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Sample records for potential oral markers

  1. Salivary changes and dental caries as potential oral markers of autoimmune salivary gland dysfunction in primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Bardow, Allan; Nauntofte, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    Background the classification criteria for primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) include a number of oral components. In this study we evaluated if salivary flow and composition as well as dental caries are oral markers of disease severity in pSS. Methods in 20 patients fulfilling the American-European Consensus criteria for pSS and 20 age-matched healthy controls whole and parotid saliva flow rates and composition, measures of oral dryness, scores of decayed, missing and filled tooth surfaces (DMFS), periodontal indices, oral hygiene, and dietary habits were examined. Results in pSS, salivary flow rates, pH, and buffer capacities were lower, and DMFS, salivary sodium and chloride concentrations higher than in the healthy controls. DMFS also correlated inversely to salivary flow rates and positively to oral dryness. Apart from slightly increased gingival index, and more frequent dental visits in pSS, the periodontal condition, oral hygiene or sugar intake did not differ between these two groups. In pSS, findings were correlated to labial salivary gland focus score (FS) and presence of serum-autoantibodies to SSA/SSB (AB). The patients having both presence of AB and the highest FS (>2) also had the highest salivary sodium and chloride concentrations, the lowest salivary phosphate concentrations, lowest salivary flow rates, and highest DMFS compared to those with normal salivary concentrations of sodium and chloride at a given flow rate. Conclusion the salivary changes observed in some pSS patients reflect impaired ductal salt reabsorption, but unaffected acinar transport mechanisms, despite low salivary secretion. Our results suggest that changes in salivary flow and composition as well as dental caries may serve as potential markers of the extent of autoimmune-mediated salivary gland dysfunction in pSS. The study also indicates that the ductal epithelium is functionally affected in some pSS patients, which calls for future pathophysiological studies on the mechanisms

  2. Salivary markers of oxidative stress in oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tóthová, L'ubomíra; Kamodyová, Natália; Červenka, Tomáš; Celec, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is an interesting alternative diagnostic body fluid with several specific advantages over blood. These include non-invasive and easy collection and related possibility to do repeated sampling. One of the obstacles that hinders the wider use of saliva for diagnosis and monitoring of systemic diseases is its composition, which is affected by local oral status. However, this issue makes saliva very interesting for clinical biochemistry of oral diseases. Periodontitis, caries, oral precancerosis, and other local oral pathologies are associated with oxidative stress. Several markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species can be measured in saliva. Clinical studies have shown an association with oral pathologies at least for some of the established salivary markers of oxidative stress. This association is currently limited to the population level and none of the widely used markers can be applied for individual diagnostics. Oxidative stress seems to be of local oral origin, but it is currently unclear whether it is caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species due to inflammation or by the lack of antioxidants. Interventional studies, both, in experimental animals as well as humans indicate that antioxidant treatment could prevent or slow-down the progress of periodontitis. This makes the potential clinical use of salivary markers of oxidative stress even more attractive. This review summarizes basic information on the most commonly used salivary markers of oxidative damage, antioxidant status, and carbonyl stress and the studies analyzing these markers in patients with caries or periodontitis. PMID:26539412

  3. Expression of MMP-1/PAR-1 and patterns of invasion in oral squamous cell carcinoma as potential prognostic markers

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hai-Xia; Chen, Yan; Ni, Bo-Xiong; Wang, Shan; Sun, Miao; Chen, Dong; Zheng, Jin-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 degrades type I collagen of the extracellular matrix and also activates protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 to induce angiogenesis. The aims of this study were to evaluate microvessel density (MVD) and the expression of PAR-1 and MMP-1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) specimens with different patterns of invasion (POI) and to evaluate their association with clinical outcomes. Methods Seventy-four surgically obtained oral SCC samples were classified by POI according to hematoxylin-eosin staining. MVD and the localization and intensity of PAR-1 and MMP-1 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results Of the 74 oral SCC samples, 18, 5, 34, and 17 showed type I, II, III, and IV POI, respectively. MVD and expression levels of MMP-1 and PAR-1 differed between POI types I–II and POI types III–IV. Patients with low tumor expression of MMP-1 and PAR-1 and low MVD had a longer survival time than those with high tumor expression of MMP-1 and PAR-1. Moreover, the survival time of patients with POI types III–IV was shorter than that of patients with POI types I–II. Conclusion POI combined with expression levels of MMP-1 and PAR-1 may be a valuable tool for assessing the clinical prognosis of patients with oral SCC. PMID:26170698

  4. Molecular markers in oral lichen planus: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sagari, Shitalkumar; Sanadhya, Sudhanshu; Doddamani, Mallikarjun; Rajput, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory mucosal disease that is usually detected in 0.5–2.2% of the human population. Among these, only 0.5–2.9% of the lesions progress to carcinoma. However, there are no prognostic markers available presently to recognize the increased risk in malignant transformation of the lesions. Selected markers for cell proliferation, adhesion, apoptosis and lymphocytic infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in addition to static cytometry for DNA content. The concept linking OLP and oral squamous cell carcinoma states that chronic inflammation results in crucial DNA damage, which further progresses to development of carcinoma. Even though in the past decade, enormous information has been accumulated on malignant potential of OLP, its transformation still remains unclear. Hence, the purpose of this article was to review cellular and molecular markers to understand the pathogenesis of OLP and its progression toward malignancy. PMID:27194873

  5. Quantitative Immunoexpression of EGFR in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Submucous Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jyothi Meka, Naga; Ugrappa, Sridevi; Velpula, Nagalaxmi; Kumar, Sravan; Naik Maloth, Kotya; Kodangal, Srikanth; Ch, Lalitha; Goyal, Stuti

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs)which include a variety of lesions and conditions characterized by an increased risk for malignant transformation. Thisstudy evaluated the quantitative expression of EGFR in normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis to predict the malignant risk in compliance with the intensity of staining with EGFR. Materials and methods. Thirty subjects were included in the study, consisting of 10 oral leukoplakia (OL), 10 oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and 10 normal oral mucosa (NOM) as the control group. Owing to the histopathological confirmation of precancerous state of tissue, 4-μm-thick sections of tissue were taken from paraffin-embedded wax blocks for immunohistochemical staining for EGFR. Results. All the control cases showed positive expression for EGFR, while 20% of oral leukoplakia and 40% of OSMF cases showed strong expression (3+), 40% of OL and 30% of OSMF cases showed weak expression (2+), and 40% of OLand 30% of OSMF cases showed poor expression (1+) compared to controls (P=0.012). Conclusion. EGFR expression levels in the premalignant lesion appear to be a sensitive factor in predicting the neoplastic potential. This suggests that EGFR may serve as a biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups and guide prophylactic therapy with chemopreventive drugs or surgical intervention to prevent progression to carcinoma. Hence, further investigations in the direction of chemopreventive trials with a larger sample size are suggested to determine its role in the head and neck tumorigenesis. PMID:26697149

