission ratio and community changes. Soil pH was negatively associated with N2O emission ratio, while being positively associated with both community diversity and total denitrification gene (nir & nos) abundance. Abundance of nosZII was positively linked to pH, and negatively linked to N2O emissions. Our results confirm that pH imposes a general selective pressure on the entire community and that this results in changes in emission potential. Our data also support the general model that with increased microbial diversity efficiency increases, demonstrated in this study with lowered N2O emission ratio through more efficient conversion of N2O to N2. PMID:27782174

  1. A maintenance scheme of communication link in mobile robot ad hoc networks based on potential field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Jin, WenPing; Yang, GyoYing; Li, LeiMin

    2007-12-01

    Maintaining communication link in mobile robot networks between task robots and a control center is very important in some urgent application occasions such as remote danger detections. To offer a reliable multi-hop communication link, a link maintaining scheme based on artificial potential field is presented. The scheme is achieved by a task robot and communication relay ones. The task robot performs predefined tasks, and relay ones are simple robots which form a communication relay chain. When robots move towards destination in formation, a kind of attractive force created by communication quality is added to traditional potential field, and relay robots follow the task robot and automatically stop at adequate locations to form a relay chain from the control station to the task robot. In order to increase relay usage efficiency, when some relays are replaced by other short cut relays, the redundant relays can be reused by initiating another moving toward specified location. Simulation results show that the scheme can provide a reliable multi-hop communication link, and that the communication connection can be obtained through minimal number of relays.

  2. Possible Links between Intestinal Permeablity and Food Processing: A Potential Therapeutic Niche for Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Rapin, Jean Robert; Wiernsperger, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a likely cause of various pathologies, such as allergies and metabolic or even cardiovascular disturbances. Intestinal permeability is found in many severe clinical situations and in common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. In these conditions, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic circulation. To illustrate the potential harmfulness of leaky gut, we present an argument based on examples linked to protein or lipid glycation induced by modern food processing. Increased intestinal permeability should be largely improved by dietary addition of compounds, such as glutamine or curcumin, which both have the mechanistic potential to inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress linked to tight junction opening. This brief review aims to increase physician awareness of this common, albeit largely unrecognized, pathology, which may be easily prevented or improved by means of simple nutritional changes. PMID:20613941

  3. Tuning of cross-linking and mechanical properties of laser-deposited poly (methyl methacrylate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süske, Erik; Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Panchenko, Elena; Junkers, Thomas; Egorov, Mark; Buback, Michael; Kijewski, Harald

    2005-03-01

    The chemical composition, amount of cross-linking and its influence on the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at a wavelength of 248nm under ultrahigh vacuum were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, thermogravimetric analysis, and nanoindentation experiments. The films consist of two components, one fraction with a molecular weight well below that of the target material and a second fraction, which is cross-linked. Compared to bulk material, the Young's modulus of the film is increased. The amount of cross-linking in the film can be tuned by the applied laser fluence leading to changes of the mechanical properties.

  4. Interpersonal Stress Generation as a Mechanism Linking Rumination to Internalizing Symptoms in Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Rumination is a risk factor for depressive and anxiety symptoms in adolescents. Previous investigations of the mechanisms linking rumination to internalizing problems have focused primarily on cognitive factors. We investigated whether interpersonal stress generation plays a role in the longitudinal relationship between rumination and…

  5. A New Realistic Evaluation Analysis Method: Linked Coding of Context, Mechanism, and Outcome Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Suzanne F.; Kolla, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    In attempting to use a realistic evaluation approach to explore the role of Community Parents in early parenting programs in Toronto, a novel technique was developed to analyze the links between contexts (C), mechanisms (M) and outcomes (O) directly from experienced practitioner interviews. Rather than coding the interviews into themes in terms of…

  6. Psychosocial mechanisms linking the social environment to mental health in African Americans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African Amer...

  7. Insect mandibles--comparative mechanical properties and links with metal incorporation.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Bronwen W; Stewart, Aaron; Huang, Han; Truss, Rowan; Noller, Barry; Rasch, Ronald; Zalucki, Myron P

    2008-01-01

    A number of arthropod taxa contain metals in their mandibles (jaws), such as zinc, manganese, iron, and calcium. The occurrence of zinc and its co-located halogen chlorine have been studied in relation to the mechanical properties and shown to be linked in a direct fashion with increasing concentration. Hardness along with elastic modulus (stiffness) has also been linked to zinc and halogen concentration in some marine polychaete worms. The metal appears to be incorporated within the biological matrix, possibly bonding with proteins. However, the comparative advantage of metal inclusion has not been tested. It is possible that without metals, alternative mechanisms are used to achieve hardness of equal value in similar 'tools' such as mandibles. This question has direct bearing on the significance of metal hardening. In the present article, we compare across mandibles from six termite species, including samples with major zinc concentration, minor manganese, and no metals. Nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and electron microanalysis are used to assess metal concentration, form, and mechanical properties. The data demonstrate that termite mandibles lacking metals when fully developed have lower values for hardness and elastic modulus. Zinc is linked to a relative 20% increase in hardness when compared with mandibles devoid of metals. The similar transition metal, manganese, found in minor concentrations, is not linked to any significant increase in these mechanical properties. This raises the question of the function of manganese, which is as commonly found in insect mandibles as zinc and often located in the same mandibles.

  8. Insect mandibles--comparative mechanical properties and links with metal incorporation.

    PubMed

    Cribb, Bronwen W; Stewart, Aaron; Huang, Han; Truss, Rowan; Noller, Barry; Rasch, Ronald; Zalucki, Myron P

    2008-01-01

    A number of arthropod taxa contain metals in their mandibles (jaws), such as zinc, manganese, iron, and calcium. The occurrence of zinc and its co-located halogen chlorine have been studied in relation to the mechanical properties and shown to be linked in a direct fashion with increasing concentration. Hardness along with elastic modulus (stiffness) has also been linked to zinc and halogen concentration in some marine polychaete worms. The metal appears to be incorporated within the biological matrix, possibly bonding with proteins. However, the comparative advantage of metal inclusion has not been tested. It is possible that without metals, alternative mechanisms are used to achieve hardness of equal value in similar 'tools' such as mandibles. This question has direct bearing on the significance of metal hardening. In the present article, we compare across mandibles from six termite species, including samples with major zinc concentration, minor manganese, and no metals. Nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and electron microanalysis are used to assess metal concentration, form, and mechanical properties. The data demonstrate that termite mandibles lacking metals when fully developed have lower values for hardness and elastic modulus. Zinc is linked to a relative 20% increase in hardness when compared with mandibles devoid of metals. The similar transition metal, manganese, found in minor concentrations, is not linked to any significant increase in these mechanical properties. This raises the question of the function of manganese, which is as commonly found in insect mandibles as zinc and often located in the same mandibles. PMID:17646951

  9. Students' Conceptual Difficulties in Quantum Mechanics: Potential Well Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozcan, Ozgur; Didis, Nilufer; Tasar, Mehmet Fatih

    2009-01-01

    In this study, students' conceptual difficulties about some basic concepts in quantum mechanics like one-dimensional potential well problems and probability density of tunneling particles were identified. For this aim, a multiple choice instrument named Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Test has been developed by one of the researchers of this study…

  10. Laser Communications Airborne Testbed: Potential For An Air-To-Satellite Laser Communications Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Robert J.

    1988-05-01

    The Laser Communications Airborne Testbed (LCAT) offers an excellent opportunity for testing of an air-to-satellite laser communications link with the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The direct detection laser portion of the ACTS is suitable for examining the feasibility of an airborne terminal. Development of an airborne laser communications terminal is not currently part of the ACTS program; however, an air-to-satellite link is of interest. The Air Force performs airborne laser communications experiments to examine the potential usefulness of this technology to future aircraft. Lasers could be used, for example, by future airborne command posts and reconnaissance aircraft to communicate via satellite over long distances and transmit large quantities of data in the fastest way possible from one aircraft to another or to ground sites. Lasers are potentially secure, jam resistant and hard to detect and in this regard increase the survivability of the users. Under a contract awarded by Aeronautical Systems Division's Avionics Laboratory, a C-135E testbed aircraft belonging to ASD's 4950th Test Wing will be modified to create a Laser Communications Airborne Testbed. The contract is for development and fabrication of laser testbed equipment and support of the aircraft modification effort by the Test Wing. The plane to be modified is already in use as a testbed for other satellite communications projects and the LCAT effort will expand those capabilities. This analysis examines the characteristics of an LCAT to ACTS direct detection communications link. The link analysis provides a measure of the feasibility of developing an airborne laser terminal which will interface directly to the LCAT. Through the existence of the LCAT, the potential for development of an air-to-satellite laser communications terminal for the experimentation with the ACTS system is greatly enhanced.

  11. Exactly Solvable Quantum Mechanical Potentials: An Alternative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronchik, Jeremy N.; Williams, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an alternative approach to finding exactly solvable, one-dimensional quantum mechanical potentials. Differs from the usual approach in that instead of starting with a particular potential and seeking solutions to the related Schrodinger equations, it begins with known solutions to second-order ordinary differential equations and seeks to…

  12. Two mechanisms for the non-MHC-linked resistance to spontaneous autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, J; Amrani, A; Anderson, B; Schmidt, D; Santamaria, P

    1999-04-15

    Genetic susceptibility and resistance to most autoimmune disorders are associated with highly polymorphic genes of the MHC and with non-MHC-linked polygenic modifiers. It is known that non-MHC-linked polymorphisms can override or enhance the susceptibility to an autoimmune disease provided by pathogenic MHC genes, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we have followed the fate of two highly diabetogenic beta cell-specific T cell receptors (Kd and I-Ag7 restricted, respectively) in NOR/Lt mice, which are resistant to autoimmune diabetes despite expressing two copies of the diabetogenic MHC haplotype H-2g7. We show that at least two mechanisms of non-MHC-linked control of pathogenic T cells operate in these mice. One segregates as a recessive trait and is associated with a reduction in the peripheral frequency of diabetogenic CD8+ (but not CD4+) T cells. The other segregates as a dominant trait and is mediated by IL-4- and TGF-beta1-independent immune suppressive functions provided by lymphocytes that target diabetogenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, without causing their deletion, anergy, immune deviation, or ignorance. These results provide explanations as to how non-MHC-linked polymorphisms can override the susceptibility to an autoimmune disease provided by pathogenic MHC haplotypes, and demonstrate that protective non-MHC-linked genes may selectively target specific lymphoid cell types in cellularly complex autoimmune responses. PMID:10202001

  13. The potential role of vitamin D in the link between obesity and asthma severity/control in children.

    PubMed

    Vo, Phuong; Bair-Merritt, Megan; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-06-01

    Childhood obesity and asthma are major public health problems. Obesity is not only associated with increased risk of incident asthma, but it may worsen asthma severity/control. Although the mechanisms linking obesity with asthma expression have not been completely elucidated, evidence suggests that increased frequency of acute respiratory infection (ARI) and decreased corticosteroid responsiveness may help to explain how obesity worsens asthma expression. In addition, obese individuals have low vitamin D status, and emerging evidence suggests vitamin D affects risk of ARI and corticosteroid responsiveness in individuals with asthma. In this review, we summarize the association between obesity and asthma severity/control in children and discuss ARI and corticosteroid responsiveness as potential mediators in the obesity-asthma pathway. We also discuss the potential role of vitamin D, including a brief summary of recent randomized controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation.

  14. Can interactive educational technologies support the link between ultrasound theory and practice via feedback mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Linking theory to practice is an area of concern for ultrasound students, clinical mentors and academic staff. The link between theory and practice requires a robust clinical mentorship scheme in addition to careful curricula design considerations to improve student outcomes. The introduction of interactive technology in education provides ripe opportunity to improve feedback to students to support the link between theory and practice. A series of three interactive learning and teaching activities were designed and delivered to a PostGraduate Ultrasound cohort, after which, evaluation was performed to answer the research question: Which interactive technologies support the link between theory and practice through improved feedback mechanisms? An action research methodology was adopted involving an enquiry based literature review, planning, design and action process. Data were collected following action of three interactive teaching and learning sessions within the Medical Ultrasound cohort of 2013/2014 at Glasgow Caledonian University via a paper based questionnaire. A 100% response rate was achieved (n = 14). All three interactive learning and teaching sessions were considered with 100% highest point agreement to support the link between ultrasound theory and practice via feedback. Students found all three designed and facilitated sessions valuable and relevant to their learning, which in turn provided positive experiences which were perceived to support the link between theory and practice through feedback. These activities can be considered valuable in Postgraduate Ultrasound education. PMID:27433244

  15. The Potential Link between Gut Microbiota and IgE-Mediated Food Allergy in Early Life

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, John; Allen, Katrina; Collier, Fiona; Tang, Mimi L. K.; Ward, Alister C.; Vuillermin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The coevolution of the human gastrointestinal tract and commensal microbiota has resulted in a symbiotic relationship in which gut microbiota play a vital role in early life immune development and function, as well as maintenance of gut wall epithelial integrity. Since IgE mediated food allergy is associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut epithelial integrity there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergy. Although the exact link between gut microbiota and food allergy is yet to be established in humans, recent experimental evidence suggests that specific patterns of gut microbiota colonization may influence the risk and manifestations of food allergy. An understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and food allergy has the potential to inform both the prevention and treatment of food allergy. In this paper we review the theory and evidence linking gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. We then consider the implications and challenges for future research, including the techniques of measuring and analyzing gut microbiota, and the types of studies required to advance knowledge in the field. PMID:24351744

  16. Mechanical and biocompatible characterization of a cross-linked collagen-hyaluronic acid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Kirk, James F; Ritter, Gregg; Finger, Isaac; Sankar, Dhyana; Reddy, Joseph D; Talton, James D; Nataraj, Chandra; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Cobb, Ronald R

    2013-01-01

    Collagen scaffolds have been widely employed as a dermal equivalent to induce fibroblast infiltrations and dermal regeneration in the treatment of chronic wounds and diabetic foot ulcers. Cross-linking methods have been developed to address the disadvantages of the rapid degradation associated with collagen-based scaffolds. To eliminate the potential drawbacks associated with glutaraldehyde cross-linking, methods using a water soluble carbodiimide have been developed. In the present study, the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hyaluronic acid (HA), was covalently attached to an equine tendon derived collagen scaffold using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) to create ntSPONGE The HA was shown to be homogeneously distributed throughout the collagen matrix. In vitro analyses of the scaffold indicated that the cross-linking enhanced the biological stability by decreasing the enzymatic degradation and increasing the thermal denaturation temperature. The material was shown to support the attachment and proliferation of mouse L929 fibroblast cells. In addition, the cross-linking decreased the resorption rate of the collagen as measured in an intramuscular implant model in rabbits. The material was also shown to be biocompatible in a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays. These results indicate that this cross-linked collagen-HA scaffold, ntSPONGE has the potential for use in chronic wound healing.

  17. The potential biological mechanisms of arsenic-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2004-06-01

    Although epidemiologic studies carried out in Taiwan, Bangladesh, and Sweden have demonstrated a diabetogenic effect of arsenic, the mechanisms remain unclear and require further investigation. This paper reviewed the potential biological mechanisms of arsenic-induced diabetes mellitus based on the current knowledge of the biochemical properties of arsenic. Arsenate can substitute phosphate in the formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and other phosphate intermediates involved in glucose metabolism, which could theoretically slow down the normal metabolism of glucose, interrupt the production of energy, and interfere with the ATP-dependent insulin secretion. However, the concentration of arsenate required for such reaction is high and not physiologically relevant, and these effects may only happen in acute intoxication and may not be effective in subjects chronically exposed to low-dose arsenic. On the other hand, arsenite has high affinity for sulfhydryl groups and thus can form covalent bonds with the disulfide bridges in the molecules of insulin, insulin receptors, glucose transporters (GLUTs), and enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (e.g., pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase). As a result, the normal functions of these molecules can be hampered. However, a direct effect on these molecules caused by arsenite at physiologically relevant concentrations seems unlikely. Recent evidence has shown that treatment of arsenite at lower and physiologically relevant concentrations can stimulate glucose transport, in contrary to an inhibitory effect exerted by phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or by higher doses of arsenite. Induction of oxidative stress and interferences in signal transduction or gene expression by arsenic or by its methylated metabolites are the most possible causes to arsenic-induced diabetes mellitus through mechanisms of induction of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. Recent studies have shown that, in subjects with

  18. Thermogelling and Chemoselectively Cross-Linked Hydrogels with Controlled Mechanical Properties and Degradation Behavior.

    PubMed

    Boere, Kristel W M; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; Gao, Yuan; Visser, Jetze; Hennink, Wim E; Vermonden, Tina

    2015-09-14

    Chemoselectively cross-linked hydrogels have recently gained increasing attention for the development of novel, injectable biomaterials given their limited side reactions. In this study, we compared the properties of hydrogels obtained by native chemical ligation (NCL) and its recently described variation termed oxo-ester-mediated native chemical ligation (OMNCL) in combination with temperature-induced physical gelation. Triblock copolymers consisting of cysteine functionalities, thermoresponsive N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) units and degradable moieties were mixed with functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) cross-linkers. Thioester or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) functionalities attached to PEG reacted with cysteine residues of the triblock copolymers via either an NCL or OMNCL pathway. The combined physical and chemical cross-linking resulted in rapid network formation and mechanically strong hydrogels. Stiffness of the hydrogels was highest for thermogels that were covalently linked via OMNCL. Specifically, the storage modulus after 4 h reached a value of 26 kPa, which was over a 100 times higher than hydrogels formed by solely thermal physical interactions. Endothelial cells showed high cell viability of 98 ± 2% in the presence of OMNCL cross-linked hydrogels after 16 h of incubation, in contrast to a low cell viability (13 ± 7%) for hydrogels obtained by NCL cross-linking. Lysozyme was loaded in the gels and after 2 days more than 90% was released, indicating that the cross-linking reaction was indeed chemoselective as the protein was not covalently grafted to the hydrogel network. Moreover, the degradation rates of these hydrogels under physiological conditions could be tailored from 12 days up to 6 months by incorporation of a monomer containing a hydrolyzable lactone ring in the thermosensitive triblock copolymer. These results demonstrate a high tunability of mechanical properties and degradation rates of these in situ forming hydrogels that could be

  19. Two fundamental mechanisms govern the stiffening of cross-linked networks.

    PubMed

    Žagar, Goran; Onck, Patrick R; van der Giessen, Erik

    2015-03-24

    Biopolymer networks, such as those constituting the cytoskeleton of a cell or biological tissue, exhibit a nonlinear strain-stiffening behavior when subjected to large deformations. Interestingly, rheological experiments on various in vitro biopolymer networks have shown similar strain-stiffening trends regardless of the differences in their microstructure or constituents, suggesting a universal stiffening mechanism. In this article, we use computer simulations of a random network comprised of cross-linked biopolymer-like fibers to substantiate the notion that this universality lies in the existence of two fundamental stiffening mechanisms. After showing that the large strain response is accompanied by the development of a stress path, i.e., a percolating path of axially stressed fibers and cross-links, we demonstrate that the strain stiffening can be caused by two distinctly different mechanisms: 1) the pulling out of stress-path undulations; and 2) reorientation of the stress path. The former mechanism is bending-dominated and can be recognized by a power-law dependence with exponent 3/2 of the shear modulus on stress, whereas the latter mechanism is stretching-dominated and characterized by a power-law exponent 1/2. We demonstrate how material properties of the constituents, as well as the network microstructure, can affect the transition between the two stiffening mechanisms and, as such, control the dominant power-law scaling behavior.

  20. Tuning chemical and physical cross-links in silk electrogels for morphological analysis and mechanical reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yinan; Xia, Xiaoxia; Shang, Ke; Elia, Roberto; Huang, Wenwen; Cebe, Peggy; Leisk, Gary; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L

    2013-08-12

    Electrochemically controlled, reversible assembly of biopolymers into hydrogel structures is a promising technique for on-demand cell or drug encapsulation and release systems. An electrochemically sol-gel transition has been demonstrated in regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin, offering a controllable way to generate biocompatible and reversible adhesives and other biomedical materials. Despite the involvement of an electrochemically triggered electrophoretic migration of the silk molecules, the mechanism of the reversible electrogelation remains unclear. It is, however, known that the freshly prepared silk electrogels (e-gels) adopt a predominantly random coil conformation, indicating a lack of cross-linking as well as thermal, mechanical, and morphological stabilities. In the present work, the tuning of covalent and physical β-sheet cross-links in silk hydrogels was studied for programming the structural properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed delicate morphology, including locally aligned fibrillar structures, in silk e-gels, preserved by combining glutaraldehyde-cross-linking and ethanol dehydration. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis of either electrogelled, vortex-induced or spontaneously formed silk hydrogels showed that the secondary structure of silk e-gels was tunable between non-β-sheet-dominated and β-sheet-dominated states. Dynamic oscillatory rheology confirmed the mechanical reinforcement of silk e-gels provided by controlled chemical and physical cross-links. The selective incorporation of either chemical or physical or both cross-links into the electrochemically responsive, originally unstructured silk e-gel should help in the design for electrochemically responsive protein polymers. PMID:23859710

  1. Effects of alginate hydrogel cross-linking density on mechanical and biological behaviors for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinah; Seol, Young-Joon; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Kundu, Joydip; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-09-01

    An effective cross-linking of alginate gel was made through reaction with calcium carbonate (CaCO3). We used human chondrocytes as a model cell to study the effects of cross-linking density. Three different pore size ranges of cross-linked alginate hydrogels were fabricated. The morphological, mechanical, and rheological properties of various alginate hydrogels were characterized and responses of biosynthesis of cells encapsulated in each gel to the variation in cross-linking density were investigated. Desired outer shape of structure was maintained when the alginate solution was cross-linked with the applied method. The properties of alginate hydrogel could be tailored through applying various concentrations of CaCO3. The rate of synthesized GAGs and collagens was significantly higher in human chondrocytes encapsulated in the smaller pore structure than that in the larger pore structure. The expression of chondrogenic markers, including collagen type II and aggrecan, was enhanced in the smaller pore structure. It was found that proper structural morphology is a critical factor to enhance the performance and tissue regeneration.

  2. Collisional cross sections and momentum distributions in astrophysical plasmas: dynamics and statistical mechanics link.

    PubMed

    Ferro, F; Quarati, P

    2005-02-01

    We show that in stellar core plasmas, the one-body momentum distribution function is strongly dependent, at least in the high velocity regime, on the microscopic dynamics of ion elastic collisions and therefore on the effective collisional cross sections if a random force field is present. We take into account two cross sections describing ion-dipole and ion-ion screened interactions. Furthermore, we introduce a third unusual cross section to link statistical distributions and a quantum effect originated by the energy-momentum uncertainty owing to many-body collisions. We also propose a possible physical interpretation in terms of a tidal-like force. We show that each collisional cross section gives rise to a slight peculiar correction on the Maxwellian momentum distribution function in a well defined velocity interval. We also find a possible link between microscopic dynamics of ions and statistical mechanics in interpreting our results in the framework of nonextensive statistical mechanics.

  3. Multicentered valence electron effective potentials: a solution to the link atom problem for ground and excited electronic states.

    PubMed

    Slavícek, Petr; Martínez, Todd J

    2006-02-28

    We introduce a multicentered valence electron effective potential (MC-VEEP) description of functional groups which succeeds even in the context of excited electronic states. The MC-VEEP is formulated within the ansatz which is familiar for effective core potentials in quantum chemistry, and so can be easily incorporated in any quantum chemical calculation. By demanding that both occupied and virtual orbitals are described correctly on the MC-VEEP, we are able to ensure correct behavior even when the MC-VEEP borders an electronically excited region. However, the present formulation does require that the electrons represented by the MC-VEEP are primarily spectators and not directly participating in the electronic excitation. We point out the importance of separating the electrostatic and exchange-repulsion components of the MC-VEEP in order that interactions between the effective potential and other nuclei can be modeled correctly. We present a MC-VEEP for methyl radical with one active electron which is tested in several conjugated molecules. We discuss the use of the MC-VEEP as a solution to the "link atom" problem in hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods. We also discuss the limitations and further development of this approach.

  4. Dissipating mechanical mechanisms and their link to morphology in polyamide toughened carbon-epoxy UD laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranger, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    Toughened carbon/epoxy laminates include thermoplastic particles. Depending of the curing cycle, the morphology of the thermoplastic phases can differ. This strongly impacts the degradation scenario of the composite. In the present paper, such reinforced laminates are evaluated. Different morphologies are studied. Classical experiments are used to evaluate the impact of the morphology on the damage and plasticity evolution laws at the scale of the ply. Some elements to model the toughening mechanism at the inter-ply scale are given and limitations are discussed.

  5. Mechanical Loading Stimulates Expression of Collagen Cross-Linking Associated Enzymes in Periodontal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Masaru; Rosales Rocabado, Juan Marcelo; Kitami, Megumi; Ida, Takako; Akiba, Yosuke; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Uoshima, Katsumi

    2016-04-01

    Type I collagen, a major extracellular component of the periodontal ligament (PDL), is post-translationally modified by a series of specific enzymes. Among the collagen-modifying enzymes, lysyl oxidase (LOX) is essential to initiate collagen cross-linking and lysyl hydroxylases (LHs) to regulate the cross-linking pathways that are important for tissue specific mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mechanical loading on the expression of collagen-modifying enzymes and subsequent tissue changes in PDL. Primary human PDL cells were subjected to mechanical loading in a 3D collagen gel, and gene expression and collagen component were analyzed. Wistar rats were subjected to excessive occlusal loading with or without intra-peritoneal injection of a LOX inhibitor, β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN). Upon mechanical loading, gene expression of LH2 and LOX was significantly elevated, while that of COL1A2 was not affected on hPDL-derived cells. The mechanical loading also elevated formation of collagen α-chain dimers in 3D culture. The numbers of LH2 and LOX positive cells in PDL were significantly increased in an excessive occlusal loading model. Notably, an increase of LH2-positive cells was observed only at the bone-side of PDL. Intensity of picrosirius red staining was increased by excessive occlusal loading, but significantly diminished by BAPN treatment. These results demonstrated that mechanical loading induced collagen maturation in PDL by up-regulating collagen-modifying enzymes and subsequent collagen cross-linking which are important for PDL tissue maintenance. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 926-933, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26381152

  6. An Investigation of Siloxane Cross-linked Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin/Copolymer Composites for Potential Orthopedic Applications†

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, Jason Christopher; Knight, Kelly Jane; Zhou, Huaxing; Chiu, Chi-Kai; Ko, Ching-Chang; You, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Causes of bone deficiency are numerous, but biomimetic alloplastic grafts provide an alternative to repair tissue naturally. Previously, a hydroxyapatite-gelatin modified siloxane (HAp-Gemosil) composite was prepared by cross-linking (N, N′-bis[(3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylene diamine (enTMOS) around the HAp-Gel nanocomposite particles, to mimic the natural composition and properties of bone. However, the tensile strength remained too low for many orthopedic applications. It was hypothesized that incorporating a polymer chain into the composite could help improve long range interaction. Furthermore, designing this polymer to interact with the enTMOS siloxane cross-linked matrix would provide improved adhesion between the polymer and the ceramic composite, and improve mechanical properties. To this end, copolymers of L-Lactide (LLA), and a novel alkyne derivatized trimethylene carbonate, propargyl carbonate (PC), were synthesized. Incorporation of PC during copolymerization affects properties of copolymers such as molecular weight, Tg, and % PC incorporation. More importantly, PC monomers bear a synthetic handle, allowing copolymers to undergo post-polymerization functionalization with graft monomers to specifically tailor the properties of the final composite. For our investigation, P(LLA-co-PC) copolymers were functionalized by an azido-silane (AS) via copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) through terminal alkyne on PC monomers. The new functionalized polymer, P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) was blended with HAp-Gemosil, with the azido-silane linking the copolymer to the silsesquioxane matrix within the final composite. These HAp-Gemosil/P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) composites were subjected to mechanical and biological testing, and the results were compared with those from the HAp-Gemosil composites. This study revealed that incorporating a cross-linkable polymer served to increase the flexural strength of the composite by 50%, while maintaining the biocompatibility of

  7. The induction of reentry in cardiac tissue. The missing link: How electric fields alter transmembrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Krassowska, Wanda

    1998-03-01

    This review examines the initiation of reentry in cardiac muscle by strong electric shocks. Specifically, it concentrates on the mechanisms by which electric shocks change the transmembrane potential of the cardiac membrane and create the physiological substrate required by the critical point theory for the initiation of rotors. The mechanisms examined include (1) direct polarization of the tissue by the stimulating current, as described by the one-dimensional cable model and its two- and three-dimensional extensions, (2) the presence of virtual anodes and cathodes, as described by the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios of the intra- and extracellular spaces, (3) polarization of the tissue due to changing orientation of cardiac fibers, and (4) polarization of individual cells or groups of cells by the electric field ("sawtooth potential"). The importance of these mechanisms in the initiation of reentry is examined in two case studies: the induction of rotors using successive stimulation with a unipolar electrode, and the induction of rotors using cross-field stimulation. These cases reveal that the mechanism by which a unipolar stimulation induces arrhythmias can be explained in the framework of the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios. In contrast, none of the examined mechanisms provide an adequate explanation for the induction of rotors by cross-field stimulation. Hence, this study emphasizes the need for further experimental and theoretical work directed toward explaining the mechanism of field stimulation.

  8. Modulation of mechanical resonance by chemical potential oscillation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Koshino, Mikito; Lee, Sunwoo; Gondarenko, Alexander; MacDonald, Allan H.; Kim, Philip; Hone, James

    2016-03-01

    The classical picture of the force on a capacitor assumes a large density of electronic states, such that the electrochemical potential of charges added to the capacitor is given by the external electrostatic potential and the capacitance is determined purely by geometry. Here we consider capacitively driven motion of a nano-mechanical resonator with a low density of states, in which these assumptions can break down. We find three leading-order corrections to the classical picture: the first of which is a modulation in the static force due to variation in the internal chemical potential; the second and third are changes in the static force and dynamic spring constant due to the rate of change of chemical potential, expressed as the quantum (density of states) capacitance. As a demonstration, we study capacitively driven graphene mechanical resonators, where the chemical potential is modulated independently of the gate voltage using an applied magnetic field to manipulate the energy of electrons residing in discrete Landau levels. In these devices, we observe large periodic frequency shifts consistent with the three corrections to the classical picture. In devices with extremely low strain and disorder, the first correction term dominates and the resonant frequency closely follows the chemical potential. The theoretical model fits the data with only one adjustable parameter representing disorder-broadening of the Landau levels. The underlying electromechanical coupling mechanism is not limited by the particular choice of material, geometry, or mechanism for variation in the chemical potential, and can thus be extended to other low-dimensional systems.

  9. Potentiation of antidepressant-like activity with lithium: mechanism involved.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Franck; Bourin, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last decade, many augmentation strategies have been developed to increase the activity of antidepressant drugs or to reduce their long onset of action by acting on different targets. One of the first augmentation strategy used in psychiatric disorders is coadministration of lithium and antidepressant drugs. However, the underlaying mechanism of action involved in the potentiatory effect of lithium is still unclear and many hypotheses have been suggested such as activity on BDNF, ACTH, thyroid hormones and serotonin neurotransmission. All these systems being embedded in each other, we focused on the 5-HT neurotransmission-increase induced by lithium treatment. Based on neurobiochemical and behavioral results we tried to better understand its mechanism of action and we concluded that effect of lithium on 5-HT neurotransmission could be linked to a partial agonist activity on 5-HT1B autoreceptors, or to a modulatory activity on these receptors, located in the cortical area in the case of a short term treatment, or in the hippocampus in the case of a long term treatment. We also suggested that the anti-manic effect of lithium was linked to this activity on 5-HT1B receptors, occurring this time on 5-HT1B postsynaptic (heteroreceptors on dopaminergic pathways) receptors levels.

  10. New Potentials for Old: The Darboux Transformation in Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brian Wesley; Celius, Tevye C.

    2008-01-01

    The Darboux transformation in quantum mechanics is reviewed at a basic level. Examples of how this transformation leads to exactly solvable potentials related to the "particle in a box" and the harmonic oscillator are shown in detail. The connection between the Darboux transformation and some modern operator based approaches to quantum mechanics…

  11. Graphene mechanics: I. Efficient first principles based Morse potential.

    PubMed

    Costescu, Bogdan I; Baldus, Ilona B; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-06-28

    We present a computationally efficient pairwise potential for use in molecular dynamics simulations of large graphene or carbon nanotube systems, in particular, for those under mechanical deformation, and also for mixed systems including biomolecules. Based on the Morse potential, it is only slightly more complex and computationally expensive than a harmonic bond potential, allowing such large or mixed simulations to reach experimentally relevant time scales. By fitting to data obtained from quantum mechanics (QM) calculations to represent bond breaking in graphene patches, we obtain a dissociation energy of 805 kJ mol(-1) which reflects the steepness of the QM potential up to the inflection point. A distinctive feature of our potential is its truncation at the inflection point, allowing a realistic treatment of ruptured C-C bonds without relying on a bond order model. The results obtained from equilibrium MD simulations using our potential compare favorably with results obtained from experiments and from similar simulations with more complex and computationally expensive potentials.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Elshaer, Sally L.; Eldahshan, Wael S.; Mysona, Barbara A.; El-Remessy, Azza B.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults in United States. Research indicates an association between oxidative stress and the development of diabetes complications. However, clinical trials with general antioxidants have failed to prove effective in diabetic patients. Mounting evidence from experimental studies that continue to elucidate the damaging effects of oxidative stress and inflammation in both vascular and neural retina suggest its critical role in the pathogenesis of DR. This review will outline the current management of DR as well as present potential experimental therapeutic interventions, focusing on molecules that link oxidative stress to inflammation to provide potential therapeutic targets for treatment or prevention of DR. Understanding the biochemical changes and the molecular events under diabetic conditions could provide new effective therapeutic tools to combat the disease. PMID:25949069

  13. Potential of D-Octaarginine-Linked Polymers as an in Vitro Transfection Tool for Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Mohri, Kohta; Morimoto, Naoki; Maruyama, Megumi; Nakamoto, Norimasa; Hayashi, Emi; Nagata, Kengo; Miyata, Kohei; Ochiai, Kyohei; Hiwatari, Ken-ichiro; Tsubaki, Kazufumi; Tobita, Etsuo; Ishimaru, Yuki; Maeda, Sadaaki; Sakuma, Shinji

    2015-08-19

    We have been investigating the potential use of cell-penetrating peptide-linked polymers as a novel penetration enhancer. Since previous in vivo studies demonstrated that poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) bearing D-octaarginine, a typical cell-penetrating peptide, enhanced membrane permeation of biomolecules, its potential as an in vitro transfection tool was evaluated in this study. A plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pGFP-C1), β-galactosidase, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used as model biomolecules. Anionic pGFP-C1 interacted electrostatically with cationic d-octaarginine-linked polymers. When the ratio of mass concentration of polymers to that of pGFP-C1 reached 2.5, complexes whose size and zeta potential were approximately 200 nm and 15 mV, respectively, were obtained. GFP expression was observed in cells incubated with complexes prepared under conditions in which the polymer/pDNA concentration ratio exceeded 2.5. The expression level elevated with an increase in the concentration ratio, but physicochemical properties of the complexes remained unchanged. Results suggested that free polymers contributed to pGFP-C1 internalization. Another cell study demonstrated that β-galactosidase premixed with polymers was taken up into cells in its active tetrameric form. Similar electrostatic interaction-driven complex formation was observed for BSA charged negatively in neutral solution. However, it appeared that the internalization processes of BSA differed from those of pGFP-C1. A mass concentration-dependent increase in internalized BSA was observed, irrespective of the polymer/protein concentration ratio. Due to frail interactions, polymers that were released from the complexes and subsequently immobilized on cell membranes might also contribute to membrane permeation of BSA.

  14. Chemo-mechanical microscale characterization of materials heterogeneity in oil/gas shales: linking organics and inorganics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferralis, N.; Abedi, S.; Grossman, J. C.; Ulm, F.

    2013-12-01

    From a materials perspective, the unconventional peculiarity of oil/gas shales resides in the intrinsic multi-scale heterogeneity in their chemical composition, organic maturity, mineralogy and microtexture. In contrast to common assumptions of maturity being driven only by the reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure), the presence of organic matter with different maturity within a few microns apart calls into question the role played by the organic and mineral heterogeneity into the chemo-mechanical properties of the material. Understanding how the upscaling of chemical diversity affects the fracturability and in general the mechanical strength of oil/gas shales is crucial. Compared to conventional oil and gas reservoirs, as well as coal, such heterogeneity requires novel and additional characterization tools from nano- to macro-scales to allow for a complete understanding of the role played by such heterogeneity in the chemo- mechanical properties of gas shales. Here we present a novel suite of chemical and mineralogical characterization tools that allow the in situ, non-destructive imaging of organic maturity and mineralogy from the microscale to the millimeter scale. This method is based on a combination of Raman, fluorescence and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The upscaling is designed to provide a maturity population distribution from the nanoscale to the conventionally used macro-scale averaged parameters (such as vitrinite reflectance). Furthermore, in combination with registered micro/nano-mechanical indentation data a direct correlation of fracture mechanics and chemistry is made, allowing for the determination of high yield strain regions, relations between organic and inorganic anisotropy and interface mechanics. The underlying scientific insight at the nano and micro-scale of the potential origin of fractures in oil/gas shales, will potentially provide a connection bottom-up link to continuum fracture mechanics.

  15. Beyond Failure: Potentially Mitigating Failed Author Searches in the Online Library Catalog through the Use of Linked Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulaison, Heather Lea; Stanley, Susan Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Linked data stores house vetted content that can supplement the information available through online library catalogs, potentially mitigating failed author searches if information about the author exists in linked data formats. In this case study, a total of 689 failed author index queries from a large Midwestern academic library's online library…

  16. The Effect of Cross-Link Density on the Toughening Mechanism of Elastomer-Modified Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R. A.; Yee, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    A DGEBA epoxide resin (EPON 828) was elastomer modified by using three different carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymers. The fracture toughness of these elastomer modified epoxies was measured in terms of the critical strain energy release rate, G sub IC. The toughening mechanism was elucidated using a tensile dilatometry technique. A plot of volume strain versus longitudinal strain often reveals the types of micromechanical deformations occurring in the uniaxial tensile specimen up to yield. Several microscopy techniques were employed to corroborate the tensile dilatometry results. The role of matrix ductility on the toughening mechanism of elastomer modified epoxies was investigated. By reducing the cross link density with various equivalent weight epoxide resins. Fracture toughness was again measured in terms of G sub IC. The characterization of the toughening mechanism was performed using a uniaxial tensile dilatometry technique and corroborated using various microscopy techniques.

  17. Post-extrasystolic Potentiation: Link between Ca2+ Homeostasis and Heart Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Sprenkeler, David J; Vos, Marc A

    2016-01-01

    Post-extrasystolic potentiation (PESP) describes the phenomenon of increased contractility of the beat following an extrasystole and has been attributed to changes in Ca2+ homeostasis. While this effect has long been regarded to be a normal physiological phenomenon, a number of reports describe an enhanced potentiation of the post-extrasystolic beat in heart failure patients. The exact mechanism of this increased PESP is unknown, but disruption of normal Ca2+ handling in heart failure may be the underlying cause. The use of PESP as a prognostic marker or therapeutic intervention have recently regained new attention, however, the value of the application of PESP in the clinic is still under debate. In this review, the mechanism of PESP with regard to Ca2+ in the normal and failing heart will be discussed and the possible diagnostic and therapeutic role of this phenomenon will be explored. PMID:27403289

  18. Complex mechanisms linking neurocognitive dysfunction to insulin resistance and other metabolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckel, Luke E.; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Gandy, Sam; Small, Dana; Kahn, C. Ronald; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Pawlyk, Aaron; Sherwin, Robert; Smith, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Scientific evidence has established several links between metabolic and neurocognitive dysfunction, and epidemiologic evidence has revealed an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia in patients with diabetes. In July 2015, the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases gathered experts from multiple clinical and scientific disciplines, in a workshop entitled “The Intersection of Metabolic and Neurocognitive Dysfunction”, to clarify the state-of-the-science on the mechanisms linking metabolic dysfunction, and insulin resistance and diabetes in particular, to neurocognitive impairment and dementia. This perspective is intended to serve as a summary of the opinions expressed at this meeting, which focused on identifying gaps and opportunities to advance research in this emerging area with important public health relevance. PMID:27303627

  19. Expression of myotubularins in blood platelets: Characterization and potential diagnostic of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Rana; Severin, Sonia; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Laporte, Jocelyn; Buj-Bello, Ana; Tronchère, Hélène; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-07-29

    Phosphoinositides play a key role in the spatiotemporal control of central intracellular processes and several specific kinases and phosphatases regulating the level of these lipids are implicated in human diseases. Myotubularins are a family of 3-phosphatases acting specifically on phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,5 bisphosphate. Members of this family are mutated in genetic diseases including myotubularin 1 (MTM1) and myotubularin-related protein 2 (MTMR2) which mutations are responsible of X-linked centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy, respectively. Here we show that MTM1 is expressed in blood platelets and that hundred microliters of blood is sufficient to detect the protein by western blotting. Since the most severe cases of pathogenic mutations of MTM1 lead to loss of expression of the protein, we propose that a minimal amount of blood can allow a rapid diagnostic test of X-linked myotubular myopathy, which is currently based on histopathology of muscle biopsy and molecular genetic testing. In platelets, MTM1 is a highly active 3-phosphatase mainly associated to membranes and found on the dense granules and to a lesser extent on alpha-granules. However, deletion of MTM1 in mouse had no significant effect on platelet count and on platelet secretion and aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen stimulation. Potential compensation by other members of the myotubularin family is conceivable since MTMR2 was easily detectable by western blotting and the mRNA of several members of the family increased during in vitro differentiation of human megakaryocytes and MEG-01 cells. In conclusion, we show the presence of several myotubularins in platelets and propose that minimal amounts of blood can be used to develop a rapid diagnostic test for genetic pathologies linked to loss of expression of these phosphatases.

  20. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals Converging Molecular Mechanisms that Link Different POPs to Common Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Patricia; Perlina, Ally; Mumtaz, Moiz; Fowler, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of epidemiological studies have identified statistical associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metabolic diseases, but testable hypotheses regarding underlying molecular mechanisms to explain these linkages have not been published. Objectives: We assessed the underlying mechanisms of POPs that have been associated with metabolic diseases; three well-known POPs [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), 2,2´,4,4´,5,5´-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 4,4´-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE)] were studied. We used advanced database search tools to delineate testable hypotheses and to guide laboratory-based research studies into underlying mechanisms by which this POP mixture could produce or exacerbate metabolic diseases. Methods: For our searches, we used proprietary systems biology software (MetaCore™/MetaDrug™) to conduct advanced search queries for the underlying interactions database, followed by directional network construction to identify common mechanisms for these POPs within two or fewer interaction steps downstream of their primary targets. These common downstream pathways belong to various cytokine and chemokine families with experimentally well-documented causal associations with type 2 diabetes. Conclusions: Our systems biology approach allowed identification of converging pathways leading to activation of common downstream targets. To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose an integrated global set of step-by-step molecular mechanisms for a combination of three common POPs using a systems biology approach, which may link POP exposure to diseases. Experimental evaluation of the proposed pathways may lead to development of predictive biomarkers of the effects of POPs, which could translate into disease prevention and effective clinical treatment strategies. Citation: Ruiz P, Perlina A, Mumtaz M, Fowler BA. 2016. A systems biology approach reveals converging molecular mechanisms that

  1. Variation potential in higher plants: Mechanisms of generation and propagation

    PubMed Central

    Vodeneev, Vladimir; Akinchits, Elena; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Long-distance intercellular electrical signals, including variation potential (VP) in higher plants, are a potential mechanism of coordinate functional responses in different plant cells under action of stressors. VP, which is caused by damaging factors (e.g., heating, crushing), is transient depolarization with an irregular shape. It can include a long-term depolarization and fast impulse depolarization (‘AP-like’ spikes). Mechanisms of VP generation and propagation are still under investigation. It is probable that VP is a local electrical response induced by propagation of hydraulic wave and (or) chemical agent. Both hypotheses are based on numerous experimental results but they predict VP velocities which are not in a good accordance with speed of variation potential propagation. Thus combination of hydraulic and chemical signals is the probable mechanism of VP propagation. VP generation is traditionally connected with transient H+-ATPase inactivation, but AP-like spikes are also connected with passive ions fluxes. Ca2+ influx is a probable mechanism which triggers H+-ATPase inactivation and ions channels activation at VP. PMID:26313506

  2. Assessing the potential of using telecommunication microwave links in urban drainage modelling.

    PubMed

    Fencl, M; Rieckermann, J; Schleiss, M; Stránský, D; Bareš, V

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict the runoff response of an urban catchment to rainfall is crucial for managing drainage systems effectively and controlling discharges from urban areas. In this paper we assess the potential of commercial microwave links (MWL) to capture the spatio-temporal rainfall dynamics and thus improve urban rainfall-runoff modelling. Specifically, we perform numerical experiments with virtual rainfall fields and compare the results of MWL rainfall reconstructions to those of rain gauge (RG) observations. In a case study, we are able to show that MWL networks in urban areas are sufficiently dense to provide good information on spatio-temporal rainfall variability and can thus considerably improve pipe flow prediction, even in small subcatchments. In addition, the better spatial coverage also improves the control of discharges from urban areas. This is especially beneficial for heavy rainfall, which usually has a high spatial variability that cannot be accurately captured by RG point measurements.

  3. Nonlinear optical collagen cross-linking and mechanical stiffening: a possible photodynamic therapeutic approach to treating corneal ectasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Dongyul; Juhasz, Tibor; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2013-03-01

    In this study we test the hypothesis that nonlinear optical (NLO) multiphoton photoactivation of riboflavin using a focused femtosecond (FS) laser light can be used to induce cross-linking (CXL) and mechanically stiffen collagen as a potential clinical therapy for the treatment of keratoconus and corneal ectasia. Riboflavin-soaked, compressed collagen hydrogels are cross-linked using a FS laser tuned to 760 nm and set to either 100 mW (NLO CXL I) or 150 mW (NLO CXL II) of laser power. FS pulses are focused into the hydrogel using a 0.75 NA objective lens, and the hydrogel is three-dimensionally scanned. Measurement of hydrogel stiffness by indentation testing show that the calculated elastic modulus (E) values are significantly increased over twofold following NLO CXL I and II compared with baseline values (P<0.05). Additionally, no significant differences are detected between NLO CXL and single photon, UVA CXL (P>0.05). This data suggests that NLO CXL has a comparable effect to conventional UVA CXL in mechanically stiffening collagen and may provide a safe and effective approach to localize CXL at different regions and depths within the cornea.

  4. Nonlinear optical collagen cross-linking and mechanical stiffening: a possible photodynamic therapeutic approach to treating corneal ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Dongyul; Juhasz, Tibor; Brown, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. In this study we test the hypothesis that nonlinear optical (NLO) multiphoton photoactivation of riboflavin using a focused femtosecond (FS) laser light can be used to induce cross-linking (CXL) and mechanically stiffen collagen as a potential clinical therapy for the treatment of keratoconus and corneal ectasia. Riboflavin-soaked, compressed collagen hydrogels are cross-linked using a FS laser tuned to 760 nm and set to either 100 mW (NLO CXL I) or 150 mW (NLO CXL II) of laser power. FS pulses are focused into the hydrogel using a 0.75 NA objective lens, and the hydrogel is three-dimensionally scanned. Measurement of hydrogel stiffness by indentation testing show that the calculated elastic modulus (E) values are significantly increased over twofold following NLO CXL I and II compared with baseline values (P<0.05). Additionally, no significant differences are detected between NLO CXL and single photon, UVA CXL (P>0.05). This data suggests that NLO CXL has a comparable effect to conventional UVA CXL in mechanically stiffening collagen and may provide a safe and effective approach to localize CXL at different regions and depths within the cornea. PMID:23515869

  5. Apoptotic Pathways Linked to Endocrine System as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Marini, Herbert; Irrera, Natasha; Crea, Giovanni; Lorenzini, Cesare; Puzzolo, Domenico; Valenti, Andrea; Pisani, Antonina; Adamo, Elena B; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco; Micali, Antonio

    2016-08-11

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a chronic condition common in older men that can result in bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms. The molecular mechanisms and networks underlying the development and the progression of the disease are still far from being fully understood. BPH results from smooth muscle cell and epithelial cell proliferation, primarily within the transition zone of the prostate. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in the control of cell growth and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in molecular mechanisms of apoptosis machinery have been linked to BPH. Increased levels of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-related protein 3 in BPH cause an inhibition of the apoptosis machinery through a reduction in B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins influence cell death by direct inhibition of caspases and modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Current pharmacotherapy targets either the static component of BPH, including finasteride and dutasteride, or the dynamic component of BPH, including α-adrenoceptor antagonists such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin. Both these classes of drugs significantly interfere with the apoptosis machinery. Furthermore, phytotherapic supplements and new drugs may also modulate several molecular steps of apoptosis.