  6. Expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in basaloid and conventional squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: are potential prognostic markers?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma presents with a preference for the head and neck region, and shows a distinct aggressive behavior, with frequent local recurrences, regional and distant metastasis. The alterations in the cadherin-catenin complex are fundamental requirements for the metastasis process, and this is the first study to evaluate the immunostaining of E-cadherin and β-catenin in oral basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Methods Seventeen cases of this tumor located exclusively in the mouth were compared to 26 cases of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and 28 cases of well to moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma matched by stage and tumor site. The immunostaining of E-cadherin and β-catenin were evaluated in the three groups and compared to their clinicopathological features and prognosis. Results For groups poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma, reduction or absence of E-cadherin staining was observed in more than 80.0% of carcinomas, and it was statistically significant compared to well to moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (p = .019). A strong expression of β-catenin was observed in 26.9% and 20.8% of well to moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, respectively, and in 41.2% of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. The 5-year and 10-year overall and disease-free survival rates demonstrated no significant differences among all three groups. Conclusions The clinical and biological behavior of three groups of the oral cavity tumors evaluated are similar. E-cadherin and β-catenin immunostaining showed no prognostic value for basaloid and conventional squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:24893577

  7. Can MMP-9 be a Prognosticator Marker for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Shiva Kumar; Kumar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Invasion and metastasis of malignant tumours severely endanger the life of cancer patients. Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the commonly found malignancies in the oral cavity and its survival rate has not improved from past few decades. Since an important risk factor for oral squamous cell carcinoma is the presence of epithelial dysplasia, it is necessary to check the presence of a prognosticator marker in both of them. As matrix metalloproteinase’s (MMP’s) are involved in degradation of type IV collagen, which are one of the important components of extracellular matrix components which play a relevant role in several steps of tumour progression such as invasion and metastasis. We have studied MMP-9 expression to evaluate its prognostic potential in oral cancers as well as oral epithelial dysplasia along with tissues of normal oral epithelium. Materials and Methods The expression was examined using immunohistochemistry procedure with MMP-9 in 100 samples including cases of epithelium from normal oral mucosa, oral dysplastic lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. One set of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded sections of the three categories were stained by haematoxylin and eosin. The sections were then evaluated under microscope. Data was examined for statistical significance using SPSS 13.0 by Mann-Whitney Test and Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results With MMP-9 gain of expression was noted from Control group to oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic staining was seen with MMP-9. Statistically highly significant differences were seen between oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma and statistically significant differences were found between the control group and the oral squamous cell carcinoma group. Conclusion This study suggested that oral squamous cell carcinoma shows higher MMP-9 expression as compared to oral epithelial dysplasia followed by epithelium from normal oral mucosa. However, no correlation was found among the

  8. Potential Markers in Cardiac Hypertrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Fulgheri, Gabriele; Wicinski, Michal; Grzesk, Elzbieta; Odrowaz-Sypniewska, Grazyna; Grześk, Grzegorz; Darwish, Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed based on medical history of patient (symptoms and family history), physical examination, results of echocardiogram and in some situations additionally ECG or chest-X-ray results. Currently used non-invasive diagnostic methods, could be complemented by biochemical tests. In this review some emerging potential biomarkers such as: osteopontin, ST-2 receptor, osteoprotegerin, neopterin, urocortins, growth differentiation factor 15 and urotensin II are described. In current article human and non human investigations have been reviewed, since rat is most commonly used model in experimental cardiology and gives important foundations to clinical knowledge.

  9. Potentially malignant oral lesions: clinicopathological correlations

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Haline Cunha de Medeiros; Pinto, Najara Alcântara Sampaio; Pereira, Joabe dos Santos; de Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the incidence of potentially malignant oral lesions, and evaluate and correlate their clinical and pathological aspects. Methods The sample consisted of cases clinically diagnosed as oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, erythroleukoplakia, actinic cheilitis, and oral lichen planus treated at a diagnostic center, between May 2012 and July 2013. Statistical tests were conducted adopting a significance level of 5% (p≤0.05). Results Out of 340 patients, 106 (31.2%) had potentially malignant oral lesions; and 61 of these (17.9%) were submitted to biopsy. Actinic cheilitis was the most frequent lesion (37.5%) and the lower lip was the most affected site (49.6%). Among 106 patients in the sample, 48 (45.3%) reported nicotine consumption, 35 (33%) reported alcohol intake and 34 (32.1%) sun exposure while working. When clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compared, oral erythroplakia and atypical ulcer were the lesions that exhibited greater compatibility (100% each). Conclusion In most cases, clinical and histopathological diagnoses were compatible. An association between the occurrence of erythroplakia, leukoplakia and erythroleukoplakia with smoking was observed. Similarly, an association between actinic cheilitis and sun exposure was noted. Erythroleukoplakia presented the highest malignancy grade in this study. Finally, dental surgeons should draw special attention to diagnosis of potentially malignant oral lesions, choose the best management, and control the lesions to avoid their malignant transformation. PMID:27074232