  6. Apoptotic Pathways Linked to Endocrine System as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Minutoli, Letteria; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Marini, Herbert; Irrera, Natasha; Crea, Giovanni; Lorenzini, Cesare; Puzzolo, Domenico; Valenti, Andrea; Pisani, Antonina; Adamo, Elena B.; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco; Micali, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a chronic condition common in older men that can result in bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms. The molecular mechanisms and networks underlying the development and the progression of the disease are still far from being fully understood. BPH results from smooth muscle cell and epithelial cell proliferation, primarily within the transition zone of the prostate. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in the control of cell growth and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in molecular mechanisms of apoptosis machinery have been linked to BPH. Increased levels of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-related protein 3 in BPH cause an inhibition of the apoptosis machinery through a reduction in B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins influence cell death by direct inhibition of caspases and modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Current pharmacotherapy targets either the static component of BPH, including finasteride and dutasteride, or the dynamic component of BPH, including α-adrenoceptor antagonists such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin. Both these classes of drugs significantly interfere with the apoptosis machinery. Furthermore, phytotherapic supplements and new drugs may also modulate several molecular steps of apoptosis. PMID:27529214

  7. Apoptotic Pathways Linked to Endocrine System as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Marini, Herbert; Irrera, Natasha; Crea, Giovanni; Lorenzini, Cesare; Puzzolo, Domenico; Valenti, Andrea; Pisani, Antonina; Adamo, Elena B; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco; Micali, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a chronic condition common in older men that can result in bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms. The molecular mechanisms and networks underlying the development and the progression of the disease are still far from being fully understood. BPH results from smooth muscle cell and epithelial cell proliferation, primarily within the transition zone of the prostate. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in the control of cell growth and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in molecular mechanisms of apoptosis machinery have been linked to BPH. Increased levels of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-related protein 3 in BPH cause an inhibition of the apoptosis machinery through a reduction in B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins influence cell death by direct inhibition of caspases and modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Current pharmacotherapy targets either the static component of BPH, including finasteride and dutasteride, or the dynamic component of BPH, including α-adrenoceptor antagonists such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin. Both these classes of drugs significantly interfere with the apoptosis machinery. Furthermore, phytotherapic supplements and new drugs may also modulate several molecular steps of apoptosis. PMID:27529214

  8. Simple relations for different stomatal control mechanisms link partially drying soil and transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Katrin; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Stomata can close to regulate plant water loss under unfavourable water availability. This closure can be triggered by hydraulic ('H') and/or chemical signals ('C', 'H+C'). By combining plant hydraulic relations with a model for stomatal conductance, including chemical signalling, our aim was to derive a simple relation that links soil water availability, expressed as the fraction of roots in dry soil, to transpiration. We used the detailed mechanistic soil-root water flow model R-SWMS to verify this relation. Virtual split root experiments were simulated, comparing horizontally and vertically split domains with varying fractions of roots in dry soil and comparing different strengths of stomatal regulation by chemical and hydraulic signals. Transpiration predicted by the relation was in good agreement with numerical simulations. Under certain conditions H+C control leads to isohydric plant behaviour, which means that stomata close to keep leaf water potential constant after reaching a certain level. C control on the other hand exerts anisohydric behaviour, meaning that stomata remain fully open during changes in leaf water potential. For C control the relation between transpiration reduction and fraction of roots in dry soil becomes independent of transpiration rate whereas H+C control results in stronger reduction for higher transpiration rates. Simple relations that link effective soil and leaf water potential can describe different stomatal control resulting in contrasting behaviour.

  9. Explicating the Social Mechanisms Linking Alcohol Use Behaviors and Ecology to Child Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Freisthler, Bridget; Holmes, Megan R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper begins to describe and explicate the specific mechanisms by which alcohol use and the alcohol use environment contribute to specific types of child maltreatment. These mechanisms relating alcohol outlet densities to child maltreatment described here include effects on social disorganization, parent’s drinking behaviors, and parental supervision. By investigating potential mechanisms, new information could be obtained on the importance and role of alcohol and their availability in the etiology of child maltreatment. This knowledge can be used to further tailor interventions to those conditions most likely to prevent and reduce maltreatment. PMID:25284922

  10. Neural mechanisms linking social status and inflammatory responses to social stress.

    PubMed

    Muscatell, Keely A; Dedovic, Katarina; Slavich, George M; Jarcho, Michael R; Breen, Elizabeth C; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2016-06-01

    Social stratification has important implications for health and well-being, with individuals lower in standing in a hierarchy experiencing worse outcomes than those higher up the social ladder. Separate lines of past research suggest that alterations in inflammatory processes and neural responses to threat may link lower social status with poorer outcomes. This study was designed to bridge these literatures to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms linking subjective social status and inflammation. Thirty-one participants reported their subjective social status, and underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan while they were socially evaluated. Participants also provided blood samples before and after the stressor, which were analysed for changes in inflammation. Results showed that lower subjective social status was associated with greater increases in inflammation. Neuroimaging data revealed lower subjective social status was associated with greater neural activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) in response to negative feedback. Finally, results indicated that activation in the DMPFC in response to negative feedback mediated the relation between social status and increases in inflammatory activity. This study provides the first evidence of a neurocognitive pathway linking subjective social status and inflammation, thus furthering our understanding of how social hierarchies shape neural and physiological responses to social interactions. PMID:26979965

  11. Mechanism of Shear Thickening in Reversibly Cross-linked Supramolecular Polymer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Donghua; Hawk, Jennifer L.; Loveless, David M.; Jeon, Sung Lan; Craig, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    We report here the nonlinear rheological properties of metallo-supramolecular networks formed by the reversible cross-linking of semi-dilute unentangled solutions of poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The reversible cross-linkers are bis-Pd(II) or bis-Pt(II) complexes that coordinate to the pyridine functional groups on the PVP. Under steady shear, shear thickening is observed above a critical shear rate, and that critical shear rate is experimentally correlated with the lifetime of the metal-ligand bond. The onset and magnitude of the shear thickening depend on the amount of cross-linkers added. In contrast to the behavior observed in most transient networks, the time scale of network relaxation is found to increase during shear thickening. The primary mechanism of shear thickening is ascribed to the shear-induced transformation of intrachain cross-linking to interchain cross-linking, rather than nonlinear high tension along polymer chains that are stretched beyond the Gaussian range. PMID:20479956

  12. Structural Analysis and Mechanical Characterization of Hyaluronic Acid-Based Doubly Cross-Linked Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Amit K.; Hule, Rohan A.; Jiao, Tong; Teller, Sean S.; Clifton, Rodney J.; Duncan, Randall L.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2009-01-01

    We have created a new class of hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel materials with HA hydrogel particles (HGPs) embedded in and covalently cross-linked to a secondary network. HA HGPs with an average diameter of ∼900 nm and narrow particle size distribution were synthesized using a refined reverse micelle polymerization technique. The average mesh size of the HGPs was estimated to be approximately 5.5 to 7.0 nm by a protein uptake experiment. Sodium periodate oxidation not only introduced aldehyde groups to the particles but also reduced the average particle size. The aldehyde groups generated were used as reactive handles for subsequent cross-linking with an HA derivative containing hydrazide groups. The resulting macroscopic gels contain two distinct hierarchical networks (doubly cross-linked networks, DXNs): one within individual particles and another among different particles. Bulk gels (BGs) formed by direct mixing of HA derivatives with mutually reactive groups were included for comparison. The hydrogel microstructures were collectively characterized by microscopy and neutron scattering techniques. Their viscoelasticity was quantified at low frequencies (0.1−10 Hz) using a controlled stress rheometer and at high frequencies (up to 200 Hz) with a home-built torsional wave apparatus. Both BGs and DXNs are stable elastic gels that become stiffer at higher frequencies. The HA-based DXN offers unique structural hierarchy and mechanical properties that are suitable for soft tissue regeneration. PMID:20046226

  13. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links.

    PubMed

    Ares, P; Garcia-Doval, C; Llauró, A; Gómez-Herrero, J; van Raaij, M J; de Pablo, P J

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ∼ 0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ∼ 120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ∼ 20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data. PMID:25353832

  14. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, P.; Garcia-Doval, C.; Llauró, A.; Gómez-Herrero, J.; van Raaij, M. J.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ˜0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ˜120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ˜20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  15. Interplay between the mechanics of bacteriophage fibers and the strength of virus-host links.

    PubMed

    Ares, P; Garcia-Doval, C; Llauró, A; Gómez-Herrero, J; van Raaij, M J; de Pablo, P J

    2014-05-01

    Viral fibers play a central role in many virus infection mechanisms since they recognize the corresponding host and establish a mechanical link to its surface. Specifically, bacteriophages have to anchor to bacteria through the fibers surrounding the tail before starting the viral DNA translocation into the host. The protein gene product (gp) 37 from bacteriophage T4 long tail fibers forms a fibrous parallel homotrimer located at the distal end of the long tail fibers. Biochemical data indicate that, at least, three of these fibers are required for initial host cell interaction but do not reveal why three and no other numbers are required. By using atomic force microscopy, we obtained high-resolution images of gp37 fibers adsorbed on a mica substrate in buffer conditions and probed their local mechanical properties. Our experiments of radial indentation at the nanometer scale provided a radial stiffness of ∼ 0.08 N/m and a breaking force of ∼ 120 pN. In addition, we performed finite element analysis and determined a Young's modulus of ∼ 20 MPa. From these mechanical parameters, we hypothesize that three viral fibers provide enough mechanical strength to prevent a T4 virus from being detached from the bacteria by the viral particle Brownian motion, delivering a biophysical justification for the previous biochemical data.

  16. Connecting the mechanisms of T-cell regulation: dendritic cells as the missing link.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Adams, Elizabeth; Nolan, Kathleen F; Regateiro, Frederico S; Waldmann, Herman

    2010-07-01

    A variety of different molecular mechanisms have been proposed to explain the suppressive action of regulatory T cells, including the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, negative costimulatory ligands, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan catabolism, CD73-mediated adenosine generation, and downregulation of antigen-presenting cells. Until now it has been unclear how important each of these different mechanisms might be and how they are coordinated. In this review, we examine the hypothesis that it is the interaction between regulatory T cells and dendritic cells that creates a local microenvironment depleted of essential amino acids and rich in adenosine that leads to the amplification of a range of different tolerogenic signals. These signals are all eventually integrated by mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition, which enables the induction of new forkhead box protein 3-expressing Tregs. If correct, this provides a molecular explanation for the in vivo phenomena of linked suppression and infectious tolerance. PMID:20636819

  17. Prestressed F-actin networks cross-linked by hinged filamins replicate mechanical properties of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, M. L.; Nakamura, F.; Hartwig, J. H.; Crocker, J. C.; Stossel, T. P.; Weitz, D. A.

    2006-02-01

    We show that actin filaments, shortened to physiological lengths by gelsolin and cross-linked with recombinant human filamins (FLNs), exhibit dynamic elastic properties similar to those reported for live cells. To achieve elasticity values of comparable magnitude to those of cells, the in vitro network must be subjected to external prestress, which directly controls network elasticity. A molecular requirement for the strain-related behavior at physiological conditionsis a flexible hinge found in FLNa and some FLNb molecules. Basic physical properties of the in vitro filamin-F-actin network replicate the essential mechanical properties of living cells. This physical behavior could accommodate passive deformation and internal organelle trafficking at low strains yet resist externally or internally generated high shear forces. cytoskeleton | cell mechanics | nonlinear rheology

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of oxindole linked indolyl-pyrimidine derivatives as potential cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Prajapti, Santosh Kumar; Nagarsenkar, Atulya; Guggilapu, Sravanthi Devi; Gupta, Keshav Kumar; Allakonda, Lingesh; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Naidu, V G M; Babu, Bathini Nagendra

    2016-07-01

    In our endeavor towards the development of effective cytotoxic agents, a series of oxindole linked indolyl-pyrimidine derivatives were synthesized and characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and Mass spectral analysis. All the newly synthesized target compounds were assessed against PA-1 (ovarian), U-87MG (glioblastoma), LnCaP (prostate), and MCF-7 (Breast) cancer cell lines for their cytotoxic potential, with majority of them showing inhibitory activity at low micro-molar concentrations. Significantly, compound 8e was found to be most potent amongst all the tested compounds with an IC50 value of (2.43±0.29μM) on PA-1 cells. The influence of the most active cytotoxic compound 8e on the cell cycle distribution was assessed on the PA-1 cell line, exhibiting a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and annexin V binding assay confirmed that compound 8e can induce cell apoptosis in PA-1 cells. These preliminary results persuade further investigation on the synthesized compounds aiming to the development of potential cytotoxic agents.

  19. The carboxy-terminus of p63 links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sahu, Raju; Leu, N. Adrian; Senoo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 (Trp63) plays a key role in homeostasis and regeneration of the skin. The p63 gene is transcribed from dual promoters, generating TAp63 isoforms with growth suppressive functions and dominant-negative ΔNp63 isoforms with opposing properties. p63 also encodes multiple carboxy (C)-terminal variants. Although mutations of C-terminal variants have been linked to the pathogenesis of p63-associated ectodermal disorders, the physiological role of the p63 C-terminus is poorly understood. We report here that deletion of the p63 C-terminus in mice leads to ectodermal malformation and hypoplasia, accompanied by a reduced proliferative capacity of epidermal progenitor cells. Notably, unlike the p63-null condition, we find that p63 C-terminus deficiency promotes expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a), a factor associated with reduced proliferative capacity of both hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells. These data suggest that the p63 C-terminus plays a key role in the cell cycle progression required to maintain the proliferative potential of stem cells of many different lineages. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Cα, the predominant C-terminal p63 variant in epithelia, promotes the transcriptional activity of TAp63 and also impairs the dominant-negative activity of ΔNp63, thereby controlling p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We propose that the p63 C-terminus links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells via mechanisms that equilibrate TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoform function. PMID:25503409

  20. From Fragmented Knowledge to a Knowledge Structure: Linking the Domains of Mechanics and Electromagnetism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagno, Esther; Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Ganiel, Uri

    2000-01-01

    Describes the MAOF physics education program which is designed to relate large parts of mechanics and electromagnetism to each other via the key concepts of field and potential, while at the same time treat students' conceptual difficulties. Finds that students who studied with the MAOF program significantly improved their physics knowledge…

  1. Molecular mechanisms linking diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer disease: beta-amyloid peptide, insulin signaling, and neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuko; Sato, Naoyuki; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-06-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing at an alarming rate and has become a major public health concern worldwide. Recent epidemiological studies have provided direct evidence that DM is a strong risk factor for AD; this finding is now attracting attention. However, the underlying mechanisms for this association remain largely unknown. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies reported that diabetic conditions could cause an increase in the beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) levels, which exhibits neurotoxic properties and plays a causative role in AD. However, unexpectedly, recent clinicopathological studies have shown no evidence that the pathological hallmarks of AD, including amyloid plaque, were increased in the brains of diabetic patients, suggesting that DM could affect the pathogenesis of AD through mechanisms other than modulation of Aβ metabolism. One possible mechanism is the alteration in brain insulin signaling. It has been shown that insulin signaling is involved in a variety of neuronal functions, and that it also plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of AD. Thus, the modification of neuronal insulin signaling by diabetic conditions may contribute to AD progression. Another possible mechanism is cerebrovascular alteration, a common pathological change observed in both diseases. Accumulating evidence has suggested the importance of Aβ-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction in AD, and indicated that pathological interactions between the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and Aβ peptides may play a role in this dysfunction. Our study has provided a further understanding of the potential underlying mechanisms linking DM and AD by establishing novel mouse models showing pathological manifestations of both diseases. The current review summarizes the results from recent studies on the pathological relationship between DM and AD while focusing on brain insulin signaling and cerebrovascular alteration

  2. Role of insulin signaling in the interaction between Alzheimer disease and diabetes mellitus: a missing link to therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoyuki; Takeda, Shuko; Uchio-Yamada, Kozue; Ueda, Hironori; Fujisawa, Tomomi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the major non-genetic risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the mechanism by which DM increases the risk of AD has not been elucidated. Here, we summarize recent findings to address this question. Whereas neuropathological studies in humans suggest that DM does not increase Aβ accumulation in the brain (a major hallmark of AD), earlier works in animal models show that Aβ does accumulate. Therefore, alternate mechanisms might exist. Recent studies using the human brain indicate that insulin signaling is impaired in the AD brain. In neurons, this insulin signaling plays a key role in modulating synaptic function and neuronal senescence besides regulating tau phosphorylation, another hallmark of AD. On the other hand, in cerebrovessels, DM causes vascular remodeling, which involves increased RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation endproducts) expression, and AD is associated with cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Our recent study involving AD mice with DM has revealed that a vicious circle underlies the interaction between AD and DM. Interestingly, in our mouse model, AD increased RAGE expression, and DM worsened CAA. The contribution of vascular factors such as RAGE expression and CAA to the impairment of insulin signaling will be discussed. This impaired insulin signaling might be a possible link between AD and DM. Moreover, insulin signaling is also involved in the mechanism of aging, decreasing with an increase in age. An identification of the mechanism whereby DM modifies the pathological condition of AD through the modulation of insulin signaling is required to develop potential therapeutics for AD not only with but also without DM.

  3. Potential of isotope analysis (C, Cl) to identify dechlorination mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cretnik, Stefan; Thoreson, Kristen; Bernstein, Anat; Ebert, Karin; Buchner, Daniel; Laskov, Christine; Haderlein, Stefan; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Kliegman, Sarah; McNeill, Kristopher; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Chloroethenes are commonly used in industrial applications, and detected as carcinogenic contaminants in the environment. Their dehalogenation is of environmental importance in remediation processes. However, a detailed understanding frequently accounted problem is the accumulation of toxic degradation products such as cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) at contaminated sites. Several studies have addressed the reductive dehalogenation reactions using biotic and abiotic model systems, but a crucial question in this context has remained open: Do environmental transformations occur by the same mechanism as in their corresponding in vitro model systems? The presented study shows the potential to close this research gap using the latest developments in compound specific chlorine isotope analysis, which make it possible to routinely measure chlorine isotope fractionation of chloroethenes in environmental samples and complex reaction mixtures.1,2 In particular, such chlorine isotope analysis enables the measurement of isotope fractionation for two elements (i.e., C and Cl) in chloroethenes. When isotope values of both elements are plotted against each other, different slopes reflect different underlying mechanisms and are remarkably insensitive towards masking. Our results suggest that different microbial strains (G. lovleyi strain SZ, D. hafniense Y51) and the isolated cofactor cobalamin employ similar mechanisms of reductive dechlorination of TCE. In contrast, evidence for a different mechanism was obtained with cobaloxime cautioning its use as a model for biodegradation. The study shows the potential of the dual isotope approach as a tool to directly compare transformation mechanisms of environmental scenarios, biotic transformations, and their putative chemical lab scale systems. Furthermore, it serves as an essential reference when using the dual isotope approach to assess the fate of chlorinated compounds in the environment.

  4. Y-linked variation for autosomal immune gene regulation has the potential to shape sexually dimorphic immunity.

    PubMed

    Kutch, Ian C; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Sexually dimorphic phenotypes arise from the differential expression of male and female shared genes throughout the genome. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which dimorphic regulation manifests and evolves are unclear. Recent work suggests that Y-chromosomes may play an important role, given that Drosophila melanogaster Ys were shown to influence the regulation of hundreds of X and autosomal genes. For Y-linked regulatory variation (YRV) to facilitate sexually dimorphic evolution, however, it must exist within populations (where selection operates) and influence male fitness. These criteria have seldom been investigated, leaving the potential for dimorphic evolution via YRV unclear. Interestingly, male and female D. melanogaster differ in immune gene regulation. Furthermore, immune gene regulation appears to be influenced by the Y-chromosome, suggesting it may contribute to dimorphic immune evolution. We address this possibility by introgressing Y-chromosomes from a single wild population into an isogenic background (to create Y-lines) and assessing immune gene regulation and bacterial defence. We found that Y-line males differed in their immune gene regulation and their ability to defend against Serratia marcescens. Moreover, gene expression and bacterial defence were positively genetically correlated. These data indicate that the Y-chromosome has the potential to shape the evolution of sexually dimorphic immunity in this system.

  5. Quantum mechanical embedding theory based on a unique embedding potential

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Huang; Pavone, Michele; Carter, Emily A.

    2011-04-21

    We remove the nonuniqueness of the embedding potential that exists in most previous quantum mechanical embedding schemes by letting the environment and embedded region share a common embedding (interaction) potential. To efficiently solve for the embedding potential, an optimized effective potential method is derived. This embedding potential, which eschews use of approximate kinetic energy density functionals, is then used to describe the environment while a correlated wavefunction (CW) treatment of the embedded region is employed. We first demonstrate the accuracy of this new embedded CW (ECW) method by calculating the van der Waals binding energy curve between a hydrogen molecule and a hydrogen chain. We then examine the prototypical adsorption of CO on a metal surface, here the Cu(111) surface. In addition to obtaining proper site ordering (top site most stable) and binding energies within this theory, the ECW exhibits dramatic changes in the p-character of the CO 4{sigma} and 5{sigma} orbitals upon adsorption that agree very well with x-ray emission spectra, providing further validation of the theory. Finally, we generalize our embedding theory to spin-polarized quantum systems and discuss the connection between our theory and partition density functional theory.

  6. The potential mechanistic link between allergy and obesity development and infant formula feeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a new view of the cellular mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the links between infant formula feeding and the development of atopy and obesity. Epidemiological evidence points to an allergy- and obesity-preventive effect of breastfeeding. Both allergy and obesity development have been traced back to accelerated growth early in life. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is the master regulator of cell growth, which is predominantly activated by amino acids. In contrast to breastfeeding, artificial infant formula feeding bears the risk of uncontrolled excessive protein intake overactivating the infant’s mTORC1 signalling pathways. Overactivated mTORC1 enhances S6K1-mediated adipocyte differentiation, but negatively regulates growth and differentiation of FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs), which are deficient in atopic individuals. Thus, the “early protein hypothesis” not only explains increased mTORC1-mediated infant growth but also the development of mTORC1-driven diseases such as allergy and obesity due to a postnatal deviation from the appropriate axis of mTORC1-driven metabolic and immunologic programming. Remarkably, intake of fresh unpasteurized cow’s milk exhibits an allergy-preventive effect in farm children associated with increased FoxP3+ Treg numbers. In contrast to unprocessed cow’s milk, formula lacks bioactive immune-regulatory microRNAs, such as microRNA-155, which plays a major role in FoxP3 expression. Uncontrolled excessive protein supply by formula feeding associated with the absence of bioactive microRNAs and bifidobacteria in formula apparently in a synergistic way result in insufficient Treg maturation. Treg deficiency allows Th2-cell differentiation promoting the development of allergic diseases. Formula-induced mTORC1 overactivation is thus the critical mechanism that explains accelerated postnatal growth, allergy and obesity development on one aberrant pathway. PMID:25071855

  7. Assessing DNA methylation in the developing human intestinal epithelium: potential link to inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kraiczy, J; Nayak, K; Ross, A; Raine, T; Mak, T N; Gasparetto, M; Cario, E; Rakyan, V; Heuschkel, R; Zilbauer, M

    2016-05-01

    DNA methylation is one of the major epigenetic mechanisms implicated in regulating cellular development and cell-type-specific gene expression. Here we performed simultaneous genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression analysis on purified intestinal epithelial cells derived from human fetal gut, healthy pediatric biopsies, and children newly diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results were validated using pyrosequencing, real-time PCR, and immunostaining. The functional impact of DNA methylation changes on gene expression was assessed by employing in-vitro assays in intestinal cell lines. DNA methylation analyses allowed identification of 214 genes for which expression is regulated via DNA methylation, i.e. regulatory differentially methylated regions (rDMRs). Pathway and functional analysis of rDMRs suggested a critical role for DNA methylation in regulating gene expression and functional development of the human intestinal epithelium. Moreover, analysis performed on intestinal epithelium of children newly diagnosed with IBD revealed alterations in DNA methylation within genomic loci, which were found to overlap significantly with those undergoing methylation changes during intestinal development. Our study provides novel insights into the physiological role of DNA methylation in regulating functional maturation of the human intestinal epithelium. Moreover, we provide data linking developmentally acquired alterations in the DNA methylation profile to changes seen in pediatric IBD.

  8. Ballistocardiogram: Mechanism and Potential for Unobtrusive Cardiovascular Health Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Ober, Stephanie L; McMurtry, M Sean; Finegan, Barry A; Inan, Omer T; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that the body recoils each time the heart ejects blood into the arteries. These subtle cardiogenic body movements have been measured with increasingly convenient ballistocardiography (BCG) instruments over the years. A typical BCG measurement shows several waves, most notably the "I", "J", and "K" waves. However, the mechanism for the genesis of these waves has remained elusive. We formulated a simple mathematical model of the BCG waveform. We showed that the model could predict the BCG waves as well as physiologic timings and amplitudes of the major waves. The validated model reveals that the principal mechanism for the genesis of the BCG waves is blood pressure gradients in the ascending and descending aorta. This new mechanistic insight may be exploited to allow BCG to realize its potential for unobtrusive monitoring and diagnosis of cardiovascular health and disease. PMID:27503664

  9. Mechanisms and therapeutic potential of microRNAs in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lijun; Liao, Jingwen; Liu, Bailin; Zeng, Fanxing; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is the major risk factor for the development of stroke, coronary artery disease, heart failure and renal disease. The underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of hypertension are complex and remain largely elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, noncoding RNA fragments of 22-26 nucleotides and regulate protein expression post-transcriptionally by targeting the 3'-untranslated region of mRNA. A growing body of recent research indicates that miRNAs are important in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. Herein, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of miRNAs in cardiovascular remodeling, focusing specifically on hypertension. We also review recent progress of the miRNA-based therapeutics including pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (such as exercise training) and their potential applications in the management of hypertension.

  10. Ballistocardiogram: Mechanism and Potential for Unobtrusive Cardiovascular Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Ober, Stephanie L.; McMurtry, M. Sean; Finegan, Barry A.; Inan, Omer T.; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that the body recoils each time the heart ejects blood into the arteries. These subtle cardiogenic body movements have been measured with increasingly convenient ballistocardiography (BCG) instruments over the years. A typical BCG measurement shows several waves, most notably the “I”, “J”, and “K” waves. However, the mechanism for the genesis of these waves has remained elusive. We formulated a simple mathematical model of the BCG waveform. We showed that the model could predict the BCG waves as well as physiologic timings and amplitudes of the major waves. The validated model reveals that the principal mechanism for the genesis of the BCG waves is blood pressure gradients in the ascending and descending aorta. This new mechanistic insight may be exploited to allow BCG to realize its potential for unobtrusive monitoring and diagnosis of cardiovascular health and disease. PMID:27503664

  11. Music listening after stroke: beneficial effects and potential neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Särkämö, Teppo; Soto, David

    2012-04-01

    Music is an enjoyable leisure activity that also engages many emotional, cognitive, and motor processes in the brain. Here, we will first review previous literature on the emotional and cognitive effects of music listening in healthy persons and various clinical groups. Then we will present findings about the short- and long-term effects of music listening on the recovery of cognitive function in stroke patients and the underlying neural mechanisms of these music effects. First, our results indicate that listening to pleasant music can have a short-term facilitating effect on visual awareness in patients with visual neglect, which is associated with functional coupling between emotional and attentional brain regions. Second, daily music listening can improve auditory and verbal memory, focused attention, and mood as well as induce structural gray matter changes in the early poststroke stage. The psychological and neural mechanisms potentially underlying the rehabilitating effect of music after stroke are discussed.

  12. Probiotics and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Treatment and Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengyuan; Duan, Kangmin; Wang, Cuiling; McClain, Craig; Feng, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive research, alcohol remains one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders, including steatosis, steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis. Although many agents and approaches have been tested in patients with ALD and in animals with experimental ALD in the past, there is still no FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved therapy for any stage of ALD. With the increasing recognition of the importance of gut microbiota in the onset and development of a variety of diseases, the potential use of probiotics in ALD is receiving increasing investigative and clinical attention. In this review, we summarize recent studies on probiotic intervention in the prevention and treatment of ALD in experimental animal models and patients. Potential mechanisms underlying the probiotic function are also discussed. PMID:26839540

  13. Possibility and potential of clean development mechanisms inChina

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Weijun; Zhou, Nan; Li, Haifeng; Kammen, Daniel

    2007-10-30

    China has become the world's second largest greenhouse gas(GHG) emitter behind the United States. It emits approximately threebillion tons of CO2 equivalents every year. Its growing economy and largepopulation are making a wealthier, more consumption-oriented country.Energy demand is expected to grow 5?10 percent per year through 2030.Therefore, a large potential of GHG emission reduction in Chinacan beexpected. The clean development mechanism (CDM) put forward in the KyotoProtocol for reductions of GHGs can support the sustainable developmentof developing countries and help developed countries to achieve theiremission reduction targets at low cost. However, there are still manydisagreements to be resolved between developing and developed countries.In this letter, we try to introduce the current development of CDMprojects in China and discuss its potential and opportunities in thefuture decades.

  14. Membrane Damage Induced by Amyloid Beta and a Potential Link with Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Perez, Eduardo J; Peters, Christian; Aguayo, Luis G

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that cortical and hippocampal synaptic densities are reduced in Alzheimer's disease (AD). These alterations in neuronal networking occur at the very onset of AD and may lead to the neuronal loss displayed in later stages of the disease, which is characterized by severe cognitive and behavioral impairments. Many studies suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are responsible for synaptic disconnections and neuronal death. The effects of Aβ in different brain regions are pleotropic, thus suggesting a common mechanism for toxicity. One potential site for this mechanism of toxicity is the neuronal membrane. It is recognized that Aβ can associate to the plasma membrane and induce the formation of pores after the interaction with lipids like GM1 and cholesterol, and proteins such as APP and NMDA receptors. After this early event, the membrane increases its permeability allowing the influx of small ions and larger molecules. Thus, one of the main toxic consequences of Aβ oligomer interaction with neurons is an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that causes alterations in ionic homeostasis. It has been proposed that Aβ perforates the membrane similarly to pore-forming toxins producing a series of effects that include synaptic failure and cell death. These actions of Aβ appear to be potentiated by neuroinflammation, which results in a series of effects that, when prolonged, will affect membrane integrity, pore formation and cellular homeostasis. Here, we will review the most recent data on Aβ actions at the membrane level and how its relationship with neuroinflammation could further potentiate brain impairment in AD. The notion of having drugs acting with dual inhibitory actions, inhibition of membrane damage and inflammation, could serve as a starting conceptual point for the development of new therapies for the disease. PMID:26972288

  15. Vitamin D receptor expression is linked to potential markers of human thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Izkhakov, Elena; Somjen, Dalia; Sharon, Orli; Knoll, Esther; Aizic, Asaf; Fliss, Dan M; Limor, Rona; Stern, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Genes regulated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been screened as potential markers of malignant thyroid nodules. The mRNA expression levels of two of them, the ECM protein-1 (ECM1) and the type II transmembrane serine protease-4 (TMPRSS4), were shown to be an independent predictor of an existing thyroid carcinoma. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in epithelial cells of the normal thyroid gland, as well as in malignant dividing cells, which respond to the active metabolite of vitamin D by decreased proliferative activity in vitro. We evaluated the relationship between mRNA gene expressions of TMPRSS4, ECM1 and VDR in 21 papillary thyroid carcinoma samples and compared it to 21 normal thyroid tissues from the same patients. Gene expression was considered as up- or down-regulated if it varied by more or less than 2-fold in the cancer tissue relative to the normal thyroid tissue (Ca/N) from the same patient. We found an overall significant adjusted correlation between the mRNA expression ratio (ExR) of VDR and that of ECM1 in Ca/N thyroid tissue (R=0.648, P<0.001). There was a high ExR of VDR between Ca/N thyroid tissue from the same patient (3.06±2.9), which also exhibited a high Ca/N ExR of ECM1 and/or of TMPRSS4 (>2, P=0.05).The finding that increased VDR expression in human thyroid cancer cells is often linked to increased ECM1 and/or TPMRSS4 expression warrants further investigation into the potential role of vitamin D analogs in thyroid carcinoma.

  16. Examining potential shortcomings in using phase shifts as a link between experiment and QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švarc, A.

    2013-06-01

    Lüscher [M. Lüscher, Commun. Math. Phys.CMPHAY0010-361610.1007/BF01211097 105, 153 (1986); M. Lüscher, Nucl. Phys. BNUPBBO0550-321310.1016/0550-3213(91)90366-6 354, 531 (1991)] has shown that in the single-channel problem (where the elastic region is below the first inelastic threshold) there exists a direct link between the discrete value of the energy in a finite QCD volume and the scattering phase shift at the same energy. However, when the theorem is extended to the baryon resonance sector (multichannel situation in the inelastic region above first inelastic threshold), eigenphases (diagonal multichannel quantities) replace phase shifts (single-channel quantities). It is necessary to stress that the renowned π/2 resonance criterion is formulated for eigenphases and not for phase shifts, so the resonance extracting procedure has to be applied with utmost care. The potential instability of extracting eigenphases from experimental data that occurs if an insufficient number of channels is used can be reduced if a trace function that explicitly takes the multichannel aspect of the problem into account is used instead of single-channel phase shifts.

  17. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases.

    PubMed

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan J; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O'Leary, Timothy P; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-10

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming.

  18. Dually cross-linked single network poly(acrylic acid) hydrogels with superior mechanical properties and water absorbency.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming; Liu, Yi-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Ying; Shi, Fu-Kuan; Zhang, Li-Qin; Zhu, Mei-Fang; Xie, Xu-Ming

    2016-06-28

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) hydrogels with superior mechanical properties, based on a single network structure with dual cross-linking, are prepared by one-pot free radical polymerization. The network structure of the PAA hydrogels is composed of dual cross-linking: a dynamic and reversible ionic cross-linking among the PAA chains enabled by Fe(3+) ions, and a sparse covalent cross-linking enabled by a covalent cross-linker (Bis). Under deformation, the covalently cross-linked PAA chains remain intact to maintain their original configuration, while the Fe(3+)-enabled ionic cross-linking among the PAA chains is broken to dissipate energy and then recombined. It is found that the mechanical properties of the PAA hydrogels are significantly influenced by the contents of covalent cross-linkers, Fe(3+) ions and water, which can be adjusted within a substantial range and thus broaden the applications of the hydrogels. Meanwhile, the PAA hydrogels have excellent recoverability based on the dynamic and reversible ionic cross-linking enabled by Fe(3+) ions. Moreover, the swelling capacity of the PAA hydrogels is as high as 1800 times in deionized water due to the synergistic effects of ionic and covalent cross-linkings. The combination of balanced mechanical properties, efficient recoverability, high swelling capacity and facile preparation provides a new method to obtain high-performance hydrogels. PMID:27230478

  19. Link between the relativistic canonical quantum mechanics of arbitrary spin and the corresponding field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simulik, Volodimir

    2016-01-01

    The new relativistic equations of motion for the particles with arbitrary spin and nonzero mass have been introduced. The axiomatic level description of the relativistic canonical quantum mechanics of the arbitrary mass and spin has been given. The 64-dimensional ClR(0,6) algebra in terms of Dirac gamma matrices has been suggested. The link between the relativistic canonical quantum mechanics of the arbitrary spin and the covariant local field theory has been found. Different methods of the Dirac equation derivation have been reviewed. The manifestly covariant field equations for an arbitrary spin that follow from the quantum mechanical equations have been considered. The covariant local field theory equations for spin s = (1,1) particle-antiparticle doublet, spin s = (1,0,1,0) particle antiparticle multiplet, spin s = (3/2,3/2) particle-antiparticle doublet, spin s = (2,2) particle-antiparticle doublet, spin s = (2,0,2,0) particle-antiparticle multiplet and spin s = (2,1,2,1) particle-antiparticle multiplet have been introduced. The Maxwell-like equations for the boson with spin s = 1 and nonzero mass have been introduced as well.

  20. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    SciTech Connect

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  1. Generation of Link Mechanism by Shape-Topology Optimization of Trusses Considering Geometrical Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaki, Makoto; Nishiwaki, Shinji

    A two-stage general optimization approach is presented for generating link mechanisms from a highly connected ground structure. The structure is modeled as a pinjointed truss, which is to be optimized so that a large displacement is generated in the specified direction at the output node. The design variables are the cross-sectional areas of the members and the nodal locations. The equilibrium path of an unstable mechanism is traced by the displacement control method. In the first step, the unnecessary members are removed by solving the optimization problem for minimizing the total structural volume under constraints on the maximum load, the displacement at the specified node, and the stiffnesses at the initial and final states. In the second step, the deviation of the displacement of the output node from the specified direction is minimized. It is shown in the numerical examples that several mechanisms can be naturally found as a result of the two-stage optimization starting from randomly selected initial solutions.

  2. Link between the enzymatic kinetics and mechanical behavior in an actomyosin motor.

    PubMed Central

    Amitani, I; Sakamoto, T; Ando, T

    2001-01-01

    We have attempted to link the solution actomyosin ATPase with the mechanical properties of in vitro actin filament sliding over heavy meromyosin. To accomplish this we perturbed the system by altering the substrate with various NTPs and divalent cations, and by altering ionic strength. A wide variety of enzymatic and mechanical measurements were made under very similar solution conditions. Excellent correlations between the mechanical and enzymatic quantities were revealed. Analysis of these correlations based on a force-balance model led us to two fundamental equations, which can be described approximately as follows: the maximum sliding velocity is proportional to square root of V(max)K(m)(A), where K(m)(A) is the actin concentration at which the substrate turnover rate is half of its maximum (V(max)). The active force generated by a cross-bridge under no external load or under a small external load is proportional to square root of V(max)/K(m)(A). The equations successfully accounted for the correlations observed in the present study and observations in other laboratories. PMID:11159410

  3. Mechanical and barrier properties of cross-linked soy and whey protein based films.

    PubMed

    Sabato, S F; Ouattara, B; Yu, H; D'Aprano, G; Le Tien, C; Mateescu, M A; Lacroix, M

    2001-03-01

    Sterilized biofilms based on soy protein isolate (SPI, S system) and a 1:1 mixture of SPI and whey protein isolate (WPI, SW system) were achieved through the formation of cross-links by means of gamma-irradiation combined with thermal treatments. The effect of the incorporation of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and poly(vinyl alcohol) was also examined. gamma-Irradiation combined with thermal treatment improved significantly the mechanical properties, namely, puncture strength and puncture deformation, for all types of films. Irradiated formulations that contain CMC behave more similarly as elastomers. CMC showed also significant improvements of the barrier properties, namely, water vapor permeability, for irradiated films of the S system and for non-irradiated films of the SW system.

  4. Why the Mechanical Properties of Cross-linked Polydimethylsiloxane Surface Enhance? - A First Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifan; Jin, Mengting; Zhang, Yanning; Beijing Computational Science Research Center Collaboration

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been widely used in various areas due to its high flexibility, controllable mechanical properties, brilliant biocompatibility and low cost. Now more work on PDMS focus on tuning its surface physical and chemical properties. Our experimental group has shown that the top surface stiffness of PDMS is significantly enhanced after a surface treatment of hyperthermal hydrogen induced cross-linking (HHIC), without losing its inherent hydrophobicity. To understand why this, we investigated how the HHIC treatment changes the structure of PDMS molecules and chains, by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the nonlocal van der Waals interaction. The elastic and hydrophobic properties of PDMS, before and after the surface treatment, will be discussed then, providing deep understandings on the experimental observations. Our theoretical studies could give insights in the new development of HHIC tuning technology.

  5. DNA methylation: a mechanism linking environmental chemical exposures to risk of autism spectrum disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Kimberly P.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that gene by environment interactions are important in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, the mechanisms by which environmental factors interact with genetic susceptibilities to confer individual risk for ASD remain a significant knowledge gap in the field. The epigenome, and in particular DNA methylation, is a critical gene expression regulatory mechanism in normal and pathogenic brain development. DNA methylation can be influenced by environmental factors such as diet, hormones, stress, drugs, or exposure to environmental chemicals, suggesting that environmental factors may contribute to adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes of relevance to ASD via effects on DNA methylation in the developing brain. In this review, we describe epidemiological and experimental evidence implicating altered DNA methylation as a potential mechanism by which environmental chemicals confer risk for ASD, using polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and bisphenol A (BPA) as examples. Understanding how environmental chemical exposures influence DNA methylation and how these epigenetic changes modulate the risk and/or severity of ASD will not only provide mechanistic insight regarding gene-environment interactions of relevance to ASD but may also suggest potential intervention strategies for these and potentially other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27158529

  6. Potential Mechanisms of Cancer Prevention by Weight Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Wang, Weiqun

    Weight control via dietary caloric restriction and/or physical activity has been demonstrated in animal models for cancer prevention. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Body weight loss due to negative energy balance significantly reduces some metabolic growth factors and endocrinal hormones such as IGF-1, leptin, and adiponectin, but enhances glucocorticoids, that may be associated with anti-cancer mechanisms. In this review, we summarized the recent studies related to weight control and growth factors. The potential molecular targets focused on those growth factors- and hormones-dependent cellular signaling pathways are further discussed. It appears that multiple factors and multiple signaling cascades, especially for Ras-MAPK-proliferation and PI3K-Akt-anti-apoptosis, could be involved in response to weight change by dietary calorie restriction and/or exercise training. Considering prevalence of obesity or overweight that becomes apparent over the world, understanding the underlying mechanisms among weight control, endocrine change and cancer risk is critically important. Future studies using "-omics" technologies will be warrant for a broader and deeper mechanistic information regarding cancer prevention by weight control.

  7. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5-5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  8. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  9. Stepping Out of the Cytosol: AIMp1/p43 Potentiates the Link Between Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Liang, D; Halpert, M M; Konduri, V; Decker, W K

    2015-01-01

    As a structural component of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (mARS) complex, AIMp1, also known as p43, hasn't until recently been recognized for its prominent immunological functions. Together with other nonenzymatic mARS structural components AIMp2/38 and AIMp3/p18, it participates in the machinery responsible for cell-cycle control and tumor suppression. Novel studies also show that AIMp1/p43 can be released by certain cancer cells under conditions of stress. Extracellularly, AIMp1 promotes the proliferation and migration of fibroblasts/endothelial cells and importantly, pro-inflammatory gene expression in monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. AIMp1/p43 deficiency is also correlated with spontaneous Type-2 airway hypersensitivity in mice, indicating a potential role in skewing toward T-helper type-1 (T(H)1) immunity. Vaccination strategies in which dendritic cells receive dual MHC class I and MHC class II antigens of homologous origins (i.e., that share overlapping class I and II binding epitopes) boost downstream T(H)1 immunity in a manner that appears to be wholly dependent upon dendritic cell AIMp1 release. Here we underscore the importance of AIMp1/p43 as a pro-inflammatory cytokine when it is released from cytosol to extracellular space and discuss future directions by which the mechanisms that regulate this process might be better characterized, further elucidating the link between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:26325028

  10. The potential and limitations of linking biological monitoring data and restoration needs of urbanized waterways: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Stanley

    2014-06-01

    The implementation of effective strategies to mitigate the impacts of urbanization on waterways represents a major global challenge. Monitoring data plays an important role in the formulation of these strategies. Using monitoring and historical data compiled from around an urban area (Baltimore, USA), this paper is an assessment of the potential and limitations of the use of fish assemblage monitoring data in watershed restoration. A discriminant analysis between assemblages from urban and reference sites was used to determine faunal components which have been reduced or eliminated from Baltimore area waterways. This analysis produced a strong discrimination between fish assemblages from urban and reference sites. Species primarily associated with reference sites varied taxonomically and ecologically, were generally classified as pollution intolerant, and were native. Species associated with urbanized sites were also native, varied taxonomically and ecologically, and were mixed in pollution tolerance. One factor linking most species associated with reference sites was spawning mode (lithophilic). Spawning habitat limitations may be the mechanism through which these species have been reduced in the urbanized faunas. While this presents a strong general hypothesis, information regarding the specific habitat requirements and responses to urbanization of these species is limited. This represents a limitation to producing effective restoration strategies based on exact goals and targets. Without these, determining the type and number of restoration activities required to restore ecological communities remains problematic.

  11. A potential mechanism for allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    Christen, Patrik; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2015-03-01

    Trabecular bone microstructural parameters, including trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, have been reported to scale with animal size with negative allometry, whereas bone volume fraction is animal size-invariant in terrestrial mammals. As for the majority of scaling patterns described in animals, its underlying mechanism is unknown. However, it has also been found that osteocyte density is inversely related to animal size, possibly adapted to metabolic rate, which shows a negative relationship as well. In addition, the signalling reach of osteocytes is limited by the extent of the lacuno-canalicular network, depending on trabecular dimensions and thus also on animal size. Here we propose animal size-dependent variations in osteocyte density and their signalling influence distance as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. Using an established and tested computational model of bone modelling and remodelling, we run simulations with different osteocyte densities and influence distances mimicking six terrestrial mammals covering a large range of body masses. Simulated trabecular structures revealed negative allometric scaling for trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, constant bone volume fraction, and bone turnover rates inversely related to animal size. These results are in agreement with previous observations supporting our proposal of osteocyte density and influence distance variation as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. The inverse relationship between bone turnover rates and animal size further indicates that trabecular bone scaling may be linked to metabolic rather than mechanical adaptations.

  12. Neuron-specific chromatin remodeling: a missing link in epigenetic mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, memory, and intellectual disability disorders.

    PubMed

    Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Wood, Marcelo A

    2014-05-01

    Long-term memory formation requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression. Until recently nucleosome remodeling, one of the major epigenetic mechanisms for controlling gene expression, had been largely unexplored in the field of neuroscience. Nucleosome remodeling is carried out by chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) that interact with DNA and histones to physically alter chromatin structure and ultimately regulate gene expression. Human exome sequencing and gene wide association studies have linked mutations in CRC subunits to intellectual disability disorders, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, how mutations in CRC subunits were related to human cognitive disorders was unknown. There appears to be both developmental and adult specific roles for the neuron specific CRC nBAF (neuronal Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor). nBAF regulates gene expression required for dendritic arborization during development, and in the adult, contributes to long-term potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We propose that the nBAF complex is a novel epigenetic mechanism for regulating transcription required for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory processes and that impaired nBAF function may result in human cognitive disorders. PMID:24140580

  13. Potential mechanisms for low uric acid in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Radhika; Young, Sarah; Rosen, Ami; Bernhard, Douglas; Millington, David; Factor, Stewart; Jinnah, H A

    2016-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have described an association between low serum uric acid (UA) and Parkinson disease (PD). Uric acid is a known antioxidant, and one proposed mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD is oxidative damage of dopamine neurons. However, other complex metabolic pathways may contribute. The purpose of this study is to elucidate potential mechanisms of low serum UA in PD. Subjects who met diagnostic criteria for definite or probable PD (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) aged 55-80 years were recruited. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected from all participants, and both uric acid and allantoin were measured and corrected for body mass index (BMI). Urinary metabolites were compared using a twoway ANOVA with diagnosis and sex as the explanatory variables. There were no significant differences between PD and controls for total UA (p = 0.60), UA corrected for BMI (p = 0.37), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on UA (p = 0.24). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PD and controls for allantoin (p = 0.47), allantoin corrected for BMI (p = 0.57), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on allantoin (p = 0.78). Allantoin/UA ratios also did not significantly differ by diagnosis (p = 0.99). Our results imply that low serum UA in PD may be due to an intrinsic mechanism that alters the homeostatic set point for serum UA in PD, and may contribute to relatively lower protection against oxidative damage. These findings provide indirect support for neuroprotection trials aimed at raising serum UA.

  14. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  15. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christine M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  16. Photo-cross-linking approach to engineering small tyrosine-containing peptide hydrogels with enhanced mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yin; Li, Ying; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2013-10-29

    Peptide-based supramolecular hydrogels have been extensively explored in biomaterials owing to their unique bioactive, stimulus-responsive, and biocompatible features. However, peptide-based hydrogels often have low mechanical stability with storage moduli of 10-1000 Pa. They are susceptible to mechanical destruction and solvent erosion, greatly hindering their practical application. Here, we present a photo-cross-linking strategy to enhance the mechanical stability of a peptide-based hydrogel by 10(4)-fold with a storage modulus of ~100 kPa, which is one of the highest reported so far for hydrogels made of small peptide molecules. This method is based on the ruthenium-complex-catalyzed conversion of tyrosine to dityrosine upon light irradiation. The reinforcement of the hydrogel through photo-cross-linking can be achieved within 2 min thanks to the fast reaction kinetics. The enhancement of the mechanical stability was due to the formation of a densely entangled fibrous network of peptide dimers through a dityrosine linkage. We showed that in order to implement this method successfully, the peptide sequence should be rationally designed to avoid the cross talk between self-assembly and cross-linking. This method is convenient and versatile for the enhancement of the mechanical stability of tyrosine-containing peptide-based hydrogels. We anticipate that the photo-cross-linked supramolecular hydrogels with much improved mechanical stability will find broad applications in tissue engineering and drug controlled release.

  17. Characterization and performance evaluation of a vertical seismic isolator using link and crank mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiuchi, N.; Ito, A.; Sekiya, Y.; Nan, C.; Yasuda, M.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, various seismic isolators have been developed to prevent earthquake damage to valuable art and other rare objects. Many seismic isolators only defend against horizontal motions, which are the usual cause of falling objects. However, the development of a seismic isolator designed for vertical vibration is necessary since such great vertical vibration earthquakes as the 2004 Niigata Prefecture Chuetsu Earthquake have occurred, and their increased height characteristics are undesirable. In this study, we developed a vertical seismic isolator that can be installed at a lower height and can support loads using a horizontal spring without requiring a vertical spring. It has a mechanism that combines links and cranks. The dynamic model was proposed and the frequency characteristics were simulated when the sine waves were the input. Shaking tests were also performed. The experimental value of the natural frequency was 0.57 Hz, and the theoretical values of the frequency characteristics were close to the experimental values. In addition, we verified this vertical seismic isolator's performance through shaking tests and simulation for typical seismic waves in Japan. We verified the seismic isolation's performance from the experimental result because the average reduction rate of the acceleration was 0.21.

  18. Deletions linked to TP53 loss drive cancer through p53–independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhengmin; Scuoppo, Claudio; Rillahan, Cory D.; Gao, Jianjiong; Spitzer, Barbara; Bosbach, Benedikt; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Baslan, Timour; Ackermann, Sarah; Cheng, Lihua; Wang, Qingguo; Niu, Ting; Schultz, Nikolaus; Levine, Ross L.; Mills, Alea A.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations disabling the TP53 tumour suppressor gene represent the most frequent events in human cancer and typically occur through a two-hit mechanism involving a missense mutation in one allele and a ‘loss of heterozygosity’ deletion encompassing the other. While TP53 missense mutations can also contribute gain-of-function activities that impact tumour progression, it remains unclear whether the deletion event, which frequently includes many genes, impacts tumorigenesis beyond TP53 loss alone. Here we show that somatic heterozygous deletion of mouse chromosome 11B3, a 4-megabase region syntenic to human 17p13.1, produces a greater effect on lymphoma and leukaemia development than Trp53 deletion. Mechanistically, the effect of 11B3 loss on tumorigenesis involves co-deleted genes such as Eif5a and Alox15b (also known as Alox8), the suppression of which cooperates with Trp53 loss to produce more aggressive disease. Our results imply that the selective advantage produced by human chromosome 17p deletion reflects the combined impact of TP53 loss and the reduced dosage of linked tumour suppressor genes. PMID:26982726

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Link between Bone and the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Chang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increases mortality in those patients. Impaired calcium and phosphate homeostasis, increased oxidative stress, and loss of calcification inhibitors have been linked to vascular calcification in CKD. Additionally, impaired bone may perturb serum calcium/phosphate and their key regulator, parathyroid hormone, thus contributing to increased vascular calcification in CKD. Therapeutic approaches for CKD, such as phosphate binders and bisphosphonates, have been shown to ameliorate bone loss as well as vascular calcification. The precise mechanisms responsible for vascular calcification in CKD and the contribution of bone metabolism to vascular calcification have not been elucidated. This review discusses the role of systemic uremic factors and impaired bone metabolism in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in CKD. The regulation of the key osteogenic transcription factor Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and the emerging role of Runx2-dependent receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in vascular calcification of CKD are emphasized. PMID:25947259

  20. ATRX ADD domain links an atypical histone methylation recognition mechanism to human mental-retardation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Iwase, Shigeki; Xiang, Bin; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Ren, Ting; Lewis, Peter W.; Cochrane, Jesse C.; Allis, C. David; Picketts, David J.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Li, Haitao; Shi, Yang

    2011-07-19

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  1. Mechanical properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of cross-linked cellulose acetate-reinforced polyester composites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-San

    2014-05-25

    Composites of treated (cross-linked) cellulose acetate (t-CA) and acrylic acid-grafted poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA-g-AA/t-CA) exhibited noticeably superior mechanical properties compared with PHA/CA composites due to greater compatibility between the two components. The dispersion covering of t-CA in the PHA-g-AA matrix was highly homogeneous as a result of condensation reactions. Human lung fibroblasts (FBs) were seeded on these two series of composites to characterize the biocompatibility properties. In a time-dependent course, the FB proliferation results demonstrated higher performance from the PHA/CA series of composites than from the PHA-g-AA/t-CA composites. The water resistance of PHA-g-AA/t-CA was higher than that of PHA/CA, although the weight loss of both composites buried in Acetobacter pasteurianus (A. pasteurianus) indicated that they were both biodegradable, especially at higher levels of cellulose acetate substitution. The PHA/CA and PHA-g-AA/t-CA composites were more biodegradable than pure PHA, implying a strong connection between cellulose acetate content and biodegradability.

  2. ATRX ADD Domain Links an Atypical Histone Methylation Recognition Mechanism to Human Mental-Retardation Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    S Iwase; B Xiang; S Ghosh; T Ren; P Lewis; J Cochrane; C Allis; D Picketts; D Patel; et al.

    2011-12-31

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  3. Classifying compound mechanism of action for linking whole cell phenotypes to molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Christina R; Wakeham, Nancy; Bunce, Richard A; Nammalwar, Baskar; Berlin, K Darrell; Barrow, William W

    2012-04-01

    Drug development programs have proven successful when performed at a whole cell level, thus incorporating solubility and permeability into the primary screen. However, linking those results to the target within the cell has been a major setback. The Phenotype Microarray system, marketed and sold by Biolog, seeks to address this need by assessing the phenotype in combination with a variety of chemicals with known mechanism of action (MOA). We have evaluated this system for usefulness in deducing the MOA for three test compounds. To achieve this, we constructed a database with 21 known antimicrobials, which served as a comparison for grouping our unknown MOA compounds. Pearson correlation and Ward linkage calculations were used to generate a dendrogram that produced clustering largely by known MOA, although there were exceptions. Of the three unknown compounds, one was definitively placed as an antifolate. The second and third compounds' MOA were not clearly identified, likely because the unique MOA was not represented within the database. The availability of the database generated in this report for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 will increase the accessibility of this technique to other investigators. From our analysis, the Phenotype Microarray system can group compounds with clear MOA, but the distinction of unique or broadly acting MOA at this time is less clear. PMID:22434711

  4. Building Student Networks with LinkedIn: The Potential for Connections, Internships, and Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Robert M.; Dover, Howard F.

    2014-01-01

    Networking is a chance to interact with people, build friendships or business partners, identify opportunities, and create value. Technology has made this process easier, since individuals can readily contact others who were previously unknown. In the professional world, LinkedIn has become the standard way to build virtual and personal networks.…

  5. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke outcome. Acutely, inflammation appears to have a detrimental effect, and anti-inflammatory treatments have been been studied as a potential therapeutic target. Chronically, reports suggest that post-ischemic inflammation is also essential for the tissue repairing and remodeling. The majority of the work in this area has centered around innate immune mechanisms, which will be the focus of this review. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. A better understanding of the roles of the different immune cells and their temporal profile of damage versus repair will help to clarify more effective modulation of inflammation post stroke. Introduction Stroke refers to conditions caused by occlusion and/or rupture of blood vessels in the brain, and is a leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. PMID:24372209

  6. Calcium signalling in pancreatic stellate cells: Mechanisms and potential roles.

    PubMed

    Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Petersen, Ole H

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic and pancreatic stellate cells may or may not be regarded as stem cells, but they are capable of remarkable transformations. There is less information about stellate cells in the pancreas than in the liver, where they were discovered much earlier and therefore have been studied longer and more intensively than in the pancreas. Most of the work on pancreatic stellate cells has been carried out in studies on cell cultures, but in this review we focus attention on Ca(2+) signalling in stellate cells in their real pancreatic environment. We review current knowledge on patho-physiologically relevant Ca(2+) signalling events and their underlying mechanisms. We focus on the effects of bradykinin in the initial stages of acute pancreatitis, an often fatal disease in which the pancreas digests itself and its surroundings. Ca(2+) signals, elicited in the stellate cells by the action of bradykinin, may have a negative effect on the outcome of the acute disease process and promote the development of chronic pancreatitis. The bradykinin-elicited Ca(2+) signals can be inhibited by blockade of type 2 receptors and also by blockade of Ca(2+)-release activated Ca(2+) channels. The potential benefits of such pharmacological inhibition for the treatment of pancreatitis are reviewed. PMID:26960936

  7. Cachexia and sarcopenia: mechanisms and potential targets for intervention.

    PubMed

    Argilés, Josep M; Busquets, Silvia; Stemmler, Britta; López-Soriano, Francisco J

    2015-06-01

    Cachexia is a multi-organ syndrome associated with cancer and other chronic diseases, characterized by body weight loss, muscle and adipose tissue wasting and inflammation, being often associated with anorexia. Skeletal muscle tissue represents more than 40% of body weight and seems to be one of the main tissues involved in the wasting that occurs during cachexia. Sarcopenia is a degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with healthy ageing. The molecular mechanisms behind cachexia and sarcopenia share some common trends. Muscle wasting is the result of a combination of an imbalance between synthetic and degradative protein pathways together with increased myocyte apoptosis and decreased regenerative capacity. Oxidative pathways are also altered in skeletal muscle during muscle wasting and this seems to be a consequence of mitochondrial abnormalities that include altered morphology and function, decreased ATP synthesis and uncoupling. The aim of the present review is to analyse common molecular pathways between cachexia and sarcopenia in order to put forward potential targets for intervention.

  8. Autophagy in Cancer Stem Cells: A Potential Link Between Chemoresistance, Recurrence, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Rani; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Singh, Shrawan K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer cells require an uninterrupted nutritional supply for maintaining their proliferative needs and this high demand in concurrence with inadequate supply of blood and nutrition induces stress in these cells. These cells utilize various strategies like high glycolytic flux, redox signaling, and modulation of autophagy to avoid cell death and overcome nutritional deficiency. Autophagy allows the cell to generate ATP and other essential biochemical building blocks necessary under such adverse conditions. It is emerging as a decisive process in the development and progression of pathophysiological conditions that are associated with increased cancer risk. However, the precise role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is still debatable. Autophagy is a novel cytoprotective process to augment tumor cell survival under nutrient or growth factor starvation, metabolic stress, and hypoxia. The tumor hypoxic environment may provide site for the enrichment/expansion of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) and successive rapid tumor progression. CSCs are characteristically resistant to conventional anticancer therapy, which may contribute to treatment failure and tumor relapse. CSCs have the potential to regenerate for an indefinite period, which can impel tumor metastatic invasion. From last decade, preclinical research has focused on the diversity in CSC content within tumors that could affect their chemo- or radio-sensitivity by impeding with mechanisms of DNA repair and cell cycle progression. The aim of this review is predominantly directed on the recent developments in the CSCs during cancer treatment, role of autophagy in maintenance of CSC populations and their implications in the development of promising new cancer treatment options in future. PMID:26309786

  9. The influence of mechanical properties on the link between tectonic and topographic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koons, Peter O.; Upton, Phaedra; Barker, Adam D.

    2012-01-01

    In actively deforming orogens, the material strength at the Earth's surface is controlled in part by strain localization determined by the local stress fields which in turn are driven by contributions from local topography and far field plate velocities. Material weakening associated with strain localization imparts partially predictable, and entirely inescapable heterogeneity to the material fabric of an orogen. The characteristic damage structure of individual fault zones that undergo strain weakening, as imaged in dam site excavations, deep drill holes and geological observations, results in geomorphically relevant strength variations normal to the fault of many orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of hillslope and fluvial erosion to the strength parameters coupled with the large and oriented strain-related strength variations, cause the topographic evolution to be dominated by tectonically driven rheological behavior at multiple wavelengths. Using three-dimensional, lithospheric scale modeling of two oblique orogens, Southern Alps, New Zealand and the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis, we examine the generation of model surface strength fields that occur as a consequence of a simple strain softening upper crustal rheological model. Mapping of topographic anisotropy of the Southern Alps and the Eastern Himalaya Syntaxis indicates azimuthal control on correlation distances that are spatially related to the different strain regimes of the two orogens. By defining landscape evolution in terms of mechanical failure in the conventional motion—stress mechanical framework, the behavior of Earth's surface can be brought into the same theoretical framework as the behavior of the sub-surface and many of the observational—theoretical inconsistencies arising from application of dominantly potential field theory can be obviated. Heterogeneity and anisotropy of material strength are fundamental aspects of active orogens and description of the strength field in terms of

  10. The effect of cross linking density on the mechanical properties and structure of the epoxy polymers: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Shokuhfar, Ali; Arab, Behrouz

    2013-09-01

    Recently, great attention has been focused on using epoxy polymers in different fields such as aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, and electronics, owing to their superior properties. In this study, the classical molecular dynamics (MD) was used to simulate the cross linking of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) with diethylenetriamine (DETA) curing agent, and to study the behavior of resulted epoxy polymer with different conversion rates. The constant-strain (static) approach was then applied to calculate the mechanical properties (Bulk, shear and Young's moduli, elastic stiffness constants, and Poisson's ratio) of the uncured and cross-linked systems. Estimated material properties were found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. Moreover, the dependency of mechanical properties on the cross linking density was investigated and revealed improvements in the mechanical properties with increasing the cross linking density. The radial distribution function (RDF) was also used to study the evolution of local structures of the simulated systems as a function of cross linking density. PMID:23793720

  11. Biochar Mechanisms of Heavy Metal Sorption and Potential Utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ippolito, J.

    2015-12-01

    Mining-affected lands are a global issue; in the USA alone there are an estimated 500,000 abandoned mines encompassing hundreds of thousands of hectares. Many of these sites generate acidic mine drainage that causes release of heavy metals, and subsequently degradation in environmental quality. Because of its potential liming characteristics, biochar may play a pivotal role as a soil amendment in future mine land reclamation. However, to date, most studies have focused on the use of biochar to sorb metals from solution. Previous studies suggest that metals are complexed by biochar surface function groups (leading to ion exchange, complexation), coordination with Pi electrons (C=C) of carbon, and precipitation of inorganic mineral phases. Several recent studies have focused on the use of biochar for amending mine land soils, showing that biochar can indeed reduce heavy metal lability, yet the mechanism(s) behind labile metal reduction have yet to be established. In a proof-of-concept study, we added lodgepole pine, tamarisk, and switchgrass biochar (0, 5, 10, 15% by weight; 500 oC) to four different western US mine land soils affected by various heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn). Extraction with 0.01M CaCl2 showed that increasing biochar application rate significantly decreased 'bioaccessible' metals in almost all instances. A concomitant increase in solution pH was observed, suggesting that metals may be rendered bio-inaccessible through precipitation as carbonate or (hydr)oxide phases, or sorbed onto mineral surfaces. However, this was only supposition and required further research. Thus, following the 0.01M CaCl2 extraction, biochar-soil mixtures were air-dried and metals were further extracted using the four-step BCR sequential removal procedure. Results from selective extraction suggest that, as compared to the controls, most metals in the biochar-amended mine land soils were associated with exchange sites, carbonate, and oxide phases. Biochar may play a

  12. Androgen dependence in hamsters: overdose, tolerance, and potential opioidergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peters, K D; Wood, R I

    2005-01-01

    Anabolic steroids are drugs of abuse. However, the potential for steroid reward and addiction remains largely unexplored. This study used i.c.v. testosterone self-administration and controlled infusions of testosterone or vehicle in hamsters to explore central mechanisms of androgen overdose. Forty-two hamsters used nose-pokes to self-administer 1 microg/microl testosterone i.c.v. 4 h/day in an operant chamber. During 1-56 days of androgen self-administration, 10 (24%) hamsters died. Deaths correlated with peak daily intake of testosterone. Of the hamsters that self-administered a peak intake of <20 microg/day, there was 100% survival (10/10). Survival decreased to 86% (19/22) when daily testosterone intake peaked at 20-60 microg/day. Only 30% (three of 10) survived when daily testosterone intake exceeded 60 microg/day. Deaths are not due to volume or vehicle because i.c.v. infusions of 80 mul vehicle had no effect. Testosterone overdose resembles opiate intoxication. When male hamsters received infusions of 40 microg testosterone, locomotion (25.1+/-18.8 grid-crossings/10 min), respiration (72.7+/-5.4 breaths/min) and body temperature (33.5+/-0.4 degrees C) were significantly reduced, compared with males receiving vehicle infusions (186.1+/-8.1 crossings/10 min, 117.6+/-1.0 breaths/min, 35.9+/-0.1 degrees C, P<0.05). However, males developed tolerance to continued daily testosterone infusion. After 15 days, locomotion (170.2+/-6.3 crossings), respiration (118.4+/-1.3 breaths/min), and body temperature (35.3+/-0.3 degrees C) in testosterone-infused males were equivalent to that in vehicle controls (P>0.05). The depressive effects of testosterone infusion are blocked by the opioid antagonist, naltrexone. With naltrexone pre-treatment (10 mg/kg s.c.), locomotion (183.7+/-1.8 crossings/10 min), respiration (116.9+/-0.3 breaths/min), and body temperature (36.1+/-0.4 degrees C) during testosterone infusion were equivalent to vehicle controls. Likewise, naltrexone

  13. Parenting practices as potential mechanisms for child adjustment following mass trauma.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Abigail; Forgatch, Marion; Wieling, Elizabeth

    2008-04-01

    Trauma research has identified a link between parental adjustment and children's functioning and the sometimes ensuing intergenerational impact of traumatic events. The effects of traumatic events on children have been demonstrated to be mediated through their impact on children's parents. However, until now, little consideration has been given to the separate and more proximal mechanism of parenting practices as potential mediators between children's adjustment and traumatic events. To shed some light in this arena, we review literature on trauma, adversity, and resilience, and discuss how parenting practices may mediate trauma and adverse environmental contexts. Using a social interaction learning perspective (Forgatch & Knutson, 2002; Patterson, 2005), we propose a prevention research framework to examine the role that parenting practices may play in influencing children's adjustment in the wake of trauma exposure. The article concludes by providing a specific model and role for evidence-based parenting interventions for children exposed to mass trauma.

  14. Smoking and increased Alzheimer’s disease risk: A review of potential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mattsson, Niklas; Weiner, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking has been linked with both increased and decreased risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This is relevant for the US military because the prevalence of smoking in the military is approximately 11% higher than in civilians. Methods Systematic review of published studies on the association between smoking and increased risk for AD, and preclinical and human literature on the relationships between smoking, nicotine exposure and AD-related neuropathology. Original data from comparisons of smoking and never-smoking cognitively normal elders on in vivo amyloid imaging are also presented. Results Overall, the literature indicates that former/active smoking is related to a significantly increased risk for AD. Cigarette smoke/smoking is associated with AD neuropathology in preclinical models and humans. Smoking-related cerebral oxidative stress is a potential mechanism promoting AD pathophysiology and increased risk for AD. Conclusions A reduction in the incidence of smoking will likely reduce the future prevalence of AD. PMID:24924665

  15. Corneal Cross-Linking: Evaluating the Potential for a Lower Power, Shorter Duration Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Ciro; Barbaro, Gaetano; Tronino, Diana; Ostacolo, Carmine; Sacchi, Antonia; Pacente, Luigi; Del Prete, Antonio; Sala, Marina; Troisi, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the cross-linking effect of a riboflavin ultraviolet-A (UV-A) corneal cross-linking treatment that is both shorter and has lower energy than the Dresden protocol. Methods: In a first experiment, 12 human corneas were presoaked with riboflavin and then irradiated with UV-A at 3 mW/cm2 after clearing the surface of riboflavin, with no added riboflavin during irradiation. Percent UV-A transmission through the corneas was measured at intervals up to 30 minutes. A second experiment involved 24 porcine corneas. Eight were de-epithelialized, presoaked in riboflavin for 30 minutes, and irradiated at 1.5 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes. An additional 8 were riboflavin treated and similarly irradiated, but with epithelium intact and a final 8 corneas were not treated. Young modulus was measured in all 24 corneas at the end of the experiment. Results: The first experiment showed essentially complete riboflavin oxidation after only 10 minutes. Based on these results, a shortened UV-A exposure cross-linking experiment was designed using a reduced UV-A fluence of 1.5 mW/cm2, an endothelial exposure within safety limits in humans. With this protocol Young modulus was the same in the irradiated porcine corneas but with epithelium intact as in the untreated corneas. In contrast, Young modulus increased by a factor of 1.99 in the UV-A cross-linked corneas at 1.5 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes with the epithelium removed. Conclusions: A shorter, lower energy protocol than the Dresden protocol seems to provide a significant increase in Young modulus, similar to published results with higher energy, longer exposure protocols. PMID:26989958

  16. Potential effects of intrinsic heart pacemaker cell mechanisms on dysrhythmic cardiac action potential firing

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Tsutsui, Kenta; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    The heart's regular electrical activity is initiated by specialized cardiac pacemaker cells residing in the sinoatrial node. The rate and rhythm of spontaneous action potential firing of sinoatrial node cells are regulated by stochastic mechanisms that determine the level of coupling of chemical to electrical clocks within cardiac pacemaker cells. This coupled-clock system is modulated by autonomic signaling from the brain via neurotransmitter release from the vagus and sympathetic nerves. Abnormalities in brain-heart clock connections or in any molecular clock activity within pacemaker cells lead to abnormalities in the beating rate and rhythm of the pacemaker tissue that initiates the cardiac impulse. Dysfunction of pacemaker tissue can lead to tachy-brady heart rate alternation or exit block that leads to long atrial pauses and increases susceptibility to other cardiac arrhythmia. Here we review evidence for the idea that disturbances in the intrinsic components of pacemaker cells may be implemented in arrhythmia induction in the heart. PMID:25755643

  17. Mechanisms That Link Parenting Practices to Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior: A Test of Six Competing Theories.

    PubMed

    Simons, Leslie Gordon; Sutton, Tara E; Simons, Ronald L; Gibbons, Frederick X; Murry, Velma McBride

    2016-02-01

    Risky sexual behavior, particularly among adolescents, continues to be a major source of concern. In order to develop effective education and prevention programs, there is a need for research that identifies the antecedents of such behavior. This study investigated the mediators that link parenting experiences during early adolescence to subsequent risky sexual behaviors among a diverse sample of African American youth (N = 629, 55 % female). While there is ample evidence that parenting practices (e.g., supportive parenting, harsh parenting, parental management) are antecedent to risky sexual behavior, few studies have examined whether one approach to parenting is more strongly related to risky sex than others. Using a developmental approach, the current study focused on factors associated with six theories of risky sexual behavior. While past research has provided support for all of the theories, few studies have assessed the relative contribution of each while controlling for the processes proposed by the others. The current study addresses these gaps in the literature and reports results separately by gender. Longitudinal analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that the mediating mechanisms associated with social learning and attachment theories were significantly related to the risky sexual behavior of males and females. Additionally, there was support for social control and self-control theories only for females and for life history theory only for males. We did not find support for problem behavior theory, a perspective that dominates the risky sex literature, after controlling for the factors associated with the other theories. Finally, supportive parenting emerged as the parenting behavior most influential with regard to adolescents' risky sexual behavior. These results provide insight regarding efficacious approaches to education and preventative programs designed to reduce risky sexual behaviors among adolescents. PMID:26718543

  18. Mechanisms That Link Parenting Practices to Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior: A Test of Six Competing Theories.

    PubMed

    Simons, Leslie Gordon; Sutton, Tara E; Simons, Ronald L; Gibbons, Frederick X; Murry, Velma McBride

    2016-02-01

    Risky sexual behavior, particularly among adolescents, continues to be a major source of concern. In order to develop effective education and prevention programs, there is a need for research that identifies the antecedents of such behavior. This study investigated the mediators that link parenting experiences during early adolescence to subsequent risky sexual behaviors among a diverse sample of African American youth (N = 629, 55 % female). While there is ample evidence that parenting practices (e.g., supportive parenting, harsh parenting, parental management) are antecedent to risky sexual behavior, few studies have examined whether one approach to parenting is more strongly related to risky sex than others. Using a developmental approach, the current study focused on factors associated with six theories of risky sexual behavior. While past research has provided support for all of the theories, few studies have assessed the relative contribution of each while controlling for the processes proposed by the others. The current study addresses these gaps in the literature and reports results separately by gender. Longitudinal analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that the mediating mechanisms associated with social learning and attachment theories were significantly related to the risky sexual behavior of males and females. Additionally, there was support for social control and self-control theories only for females and for life history theory only for males. We did not find support for problem behavior theory, a perspective that dominates the risky sex literature, after controlling for the factors associated with the other theories. Finally, supportive parenting emerged as the parenting behavior most influential with regard to adolescents' risky sexual behavior. These results provide insight regarding efficacious approaches to education and preventative programs designed to reduce risky sexual behaviors among adolescents.

  19. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to (18)O and (13)C-isotopes of human breath CO2.

    PubMed

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-06-03

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 ((18)O) and carbon-13 ((13)C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of (18)O/(16)O and (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of (18)O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the (13)C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to (13)C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the (18)O and (13)C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath (12)C(18)O(16)O and (13)C(16)O(16)O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen's physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection.

  20. Family Socioeconomic Status and Academic Achievement among Korean Adolescents: Linking Mechanisms of Family Processes and Adolescents' Time Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Dayoung; Wickrama, K. A. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined pathways through which family socioeconomic status may influence adolescents' academic achievement. We focused on parental monitoring and adolescents' after-school time-use patterns as linking mechanisms. Participants were 441 twelve- to fourteen-year-old Korean adolescents who participated in the Korea Welfare Panel Study.…

  1. Compulsive Eating: The Emotional Link of Its Use as a Coping Mechanism for Resident Freshman Female College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beylerian, Nvair Kadian

    An 18-year old's freshman year in college is not only a test of his or her intellect, but also a test in social skills, adaptability to new living situations, and other conditions. This study examined the link of emotions to compulsive eating and its use as a coping mechanism for female college students. It explores the stresses of the transition…

  2. [Linking claims data and beneficiary survey information to report on the quality of health care: potential, pitfalls, and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, E M

    2015-02-01

    Reports on the quality of care aim at health and patient-reported outcomes in routine clinical care. To achieve meaningful information the study designs must be robust against bias through highly selected patient populations or health care providers but also allow for adequate control of confounding. The article describes the potential and pitfalls of administrative claims data and surveys of beneficiaries. The large potential of using both sources is illustrated in the primary inpatient treatment for prostate cancer. However, linking claims data and patient survey data still leaves some problems to be addressed in the final section. Linking claims data and beneficiary survey information on patient reported outcomes overcomes sectoral barriers and allows for an integrated evaluation of pathways of care in the short-, mid- and long-term. It is economical and well suited for a variety, but not all health care problems. Future efforts might be directed towards more collaboration among sickness funds.

  3. The link between depression and diabetes: the search for shared mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Calum D; Pickup, John C; Ismail, Khalida

    2015-06-01

    Depression is twice as common in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes as in the general population, and is associated with poor outcomes. Evidence is growing that depression and type 2 diabetes share biological origins, particularly overactivation of innate immunity leading to a cytokine-mediated inflammatory response, and potentially through dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Throughout the life course, these pathways can lead to insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, depression, increased risk of type 2 diabetes, and increased mortality. Proinflammatory cytokines might directly affect the brain, causing depressive symptoms. In type 1 diabetes, mediators of depression are not well studied, with research hindered by inconsistent definitions of depression and scarcity of observational, mechanistic, and interventional research along the life course. Despite few studies, evidence suggests that familial relationships and burden of a lifelong disorder with an onset early in personality development might contribute to increased vulnerability to depression. Overall, longitudinal research is needed to identify risk factors and mechanisms for depression in patients with diabetes, particularly early in the life course. Ultimately, improved understanding of shared origins of depression and diabetes could provide the potential to treat and improve outcomes of both disorders simultaneously. These shared origins are targets for primary prevention of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25995124

  4. Compassionate love as a mechanism linking sacred qualities of marriage to older couples' marital satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sabey, Allen K; Rauer, Amy J; Jensen, Jakob F

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has underscored the robust links between sanctification of marriage and marital outcomes, and recent developments in the literature suggest that compassionate love, which is important for intimate relationships, may act as a mediator of that relationship. Accordingly, the current study used actor-partner interdependence models to examine the relationship between a spiritual cognition (i.e., perceived sacred qualities of marriage) and marital satisfaction, and to determine whether that relationship is mediated by compassionate love, in a sample of older married couples (N = 64). Results revealed that wives' greater sacred qualities of marriage were significantly and positively linked to marital satisfaction on the part of both spouses, and that these links were partially mediated by couples' reports of compassionate love. These findings highlight the importance of moving beyond simply establishing the existence of the link between global markers of involvement of religion and marriage to understanding how specific spiritual cognitions may foster better relationship quality, especially among older couples.

  5. The potentiality of cross-linked fungal chitosan to control water contamination through bioactive filtration.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F; Elguindy, Nihal M

    2016-07-01

    Water contamination, with heavy metals and microbial pathogens, is among the most dangerous challenges that confront human health worldwide. Chitosan is a bioactive biopolymer that could be produced from fungal mycelia to be utilized in various applied fields. An attempt to apply fungal chitosan for heavy metals chelation and microbial pathogens inhibition, in contaminated water, was performed in current study. Chitosan was produced from the mycelia of Aspergillus niger, Cunninghamella elegans, Mucor rouxii and from shrimp shells, using unified production conditions. The FT-IR spectra of produced chitosans were closely comparable. M. rouxii chitosan had the highest deacetylation degree (91.3%) and the lowest molecular weight (33.2kDa). All chitosan types had potent antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus; the most forceful type was C. elegans chitosan. Chitosan beads were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GLA) and ethylene-glycol-diglycidyl ether (EGDE); linked beads became insoluble in water, acidic and alkaline solutions and could effectively adsorb heavy metals ions, e.g. copper, lead and zinc, in aqueous solution. The bioactive filter, loaded with EGDE- A. niger chitosan beads, was able to reduce heavy metals' concentration with >68%, and microbial load with >81%, after 6h of continuous water flow in the experimentally designed filter. PMID:26995612

  6. Synonymous codon usage and its potential link with optimal growth temperature in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Lobry, J R; Necşulea, A

    2006-12-30

    The relationship between codon usage in prokaryotes and their ability to grow at extreme temperatures has been given much attention over the past years. Previous studies have suggested that the difference in synonymous codon usage between (hyper)thermophiles and mesophiles is a consequence of a selective pressure linked to growth temperature. Here, we performed an updated analysis of the variation in synonymous codon usage with growth temperature; our study includes a large number of species from a wide taxonomic and growth temperature range. The presence of psychrophilic species in our study allowed us to test whether the same selective pressure acts on synonymous codon usage at very low growth temperature. Our results show that the synonymous codon usage for Arg (through the AGG, AGA and CGT codons) is the most discriminating factor between (hyper)thermophilic and non-thermophilic species, thus confirming previous studies. We report the unusual clustering of an Archaeal psychrophile with the thermophilic and hyperthermophilic species on the synonymous codon usage factorial map; the other psychrophiles in our study cluster with the mesophilic species. Our conclusion is that the difference in synonymous codon usage between (hyper)thermophilic and non-thermophilic species cannot be clearly attributed to a selective pressure linked to growth at high temperatures.

  7. The identification of factors linked to the potential acceptance of transgenic biopharmaceuticals: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Duguay, Francois; Katsanis, Lea Prevel; Thakor, Mrugank V

    2003-01-01

    In this exploratory study, Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory was used to identify which factors are likely to contribute to the potential acceptance of transgenic biopharmaceuticals (TG-Bs). These products are not yet available to the general public. A scale was designed to assess three of five core attributes related to the potential adoption rate of innovations (Rogers 1995), as well as to measure potential acceptance characteristics for biotechnology products. These attributes were relative advantage, compatibility with existing values, and complexity. In addition, two other characteristics were included: knowledge (Gartrell and Gartrell 1979) and perceived risks (Bauer 1960). The survey was completed by 74 consumers (78% response rate) using convenience sampling. The research findings show that Rogers' three core attributes are supported, but that knowledge andperceived risks were excluded from the model. The model for transgenic biopharmaceuticals consists of: 1. Consumer-related benefits (positively correlated to potential adoption). 2. New types of animals (negatively correlated to potential 3. Perceived complexity (negatively correlated to potential adoption). All the scaled items developed for this study were highly significant, which indicates that they can be used successfully by other researchers working in this field. As TG-Bs are a discontinuous innovation, biotechnology companies may need to present the benefits of these products, as well as the ease of their use prior to their launch, in order to increase their potential acceptance by consumers. PMID:15271632

  8. Cylindrospermopsin: water-linked potential threat to human health in Europe.

    PubMed

    Poniedziałek, Barbara; Rzymski, Piotr; Kokociński, Mikołaj

    2012-11-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a secondary metabolite produced by several cyanobacteria species. Its potential effect on human health includes liver, kidneys, lungs, spleen and intestine injuries. CYN can be cyto- and genotoxic to a variety of cell types. Occurrence and expansion of species able to synthesize CYN in European water bodies has been recently reported and raised awareness of potential harm to human health. Therefore, surface water of different human use should be monitored for the presence of toxic species of blue-green algae. This paper aims to describe the distribution of CYN producers in Europe and the potential effects of the toxin on human health according to the current state of knowledge.

  9. Link between Culture Zeta Potential Homogeneity and Ebp in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Muhammad; Bruijs, Chissa; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis, a commensal of the gastrointestinal tract and an opportunistic pathogen, has the ability to adhere to surfaces and form biofilms. It has been shown earlier that only 10 to 20% of an E. faecalis OG1RF culture expresses endocarditis- and biofilm-associated pili (Ebp), which are involved in biofilm formation. Another study revealed that E. faecalis clinical isolates, as well as OG1RF, are heterogeneous with respect to their apparent zeta potential, which was also correlated with increased ability to form biofilm. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the heterogeneity in the presence of Ebp is correlated to that in apparent zeta potential. Heterogeneous cultures of OG1RF showed two distinct subpopulations with the most (−38 mV) and least (−26 mV) negative zeta potential. Deletion of EbpR, the activator of the ebp operon, or the structural genes ebpABC resulted in homogeneous culture with the most negative zeta potential. Conversely, overexpression of EbpR or the structural genes ebpABC resulted in homogeneous culture with the least negative zeta potential. The results show that ebp operon expression in E. faecalis, as measured by using Pebp-gfp promoter fusion, is the cause of heterogeneity in zeta potential and that pilus production causes the cells to behave as the least negative particle in an electric field. PMID:22267669

  10. Astrocytes and Microglia and Their Potential Link with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Petrelli, Francesco; Pucci, Luca; Bezzi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The cellular mechanism(s) underlying autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are not fully understood although it has been shown that various genetic and environmental factors contribute to their etiology. As increasing evidence indicates that astrocytes and microglial cells play a major role in synapse maturation and function, and there is evidence of deficits in glial cell functions in ASDs, one current hypothesis is that glial dysfunctions directly contribute to their pathophysiology. The aim of this review is to summarize microglia and astrocyte functions in synapse development and their contributions to ASDs. PMID:26903806

  11. Behavioral differences in aggressive children linked with neural mechanisms of emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Marc D; Granic, Isabela; Lamm, Connie

    2006-12-01

    Children with aggressive behavior problems may have difficulties regulating negative emotions, resulting in harmful patterns of interpersonal behavior at home and in the schoolyard. Ventral and dorsal regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) have been associated with response inhibition and self-control-key components of emotion regulation. Our research program aims to explore differences among aggressive and normal children in the activation of these cortical regions during emotional episodes, to the extent possible using electrophysiological techniques, to identify diagnostic subtypes, gain insights into their interpersonal difficulties, and help develop effective treatment strategies. This report reviews several recent studies investigating individual and developmental differences in cortical mechanisms of emotion regulation, corresponding with different patterns of interpersonal behavior. Our methods include event-related potentials (ERPs) and cortical source modeling, using dense-array electroencephalography (EEG) technology, as well as videotaped observations of parent-child interactions, with both normal and aggressive children. By relating patterns of brain activation to observed behavioral differences, we find (i) a steady decrease in cortical activation subserving self-regulation across childhood and adolescence, (ii) different cortical activation patterns as well as behavioral constellations distinguishing subtypes of aggressive children, and (iii) robust correlations between the activation of cortical mediators of emotion regulation and flexibility in parent-child emotional communication in children referred for aggressive behavior problems. These findings point toward models of developmental psychopathology based on the interplay among biological, psychological, and social factors. PMID:17347349

  12. The Perception of Time: Basic Research and Some Potential Links to the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearden, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The article first discusses some recent work in time perception--in particular the distinction among prospective timing, retrospective timing, and passage of time judgments. The history and application of an "internal clock" model as an explanation of prospective timing performance is reviewed and contrasted with the different mechanisms needed…

  13. Investigations into the Mechanisms of Cell Death: The Common Link between Anticancer Nanotherapeutics and Nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shalini

    Nanotoxicology and anticancer nanotherapeutics are essentially two sides of the same coin. The nanotoxicology discipline deals with the nanoparticle (NP)-induced toxicity and mechanisms of cell death in healthy cells, whereas anticancer agents delivered via nano-based approaches aim to induce cell death in abnormally proliferating cancer cells. The objectives of the studies presented herein were two-fold; to (a) systematically study the physico-chemical properties and cell death mechanisms of model NPs and (b) utilize the knowledge gained from cell death-nanotoxicity studies in developing a potentially novel anticancer nanotherapeutic agent. For the first objective, the effect of a distinguishing characteristic, i.e., surface carbon coating on the matched pairs of carbon-coated and non-coated copper and nickel NPs (Cu, C-Cu, Ni and C-Ni) on the physico-chemical properties and toxicity in A549 alveolar epithelial cells were evaluated. The effect of carbon coating on particle size, zeta potential, oxidation state, cellular uptake, release of soluble metal and concentration dependent toxicity of Cu and Ni NPs was systematically evaluated. A significant effect of carbon coating was observed on the physico-chemical properties, interaction with cellular membranes, and overall toxicity of the NPs. C-Cu NPs, compared to Cu NPs, showed four-fold lower release of soluble copper, ten-fold higher cellular uptake and protection against surface oxidation. In toxicity assays, C-Cu NPs induced higher mitochondrial damage than Cu NPs whereas Cu NPs were associated with a significant damage to plasma membrane integrity. Nickel and carbon coated nickel NPs were less toxic compared to Cu and C-Cu NPs. Thus, by studying the effect of carbon coating, correlations between physico-chemical properties and toxicity of NPs were established. The second objective was focused on utilizing nano-based approaches for the intracellular delivery of an anticancer agent, Cytochrome c (Cyt c), to

  14. Design and Development of a Linked Open Data-Based Health Information Representation and Visualization System: Potentials and Preliminary Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kauppinen, Tomi; Keßler, Carsten; Fritz, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations around the world are challenged by pressures to reduce cost, improve coordination and outcome, and provide more with less. This requires effective planning and evidence-based practice by generating important information from available data. Thus, flexible and user-friendly ways to represent, query, and visualize health data becomes increasingly important. International organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) regularly publish vital data on priority health topics that can be utilized for public health policy and health service development. However, the data in most portals is displayed in either Excel or PDF formats, which makes information discovery and reuse difficult. Linked Open Data (LOD)—a new Semantic Web set of best practice of standards to publish and link heterogeneous data—can be applied to the representation and management of public level health data to alleviate such challenges. However, the technologies behind building LOD systems and their effectiveness for health data are yet to be assessed. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate whether Linked Data technologies are potential options for health information representation, visualization, and retrieval systems development and to identify the available tools and methodologies to build Linked Data-based health information systems. Methods We used the Resource Description Framework (RDF) for data representation, Fuseki triple store for data storage, and Sgvizler for information visualization. Additionally, we integrated SPARQL query interface for interacting with the data. We primarily use the WHO health observatory dataset to test the system. All the data were represented using RDF and interlinked with other related datasets on the Web of Data using Silk—a link discovery framework for Web of Data. A preliminary usability assessment was conducted following the System Usability Scale (SUS) method. Results We developed an LOD

  15. Atmospheric Transport and Deposition of Arsenic and Potential Link to Florida Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C. W.; Shinn, E. A.

    2001-05-01

    It has been recognized that detritus that is introduced into the remote ecosystems bordering the western Atlantic Ocean is derived from Africa. Identification of North African sources is confirmed by mass distribution and a characteristic Al/Ca ratio of greater than 3.8, ratios of Be-7 and Pb-210, and satellite tracking. In his 1999 paper, Prospero reported that the flux of Saharan dust in Southern Florida ranges between 10 \\mug/m 3 to 100 μg/m ^{3}daily. The composition of material collected in Africa, from "dust-events" that crossed the Azores, and collection sites in the Caribbean and the Eastern United Stated reveal that arsenic and other metals are transported within the dust. The arsenic content of dust material collected in Mali, North Central Africa, was approximately 17 mg/kg. Arsenic in a cistern collected on eastern end of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands was about 38 mg/kg. The largest aerosol data set available with arsenic information is the IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments) data set. In addition to a Virgin Islands site, the IMPROVE program established three sites in Florida, one in Everglades National Park in south Florida, one a Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge along the Gulf Coast in Central Florida and one in the Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge on the Florida/Georgia border. The IMPROVE data indicated a strong relationship between mineral dust and arsenic in the Virgin Islands. Arsenic, in the 289 samples, ranged from 0.5 to 44 mg/kg, with a mean of 17 mg/kg. In the Everglades National Park in south Florida, the data suggests approximately 50% of the arsenic is associated with other than soil material. At Chassahowitzka Wildlife Refuge in central Florida, only ~25% were linked with the soil fraction. At the Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge, only ~ 2.5% had an association with soil; the remaining fraction had a strong relationship to organic carbon concentrations. Of all the sites, Chassahowitzka samples appeared to have

  16. Exposure to Potentially Traumatic Events in Early Childhood: Differential Links to Emergent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Carter, Alice S.; Clark, Roseanne; Augustyn, Marilyn; McCarthy, Kimberly J.; Ford, Julian D.

    2010-01-01

    Research NeedsObjective: To examine associations between exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs) and clinical patterns of symptoms and disorders in preschool children. Method: Two hundred and thirteen referred and non-referred children, ages 24 to 48 months (MN = 34.9, SD = 6.7 months) were studied. Lifetime exposure to PTEs (family…

  17. The oncogenic potential of BK-polyomavirus is linked to viral integration into the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kenan, Daniel J; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Singh, Harsharan K; Nickeleit, Volker

    2015-11-01

    It has been suggested that BK-polyomavirus is linked to oncogenesis via high expression levels of large T-antigen in some urothelial neoplasms arising following kidney transplantation. However, a causal association between BK-polyomavirus, large T-antigen expression and oncogenesis has never been demonstrated in humans. Here we describe an investigation using high-throughput sequencing of tumour DNA obtained from an urothelial carcinoma arising in a renal allograft. We show that a novel BK-polyomavirus strain, named CH-1, is integrated into exon 26 of the myosin-binding protein C1 gene (MYBPC1) on chromosome 12 in tumour cells but not in normal renal cells. Integration of the BK-polyomavirus results in a number of discrete alterations in viral gene expression, including: (a) disruption of VP1 protein expression and robust expression of large T-antigen; (b) preclusion of viral replication; and (c) deletions in the non-coding control region (NCCR), with presumed alterations in promoter feedback loops. Viral integration disrupts one MYBPC1 gene copy and likely alters its expression. Circular episomal BK-polyomavirus gene sequences are not found, and the renal allograft shows no productive polyomavirus infection or polyomavirus nephropathy. These findings support the hypothesis that integration of polyomaviruses is essential to tumourigenesis. It is likely that dysregulation of large T-antigen, with persistent over-expression in non-lytic cells, promotes cell growth, genetic instability and neoplastic transformation.

  18. Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells: A Potential Developmental Link Between Germinal Lineage and Hematopoiesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Virant-Klun, Irma

    2016-01-15

    It has been suggested that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) could become specified from a population of migrating primordial germ cells (PGCs), precursors of gametes, during embryogenesis. Some recent experimental data demonstrated that the cell population that is usually considered to be PGCs, moving toward the gonadal ridges of an embryo, contains a subset of cells coexpressing several germ cell and hematopoietic markers and possessing hematopoietic activity. Experimental data showed that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) generates PGCs from mouse bone marrow-derived pluripotent stem cells. Interestingly, functional reproductive hormone receptors have been identified in HSPCs, thus indicating their potential role in reproductive function. Several reports have demonstrated fertility restoration and germ cell generation after bone marrow transplantation in both animal models and humans. A potential link between HSPCs and germinal lineage might be represented by very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which have been found in adult human bone marrow, peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood, express a specific pattern of pluripotency, germinal lineage, and hematopoiesis, and are proposed to persist in adult tissues and organs from the embryonic period of life. Stem cell populations, similar to VSELs, expressing several genes related to pluripotency and germinal lineage, especially to PGCs, have been discovered in adult human reproductive organs, ovaries and testicles, and were related to primitive germ cell-like cell development in vitro, thus supporting the idea of VSELs as a potential link between germinal lineage and hematopoiesis.

  19. Potential Triggering Mechanisms for the 2006-2007 Half Dome Rockfalls, Yosemite National Park, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, G. M.

    2007-12-01

    Yosemite Valley is one of the most active areas of rockfall in the world, allowing for detailed examination of individual rockfall events. A rockfall database going back to 1857 reveals that more than half of all documented rockfalls were not associated with a recognizable triggering mechanism. Between July 2006 and June 2007, a series of at least eight rockfalls occurred from a single release point on the Northwest Face of Half Dome in eastern Yosemite Valley. The largest of these rockfalls occurred at 18:46 on July 27th, 2007, and had an approximate volume of 735 m3. Interestingly, all of the rockfalls occurred during the summer (June-August), with no apparent activity at the release point during the winter and spring, typically considered peak seasons for rockfall. In addition to mapping rockfall volumes and the distribution of rock debris, I investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to failure, including bedrock lithology, degree of weathering, joint density and orientation, and release point geometry. I also analyzed a number of potential rockfall triggering mechanisms, including earthquakes, precipitation, freeze-thaw, and thermal stresses. Although a number of factors contributed to weakening of the rock mass, no specific triggering mechanism(s) can be confidently linked to the rockfalls. Rather, the rockfalls likely resulted from progressive strain weakening of an overhanging arch, with initial small rockfalls destabilizing the rock mass to the point that a large failure occurred. The supposition that summertime rockfalls with unrecognized triggers are unusual has been used to support claims that rockfalls below Glacier Point were caused by wastewater discharges, but the 2006-2007 Half Dome rockfalls, which occurred in a wilderness setting, demonstrate that subtle, even unrecognizable, natural processes trigger summertime rockfalls in Yosemite Valley.