  10. Origin of Ameloblastoma From Basal Cells of the Oral Epithelium- Establishing the Relation Using Neuroectodermal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Suneela, S; Narayan, T V; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Mohanty, Leeky; Shenoy, Sadhana; Swaminathan, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Basal cell layer of the oral epithelium has been rightfully regarded as a potential source of odontogenic tumours and cysts, but, without substantial evidence. Also, whether the basal cell layer retains within it, some properties of ectomesenchyme, which was imbibed during the early embryogenesis and hence its neuroectodermal relation, is not known. Here, an attempt is made to establish the hidden neuroectodermal potential of the oral epithelium, especially the basal layer, by observing the expression of known neuroectodermal markers, NSE (Neuron Specific Enolase), Synaptophysin and CD99. The expression of the same markers has also been studied in Ameloblastoma, connecting it with oral epithelium, in turn establishing basal cell layer as a potential source of Ameloblastoma. Materials and Methods: Sections of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue samples of 20 cases of Ameloblastoma and 10 cases of Normal Retromolar mucosa, were stained immunohistochemically with NSE, Synaptophysin, CD99 and also with CK-19 and evaluated for positive expression. Results: Positive reaction was obtained in all the cases of Ameloblastoma and NRM (Normal Retromolar mucosa) with NSE, all the cases of Ameloblastoma and eight cases of NRM with Synaptophysin and in six cases of Ameloblastoma and NRM with CD99. The staining was diffuse and more marked in case of NSE than Synaptophysin and CD99. CK19 staining done to assure that the tissue antigenicity was maintained was positive in all the samples. Interpretation and Conclusion: A strong relationship between the neuroectoderm, Ameloblastoma and the basal layer of the oral epithelium is established by the study. It favours the hypothesis that the basal cell layer of oral mucosa may be the sought out culprit in most cases of the Ameloblastomas, especially those occurring in the non-tooth bearing area. This would call for the need to incorporate additional therapy in the form of mucosal striping along with the

  11. Biochemical markers in oral submucous fibrosis: A review and update

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, V V; Satelur, K; Komali, Y

    2013-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a potentially malignant oral condition effectively linked to the causative habit of chewing areca nut. Since its first description in the 1950s, numerous epidemiological, biochemical, histological, and genetic studies have been reported. While most studies point out to the cause and effect of areca nut, co-additive factors are also implicated in the progression and malignant transformation of this condition. Biochemical investigations have concentrated on outlining such changes in the blood, serum or tissues of these patients and have given insights on the possible pathogenesis of OSMF. This article attempts to compile details of biochemical investigations in OSMF and summarize and infer on the findings. PMID:24348612

  12. Leptin receptor expression and Gln223Arg polymorphism as prognostic markers in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P R S; Maia, L L; Santos, M; Peterle, G T; Alves, L U; Takamori, J T; Souza, R P; Barbosa, W M; Mercante, A M C; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-11-25

    The leptin gene product is released into the blood stream, passes through the blood-brain barrier, and finds the leptin receptor (LEPR) in the central nervous system. This hormone regulates food intake, hematopoiesis, inflammation, immunity, differentiation, and cell proliferation. The LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism has been reported to alter receptor function and expression, both of which have been related with prognostics in several tumor types. Furthermore, several studies have shown a relationship between the Gln223Arg polymorphism and tumor development, and its role in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now well understood. In this study, 315 DNA samples were used for LEPR Gln223Arg genotyping and 87 primary oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas were used for immunohistochemical expression analysis, such that a relationship between these and tumor development and prognosis could be established. Homozygous LEPR Arg223 was found to be associated with a 2-fold reduction in oral and oropharyngeal cancer risk. In contrast, the presence of the Arg223 allele in tumors was associated with worse disease-free and disease-specific survival. Low LEPR expression was found to be an independent risk factor, increasing the risk for lymph node metastasis 4-fold. In conclusion, the Gln223Arg polymorphism and LEPR expression might be valuable markers for oral and oropharyngeal cancer, suggesting that LEPR might serve as a potential target for future therapies.

  13. Surgical site markers: potential source of infection.

    PubMed

    Driessche, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Observing licensed independent practitioners mark surgical sites with all types of marking pens is a concern related to the potential spread of infections from patient to patient. The practice of using the same marking pen to mark a surgical site has been questioned as a source of cross contamination. A literature review was done on recent studies and best practice recommendations to determine whether marking pens can act as fomites for nosocomial infections. The review indicated that surgical site markers, ink pens, and aging permanent marking pens can be a source for cross-infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, other bacteria, fungus, or virus. The type of marking pens used and the act of using the same marking pen from patient to patient could contribute to nosocomial infections. The literature reviewed recommends a single time use of a surgical marking pen. Interventions to prevent cross contamination and postoperative surgical site infections are a major concern in the care of the orthopaedic patient. PMID:23168939

  14. Surgical site markers: potential source of infection.

    PubMed

    Driessche, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Observing licensed independent practitioners mark surgical sites with all types of marking pens is a concern related to the potential spread of infections from patient to patient. The practice of using the same marking pen to mark a surgical site has been questioned as a source of cross contamination. A literature review was done on recent studies and best practice recommendations to determine whether marking pens can act as fomites for nosocomial infections. The review indicated that surgical site markers, ink pens, and aging permanent marking pens can be a source for cross-infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, other bacteria, fungus, or virus. The type of marking pens used and the act of using the same marking pen from patient to patient could contribute to nosocomial infections. The literature reviewed recommends a single time use of a surgical marking pen. Interventions to prevent cross contamination and postoperative surgical site infections are a major concern in the care of the orthopaedic patient.

  15. Keratins 17 and 19 expression as prognostic markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Coelho, B A; Peterle, G T; Santos, M; Agostini, L P; Maia, L L; Stur, E; Silva, C V M; Mendes, S O; Almança, C C J; Freitas, F V; Borçoi, A R; Archanjo, A B; Mercante, A M C; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-11-25

    Five-year survival rates for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are 30% and the mortality rate is 50%. Immunohistochemistry panels are used to evaluate proliferation, vascularization, apoptosis, HPV infection, and keratin expression, which are important markers of malignant progression. Keratins are a family of intermediate filaments predominantly expressed in epithelial cells and have an essential role in mechanical support and cytoskeleton formation, which is essential for the structural integrity and stability of the cell. In this study, we analyzed the expressions of keratins 17 and 19 (K17 and K19) by immunohistochemistry in tumoral and non-tumoral tissues from patients with OSCC. The results show that expression of these keratins is higher in tumor tissues compared to non-tumor tissues. Positive K17 expression correlates with lymph node metastasis and multivariate analysis confirmed this relationship, revealing a 6-fold increase in lymph node metastasis when K17 is expressed. We observed a correlation between K17 expression with disease-free survival and disease-specific death in patients who received surgery and radiotherapy. Multivariate analysis revealed that low expression of K17 was an independent marker for early disease relapse and disease-specific death in patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy, with an approximately 4-fold increased risk when compared to high K17 expression. Our results suggest a potential role for K17 and K19 expression profiles as tumor prognostic markers in OSCC patients.

  16. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search. PMID:27416153

  17. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search.