  20. Synthesis and surface activity of diether-linked phosphoglycerols: potential applications for exogenous lung surfactants.

    PubMed

    Notter, Robert H; Wang, Zhongyi; Wang, Zhengdong; Davy, Jason A; Schwan, Adrian L

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of three phosphoglycerols is described, one of which contains the previously unknown phosphonoglycerol headgroup. The surface tension-lowering capabilities of synthetic lung surfactant mixtures containing the PG analogs were measured on the pulsating bubble surfactometer and compared to known controls. The PG-containing mixtures exhibited superior surface tension-lowering properties indicating the significant potential of these analogs as components in synthetic exogenous lung surfactants.

  1. Mechanisms linking metabolism of Helicobacter pylori to 18O and 13C-isotopes of human breath CO2

    PubMed Central

    Som, Suman; De, Anulekha; Banik, Gourab Dutta; Maity, Abhijit; Ghosh, Chiranjit; Pal, Mithun; Daschakraborty, Sunil B.; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Jana, Subhra; Pradhan, Manik

    2015-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilize glucose during metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms linking to oxygen-18 (18O) and carbon-13 (13C)-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 during glucose metabolism are poorly understood. Using the excretion dynamics of 18O/16O and 13C/12C-isotope ratios of breath CO2, we found that individuals with Helicobacter pylori infections exhibited significantly higher isotopic enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 during the 2h-glucose metabolism regardless of the isotopic nature of the substrate, while no significant enrichments of 18O in breath CO2 were manifested in individuals without the infections. In contrast, the 13C-isotopic enrichments of breath CO2 were significantly higher in individuals with Helicobacter pylori compared to individuals without infections in response to 13C-enriched glucose uptake, whereas a distinguishable change of breath 13C/12C-isotope ratios was also evident when Helicobacter pylori utilize natural glucose. Moreover, monitoring the 18O and 13C-isotopic exchange in breath CO2 successfully diagnosed the eradications of Helicobacter pylori infections following a standard therapy. Our findings suggest that breath 12C18O16O and 13C16O16O can be used as potential molecular biomarkers to distinctively track the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori and also for eradication purposes and thus may open new perspectives into the pathogen’s physiology along with isotope-specific non-invasive diagnosis of the infection. PMID:26039789

  2. Feedback mechanisms linking barrier island transgression and storm response with beach-dune interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines the multi-scale feedback relationship of event-scale sediment exchange between beach and dune with long-term barrier island transgression. Using field and remotely sensed data from Santa Rosa Island in northwest Florida and South Padre Island in Texas, it is shown how the alongshore variation in storm washover and breaching is coherent (but in different ways) with transverse ridges that developed on the inner-shelf as the island transgressed. Model results suggest that the ridges are reinforced during tropical storms and hurricanes through the offshore transport of beach and dune sediment eroded by the storm surge. These ridges force an alongshore variation in beach and nearshore state that determines the aeolian transport potential and available sediment supplied from beach to dune. On Santa Rosa Island, dune aeolian transport and dune heights are limited by the steep beachface, such that the largest dunes are found at the crest of the transverse ridges where the beachface is more intermediate. In contrast, Aeolian transport and dune heights are shown to be supply limited on Padre Island, which has a relatively dissipative nearshore and beach. The largest dunes on Padre Island are found between transverse ridges where the profile is more intermediate and sediment is more readily supplied by inter- and supra-tidal swash bars. As a consequence, the largest storm surge and washover occurs at the transverse ridges where the dunes are small, while on Santa Rosa Island, the storm surge is greater where the dunes are larger leading to greater loss of sediment offshore. While Padre Island and Santa Rosa Island represent different beach states and exhibit different mechanisms of beach-dune interaction and storm impact, it is shown that small-scale beach-dune interaction is as much dependent on the geologic framework of the island, which developed as it transgressed, as the transgression and storm response are dependent on the exchange of sediment

  3. Potential mechanisms underlying anxiety and depression in Parkinson's disease: consequences of l-DOPA treatment.

    PubMed

    Eskow Jaunarajs, Karen L; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Bishop, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Though the most recognizable symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are motor-related, many patients also suffer from debilitating affective symptoms that deleteriously influence quality of life. Dopamine (DA) loss is likely involved in the onset of depression and anxiety in PD. However, these symptoms are not reliably improved by DA replacement therapy with l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA). In fact, preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that l-DOPA treatment may worsen affect. Though the neurobiological mechanisms remain unclear, recent research contends that l-DOPA further perturbs the function of the norepinephrine and serotonin systems, already affected by PD pathology, which have been intimately linked to the development and expression of anxiety and depression. As such, this review provides an overview of the clinical characteristics of affective disorders in PD, examines the utility of animal models for the study of anxiety and depression in PD, and finally, discusses potential mechanisms by which DA loss and subsequent l-DOPA therapy influence monoamine function and concomitant affective symptoms.

  4. System Voltage Potential-Induced Degradation Mechanisms in PV Modules and Methods for Test: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Smith, R.; Glick, S.; Pankow, J.; Kempe, M.; Kurtz, S.; Bennett, I.; Kloos, M.

    2011-07-01

    Over the past decade, degradation and power loss have been observed in PV modules resulting from the stress exerted by system voltage bias. This is due in part to qualification tests and standards that do not adequately evaluate for the durability of modules to the long-term effects of high voltage bias experienced in fielded arrays. High voltage can lead to module degradation by multiple mechanisms. The extent of the voltage bias degradation is linked to the leakage current or coulombs passed from the silicon active layer through the encapsulant and glass to the grounded module frame, which can be experimentally determined; however, competing processes make the effect non-linear and history-dependent. Appropriate testing methods and stress levels are described that demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. This information, along with outdoor testing that is in progress, is used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. Na-rich precipitates are observed on the cell surface after stressing the module to induce PID in damp heat with negative bias applied to the active layer.

  5. Potential mechanisms underlying anxiety and depression in Parkinson's disease: consequences of L-DOPA treatment

    PubMed Central

    Eskow Jaunarajs, Karen L.; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M.; Bishop, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Though the most recognizable symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are motor-related, many patients also suffer from debilitating affective symptoms that deleteriously influence quality of life. Dopamine (DA) loss is likely involved in the onset of depression and anxiety in PD. However, these symptoms are not reliably improved by DA replacement therapy with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). In fact, preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that L-DOPA treatment may worsen affect. Though the neurobiological mechanisms remain unclear, recent research contends that L-DOPA further perturbs the function of the norepinephrine and serotonin systems, already affected by PD pathology, which have been intimately linked to the development and expression of anxiety and depression. As such, this review provides an overview of the clinical characteristics of affective disorders in PD, examines the utility of animal models for the study of anxiety and depression in PD, and finally, discusses potential mechanisms by which DA loss and subsequent L-DOPA therapy influence monoamine function and concomitant affective symptoms. PMID:20615430

  6. Child Care Subsidy Use and Child Development: Potential Causal Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkinson, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Research using an experimental design is needed to provide firm causal evidence on the impacts of child care subsidy use on child development, and on underlying causal mechanisms since subsidies can affect child development only indirectly via changes they cause in children's early experiences. However, before costly experimental research is…

  7. Physiological mechanisms and therapeutic potential of bone mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhousheng

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal loading is an important physiological regulator of bone mass. Theoretically, mechanical forces or administration of drugs that activate bone mechanosensors would be a novel treatment for osteoporotic disorders, particularly age-related osteoporosis and other bone loss caused by skeletal unloading. Uncertainty regarding the identity of the molecular targets that sense and transduce mechanical forces in bone, however, has limited the therapeutic exploitation of mechanosesning pathways to control bone mass. Recently, two evolutionally conserved mechanosensing pathways have been shown to function as “physical environment” sensors in cells of the osteoblasts lineage. Indeed, polycystin–1 (Pkd1, or PC1) and polycystin–2 (Pkd2, or PC2, or TRPP2), which form a flow sensing receptor channel complex, and TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, or WWTR1), which responds to the extracellular matrix microenvironment act in concert to reciprocally regulate osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis through co-activating Runx2 and a co-repressing PPARγ activities. Interactions of polycystins and TAZ with other putative mechanosensing mechanism, such as primary cilia, integrins and hemichannels, may create multifaceted mechanosensing networks in bone. Moreover, modulation of polycystins and TAZ interactions identify novel molecular targets to develop small molecules that mimic the effects of mechanical loading on bone. PMID:26038304

  8. Polyextremotolerant black fungi: oligotrophism, adaptive potential, and a link to lichen symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Gostinčar, Cene; Muggia, Lucia; Grube, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Black meristematic fungi can survive high doses of radiation and are resistant to desiccation. These adaptations help them to colonize harsh oligotrophic habitats, e.g., on the surface and subsurface of rocks. One of their most characteristic stress-resistance mechanisms is the accumulation of melanin in the cell walls. This, production of other protective molecules and a plastic morphology further contribute to ecological flexibility of black fungi. Increased growth rates of some species after exposure to ionizing radiation even suggest yet unknown mechanisms of energy production. Other unusual metabolic strategies may include harvesting UV or visible light or gaining energy by forming facultative lichen-like associations with algae or cyanobacteria. The latter is not entirely surprising, since certain black fungal lineages are phylogenetically related to clades of lichen-forming fungi. Similar to black fungi, lichen-forming fungi are adapted to growth on exposed surfaces with low availability of nutrients. They also efficiently use protective molecules to tolerate frequent periods of extreme stress. Traits shared by both groups of fungi may have been important in facilitating the evolution and radiation of lichen-symbioses. PMID:23162543

  9. Lathyrism-induced alterations in collagen cross-links influence the mechanical properties of bone material without affecting the mineral

    PubMed Central

    Paschalis, E.P.; Tatakis, D.N.; Robins, S.; Fratzl, P.; Manjubala, I.; Zoehrer, R.; Gamsjaeger, S.; Buchinger, B.; Roschger, A.; Phipps, R.; Boskey, A.L.; Dall'Ara, E.; Varga, P.; Zysset, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Roschger, P.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study a rat animal model of lathyrism was employed to decipher whether anatomically confined alterations in collagen cross-links are sufficient to influence the mechanical properties of whole bone. Animal experiments were performed under an ethics committee approved protocol. Sixty-four female (47 day old) rats of equivalent weights were divided into four groups (16 per group): Controls were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.6% calcium and 0.6% phosphorus for 2 or 4 weeks and β-APN treated animals were fed additionally with β-aminopropionitrile (0.1% dry weight). At the end of this period the rats in the four groups were sacrificed, and L2–L6 vertebra were collected. Collagen cross-links were determined by both biochemical and spectroscopic (Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI)) analyses. Mineral content and distribution (BMDD) were determined by quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), and mineral maturity/crystallinity by FTIRI techniques. Micro-CT was used to describe the architectural properties. Mechanical performance of whole bone as well as of bone matrix material was tested by vertebral compression tests and by nano-indentation, respectively. The data of the present study indicate that β-APN treatment changed whole vertebra properties compared to non-treated rats, including collagen cross-links pattern, trabecular bone volume to tissue ratio and trabecular thickness, which were all decreased (p < 0.05). Further, compression tests revealed a significant negative impact of β-APN treatment on maximal force to failure and energy to failure, while stiffness was not influenced. Bone mineral density distribution (BMDD) was not altered either. At the material level, β-APN treated rats exhibited increased Pyd/Divalent cross-link ratios in areas confined to a newly formed bone. Moreover, nano-indentation experiments showed that the E-modulus and hardness were reduced only in newly formed bone areas under the influence

  10. Ladder Operators for Some Spherically Symmetric Potentials in Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmarch, J. D.; Golding, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The energy levels of the free field, Coulomb potential, and the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator are found using the Dirac operator formalism by the construction of suitable ladder operators. The degeneracy of each level is also discussed. (Author/GA)

  11. Mental imagery in music performance: underlying mechanisms and potential benefits.

    PubMed

    Keller, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the role of mental imagery in music performance. Self-reports by musicians, and various other sources of anecdotal evidence, suggest that covert auditory, motor, and/or visual imagery facilitate multiple aspects of music performance. The cognitive and motor mechanisms that underlie such imagery include working memory, action simulation, and internal models. Together these mechanisms support the generation of anticipatory images that enable thorough action planning and movement execution that is characterized by efficiency, temporal precision, and biomechanical economy. In ensemble performance, anticipatory imagery may facilitate interpersonal coordination by enhancing online predictions about others' action timing. Overlap in brain regions subserving auditory imagery and temporal prediction is consistent with this view. It is concluded that individual differences in anticipatory imagery may be a source of variation in expressive performance excellence and the quality of ensemble cohesion. Engaging in effortful musical imagery is therefore justified when artistic perfection is the goal.

  12. Epilepsy drugs and effects on fetal development: Potential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Leila; Moshiri, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 1% of all pregnancies are in woman with epilepsy. Although, the majority of children born to women with epilepsy are normal, they are at increased risk for malformations. Notably, the teratogenicity of antiepileptic drugs is a well-defined subject. The incidence of major malformations in offspring of mothers with epilepsy who were treated with AEDs is higher than women with untreated epilepsy and in the general population. These malformations include spina bifida, cleft palate, limb reduction defects, cardiac abnormalities, hypospadias, and gastrointestinal atresia. The exact mechanism by which the AEDs mediate abnormalities in the fetus is uncertain. However, there are several hypotheses to explain them. Some of the most important include folate-related actions, ischemia, reactive intermediates (e.g., free radicals), and genetic susceptibility. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of AED-related abnormalities is of vital importance for the care of epileptic women and their offspring. PMID:23826017

  13. Epilepsy drugs and effects on fetal development: Potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Leila; Moshiri, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel

    2012-09-01

    Approximately 1% of all pregnancies are in woman with epilepsy. Although, the majority of children born to women with epilepsy are normal, they are at increased risk for malformations. Notably, the teratogenicity of antiepileptic drugs is a well-defined subject. The incidence of major malformations in offspring of mothers with epilepsy who were treated with AEDs is higher than women with untreated epilepsy and in the general population. These malformations include spina bifida, cleft palate, limb reduction defects, cardiac abnormalities, hypospadias, and gastrointestinal atresia. The exact mechanism by which the AEDs mediate abnormalities in the fetus is uncertain. However, there are several hypotheses to explain them. Some of the most important include folate-related actions, ischemia, reactive intermediates (e.g., free radicals), and genetic susceptibility. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of AED-related abnormalities is of vital importance for the care of epileptic women and their offspring. PMID:23826017

  14. CLCA1 and TMEM16A: the link towards a potential cure for airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Brett, Tom J

    2015-10-01

    The hallmark traits of chronic obstructive airway diseases are inflammation, airway constriction due to hyperreactivity and mucus overproduction. The current common treatments for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease target the first two traits with none currently targeting mucus overproduction. The main source of obstructive mucus production is mucus cell metaplasia (MCM), the transdifferentiation of airway epithelial cells into mucus-producing goblet cells, in the small airways. Our current understanding of MCM is profusely incomplete. Few of the molecular players involved in driving MCM in humans have been identified and for many of those that have, their functions and mechanisms are unknown. This fact has limited the development of therapeutics that target mucus overproduction by inhibiting MCM. Current work in the field is aiming to change that. PMID:26296094

  15. Deregulated repression of c-Jun provides a potential link to its role in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Carsten; Bohmann, Dirk

    2004-02-01

    The transcription factor c-Jun cooperates with oncogenic alleles of ras in malignant transformation. Constitutively active Ras causes, via activation of mitogen activated protein kinases, phosphorylation of c-Jun which is essential for subsequent target gene activation and tumorigenesis. Studying the mechanisms controlling c-Jun activity we found that its transcription activation function is actively repressed by a presumably multimeric repressor complex that includes histone deacetylase 3 as a critical subunit. Suppression of c-Jun is relieved by MAP kinase-mediated phosphorylation and/or titration of inhibitor components. The viral tumorigenic counterpart of c-Jun, v-Jun, escapes this inhibition, suggesting deregulated transcriptional activity of c-Jun as a relevant cause for carcinogenesis.

  16. Mood disorders: A potential link between ghrelin and leptin on human body?

    PubMed Central

    Zarouna, Stalo; Wozniak, Greta; Papachristou, Anastasia Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Leptin and ghrelin are two hormones associated with multiple physiological functions, especially energy balance. Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone discovered in 1950 and ghrelin which was found in 1999, is a peptide hormone produced and secreted in the stomach. A number of previous studies showed that these hormones could be associated with different types of mood disorders. The results of previous studies, nevertheless, are confounded by diverse sample selection and different methodologies. A search for related articles in the PubMed database was attempted. The search covered studies, reports, reviews and editorials published in the last ten years. Older references served as auxiliary sources for comparison purposes. However, due to the different results of the studies, there is a need for more investigation in order to establish the exact biochemical mechanisms that are responsible for these diseases and ghrelin’s and leptin’s effects on mood. PMID:25992324

  17. Immobilization of a phosphonated analog of matrix phosphoproteins within cross-linked collagen as a templating mechanism for biomimetic mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Li-sha; Kim, Young Kyung; Liu, Yan; Takahashi, Kei; Arun, Senthil; Wimmer, Courtney E.; Osorio, Raquel; Ling, Jun-qi; Looney, Stephen W.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Immobilization of phosphoproteins on a collagen matrix is important for induction of intrafibrillar apatite mineralization. Unlike phosphate esters, polyphosphonic acid has no reactive sites for covalent binding to collagen amine groups. Binding of polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), a biomimetic templating analog of matrix phosphoproteins, to collagen was found to be electrostatic in nature. Thus, an alternative retention mechanism was designed for immobilization of PVPA to collagen by cross-linking the latter with carbodiimide (EDC). This mechanism is based on the principle of size exclusion entrapment of PVPA molecules within the internal water compartments of collagen. By cross-linking collagen with EDC, a zero-length cross-linking agent, the sieving property of collagen is increased, enabling the PVPA to be immobilized within the collagen. Absence of covalent cross-linking between PVPA and collagen was confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Based on these results, a concentration range for immobilized PVPA to template intrafibrillar apatite deposition was established and validated using a single-layer reconstituted type I collagen mineralization model. In the presence of a polyacrylic acid-containing mineralization medium, optimal intrafibrillar mineralization of the EDC-cross-linked collagen was achieved using 500 and 1,000 μg/mL PVPA. The mineralized fibrils exhibited a hierarchical order of intrafibrillar mineral infiltration, as manifested by the appearance of electron-dense periodicity within unstained fibrils. Understanding the basic processes in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen creates opportunities for the design of tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20688200

  18. Sodium arsenite potentiates the clastogenicity and mutagenicity of DNA cross linking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Lee, K.C.; Tzeng, Y.J.; Huang, R.Y.; Jan, K.Y.

    1986-01-01

    To see if sodium arsenite enhances the clastogenicity and the mutagenicity of DNA crosslinking agents, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human skin fibroblasts were exposed to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-Pt(II)) or 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus long-wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and then to sodium arsenite. The results indicate that the clastogenicity of cis-Pt(II) and 8-MOP pllus UVA are enhanced by the post-treatment with sodium arsenite. Chromatid breaks and exchanges are predominantly increased in doubly treated cells. Furthermore, the mutagenicity of cis-Pt(II) at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus is also potentiated by sodium arsenite in CHO cells

  19. [The significance of sex-linked differences for the assessment of somatosensory evoked potentials (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Hedderich, J; Tackmann, W

    1981-09-01

    In 45 healthy volunteers (22 males and 23 females with the same age structure) the peak latencies and inter-peak differences of the cervical and early cortical components of the somatosensory evoked potential were measured. The distribution of the values of the variables and their relationship with arm length were investigated both for the sample as a whole and for each sex separately. Significantly higher average values of the latencies and arm lengths were found in men. The correlations between arm length and latency had consistently higher values for the female sample. On the basis of these results it is concluded that a sufficient assessment of the latencies is only possible with the help of sex-specific normal values. PMID:6795015

  20. Spermidine-cross-linked hydrogels as novel potential platforms for pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    López-Cebral, Rita; Paolicelli, Patrizia; Romero-Caamaño, Vanessa; Seijo, Begoña; Casadei, Maria Antonietta; Sanchez, Alejandro

    2013-08-01

    Endogen polyamines are known to be molecules of high biological value. Herein, a new generation of physical hydrogels was developed through the mild ionotropic gelantion technique, using the endogen polyamine spermidine as a physical cross-linker. The main negatively charged polymer of the hydrogel is the natural polysaccharide gellan gum. Optionally, interesting endogen molecules, such as chondroitin sulfate and albumin, can be included as part of the formulation. These new hydrogels were characterized and the influence of the different components on their final properties was carefully analyzed, ultimately demonstrating the possibility to modulate these properties as well as the system's versatility in terms of composition. On the contrary, in vitro cell studies showed the absence of cytotoxicity of these hydrogels. Finally, the in vitro-release profiles obtained for different model molecules evidenced the potential of these systems as novel drug delivery platforms. PMID:23757346

  1. (Metabolic mechanisms of plant growth at low-water potentials)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    For the year 1989, the progress made on this DOE sponsored research will be described by considering the questions presented in the original proposal and describing the work on each one. We used soybean seedlings grown in vermiculite in a dark, humid environment because they are convenient to grow, undergo most of the physiological changes induced by low water potentials in large plants, and have exposed growing regions on which molecular experiments can be done.

  2. Biomedical applications and potential health risks of nanomaterials: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lanone, Sophie; Boczkowski, Jorge

    2006-09-01

    Nanotechnologies, defined as techniques aimed to conceive, characterize and produce material at the nanometer scale, represent a fully expanding domain, and one can predict without risk that production and utilization of nanomaterials will increase exponentially in the coming years. Applications of nanotechnologies are numerous, in constant development, and their potential use in the medical field as diagnosis and therapeutics tools is very attractive. The size particularity of these nanomaterials gives them novel properties, allowing them to adopt new comportments because of the laws of quantum physics that exist at this scale. However, worries are expressed regarding the exact properties that make these nanomaterials attractive, and questions are raised regarding their potential toxicity, their long-term secondary effects or their biodegradability, particularly when thinking of their use in the (nano)medical field. These questions are justified by the knowledge of the toxic effects of atmospheric pollution micrometric particles on health, and the fear to get an amplification of these effects because of the size of the materials blamed. In this paper, we first expose the sensed medical applications of nanomaterials, and the physicochemical and molecular determinants potentially responsible for nanomaterials biological effects. Finally, we present a synthesis of the actual knowledge regarding toxicological effects of nanomaterials. It is clear that, in regard to the almost empty field of what is known on the subject, there's an urge to better understand biological effects of nanomaterials, which will allow their safe use, in particular in the nanomedicine field.

  3. Cap buckling as a potential mechanism of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Abdelali, Maria; Reiter, Steven; Mongrain, Rosaire; Bertrand, Michel; L'Allier, Philippe L; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2014-04-01

    Plaque rupture in atherosclerosis is the primary cause of potentially deadly coronary events, yet about 40% of ruptures occur away from the plaque cap shoulders and cannot be fully explained with the current biomechanical theories. Here, cap buckling is considered as a potential destabilizing factor which increases the propensity of the atherosclerotic plaque to rupture and which may also explain plaque failure away from the cap shoulders. To investigate this phenomenon, quasistatic 2D finite element simulations are performed, considering the salient geometrical and nonlinear material properties of diverse atherosclerotic plaques over the range of physiological loads. The numerical results indicate that buckling may displace the location of the peak von Mises stresses in the deflected caps. Plaque buckling, together with its deleterious effects is further observed experimentally in plaque caps using a physical model of deformable mock coronary arteries with fibroatheroma. Moreover, an analytical approach combining quasistatic equilibrium equations with the Navier-Bresse formulas is used to demonstrate the buckling potential of a simplified arched slender cap under intraluminal pressure and supported by foundations. This analysis shows that plaque caps - calcified, fibrotic or cellular - may buckle in specific undulated shapes once submitted to critical loads. Finally, a preliminary analysis of intravascular ultrasonography recordings of patients with atherosclerotic coronary arteries corroborates the numerical, experimental and theoretical findings and shows that various plaque caps buckle in vivo. By displacing the sites of high stresses in the plaque cap, buckling may explain the atherosclerotic plaque cap rupture at various locations, including cap shoulders.

  4. Inhibitory potential of ginger extracts against enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes, inflammation and induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rani, M Priya; Padmakumari, K P; Sankarikutty, B; Cherian, O Lijo; Nisha, V M; Raghu, K G

    2011-03-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) continues to be used as an important cooking spice and herbal medicine around the world. Gingerols, the major pungent components of ginger, are known to improve diabetes, including the effect of enhancement against insulin sensitivity. In the current study, ginger sequentially extracted with different solvents-namely, hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, 70% methanol-water and water-were screened to determine the variations in phenolic-linked active constituents. The potential of these extracts to inhibit key enzymes relevant to type 2 diabetes and inflammation was studied. Phenolic compounds-namely, gingerols and shoagols-were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Ethyl acetate extract showed higher activity compared with other extracts. These studies indicate that ginger has very good potential for α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibition relevant for type 2 diabetes management and cyclooxygenase inhibition for inflammation. PMID:20874376

  5. Is forebrain neurogenesis a potential repair mechanism after stroke?

    PubMed

    Inta, Dragos; Gass, Peter

    2015-07-01

    The use of adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis as brain repair strategy after stroke represents a hot topic in neurologic research. Recent radiocarbon-14 dating has revealed a lack of poststroke neurogenesis in the adult human neocortex; however, adult neurogenesis has been shown to occur, even under physiologic conditions, in the human striatum. Here, these results are contrasted with experimental poststroke neurogenesis in the murine brain. Both in humans and in rodents, the SVZ generates predominantly calretinin (CR)-expressing GABAergic interneurons, which cannot replace the broad spectrum of neuronal subtypes damaged by stroke. Therefore, SVZ neurogenesis may represent a repair mechanism only after genetic manipulation redirecting its differentiation.

  6. Is forebrain neurogenesis a potential repair mechanism after stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Inta, Dragos; Gass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The use of adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis as brain repair strategy after stroke represents a hot topic in neurologic research. Recent radiocarbon-14 dating has revealed a lack of poststroke neurogenesis in the adult human neocortex; however, adult neurogenesis has been shown to occur, even under physiologic conditions, in the human striatum. Here, these results are contrasted with experimental poststroke neurogenesis in the murine brain. Both in humans and in rodents, the SVZ generates predominantly calretinin (CR)-expressing GABAergic interneurons, which cannot replace the broad spectrum of neuronal subtypes damaged by stroke. Therefore, SVZ neurogenesis may represent a repair mechanism only after genetic manipulation redirecting its differentiation. PMID:25966955

  7. The activation of mechanisms linking judgements of work design and management with musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Randall, Raymond; Griffiths, Amanda; Cox, Tom; Welsh, Claire

    2002-01-15

    The report of work-related musculoskeletal pain may be related to worker evaluations of the design and management of work through two mechanisms: one biomechanical and the other stress-related. This study of engineering workers (n = 204) explored the validity of these mechanisms using sequential logistic regression. Analyses suggested that workers' ratings of the adequacy of the design and management of their work were related to their report of work-related musculoskeletal pain. However, the mechanisms appeared to be activated in certain conditions. The reporting of pain in the upper body was both biomechanically- and stress-related, whereas that in the lower body was only biomechanically-related. It is argued that the mechanism activated appeared to be determined by the anatomical location of the pain, and probably the variance shared between the different aspects of work design and management, on the one hand, and the mechanical load of the job, on the other. PMID:11964192

  8. Mechanisms of cardiac radiation injury and potential preventive approaches.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Jan; Kura, Branislav; Ravingerová, Táňa; Tribulova, Narcisa; Okruhlicova, Ludmila; Barancik, Miroslav

    2015-09-01

    In addition to cytostatic treatment and surgery, the most common cancer treatment is gamma radiation. Despite sophisticated radiological techniques however, in addition to irradiation of the tumor, irradiation of the surrounding healthy tissue also takes place, which results in various side-effects, depending on the absorbed dose of radiation. Radiation either damages the cell DNA directly, or indirectly via the formation of oxygen radicals that in addition to the DNA damage, react with all cell organelles and interfere with their molecular mechanisms. The main features of radiation injury besides DNA damage is inflammation and increased expression of pro-inflammatory genes and cytokines. Endothelial damage and dysfunction of capillaries and small blood vessels plays a particularly important role in radiation injury. This review is focused on summarizing the currently available data concerning the mechanisms of radiation injury, as well as the effectiveness of various antioxidants, anti-inflammatory cytokines, and cytoprotective substances that may be utilized in preventing, mitigating, or treating the toxic effects of ionizing radiation on the heart. PMID:26030720

  9. Linking potential denitrification rates to microbial gene abundances in multiple boreal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D. G.; Blazewicz, S.; Herman, D. J.; Firestone, M. K.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    The composition and functioning of boreal ecosystems are vulnerable to changes in climate, leading to changes in season length, fire regimes, and soil moisture status. To investigate the influence of vegetation and soil moisture on microbial nitrogen cycling several disparate boreal ecosystems was studied. The two primary objectives were to: (1) determine whether process rates could be predicted solely from soil physical and chemical characteristics and (2) determine if the abundance of functional genes could be an additional explanatory variable. Surface soils were sampled along an elevation-driven hydrologic gradient at the Bonanza Creek LTER that corresponds with five plant communities typical of interior Alaska. The plant communities included a black spruce stand, a deciduous stand, a tussock grassland, an emergent fen, and a rich fen. We examined the chemical composition of the surface organic moss and soil, measured gross N-mineralization, potential rates of nitrification and denitrification (DEA), and abundances of several functional groups of microorganisms from soil cores collected in mid summer. We used quantitative PCR to assess the gene abundances of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers based on a functional gene approach. Here, we focus on potential denitrification rates (PDR), and abundance of denitrifyers carrying NirS and NirK genes (nitrate reductase) and NosZ genes (nitrous oxide reductase). PDR increased dramatically with increasing soil moisture along the gradient, from 1 mg N/m2/h at the dry black spruce site to 300 mg N/m2/h in the rich fen, which is very high compared to other poorly drained soil environments. PDR were linearly related to the abundance of functional genes from the microorganisms responsible for this process. Abundances of NirS, NirK and NosZ genes correlated significantly to PDR (r2 = 0.61 p < 0.0001, r2 = 0.45 p < 0.0003, r2 = 0.81 p < 0.0001, respectively). In addition, PDR were better explained by functional gene abundances

  10. A potential link among antioxidant enzymes, histopathology and trace elements in canine visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Carolina C; Barreto, Tatiane de O; da Silva, Sydnei M; Pinto, Aldair W J; Figueiredo, Maria M; Ferreira Rocha, Olguita G; Cangussú, Silvia D; Tafuri, Wagner L

    2014-01-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is a severe and fatal systemic chronic inflammatory disease. We investigated the alterations in, and potential associations among, antioxidant enzymes, trace elements and histopathology in CVL. Blood and tissue levels of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured in mixed-breed dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum chagasi, symptomatic (n = 19) and asymptomatic (n = 11). Serum levels of copper, iron, zinc, selenium and nitric oxide, and plasma lipid peroxidation were measured. Histological and morphometric analyses were conducted of lesions in liver, spleen and lymph nodes. We found lower blood catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity to be correlated with lower iron and selenium respectively. However, higher activity of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase was not correlated with the increase in copper and decreased in zinc observed in infected animals compared to controls. Organ tissue was characterized by lower enzyme activity in infected dogs than in controls, but this was not correlated with trace elements. Lipid peroxidation was higher in symptomatic than in asymptomatic and control dogs and was associated with lesions such as chronic inflammatory reaction, congestion, haemosiderin and fibrosis. Systemic iron deposition was observed primarily in the symptomatic dogs showing a higher tissue parasite load. Dogs with symptomatic CVL displayed enhanced LPO and Fe tissue deposition associated with decreased levels of antioxidant enzymes. These results showed new points in the pathology of CVL and might open new treatment perspectives associated with antioxidants and the role of iron in the pathogenesis of CVL. PMID:24766461

  11. Wear resistance and mechanical properties of highly cross-linked, ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene doped with vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; Christensen, Steven D; Malhi, Arnaz S; Wannomae, Keith K; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2006-06-01

    Our hypothesis was that cross-linked, ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) stabilized with vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) would be wear-resistant and fatigue-resistant. Acetabular liners were radiation cross-linked, doped with vitamin E, and gamma-sterilized. Hip simulator wear rate of vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE was approximately 1 and 6 mg/million-cycles in clean serum and in serum with third-body particles, respectively, a 4-fold to 10-fold decrease from that of conventional UHMWPE. The ultimate strength, yield strength, elongation at break, and fatigue resistance of vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE were significantly higher than that of 100 kGy-irradiated and melted UHMWPE, and were unaffected by accelerated aging. Rim impingement testing with 3.7-mm-thick acetabular liners up to 2 million-cycles showed no significant damage of the cross-linked liners compared with conventional, gamma-sterilized in inert UHMWPE, vitamin E-stabilized liners. The data indicate good in vitro wear properties and improved mechanical and fatigue properties for vitamin E-stabilized, cross-linked UHMWPE.

  12. Elucidating the mechanisms linking early pubertal timing, sexual activity, and substance use for maltreated versus nonmaltreated adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Negriff, Sonya; Brensilver, Matthew; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test models linking pubertal timing, peer substance use, sexual behavior, and substance use for maltreated versus comparison adolescents. Three theoretical mechanisms were tested: 1) peer influence links early pubertal timing to later sexual behavior and substance use, 2) early maturers engage in substance use on their own and then select substance-using friends, or 3) early maturers initiate sexual behaviors which leads them to substance-using peers. Methods The data came from a longitudinal study of the effects of child maltreatment on adolescent development (303 maltreated and 151 comparison adolescents; age: 9–13 years at initial wave). Multiple-group structural equation models tested the hypotheses across three timepoints including variables of pubertal timing, perception of peer substance use, sexual behavior, and self-reported substance use. Results Early pubertal timing was associated with substance-using peers only for maltreated adolescents, indicating the mediation path from early pubertal timing through substance-using peers to subsequent adolescent substance use and sexual behavior only holds for maltreated adolescents. Mediation via sexual behavior was significant for both maltreated and comparison adolescents. This indicates that sexual behavior may be a more universal mechanism linking early maturation with risky friends regardless of adverse life experiences. Conclusions The findings are a step toward elucidating the developmental pathways from early puberty to risk behavior and identifying early experiences that may alter mediation effects. PMID:26003577

  13. Rainbow-shift mechanism behind discrete optical-potential ambiguities

    SciTech Connect

    Brandan, M.E. ); McVoy, K.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Some years ago, Drisko {ital et} {ital al}. suggested that the discrete ambiguity often encountered for elastic scattering optical potentials could be understood as being due to the interior or small-{ital l} {ital S}-matrix elements for two equivalent'' potentials differing in phase by 2{pi}, {ital l}-by-{ital l}. We point out that the {ital absence} of this phase change for peripheral partial waves is equally essential, and suggest that a deeper understanding of the ambiguity may be achieved by viewing it as a consequence of a farside interference between interior and peripheral partial waves. It is this interference which produces the broad Airy maxima'' of a nuclear rainbow, and we show that a Drisko-type phase-shift increment {delta}{sub {ital l}}{r arrow}({delta}{sub {ital l}}+{pi}) for low-{ital l} phases relative to the high-{ital l} ones is exactly what is needed to shift a farside rainbow pattern by one Airy maximum, thus providing an equivalent rainbow-shift'' interpretation of the discrete ambiguity. The physical importance of both interpretations lies in the fact that the existence of discrete ambiguities (as well as of nuclear rainbows) is explicit evidence for low-{ital l} transparency in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The essential role played by low partial waves explains why peripheral reactions have generally not proven helpful in resolving this ambiguity.

  14. Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cancer: Epidemiology and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shmuel, Sarit; Rostoker, Ran; Scheinman, Eyal J; LeRoith, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with multiple metabolic disorders that drive cardiovascular disease, T2D and cancer. The doubling in the number of obese adults over the past 3 decades led to the recognition of obesity as a "disease". With over 42 million children obese or overweight, this epidemic is rapidly growing worldwide. Obesity and T2D are both associated together and independently with an increased risk for cancer and a worse prognosis. Accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies revealed potential factors that may explain the association between obesity-linked metabolic disorders and cancer risk. Studies based on the insulin resistance MKR mice, highlighted the roe of the insulin receptor and its downstream signaling proteins in mediating hyperinsulinemia's mitogenic effects. Hypercholesterolemia was also shown to promote the formation of larger tumors and enhancement in metastasis. Furthermore, the conversion of cholesterol into 27-Hydroxycholesterol was found to link high fat diet-induced hypercholesterolemia with cancer pathophysiology. Alteration in circulating adipokines and cytokines are commonly found in obesity and T2D. Adipokines are involved in tumor growth through multiple mechanisms including mTOR, VEGF and cyclins. In addition, adipose tissues are known to recruit and alter macrophage phenotype; these macrophages can promote cancer progression by secreting inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6. Better characterization on the above factors and their downstream effects is required in order to translate the current knowledge into the clinic, but more importantly is to understand which are the key factors that drive cancer in each patient. Until we reach this point, policies and activities toward healthy diets and physical activities remain the best medicine.

  15. Childhood Abuse and Migraine: Epidemiology, Sex Differences, and Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tietjen, Gretchen E.; Peterlin, B. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Migraine and maltreatment are both common conditions that are more prevalent in women. Epidemiological evidence supports an association between childhood abuse and headache, as well as pain in general, although some controversy exists based on methodological concerns of studying the influence of remote, traumatic, stigmatizing events in an often depressed population. There is a growing scientific body of knowledge regarding the neurobiological effects of abuse on brain function and structure that suggest a possible role of early life stress in the pathogenesis of migraine, and a differential impact based on sex. Advances in our understanding of the basic mechanisms by which an adverse environment interacts with and changes the genome, may suggest new treatment strategies. PMID:21631473

  16. Comparing potential copper chelation mechanisms in Parkinson's disease protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented the nudged elastic band (NEB) as a guided dynamics framework for our real-space multigrid method of DFT-based quantum simulations. This highly parallel approach resolves a minimum energy pathway (MEP) on the energy hypersurface by relaxing intermediates in a chain-of-states. As an initial application we present an investigation of chelating agents acting on copper ion bound to α -synuclein, whose misfolding is implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD). Copper ions are known to act as highly effective misfolding agents in a-synuclein and are thus an important target in understanding PD. Furthermore, chelation therapy has shown promise in the treatment of Alzheimer's and other neuro-degenerative diseases with similar metal-correlated pathologies. At present, our candidate chelating agents include nicotine, curcumin and clioquinol. We examine their MEP activation barriers in the context of a PD onset mechanism to assess the viability of various chelators for PD remediation.

  17. Maladaptive perfectionism's link to aggression and self-harm: Emotion regulation as a mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chester, David S; Merwin, Lauren M; DeWall, C Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The negative affect that results from negative feedback is a substantial, proximal cause of aggression. People high in maladaptive perfectionism, the tendency to focus on the discrepancy between one's standards and performance, are characterized by an exaggerated negative affective response to negative feedback. This exacerbated affective response to failure may then dispose them to hurt others and themselves as aggression and self-harm are often perceived as a means to regulate negative affect. In Study 1, we demonstrated that maladaptive perfectionism was linked to greater aggressive behavior towards others after receiving negative feedback. Suggesting the presence of an emotion regulation strategy, this effect was mediated by the motivation to use aggression to improve mood. In Study 2, maladaptive perfectionism was linked to self-harm, an effect exacerbated by negative feedback and mediated by negative affect. These findings suggest that maladaptive perfectionists are at risk for greater harm towards others and the self because negative feedback has a stronger affective impact and harming others and the self is perceived a means to alleviate this aversive state. PMID:26918433

  18. Maladaptive perfectionism's link to aggression and self-harm: Emotion regulation as a mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chester, David S; Merwin, Lauren M; DeWall, C Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The negative affect that results from negative feedback is a substantial, proximal cause of aggression. People high in maladaptive perfectionism, the tendency to focus on the discrepancy between one's standards and performance, are characterized by an exaggerated negative affective response to negative feedback. This exacerbated affective response to failure may then dispose them to hurt others and themselves as aggression and self-harm are often perceived as a means to regulate negative affect. In Study 1, we demonstrated that maladaptive perfectionism was linked to greater aggressive behavior towards others after receiving negative feedback. Suggesting the presence of an emotion regulation strategy, this effect was mediated by the motivation to use aggression to improve mood. In Study 2, maladaptive perfectionism was linked to self-harm, an effect exacerbated by negative feedback and mediated by negative affect. These findings suggest that maladaptive perfectionists are at risk for greater harm towards others and the self because negative feedback has a stronger affective impact and harming others and the self is perceived a means to alleviate this aversive state.

  19. Potential Mechanism Leading to Impaired Thermoregulation Following Microgravity Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Etzel, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity or its analogues impairs thermoregulation in humans evidenced by higher internal temperatures following the exposure during a thermal challenge. Although the mechanism leading to this response has not been clearly delineated, we identified that prolonged head-down tilt (HDT) markedly impairs thermoregulatory reflex control of skin blood flow, as demonstrated by an increased internal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation, and by a reduced slope of the relationship between the elevation in skin blood flow relative to the elevation in internal temperature. Recently, Fortney et al. identified similar responses in two individuals following 115 days of microgravity exposure. One possible mechanism leading to altered cutaneous vasodilation during a thermal challenge following actual or simulated microgravity exposure may be associated with baroreflex-mediated attenuation in the elevation of skin blood flow. During a heat stress the elevation in skin blood flow is accomplished through a combination of increased cutaneous vascular conductance and cardiac output, both of which result in central venous pressure (CVP) decreasing 2-6 mmHg. Reductions in CVP of this magnitude in normothermia decrease muscle blood flow and skin blood flow presumably through unloading the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. It is unclear whether the reduction in CVP, and accompanying cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading, during passive heating buffers the elevation in skin blood flow. That is, would the elevation in skin blood flow be greater if CVP did not decrease, or decreased to a lesser extent during the heat stress? Conversely, if CVP decreased to a greater extend during a thermal challenge following a perturbation such as prolonged HDT, would the elevation in skin blood flow be attenuated during that thermal challenge? Given that prolonged HDT decreases plasma volume and central venous pressure, such a finding would provide a plausible hypothesis

  20. Mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic uses of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Mujagić, Hamza; Chabner, Bruce A; Mujagić, Zlata

    2002-06-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced to the market in Germany under the brand name of Contergan in 1956, as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, advocated to ensure a good nights sleep and to prevent morning sickness in pregnancy. It was advertised for its prompt action, lack of hangover, and apparent safety. It has been banned from the market since 1963 after it caused the worldwide teratogenic disaster: babies exposed to thalidomide in utero during the first 34-50 days of pregnancy were born with severe life-threatening birth defects. Despite its unfortunate history, thalidomide has attracted scientific interest again because of its recently discovered action against inflammatory diseases and cancer. Its broad range of biological activities stems from its ability to moderate cytokine action in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Early studies examined its anxiolytic, mild hypnotic, antiemetic, and adjuvant analgesic properties. Subsequently, thalidomide was found to be highly effective in managing the cutaneous manifestations of leprosy, being superior to Aspirin in controlling leprosy-associated fever. Recent research has shown promising results with thalidomide in patients with myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, a variety of infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and progressive body weight loss related to advanced cancer and AIDS. Here we review the history of its development, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, biologic effects, and the results of clinical trials conducted thus far. Further research in this field should be directed towards better understanding of thalidomide metabolism, its mechanism of action, and the development of less toxic and more active analogs. PMID:12035132

  1. Mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic uses of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Mujagić, Hamza; Chabner, Bruce A; Mujagić, Zlata

    2002-06-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced to the market in Germany under the brand name of Contergan in 1956, as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, advocated to ensure a good nights sleep and to prevent morning sickness in pregnancy. It was advertised for its prompt action, lack of hangover, and apparent safety. It has been banned from the market since 1963 after it caused the worldwide teratogenic disaster: babies exposed to thalidomide in utero during the first 34-50 days of pregnancy were born with severe life-threatening birth defects. Despite its unfortunate history, thalidomide has attracted scientific interest again because of its recently discovered action against inflammatory diseases and cancer. Its broad range of biological activities stems from its ability to moderate cytokine action in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Early studies examined its anxiolytic, mild hypnotic, antiemetic, and adjuvant analgesic properties. Subsequently, thalidomide was found to be highly effective in managing the cutaneous manifestations of leprosy, being superior to Aspirin in controlling leprosy-associated fever. Recent research has shown promising results with thalidomide in patients with myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome, a variety of infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and progressive body weight loss related to advanced cancer and AIDS. Here we review the history of its development, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, biologic effects, and the results of clinical trials conducted thus far. Further research in this field should be directed towards better understanding of thalidomide metabolism, its mechanism of action, and the development of less toxic and more active analogs.

  2. Oxymetazoline: potential mechanisms of inhibitory effects on aqueous humor dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chu, T C; Ogidigben, M J; Potter, D E

    1996-10-01

    Oxymetazoline, an alpha 2 agonist, was active in lowering intraocular pressure in normal and sympathetically denervated rabbit eyes. Ocular hypotension was accompanied by decreased aqueous humor inflow. Topical pretreatment with rauwolscine, an alpha 2 antagonist, reduced the oxymetazoline-induced hypotensive effect more in contralateral than in ipsilateral eyes indicating the possible involvement of central alpha 2 adrenoceptors. Efaroxan, a relatively selective imidazoline antagonist, and diclofenac, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, failed to inhibit the oxymetazoline-induced ocular hypotensive response. Oxymetazoline induced mydriasis in treated eyes at all doses. In in vitro studies, oxymetazoline inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP production in rabbit iris-ciliary bodies and cultured rabbit nonpigmented ciliary epithelial cells. The inhibition of cAMP accumulation induced by oxymetazoline was antagonized by rauwolscine or by BRL-44408, a relatively selective alpha 2A-adrenoceptor antagonist. These data indicate that oxymetazoline lowered intraocular pressure by activating alpha 2A receptors (ciliary epithelium) and that the ocular hypotensive effect was not totally dependent on intact sympathetic nerves. Results suggest that mechanisms involving centrally mediated effects of oxymetazoline are probable and this possibility is currently under investigation.

  3. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  4. Nonlinear Riccati equations as a unifying link between linear quantum mechanics and other fields of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical physics seems to be in a kind of schizophrenic state. Many phenomena in the observable macroscopic world obey nonlinear evolution equations, whereas the microscopic world is governed by quantum mechanics, a fundamental theory that is supposedly linear. In order to combine these two worlds in a common formalism, at least one of them must sacrifice one of its dogmas. I claim that linearity in quantum mechanics is not as essential as it apparently seems since quantum mechanics can be reformulated in terms of nonlinear Riccati equations. In a first step, it will be shown where complex Riccati equations appear in time-dependent quantum mechanics and how they can be treated and compared with similar space-dependent Riccati equations in supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Furthermore, the time-independent Schrödinger equation can also be rewritten as a complex Riccati equation. Finally, it will be shown that (real and complex) Riccati equations also appear in many other fields of physics, like statistical thermodynamics and cosmology.

  5. The Effects of Calorie Restriction in Depression and Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Changhong; Zhao, Yinghao; Zhang, Xingyi; Li, Bingjin; Cui, Ranji

    2015-01-01

    Depression, also called major depressive disorder, is a neuropsychiatric disorder jeopardizing an increasing number of the population worldwide. To date, a large number of studies have devoted great attention to this problematic condition and raised several hypotheses of depression. Based on these theories, many antidepressant drugs were developed for the treatment of depression. Yet, the depressed patients are often refractory to the antidepressant therapies. Recently, increasing experimental evidences demonstrated the effects of calorie restriction in neuroendocrine system and in depression. Both basic and clinical investigations indicated that short-term calorie restriction might induce an antidepressant efficacy in depression, providing a novel avenue for treatment. Molecular basis underlying the antidepressant actions of calorie restriction might involve multiple physiological processes, primarily including orexin signaling activation, increased CREB phosphorylation and neurotrophic effects, release of endorphin and ketone production. However, the effects of chronic calorie restriction were quite controversial, in the cases that it often resulted in the long-term detrimental effects via inhibiting the function of 5-HT system and decreasing leptin levels. Here we review such dual effects of calorie restriction in depression and potential molecular basis behind these effects, especially focusing on antidepressant effects. PMID:26412073

  6. The Effects of Calorie Restriction in Depression and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Changhong; Zhao, Yinghao; Zhang, Xingyi; Li, Bingjin; Cui, Ranji

    2015-01-01

    Depression, also called major depressive disorder, is a neuropsychiatric disorder jeopardizing an increasing number of the population worldwide. To date, a large number of studies have devoted great attention to this problematic condition and raised several hypotheses of depression. Based on these theories, many antidepressant drugs were developed for the treatment of depression. Yet, the depressed patients are often refractory to the antidepressant therapies. Recently, increasing experimental evidences demonstrated the effects of calorie restriction in neuroendocrine system and in depression. Both basic and clinical investigations indicated that short-term calorie restriction might induce an antidepressant efficacy in depression, providing a novel avenue for treatment. Molecular basis underlying the antidepressant actions of calorie restriction might involve multiple physiological processes, primarily including orexin signaling activation, increased CREB phosphorylation and neurotrophic effects, release of endorphin and ketone production. However, the effects of chronic calorie restriction were quite controversial, in the cases that it often resulted in the long-term detrimental effects via inhibiting the function of 5-HT system and decreasing leptin levels. Here we review such dual effects of calorie restriction in depression and potential molecular basis behind these effects, especially focusing on antidepressant effects.

  7. The Effects of Calorie Restriction in Depression and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Changhong; Zhao, Yinghao; Zhang, Xingyi; Li, Bingjin; Cui, Ranji

    2015-01-01

    Depression, also called major depressive disorder, is a neuropsychiatric disorder jeopardizing an increasing number of the population worldwide. To date, a large number of studies have devoted great attention to this problematic condition and raised several hypotheses of depression. Based on these theories, many antidepressant drugs were developed for the treatment of depression. Yet, the depressed patients are often refractory to the antidepressant therapies. Recently, increasing experimental evidences demonstrated the effects of calorie restriction in neuroendocrine system and in depression. Both basic and clinical investigations indicated that short-term calorie restriction might induce an antidepressant efficacy in depression, providing a novel avenue for treatment. Molecular basis underlying the antidepressant actions of calorie restriction might involve multiple physiological processes, primarily including orexin signaling activation, increased CREB phosphorylation and neurotrophic effects, release of endorphin and ketone production. However, the effects of chronic calorie restriction were quite controversial, in the cases that it often resulted in the long-term detrimental effects via inhibiting the function of 5-HT system and decreasing leptin levels. Here we review such dual effects of calorie restriction in depression and potential molecular basis behind these effects, especially focusing on antidepressant effects. PMID:26412073

  8. Ambient particle inhalation and the cardiovascular system: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, K; Stone, V; Seaton, A; MacNee, W

    2001-01-01

    Well-documented air pollution episodes throughout recent history have led to deaths among individuals with cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Although the components of air pollution that cause the adverse health effects in these individuals are unknown, a small proportion by mass but a large proportion by number of the ambient air particles are ultrafine, i.e., less than 100 nm in diameter. This ultrafine component of particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm (PM(10) may mediate some of the adverse health effects reported in epidemiologic studies and for which there is toxicologic evidence to support this contention. The exact mechanism by which ultrafine particles have adverse effects is unknown, but these particles have recently been shown to enhance calcium influx on contact with macrophages. Oxidative stress is also to be anticipated at the huge particle surface; this can be augmented by oxidants generated by recruited inflammatory leukocytes. Atheromatous plaques form in the coronary arteries and are major causes of morbidity and death associated epidemiologically with particulate air pollution. In populations exposed to air pollution episodes, blood viscosity, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were higher. More recently, increases in heart rate in response to rising air pollution have been described and are most marked in individuals who have high blood viscosity. In our study of elderly individuals, there were significant rises in CRP, an index of inflammation. In this present review, we consider the likely interactions between the ultrafine particles the acute phase response and cardiovascular disease. PMID:11544157

  9. Drug release mechanisms of chemically cross-linked albumin microparticles: effect of the matrix erosion.

    PubMed

    Sitta, Danielly L A; Guilherme, Marcos R; da Silva, Elisangela P; Valente, Artur J M; Muniz, Edvani C; Rubira, Adley F

    2014-10-01

    Albumin (BSA) microparticles were developed as a biotechnological alternative for drug delivery. Vitamin B12 (Vit-B12) was used as a model drug. The microparticles were obtained from maleic anhydride-functionalized BSA and N',N'-dimethylacrylamide (DMAAm) in a W/O emulsion without and with PVA. The microparticles produced at 15min of stirring without PVA showed the best results in terms of size, homogeneity, and sphericity. In such a case, BSA played a role as a surface active agent, replacing PVA. For longer stirring times, BSA was unable to act as an emulsifier. These microparticles showed an uncommon release profile, consisting of a two-step release mechanism, at the pH range studied. Considering that a two-step release mechanism is occurring, the experimental data were adjusted by applying modified power law and Weibull equations in order to describe release mechanism n and release rate constant k, respectively. Each one of the release stages was related to a specific value of n and k. The second stage was driven by a super case II transport mechanism, as a result of diffusion, macromolecular relaxation, and erosion. A third model, described by Hixson-Crowell, confirmed the erosion mechanism. Vit-B12 diffusion kinetics in aqueous solutions (i.e., without the microparticles) follows a one-step process, being k dependent on the pH, confirming that the two-step release mechanism is a characteristic profile of the developed microparticles. The microparticles released only 2.70% of their initial drug load at pH 2, and 58.53% at pH 10. PMID:25087021

  10. Comorbidity Factors and Brain Mechanisms Linking Chronic Stress and Systemic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Duric, Vanja; Clayton, Sarah; Leong, Mai Lan; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms and mental illness are commonly present in patients with chronic systemic diseases. Mood disorders, such as depression, are present in up to 50% of these patients, resulting in impaired physical recovery and more intricate treatment regimen. Stress associated with both physical and emotional aspects of systemic illness is thought to elicit detrimental effects to initiate comorbid mental disorders. However, clinical reports also indicate that the relationship between systemic and psychiatric illnesses is bidirectional, further increasing the complexity of the underlying pathophysiological processes. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence linking chronic stress and systemic illness, such as activation of the immune response system and release of common proinflammatory mediators. Altogether, discovery of new targets is needed for development of better treatments for stress-related psychiatric illnesses as well as improvement of mental health aspects of different systemic diseases. PMID:26977323

  11. Comorbidity Factors and Brain Mechanisms Linking Chronic Stress and Systemic Illness.

    PubMed

    Duric, Vanja; Clayton, Sarah; Leong, Mai Lan; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms and mental illness are commonly present in patients with chronic systemic diseases. Mood disorders, such as depression, are present in up to 50% of these patients, resulting in impaired physical recovery and more intricate treatment regimen. Stress associated with both physical and emotional aspects of systemic illness is thought to elicit detrimental effects to initiate comorbid mental disorders. However, clinical reports also indicate that the relationship between systemic and psychiatric illnesses is bidirectional, further increasing the complexity of the underlying pathophysiological processes. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence linking chronic stress and systemic illness, such as activation of the immune response system and release of common proinflammatory mediators. Altogether, discovery of new targets is needed for development of better treatments for stress-related psychiatric illnesses as well as improvement of mental health aspects of different systemic diseases.

  12. PARENTAL FAMILISM AND ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIORS: DEVELOPMENT, GENDER AND POTENTIAL MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Morcillo, Carmen; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Shen, Sa; Blanco, Carlos; Canino, Glorisa; Bird, Hector R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between parental familism (strong values of attachment to nuclear and extended family members) with youth antisocial behaviors over time. Method Sample: Puerto Rican children aged 5-13 years at baseline residing in the South Bronx in New York (n=1,138) and in the Standard Metropolitan Area in San Juan and Caguas, Puerto Rico (n=1,353) and followed up over 2 waves one year apart from 2000 to 2003. Measures Parental familism was assessed using an adaptation of Sabogal’s Familism Scale. Level of youth past year antisocial behaviors was measured by the antisocial behavior index (ASBI). The association between familism and ASBI over three waves was examined through mixed models stratified by age and gender, adjusted by site (South Bronx or San Juan), propensity scores reflecting site differences in family income, maternal age and education, plus environmental and child risk factors. Specific family processes were examined as potential mediators. Results Parental familism was protective against antisocial behaviors among girls [estimate(SE)=-0.11(0.03), p<0.001 for 5-9 year-old; estimate(SE)=-0.15(0.03), p<0.0001 for 10 or older]. For boys, parental familism was only protective among 5-9 year-olds [estimate (SE) =-0.09(0.03), p=0.0008]. The protective effect of parental familism on antisocial behaviors operated mostly through parent-child relationships for 5-9 year old children and parental attitudes/behaviors towards youth high-risk behaviors for both age groups. Conclusions Familism may protect youth against increasing levels of antisocial behaviors (except for boys who are 10 years or older). Incorporating familism as part of therapeutic approaches addressing antisocial behaviors for youth may be helpful. PMID:21515196

  13. Potential self-regulatory mechanisms of yoga for psychological health

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Tim; Noggle, Jessica J.; Park, Crystal L.; Vago, David R.; Wilson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Research suggesting the beneficial effects of yoga on myriad aspects of psychological health has proliferated in recent years, yet there is currently no overarching framework by which to understand yoga’s potential beneficial effects. Here we provide a theoretical framework and systems-based network model of yoga that focuses on integration of top-down and bottom-up forms of self-regulation. We begin by contextualizing yoga in historical and contemporary settings, and then detail how specific components of yoga practice may affect cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and autonomic output under stress through an emphasis on interoception and bottom-up input, resulting in physical and psychological health. The model describes yoga practice as a comprehensive skillset of synergistic process tools that facilitate bidirectional feedback and integration between high- and low-level brain networks, and afferent and re-afferent input from interoceptive processes (somatosensory, viscerosensory, chemosensory). From a predictive coding perspective we propose a shift to perceptual inference for stress modulation and optimal self-regulation. We describe how the processes that sub-serve self-regulation become more automatized and efficient over time and practice, requiring less effort to initiate when necessary and terminate more rapidly when no longer needed. To support our proposed model, we present the available evidence for yoga affecting self-regulatory pathways, integrating existing constructs from behavior theory and cognitive neuroscience with emerging yoga and meditation research. This paper is intended to guide future basic and clinical research, specifically targeting areas of development in the treatment of stress-mediated psychological disorders. PMID:25368562

  14. The potential pharmacologic mechanisms of omalizumab in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tse Wen; Chen, Christina; Lin, Chien-Jen; Metz, Martin; Church, Martin K; Maurer, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    In patients given a diagnosis of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), there are no obvious external triggers, and the factors that initiate the clinical symptoms of wheal, flare, and itch arise from within the patient. Most patients with CSU have an autoimmune cause: some patients produce IgE autoantibodies against autoantigens, such as thyroperoxidase or double-stranded DNA, whereas other patients make IgG autoantibodies against FcεRI, IgE, or both, which might chronically activate mast cells and basophils. In the remainder of patients with CSU, the nature of the abnormalities has not yet been identified. Accumulating evidence has shown that IgE, by binding to FcεRI on mast cells without FcεRI cross-linking, can promote the proliferation and survival of mast cells and thus maintain and expand the pool of mast cells. IgE and FcεRI engagement can also decrease the release threshold of mast cells and increase their sensitivity to various stimuli through either FcεRI or other receptors for the degranulation process. Furthermore, IgE-FcεRI engagement potentiates the ability of mast cells to store and synthesize de novo inflammatory mediators and cytokines. Administration of omalizumab, by virtue of its ability to deplete IgE, attenuates the multiple effects of IgE to maintain and enhance mast cell activities and hence reduces the ability of mast cells to manifest inflammatory mechanisms in patients with CSU.

  15. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion.

  16. pH-dependent cross-linking of catechols through oxidation via Fe(3+) and potential implications for mussel adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E; Barrett, Devin G; Miller, Dusty R; Kurutz, Josh W; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2014-01-01

    The mussel byssus is a remarkable attachment structure that is formed by injection molding and rapid in-situ hardening of concentrated solutions of proteins enriched in the catecholic amino acid 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA). Fe(3+), found in high concentrations in the byssus, has been speculated to participate in redox reactions with DOPA that lead to protein polymerization, however direct evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. Using small molecule catechols, DOPA-containing peptides, and native mussel foot proteins, we report the first direct observation of catechol oxidation and polymerization accompanied by reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). In the case of the small molecule catechol, we identified two dominant dimer species and characterized their connectivities by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the C6-C6 and C5-C6 linked species as the major and minor products, respectively. For the DOPA-containing peptide, we studied the pH dependence of the reaction and demonstrated that catechol polymerization occurs readily at low pH, but is increasingly diminished in favor of metal-catechol coordination interactions at higher pH. Finally, we demonstrate that Fe(3+) can induce cross-links in native byssal mussel proteins mefp-1 and mcfp-1 at acidic pH. Based on these findings, we discuss the potential implications to the chemistry of mussel adhesion. PMID:25243062

  17. Linking Basic Skills to Entry-Level Auto Mechanic & Auto Body Worker Tasks. Instructional Resources. Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavidez, Charlotte; Miyatake, George

    This project first identified the duties and tasks required of an entry-level auto mechanic (AM) and an auto body worker (ABW), using a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) occupational analysis process. In this process, a panel of local, expert workers determined the essential duties and tasks of their occupations. Next, the panel identified…

  18. Emotion Dysregulation as a Mechanism Linking Stress Exposure to Adolescent Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herts, Kate L.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to stress is associated with a wide range of internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents, including aggressive behavior. Extant research examining mechanisms underlying the associations between stress and youth aggression has consistently identified social information processing pathways that are disrupted by exposure to…

  19. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Tornés, Jesús; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, María; Denaro, Renata; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakimov, Michail M; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills. PMID:26119183

  20. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Tornés, Jesús; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, María; Denaro, Renata; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakimov, Michail M; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  1. Variation in TREK1 gene linked to depression-resistant phenotype is associated with potentiated neural responses to rewards in humans

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Daniel G.; Bogdan, Ryan; Fagerness, Jesen; Holmes, Avram J.; Perlis, Roy H.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2010-01-01

    The TREK1 gene has been linked to a depression-resistant phenotype in rodents and antidepressant response in humans, but the neural mechanisms underlying these links are unclear. Because TREK1 is expressed in reward-related basal ganglia regions, it has been hypothesized that TREK1 genetic variation may be associated with anhedonic symptoms of depression. To investigate whether TREK1 genetic variation influences reward processing, we genotyped healthy individuals (n = 31) who completed a monetary incentive delay task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Three genotypes previously linked to positive antidepressant response were associated with potentiated basal ganglia activity to gains, but did not influence responses to penalties or no change feedback. TREK1 genetic variations did not affect basal ganglia volume, and fMRI group differences were confirmed when accounting for self-report measures of anhedonia. In addition, the total number of “protective” TREK1 alleles was associated with stronger responses to gains in several other reward-related regions, including the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and mesial prefrontal cortex. In control analyses, associations between basal ganglia responses to gains and functional polymorphisms in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes were also explored. Results revealed that TREK1 and DAT/COMT genotypes were independently related to basal ganglia responses to gains. These findings indicate that TREK1 genotypes are associated with individual differences in reward-related brain activity. Future studies in depressed samples should evaluate whether variation in neural responses to rewards may contribute to the association between TREK1 and antidepressant response in humans. PMID:19621370

  2. Potential Mechanisms for Microbial Energy Acquisition in Oxic Deep-Sea Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberg, John F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) possesses the lowest rates of sedimentation, surface chlorophyll concentration, and primary productivity in the global oceans. As a direct result, deep-sea sediments are thin and contain small amounts of labile organic carbon. It was recently shown that the entire SPG sediment column is oxygenated and may be representative of up to a third of the global marine environment. To understand the microbial processes that contribute to the removal of the labile organic matter at the water-sediment interface, a sediment sample was collected and subjected to metagenomic sequencing and analyses. Analysis of nine partially reconstructed environmental genomes, which represent approximately one-third of the microbial community, revealed that the members of the SPG surface sediment microbial community are phylogenetically distinct from surface/upper-ocean organisms. These genomes represent a wide distribution of novel organisms, including deep-branching Alphaproteobacteria, two novel organisms within the Proteobacteria, and new members of the Nitrospirae, Nitrospinae, and candidate phylum NC10. These genomes contain evidence for microbially mediated metal (iron/manganese) oxidation and carbon fixation linked to nitrification. Additionally, despite hypothesized energy limitation, members of the SPG microbial community had motility and chemotaxis genes and possessed mechanisms for the degradation of high-molecular-weight organic matter. This study contributes to our understanding of the metabolic potential of microorganisms in deep-sea oligotrophic sediments and their impact on local carbon geochemistry. IMPORTANCE This research provides insight into the microbial metabolic potential of organisms inhabiting oxygenated deep-sea marine sediments. Current estimates suggest that these environments account for up to a third of the global marine sediment habitat. Nine novel deep-sea microbial genomes were reconstructed from a metagenomic data set

  3. The impact of mechanical stress on stem cell properties: The link between cell shape and pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jolene Caifeng; Ueda, Jun; Shimizu, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development and differentiation are controlled largely by external stimuli. Mechanical forces, such as those exerted by the surrounding cells and tissues, gravity and substrate rigidity, have been shown to affect cell morphology and spreading, thus triggering signaling pathways that dictate their development. These mechanosignaling pathways play important roles in cellular differentiation and the determination of cell fate. In this review, we discuss the effects of external environmental stimuli on cell differentiation and how this affects pluripotency, as well as the key molecules and pathways involved in mechanosignaling, particularly in relation to embryonic stem cells. Advances in experimental techniques and devices used to study the different aspects of mechanobiology are also examined. Finally, the effects of mechanical stress on the initiation and maintenance of pathological processes such as cancer, as well as their implications for prognosis and possible therapies are discussed.

  4. An affine continuum mechanical model for cross-linked F-actin networks with compliant linker proteins.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Unterberger, Michael J; Ogden, Ray W

    2014-10-01

    Cross-linked actin networks are important building blocks of the cytoskeleton. In order to gain deeper insight into the interpretation of experimental data on actin networks, adequate models are required. In this paper we introduce an affine constitutive network model for cross-linked F-actin networks based on nonlinear continuum mechanics, and specialize it in order to reproduce the experimental behavior of in vitro reconstituted model networks. The model is based on the elastic properties of single filaments embedded in an isotropic matrix such that the overall properties of the composite are described by a free-energy function. In particular, we are able to obtain the experimentally determined shear and normal stress responses of cross-linked actin networks typically observed in rheometer tests. In the present study an extensive analysis is performed by applying the proposed model network to a simple shear deformation. The single filament model is then extended by incorporating the compliance of cross-linker proteins and further extended by including viscoelasticity. All that is needed for the finite element implementation is the constitutive model for the filaments, the linkers and the matrix, and the associated elasticity tensor in either the Lagrangian or Eulerian formulation. The model facilitates parameter studies of experimental setups such as micropipette aspiration experiments and we present such studies to illustrate the efficacy of this modeling approach. PMID:25043658

  5. Development and qualification of a mechanical-optical interface for parallel optics links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, S.; Schoellner, D.; Ugolini, A.; Wakjira, J.; Wolf, G.

    2015-03-01

    As parallel optics applications continue to expand, there remains a need for an effective coupling interface between the board-level active components and the passive components of the network. While mid-board level photonic turn connectors are available, coupling interfaces are generally not available outside of proprietary solutions. Development of a general mechanical-optical coupling interface opens the door for broader parallel optics implementation. An interface for use between the optical transmitter and the photonic turn connector is introduced. The interface is a monolithic injection molded component with an array of collimating lenses to couple efficiently with common VCSEL/PD designs. The component has precise epoxy control features to manage epoxy bond-line thickness and strength. Suitable UV and thermal epoxies have been qualified for effective die bond placement of the component in the VCSEL/PD environment. Environmental and mechanical performance of the component to industry-standard qualification requirements are reviewed, and tensile force testing and durability results validate the mechanical characteristics of the interface.

  6. A dual analysis for recycled particulate composites: linking micro- and macro-mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Antonio F.; Rodrigues, Paulo C.M.; Santos, Dagoberto B.; Faria, Ana C.A

    2003-06-15

    The large amount of disposable bottles produced nowadays makes imperative the search for alternative procedures for recycling them since they are not biodegradable. This paper takes into consideration the thermomechanical recycling of post-consumed plastic bottles, especially the ones made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and their use as composite materials for engineering applications. As changes on the composite's microstructure can have an influence on macroscopic behavior, a new type of analysis is needed. To be able to evaluate the composite performance, a dual analysis procedure was developed. It consists of a micro-mechanical analysis where the microstructure is observed by optical microscopy, and variations in morphology are related to composite overall mechanical behavior. The macro-mechanical analysis is performed by ASTM D 3039/3039 M tensile tests. By doing this, the composite effective moduli can be determined. The new composite seems to be encouraging, i.e., an HDPE/PET composite with 40:60 ratio, in weight, experiments a stiffness recovery from the third to the fourth recycle. Moreover, the dual analysis was able to capture this variation.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in OSAHS: the oxidative stress link.

    PubMed

    Lavie, L; Lavie, P

    2009-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) is a highly prevalent breathing disorder in sleep that is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A large body of evidence, including clinical studies and cell culture and animal models utilising intermittent hypoxia, delineates the central role of oxidative stress in OSAHS as well as in conditions and comorbidities that aggregate with it. Intermittent hypoxia, the hallmark of OSAHS, is implicated in promoting the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inducing oxidative stress. The ramifications of increased ROS formation are pivotal. ROS can damage biomolecules, alter cellular functions and function as signalling molecules in physiological as well as in pathophysiological conditions. Consequently, they promote inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular morbidity. Oxidative stress is also a crucial component in obesity, sympathetic activation and metabolic disorders such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance, which aggregate with OSAHS. These conditions and comorbidities could result directly from the oxidative stress that is characteristic of OSAHS or could develop independently. Hence, oxidative stress represents the common underlying link in OSAHS and the conditions and comorbidities that aggregate with it. PMID:19483049

  8. Evaluation of potential reaction mechanisms leading to the formation of coniferyl alcohol a-linkages in lignin: a density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Heath D.; Mohamed, Mohamed Naseer Ali; Kubicki, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Five potential reaction mechanisms, each leading to the formation of an α-O-4-linked coniferyl alcohol dimer, and one scheme leading to the formation of a recently proposed free-radical coniferyl alcohol trimer were assessed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. These potential reaction mechanisms were evaluated using both the calculated Gibbs free energies, to predict the spontaneity of the constituent reactions, and the electron-density mapped Fukui function, to determine the most reactive sites of each intermediate species. The results indicate that each reaction in one of the six mechanisms is thermodynamically favorable to those in the other mechanisms; what is more, the Fukui function for each free radical intermediate corroborates with the thermochemical results for this mechanism. This mechanism proceeds via the formation of two distinct free-radical intermediates, which then react to produce the four α-O-4 stereoisomers.

  9. Linking hydrologic, physical and chemical habitat environments for the potential assessment of fish community rehabilitation in a developing city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C. S.; Yang, S. T.; Liu, C. M.; Dou, T. W.; Yang, Z. L.; Yang, Z. Y.; Liu, X. L.; Xiang, H.; Nie, S. Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Mitrovic, S. M.; Yu, Q.; Lim, R. P.

    2015-04-01

    Aquatic ecological rehabilitation is increasingly attracting considerable public and research attention. An effective method that requires less data and expertise would help in the assessment of rehabilitation potential and in the monitoring of rehabilitation activities as complicated theories and excessive data requirements on assemblage information make many current assessment models expensive and limit their wide use. This paper presents an assessment model for restoration potential which successfully links hydrologic, physical and chemical habitat factors to fish assemblage attributes drawn from monitoring datasets on hydrology, water quality and fish assemblages at a total of 144 sites, where 5084 fish were sampled and tested. In this model three newly developed sub-models, integrated habitat index (IHSI), integrated ecological niche breadth (INB) and integrated ecological niche overlap (INO), are established to study spatial heterogeneity of the restoration potential of fish assemblages based on gradient methods of habitat suitability index and ecological niche models. To reduce uncertainties in the model, as many fish species as possible, including important native fish, were selected as dominant species with monitoring occurring over several seasons to comprehensively select key habitat factors. Furthermore, a detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) was employed prior to a canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of the data to avoid the "arc effect" in the selection of key habitat factors. Application of the model to data collected at Jinan City, China proved effective reveals that three lower potential regions that should be targeted in future aquatic ecosystem rehabilitation programs. They were well validated by the distribution of two habitat parameters: river width and transparency. River width positively influenced and transparency negatively influenced fish assemblages. The model can be applied for monitoring the effects of fish assemblage restoration

  10. Pathological relationships involving iron and myelin may constitute a shared mechanism linking various rare and common brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Moones; Gerami, Sam H.; Bassett, Brianna; Graham, Ross M.; Chua, Anita C.G.; Aryal, Ritambhara; House, Michael J.; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Ryten, Mina; Olynyk, John K.; Trinder, Debbie; Johnstone, Daniel M.; Milward, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously demonstrated elevated brain iron levels in myelinated structures and associated cells in a hemochromatosis Hfe−/−xTfr2mut mouse model. This was accompanied by altered expression of a group of myelin-related genes, including a suite of genes causatively linked to the rare disease family ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation’ (NBIA). Expanded data mining and ontological analyses have now identified additional myelin-related transcriptome changes in response to brain iron loading. Concordance between the mouse transcriptome changes and human myelin-related gene expression networks in normal and NBIA basal ganglia testifies to potential clinical relevance. These analyses implicate, among others, genes linked to various rare central hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and peripheral neuropathies including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease as well as genes linked to other rare neurological diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease. The findings may help understand interrelationships of iron and myelin in more common conditions such as hemochromatosis, multiple sclerosis and various psychiatric disorders. PMID:27500074

  11. A polypeptide-DNA hybrid with selective linking capability applied to single molecule nano-mechanical measurements using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Moayed, Fatemeh; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander J

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN) and the peptide StrepTag II (ST). We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST). In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV) linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV)-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications.

  12. Diminished swelling of cross-linked aromatic oligoamide surfaces revealing a new fouling mechanism of reverse-osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wang; Kumar, Rajender; Herzberg, Moshe; Kasher, Roni

    2015-06-01

    Swelling of the active layer of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has an important effect on permeate water flux. The effects of organic- and biofouling on the swelling of the RO membrane active layer and the consequent changes of permeate flux are examined here. A cross-linked aromatic oligoamide film that mimics the surface chemistry of an RO polyamide membrane was synthesized stepwise on gold-coated surfaces. Foulant adsorption to the oligoamide film and its swelling were measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, and the effects of fouling on the membrane's performance were evaluated. The foulants were extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from fouled RO membranes and organic compounds of ultrafiltration permeate (UFP) from a membrane bioreactor used to treat municipal wastewater. The adsorbed foulants affected the swelling of the cross-linked oligoamide film differently. EPS had little effect on the swelling of the oligoamide film, whereas UFP significantly impaired swelling. Permeate flux declined more rapidly under UFP fouling than it did under EPS. Foulant adsorption was shown to diminish swelling of the aromatic oligoamide surfaces. Among the already known RO membrane fouling mechanisms, a novel RO fouling mechanism is proposed, in which foulant-membrane interactions hinder membrane swelling and thus increase hydraulic resistance.

  13. A Polypeptide-DNA Hybrid with Selective Linking Capability Applied to Single Molecule Nano-Mechanical Measurements Using Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Tans, Sander J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN) and the peptide StrepTag II (ST). We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST). In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV) linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV)-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications. PMID:23336001

  14. Cross-linking of cellular proteins by tissue transglutaminase during necrotic cell death: a mechanism for maintaining tissue integrity.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Ben; Smethurst, Peter; Verderio, Elisabetta; Jones, Richard; Griffin, Martin

    2003-04-15

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a Ca(2+)-dependent enzyme which cross-links proteins via epsilon(gamma-glutamyl)lysine bridges. There is increasing evidence that tTG is involved in wound repair and tissue stabilization, as well as in physiological mechanisms leading to cell death. To investigate the role of this enzyme in tissue wounding leading to loss of Ca(2+) homoeostasis, we initially used a model involving electroporation to reproduce cell wounding under controlled conditions. Two cell models were used whereby tTG expression is regulated either by antisense silencing in ECV 304 cells or by using transfected Swiss 3T3 cells in which tTG expression is under the control of the tet regulatory system. Using these cells, loss of Ca(2+) homoeostasis following electroporation led to a tTG-dependent formation of highly cross-linked proteinaceous shells from intracellular proteins. Formation of these structures is dependent on elevated intracellular Ca(2+), but it is independent of intracellular proteases and is near maximal after only 20 min post-wounding. Using labelled primary amines as an indicator of tTG activity within these 'wounded cells', we demonstrate that tTG modifies a wide range of proteins that are present in both the perinuclear and intranuclear spaces. The demonstration of entrapped DNA within these shell structures, which showed limited fragmentation, provides evidence that the high degree of transglutaminase cross-linking results in the prevention of DNA release, which may serve to dampen any subsequent inflammatory response. Comparable observations were shown when monolayers of cells were mechanically wounded by scratching. In this second model of cell wounding, redistribution of tTG activity to the extracellular matrix was also demonstrated, an effect which may serve to stabilize tissues post-trauma, and thus contribute to the maintenance of tissue integrity. PMID:12533191

  15. Cross-linking of cellular proteins by tissue transglutaminase during necrotic cell death: a mechanism for maintaining tissue integrity.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Ben; Smethurst, Peter; Verderio, Elisabetta; Jones, Richard; Griffin, Martin

    2003-04-15

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a Ca(2+)-dependent enzyme which cross-links proteins via epsilon(gamma-glutamyl)lysine bridges. There is increasing evidence that tTG is involved in wound repair and tissue stabilization, as well as in physiological mechanisms leading to cell death. To investigate the role of this enzyme in tissue wounding leading to loss of Ca(2+) homoeostasis, we initially used a model involving electroporation to reproduce cell wounding under controlled conditions. Two cell models were used whereby tTG expression is regulated either by antisense silencing in ECV 304 cells or by using transfected Swiss 3T3 cells in which tTG expression is under the control of the tet regulatory system. Using these cells, loss of Ca(2+) homoeostasis following electroporation led to a tTG-dependent formation of highly cross-linked proteinaceous shells from intracellular proteins. Formation of these structures is dependent on elevated intracellular Ca(2+), but it is independent of intracellular proteases and is near maximal after only 20 min post-wounding. Using labelled primary amines as an indicator of tTG activity within these 'wounded cells', we demonstrate that tTG modifies a wide range of proteins that are present in both the perinuclear and intranuclear spaces. The demonstration of entrapped DNA within these shell structures, which showed limited fragmentation, provides evidence that the high degree of transglutaminase cross-linking results in the prevention of DNA release, which may serve to dampen any subsequent inflammatory response. Comparable observations were shown when monolayers of cells were mechanically wounded by scratching. In this second model of cell wounding, redistribution of tTG activity to the extracellular matrix was also demonstrated, an effect which may serve to stabilize tissues post-trauma, and thus contribute to the maintenance of tissue integrity.

  16. Water Vapor Feedback and Links to Mechanisms of Recent Tropical Climate Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.; Miller, Tim L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent variations of tropical climate on interannual to near-decadal scales have provided a useful target for studying feedback processes. A strong warm/cold ENSO couplet (e.g. 1997-2000) along with several subsequent weaker events are prominent interannual signals that are part of an apparent longer term strengthening of the Walker circulation during the mid to late1990 s with some weakening thereafter. Decadal scale changes in tropical SST structure during the 1990s are accompanied by focusing of precipitation over the Indo-Pacific warm pool and an increase in tropical ocean evaporation of order 1.0 %/decade. Here we use a number of diverse satellite measurements to explore connections between upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) variations on these time scales and changes in other water and energy fluxes. Precipitation (GPCP, TRMM), turbulent fluxes (OAFlux), and radiative fluxes (ERBE / CERES, SRB) are use to analyze vertically-integrated divergence of moist static energy, divMSE, and its dry and moist components. Strong signatures of MSE flux transport linking ascending and descending regions of tropical circulations are found. Relative strengths of these transports compared to radiative flux changes are interpreted as a measure of efficiency in the overall process of heat rejection during episodes of warm or cold SST forcing. In conjunction with the diagnosed energy transports we explore frequency distributions of upper-tropospheric humidity as inferred from SSM/T-2 and AMSU-B passive microwave measurements. Relating these variations to SST changes suggests positive water vapor feedback, but at a level reduced from constant relative humidity.

  17. Linking chlorophyll a fluorescence to photosynthesis for remote sensing applications: mechanisms and challenges.

    PubMed

    Porcar-Castell, Albert; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Atherton, Jon; van der Tol, Christiaan; Flexas, Jaume; Pfündel, Erhard E; Moreno, Jose; Frankenberg, Christian; Berry, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF) has been used for decades to study the organization, functioning, and physiology of photosynthesis at the leaf and subcellular levels. ChlF is now measurable from remote sensing platforms. This provides a new optical means to track photosynthesis and gross primary productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Importantly, the spatiotemporal and methodological context of the new applications is dramatically different compared with most of the available ChlF literature, which raises a number of important considerations. Although we have a good mechanistic understanding of the processes that control the ChlF signal over the short term, the seasonal link between ChlF and photosynthesis remains obscure. Additionally, while the current understanding of in vivo ChlF is based on pulse amplitude-modulated (PAM) measurements, remote sensing applications are based on the measurement of the passive solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), which entails important differences and new challenges that remain to be solved. In this review we introduce and revisit the physical, physiological, and methodological factors that control the leaf-level ChlF signal in the context of the new remote sensing applications. Specifically, we present the basis of photosynthetic acclimation and its optical signals, we introduce the physical and physiological basis of ChlF from the molecular to the leaf level and beyond, and we introduce and compare PAM and SIF methodology. Finally, we evaluate and identify the challenges that still remain to be answered in order to consolidate our mechanistic understanding of the remotely sensed SIF signal.

  18. Parenting Mechanisms in Links between Parents’ and Adolescents’ Alcohol Use Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Latendresse, Shawn J.; Rose, Richard J.; Viken, Richard J.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Kaprio, Jaakko; Dick, Danielle M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Adolescence has been identified as a critical period with regard to the initiation and early escalation of alcohol use. Moreover, research on familial risk and protective processes provides independent support for multiple domains of parental influence on adolescent drinking; including parents’ own drinking behaviors, as well as the practices they employ to socialize their children. Despite this prevalence of findings, whether and how these distinct associations are related to one another is still not entirely clear. Methods The present study used data from 4731 adolescents and their parents to test the nature of associations between (a) parents’ frequencies of alcohol use and intoxication, and lifetime alcohol-related problems, (b) adolescents’ perceptions of the parenting that they receive, and (c) adolescents’ prevalence of alcohol use and intoxication at ages 14 and 17½. As such, multiple mediation modeling was used to assess whether parental alcohol use behaviors influence adolescent alcohol use directly, or if they operate through indirect associations with various aspects of parenting that subsequently influence adolescent use. Results Examination of simple associations demonstrated that maternal and paternal alcohol use behaviors were positively linked with adolescent use behaviors at ages 14 and 17½. Likewise, several parenting behaviors were independently associated with both parental and adolescent drinking. Examined collectively, multivariate path analyses indicated that associations between parents’ and adolescents’ alcohol-related behaviors were mediated, in part, by adolescents’ perceptions of the parenting that they received, especially at age 14. Furthermore, perceived parental monitoring and discipline had unique mediating capabilities, net the effects of all other parenting behaviors. Conclusions This study demonstrates that parenting is an important mediator of the association between parental and adolescent drinking

  19. Fast Prediction of HCCI Combustion with an Artificial Neural Network Linked to a Fluid Mechanics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Chen, J; Babaimopoulos, A

    2006-08-29

    We have developed an artificial neural network (ANN) based combustion model and have integrated it into a fluid mechanics code (KIVA3V) to produce a new analysis tool (titled KIVA3V-ANN) that can yield accurate HCCI predictions at very low computational cost. The neural network predicts ignition delay as a function of operating parameters (temperature, pressure, equivalence ratio and residual gas fraction). KIVA3V-ANN keeps track of the time history of the ignition delay during the engine cycle to evaluate the ignition integral and predict ignition for each computational cell. After a cell ignites, chemistry becomes active, and a two-step chemical kinetic mechanism predicts composition and heat generation in the ignited cells. KIVA3V-ANN has been validated by comparison with isooctane HCCI experiments in two different engines. The neural network provides reasonable predictions for HCCI combustion and emissions that, although typically not as good as obtained with the more physically representative multi-zone model, are obtained at a much reduced computational cost. KIVA3V-ANN can perform reasonably accurate HCCI calculations while requiring only 10% more computational effort than a motored KIVA3V run. It is therefore considered a valuable tool for evaluation of engine maps or other performance analysis tasks requiring multiple individual runs.

  20. Common mechanisms linking connexin43 to neural progenitor cell migration and glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Naus, Christian C; Aftab, Qurratulain; Sin, Wun Chey

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is critical for cell differentiation, tissue formation and organ development. Several mechanisms come to play in the process of cell migration, orchestrating changes in cell polarity, adhesion, process extension and motility. Recent findings have shown that gap junctions, and specifically connexin43 (Cx43), can play a significant role in these processes, impacting adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Thus Cx43 within a cell regulates its motility and migration via intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Cx43 in the host cells can impact the degree of cellular migration through that tissue. Similarities in these connexin-based processes account for both neural progenitor migration in the developing brain, and for glioma cell invasion in the mature brain. In both cases, Cx43 in the tissue ("soil") in which cells ("seeds") exist facilitates their migration and, for glioma cells, tissue invasion. Cx43 mediates these effects through channel- and non-channel-dependent mechanisms which have similarities in both paradigms of cell migration. This provides insight into developmental processes and pathological situations, as well as possible therapeutic approaches regarding specific functional domains of gap junction proteins.

  1. Linking optics and mechanics in an in vivo model of airway fibrosis and epithelial injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raub, Christopher B.; Mahon, Sari; Narula, Navneet; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Brenner, Matthew; George, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucosal and submucosal injury can lead to persistent inflammation and tissue remodeling. We hypothesized that microstructural and mechanical properties of the airway wall could be derived from multiphoton images. New Zealand White rabbits were intubated, and the tracheal epithelium gently denuded every other day for five days (three injuries). Three days following the last injury, the tracheas were excised for multiphoton imaging, mechanical compression testing, and histological analysis. Multiphoton imaging and histology confirm epithelial denudation, mucosal ulceration, subepithelial thickening, collagen deposition, immune cell infiltration, and a disrupted elastin network. Elastase removes the elastin network and relaxes the collagen network. Purified collagenase removes epithelium with subtle subepithelial changes. Young's modulus [(E) measured in kiloPascal] was significantly elevated for the scrape injured (9.0+/-3.2) trachea, and both collagenase (2.6+/-0.4) and elastase (0.8+/-0.3) treatment significantly reduced E relative to control (4.1+/-0.7). E correlates strongly with second harmonic generation (SHG) signal depth decay for enzyme-treated and control tracheas (R2=0.77), but not with scrape-injured tracheas. We conclude that E of subepithelial connective tissue increases on repeated epithelial wounding, due in part to changes in elastin and collagen microstructure and concentration. SHG depth decay is sensitive to changes in extracellular matrix content and correlates with bulk Young's modulus.

  2. Statistical Analysis of Crystallization Database Links Protein Physico-Chemical Features with Crystallization Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Diana; Barnum, Timothy J.; Bruno, Andrew E.; Luft, Joseph R.; Snell, Edward H.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis. PMID:24988076

  3. Fresh-wood bending: linking the mechanical and growth properties of a Norway spruce stem.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Tor; Heiz, Urs; Stoffel, Markus; Stöckli, Veronika

    2007-09-01

    To provide data and methods for analyzing stem mechanics, we investigated bending, density and growth characteristics of 207 specimens of fresh wood from different heights and radial positions of the stem of one mature Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) tree. From the shape of each stress-strain curve, which was calculated from bending tests that accounted for shear deformation, we determined the modulus of elasticity (MOE), the modulus of rupture (MOR), the completeness of the material, an idealized stress-strain curve and the work involved in bending. In general, all mechanical properties increased with distance from the pith, with values in the ranges of 5.7-18 GPa for MOE, 23-90 MPa for MOR and 370-630 and 430-1100 kg m(-3) for dry and fresh wood densities, respectively. The first three properties generally decreased with stem height, whereas fresh wood density increased. Multiple regression equations were calculated, relating MOR, MOE and dry wood density to growth properties. We applied these equations to the growth of the entire stem and considered the annual rings as superimposed cylindrical shells, resulting in stem-section values of MOE, MOR and dry and fresh densities as a function of stem height and cambial age. The standing tree exhibits an inner stem structure that is well designed for bending, especially at a mature stage. PMID:17545123

  4. Statistical analysis of crystallization database links protein physico-chemical features with crystallization mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Diana; Barnum, Timothy J; Bruno, Andrew E; Luft, Joseph R; Snell, Edward H; Mukherjee, Sayan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going from protein to structure. In practice, the crystallization process proceeds through knowledge-informed empiricism. Better physico-chemical understanding remains elusive because of the large number of variables involved, hence little guidance is available to systematically identify solution conditions that promote crystallization. To help determine relationships between macromolecular properties and their crystallization propensity, we have trained statistical models on samples for 182 proteins supplied by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium. Gaussian processes, which capture trends beyond the reach of linear statistical models, distinguish between two main physico-chemical mechanisms driving crystallization. One is characterized by low levels of side chain entropy and has been extensively reported in the literature. The other identifies specific electrostatic interactions not previously described in the crystallization context. Because evidence for two distinct mechanisms can be gleaned both from crystal contacts and from solution conditions leading to successful crystallization, the model offers future avenues for optimizing crystallization screens based on partial structural information. The availability of crystallization data coupled with structural outcomes analyzed through state-of-the-art statistical models may thus guide macromolecular crystallization toward a more rational basis. PMID:24988076

  5. Contributions to the study of the mechanisms of photodynamic cross-linking of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hui-Rong

    The illumination of proteins in solution and in cells in the presence of photosensitizers may lead to the inter- and/or intramolecular crosslinking of the proteins (photosensitized or photodynamic crosslinking). This phenomenon appears to be involved in the photohemolysis of red cells, cataract development, skin photoaging, photodynamic therapy for cancers, laser welding of tissues, biomaterial modification, and other biological situations. Although the processes involved in the photocrosslinking of proteins have been extensively studied, the mechanisms involved are still largely unknown. The main objectives of the studies reported in this dissertation were to investigate the detailed mechanisms involved in the photocrosslinking of proteins and to determine the chemical nature of the crosslinks formed. The first part of this study was devoted to the verification of the roles of His, Lys and Tyr in the photodynamic crosslinking of proteins. The crosslinking reaction was modeled using tailor-made water-soluble synthetic N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers containing epsilon-aminocaproic acid side chains terminating in His, Lys or tyrosinamide residues photosensitized by rose bengal (RB) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN). RB typically produces singlet oxygen, whereas FMN produces both singlet oxygen and radicals. His-His and His-Lys crosslinks were formed with RB as the sensitizer. RB-sensitization did not crosslink Tyr residues, whereas FMN coupled two Tyr residues via a radical pathway. Protection of the His and/or Lys residues in ribonuclease A (RNase A) significantly inhibited the extent of intermolecular crosslinking, and confirmed the key roles played by His and Lys in crosslinking reactions. The second part of this study involved the elucidation of the detailed reaction mechanisms and the chemical structures of His-His and Tyr-Tyr crosslinks. N-benzoyl-histidine (Bz-His) and N-acetyl-tyrosine (Ac-Tyr) were used to model the photosensitized

  6. Remarkable Improvement in the Mechanical Properties and CO2 Uptake of MOFs Brought About by Covalent Linking to Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ram; Raut, Devaraj; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Rao, C N R

    2016-06-27

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are exceptional as gas adsorbents but their mechanical properties are poor. We present a successful strategy to improve the mechanical properties along with gas adsorption characteristics, wherein graphene (Gr) is covalently bonded with M/DOBDC (M=Mg(2+) , Ni(2+) , or Co(2+) , DOBDC=2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzene dicarboxylate) MOFs. The surface area of the graphene-MOF composites increases up to 200-300 m(2)  g(-1) whereas the CO2 uptake increases by ca. 3-5 wt % at 0.15 atm and by 6-10 wt % at 1 atm. What is significant is that the composites exhibit improved mechanical properties. In the case of Mg/DOBDC, a three-fold increase in both the elastic modulus and hardness with 5 wt % graphene reinforcement is observed. Improvement in both the mechanical properties and gas adsorption characteristics of porous MOFs on linking them to graphene is a novel observation and suggests a new avenue for the design and synthesis of porous materials. PMID:27282430

  7. Linking governance mechanisms to health outcomes: a review of the literature in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Dana Karen; Vian, Taryn; Maurer, Lydia; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a synthesis of peer-reviewed literature to shed light on links between governance mechanisms and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. Our review yielded 30 studies, highlighting four key governance mechanisms by which governance may influence health outcomes in these settings: Health system decentralization that enables responsiveness to local needs and values; health policymaking that aligns and empowers diverse stakeholders; enhanced community engagement; and strengthened social capital. Most, but not all, studies found a positive association between governance and health. Additionally, the nature of the association between governance mechanisms and health differed across studies. In some studies (N = 9), the governance effect was direct and positive, while in others (N = 5), the effect was indirect or modified by contextual factors. In still other studies (N = 4), governance was found to have a moderating effect, indicating that governance mechanisms influenced other system processes or structures that improved health. The remaining studies reported mixed findings about the association between governance and health (N = 6), no association between governance and health (N = 4), or had inconclusive results (N = 2). Further exploration is needed to fully understand the relationship between governance and health and to inform the design and delivery of evidence-based, effective governance interventions around the world.

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer and fluorescence mechanisms in covalently linked polynuclear aromatic-nucleotide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Geacintov, N.E.; Mao, Bing; Zhao, Rushen; Chen, Junxin; Liu, Tong Ming; Ya, Nai-Qi; France, L.L.; Sutherland, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    The fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-nucleic acid complexes is quenched by photoinduced electron transfer mechanisms in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures. These effects are illustrated with the biologically important compound benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), a mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the environmental pollutant benzo[a]pyrene, which forms covalent mutagenic lesions with 2{prime}-deoxyguanosine (dG) residues in DNA. The dependence of the fluroescence yeild and fluorescence decay times of the covalent model adduct (+)-trans-BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG as a function of temperature and methanol/water composition are described. Because of the sensitivity of the fluorescence of the pyrenyl residue to the polarity of the microenvironment, the magnitude of the fluorescence yield can be used to distinguish between highly hydrophobic (e.g. intercalation) and other more solvent-exposed BPDE-nucleic acid binding sites.

  9. Photoinduced electron transfer and fluorescence mechanisms in covalently linked polynuclear aromatic-nucleotide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Geacintov, N.E.; Mao, Bing; Zhao, Rushen; Chen, Junxin; Liu, Tong Ming; Ya, Nai-Qi . Dept. of Chemistry); France, L.L.; Sutherland, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The fluorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-nucleic acid complexes is quenched by photoinduced electron transfer mechanisms in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures. These effects are illustrated with the biologically important compound benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), a mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the environmental pollutant benzo(a)pyrene, which forms covalent mutagenic lesions with 2{prime}-deoxyguanosine (dG) residues in DNA. The dependence of the fluroescence yeild and fluorescence decay times of the covalent model adduct (+)-trans-BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG as a function of temperature and methanol/water composition are described. Because of the sensitivity of the fluorescence of the pyrenyl residue to the polarity of the microenvironment, the magnitude of the fluorescence yield can be used to distinguish between highly hydrophobic (e.g. intercalation) and other more solvent-exposed BPDE-nucleic acid binding sites.