  18. Chronic oral infection with major periodontal bacteria Tannerella forsythia modulates systemic atherosclerosis risk factors and inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Velsko, Irina M; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-04-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative anaerobic organism that inhabits the subgingival cavity and initiates connective tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption in periodontal disease (PD). PD is a chronic immunoinflammatory disease and has been linked to several systemic diseases including atherosclerosis. This study evaluated the effects of a chronic oral infection with T. forsythia ATCC 43037 on the induction of PD, inflammatory markers and atherosclerosis risk factors in hyperlipidemic ApoE(null) mice. Mice were orally infected for 12 and 24 weeks prior to euthanasia. Bacterial colonization of the oral cavity and bacteremia was confirmed via isolation of genomic DNA from oral plaque and tissues. Oral infection elicited significantly elevated levels of serum IgG and IgM antibodies and alveolar bone resorption compared to control mice. Tannerella forsythia-infected mice had increased serum amyloid A, and significantly reduced serum nitric oxide when compared to controls. Tannerella forsythia chronic infection also significantly increased serum lipoproteins suggesting altered cholesterol metabolism and potential for aortic inflammation. Despite enhanced acute phase reactants and altered lipid profiles, T. forsythia infection was associated with decreased aortic plaque. This study investigates the potential of a known periodontal bacterial pathogen found in atherosclerotic plaque in humans to accelerate atherosclerosis in hyperlipdemic mice. PMID:25663343

  19. Recognizing and overcoming potential barriers to oral medications for MS.

    PubMed

    Moses, Harold

    2014-10-01

    Three FDA-approved oral medications are available for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis: fingolimod, teriflunomide, and dimethyl fumarate. While injection and IV treatments have proven to be beneficial, these newer oral agents also offer positive outcomes for patients. Numerous barriers exist, though, for these oral agents, including the unknown long-term efficacy and safety and potential side effects. Despite possible side effects, oral agents provide convenience, ease of use, and the elimination of injection/IV administration-site pain. To ensure MS patients receive the most appropriate individualized care, clinicians should present all of the available treatment options to both newly diagnosed and established patients. PMID:25373133

  20. Potential prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic markers for human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chia-Siu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer (GC) and its consequent mortality rate severely threaten human health. GC is frequently not diagnosed until a relatively advanced stage. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment. Thus, early screening and diagnosis are critical for improving prognoses in patients with GC. Gastroscopy with biopsy is an appropriate method capable of aiding the diagnosis of specific early GC tumor types; however, the stress caused by this method together with it being excessively expensive makes it difficult to use it as a routine method for screening for GC on a population basis. The currently used tumor marker assays for detecting GC are simple and rapid, but their use is limited by their low sensitivity and specificity. In recent years, several markers have been identified and tested for their clinical relevance in the management of GC. Here, we review the serum-based tumor markers for GC and their clinical significance, focusing on discoveries from microarray/proteomics research. We also review tissue-based GC tumor markers and their clinical application, focusing on discoveries from immunohistochemical research. This review provides a brief description of various tumor markers for the purposes of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics, and we include markers already in clinical practice and various forthcoming biomarkers. PMID:25320517

  1. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  2. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  3. Volatile compounds as potential defective coffee beans' markers.

    PubMed

    Toci, Aline T; Farah, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Although Brazil is the largest raw coffee producer and exporter in the world, a large amount of its Arabica coffee production is considered inappropriate for exportation. This by-product of coffee industry is called PVA due to the presence of black (P), green (V) and sour (A) defective beans, which are known to contribute considerably for cup quality decrease. Data on the volatile composition of Brazilian defective coffee beans are scarce. In this study, we evaluated the volatile composition of defective coffee beans (two lots) compared to good quality beans from the respective lots. Potential defective beans' markers were identified. In the raw samples, 2-methylpyrazine and 2-furylmethanol acetate were identified only in black-immature beans and butyrolactone only in sour beans, while benzaldehyde and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine showed to be potential markers of defective beans in general. In the roasted PVA beans, pyrazine, 2,3-butanediol meso, 2-methyl-5-(1-propenyl)pyrazine, hexanoic acid, 4-ethyl-guayacol and isopropyl p-cresol sulfide also showed to be potential defective coffee beans' markers.

  4. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  5. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kartha, Vinay K; Stawski, Lukasz; Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  6. Oral verrucous hyperplasia versus oral verrucous carcinoma: A clinicopathologic dilemma revisited using p53 as immunohistochemical marker

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Preeti; Wadhwan, Vijay; Aggarwal, Pooja; Sharma, Anamika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH) and oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) are two distinct clinicopathologic verrucous lesions. However, the distinction between the two lesions still remains enigmatic. It is almost impossible to distinguish them clinically. Thus, the final diagnosis rests on the histopathological characteristics of both lesions, being distinguished from each other by an exophytic and endophytic growth pattern, respectively. Methods: This institutional study was planned to review retrospectively two series of patients with histologic diagnoses of VH (n = 27) and VC (n = 27) to investigate their clinicopathological features and to analyze the role of immunohistochemical (IHC) marker p53 protein in distinguishing between the two verrucous lesions. The biopsies of the histopathologically diagnosed cases spanning last 10 years were retrieved from the archives of the Oral Pathology department of the institution. Clinical data were tabulated and analyzed for age, gender, site and tobacco habits. IHC staining was done on all the samples using p53 antibody. Results: Applying Chi-square test, the buccal mucosa was the most common affected site and tobacco chewing was more prevalent habit in both these lesions (P > 0.05). While the elderly males (>60 years) were the most commonly affected group in VC, a relatively younger age group of males (30–39 years) was more commonly affected in VH (P < 0.05). IHC staining with p53 antibody did not show any significant difference between these two verrucous lesions (P > 0.05). Conclusion: VH and VC are closely related lesions distinguished by an adequate biopsy sample. PMID:27721598

  7. PTPN12 inhibits oral squamous epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion and can be used as a prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhe; Tian, Hua; Song, Hong-quan; Zhang, Rui; Deng, An-mei; Liu, Hong-wen

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 12 (PTPN12) has been recognized as a tumor suppressor gene that may inhibit tumor growth. However, PTPN12 expression in oral squamous carcinoma (OSCC) has not been studied. We showed reduced expression of PTPN12 in OSCC tissues. Decreased PTPN12 expression was significantly associated with clinical stage of the disease (P < 0.01). Moreover, reduction in PTPN12 correlated with the overactivation of STAT3. PTPRD negatively related to STAT3 phosphorylation (R = -0.535). Low expression of PTPN12 and high level of phosphorylation of STAT3 correlated with poor prognosis. Overexpression of PTPN12 inhibited proliferation and migration in OSCC cells. PTPN12 was associated with STAT3 and induced STAT3 dephosphorylation. Moreover, our results suggested that PTPN12 might function through binding and dephosphorylation of STAT3. Therefore, PTPN12 is a potential marker for prognosis of OSCC.