  10. An evaluation and force gradient determination of mechanically linked reversible sidestick controllers for General Aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeron, H. P.

    1984-01-01

    In connection with the increase in air traffic, IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) flight in the air traffic control system has become very demanding. It has, therefore, become imperative to optimize the pilot's skills in his management of the various aircraft systems. The present investigation is concerned with the human factors aspects of the use of sidesticks in direct mechanical linkage (reversible) control systems in a production General Aviation (G.A.) aircraft. A total of 140 fifteen to twenty minute flight tasks were flown on the NASA Langley G.A. motion base simulator. The study involved a comparison of three locations of the sidestick, left side, center, and right side, and the standard yoke. It was found that the sidestick is preferable to the standard yoke. However, some of the design and installation features of the sidestick are critical for pilot acceptance.

  11. Tomographic, kinematic and gravitational evidence for a slab under Greenland and its potential links to Arctic magmatism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Grace; Spakman, Wim; Panet, Isabelle; Gaina, Carmen; Trønnes, Reidar

    2015-04-01

    Seismic tomography and recent satellite gravity data reveal regions of anomalous structure within Earth's present-day mantle. On scales of some tens to hundreds of kilometers in wavelength, individual subducted slabs and mantle plumes can be resolved. When linked with global plate reconstructions and models of mantle convection, subducted slabs of lithosphere can be related to distinct periods of ocean basin closure. Here we explore the origins for a distinct fast seismic feature under present-day Greenland that is apparent across several P and S-wave tomography models. The sub-rounded seismic anomaly of interest is distinct from the more westerly "Farallon" slab, and is located in the mid mantle between ~1000-1600 km depth. We include a discussion of mantle sinking rates, showing that taking 1600 km slab base depth and applying sinking rate of 1.2 cm/yr implies a subduction age of ~133 Ma. We supplement the tomographic evidence for this slab with independent, satellite-derived vertical gravity gradients. Preliminary analysis of the gravity reveals a possible mantle anomaly in the SW Greenland region, complementary in spatial extent to that inferred from tomography. Considering absolute and relative plate reference frames, we suggest that palaeo-Arctic subduction related to the opening of the Amerasia Basin in the Jurassic, may account for this mantle feature. We finally investigate potential geochemical links of this slab feature with high arctic magmatism in the Cretaceous, showing that a time-dependent consideration of surface kinematics and mantle dynamics may reveal new insights into the geodynamic evolution of the Arctic.

  12. Colony Failure Linked to Low Sperm Viability in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queens and an Exploration of Potential Causative Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pettis, Jeffery S.; Rice, Nathan; Joselow, Katie; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Chaimanee, Veeranan

    2016-01-01

    linked to colony performance and laboratory and field data provide evidence that temperature extremes are a potential causative factor. PMID:26863438

  13. Colony Failure Linked to Low Sperm Viability in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queens and an Exploration of Potential Causative Factors.

    PubMed

    Pettis, Jeffery S; Rice, Nathan; Joselow, Katie; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Chaimanee, Veeranan

    2016-01-01

    Queen health is closely linked to colony performance in honey bees as a single queen is normally responsible for all egg laying and brood production within the colony. In the U. S. in recent years, queens have been failing at a high rate; with 50% or greater of queens replaced in colonies within 6 months when historically a queen might live one to two years. This high rate of queen failure coincides with the high mortality rates of colonies in the US, some years with >50% of colonies dying. In the current study, surveys of sperm viability in US queens were made to determine if sperm viability plays a role in queen or colony failure. Wide variation was observed in sperm viability from four sets of queens removed from colonies that beekeepers rated as in good health (n = 12; average viability = 92%), were replacing as part of normal management (n = 28; 57%), or where rated as failing (n = 18 and 19; 54% and 55%). Two additional paired set of queens showed a statistically significant difference in viability between colonies rated by the beekeeper as failing or in good health from the same apiaries. Queens removed from colonies rated in good health averaged high viability (ca. 85%) while those rated as failing or in poor health had significantly lower viability (ca. 50%). Thus low sperm viability was indicative of, or linked to, colony performance. To explore the source of low sperm viability, six commercial queen breeders were surveyed and wide variation in viability (range 60-90%) was documented between breeders. This variability could originate from the drones the queens mate with or temperature extremes that queens are exposed to during shipment. The role of shipping temperature as a possible explanation for low sperm viability was explored. We documented that during shipment queens are exposed to temperature spikes (<8 and > 40°C) and these spikes can kill 50% or more of the sperm stored in queen spermathecae in live queens. Clearly low sperm viability is linked

  14. Colony Failure Linked to Low Sperm Viability in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queens and an Exploration of Potential Causative Factors.

    PubMed

    Pettis, Jeffery S; Rice, Nathan; Joselow, Katie; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Chaimanee, Veeranan

    2016-01-01

    Queen health is closely linked to colony performance in honey bees as a single queen is normally responsible for all egg laying and brood production within the colony. In the U. S. in recent years, queens have been failing at a high rate; with 50% or greater of queens replaced in colonies within 6 months when historically a queen might live one to two years. This high rate of queen failure coincides with the high mortality rates of colonies in the US, some years with >50% of colonies dying. In the current study, surveys of sperm viability in US queens were made to determine if sperm viability plays a role in queen or colony failure. Wide variation was observed in sperm viability from four sets of queens removed from colonies that beekeepers rated as in good health (n = 12; average viability = 92%), were replacing as part of normal management (n = 28; 57%), or where rated as failing (n = 18 and 19; 54% and 55%). Two additional paired set of queens showed a statistically significant difference in viability between colonies rated by the beekeeper as failing or in good health from the same apiaries. Queens removed from colonies rated in good health averaged high viability (ca. 85%) while those rated as failing or in poor health had significantly lower viability (ca. 50%). Thus low sperm viability was indicative of, or linked to, colony performance. To explore the source of low sperm viability, six commercial queen breeders were surveyed and wide variation in viability (range 60-90%) was documented between breeders. This variability could originate from the drones the queens mate with or temperature extremes that queens are exposed to during shipment. The role of shipping temperature as a possible explanation for low sperm viability was explored. We documented that during shipment queens are exposed to temperature spikes (<8 and > 40°C) and these spikes can kill 50% or more of the sperm stored in queen spermathecae in live queens. Clearly low sperm viability is linked

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms: A possible link between autism spectrum disorders and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Varadinova, Miroslava; Boyadjieva, Nadka

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) still remains unclear and seems to involve a considerable overlap between polygenic, epigenetic and environmental factors. We have summarized the current understanding of the interplay between gene expression dysregulation via epigenetic modifications and the potential epigenetic impact of environmental factors in neurodevelopmental deficits. Furthermore, we discuss the scientific controversies of the relationship between prenatal exposure to alcohol and alcohol-induced epigenetic dysregulations, and gene expression alterations which are associated with disrupted neural plasticity and causal pathways for ASDs. The review of the literature suggests that a better understanding of developmental epigenetics should contribute to furthering our comprehension of the etiology and pathogenesis of ASDs and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

  16. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  17. Mechanisms linking bacterial infections of the bovine endometrium to disease and infertility.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Luísa Cunha; Cronin, James Graham; Sheldon, Iain Martin

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infections of the endometrium after parturition commonly cause metritis and endometritis in dairy cattle, and these diseases are important because they compromise animal welfare and incur economic costs, as well as delaying or preventing conception. Here we highlight that uterine infections cause infertility, discuss which bacteria cause uterine disease, and review the evidence for mechanisms of inflammation and tissue damage in the endometrium. Bacteria cultured from the uterus of diseased animals include Escherichia coli, Trueperella pyogenes, and several anaerobic species, but their causative role in disease is challenged by the discovery of many other bacteria in the uterine disease microbiome. Irrespective of the species of bacteria, endometrial cell inflammatory responses to infection initially depend on innate immunity, with Toll-like receptors binding pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as lipopolysaccharide and bacterial lipopeptides. In addition to tissue damage associated with parturition and inflammation, endometrial cell death is caused by a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin secreted by T. pyogenes, called pyolysin, which forms pores in plasma membranes of endometrial cells. However, endometrial cells surprisingly do not sense damage-associated molecular patterns, but a combination of infections followed by cell damage leads to release of the intracellular cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 alpha from endometrial cells, which then acts to scale inflammatory responses. To develop strategies to limit the impact of uterine disease on fertility, future work should focus on determining which bacteria and virulence factors cause endometritis, and understanding how the host response to infection is regulated in the endometrium. PMID:26952747

  18. Broken English, broken bones? Mechanisms linking language proficiency and occupational health in a Montreal garment factory.

    PubMed

    Premji, Stéphanie; Messing, Karen; Lippel, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Language barriers are often cited as a factor contributing to ethnic inequalities in occupational health; however, little information is available about the mechanisms at play. The authors describe the multiple ways in which language influences occupational health in a large garment factory employing many immigrants in Montreal. Between 2004 and 2006, individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 women and 10 men from 14 countries of birth. Interviews were conducted in French and English, Canada's official languages, as well as in non-official languages with the help of colleague-interpreters. Observation within the workplace was also carried out at various times during the project. The authors describe how proficiency in the official languages influences occupational health by affecting workers' ability to understand and communicate information, and supporting relationships that can affect work-related health. They also describe workers' strategies to address communication barriers and discuss the implications of these strategies from an occupational health standpoint. Along with the longer-term objectives of integrating immigrants into the linguistic majority and addressing structural conditions that can affect health, policies and practices need to be put in place to protect the health and well-being of those who face language barriers in the short term. PMID:18341120

  19. Broken English, broken bones? Mechanisms linking language proficiency and occupational health in a Montreal garment factory.

    PubMed

    Premji, Stéphanie; Messing, Karen; Lippel, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Language barriers are often cited as a factor contributing to ethnic inequalities in occupational health; however, little information is available about the mechanisms at play. The authors describe the multiple ways in which language influences occupational health in a large garment factory employing many immigrants in Montreal. Between 2004 and 2006, individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 women and 10 men from 14 countries of birth. Interviews were conducted in French and English, Canada's official languages, as well as in non-official languages with the help of colleague-interpreters. Observation within the workplace was also carried out at various times during the project. The authors describe how proficiency in the official languages influences occupational health by affecting workers' ability to understand and communicate information, and supporting relationships that can affect work-related health. They also describe workers' strategies to address communication barriers and discuss the implications of these strategies from an occupational health standpoint. Along with the longer-term objectives of integrating immigrants into the linguistic majority and addressing structural conditions that can affect health, policies and practices need to be put in place to protect the health and well-being of those who face language barriers in the short term.

  20. A Summary of Pathways or Mechanisms Linking Preconception Maternal Nutrition with Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    King, Janet C

    2016-07-01

    Population, human, animal, tissue, and molecular studies show collectively and consistently that maternal nutrition in the pre- or periconception period influences fetal growth and development, which subsequently affects the individual's long-term health. It is known that nutrition during pregnancy is an important determinant of the offspring's growth and health. However, now there is evidence that the mother's nutritional status at conception also influences pregnancy outcome and long-term health. For example, the mother's nutritional status at conception influences the way energy is partitioned between maternal and fetal needs. Furthermore, placental development during the first weeks of gestation reflects maternal nutrition and establishes mechanisms for balancing maternal and fetal nutritional needs. Also, maternal nutritional signals at fertilization influence epigenetic remodeling of fetal genes. These findings all indicate that maternal parenting begins before conception. The following papers from a symposium on preconception nutrition presented at the 2015 Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting of the ASN emphasize the importance of maternal nutrition at conception on the growth and long-term health of the child.

  1. The evolutionary ecology of complex lifecycle parasites: linking phenomena with mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Auld, S K J R; Tinsley, M C

    2015-02-01

    Many parasitic infections, including those of humans, are caused by complex lifecycle parasites (CLPs): parasites that sequentially infect different hosts over the course of their lifecycle. CLPs come from a wide range of taxonomic groups-from single-celled bacteria to multicellular flatworms-yet share many common features in their life histories. Theory tells us when CLPs should be favoured by selection, but more empirical studies are required in order to quantify the costs and benefits of having a complex lifecycle, especially in parasites that facultatively vary their lifecycle complexity. In this article, we identify ecological conditions that favour CLPs over their simple lifecycle counterparts and highlight how a complex lifecycle can alter transmission rate and trade-offs between growth and reproduction. We show that CLPs participate in dynamic host-parasite coevolution, as more mobile hosts can fuel CLP adaptation to less mobile hosts. Then, we argue that a more general understanding of the evolutionary ecology of CLPs is essential for the development of effective frameworks to manage the many diseases they cause. More research is needed identifying the genetics of infection mechanisms used by CLPs, particularly into the role of gene duplication and neofunctionalisation in lifecycle evolution. We propose that testing for signatures of selection in infection genes will reveal much about how and when complex lifecycles evolved, and will help quantify complex patterns of coevolution between CLPs and their various hosts. Finally, we emphasise four key areas where new research approaches will provide fertile opportunities to advance this field.

  2. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND LEUKOCYTE TELOMERE LENGTH: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS LINKING MENTAL ILLNESS WITH CELLULAR AGING

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Daniel; Epel, Elissa S.; Mellon, Synthia H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Révész, Dóra; Verhoeven, Josine E.; Reus, Victor I.; Lin, Jue; Mahan, Laura; Hough, Christina M.; Rosser, Rebecca; Bersani, F. Saverio; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric illnesses are associated with early mortality and with an increased risk of developing physical diseases that are more typically seen in the elderly. Moreover, certain psychiatric illnesses may be associated with accelerated cellular aging, evidenced by shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which could underlie this association. Shortened LTL reflects a cell’s mitotic history and cumulative exposure to inflammation and oxidation as well as the availability of telomerase, a telomere-lengthening enzyme. Critically short telomeres can cause cells to undergo senescence, apoptosis or genomic instability, and shorter LTL correlates with poorer health and predicts mortality. Emerging data suggest that LTL may be reduced in certain psychiatric illnesses, perhaps in proportion to exposure to the psychiatric illnesses, although conflicting data exist. Telomerase has been less well characterized in psychiatric illnesses, but a role in depression and in antidepressant and neurotrophic effects has been suggested by preclinical and clinical studies. In this article, studies on LTL and telomerase activity in psychiatric illnesses are critically reviewed, potential mediators are discussed, and future directions are suggested. A deeper understanding of cellular aging in psychiatric illnesses could lead to re-conceptualizing them as systemic illnesses with manifestations inside and outside the brain and could identify new treatment targets. PMID:25999120

  3. A Prospective Examination of the Mechanisms Linking Childhood Physical Abuse to Body Mass Index in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Melville M.; Nikulina, Valentina; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has reported associations between childhood physical abuse and Body Mass Index (BMI) in adulthood. This paper examined the role of four potential mediators (anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and coping) hypothesized to explain this relationship. Using data from a prospective cohort design, court-substantiated cases of childhood physical abuse (N = 78) and non-maltreated comparisons (N = 349) were followed-up and assessed in adulthood at three time points (1989-1995, 2000-2002, and 2003-2005) when participants were ages 29.2, 39.5, and 41.2, respectively. At age 41, average BMI of the current sample was 29.97, falling between overweight and obese categories. Meditation analyses were conducted, controlling for age, sex, race, smoking, and self-reported weight. Childhood physical abuse was positively associated with subsequent generalized anxiety, major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms at age 29.2 and higher levels of depression and posttraumatic stress predicted higher BMI at age 41.2. In contrast, higher levels of anxiety predicted lower BMI. Coping did not mediate between physical abuse and BMI. Anxiety symptoms mediated the relationship between physical abuse and BMI for women, but not men. These findings illustrate the complexity of studying the consequences of physical abuse, particularly the relationship between psychiatric symptoms and adult health outcomes. PMID:25648448

  4. A Prospective Examination of the Mechanisms Linking Childhood Physical Abuse to Body Mass Index in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Francis, Melville M; Nikulina, Valentina; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2015-08-01

    Previous research has reported associations between childhood physical abuse and body mass index (BMI) in adulthood. This article examined the role of four potential mediators (anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and coping) hypothesized to explain this relationship. Using data from a prospective cohort design, court-substantiated cases of childhood physical abuse (N = 78) and nonmaltreated comparisons (N = 349) were followed up and assessed in adulthood at three time points (1989-1995, 2000-2002, and 2003-2005) when participants were of age 29.2, 39.5, and 41.2, respectively. At age 41, average BMI of the current sample was 29.97, falling between overweight and obese categories. Meditation analyses were conducted, controlling for age, sex, race, smoking, and self-reported weight. Childhood physical abuse was positively associated with subsequent generalized anxiety, major depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms at age 29.2 and higher levels of depression and posttraumatic stress predicted higher BMI at age 41.2. In contrast, higher levels of anxiety predicted lower BMI. Coping did not mediate between physical abuse and BMI. Anxiety symptoms mediated the relationship between physical abuse and BMI for women, but not for men. These findings illustrate the complexity of studying the consequences of physical abuse, particularly the relationship between psychiatric symptoms and adult health outcomes. PMID:25648448

  5. A Link between ORC-Origin Binding Mechanisms and Origin Activation Time Revealed in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hoggard, Timothy; Shor, Erika; Müller, Carolin A.; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication origins are selected in G1-phase when the origin recognition complex (ORC) binds chromosomal positions and triggers molecular events culminating in the initiation of DNA replication (a.k.a. origin firing) during S-phase. Each chromosome uses multiple origins for its duplication, and each origin fires at a characteristic time during S-phase, creating a cell-type specific genome replication pattern relevant to differentiation and genome stability. It is unclear whether ORC-origin interactions are relevant to origin activation time. We applied a novel genome-wide strategy to classify origins in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on the types of molecular interactions used for ORC-origin binding. Specifically, origins were classified as DNA-dependent when the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo could be explained by the affinity of ORC for origin DNA in vitro, and, conversely, as ‘chromatin-dependent’ when the ORC-DNA interaction in vitro was insufficient to explain the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo. These two origin classes differed in terms of nucleosome architecture and dependence on origin-flanking sequences in plasmid replication assays, consistent with local features of chromatin promoting ORC binding at ‘chromatin-dependent’ origins. Finally, the ‘chromatin-dependent’ class was enriched for origins that fire early in S-phase, while the DNA-dependent class was enriched for later firing origins. Conversely, the latest firing origins showed a positive association with the ORC-origin DNA paradigm for normal levels of ORC binding, whereas the earliest firing origins did not. These data reveal a novel association between ORC-origin binding mechanisms and the regulation of origin activation time. PMID:24068963

  6. Mechanisms of proximal tubule sodium transport regulation that link extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Alicia A

    2010-04-01

    One-hundred years ago, Starling articulated the interdependence of renal control of circulating blood volume and effective cardiac performance. During the past 25 years, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the interdependence of blood pressure (BP), extracellular fluid volume (ECFV), the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) have begun to be revealed. These variables all converge on regulation of renal proximal tubule (PT) sodium transport. The PT reabsorbs two-thirds of the filtered Na(+) and volume at baseline. This fraction is decreased when BP or perfusion pressure is increased, during a high-salt diet (elevated ECFV), and during inhibition of the production of ANG II; conversely, this fraction is increased by ANG II, SNS activation, and a low-salt diet. These variables all regulate the distribution of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and the Na(+)-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi2), along the apical microvilli of the PT. Natriuretic stimuli provoke the dynamic redistribution of these transporters along with associated regulators, molecular motors, and cytoskeleton-associated proteins to the base of the microvilli. The lipid raft-associated NHE3 remains at the base, and the nonraft-associated NaPi2 is endocytosed, culminating in decreased Na(+) transport and increased PT flow rate. Antinatriuretic stimuli return the same transporters and regulators to the body of the microvilli associated with an increase in transport activity and decrease in PT flow rate. In summary, ECFV and BP homeostasis are, at least in part, maintained by continuous and acute redistribution of transporter complexes up and down the PT microvilli, which affect regulation of PT sodium reabsorption in response to fluctuations in ECFV, BP, SNS, and RAS. PMID:20106993

  7. The evolutionary ecology of complex lifecycle parasites: linking phenomena with mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Auld, S KJR; Tinsley, M C

    2015-01-01

    Many parasitic infections, including those of humans, are caused by complex lifecycle parasites (CLPs): parasites that sequentially infect different hosts over the course of their lifecycle. CLPs come from a wide range of taxonomic groups—from single-celled bacteria to multicellular flatworms—yet share many common features in their life histories. Theory tells us when CLPs should be favoured by selection, but more empirical studies are required in order to quantify the costs and benefits of having a complex lifecycle, especially in parasites that facultatively vary their lifecycle complexity. In this article, we identify ecological conditions that favour CLPs over their simple lifecycle counterparts and highlight how a complex lifecycle can alter transmission rate and trade-offs between growth and reproduction. We show that CLPs participate in dynamic host–parasite coevolution, as more mobile hosts can fuel CLP adaptation to less mobile hosts. Then, we argue that a more general understanding of the evolutionary ecology of CLPs is essential for the development of effective frameworks to manage the many diseases they cause. More research is needed identifying the genetics of infection mechanisms used by CLPs, particularly into the role of gene duplication and neofunctionalisation in lifecycle evolution. We propose that testing for signatures of selection in infection genes will reveal much about how and when complex lifecycles evolved, and will help quantify complex patterns of coevolution between CLPs and their various hosts. Finally, we emphasise four key areas where new research approaches will provide fertile opportunities to advance this field. PMID:25227255

  8. Linking rapid magma reservoir assembly and eruption trigger mechanisms at evolved Yellowstone-type supervolcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wotzlaw, J.F.; Bindeman, I.N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, A.K.; Caricchi, L.; Schaltegger, U.

    2014-01-01

    reservoir configurations inferred from seismic data at active supervolcanoes. The connection of magma batches vertically distributed over several kilometers in the upper crust would cause a substantial increase of buoyancy overpressure, providing an eruption trigger mechanism that is the direct consequence of the reservoir assembly process.

  9. Mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to model biomaterial surfaces: Establising a link between thrombosis and infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Julie Miyo

    Infections involving Staphylococcus epidermidis remain a life threatening complication associated with the use of polymer based cardiovascular devices. One of the critical steps in infection pathogenesis is the adhesion of the bacteria to the device surface. Currently, mechanisms of S. epidermidis adhesion are incompletely understood, but are thought to involve interactions between bacteria, device surface, and host blood elements in the form of adsorbed plasma proteins and surface adherent platelets. Our central hypothesis is that elements participating in thrombosis also promote S. epidermidis adhesion by specifically binding to the bacterial surface. The adhesion kinetics of S. epidermidis RP62A to host modified model biomaterial surface octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) under hydrodynamic shear conditions were characterized. Steady state adhesion to adsorbed proteins and surface adherent platelets was achieved at 90-120 minutes and 60-90 minutes, respectively. A dose response curve of S. epidermidis adhesion in the concentration range of 10sp7{-}10sp9 bac/mL resembled a multilayer adsorption isotherm. Increasing shear stress was found to LTA, and other LTA blocking agents significantly decreased S. epidermidis adhesion to the fibrin-platelet clots, suggesting that this interaction between S. epidermidis and fibrin-platelet clots is specific. Studies evaluated the adhesion of S. epidermidis to polymer immobilized heparin report conflicting results. Paulsson et al., showed that coagulase negative staphylococci adhered in comparable numbers to both immobilized heparin and nonheparinized surfaces, while exhibiting significantly greater adhesion to both surfaces than S. aureus. Preadsorption of the surfaces with specific heparin binding plasma proteins vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen significantly increased adhesion. It was postulated that immobilized heparin contained binding sites for the plasma proteins, exposing bacteria binding domains of the

  10. Protective effects and potential mechanisms of Pien Tze Huang on cerebral chronic ischemia and hypertensive stroke

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stroke caused by brain ischemia is the third leading cause of adult disability. Active prevention and early treatment of stroke targeting the causes and risk factors may decrease its incidence, mortality and subsequent disability. Pien Tze Huang (PZH), a Chinese medicine formula, was found to have anti-edema, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects that can prevent brain damage. This study aims to investigate the potential mechanisms of the preventive effects of Pien Tze Huang on brain damage caused by chronic ischemia and hypertensive stroke in rats. Methods The effects of Pien Tze Huang on brain protein expression in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and stroke prone SHR (SHRsp) were studied with 2-D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)/TOF tandem mass spectrometer and on brain cell death with enzyme link immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunostaining. Results Pien Tze Huang decreased cell death in hippocampus and cerebellum caused by chronic ischemia and hypertensive stroke. Immunostaining of caspase-3 results indicated that Pien Tze Huang prevents brain cells from apoptosis caused by ischemia. Brain protein expression results suggested that Pien Tze Huang downregulated QCR2 in the electron transfer chain of mitochondria preventing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage and possibly subsequent cell death (caspase 3 assay) as caused by chronic ischemia or hypertensive stroke to hippocampus and cerebellum. Conclusion Pien Tze Huang showed preventive effects on limiting the damage or injury caused by chronic ischemia and hypertensive stroke in rats. The effect of Pien Tze Huang was possibly related to prevention of cell death from apoptosis or ROS/oxidative damage in mitochondria. PMID:20955558

  11. Linking Genomo- and Pathotype: Exploiting the Zebrafish Embryo Model to Investigate the Divergent Virulence Potential among Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Eshwar, Athmanya K.; Tall, Ben D.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Patel, Isha R.; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections primarily in premature, low-birth weight and immune-compromised neonates. Apparently not all Cronobacter species are linked to infantile infections and it has been proposed that virulence varies among strains. Whole genome comparisons and in silico analysis have proven to be powerful tools in elucidating potential virulence determinants, the presence/absence of which may explain the differential virulence behaviour of strains. However, validation of these factors has in the past been hampered by the availability of a suitable neonatal animal model. In the present study we have used zebrafish embryos to model Cronobacter infections in vivo using wild type and genetically engineered strains. Our experiments confirmed the role of the RepF1B-like plasmids as “virulence plasmids” in Cronobacter and underpinned the importantce of two putative virulence factors—cpa and zpx—in in vivo pathogenesis. We propose that by using this model in vivo infection studies are now possible on a large scale level which will boost the understanding on the virulence strategies employed by these pathogens. PMID:27355472

  12. Design and synthesis of pyrazole/isoxazole linked arylcinnamides as tubulin polymerization inhibitors and potential antiproliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Shaik, Anver Basha; Rao, Bala Bhaskara; Khan, Irfan; Bharath Kumar, G; Jain, Nishant

    2015-10-28

    As pyrazole and isoxazole based derivatives are well-known for displaying a considerable biological profile, an attempt has been made to unravel their cytotoxic potential. In this context, a number of pyrazole/isoxazole linked arylcinnamide conjugates (15a-o and 21a-n) have been synthesized by employing a straight forward route. The basic structure comprised three ring scaffolds (A, B and C): methoxyphenyl rings as A and C rings and a five membered heterocyclic ring (pyrazole or isoxazole) as the B-ring. To achieve clear understanding, these derivatives are categorized as pyrazole-phenylcinnamides (PP) and isoxazole-phenylcinnamides (IP). These compounds have been evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of various human cancer cell lines such as HeLa, DU-145, A549 and MDA-MB231 and most of them exhibit considerable cytotoxic effects. Some of them like 15a, 15b, 15e, 15i and 15l exhibit promising cytotoxicity in HeLa cells (IC50 = 0.4, 1.8, 1.2, 2.7 and 1.7 μM). Amongst them 15a, 15b and 15e were taken up for detailed biological studies, they were found to arrest the cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, they were investigated for their effect on the microtubular cytoskeletal system by using a tubulin polymerization assay, immunofluroscence and molecular docking studies; interestingly they demonstrate a significant inhibition of tubulin polymerization.

  13. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Tornés, Jesús; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V.; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, María; Denaro, Renata; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A.; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Golyshina, Olga V.; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R.; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I.; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakimov, Michail M.; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills. PMID:26119183

  14. Linking Genomo- and Pathotype: Exploiting the Zebrafish Embryo Model to Investigate the Divergent Virulence Potential among Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Eshwar, Athmanya K; Tall, Ben D; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Gopinath, Gopal R; Patel, Isha R; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Cronobacter have been recognized as causative agents of life-threatening systemic infections primarily in premature, low-birth weight and immune-compromised neonates. Apparently not all Cronobacter species are linked to infantile infections and it has been proposed that virulence varies among strains. Whole genome comparisons and in silico analysis have proven to be powerful tools in elucidating potential virulence determinants, the presence/absence of which may explain the differential virulence behaviour of strains. However, validation of these factors has in the past been hampered by the availability of a suitable neonatal animal model. In the present study we have used zebrafish embryos to model Cronobacter infections in vivo using wild type and genetically engineered strains. Our experiments confirmed the role of the RepF1B-like plasmids as "virulence plasmids" in Cronobacter and underpinned the importantce of two putative virulence factors-cpa and zpx-in in vivo pathogenesis. We propose that by using this model in vivo infection studies are now possible on a large scale level which will boost the understanding on the virulence strategies employed by these pathogens. PMID:27355472

  15. Does the concept of "sensitization" provide a plausible mechanism for the putative link between the environment and schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Collip, Dina; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Van Os, Jim

    2008-03-01

    Previous evidence reviewed in Schizophrenia Bulletin suggests the importance of a range of different environmental factors in the development of psychotic illness. It is unlikely, however, that the diversity of environmental influences associated with schizophrenia can be linked to as many different underlying mechanisms. There is evidence that environmental exposures may induce, in interaction with (epi)genetic factors, psychological or physiological alterations that can be traced to a final common pathway of cognitive biases and/or altered dopamine neurotransmission, broadly referred to as "sensitization," facilitating the onset and persistence of psychotic symptoms. At the population level, the behavioral phenotype for sensitization may be examined by quantifying, in populations exposed to environmental risk factors associated with stress or dopamine-agonist drugs, (1) the increased rate of persistence (indicating lasting sensitization) of normally transient developmental expressions of subclinical psychotic experiences and (2) the subsequent increased rate of transition to clinical psychotic disorder.

  16. Effect of modified starch and nanoclay particles on biodegradability and mechanical properties of cross-linked poly lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Shayan, M; Azizi, H; Ghasemi, I; Karrabi, M

    2015-06-25

    Mechanical properties and biodegradation of cross-linked poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/maleated thermoplastic starch (MTPS)/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposite were studied. Crosslinking was carried out by adding di-cumyl peroxide (DCP) in the presence of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) as coagent. At first, MTPS was prepared by grafting maleic anhydride (MA) to thermoplastic starch in internal mixer. Experimental design was performed by using Box-Behnken method at three variables: MTPS, nanoclay and TAIC at three levels. Results showed that increasing TAIC amount substantially increased the gel fraction, enhanced tensile strength, and caused a decrease in elongation at break. Biodegradation was prevented by increasing TAIC amount in nanocomposite. Increasing MTPS amount caused a slight increase in gel fraction and decreased the tensile strength of nanocomposite. Also, MTPS could increase the elongation at break of nanocomposite and improve the biodegradation. Nanoclay had no effect on the gel fraction, but it improved tensile strength. PMID:25839817

  17. The Double-Well Potential in Quantum Mechanics: A Simple, Numerically Exact Formulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelic, V.; Marsiglio, F.

    2012-01-01

    The double-well potential is arguably one of the most important potentials in quantum mechanics, because the solution contains the notion of a state as a linear superposition of "classical" states, a concept which has become very important in quantum information theory. It is therefore desirable to have solutions to simple double-well potentials…

  18. Use of next generation sequence to investigate potential novel macrolide resistance mechanisms in a population of Moraxella catarrhalis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Li; Li, Dong-Fang; Xu, He-Ping; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Ge; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Gong, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Yin-Xin; Wu, Hong-Long; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have confirmed that 23S rRNA gene mutation could be responsible for most of macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis, a recent study suggested otherwise. Next generation sequence based comparative genomics has revolutionized the mining of potential novel drug resistant mechanisms. In this study, two pairs of resistant and susceptible M. catarrhalis isolates with different multilocus sequence types, were investigated for potential differential genes or informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The identified genes and SNPs were evaluated in 188 clinical isolates. From initially 12 selected differential genes and 12 informative SNPs, 10 differential genes (mboIA, mcbC, mcbI, mboIB, MCR_1794, MCR_1795, lgt2B/C, dpnI, mcbB, and mcbA) and 6 SNPs (C619T of rumA, T140C of rplF, G643A of MCR_0020, T270G of MCR_1465, C1348A of copB, and G238A of rrmA) were identified as possibly linked to macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis. Most of the identified differential genes and SNPs are related to methylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or DNA, especially MCR_0020 and rrmA. Further studies are needed to determine the function and/or evolution process, of the identified genes or SNPs, to establish whether some novel or combined mechanisms are truly involved in M. catarrhalis macrolide resistance mechanism. PMID:27774989

  19. DEHP exposure in utero disturbs sex determination and is potentially linked with precocious puberty in female mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongan; Yang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Yu, Mingxi; Zhang, Zhou; Cui, Xiaoyu

    2016-09-15

    Human's ubiquitous exposure to di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is thought to be associated with female reproductive toxicity. Previous studies found that DEHP inhibited follicle growth and decreased estradiol levels in adult female mice. However, limited information is available on the link between in utero DEHP exposure and ovarian development in female mouse offspring. The present study evaluates the disturbances in regulatory genes involved in female sex determination and the ovarian outcomes in fetal and postnatal female mice treated with in utero DEHP exposure. Pregnant mice were exposed to DEHP by gavage, with the dosage regime beginning at human relevant exposure levels. After in utero DEHP exposure, increased follicular atresia was observed in the female pups at postnatal days (PND) 21. Foxl2 expression was significantly upregulated, and Fst was significantly downregulated by DEHP above 2mg/kg/d at PND 1 and 21. This suggests that lesion of granulosa cell differentiation and disturbance of follicle development in postnatal female mice. The expression of Cyp11a1 and Star were significantly downregulated by in utero DEHP exposure, indicating effects on estradiol biosynthesis. The female sex determination pathway was disturbed in fetus by DEHP at 2mg/kg/d and above during the critical time window of sex determination causing significant upregulation of Foxl2, Wnt4, β-catenin and Fst. Furthermore, the increased expression of Wnt4 was supported by whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH). These results suggest a possible association between in utero DEHP exposure and precocious puberty in the postnatal life of mice offspring, where disturbance of the sex determination regulating pathway acted as an important mechanism. PMID:27495896

  20. Exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat as a mechanism linking anxiety with increased risk for diseases of aging

    PubMed Central

    O’Donovan, Aoife; Slavich, George M; Epel, Elissa S.; Neylan, Thomas C

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders increase risk for the early development of several diseases of aging. Elevated inflammation, a common risk factor across diseases of aging, may play a key role in the relationship between anxiety and physical disease. However, the neurobiological mechanisms linking anxiety with elevated inflammation remain unclear. In this review, we present a neurobiological model of the mechanisms by which anxiety promotes inflammation. Specifically we propose that exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat in anxious individuals may lead to sustained threat perception, which is accompanied by prolonged activation of threat-related neural circuitry and threat-responsive biological systems including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, autonomic nervous system (ANS), and inflammatory response. Over time, this pattern of responding can promote chronic inflammation through structural and functional brain changes, altered sensitivity of immune cell receptors, dysregulation of the HPA axis and ANS, and accelerated cellular aging. Chronic inflammation, in turn, increases risk for diseases of aging. Exaggerated neurobiological sensitivity to threat may thus be a treatment target for reducing disease risk in anxious individuals. PMID:23127296

  1. The cytotoxicity of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin is linked to an endocytotic mechanism equivalent to transport-P

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Robert; Stracke, Anika; Ebner, Nadine; Zeller, Christian Wolfgang; Raninger, Anna Maria; Schittmayer, Matthias; Kueznik, Tatjana; Absenger-Novak, Markus; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Since the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin (PRZ) was introduced into medicine as a treatment for hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia, several studies have shown that PRZ induces apoptosis in various cell types and interferes with endocytotic trafficking. Because PRZ is also able to induce apoptosis in malignant cells, its cytotoxicity is a focus of interest in cancer research. Besides inducing apoptosis, PRZ was shown to serve as a substrate for an amine uptake mechanism originally discovered in neurones called transport-P. In line with our hypothesis that transport-P is an endocytotic mechanism also present in non-neuronal tissue and linked to the cytotoxicity of PRZ, we tested the uptake of QAPB, a fluorescent derivative of PRZ, in cancer cell lines in the presence of inhibitors of transport-P and endocytosis. Early endosomes and lysosomes were visualised by expression of RAB5-RFP and LAMP1-RFP, respectively; growth and viability of cells in the presence of PRZ and uptake inhibitors were also tested. Cancer cells showed co-localisation of QAPB with RAB5 and LAMP1 positive vesicles as well as tubulation of lysosomes. The uptake of QAPB was sensitive to transport-P inhibitors bafilomycin A1 (inhibits v-ATPase) and the antidepressant desipramine. Endocytosis inhibitors pitstop® 2 (general inhibitor of endocytosis), dynasore (dynamin inhibitor) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (cholesterol chelator) inhibited the uptake of QAPB. Bafilomycin A1 and methyl-β-cyclodextrin but not desipramine were able to preserve growth and viability of cells in the presence of PRZ. In summary, we confirmed the hypothesis that the cellular uptake of QAPB/PRZ represents an endocytotic mechanism equivalent to transport-P. Endocytosis of QAPB/PRZ depends on a proton gradient, dynamin and cholesterol, and results in reorganisation of the LAMP1 positive endolysosomal system. Finally, the link seen between the cellular uptake of PRZ and cell death implies a still unknown pro

  2. Juvenile flatfish in the northern Baltic Sea - long-term decline and potential links to habitat characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokinen, Henri; Wennhage, Håkan; Ollus, Victoria; Aro, Eero; Norkko, Alf

    2016-01-01

    Flatfish in the northern Baltic Sea are facing multiple environmental pressures due to on-going large-scale ecosystem changes linked to eutrophication and climate change. Shallow juvenile habitats of flatfishes are expected to be especially susceptible to these environmental pressures. Using previously unpublished historical and present-state data on juvenile flatfish in nursery areas along the Finnish coast we demonstrate a drastic (up to 40 ×) decline in 1-Y-O flounder densities since the 1980s and a particularly low current occurrence of both flounders and turbots in several known juvenile habitats. As a consequence of ongoing coastal eutrophication vegetation coverage and filamentous algae have generally increased in shallow areas. We examined the predicted negative effect of vegetation/algae by exploring quantitative relationships between juvenile flatfish (flounder and turbot) occurrence and vegetation/algae among other environmental factors in shallow juvenile habitats. Despite sparse occurrence of juveniles we found a significant negative relationship between flatfish abundance and vegetation cover, implicating eutrophication as a potential major driver affecting the value of juvenile habitat. Shallow littoral habitats play a particularly central role for flatfish due to the spatial concentration of fish in these areas during the critical juvenile stage. Despite their importance, these areas have been relatively poorly studied in the northern Baltic Sea, which makes it difficult to quantify overall changes in environmental conditions and to relate these changes to flatfish recruitment. The low present-state flatfish densities recorded preclude strong inferences of the role of habitat quality to be drawn. Our study does, however, provide a baseline for future assessment. Based on existing evidence, we cannot thus establish any bottlenecks but hypothesize that the current low occurrence of juvenile flatfish, and the population decline of flounder on the

  3. Effects on DNA Damage and/or Repair Processes as Biological Mechanisms Linking Psychological Stress to Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Frank J; Van Houten, Bennett; Bovbjerg, Dana H

    2014-02-01

    Considerable research effort in the past several decades has focused on the impact of psychological stress, and stress hormones, on cancer progression. Numerous studies have reported that stress hormone treatment or in vivo stress exposure can enhance the growth of tumor cell lines in vitro, as well as tumors in animal models, and have begun to explore molecular mechanisms. Comparatively little research has focused on the impact of psychological stress and stress hormones on cancer initiation, in part due to inherent methodological challenges, but also because potential underlying biological mechanisms have remained obscure. In this review, we present a testable theoretical model of pathways by which stress may result in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. This model supports our overarching hypothesis that psychological stress, acting through increased levels of catecholamines and/or cortisol, can increase DNA damage and/or reduce repair mechanisms, resulting in increased risk of DNA mutations leading to carcinogenesis. A better understanding of molecular pathways by which psychological stress can increase the risk of cancer initiation would open new avenues of translational research, bringing together psychologists, neuroscientists, and molecular biologists, potentially resulting in the development of novel approaches for cancer risk reduction at the population level.

  4. 2-Anilinonicotinyl linked 2-aminobenzothiazoles and [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-b] [1,2,4]benzothiadiazine conjugates as potential mitochondrial apoptotic inducers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Srikanth, Y V V; Naseer Ahmed Khan, M; Ashraf, Md; Kashi Reddy, M; Sultana, Farheen; Kaur, Tandeep; Chashoo, Gousia; Suri, Nitasha; Sehar, Irum; Wani, Zahoor A; Saxena, Arpita; Sharma, Parduman R; Bhushan, Shashi; Mondhe, Dilip M; Saxena, Ajit K

    2011-12-01

    A series of N-(2-anilino-pyridyl) linked 2-amino benzothiazoles (4a-n) and [1,2,4]triazolo [1,5-b]benzothiadiazine conjugates (5a-j) have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their antiproliferative activity. Some of these compounds (4h-k, 4n, and 5e) have exhibited potent cytotoxicity specifically against human leukemia HL-60 cell lines with IC(50) values in the range of 0.08-0.70 μM. All these compounds were tested for their effects on the cell cycle perturbations and induction of apoptosis. Morphological evidences of apoptosis, including fragmentation of nuclei and inter nucleosomal DNA laddering formation were clearly observed after 24h exposure to compound 4i. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that compound 4i showed drastic cell cycle perturbations due to concentration dependant increase in the sub-G0 region which comprises of both the apoptotic and debris fraction, thus implying the extent of cell death. These compounds trigger the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway that results in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential through activation of multiple caspases followed by activation of caspase-3, and finally cleavage of PARP. Further the mechanism of cell death was analysed by fluorescent microscopic analysis and also by scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of 4i correlated with induction of apoptosis, caspases activation and DNA damage and thus indicating the apoptotic pathway of anticancer effect of these compounds. PMID:22047801

  5. Supramolecular Cross-Links in Poly(alkyl methacrylate) Copolymers and Their Impact on the Mechanical and Reversible Adhesive Properties.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Christian; Salz, Ulrich; Moszner, Norbert; Fiore, Gina L; Weder, Christoph

    2015-06-24

    Hydrogen-bonded, side-chain-functionalized supramolecular poly(alkyl methacrylate)s were investigated as light- and temperature-responsive reversible adhesives that are useful for bonding and debonding on demand applications. Here, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) was functionalized with 2-ureido-4[1H]pyrimidinone (UPy) via a hexamethylenediisocyanate (HMDI) linker, to create a monomer (UPy-HMDI-HEMA) that serves to form supramolecular cross-links by way of forming quadruple hydrogen bonded dimers. UPy-HMDI-HEMA was copolymerized with either hexyl methacrylate or butyl methacrylate to create copolymers comprising 2.5, 5, or 10 mol % of the cross-linker. The mechanical properties of all (co)polymers were investigated with stress-strain experiments and dynamic mechanical analysis. Furthermore, the adhesive properties were studied at temperatures between 20 and 60 °C by testing single lap joints formed with stainless steel substrates. It was found that increasing the concentration of the UPy-HMDI-HEMA cross-linker leads to improved mechanical and adhesive properties at elevated temperatures. Concurrently, the reversibility of the bond formation remained unaffected, where rebonded samples displayed the same adhesive strength as regularly bonded samples. Debonding on demand abilities were also tested exemplarily for one copolymer, which for light-induced debonding experiments was blended with a UV-absorber that served as light-heat converter. Single lap joints were subjected to a constant force and heated or irradiated with UV light until debonding occurred. The necessary debonding temperature was comparable for direct heating and UV irradiation and varied between 28 and 82 °C, depending on the applied force. The latter also influenced the debonding time, which under the chosen conditions ranged from 30 s to 12 min. PMID:26043809

  6. Mechanisms of plastic deformation in highly cross-linked UHMWPE for total hip components--the molecular physics viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Plastic deformation is an unavoidable event in biomedical polymeric implants for load-bearing application during long-term in-vivo service life, which involves a mass transfer process, irreversible chain motion, and molecular reorganization. Deformation-induced microstructural alterations greatly affect mechanical properties and durability of implant devices. The present research focused on evaluating, from a molecular physics viewpoint, the impact of externally applied strain (or stress) in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) prostheses, subjected to radiation cross-linking and subsequent remelting for application in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Two different types of commercial acetabular liners, which belong to the first-generation highly cross-linked UHMWPE (HXLPE), were investigated by means of confocal/polarized Raman microprobe spectroscopy. The amount of crystalline region and the spatial distribution of molecular chain orientation were quantitatively analyzed according to a combined theory including Raman selection rules for the polyethylene orthorhombic structure and the orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical approach. The structurally important finding was that pronounced recrystallization and molecular reorientation increasingly appeared in the near-surface regions of HXLPE liners with increasing the amount of plastic (compressive) deformation stored in the microstructure. Such molecular rearrangements, occurred in response to external strains, locally increase surface cross-shear (CS) stresses, which in turn trigger microscopic wear processes in HXLPE acetabular liners. Thus, on the basis of the results obtained at the molecular scale, we emphasize here the importance of minimizing the development of irrecoverable deformation strain in order to retain the pristine and intrinsically high wear performance of HXLPE components. PMID:25460925

  7. Mechanisms of plastic deformation in highly cross-linked UHMWPE for total hip components--the molecular physics viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Plastic deformation is an unavoidable event in biomedical polymeric implants for load-bearing application during long-term in-vivo service life, which involves a mass transfer process, irreversible chain motion, and molecular reorganization. Deformation-induced microstructural alterations greatly affect mechanical properties and durability of implant devices. The present research focused on evaluating, from a molecular physics viewpoint, the impact of externally applied strain (or stress) in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) prostheses, subjected to radiation cross-linking and subsequent remelting for application in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Two different types of commercial acetabular liners, which belong to the first-generation highly cross-linked UHMWPE (HXLPE), were investigated by means of confocal/polarized Raman microprobe spectroscopy. The amount of crystalline region and the spatial distribution of molecular chain orientation were quantitatively analyzed according to a combined theory including Raman selection rules for the polyethylene orthorhombic structure and the orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical approach. The structurally important finding was that pronounced recrystallization and molecular reorientation increasingly appeared in the near-surface regions of HXLPE liners with increasing the amount of plastic (compressive) deformation stored in the microstructure. Such molecular rearrangements, occurred in response to external strains, locally increase surface cross-shear (CS) stresses, which in turn trigger microscopic wear processes in HXLPE acetabular liners. Thus, on the basis of the results obtained at the molecular scale, we emphasize here the importance of minimizing the development of irrecoverable deformation strain in order to retain the pristine and intrinsically high wear performance of HXLPE components.

  8. Flour mill stream blending affects sugar snap cookie and Japanese sponge cake quality and oxidative cross-linking potential of soft white wheat.

    PubMed

    Ramseyer, Daniel D; Bettge, Arthur D; Morris, Craig F

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the functional differences between straight grade (75% extraction rate) and patent (60% extraction rate) flour blends from 28 genetically pure soft white and club wheat grain lots, as evidenced by variation in sugar snap cookie and Japanese sponge cake quality. Functional differences were examined relative to arabinoxylan content, protein content, and oxidative cross-linking potential of flour slurries. Oxidative cross-linking measurements were obtained on flour slurries with a low shear Bostwick consistometer and considered endogenous oxidative cross-linking potential (water alone) or enhanced oxidative cross-linking potential (with added hydrogen peroxide-peroxidase). A 2-way ANOVA indicated that flour blend was the greater source of variation compared to grain lot for all response variables except water-extractable arabinoxylan content. Patent flours produced larger sugar snap cookies and Japanese sponge cakes, and contained significantly less total and water-unextractable arabinoxylans, protein, and ash than did straight grade flours. Patent flours produced more viscous slurries for endogenous and enhanced cross-linking measurements compared to the straight grade flours. The functional differences between patent and straight grade flours appear to be related to the particular mill streams that were utilized in the formulation of the 2 flour blends and compositional differences among those streams.

  9. The Kronig-Penney model extended to arbitrary potentials via numerical matrix mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelich, R. L.; Marsiglio, F.

    2015-09-01

    The Kronig-Penney model is a common starting point for studying the quantum mechanics of electrons in a confining periodic potential. This model uses a square-well potential; the energies and eigenstates can be obtained analytically for a single well, and then Bloch's theorem allows one to extend these solutions to the periodically repeating potential. In this work, we describe how to obtain simple numerical solutions for the eigenvalues and eigenstates for any confining one-dimensional potential within a unit cell and then extend this procedure, with virtually no extra effort, to the case of arbitrary periodically repeating potentials. In this way, one can study the band structure effects that arise from differently shaped potentials. One of these effects is the electron-hole mass asymmetry; more realistic unit cell potentials generally give rise to higher electron-hole mass asymmetries.

  10. Biomass Carbon in the South Mexican Pacific Coast: Exploring Mangrove Potential to REDD+ Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano, M.; Amezcua-Torrijos, I.

    2014-12-01

    Mangroves have the highest carbon stocks amongst tropical forests. In Mexico, however, little is known about their potential to mitigate climate change. In this work, we estimated biomass carbon stocks in the Southern Mexican Pacific Coast (~69,000 ha). We quantified above and belowground biomass carbon stocks at (1) the regional scale along two environmental strata (i.e. dry and wet), and (2) at the local scale along three geomorphological types of mangroves (i.e. fringe, estuarine and basin). Regional strata were defined using intensity and influence of rivers and, the mean annual precipitation and evapotranspiration ratio (i.e., wet < 1 > dry). By lowering the stressing environmental conditions (e.g., low salinity and high sediment accumulation), we expected the highest stocks in mangroves growing in wet and estuarine strata at the regional scale and local scale, respectively. Quantifications were carried out in sixty-six sites chosen through stratified randomized design in which six strata were obtained by a full combination of regional and local strata. In all strata, aboveground carbon represents 64-67% of total carbon. Total biomass carbon was higher in wet than dry stratum (W: 87.3 ± 6.9, D: 47.0 ± 5.0, p<0.001). While at local scale, total biomass carbon was high in estuarine mangroves of both wet and dry regions (W: 91.6 ± 7.8, D: 77.6 ± 14.8, p<0.001), and these were statistically similar to fringe wet mangroves (110.9 ± 24.2, p<0.001), the stratum with the highest total carbon. Following a conservative approach, the Mexican Southern Pacific Coast is storing near 20,344 Gg CO2e. If the historical annual deforestation rate of 0.54% continues, this region could emit between 0.03 and 14.4 Gg of CO2e ha/year, out of which wet estuarine mangroves would have the highest emission values. Evidence suggests that these mangroves are the most important strata in which REDD+ mechanisms could be implemented due to (1) their carbon stocks, and (2) their highest

  11. Comparative investigation of thermal and mechanical properties of cross-linked epoxy polymers with different curing agents by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jeyranpour, F; Alahyarizadeh, Gh; Arab, B

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to predict the thermal and mechanical properties of the cross-linked epoxy system composed of DGEBA resin and the curing agent TETA. To investigate the effects of curing agents, a comprehensive and comparative study was also performed on the thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA epoxy systems such as density, glass transition temperature (Tg), coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and elastic properties of different cross-linking densities and different temperatures. The results indicated that the glass transition temperature of DGEBA/TETA system calculated through density-temperature data, ∼ 385-395 °K, for the epoxy system with the cross-linking density of 62.5% has a better agreement with the experimental value (Tg, ∼ 400 °K) in comparison to the value calculated through the variation of cell volume in terms of temperature, 430-440 °K. They also indicated that CTE related parameters and elastic properties including Young, Bulk, and shear's moduli, and Poisson's ratio have a relative agreement with the experimental results. Comparison between the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy systems of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA showed that the DGEBA/DETDA has a higher Tg in all cross linking densities than that of DGEBA/TETA, while higher mechanical properties was observed in the case of DGEBA/TETA in almost all cross linking densities.

  12. Bacteriophage resistance mechanisms in the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum: linking genomic mutations to changes in bacterial virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger; Madsen, Lone; Middelboe, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen in salmonid aquaculture worldwide. Due to increased antibiotic resistance, pathogen control using bacteriophages has been explored as a possible alternative treatment. However, the effective use of bacteriophages in pathogen control requires overcoming the selection for phage resistance in the bacterial populations. Here, we analyzed resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum after phage exposure using whole-genome sequencing of the ancestral phage-sensitive strain 950106-1/1 and six phage-resistant isolates. The phage-resistant strains had all obtained unique insertions and/or deletions and point mutations distributed among intergenic and genic regions. Mutations in genes related to cell surface properties, gliding motility, and biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharides and cell wall were found. The observed links between phage resistance and the genetic modifications were supported by direct measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, biofilm formation, and secretion of extracellular enzymes, which were all impaired in the resistant strains, probably due to superficial structural changes. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) region was unaffected in the resistant isolates and thus did not play a role as a resistance mechanism for F. psychrophilum under the current conditions. All together, the results suggest that resistance in F. psychrophilum was driven by spontaneous mutations, which were associated with a number of derived effects on the physiological properties of the pathogen, including reduced virulence under in vitro conditions. Consequently, phage-driven physiological changes associated with resistance may have implications for the impact of the pathogen in aquaculture, and these effects of phage resistance on host properties are therefore important for the ongoing exploration of phage-based control of F. psychrophilum.

  13. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A; Johnson, Matthew S; Danielache, Sebastian O; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-10-29

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of (32)SO2, (33)SO2, (34)SO2, and (36)SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ(33)S/δ(34)S and Δ(36)S/Δ(33)S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  14. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  15. Non-Hermitian quantum mechanics: wave packet propagation on autoionizing potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moiseyev, N; Scheit, S; Cederbaum, L S

    2004-07-01

    The correspondence between the time-dependent and time-independent molecular dynamic formalisms is shown for autoionizing processes. We demonstrate that the definition of the inner product in non-Hermitian quantum mechanics plays a key role in the proof. When the final state of the process is dissociative, it is technically favorable to introduce a complex absorbing potential into the calculations. The conditions which this potential should fulfill are briefly discussed. An illustrative numerical example is presented involving three potential energy surfaces. PMID:15260598

  16. POTENTIAL MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR CHLOROTRIAZINE-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CATECHOLAMINES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Potential Mechanisms Responsible for Chlorotriazine-induced Changes in Catecholamine Metabolism in Pheochromocytoma (PC12) Cells*
    PARIKSHIT C. DAS1, WILLIAM K. McELROY2 , AND RALPH L. COOPER2+
    1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chape...

  17. An Introductory Organic Chemistry Review Homework Exercise: Deriving Potential Mechanisms for Glucose Ring Opening in Mutarotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Margaret; Holman, R. W.; Slade, Tyler; Clark, Shelley L. D.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    A unique homework assignment has been designed as a review exercise to be implemented near the end of the one-year undergraduate organic chemistry sequence. Within the framework of the exercise, students derive potential mechanisms for glucose ring opening in the aqueous mutarotation process. In this endeavor, 21 general review principles are…

  18. Colony failure linked to low sperm viability in honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens and an exploration of potential causative factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Queen health is closely linked to colony performance in honey bees as a single queen is normally responsible for all egg laying and brood production within the colony. In the U. S. in recent years, queens have been failing at a high rate; with 50% or greater of queens replaced in colonies within 6 m...

  19. Lifelong bilingualism and neural reserve against Alzheimer's disease: a review of findings and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gold, Brian T

    2015-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain disorder that initially affects medial temporal lobe circuitry and memory functions. Current drug treatments have only modest effects on the symptomatic course of the disease. In contrast, a growing body of evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may delay the onset of clinical AD symptoms by several years. The purpose of the present review is to summarize evidence for bilingualism as a reserve variable against AD and discuss potential underlying neurocognitive mechanisms. Evidence is reviewed suggesting that bilingualism may delay clinical AD symptoms by protecting frontostriatal and frontoparietal executive control circuitry rather than medial temporal lobe memory circuitry. Cellular and molecular mechanisms that may contribute to bilingual cognitive reserve effects are discussed, including those that may affect neuronal metabolic functions, dynamic neuronal-glial interactions, vascular factors, myelin structure and neurochemical signaling. Future studies that may test some of these potential mechanisms of bilingual CR effects are proposed.

  20. New identities from quantum-mechanical sum rules of parity-related potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayorinde, O. A.; Chisholm, K.; Belloni, M.; Robinett, R. W.

    2010-06-01

    We apply quantum-mechanical sum rules to pairs of one-dimensional systems defined by potential energy functions related by parity. Specifically, we consider symmetric potentials, V(x) = V(- x), and their parity-restricted partners, ones with V(x) but defined only on the positive half-line. We extend recent discussions of sum rules for the quantum bouncer by considering the parity-extended version of this problem, defined by the symmetric linear potential, V(z) = F|z| and find new classes of constraints on the zeros of the Airy function, Ai(ζ), and its derivative, Ai'(ζ). We also consider the parity-restricted version of the harmonic oscillator and find completely new classes of mathematical relations, unrelated to those of the ordinary oscillator problem. These two soluble quantum-mechanical systems defined by power-law potentials provide examples of how the form of the potential (both parity and continuity properties) affects the convergence of quantum-mechanical sum rules. We also discuss semi-classical predictions for expectation values and the Stark effect for these systems.

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation: Mechanisms, Pathophysiology, and Potential Therapies in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Steven J; Kawai, Tatsuo; O'Brien, Shannon; Thomas, Walter; Harris, Raymond C; Eguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation impacts the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, and inhibition of EGFR activity is emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat diseases including hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, renal fibrosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm. The capacity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, such as angiotensin II (AngII), to promote EGFR signaling is called transactivation and is well described, yet delineating the molecular processes and functional relevance of this crosstalk has been challenging. Moreover, these critical findings are dispersed among many different fields. The aim of our review is to highlight recent advancements in defining the signaling cascades and downstream consequences of EGFR transactivation in the cardiovascular renal system. We also focus on studies that link EGFR transactivation to animal models of the disease, and we discuss potential therapeutic applications.

  2. Comparative role of potential structure in classical, semiclassical, and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Judson, R.S.; Shi, S.; Rabitz, H.

    1989-02-15

    The corresponding effects of features in the potential on classical, semiclassical, and quantum mechanics are probed using the technique of functional sensitivity analysis. It is shown that the classical and quantum functional sensitivities are equivalent in the classical (small (h/2..pi..)) and harmonic limits. Classical and quantum mechanics are known to react in qualitatively similar ways provided that features on the potential are smooth on the length scale of oscillations in the quantum wave function. By using functional sensitivity analysis, we are able to show in detail how the classical and quantum dynamics differ in the way that they sense the potential. Two examples are given, the first of which is the harmonic oscillator. This problem is well understood by other means but is useful to examine because it illustrates the detailed information about the interaction of the potential and the dynamics which can be provided by functional sensitivity analysis, simplifying the analysis of more complex systems. The second example is the collinear H+H/sub 2/ reaction. In that case there are a number of detailed and striking differences between the ways that classical and quantum mechanics react to features on the potential. For features which are broad compared to oscillations in the wave function, the two react in qualitatively the same way. The sensitivities are oscillatory, however, and there are phasing differences between the classical and quantum sensitivity functions. This means that using classical mechanics plus experimental data in an inversion scheme intended to find the ''true'' potential will necessarily introduce sizeable errors.

  3. Cation transport mechanisms in Mycoplasma mycoides var. Capri cells. The nature of the link between K+ and Na+ transport

    PubMed Central

    Benyoucef, Mohammed; Rigaud, Jean-Louis; Leblanc, Gérard

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the links between the mechanisms of Na+, K+ and H+ movements in glycolysing Mycoplasma mycoides var. Capri cells. In the light of the results reported in the preceding paper [Benyoucef, Rigaud & Leblanc (1982) Biochem. J. 208, 529–538], we investigated certain properties of the membrane-bound ATPase of Mycoplasma cells, with special reference to its ionic requirements and sensitivity to specific inhibitors. Our findings show, first, that, although Na+ stimulated ATPase activity, K+ did not affect it, and, secondly, that NN′-dicyclocarboidi-imide and 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD) were potent inhibitors of the basal ATPase activity, which was unaffected by vanadate and ouabain. We also investigated the movements of Na+ and H+ under the experimental conditions applied to the study of the K+ uptake reported in the preceding paper, and found that when `Na+-loaded cells' previously equilibrated with 22Na+ were diluted in a sodium-free medium, addition of glucose induced a rapid efflux of 22Na+. This energy-dependent efflux was independent of the presence of KCl in the medium. Studies of the changes in internal pH by 9-aminoacridine fluorescence or [14C]methylamine distribution indicated that the movement of Na+ was coupled to that of protons moving in the opposite direction, a finding that supports the presence of an Na+/H+ antiport. When Na+-loaded cells are diluted in an Na+-rich medium the Na+/H+ antiport is still active, but cannot decrease the intracellular Na+ concentration. Under such conditions, net 22Na+ extrusion is specifically dependent on the presence of K+ in the medium. The present results and those derived from the study of K+ accumulation (the preceding paper) can be rationalized by assuming that Mycoplasma mycoides var. Capri cells contain two transport systems for Na+ extrusion: an Na+/H+ antiport and an ATP-consuming Na+/K+-exchange system. PMID:6219666

  4. Early-life stress interactions with the epigenome: potential mechanisms driving vulnerability toward psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Candace R; Olive, M Foster

    2014-09-01

    Throughout the 20th century a body of literature concerning the long-lasting effects of the early environment was produced. Adverse experiences in early life, or early-life stress (ELS), is associated with a higher risk of developing various psychiatric illnesses. The mechanisms driving the complex interplay between ELS and adult phenotype has baffled many investigators for decades. Over the last decade, the new field of neuroepigenetics has emerged as one possible mechanism by which ELS can have far-reaching effects on adult phenotype, behavior, and risk for psychiatric illness. Here we review two commonly investigated epigenetic mechanisms, histone modifications and DNA methylation, and the emerging field of neuroepigenetics as they relate to ELS. We discuss the current animal literature demonstrating ELS-induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression that results in altered adult phenotypes. We also briefly discuss other areas in which neuroepigenetics has emerged as a potential mechanism underlying environmental and genetic interactions.

  5. Mind your errors: evidence for a neural mechanism linking growth mind-set to adaptive posterror adjustments.

    PubMed

    Moser, Jason S; Schroder, Hans S; Heeter, Carrie; Moran, Tim P; Lee, Yu-Hao

    2011-12-01

    How well people bounce back from mistakes depends on their beliefs about learning and intelligence. For individuals with a growth mind-set, who believe intelligence develops through effort, mistakes are seen as opportunities to learn and improve. For individuals with a fixed mind-set, who believe intelligence is a stable characteristic, mistakes indicate lack of ability. We examined performance-monitoring event-related potentials (ERPs) to probe the neural mechanisms underlying these different reactions to mistakes. Findings revealed that a growth mind-set was associated with enhancement of the error positivity component (Pe), which reflects awareness of and allocation of attention to mistakes. More growth-minded individuals also showed superior accuracy after mistakes compared with individuals endorsing a more fixed mind-set. It is critical to note that Pe amplitude mediated the relationship between mind-set and posterror accuracy. These results suggest that neural mechanisms indexing on-line awareness of and attention to mistakes are intimately involved in growth-minded individuals' ability to rebound from mistakes.

  6. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-03-31

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN.

  7. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN. PMID:25826110

  8. Magnetic particle-linked anti hCG β antibody for immunoassay of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), potential application to early pregnancy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Ting; Yeh, Jay Z; Jiang, Chi-Ming; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2012-07-31

    The objective of this study was to develop a magnetic particle-linked monoclonal antibody to hCG β for immunosorbent assay of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with improved detection sensitivity. Monoclonal antibody against hCG β was found to be optimally cross-linked to the superparamagnetic particles (SPIO) using EDC and NHS as cross-linking reagents. This superparamagnetic particle-linked monoclonal antibody was able to concentrate hCG from a tested solution for further ELISA assay using horse radish peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibody against hCG β. This hybrid technique had greatly decreased the detection limit to 0.1 mIU/mL, making an early detection of pregnancy possible. With an improved sensitivity and simple operation, the magnetic particle-linked anti hCG β antibody for immunoassay of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has a great potential to supersede the traditional ELISA for pregnancy diagnosis. PMID:22542932

  9. Cross-linking of Thy-1 glycoproteins or high-affinity IgE receptors induces mast cell activation via different mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Dráberová, L; Dráber, P

    1993-01-01

    Rat peritoneal and pleural mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells, RBL-2H3, have been previously shown to be activated by Thy-1-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In the present study we investigated the mechanism of Thy-1-mediated activation and compared it with activation induced by cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor. Binding of an IgG Thy-1 x 1-specific mAb, MRCOX7 (OX7), to RBL-2H3 cells and mast cells, and activation of RBL-2H3 by the OX7 were abrogated by pretreatment of the cells with phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). The F(ab')2 fragment of OX7, in contrast to the Fab' fragment, induced cell activation as well as intact OX7 mAb. Cells sensitized with IgE exhibited an increased responsiveness to anti-Thy-1 antibodies suggesting formation of functional complexes of IgE receptor/IgE/Thy-1/anti-Thy-1. Pretreatment of RBL-2H3 cells with cholera toxin potentiated activation induced by IgE+antigen (Ag) and IgE+OX7, but had no effect on activation induced by OX7 antibody alone. Similarly, dexamethasone had no effect on OX7-induced activation but inhibited IgE+Ag- and IgE+OX7-induced activation. Analysis of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins in RBL-2H3 cell lysates revealed that IgE+Ag and IgE+OX7 induced a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins that were not tyrosine phosphorylated in cells exposed to OX7 mAb alone. Similar results were obtained when RBL-2H3-derived cells, expressing transfected mouse Thy-1.2, were activated with Thy-1.2-specific IgM antibody. The combined data suggest that Thy-1-specific antibodies activate cells by a mechanism that is different from activation induced by cross-linking of high-affinity IgE receptor. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7902332

  10. Despair-associated memory requires a slow-onset CA1 long-term potentiation with unique underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jing, Liang; Duan, Ting-Ting; Tian, Meng; Yuan, Qiang; Tan, Ji-Wei; Zhu, Yong-Yong; Ding, Ze-Yang; Cao, Jun; Yang, Yue-Xiong; Zhang, Xia; Mao, Rong-Rong; Richter-Levin, Gal; Zhou, Qi-Xin; Xu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of despair that occurs with uncontrollable stressful event is probably retained by memory, termed despair-associated memory, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report that forced swimming (FS) with no hope to escape, but not hopefully escapable swimming (ES), enhances hippocampal α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)-dependent GluA1 Ser831 phosphorylation (S831-P), induces a slow-onset CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) in freely moving rats and leads to increased test immobility 24-h later. Before FS application of the antagonists to block S831-P or N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) or glucocorticoid receptor (GR) disrupts LTP and reduces test immobility, to levels similar to those of the ES group. Because these mechanisms are specifically linked with the hopeless of escape from FS, we suggest that despair-associated memory occurs with an endogenous CA1 LTP that is intriguingly mediated by a unique combination of rapid S831-P with NMDAR and GR activation to shape subsequent behavioral despair. PMID:26449319

  11. Despair-associated memory requires a slow-onset CA1 long-term potentiation with unique underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Liang; Duan, Ting-Ting; Tian, Meng; Yuan, Qiang; Tan, Ji-Wei; Zhu, Yong-Yong; Ding, Ze-Yang; Cao, Jun; Yang, Yue-Xiong; Zhang, Xia; Mao, Rong-Rong; Richter-levin, Gal; Zhou, Qi-Xin; Xu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of despair that occurs with uncontrollable stressful event is probably retained by memory, termed despair-associated memory, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report that forced swimming (FS) with no hope to escape, but not hopefully escapable swimming (ES), enhances hippocampal α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)-dependent GluA1 Ser831 phosphorylation (S831-P), induces a slow-onset CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) in freely moving rats and leads to increased test immobility 24-h later. Before FS application of the antagonists to block S831-P or N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) or glucocorticoid receptor (GR) disrupts LTP and reduces test immobility, to levels similar to those of the ES group. Because these mechanisms are specifically linked with the hopeless of escape from FS, we suggest that despair-associated memory occurs with an endogenous CA1 LTP that is intriguingly mediated by a unique combination of rapid S831-P with NMDAR and GR activation to shape subsequent behavioral despair. PMID:26449319

  12. The Effects of Puerarin on Rat Ventricular Myocytes and the Potential Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Zhao, Manxi; Liang, Shenghui; Huang, Quanshu; Xiao, Yunchuan; Ye, Liang; Wang, Qinyi; He, Longmei; Ma, Lanxiang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Hui; Ke, Xiao; Gu, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    Puerarin, a known isoflavone, is commonly found as a Chinese herb medicine. It is widely used in China to treat cardiac diseases such as angina, cardiac infarction and arrhythmia. However, its cardioprotective mechanism remains unclear. In this study, puerarin significantly prolonged ventricular action potential duration (APD) with a dosage dependent manner in the micromolar range on isolated rat ventricular myocytes. However, submicromolar puerarin had no effect on resting membrane potential (RMP), action potential amplitude (APA) and maximal velocity of depolarization (Vmax) of action potential. Only above the concentration of 10 mM, puerarin exhibited more aggressive effect on action potential, and shifted RMP to the positive direction. Millimolar concentrations of puerarin significantly inhibited inward rectified K+ channels in a dosage dependent manner, and exhibited bigger effects upon Kir2.1 vs Kir2.3 in transfected HEK293 cells. As low as micromolar range concentrations of puerarin significantly inhibited Kv7.1 and IKs. These inhibitory effects may due to the direct inhibition of puerarin upon channels not via the PKA-dependent pathway. These results provided direct preclinical evidence that puerarin prolonged APD via its inhibitory effect upon Kv7.1 and IKs, contributing to a better understanding the mechanism of puerarin cardioprotection in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27762288

  13. Potential Mechanisms for IgG4 Inhibition of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K; Till, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    IgG4 is the least abundant IgG subclass in human serum, representing less than 5% of all IgG. Increases in IgG4 occur following chronic exposure to antigen and are generally associated with states of immune tolerance. In line with this, IgG4 is regarded as an anti-inflammatory antibody with a limited ability to elicit effective immune responses. Furthermore, IgG4 attenuates allergic responses by inhibiting the activity of IgE. The mechanism by which IgG4 inhibits IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has been investigated using a variety of model systems leading to two proposed mechanisms. First by sequestering antigen, IgG4 can function as a blocking antibody, preventing cross-linking of receptor bound IgE. Second IgG4 has been proposed to co-stimulate the inhibitory IgG receptor FcγRIIb, which can negatively regulate FcεRI signaling and in turn inhibit effector cell activation. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural features of human IgG4 have shed light on the unique functional and immunologic properties of IgG4. The aim of this review is to evaluate our current understanding of IgG4 biology and reassess the mechanisms by which IgG4 functions to inhibit IgE-mediated allergic responses.

  14. The Electrokinetic Mechanism of Hydrothermal-Circulation-Related and Production-Induced Self-Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ishido, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Sugihara, M.

    1987-01-20

    Self-potential (SP) surveys were carried out on a number of geothermal areas in Japan during the last decade. In most cases SP anomalies of positive polarity are found to overlie high temperature upflow zones. Streaming potential generated by hydrothermal circulation (Ishido, 1981) is considered to be the most likely cause of the observed positive anomalies. Repeated surveys conducted on the Nigorikawa caldera in Japan detected a change in SP induced by production of geothermal fluids. The observed change is dipolar in waveform and can also be attributed to an electrokinetic mechanism. 6 figs., 14 refs.

  15. Mechanisms of CaMKII action in long-term potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lisman, John; Yasuda, Ryohei; Raghavachari, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength occurs during learning and can last for long periods, making it a probable mechanism for memory storage. LTP induction results in calcium entry, which activates calcium–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII subsequently translocates to the synapse, where it binds to the NMDA-type glutamate receptors and produces potentiation by phosphorylating principal and auxiliary subunits of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. These processes all are localized to stimulated spines and account for the synapse specificity of LTP. In the later stages of LTP, CaMKII has a structural role in enlarging and strengthening the synapse. PMID:22334212

  16. ER-stress and apoptosis: molecular mechanisms and potential relevance in infection.

    PubMed

    Häcker, Georg

    2014-10-01

    During ER-stress, one of the responses a cell can choose is apoptosis. Apoptosis generally is a cell's preferred response when other control mechanisms are overwhelmed. We now have a reasonably clear molecular picture what is happening once the apoptotic apparatus has been started. Unclear however are the majority of the upstream pathways that connect other signalling to apoptosis. During ER-stress, confirmed apoptosis-regulating targets are pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2-family, whose concerted action induces apoptosis. I will here discuss how mitochondrial apoptosis is triggered, how this is linked to the ER-stress response and in what way this may be relevant during microbial infections.

  17. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP.

  18. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  19. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. PMID:26156387

  20. Molecular mechanism of antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cell line.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Muhammad; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Farooq, Ahsana D; Rasheed, Huma; Mesaik, Ahmed M; Choudhary, Muhammad I; Channa, Iffat S; Khan, Salman A; Erukainure, Ochuko L

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. We investigated the molecular mechanism of antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cells by cell cycle, viability, cytokines, calcium ion and gene expression analysis. Acacia honey inhibited cells proliferation, arrested G0/G1 phase, stimulated cytokines, calcium ion release as well as suppressed p53 and Bcl-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. We proposed that the molecular mechanism of the antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cell line is due to cell cycle arrest, stimulation of cytokines and calcium ion as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 and p53 genes.

  1. Music and Memory in Alzheimer's Disease and The Potential Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peck, Katlyn J; Girard, Todd A; Russo, Frank A; Fiocco, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    With population aging and a projected exponential expansion of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the development of treatment and prevention programs has become a fervent area of research and discovery. A growing body of evidence suggests that music exposure can enhance memory and emotional function in persons with AD. However, there is a paucity of research that aims to identify specific underlying neural mechanisms associated with music's beneficial effects in this particular population. As such, this paper reviews existing anecdotal and empirical evidence related to the enhancing effects of music exposure on cognitive function and further provides a discussion on the potential underlying mechanisms that may explain music's beneficial effect. Specifically, this paper will outline the potential role of the dopaminergic system, the autonomic nervous system, and the default network in explaining how music may enhance memory function in persons with AD. PMID:26967216

  2. Music and Memory in Alzheimer's Disease and The Potential Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peck, Katlyn J; Girard, Todd A; Russo, Frank A; Fiocco, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    With population aging and a projected exponential expansion of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the development of treatment and prevention programs has become a fervent area of research and discovery. A growing body of evidence suggests that music exposure can enhance memory and emotional function in persons with AD. However, there is a paucity of research that aims to identify specific underlying neural mechanisms associated with music's beneficial effects in this particular population. As such, this paper reviews existing anecdotal and empirical evidence related to the enhancing effects of music exposure on cognitive function and further provides a discussion on the potential underlying mechanisms that may explain music's beneficial effect. Specifically, this paper will outline the potential role of the dopaminergic system, the autonomic nervous system, and the default network in explaining how music may enhance memory function in persons with AD.

  3. Potential effects of the introduction of the discrete address beacon system data link on air/ground information transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    This study of Aviation Safety Reporting System reports suggests that benefits should accure from implementation of discrete address beacon system data link. The phase enhanced terminal information system service is expected to provide better terminal information than present systems by improving currency and accuracy. In the exchange of air traffic control messages, discrete address insures that only the intended recipient receives and acts on a specific message. Visual displays and printer copy of messages should mitigate many of the reported problems associated with voice communications. The problems that remain unaffected include error in addressing the intended recipient and messages whose content is wrong but are otherwise correct as to format and reasonableness.

  4. Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25355741

  5. Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

    2015-11-01

    A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25361560

  6. Archaeal Ubiquitin-like SAMP3 is Isopeptide-linked to Proteins via a UbaA-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Hugo V.; Antelmann, Haike; Hepowit, Nathaniel; Chavarria, Nikita E.; Krause, David J.; Pritz, Jonathan R.; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Humbard, Matthew A.; Brocchieri, Luciano; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    SAMP1 and SAMP2 are ubiquitin-like proteins that function as protein modifiers and are required for the production of sulfur-containing biomolecules in the archaeon Haloferax volcanii. Here we report a novel small archaeal modifier protein (named SAMP3) with a β-grasp fold and C-terminal diglycine motif characteristic of ubiquitin that is functional in protein conjugation in Hfx. volcanii. SAMP3 conjugates were dependent on the ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA) for synthesis and were cleaved by the JAMM/MPN+ domain metalloprotease HvJAMM1. Twenty-three proteins (28 lysine residues) were found to be isopeptide-linked to the C-terminal carboxylate of SAMP3, and 331 proteins were reproducibly found associated with SAMP3 in a UbaA-dependent manner based on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. The molybdopterin (MPT) synthase large subunit homolog MoaE, found samp3ylated at conserved active site lysine residues in MS/MS analysis, was also shown to be covalently bound to SAMP3 by immunoprecipitation and tandem affinity purifications. HvJAMM1 was demonstrated to catalyze the cleavage of SAMP3 from MoaE, suggesting a mechanism of controlling MPT synthase activity. The levels of samp3ylated proteins and samp3 transcripts were found to be increased by the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide to aerobically growing cells. Thus, we propose a model in which samp3ylation is covalent and reversible and controls the activity of enzymes such as MPT synthase. Sampylation of MPT synthase may govern the levels of molybdenum cofactor available and thus facilitate the scavenging of oxygen prior to the transition to respiration with molybdenum-cofactor-containing terminal reductases that use alternative electron acceptors such as dimethyl sulfoxide. Overall, our study of SAMP3 provides new insight into the diversity of functional ubiquitin-like protein modifiers and the network of ubiquitin-like protein targets in Archaea. PMID:24097257

  7. Archaeal ubiquitin-like SAMP3 is isopeptide-linked to proteins via a UbaA-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Hugo V; Antelmann, Haike; Hepowit, Nathaniel; Chavarria, Nikita E; Krause, David J; Pritz, Jonathan R; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Humbard, Matthew A; Brocchieri, Luciano; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    SAMP1 and SAMP2 are ubiquitin-like proteins that function as protein modifiers and are required for the production of sulfur-containing biomolecules in the archaeon Haloferax volcanii. Here we report a novel small archaeal modifier protein (named SAMP3) with a β-grasp fold and C-terminal diglycine motif characteristic of ubiquitin that is functional in protein conjugation in Hfx. volcanii. SAMP3 conjugates were dependent on the ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA) for synthesis and were cleaved by the JAMM/MPN+ domain metalloprotease HvJAMM1. Twenty-three proteins (28 lysine residues) were found to be isopeptide-linked to the C-terminal carboxylate of SAMP3, and 331 proteins were reproducibly found associated with SAMP3 in a UbaA-dependent manner based on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. The molybdopterin (MPT) synthase large subunit homolog MoaE, found samp3ylated at conserved active site lysine residues in MS/MS analysis, was also shown to be covalently bound to SAMP3 by immunoprecipitation and tandem affinity purifications. HvJAMM1 was demonstrated to catalyze the cleavage of SAMP3 from MoaE, suggesting a mechanism of controlling MPT synthase activity. The levels of samp3ylated proteins and samp3 transcripts were found to be increased by the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide to aerobically growing cells. Thus, we propose a model in which samp3ylation is covalent and reversible and controls the activity of enzymes such as MPT synthase. Sampylation of MPT synthase may govern the levels of molybdenum cofactor available and thus facilitate the scavenging of oxygen prior to the transition to respiration with molybdenum-cofactor-containing terminal reductases that use alternative electron acceptors such as dimethyl sulfoxide. Overall, our study of SAMP3 provides new insight into the diversity of functional ubiquitin-like protein modifiers and the network of ubiquitin-like protein targets in Archaea. PMID:24097257

  8. Effects of deformation mechanisms on reservoir potential in central Appalachian overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.

    1988-05-01

    Finite strain associated with various deformation mechanisms can significantly alter the porosity and permeability of reservoir rocks in overthrust belts. Mechanisms such as pressure solution and cataclasis reduce porosity and permeability, whereas extension fracturing and brecciation increase them. A theoretical derivation of the relationship between finite strain and original and final porosity indicates that little porosity is preserved in rocks whose strain (R) exceeds 1.5. Studies of variations in the relative importance of these mechanisms are used to define regional and local variations in reservoir properties in the central Appalachian overthrust belt. Regional limits of hydrocarbon potential are defined by combining finite-strain data with thermal-maturation (conodont color alteration index or CAI) data. On the basis of these studies, the author concludes that the potential for oil production is primarily restricted to the Appalachian Plateau province. The potential for gas production decreases from west to east in the Valley and Ridge and Plateau provinces, with its approximate eastern limit defined by the North Mountain thrust. 20 figures, 2 tables.

  9. A review of potential neurotoxic mechanisms among three chlorinated organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Ambuja S. Barone, Stan; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Cooper, Glinda S.

    2011-08-15

    The potential for central nervous system depressant effects from three widely used chlorinated solvents, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PERC), and dichloromethane (DCM), has been shown in human and animal studies. Commonalities of neurobehavioral and neurophysiological changes for the chlorinated solvents in in vivo studies suggest that there is a common mechanism(s) of action in producing resultant neurotoxicological consequences. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanistic studies conducted with these chlorinated solvents and to propose potential mechanisms of action for the different neurological effects observed. Mechanistic studies indicate that this solvent class has several molecular targets in the brain. Additionally, there are several pieces of evidence from animal studies indicating this solvent class alters neurochemical functions in the brain. Although earlier evidence indicated that these three chlorinated solvents perturb the lipid bilayer, more recent data suggest an interaction between several specific neuronal receptors produces the resultant neurobehavioral effects. Collectively, TCE, PERC, and DCM have been reported to interact directly with several different classes of neuronal receptors by generally inhibiting excitatory receptors/channels and potentiating the function of inhibitory receptors/channels. Given this mechanistic information and available studies for TCE, DCM, and PERC, we provide hypotheses on primary targets (e.g. ion channel targets) that appear to be most influential in producing the resultant neurological effects. - Research Highlights: > Comparison of neurological effects among TCE, PERC, and DCM. > Correlation of mechanistic findings to neurological effects. > Data support that TCE, PERC, and DCM interact with several ion channels to produce neurological changes.

  10. An exploration of the potential mechanisms and translational potential of five medicinal plants for applications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Taner; Coulibaly, Ahmed Y; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia, and represents a vast worldwide socio-economic burden, and in the absence of a current cure, effective therapeutic strategies are still needed. Cholinergic and cerebral blood flow deficits, excessive levels of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and glutamate excitatory mechanisms are all believed to contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Scoparia dulcis, Catharanthus roseus, Sesamum indicum, Erythrina senegalensis and Vigna unguiculata represent five plants that have been used as traditional medicines for the treatment of AD in certain cultures. Review of the scientific literature was conducted to explore the properties of these plants that might be beneficial and explain what would be perceived by many to be largely anecdotal evidence of their benefit. All plants were found to possess varying levels of anti-oxidant capability. Scoparia dulcis was also found to potentiate nerve growth factor-like effects upon cell lines. Catharanthus roseus appears to inhibit acetylcholinesterase with relatively high potency, while Sesamum indicum demonstrated the strongest antioxidant ability. Comparisons with currently used plant derived therapeutics illustrate how these plants may be likely to have some therapeutic benefits in AD. The evidence presented also highlights how appropriate dietary supplementation with some of these plants in various cultural settings might have effects analogous or complementary to the so-called protective Mediterranean diet. However, prior to embarking on making any formal recommendations to this end, further rigorous evaluation is needed to better elucidate the breadth and potential toxicological aspects of medicinal properties harboured by these plants. This would be vital to ensuring a more informed and safe delivery of preparations of these plants if they were to be considered as a form of dietary supplementation and where appropriate, how these might interact

  11. An exploration of the potential mechanisms and translational potential of five medicinal plants for applications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Taner; Coulibaly, Ahmed Y; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia, and represents a vast worldwide socio-economic burden, and in the absence of a current cure, effective therapeutic strategies are still needed. Cholinergic and cerebral blood flow deficits, excessive levels of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and glutamate excitatory mechanisms are all believed to contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Scoparia dulcis, Catharanthus roseus, Sesamum indicum, Erythrina senegalensis and Vigna unguiculata represent five plants that have been used as traditional medicines for the treatment of AD in certain cultures. Review of the scientific literature was conducted to explore the properties of these plants that might be beneficial and explain what would be perceived by many to be largely anecdotal evidence of their benefit. All plants were found to possess varying levels of anti-oxidant capability. Scoparia dulcis was also found to potentiate nerve growth factor-like effects upon cell lines. Catharanthus roseus appears to inhibit acetylcholinesterase with relatively high potency, while Sesamum indicum demonstrated the strongest antioxidant ability. Comparisons with currently used plant derived therapeutics illustrate how these plants may be likely to have some therapeutic benefits in AD. The evidence presented also highlights how appropriate dietary supplementation with some of these plants in various cultural settings might have effects analogous or complementary to the so-called protective Mediterranean diet. However, prior to embarking on making any formal recommendations to this end, further rigorous evaluation is needed to better elucidate the breadth and potential toxicological aspects of medicinal properties harboured by these plants. This would be vital to ensuring a more informed and safe delivery of preparations of these plants if they were to be considered as a form of dietary supplementation and where appropriate, how these might interact

  12. Shifts in a single muscle's control potential of body dynamics are determined by mechanical feedback

    PubMed Central

    Sponberg, Simon; Libby, Thomas; Mullens, Chris H.; Full, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Muscles are multi-functional structures that interface neural and mechanical systems. Muscle work depends on a large multi-dimensional space of stimulus (neural) and strain (mechanical) parameters. In our companion paper, we rewrote activation to individual muscles in intact, behaving cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis L.), revealing a specific muscle's potential to control body dynamics in different behaviours. Here, we use those results to provide the biologically relevant parameters for in situ work measurements. We test four hypotheses about how muscle function changes to provide mechanisms for the observed control responses. Under isometric conditions, a graded increase in muscle stress underlies its linear actuation during standing behaviours. Despite typically absorbing energy, this muscle can recruit two separate periods of positive work when controlling running. This functional change arises from mechanical feedback filtering a linear increase in neural activation into nonlinear work output. Changing activation phase again led to positive work recruitment, but at different times, consistent with the muscle's ability to also produce a turn. Changes in muscle work required considering the natural sequence of strides and separating swing and stance contributions of work. Both in vivo control potentials and in situ work loops were necessary to discover the neuromechanical coupling enabling control. PMID:21502130

  13. Cadmium transfer and detoxification mechanisms in a soil-mulberry-silkworm system: phytoremediation potential.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Shuifeng

    2015-11-01

    Phytoremediation has been proven to be an environmentally sound alternative for the recovery of contaminated soils, and the economic profit that comes along with the process might stimulate its field use. This study investigated cadmium (Cd) transfer and detoxification mechanisms in a soil-mulberry-silkworm system to estimate the suitability of the mulberry and silkworm as an alternative method for the remediation of Cd-polluted soil; it also explored the underlying mechanisms regulating the trophic transfer of Cd. The results show that both the mulberry and silkworm have high Cd tolerance. The transfer factor suggests that the mulberry has high potential for Cd extraction from polluted soil. The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in mulberry leaves show that cell wall deposition and vacuolar compartmentalization play important role in Cd tolerance. In the presence of increasing Cd concentrations in silkworm food, detoxification mechanisms (excretion and homeostasis) were activated so that excess Cd was excreted in fecal balls, and metallothionein levels in the mid-gut, the posterior of the silk gland, and the fat body of silkworms were enhanced. And, the Cd concentrations in silk are at a low level, ranging from 0.02 to 0.21 mg kg(-1). Therefore, these mechanisms of detoxification can regulate Cd trophic transfer, and mulberry planting and silkworm breeding has high phytoremediation potential for Cd-contaminated soil.

  14. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra”

    PubMed Central

    Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y.; Prosser, James I.; Nicol, Graeme W.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra” provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of “Ca. Nitrosotalea devanaterra” were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization. PMID:26896134

  15. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra".

    PubMed

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2016-05-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra" provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization. PMID:26896134

  16. A model of the mechanism of cooperativity and associativity of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus: a fundamental mechanism of associative memory and learning.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, T; Hara, K

    1991-01-01

    Long-Term Potentiation (LTP) has three properties: (1) input specificity, (2) cooperativity and (3) associativity. In a previous paper, we proposed an integrated model of the mechanisms of the induction and maintenance of LTP with input specificity. In this paper, a model of the mechanism of cooperative and associative LTP is described. According to computer simulations of the model, its mechanism is based on the spread of synaptic potentials. PMID:2049412

  17. Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko, Julia; Corsini, Emanuela; Williams, Marc A.; Decker, William; Manjili, Masoud H.; Otsuki, Takemi; Singh, Neetu; Al-Mulla, Faha; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Colacci, Anna Maria; Vaccari, Monica; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Raju, Jayadev; Hamid, Roslida A.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano; Roy, Rabindra; Woodrick, Jordan; Salem, Hosni K.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Brown, Dustin G.; Lowe, Leroy; Lyerly, H.Kim

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-β, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1α, IL-6, IL-1α, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicalscan simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression. PMID:26002081

  18. Spinal mechanisms underlying potentiation of hindpaw responses observed after transient hindpaw ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Mika; Komagata, Seiji; Tsukano, Hiroaki; Hishida, Ryuichi; Kohno, Tatsuro; Baba, Hiroshi; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemia produces postischemic tingling sensation. Ischemia also produces nerve conduction block that may modulate spinal neural circuits. In the present study, reduced mechanical thresholds for hindpaw-withdrawal reflex were found in mice after transient hindpaw ischemia, which was produced by a high pressure applied around the hindpaw for 30 min. The reduction in the threshold was blocked by spinal application of LY354740, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Neural activities in the spinal cord and the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) were investigated using activity-dependent changes in endogenous fluorescence derived from mitochondrial flavoproteins. Ischemic treatment induced potentiation of the ipsilateral spinal and contralateral S1 responses to hindpaw stimulation. Both types of potentiation were blocked by spinal application of LY354740. The contralateral S1 responses, abolished by lesioning the ipsilateral dorsal column, reappeared after ischemic treatment, indicating that postischemic tingling sensation reflects a sensory modality shift from tactile sensation to nociception in the spinal cord. Changes in neural responses were investigated during ischemic treatment in the contralateral spinal cord and the ipsilateral S1. Potentiation already appeared during ischemic treatment for 30 min. The present findings suggest that the postischemic potentiation shares spinal mechanisms, at least in part, with neuropathic pain. PMID:26165560

  19. Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Corsini, Emanuela; Williams, Marc A; Decker, William; Manjili, Masoud H; Otsuki, Takemi; Singh, Neetu; Al-Mulla, Faha; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Colacci, Anna Maria; Vaccari, Monica; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, A Ivana; Raju, Jayadev; Hamid, Roslida A; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano; Roy, Rabindra; Woodrick, Jordan; Salem, Hosni K; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Brown, Dustin G; Bisson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-β, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1α, IL-6, IL-1α, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicalscan simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression. PMID:26002081

  20. The acoustical Klein-Gordon equation: the wave-mechanical step and barrier potential functions.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy; Sharp, David B

    2003-09-01

    The transformed form of the Webster equation is investigated. Usually described as analogous to the Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics, it is noted that the second-order time dependency defines a Klein-Gordon problem. This "acoustical Klein-Gordon equation" is analyzed with particular reference to the acoustical properties of wave-mechanical potential functions, U(x), that give rise to geometry-dependent dispersions at rapid variations in tract cross section. Such dispersions are not elucidated by other one-dimensional--cylindrical or conical--duct models. Since Sturm-Liouville analysis is not appropriate for inhomogeneous boundary conditions, the exact solution of the Klein-Gordon equation is achieved through a Green's-function methodology referring to the transfer matrix of an arbitrary string of square potential functions, including a square barrier equivalent to a radiation impedance. The general conclusion of the paper is that, in the absence of precise knowledge of initial conditions on the area function, any given potential function will map to a multiplicity of area functions of identical relative resonance characteristics. Since the potential function maps uniquely to the acoustical output, it is suggested that the one-dimensional wave physics is both most accurately and most compactly described within the Klein-Gordon framework.

  1. Investigation of the atmospheric mechanisms related to the autumn sea ice and winter circulation link in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Martin P.; Hell, Momme; Keenlyside, Noel

    2016-02-01

    The relationship of Barents-Kara sea ice concentration in October and November with atmospheric circulation in the subsequent winter is examined using reanalysis and observational data. The analyses are performed on data with the 5-year running means removed to reduce the potential effects of slowly-varying external driving factors, such as global warming. We show that positive (negative) Barents-Kara sea ice concentration anomaly in autumn is associated with a positive (negative) North Atlantic Oscillation-like (NAO) pattern with lags of up to 3 months. The month-to-month variations in the lag relationships of the atmospheric anomalies related to November sea ice concentration are presented. Further analysis shows that the stratosphere-troposphere interaction may provide the memory in the system: positive (negative) sea ice concentration anomaly in November is associated with a strengthened (weakened) stratospheric polar vortex and these anomalies propagate downward leading to the positive (negative) NAO-like pattern in the late December to early January. This stratosphere mechanism may also play a role for Barents-Kara sea ice anomaly in December, but not for September and October. Consistently, Eliassen-Palm, eddy heat and momentum fluxes suggest that there is strong forcing of the zonal winds in November.

  2. Photo-cross-linked poly(ethylene carbonate) elastomers: synthesis, in vivo degradation, and determination of in vivo degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cornacchione, L A; Qi, B; Bianco, J; Zhou, Z; Amsden, B G

    2012-10-01

    Low-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate) diols of varying molecular weight were generated through catalyzed thermal degradation of high-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate). These polymers were then end functionalized with acrylate groups. The resulting α,ω-diacrylates were effectively photo-cross-linked upon exposure to long-wave UV light in the presence of a photoinitiator to yield rubbery networks of low sol content. The degree of cross-linking effectively controlled the in vivo degradation rate of the networks by adherent macrophages; higher cross-link densities yielded slower degradation rates. The cross-link density did not affect the number of adherent macrophages at the elastomer/tissue interface, indicating that cross-linking affected the susceptibility of the elastomer to degradative species released by the macrophages. The reactive species likely responsible for in vivo degradation appears to be superoxide anion, as the in vivo results were in agreement with in vitro degradation via superoxide anion, while cholesterol esterase, known to degrade similar poly(alkylene carbonate)s, had no affect on elastomer degradation.

  3. Photo-cross-linked poly(ethylene carbonate) elastomers: synthesis, in vivo degradation, and determination of in vivo degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cornacchione, L A; Qi, B; Bianco, J; Zhou, Z; Amsden, B G

    2012-10-01

    Low-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate) diols of varying molecular weight were generated through catalyzed thermal degradation of high-molecular-weight poly(ethylene carbonate). These polymers were then end functionalized with acrylate groups. The resulting α,ω-diacrylates were effectively photo-cross-linked upon exposure to long-wave UV light in the presence of a photoinitiator to yield rubbery networks of low sol content. The degree of cross-linking effectively controlled the in vivo degradation rate of the networks by adherent macrophages; higher cross-link densities yielded slower degradation rates. The cross-link density did not affect the number of adherent macrophages at the elastomer/tissue interface, indicating that cross-linking affected the susceptibility of the elastomer to degradative species released by the macrophages. The reactive species likely responsible for in vivo degradation appears to be superoxide anion, as the in vivo results were in agreement with in vitro degradation via superoxide anion, while cholesterol esterase, known to degrade similar poly(alkylene carbonate)s, had no affect on elastomer degradation. PMID:22920572

  4. Potential mechanism for pentachlorophenol-induced carcinogenicity: a novel mechanism for metal-independent production of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Shan, Guo-Qiang

    2009-06-01

    ,4-benzoquinone (TrCBQ-OOH) intermediate, which decomposes homolytically to produce (*)OH. These findings represent a novel mechanism of (*)OH formation not requiring the involvement of redox-active transition metal ions and may partly explain the potential carcinogenicity of the widely used biocides such as PCP and other polyhalogenated aromatic compounds.