  8. Expression of MUC1 mucin in potentially malignant disorders, oral squamous cell carcinoma and normal oral mucosa: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Harish; Sanjai, Karpagaselvi; Kumarswamy, Jayalakshmi; Keshavaiah, Roopavathi; Papaiah, Lokesh; Divya, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucins alteration in glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of malignant diseases. Therefore, mucins are used as valuable markers to distinguish normal and disease conditions. Many studies on MUC1 expression have been conducted on variety of neoplastic lesions other than head and neck region. None of the study has made an attempt to show its significance in potentially malignant disorders (PMDs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Hence, ours is one of the pioneer studies done to assess and evaluate the same. Aims: This study aims to compare and correlate the expression of MUC1 mucin protein in normal oral mucosa (NOM), PMD's and OSCC by immunohistochemical method. Materials and Methods: Institutional study, archived tissue sections of OSCC (n = 20), PMD's (n = 20) and NOM (n = 20) were immunostained for MUC1 mucin and percentage of positive cells evaluated. Results obtained were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney test and Student's t-test. Results: The mean MUC1 mucin positive cells in the study groups were as follows, 40% in OSCC, 28% in PMD's and 0.75% in NOM. Higher mean immunohistochemical score was observed in OSCC group followed by PMD's group and NOM group. The difference in immunohistochemical score among the groups was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The result of the current study suggests that determination of MUC1 mucin expression may be a parameter in the diagnosis of malignant behavior of PMD's to OSCC. MUC1 mucin expression may be a useful diagnostic marker for prediction of the invasive/metastatic potential of OSCC. PMID:27601811

  9. Oral cancer diagnostics based on infrared spectral markers and wax physisorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Li-Fang; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chiang, Wei-Fan; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Lee, Yao-Chang; Shieh, Dar-Bin

    2013-02-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy is an emerging approach for disease analysis owing to its capability for in situ chemical characterization of pathological processes. Synchrotron-based infrared microspectroscopy (SR-IMS) provides ultra-high spatial resolution for profiling biochemical events associated with disease progression. Spectral alterations were observed in cultured oral cells derived from healthy, precancerous, primary, and metastatic cancers. An innovative wax-physisorption-based kinetic FTIR imaging method for the detection of oral precancer and cancer was demonstrated successfully. The approach is based on determining the residual amount of paraffin wax (C(25)H(52)) or beeswax (C(46)H(92)O(2)) on a sample surface after xylene washing. This amount is used as a signpost of the degree of physisorption that altered during malignant transformation. The results of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of oral cell lines indicated that the methylene (CH(2)) and methyl group (CH(3)) stretching vibrations in the range of 3,000-2,800 cm(-1) have the highest accuracy rate (89.6 %) to discriminate the healthy keratinocytes (NHOK) from cancer cells. The results of wax-physisorption-based FTIR imaging showed a stronger physisorption with beeswax in oral precancerous and cancer cells as compared with that of NHOK, which showed a strong capability with paraffin wax. The infrared kinetic study of oral cavity tissue showed a consistency in the wax physisorption of the cell lines. On the basis of our findings, these results show the potential use of wax-physisorption-based kinetic FTIR imaging for the early screening of oral cancer lesions and the chemical changes during oral carcinogenesis.

  10. Data from human salivary proteome – A resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sivadasan, Priya; Kumar Gupta, Manoj; Sathe, Gajanan J.; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Palit, Priyanka; Gowda, Harsha; Suresh, Amritha; Abraham Kuriakose, Moni; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Salivary proteins are an important source for developing marker-based assays for oral cancers. To get an insight into the proteins present in human saliva, we applied multiple strategies involving affinity-based depletion of abundant proteins, fractionation of the resulting proteins or their tryptic peptides followed by LC–MS/MS analysis, using high resolution mass spectrometry. By integrating the protein identifications observed by us with those from similar workflows employed in earlier investigations, we compiled an updated salivary proteome. We have mapped the salivary proteome to the published data on differentially expressed proteins from oral cancer tissues and also for their secretory features using prediction tools, SignalP 4.1, TMHMM 2c and Exocarta. Proteotypic peptides for the subset of proteins implicated in oral cancer and mapped to any two of the prediction tools for secretory potential have been listed. The data here are related to the research article “Human saliva proteome – a resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer” in the Journal of Proteomics [1]. PMID:26217819

  11. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in oral potentially malignant disorders: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Archana; Uma Maheswari, TN

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is an inducible enzyme. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) are considered as the early tissue changes that happen due to various habits such as smoking tobacco, chewing tobacco or stress. This alteration in the tissues alters the expression of MMP-9. The rationale of the review is to know the expression of MMP-9 in OPMDs. Hand searching and electronic databases such as PubMed and ScienceDirect were done for mesh terms such as OPMDs and MMP-9. Eight articles were obtained, after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. These articles were assessed with QUADAS and data were extracted and evaluated. The included eight studies were done in 182 oral squamous cell carcinoma cases, 430 OPMDs (146 oral lichen planus, 264 leukoplakia and 20 oral submucous fibrosis) and 352 healthy controls evaluated for MMP-9. MMP-9 expression was found to be elevated in tissue, serum and saliva samples of OPMDs than in healthy controls. There is only one study in each serum and saliva samples to evaluate MMP-9. Saliva being noninvasive and serum being minimally invasive, more studies need to be done in both serum and saliva to establish MMP-9 as an early diagnostic marker in OPMDs to know its potential in malignant transformation. PMID:27721614

  12. Methylation markers: a potential force driving cancer diagnostics forward.

    PubMed

    Khandige, Surabhi; Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; Kapettu, Satyamoorthy

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics, transcending genetics, genomics, and molecular biology, is now poised to be the avant-garde beacon of biological science. The rise of DNA methylation studies marks a new dawn in the field of epigenetics, which only a few decades ago was largely underestimated, but is now a dynamic area of research challenging and revising traditional paradigms of gene expression and behavior. Cancer research enjoys a major share of this attention to DNA methylation and it has been widely accepted for some time now that cancer is as much an epigenetic phenomenon as it is genetic. Epigenetic lesions and perturbations are acquired during the life of an individual and accumulate with aging and represent the flip side of the same coin that bears genetic mutations. Both events, either individually or in cooperation, result in the development and progression of cancer. Epigenetic research and the hunt for strong methylation markers has been ably mitigated by new and improved high throughput technology that has improved the efficacy and enabled the rapid progress of biomarker evaluation and validation. This review looks into some of the recent strides in biomarker research dealing exclusively with methylation markers and the potential key they may hold to the resilient door shut tight on cancer diagnostics and treatment.

  13. FAS ligand expression in inflammatory infiltrate lymphoid cells as a prognostic marker in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peterle, G T; Santos, M; Mendes, S O; Carvalho-Neto, P B; Maia, L L; Stur, E; Agostini, L P; Silva, C V M; Trivilin, L O; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-09-22

    Currently, the most important prognostic factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the presence of regional lymph node metastases, which correlates with a 50% reduction in life expectancy. We have previously observed that expression of hypoxia genes in the tumor inflammatory infiltrate is statistically related to prognosis in OSCC. FAS and FASL expression levels in OSCC have previously been related to patient survival. The present study analyzed the relationship between FASL expression in the inflammatory infiltrate lymphoid cells and clinical variables, tumor histology, and prognosis of OSCC. Strong FASL expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastases (P = 0.035) and disease-specific death (P = 0.014), but multivariate analysis did not confirm FASL expression as an independent death risk factor (OR = 2.78, 95%CI = 0.81-9.55). Disease-free and disease-specific survival were significantly correlated with FASL expression (P = 0.016 and P = 0.005, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that strong FASL expression is an independent marker for earlier disease relapse and disease-specific death, with approximately 2.5-fold increased risk compared with weak expression (HR = 2.24, 95%CI = 1.08-4.65 and HR = 2.49, 95%CI = 1.04-5.99, respectively). Our results suggest a potential role for this expression profile as a tumor prognostic marker in OSCC patients.

  14. HBO: a possible supplementary therapy for oral potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaojing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Rui; Zhou, Gang

    2014-08-01

    Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) are chronic inflammatory diseases in which cells suffer hypoxia referring to deprivation of adequate oxygen supply. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO), which can increase oxygen tension and delivery to oxygen-deficient tissue, is a supplementary therapy to improve or cure disorders involving hypoxia. Although the applications of HBO in wound healings, acute ischemic stroke, radiation-induced soft tissue injury and cancers are extensively reported, there are only few studies on their effect in OPMDs. Not only does HBO furnish oxygen-it also possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. At the cellular level, HBO can decrease lymphocyte proliferation and promote apoptosis of fibroblasts. At the molecular level, it can decrease expression of HIF, ICAM-1, TNF-α, TGF-β, and IFN-γ, as well as increase vascular VEGF expression and angiogenesis. Thus, we hypothesize that HBO may contribute to treat OPMDs, including oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis both at the cellular level and the molecular level, and that it would be a safe and inexpensive therapeutic strategy. PMID:24908359

  15. Protein-bound acrolein: Potential markers for oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Koji; Kanematsu, Masamichi; Sakai, Kensuke; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Hattori, Nobutaka; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyata, Toshio; Noguchi, Noriko; Niki, Etsuo; Osawa, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    Acrolein (CH2=CH—CHO) is known as a ubiquitous pollutant in the environment. Here we show that this notorious aldehyde is not just a pollutant, but also a lipid peroxidation product that could be ubiquitously generated in biological systems. Upon incubation with BSA, acrolein was rapidly incorporated into the protein and generated the protein-linked carbonyl derivative, a putative marker of oxidatively modified proteins under oxidative stress. To verify the presence of protein-bound acrolein in vivo, the mAb (mAb5F6) against the acrolein-modified keyhole limpet hemocyanin was raised. It was found that the acrolein-lysine adduct, Nɛ-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino)lysine, constitutes an epitope of the antibody. Immunohistochemical analysis of atherosclerotic lesions from a human aorta demonstrated that antigenic materials recognized by mAb5F6 indeed constituted the lesions, in which intense positivity was associated primarily with macrophage-derived foam cells and the thickening neointima of arterial walls. The observations that (i) oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein with Cu2+ generated the acrolein-low-density lipoprotein adducts and (ii) the iron-catalyzed oxidation of arachidonate in the presence of protein resulted in the formation of antigenic materials suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids are sources of acrolein that cause the production of protein-bound acrolein. These data suggest that the protein-bound acrolein represents potential markers of oxidative stress and long-term damage to protein in aging, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. PMID:9560197

  16. Adiponectin and bone metabolism markers in female rowers: eumenorrheic and oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, J; Vaiksaar, S; Mäestu, J; Purge, P; Jürimäe, T

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated whether adiponectin, bone formation (osteocalcin) and bone resorption [type I carboxyterminal telopeptide (ICTP)] values are influenced by menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use in female rowers. Twenty-four rowers divided into normally cycling athletes (NOC; no.=15) and athletes taking oral contraceptive pills (OC; no.=9) participated in this study. Fasting blood samples, body composition and aerobic capacity measurements were taken during the follicular (FP) and the luteal (LP) phases of the menstrual cycle. Adiponectin, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, body composition and aerobic capacity did not fluctuate significantly during menstrual cycle in both groups. Osteocalcin and ICTP were lower (p<0.05) in OC compared with NOC, but did not change significantly across menstrual cycle phases in both groups. Estradiol and progesterone were not related to adiponectin, osteocalcin or ICTP (r<0.147; p>0.05). Adiponectin was correlated (p<0.05) with osteocalcin (r=0.452) and fat free mass (r=0.428), and osteocalcin was related (p<0.05) to insulin (r=-0.413), glucose (r=-0.486) and insulin resistance (r=-0.528). In conclusion, adiponectin was not affected by menstrual cycle phase and OC use in female rowers, while bone metabolism markers were lower in OC compared to NOC groups. Adiponectin and osteocalcin were interrelated and may characterise energy homeostasis in female athletes. PMID:21169728