  5. Potential mechanism for pentachlorophenol-induced carcinogenicity: a novel mechanism for metal-independent production of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Shan, Guo-Qiang

    2009-06-01

    ,4-benzoquinone (TrCBQ-OOH) intermediate, which decomposes homolytically to produce (*)OH. These findings represent a novel mechanism of (*)OH formation not requiring the involvement of redox-active transition metal ions and may partly explain the potential carcinogenicity of the widely used biocides such as PCP and other polyhalogenated aromatic compounds. PMID:19408893

  6. Transplant Tolerance Induction in Newborn Infants: Mechanisms, Advantages, and Potential Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hua; Gazarian, Aram; Dubernard, Jean-Michel; Belot, Alexandre; Michallet, Marie-Cécile; Michallet, Mauricette

    2016-01-01

    Although several tolerance induction protocols have been successfully implemented in adult renal transplantation, no tolerance induction approach has, as yet, been defined for solid organ transplantations in young infants. Pediatric transplant recipients have a pressing demand for the elaboration of tolerance induction regimens. Indeed, since they display a longer survival time, they are exposed to a higher level of risks linked to long-term immunosuppression (IS) and to chronic rejection. Interestingly, central tolerance induction may be of great interest in newborns, because of their immunological immaturity and the important role of the thymus at this early stage in life. The present review aims to clarify mechanisms and strategies of tolerance induction in these immunologically premature recipients. We first introduce the discovery and mechanisms of neonatal tolerance in murine experimental models and subsequently analyze tolerance induction in human newborn infants. Hematopoietic mixed chimerism in neonates is also discussed based on in utero hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant studies. Then, we review the recent advances in tolerance induction approaches in adults, including the infusion of HSCs associated with less toxic conditioning regimens, regulatory T cells/facilitating cells/mesenchymal stem cells transplantation, costimulatory blockade, and thymus manipulation. Finally, IS withdrawal in pediatric solid organ transplant is discussed. In conclusion, the establishment of transplant tolerance induction in infants is promising and deserves further investigations. Future studies could focus on the selection of patients, on less toxic conditioning regimens, and on biomarkers for IS minimization or withdrawal. PMID:27092138

  7. Transplant Tolerance Induction in Newborn Infants: Mechanisms, Advantages, and Potential Strategies.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hua; Gazarian, Aram; Dubernard, Jean-Michel; Belot, Alexandre; Michallet, Marie-Cécile; Michallet, Mauricette

    2016-01-01

    Although several tolerance induction protocols have been successfully implemented in adult renal transplantation, no tolerance induction approach has, as yet, been defined for solid organ transplantations in young infants. Pediatric transplant recipients have a pressing demand for the elaboration of tolerance induction regimens. Indeed, since they display a longer survival time, they are exposed to a higher level of risks linked to long-term immunosuppression (IS) and to chronic rejection. Interestingly, central tolerance induction may be of great interest in newborns, because of their immunological immaturity and the important role of the thymus at this early stage in life. The present review aims to clarify mechanisms and strategies of tolerance induction in these immunologically premature recipients. We first introduce the discovery and mechanisms of neonatal tolerance in murine experimental models and subsequently analyze tolerance induction in human newborn infants. Hematopoietic mixed chimerism in neonates is also discussed based on in utero hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant studies. Then, we review the recent advances in tolerance induction approaches in adults, including the infusion of HSCs associated with less toxic conditioning regimens, regulatory T cells/facilitating cells/mesenchymal stem cells transplantation, costimulatory blockade, and thymus manipulation. Finally, IS withdrawal in pediatric solid organ transplant is discussed. In conclusion, the establishment of transplant tolerance induction in infants is promising and deserves further investigations. Future studies could focus on the selection of patients, on less toxic conditioning regimens, and on biomarkers for IS minimization or withdrawal.

  8. Transplant Tolerance Induction in Newborn Infants: Mechanisms, Advantages, and Potential Strategies.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hua; Gazarian, Aram; Dubernard, Jean-Michel; Belot, Alexandre; Michallet, Marie-Cécile; Michallet, Mauricette

    2016-01-01

    Although several tolerance induction protocols have been successfully implemented in adult renal transplantation, no tolerance induction approach has, as yet, been defined for solid organ transplantations in young infants. Pediatric transplant recipients have a pressing demand for the elaboration of tolerance induction regimens. Indeed, since they display a longer survival time, they are exposed to a higher level of risks linked to long-term immunosuppression (IS) and to chronic rejection. Interestingly, central tolerance induction may be of great interest in newborns, because of their immunological immaturity and the important role of the thymus at this early stage in life. The present review aims to clarify mechanisms and strategies of tolerance induction in these immunologically premature recipients. We first introduce the discovery and mechanisms of neonatal tolerance in murine experimental models and subsequently analyze tolerance induction in human newborn infants. Hematopoietic mixed chimerism in neonates is also discussed based on in utero hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant studies. Then, we review the recent advances in tolerance induction approaches in adults, including the infusion of HSCs associated with less toxic conditioning regimens, regulatory T cells/facilitating cells/mesenchymal stem cells transplantation, costimulatory blockade, and thymus manipulation. Finally, IS withdrawal in pediatric solid organ transplant is discussed. In conclusion, the establishment of transplant tolerance induction in infants is promising and deserves further investigations. Future studies could focus on the selection of patients, on less toxic conditioning regimens, and on biomarkers for IS minimization or withdrawal. PMID:27092138

  9. Immature articular cartilage and subchondral bone covered by menisci are potentially susceptive to mechanical load

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The differences of mechanical and histological properties between cartilage covered by menisci and uncovered by menisci may contribute to the osteoarthritis after meniscectomy and these differences are not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate potential differences in the mechanical and histological properties, and in particular the collagen architecture, of the superficial cartilage layer and subchondral bone between regions covered and uncovered by menisci using immature knee. Methods Osteochondral plugs were obtained from porcine tibial cartilage that was either covered or uncovered by menisci. Investigation of the thickness, mechanical properties, histology, and water content of the cartilage as well as micro-computed tomography analysis of the subchondral bone was performed to compare these regions. Collagen architecture was also assessed by using scanning electron microscopy. Results Compared to the cartilage uncovered by menisci, that covered by menisci was thinner and showed a higher deformity to compression loading and higher water content. In the superficial layer of cartilage in the uncovered regions, collagen fibers showed high density, whereas they showed low density in covered regions. Furthermore, subchondral bone architecture varied between the 2 regions, and showed low bone density in covered regions. Conclusions Cartilage covered by menisci differed from that uncovered in both its mechanical and histological properties, especially with regards to the density of the superficial collagen layer. These regional differences may be related to local mechanical environment in normal condition and indicate that cartilage covered by menisci is tightly guarded by menisci from extreme mechanical loading. Our results indicate that immature cartilage degeneration and subchondral microfracture may occur easily to extreme direct mechanical loading in covered region after meniscectomy. PMID:24669849

  10. Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Moreira, Fabricio Araújo; Gomes, Felipe Villela; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-12-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major phytocannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant. It lacks the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic effects that the main plant compound Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being able, on the contrary, to antagonize these effects. This property, together with its safety profile, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Although the pharmacological effects of CBD in different biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still not clear. Here, we review recent in vivo studies indicating that these mechanisms are not unitary but rather depend on the behavioural response being measured. Acute anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects seem to rely mainly on facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in key brain areas related to defensive responses, including the dorsal periaqueductal grey, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial prefrontal cortex. Other effects, such as anti-compulsive, increased extinction and impaired reconsolidation of aversive memories, and facilitation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis could depend on potentiation of anandamide-mediated neurotransmission. Finally, activation of TRPV1 channels may help us to explain the antipsychotic effect and the bell-shaped dose-response curves commonly observed with CBD. Considering its safety profile and wide range of therapeutic potential, however, further studies are needed to investigate the involvement of other possible mechanisms (e.g. inhibition of adenosine uptake, inverse agonism at CB2 receptor, CB1 receptor antagonism, GPR55 antagonism, PPARγ receptors agonism, intracellular (Ca(2+)) increase, etc.), on CBD behavioural effects. PMID:23108553

  11. Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Moreira, Fabricio Araújo; Gomes, Felipe Villela; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-12-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major phytocannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant. It lacks the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic effects that the main plant compound Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being able, on the contrary, to antagonize these effects. This property, together with its safety profile, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Although the pharmacological effects of CBD in different biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still not clear. Here, we review recent in vivo studies indicating that these mechanisms are not unitary but rather depend on the behavioural response being measured. Acute anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects seem to rely mainly on facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in key brain areas related to defensive responses, including the dorsal periaqueductal grey, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial prefrontal cortex. Other effects, such as anti-compulsive, increased extinction and impaired reconsolidation of aversive memories, and facilitation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis could depend on potentiation of anandamide-mediated neurotransmission. Finally, activation of TRPV1 channels may help us to explain the antipsychotic effect and the bell-shaped dose-response curves commonly observed with CBD. Considering its safety profile and wide range of therapeutic potential, however, further studies are needed to investigate the involvement of other possible mechanisms (e.g. inhibition of adenosine uptake, inverse agonism at CB2 receptor, CB1 receptor antagonism, GPR55 antagonism, PPARγ receptors agonism, intracellular (Ca(2+)) increase, etc.), on CBD behavioural effects.

  12. Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Moreira, Fabricio Araújo; Gomes, Felipe Villela; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major phytocannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant. It lacks the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic effects that the main plant compound Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being able, on the contrary, to antagonize these effects. This property, together with its safety profile, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Although the pharmacological effects of CBD in different biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still not clear. Here, we review recent in vivo studies indicating that these mechanisms are not unitary but rather depend on the behavioural response being measured. Acute anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects seem to rely mainly on facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in key brain areas related to defensive responses, including the dorsal periaqueductal grey, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial prefrontal cortex. Other effects, such as anti-compulsive, increased extinction and impaired reconsolidation of aversive memories, and facilitation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis could depend on potentiation of anandamide-mediated neurotransmission. Finally, activation of TRPV1 channels may help us to explain the antipsychotic effect and the bell-shaped dose-response curves commonly observed with CBD. Considering its safety profile and wide range of therapeutic potential, however, further studies are needed to investigate the involvement of other possible mechanisms (e.g. inhibition of adenosine uptake, inverse agonism at CB2 receptor, CB1 receptor antagonism, GPR55 antagonism, PPARγ receptors agonism, intracellular (Ca2+) increase, etc.), on CBD behavioural effects. PMID:23108553

  13. Enhancement of mechanical properties, microstructure, and antimicrobial activities of zein films cross-linked using succinic anhydride, eugenol, and citric Acid.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ashraf A; Deraz, Sahar F; Elrahman, Somia Abd; El-Fawal, Gomaa

    2015-08-18

    Zein constitutes about half of the endosperm proteins in corn. Recently, attempts have been made to utilize zein for food coatings and biodegradable materials, which require better physical properties, using chemical modification of zein. In this study, zein proteins were modified using citric acid, succinic anhydride, and eugenol as natural cross-linking agents in the wet state. The cross-linkers were added either separately or combined in increment concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4%). The effects of those agents on the mechanical properties, microstructure, optical properties, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and antibacterial activities of zein were investigated. The addition of cross-linking agents promoted changes in the arrangement of groups in zein film-forming particles. Regarding the film properties, incorporation of cross-linking agents into zein films prepared in ethanol resulted in two- to three-fold increases in tensile strength (TS) values. According to the Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and Hunter parameters there were no remarkable changes in the structure and color of zein films. Transparency of zein films was decreased differentially according to the type and cross-linker concentration. The mechanical and optical properties of zein films were closely related to their microstructure. All cross-linked films showed remarkable antibacterial activities against Bacillus cereus ATCC 49064 and Salmonella enterica ATCC 25566. Food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria were affected in a film-dependent manner. Our experimental results show that even with partial cross-linking the mechanical properties and antipathogen activities of zein films were significantly improved, which would be useful for various industrial applications.

  14. Amide Link Scission in the Polyamide Active Layers of Thin-Film Composite Membranes upon Exposure to Free Chlorine: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2015-10-20

    The volume-averaged amide link scission in the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine was quantified at a variety of free chlorine exposure times, concentrations, and pH and rinsing conditions. The results showed that (i) hydroxyl ions are needed for scission to occur, (ii) hydroxide-induced amide link scission is a strong function of exposure to hypochlorous acid, (iii) the ratio between amide links broken and chlorine atoms taken up increased with the chlorination pH and reached a maximum of ∼25%, (iv) polyamide disintegration occurs when high free chlorine concentrations, alkaline conditions, and high exposure times are combined, (v) amide link scission promotes further chlorine uptake, and (vi) scission at the membrane surface is unrepresentative of volume-averaged scission in the active layer. Our observations are consistent with previously proposed mechanisms describing amide link scission as a result of the hydrolysis of the N-chlorinated amidic N-C bond due to nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ions. This study increases the understanding of the physicochemical changes that could occur for membranes in treatment plants using chlorine as an upstream disinfectant and the extent and rate at which those changes would occur. PMID:26394532

  15. Amide Link Scission in the Polyamide Active Layers of Thin-Film Composite Membranes upon Exposure to Free Chlorine: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2015-10-20

    The volume-averaged amide link scission in the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine was quantified at a variety of free chlorine exposure times, concentrations, and pH and rinsing conditions. The results showed that (i) hydroxyl ions are needed for scission to occur, (ii) hydroxide-induced amide link scission is a strong function of exposure to hypochlorous acid, (iii) the ratio between amide links broken and chlorine atoms taken up increased with the chlorination pH and reached a maximum of ∼25%, (iv) polyamide disintegration occurs when high free chlorine concentrations, alkaline conditions, and high exposure times are combined, (v) amide link scission promotes further chlorine uptake, and (vi) scission at the membrane surface is unrepresentative of volume-averaged scission in the active layer. Our observations are consistent with previously proposed mechanisms describing amide link scission as a result of the hydrolysis of the N-chlorinated amidic N-C bond due to nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ions. This study increases the understanding of the physicochemical changes that could occur for membranes in treatment plants using chlorine as an upstream disinfectant and the extent and rate at which those changes would occur.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Molecular mechanisms of activation and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Nader

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis-associated eye diseases are among the most common cause of blindness in the United States and worldwide. Recent advances in the development of angiogenesis-based therapies for treatment of angiogenesis-associated diseases have provided new hope in a wide variety of human diseases ranging from eye diseases to cancer. One group of growth factor receptors critically implicated in angiogenesis is vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), a subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 are closely related receptor tyrosine kinases and have both common and specific ligands. VEGFR-1 is a kinase-impaired RTK and its kinase activity is suppressed by a single amino acid substitution in its kinase domain and by its carboxyl terminus. VEGFR-2 is highly active kinase, stimulates a variety of signaling pathways and broad biological responses in endothelial cells. The mechanisms that govern VEGFR-2 activation, its ability to recruit signaling proteins and to undergo downregulation are highly regulated by phosphorylation activation loop tyrosines and its carboxyl terminus. Despite their differential potentials to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation and kinase activation, both VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 are required for normal embryonic development and pathological angiogenesis. VEGFR-1 regulates angiogenesis by mechanisms that involve ligand trapping, receptor homodimerization and heterodimerization. This review highlights recent insights into the mechanism of activation of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, and focuses on the signaling pathways employed by VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 that regulate angiogenesis and their therapeutic potentials in angiogenesis-associated diseases. PMID:16713597

  17. Potential link between excess added sugar intake and ectopic fat: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: The effect of added sugar intake on ectopic fat accumulation is a subject of debate. Objective: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to examine the potential effect of added sugar intake on ectopic fat depots. Data Sources: MEDLINE, CA...

  18. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics: Engineered hierarchies of integrable potentials and related orthogonal polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Balondo Iyela, Daddy; Govaerts, Jan; Hounkonnou, M. Norbert

    2013-09-15

    Within the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and its related hierarchies of integrable quantum Hamiltonians and potentials, a general programme is outlined and applied to its first two simplest illustrations. Going beyond the usual restriction of shape invariance for intertwined potentials, it is suggested to require a similar relation for Hamiltonians in the hierarchy separated by an arbitrary number of levels, N. By requiring further that these two Hamiltonians be in fact identical up to an overall shift in energy, a periodic structure is installed in the hierarchy which should allow for its resolution. Specific classes of orthogonal polynomials characteristic of such periodic hierarchies are thereby generated, while the methods of supersymmetric quantum mechanics then lead to generalised Rodrigues formulae and recursion relations for such polynomials. The approach also offers the practical prospect of quantum modelling through the engineering of quantum potentials from experimental energy spectra. In this paper, these ideas are presented and solved explicitly for the cases N= 1 and N= 2. The latter case is related to the generalised Laguerre polynomials, for which indeed new results are thereby obtained. In the context of dressing chains and deformed polynomial Heisenberg algebras, some partial results for N⩾ 3 also exist in the literature, which should be relevant to a complete study of the N⩾ 3 general periodic hierarchies.

  19. Coagulation-flocculation mechanisms in wastewater treatment plants through zeta potential measurements.

    PubMed

    López-Maldonado, E A; Oropeza-Guzman, M T; Jurado-Baizaval, J L; Ochoa-Terán, A

    2014-08-30

    Based on the polyelectrolyte-contaminant physical and chemical interactions at the molecular level, this article analyzed and discussed the coagulation-flocculation and chemical precipitation processes in order to improve their efficiency. Bench experiments indicate that water pH, polyelectrolyte (PE) dosing strategy and cationic polyelectrolyte addition are key parameters for the stability of metal-PE complexes. The coagulation-flocculation mechanism is proposed based on zeta potential (ζ) measurement as the criteria to define the electrostatic interaction between pollutants and coagulant-flocculant agents. Polyelectrolyte and wastewater dispersions are exposed to an electrophoretic effect to determine ζ. Finally, zeta potential values are compared at pH 9, suggesting the optimum coagulant dose at 162mg/L polydadmac and 67mg/L of flocculant, since a complete removal of TSS and turbidity is achieved. Based on the concentration of heavy metals (0.931mg/L Sn, 0.7mg/L Fe and 0.63mg/L Pb), treated water met the Mexican maximum permissible limits. In addition, the treated water has 45mg O2/L chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 45mg C/L total organic carbon (TOC). The coagulation-flocculation mechanism is proposed taking into account both: zeta potential (ζ)-pH measurement and chemical affinity, as the criteria to define the electrostatic and chemical interaction between pollutants and polyelectrolytes. PMID:25036994

  20. Proton cellular influx as a probable mechanism of variation potential influence on photosynthesis in pea.

    PubMed

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Sherstneva, Oksana; Surova, Lyubov; Katicheva, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    Electrical signals (action potential and variation potential, VP) caused by environmental stimuli are known to induce various physiological responses in plants, including changes in photosynthesis; however, their functional mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, the influence of VP on photosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum L.) was investigated and the proton participation in this process analysed. VP, induced by local heating, inactivated photosynthesis and activated respiration, with the initiation of the photosynthetic response connected with inactivation of the photosynthetic dark stage; however, direct VP influence on the light stage was also probable. VP generation was accompanied with pH increases in apoplasts (0.17-0.30 pH unit) and decreases in cytoplasm (0.18-0.60 pH unit), which probably reflected H(+) -ATPase inactivation and H(+) influx during this electrical event. Imitation of H(+) influx using the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) induced a photosynthetic response that was similar with a VP-induced response. Experiments on chloroplast suspensions showed that decreased external pH also induced an analogous response and that its magnitude depended on the magnitude of pH change. Thus, the present results showed that proton cellular influx was the probable mechanism of VP's influence on photosynthesis in pea. Potential means of action for this influence are discussed.

  1. Pentoxifylline decreases oxidized lipid products in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: New evidence on the potential therapeutic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zein, Claudia O.; Lopez, Rocio; Fu, Xiaoming; Kirwan, John P.; Yerian, Lisa M.; McCullough, Arthur J.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Feldstein, Ariel E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pentoxifylline (PTX) improved histological features of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in a recent randomized placebo-controlled trial. However, the underlying mechanism responsible for the beneficial effects of PTX in NASH remains unidentified. A key role of lipid oxidation in the pathogenesis and progression of NASH has been established. PTX is known to decrease free-radical mediated oxidative stress and inhibit lipid oxidation. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of PTX on levels of lipid oxidation products in patients with NASH. Methods Levels of multiple structurally specific oxidized fatty acids including hydroxy-octadecadenoic acids (HODEs), oxo-octadecadenoic acids (oxoODEs), and hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) were quantified by mass spectrometry in plasma obtained at baseline and at study completion in patients who completed 1 year of therapy with PTX or placebo in a randomized controlled trial. Results Therapy with PTX resulted in significant decreases on 9-HODE and 13-oxoODE, oxidized lipid products of linoleic acid (LA) linked to histological severity in NAFLD. Similarly, PTX therapy was associated with significant decreases in 8-HETE, 9-HETE, and 11-HETE compared to placebo. Statistically significant correlations were demonstrated between the decrease in HODEs and oxoODEs and improved histological scores of fibrosis; and between the decrease in HETEs and improved lobular inflammation. Conclusion Therapy with PTX compared to placebo was associated with a significant reduction of oxidized fatty acids. This novel evidence supports that the beneficial effects of PTX in patients with NASH are likely partly mediated through decreasing lipid oxidation, largely free-radical mediated lipid oxidation. Additionally, this is the first report on the link between decreased oxidized lipid products and improved histological disease in the setting of a therapeutic trial in NASH. PMID:22505276

  2. Potential Link between the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) System and Defective Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Barnawi, Jameel; Tran, Hai; Jersmann, Hubertus; Pitson, Stuart; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Meech, Robyn; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    patient-derived macrophages. Antagonising SIPR5 significantly improved phagocytosis. Conclusion Our results suggest a potential link between the S1P signalling system and defective macrophage phagocytic function in COPD and advise therapeutic targets. PMID:26485657

  3. Linking Climate Suitability, Spread Rates and Host-Impact When Estimating the Potential Costs of Invasive Pests

    PubMed Central

    Kriticos, Darren J.; Leriche, Agathe; Palmer, David J.; Cook, David C.; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G.; Stephens, Andréa E. A.; Watt, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Biosecurity agencies need robust bioeconomic tools to help inform policy and allocate scarce management resources. They need to estimate the potential for each invasive alien species (IAS) to create negative impacts, so that relative and absolute comparisons can be made. Using pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa sensu lato) as an example, these needs were met by combining species niche modelling, dispersal modelling, host impact and economic modelling. Within its native range (the Mediterranean Basin and adjacent areas), T. pityocampa causes significant defoliation of pines and serious urticating injuries to humans. Such severe impacts overseas have fuelled concerns about its potential impacts, should it be introduced to New Zealand. A stochastic bioeconomic model was used to estimate the impact of PPM invasion in terms of pine production value lost due to a hypothetical invasion of New Zealand by T. pityocampa. The bioeconomic model combines a semi-mechanistic niche model to develop a climate-related damage function, a climate-related forest growth model, and a stochastic spread model to estimate the present value (PV) of an invasion. Simulated invasions indicate that Thaumetopoea pityocampa could reduce New Zealand’s merchantable and total pine stem volume production by 30%, reducing forest production by between NZ$1,550 M to NZ$2,560 M if left untreated. Where T. pityocampa is controlled using aerial application of an insecticide, projected losses in PV were reduced, but still significant (NZ$30 M to NZ$2,210 M). The PV estimates were more sensitive to the efficacy of the spray program than the potential rate of spread of the moth. Our novel bioeconomic method provides a refined means of estimating potential impacts of invasive alien species, taking into account climatic effects on asset values, the potential for pest impacts, and pest spread rates. PMID:23405097

  4. Fear potentiated startle increases phospholipase D (PLD) expression/activity and PLD-linked metabotropic glutamate receptor mediated post-tetanic potentiation in rat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Balaji; Scott, Michael T; Pollandt, Sebastian; Schroeder, Bradley; Kurosky, Alexander; Shinnick-Gallagher, Patricia

    2016-02-01

    Long-term memory (LTM) of fear stores activity dependent modifications that include changes in amygdala signaling. Previously, we identified an enhanced probability of release of glutamate mediated signaling to be important in rat fear potentiated startle (FPS), a well-established translational behavioral measure of fear. Here, we investigated short- and long-term synaptic plasticity in FPS involving metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and associated downstream proteomic changes in the thalamic-lateral amygdala pathway (Th-LA). Aldolase A, an inhibitor of phospholipase D (PLD), expression was reduced, concurrent with significantly elevated PLD protein expression. Blocking the PLD-mGluR signaling significantly reduced PLD activity. While transmitter release probability increased in FPS, PLD-mGluR agonist and antagonist actions were occluded. In the unpaired group (UNP), blocking the PLD-mGluR increased while activating the receptor decreased transmitter release probability, consistent with decreased synaptic potentials during tetanic stimulation. FPS Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) immediately following long-term potentiation (LTP) induction was significantly increased. Blocking PLD-mGluR signaling prevented PTP and reduced cumulative PTP probability but not LTP maintenance in both groups. These effects are similar to those mediated through mGluR7, which is co-immunoprecipitated with PLD in FPS. Lastly, blocking mGluR-PLD in the rat amygdala was sufficient to prevent behavioral expression of fear memory. Thus, our study in the Th-LA pathway provides the first evidence for PLD as an important target of mGluR signaling in amygdala fear-associated memory. Importantly, the PLD-mGluR provides a novel therapeutic target for treating maladaptive fear memories in posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders.

  5. A novel role for integrin-linked kinase in periodic mechanical stress-mediated ERK1/2 mitogenic signaling in rat chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Song, Huanghe; Liang, Wenwei; Xu, Shun; Li, Zeng; Chen, Zhefeng; Cui, Weiding; Zhou, Jinchun; Wang, Qing; Liu, Feng; Fan, Weimin

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, a variety of studies have been performed to investigate the cellular responses of periodic mechanical stress on chondrocytes. Integrin β1-mediated ERK1/2 activation was proven to be indispensable in periodic mechanical stress-induced chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. However, other signal proteins responsible for the mitogenesis of chondrocytes under periodic mechanical stress remain incompletely understood. In the current investigation, we probed the roles of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling in periodic mechanical stress-induced chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. We found that upon periodic mechanical stress induction, ILK activity increased significantly. Depletion of ILK with targeted shRNA strongly inhibited periodic mechanical stress-induced chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. In addition, pretreatment with a blocking antibody against integrin β1 resulted in a remarkable decrease in ILK activity in cells exposed to periodic mechanical stress. Furthermore, inhibition of ILK with its target shRNA significantly suppressed ERK1/2 activation in relation to periodic mechanical stress. Based on the above results, we identified ILK as a crucial regulator involved in the integrin β1-ERK1/2 signal cascade responsible for periodic mechanical stress-induced chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis.

  6. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cancer procoagulant and its potential as a new tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Cross, B A

    1990-10-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a Mr 68,000 cysteine proteinase that initiates blood coagulation and is expressed by a variety of malignant cells but not by normally differentiated cells. Polyclonal immunoglobulin G and monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibodies were developed to purified CP and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to analyze the antigen in human serum samples. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine whether or not the analysis of CP in the serum might be a useful tumor marker. Pure CP was added to normal serum to establish a quantitative standard curve; the correlation coefficient of seven standard curves was 0.99. The upper limit of the normal range was established with 46 normal sera (mean +/- 2 SD = 0.57 microgram/ml). A total of 128 blinded serum samples were analyzed: 54 were from cancer patients (29 with gastrointestinal cancer, 22 with lung cancer, and three with urogenital cancer); 20 were from benign disease patients; and 54 were from normal individuals. All of the 13 early stage cancers were greater than 0.57 microgram/ml (positive), 31 of 41 (76%) of the late stage cancers were positive; overall, 44 of the 54 cancers (81%) were positive. Forty-nine of 54 (91%) of the normal sera and 16 of 20 (80%) of the benign disease sera were negative. Overall, the assay had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 88%.

  7. Forensic potential of the STR DXYS156 in Mexican populations: inference of X-linked allele null.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, M; Martínez-Cortes, G; Páez-Riberos, L A; Sandoval, L; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Ceballos-Quintal, J M; Pinto-Escalante, D; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2006-01-01

    The pentanucleotide STR (TAAAA)n DXYS156 offers advantages for genetic identity testing. In addition to establish the gender, DXYS156 expands the DNA profile and is able to indicate the possible geographic origin of the individual. We analyzed DXYS156 in 757 individuals of both sexes from Mexican populations. We studied the cosmopolitan Mestizo population and six Mexican ethnic groups: Tarahumaras, Purépechas, Nahuas, Mayas, Huicholes and Mezcala Indians. The six shorter (4-10) and the three larger alleles (11-13) were specific for the X and Y-chromosomes, respectively. A random distribution of alleles into genotypes was observed in males and females from each population. We estimated the power of exclusion for paternity testing according to the son's gender, and the power of discrimination in forensic casework. In addition, we detected a relatively high frequency of an X-linked allele null, principally in Mexican-Mestizos (3.6%), which must be considered when DXYS156 be applied for identification purposes.

  8. The Cardioprotective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in Heart Diseases: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yaqi; Shen, Zhuqing; Luo, Shanshan; Guo, Wei; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as a third gaseous mediator along with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), though it was originally considered as a malodorous and toxic gas. H2S is produced endogenously from cysteine by three enzymes in mammalian tissues. An increasing body of evidence suggests the involvement of H2S in different physiological and pathological processes. Recent studies have shown that H2S has the potential to protect the heart against myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, hypertrophy, fibrosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and heart failure. Some mechanisms, such as antioxidative action, preservation of mitochondrial function, reduction of apoptosis, anti-inflammatory responses, angiogenic actions, regulation of ion channel, and interaction with NO, could be responsible for the cardioprotective effect of H2S. Although several mechanisms have been identified, there is a need for further research to identify the specific molecular mechanism of cardioprotection in different cardiac diseases. Therefore, insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying H2S action in the heart may promote the understanding of pathophysiology of cardiac diseases and lead to new therapeutic targets based on modulation of H2S production.

  9. The absence of a dense potential core in supercritical injection: A thermal break-up mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuti, Daniel T.; Hannemann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Certain experiments in quasi-isobaric supercritical injection remain unexplained by the current state of theory: Without developing a constant value potential core as expected from the mechanical view of break-up, density is observed to drop immediately upon entering the chamber. Furthermore, this phenomenon has never been captured in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) despite having become a de facto standard case for real fluid CFD validation. In this paper, we present strong evidence for a thermal jet disintegration mechanism (in addition to classical mechanical break-up) which resolves both the theoretical and the computational discrepancies. A new interpretation of supercritical jet disintegration is introduced, based on pseudo-boiling, a nonlinear supercritical transition from gas-like to liquid-like states. We show that thermal disintegration may dominate classical mechanical break-up when heat transfer takes place in the injector and when the fluid state is sufficiently close to the pseudo-boiling point. A procedure which allows to capture subsided cores with standard CFD is provided and demonstrated.

  10. The Cardioprotective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in Heart Diseases: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yaqi; Shen, Zhuqing; Luo, Shanshan; Guo, Wei; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as a third gaseous mediator along with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), though it was originally considered as a malodorous and toxic gas. H2S is produced endogenously from cysteine by three enzymes in mammalian tissues. An increasing body of evidence suggests the involvement of H2S in different physiological and pathological processes. Recent studies have shown that H2S has the potential to protect the heart against myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, hypertrophy, fibrosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and heart failure. Some mechanisms, such as antioxidative action, preservation of mitochondrial function, reduction of apoptosis, anti-inflammatory responses, angiogenic actions, regulation of ion channel, and interaction with NO, could be responsible for the cardioprotective effect of H2S. Although several mechanisms have been identified, there is a need for further research to identify the specific molecular mechanism of cardioprotection in different cardiac diseases. Therefore, insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying H2S action in the heart may promote the understanding of pathophysiology of cardiac diseases and lead to new therapeutic targets based on modulation of H2S production. PMID:26078822

  11. Cytotoxic T Cells Use Mechanical Force to Potentiate Target Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Basu, Roshni; Whitlock, Benjamin M; Husson, Julien; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Jin, Weiyang; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Dotiwala, Farokh; Giannone, Gregory; Hivroz, Claire; Biais, Nicolas; Lieberman, Judy; Kam, Lance C; Huse, Morgan

    2016-03-24

    The immunological synapse formed between a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and an infected or transformed target cell is a physically active structure capable of exerting mechanical force. Here, we investigated whether synaptic forces promote the destruction of target cells. CTLs kill by secreting toxic proteases and the pore forming protein perforin into the synapse. Biophysical experiments revealed a striking correlation between the magnitude of force exertion across the synapse and the speed of perforin pore formation on the target cell, implying that force potentiates cytotoxicity by enhancing perforin activity. Consistent with this interpretation, we found that increasing target cell tension augmented pore formation by perforin and killing by CTLs. Our data also indicate that CTLs coordinate perforin release and force exertion in space and time. These results reveal an unappreciated physical dimension to lymphocyte function and demonstrate that cells use mechanical forces to control the activity of outgoing chemical signals. PMID:26924577

  12. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection.

  13. Evolutionary constraints over microsatellite abundance in larger mammals as a potential mechanism against carcinogenic burden

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Youn; An, Yong-Rock; An, Chul-Min; Kang, Jung-Ha; Kim, Eun Mi; Kim, Heebal; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Jaemin

    2016-01-01

    Larger organisms tend to live longer, have more potentially carcinogenic cells, and undergo more cell divisions. While one might intuitively expect cancer incidence to scale with body size, this assertion does not hold over the range of different mammals. Explaining this lack of correlation, so-called ‘Peto’s paradox’ can likely increase our understanding of how cancer defense mechanisms are shaped by natural selection. Here, we study the occurrence of microsatellite in mammal genomes and observe that animals with expanded body size restrain the number of microsatellite. To take into account of higher mutation rate in the microsatellite region compared to that of genome, limiting the abundance of somatic mutations might explain how larger organisms could overcome the burden of cancer. These observations may serve as the basis to better understand how evolution has modeled protective mechanisms against cancer development. PMID:27125812

  14. Potential mechanisms underlying ectodermal differentiation of Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jadalannagari, Sushma; Berry, Abigale M; Hopkins, Richard A; Bhavsar, Dhaval; Aljitawi, Omar S

    2016-09-16

    Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJMSCs) are being increasingly recognized for their ectodermal differentiation potential. Previously, we demonstrated that when WJMSC were seeded onto an acellular matrix material derived from Wharton's jelly and cultured in osteogenic induction media, generated CK19 positive cells and hair-like structures indicative of ectodermal differentiation of WJMSCs. In this manuscript, we examine the underlying mechanism behind this observation using a variety of microscopy and molecular biology techniques such as western blotting and qPCR. We demonstrate that these hair-like structures are associated with live cells that are positive for epithelial and mesenchymal markers such as cytokeratin-19 and α-smooth muscle actin, respectively. We also show that up-regulation of β-catenin and noggin, along with the expression of TGF-β and SMAD and inhibition of BMP4 could be the mechanism behind this ectodermal differentiation and hair-like structure formation.

  15. Potential mechanisms underlying ectodermal differentiation of Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jadalannagari, Sushma; Berry, Abigale M; Hopkins, Richard A; Bhavsar, Dhaval; Aljitawi, Omar S

    2016-09-16

    Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJMSCs) are being increasingly recognized for their ectodermal differentiation potential. Previously, we demonstrated that when WJMSC were seeded onto an acellular matrix material derived from Wharton's jelly and cultured in osteogenic induction media, generated CK19 positive cells and hair-like structures indicative of ectodermal differentiation of WJMSCs. In this manuscript, we examine the underlying mechanism behind this observation using a variety of microscopy and molecular biology techniques such as western blotting and qPCR. We demonstrate that these hair-like structures are associated with live cells that are positive for epithelial and mesenchymal markers such as cytokeratin-19 and α-smooth muscle actin, respectively. We also show that up-regulation of β-catenin and noggin, along with the expression of TGF-β and SMAD and inhibition of BMP4 could be the mechanism behind this ectodermal differentiation and hair-like structure formation. PMID:27501759

  16. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720's mechanisms of action in stroke. PMID:27617002

  17. Mechanical stress altered electron gate tunneling current and extraction of conduction band deformation potentials for germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Youn Sung; Lim, Ji-Song; Numata, Toshinori; Nishida, Toshikazu; Thompson, Scott E.

    2007-11-01

    Strain altered electron gate tunneling current is measured for germanium (Ge) metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with HfO2 gate dielectric. Uniaxial mechanical stress is applied using four-point wafer bending along [100] and [110] directions to extract both dilation and shear deformation potential constants of Ge. Least-squares fit to the experimental data results in Ξd and Ξu of -4.3±0.3 and 16.5±0.5 eV, respectively, which agree with theoretical calculations. The dominant mechanism for the strain altered electron gate tunneling current is a strain-induced change in the conduction band offset between Ge and HfO2. Tensile stress reduces the offset and increases the gate tunneling current for Ge while the opposite occurs for Si.

  18. Physicochemical Control of Adult Stem Cell Differentiation: Shedding Light on Potential Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Titushkin, Igor; Sun, Shan; Shin, Jennifer; Cho, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Realization of the exciting potential for stem-cell-based biomedical and therapeutic applications, including tissue engineering, requires an understanding of the cell-cell and cell-environment interactions. To this end, recent efforts have been focused on the manipulation of adult stem cell differentiation using inductive soluble factors, designing suitable mechanical environments, and applying noninvasive physical forces. Although each of these different approaches has been successfully applied to regulate stem cell differentiation, it would be of great interest and importance to integrate and optimally combine a few or all of the physicochemical differentiation cues to induce synergistic stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of multiple differentiation cues will enable the researcher to better manipulate stem cell behavior and response. PMID:20379388

  19. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood–brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke.

  20. Human oocyte developmental potential is predicted by mechanical properties within hours after fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Yanez, Livia Z.; Han, Jinnuo; Behr, Barry B.; Pera, Renee A. Reijo; Camarillo, David B.

    2016-01-01

    The causes of embryonic arrest during pre-implantation development are poorly understood. Attempts to correlate patterns of oocyte gene expression with successful embryo development have been hampered by the lack of reliable and nondestructive predictors of viability at such an early stage. Here we report that zygote viscoelastic properties can predict blastocyst formation in humans and mice within hours after fertilization, with >90% precision, 95% specificity and 75% sensitivity. We demonstrate that there are significant differences between the transcriptomes of viable and non-viable zygotes, especially in expression of genes important for oocyte maturation. In addition, we show that low-quality oocytes may undergo insufficient cortical granule release and zona-hardening, causing altered mechanics after fertilization. Our results suggest that embryo potential is largely determined by the quality and maturation of the oocyte before fertilization, and can be predicted through a minimally invasive mechanical measurement at the zygote stage. PMID:26904963

  1. Expression mechanisms underlying long-term potentiation: a postsynaptic view, 10 years on

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Adam J.; Nicoll, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the research that has occurred over the past decade which has solidified a postsynaptic expression mechanism for long-term potentiation (LTP). However, experiments that have suggested a presynaptic component are also summarized. It is argued that the pairing of glutamate uncaging onto single spines with postsynaptic depolarization provides the final and most elegant demonstration of a postsynaptic expression mechanism for NMDA receptor-dependent LTP. The fact that the magnitude of this LTP is similar to that evoked by pairing synaptic stimulation and depolarization leaves little room for a substantial presynaptic component. Finally, recent data also require a revision in our thinking about the way AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are recruited to the postsynaptic density during LTP. This recruitment is independent of subunit type, but does require an adequate reserve pool of extrasynaptic receptors. PMID:24298139

  2. Mechanism of Action and Clinical Potential of Fingolimod for the Treatment of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Xu, Haoliang; Testai, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is an orally bio-available immunomodulatory drug currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Currently, there is a significant interest in the potential benefits of FTY720 on stroke outcomes. FTY720 and the sphingolipid signaling pathway it modulates has a ubiquitous presence in the central nervous system and both rodent models and pilot clinical trials seem to indicate that the drug may improve overall functional recovery in different stroke subtypes. Although the precise mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are yet unclear, there is evidence that FTY720 has a role in regulating cerebrovascular responses, blood–brain barrier permeability, and cell survival in the event of cerebrovascular insult. In this article, we critically review the data obtained from the latest laboratory findings and clinical trials involving both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and attempt to form a cohesive picture of FTY720’s mechanisms of action in stroke. PMID:27617002

  3. Human oocyte developmental potential is predicted by mechanical properties within hours after fertilization.

    PubMed

    Yanez, Livia Z; Han, Jinnuo; Behr, Barry B; Reijo Pera, Renee A; Camarillo, David B

    2016-01-01

    The causes of embryonic arrest during pre-implantation development are poorly understood. Attempts to correlate patterns of oocyte gene expression with successful embryo development have been hampered by the lack of reliable and nondestructive predictors of viability at such an early stage. Here we report that zygote viscoelastic properties can predict blastocyst formation in humans and mice within hours after fertilization, with >90% precision, 95% specificity and 75% sensitivity. We demonstrate that there are significant differences between the transcriptomes of viable and non-viable zygotes, especially in expression of genes important for oocyte maturation. In addition, we show that low-quality oocytes may undergo insufficient cortical granule release and zona-hardening, causing altered mechanics after fertilization. Our results suggest that embryo potential is largely determined by the quality and maturation of the oocyte before fertilization, and can be predicted through a minimally invasive mechanical measurement at the zygote stage. PMID:26904963

  4. A gut feeling to cure diabetes: potential mechanisms of diabetes remission after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Min

    2014-12-01

    A cure for type 2 diabetes was once a mere dream but has now become a tangible and achievable goal with the unforeseen success of bariatric surgery in the treatment of both obesity and type 2 diabetes. Popular bariatric procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy exhibit high rates of diabetes remission or marked improvement in glycemic control. However, the mechanism of diabetes remission following these procedures is still elusive and appears to be very complex and encompasses multiple anatomical and physiological changes. In this article, calorie restriction, improved β-cell function, improved insulin sensitivity, and alterations in gut physiology, bile acid metabolism, and gut microbiota are reviewed as potential mechanisms of diabetes remission after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy.

  5. Autophagy in Alcohol-Induced Multiorgan Injury: Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaogui; Ni, Hong-Min; Huang, Heqing

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a genetically programmed, evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation pathway involved in the trafficking of long-lived proteins and cellular organelles to the lysosome for degradation to maintain cellular homeostasis. Alcohol consumption leads to injury in various tissues and organs including liver, pancreas, heart, brain, and muscle. Emerging evidence suggests that autophagy is involved in alcohol-induced tissue injury. Autophagy serves as a cellular protective mechanism against alcohol-induced tissue injury in most tissues but could be detrimental in heart and muscle. This review summarizes current knowledge about the role of autophagy in alcohol-induced injury in different tissues/organs and its potential molecular mechanisms as well as possible therapeutic targets based on modulation of autophagy. PMID:25140315

  6. Cytotoxic T Cells Use Mechanical Force to Potentiate Target Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Basu, Roshni; Whitlock, Benjamin M; Husson, Julien; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Jin, Weiyang; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Dotiwala, Farokh; Giannone, Gregory; Hivroz, Claire; Biais, Nicolas; Lieberman, Judy; Kam, Lance C; Huse, Morgan

    2016-03-24

    The immunological synapse formed between a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and an infected or transformed target cell is a physically active structure capable of exerting mechanical force. Here, we investigated whether synaptic forces promote the destruction of target cells. CTLs kill by secreting toxic proteases and the pore forming protein perforin into the synapse. Biophysical experiments revealed a striking correlation between the magnitude of force exertion across the synapse and the speed of perforin pore formation on the target cell, implying that force potentiates cytotoxicity by enhancing perforin activity. Consistent with this interpretation, we found that increasing target cell tension augmented pore formation by perforin and killing by CTLs. Our data also indicate that CTLs coordinate perforin release and force exertion in space and time. These results reveal an unappreciated physical dimension to lymphocyte function and demonstrate that cells use mechanical forces to control the activity of outgoing chemical signals.

  7. Meditation as a therapeutic intervention for adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease - potential benefits and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic, progressive, brain disorder that affects at least 5.3 million Americans at an estimated cost of $148 billion, figures that are expected to rise steeply in coming years. Despite decades of research, there is still no cure for AD, and effective therapies for preventing or slowing progression of cognitive decline in at-risk populations remain elusive. Although the etiology of AD remains uncertain, chronic stress, sleep deficits, and mood disturbance, conditions common in those with cognitive impairment, have been prospectively linked to the development and progression of both chronic illness and memory loss and are significant predictors of AD. Therapies such as meditation that specifically target these risk factors may thus hold promise for slowing and possibly preventing cognitive decline in those at risk. In this study, we briefly review the existing evidence regarding the potential utility of meditation as a therapeutic intervention for those with and at risk for AD, discuss possible mechanisms underlying the observed benefits of meditation, and outline directions for future research.

  8. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. PMID:26873972

  9. Variability in Bioreactivity Linked to Changes in Size and Zeta Potential of Diesel Exhaust Particles in Human Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Srijata; Zhang, Lin; Subramaniam, Prasad; Lee, Ki-Bum; Garfunkel, Eric; Strickland, Pamela A. Ohman.; Mainelis, Gediminas; Lioy, Paul J.; Tetley, Teresa D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Ryan, Mary; Porter, Alex; Schwander, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Acting as fuel combustion catalysts to increase fuel economy, cerium dioxide (ceria, CeO2) nanoparticles have been used in Europe as diesel fuel additives (Envirox™). We attempted to examine the effects of particles emitted from a diesel engine burning either diesel (diesel exhaust particles, DEP) or diesel doped with various concentrations of CeO2 (DEP-Env) on innate immune responses in THP-1 and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Batches of DEP and DEP-Env were obtained on three separate occasions using identical collection and extraction protocols with the aim of determining the reproducibility of particles generated at different times. However, we observed significant differences in size and surface charge (zeta potential) of the DEP and DEP-Env across the three batches. We also observed that exposure of THP-1 cells and PBMC to identical concentrations of DEP and DEP-Env from the three batches resulted in statistically significant differences in bioreactivity as determined by IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-12p40 mRNA (by qRT-PCR) and protein expression (by ELISPOT assays). Importantly, bioreactivity was noted in very tight ranges of DEP size (60 to 120 nm) and zeta potential (−37 to −41 mV). Thus, these physical properties of DEP and DEP-Env were found to be the primary determinants of the bioreactivity measured in this study. Our findings also point to the potential risk of over- or under- estimation of expected bioreactivity effects (and by inference of public health risks) from bulk DEP use without taking into account potential batch-to-batch variations in physical (and possibly chemical) properties. PMID:24825358

  10. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics.

  11. Semiclassical stochastic mechanics for the Coulomb potential with applications to modelling dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neate, Andrew; Truman, Aubrey

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about dark matter particles save that their most important interactions with ordinary matter are gravitational and that, if they exist, they are stable, slow moving and relatively massive. Based on these assumptions, a semiclassical approximation to the Schrödinger equation under the action of a Coulomb potential should be relevant for modelling their behaviour. We investigate the semiclassical limit of the Schrödinger equation for a particle of mass M under a Coulomb potential in the context of Nelson's stochastic mechanics. This is done using a Freidlin-Wentzell asymptotic series expansion in the parameter ɛ = √{ ħ / M } for the Nelson diffusion. It is shown that for wave functions ψ ˜ exp((R + iS)/ɛ2) where R and S are real valued, the ɛ = 0 behaviour is governed by a constrained Hamiltonian system with Hamiltonian Hr and constraint Hi = 0 where the superscripts r and i denote the real and imaginary parts of the Bohr correspondence limit of the quantum mechanical Hamiltonian, independent of Nelson's ideas. Nelson's stochastic mechanics is restored in dealing with the nodal surface singularities and by computing (correct to first order in ɛ) the relevant diffusion process in terms of Jacobi fields thereby revealing Kepler's laws in a new light. The key here is that the constrained Hamilto