  17. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  18. Raman spectroscopy of oral tissues: correlation of spectral and biochemical markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Introduction Optical spectroscopic methods are being explored as novel tools for early and non-invasive cancer diagnosis. Both ex vivo and in vivo Raman spectroscopic studies carried out in oral cancer over the past decade have demonstrated that spectra of normal tissues are rich in lipids while tumor spectra show predominance of proteins. An accurate understanding of spectral features with respect to the biochemical composition is a pre-requisite before transferring these technologies for routine clinical usage. Therefore, in the present study, we have carried out Raman and biochemical studies on same tissues to correlate spectral markers and biochemical composition of normal and tumor oral tissues. Materials and Methods Spectra of 20 pairs of normal and tumor oral tissues were acquired using fiber-optic probe coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Intensity associated with lipid (1440 cm-1) and protein (1450 and 1660 cm-1) bands were computed using curve-deconvolution method. Same tissues were then subjected to biochemical estimations of major biomolecules i.e., protein, lipid and phospholipids. Results and Discussion The intensity of the lipid band was found to be higher in normal tissues with respect to tumors, and the protein band was higher in tumors compared to normal tissues. Biochemical estimation yielded similar results i.e. high protein to lipid or phospholipid ratio in tumors with-respect to normal tissues. These differences were found to be statistically significant. Conclusion Findings of curve-deconvolution and biochemical estimation correlate very well and corroborate the spectral profile noted in earlier studies.

  19. Therapeutic potential of melatonin in oral medicine and periodontology.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy tryptamine) is a substance secreted by multiple organs in vertebrates. In addition to playing a part in the circadian cycle of the body, melatonin is known to have antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antioncotic effects on human tissues. Oral cavity is affected by a number of conditions such as periodontitis, mucositis, cancers, and cytotoxicity from various drugs or biomaterials. Research has suggested that melatonin is effective in treating the aforementioned pathologies. Furthermore, melatonin has been observed to enhance osseointegration and bone regeneration. The aim of this review is to critically analyze and summarize the research focusing on the potential of melatonin in the field of oral medicine. Topical administration of melatonin has a positive effect on periodontal health and osseointegration. Furthermore, melatonin is particularly effective in improving the periodontal parameters of diabetic patients with periodontitis. Melatonin exerts a regenerative effect on periodontal bone and may be incorporated into of periodontal scaffolds. The cytotoxic effect of various drugs and dental materials may be countered by the antioxidant properties of melatonin. Topical administration of melatonin promotes the healing of tooth extraction sockets and may also impede the progression of oral cancer. Although, there are a number of current and potential applications of melatonin, further long term clinical and animal studies are needed to assess its efficacy. Moreover, the role of melatonin supplements in the management of periodontitis should also be assessed. PMID:27523451

  20. Evaluating oral noncombustible potential-reduced exposure products for smokers

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Potential-reduced exposure products (PREPs) are marketed as a way for smokers to continue using tobacco while possibly lessening their tobacco toxicant intake. Some tobacco-based PREPs are combustible and intended to be smoked, while others are noncombustible and intended to be administered orally (e.g., Camel Snus [CS] tobacco sachets and Ariva tobacco tablets). The ability of these noncombustible PREPs to reduce smokers’ exposure to cigarette-delivered toxicants and suppress tobacco abstinence symptoms effectively is unclear. Clinical laboratory methods have been used to measure combustible PREP-associated toxicant exposure and abstinence symptom suppression and could be applied to evaluating the effects of orally administered noncombustible PREPs. Methods: In this study, 21 smokers (6 women) participated in four 5-day conditions that differed by product used: CS, Ariva, own brand cigarettes, or no tobacco. Measures included expired-air carbon monoxide (CO), the urinary metabolite of nicotine (cotinine), the urinary metabolite of the carcinogen NNK (NNAL-T), and subjective effect ratings. Results: Relative to own brand, all other conditions were associated with CO and cotinine levels that were lower and abstinence symptom ratings that were greater. Only no-tobacco use was associated with significantly lower NNAL levels. Acceptability ratings were also lower in all conditions relative to own brand. Discussion: Although these oral products reduce exposure to CO, their ineffective abstinence symptom suppression and low acceptability may limit their viability as PREPs. As with combustible PREPs, clinical laboratory study of orally administered noncombustible PREPs will be a valuable part of any comprehensive PREP evaluation strategy. PMID:20159791

  1. Prevalence of salivary epstein-barr virus in potentially malignant oral disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ocete-Monchon, María-Dolores; Leopoldo-Rodado, Manuel; Murillo-Cortes, Judith; Díaz-Fernández, Jose-M.; Medina-Gonzalez, Rafael; Gimeno-Cardona, Concepción; Bagan, Jose-V.

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze the presence of salivary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant oral disorders. Material and Methods Three groups were studied: Group 1 (12 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC)), Group 2 (12 potentially malignant oral disorders (PMD)) and Group 3 (47 healthy controls). EBV DNA salivary analysis was performed by PCR. Results The highest percentage of positive salivary EBV DNA corresponded to the OSCC group (58.3%), followed by the PMD group (41.7%) and the controls (40.4%). The differences between groups were not statistically significant, however (p>0.05). Conclusions Salivary EBV DNA was more prevalent in OSCC than in PMD or the controls. Key words:EBV DNA, saliva, oral squamous cell carcinoma, oral leukoplakia. PMID:26827058

  2. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  3. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers at the invasive front of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Liana Cristina Melo Carneiro; LEITE, Camila Ferreira; CARDOSO, Sérgio Vitorino; LOYOLA, Adriano Mota; de FARIA, Paulo Rogério; SOUZA, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; HORTA, Martinho Campolina Rebello

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common malignances. In epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), epithelial cells switch to mesenchymal-like cells exhibiting high mobility. This migratory phenotype is significant during tumor invasion and metastasis. Objective : The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of the EMT markers E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin in OSCC. Material and Methods : Immunohistochemical detection of E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin was performed on 20 OSCC samples. Differences in the expression of each protein at the invasive front (IF) and in the central/superficial areas (CSA) of the tumor were assessed. Differences in the expression of each protein at the IF of both histologically high- and low-invasive OSCCs were evaluated. Associations among expression of proteins at the IF were assessed. Correlations between the expression levels of each protein at the IF and the tumor stage and clinical nodal status were also evaluated. Results : Reduced expression of E-cadherin was detected in 15 samples (75%). E-cadherin expression was reduced at the IF when compared to the CSA and in high-invasive tumors when compared to low-invasive tumors. All samples were negative for N-cadherin, even though one sample showed an inconspicuous expression. Positive expression of vimentin was observed in 6 samples (30%). Nevertheless, there was no difference in vimentin expression between the IF and the CSA regions or between the low- and high-invasive tumors. Furthermore, no association was observed among protein expression levels at the IF. Finally, no correlations were observed between each protein’s expression levels and tumor stage or clinical nodal status. Conclusions : Reduced E-cadherin expression at the IF and its association with histological invasiveness suggest that this protein is a noteworthy EMT marker in OSCC. Although vimentin was also detected as an EMT marker, its expression was neither limited to the IF nor was

  4. Prognostic potential of AgNORs in oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Murgod, Sanjay; Channabasaviah, Girish Hemadal; Shivamurthy, Dyamenahalli Malleshappa; Ashok, Lingappa; Krishnappa, Savita Jangal

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objective: The role of prognosis cannot be stressed enough, especially when it comes to potentially malignant lesions. The argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs), which is simple and cost-effective has been used in diagnostic and prognostic pathologies. This study seeks to identify the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) in oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), to correlate the AgNOR count with the histologic grade of OSMF, and to evaluate the prognostic potential of AgNOR. Materials and Methods: The sample size consisted of archival paraffin blocks of 35 cases of varying grades of OSMF and 10 cases of squamous cell carcinoma. Normal mucosa samples served as controls for the study. AgNOR staining in accordance with the method of Smith and Crocker was performed and Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The results showed an increase in AgNOR counts with corresponding grades of OSMF, the count being least in normal mucosa and also an increase in AgNOR count with corresponding decrease in differentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion: AgNOR staining is a rapid and inexpensive procedure representing cellular proliferation that can be used to assess the nature of the lesion and therefore, the prognosis. PMID:27114958

  5. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  6. DNA methylation markers for oral pre-cancer progression: A critical review

    PubMed Central

    Shridhar, Krithiga; Walia, Gagandeep Kaur; Aggarwal, Aastha; Gulati, Smriti; Geetha, A.V.; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Dhillon, Preet K.; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although oral cancers are generally preceded by a well-established pre-cancerous stage, there is a lack of well-defined clinical and morphological criteria to detect and signal progression from pre-cancer to malignant tumours. We conducted a critical review to summarize the evidence regarding aberrant DNA methylation patterns as a potential diagnostic biomarker predicting progression. We identified all relevant human studies published in English prior to 30th April 2015 that examined DNA methylation (%) in oral pre-cancer by searching PubMed, Web-of-Science and Embase databases using combined key-searches. Twenty-one studies (18-cross-sectional; 3-longitudinal) were eligible for inclusion in the review, with sample sizes ranging from 4 to 156 affected cases. Eligible studies examined promoter region hyper-methylation of tumour suppressor genes in pathways including cell-cycle-control (n = 15), DNA-repair (n = 7), cell-cycle-signalling (n = 4) and apoptosis (n = 3). Hyper-methylated loci reported in three or more studies included p16, p14, MGMT and DAPK. Two longitudinal studies reported greater p16 hyper-methylation in pre-cancerous lesions transformed to malignancy compared to lesions that regressed (57–63.6% versus 8–32.1%; p < 0.01). The one study that explored epigenome-wide methylation patterns reported three novel hyper-methylated loci (TRHDE; ZNF454; KCNAB3). The majority of reviewed studies were small, cross-sectional studies with poorly defined control groups and lacking validation. Whilst limitations in sample size and study design preclude definitive conclusions, current evidence suggests a potential utility of DNA methylation patterns as a diagnostic biomarker for oral pre-cancer progression. Robust studies such as large epigenome-wide methylation explorations of oral pre-cancer with longitudinal tracking are needed to validate the currently reported signals and identify new risk-loci and the biological pathways of disease

  7. The Late Positive Potential: A Neurophysiological Marker for Emotion Regulation in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy A.; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Background: The ability to modulate emotional responses, or emotion regulation, is a key mechanism in the development of mood disruptions. Detection of a neural marker for emotion regulation thus has the potential to inform early detection and intervention for mood problems. One such neural marker may be the late positive potential (LPP), which is…

  8. Casein/pectin nanocomplexes as potential oral delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangchao; Pan, Kang; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-01-01

    Delivery systems prepared with natural biopolymers are of particular interests for applications in food, pharmaceutics and biomedicine. In this study, nanocomplex particles of sodium caseinate (NaCas) and pectin were fabricated and investigated as potential oral delivery vehicles. Nanocomplexes were prepared with three mass ratios of NaCas/pectin by acidification using glucono-δ-lactone and thermal treatment. NaCas/pectin at 1:1 mass ratio resulted in dispersions with the lowest turbidity and the smallest and most uniform nanocomplexes. Thermal treatment at 85 °C for 30 min facilitated the formation of stable, compact, and spherical nanocomplexes. Heating not only greatly increased the yield of nanocomplexes but also significantly improved the encapsulation capability of rutin studied as a model compound. Pectin in nanocomplexes delayed the hydrolysis of NaCas by pepsin at gastric conditions and enabled the controlled release of most rutin in simulated intestinal conditions. The nanocomplexes based on food-sourced biopolymers have promising features for oral delivery of nutrients and medicines.

  9. Gene expression profiling of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia reveals ADAMTS2 overexpression as a potential marker.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shang-Hui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) as an abnormal bone growth is one of the common fibro-osseous leasions (FOL) in oral and maxillofacial region, however, its etiology still remains unclear. Here, we performed gene expression profiling of FD using microarray analysis to explore the key molecule events in FD development, and develop potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets for FD. We found that 1,881 genes exhibited differential expression with more than two-fold changes in FD compared to normal bone tissues, including 1,200 upregulated genes and 681 downregulated genes. Pathway analysis indicated that obviously activated pathways are Ribosome and ECM-receptor interaction pathways; downregulated pathways are "Hepatitis C" and "cancer" signaling pathways. We further validated the expression of ADAMTS2, one of most differentiated expressed genes, by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 40 of FD cases. Results showed that ADAMTS2 was significantly overexpressed in FD tissues, but rarely expressed in normal bone tissues, suggesting that ADAMTS2 could be a potential biomarker for FD. Thus, this study uncovered differentially expressed candidate genes in FD, which provides pilot data for understanding FD pathogenesis, and developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and targeting of FD.

  10. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Coyuco, Jurja C; Liu, Yuanjie; Tan, Bee-Jen; Chiu, Gigi NC

    2011-01-01

    Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes), carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f SWCNT-PEG), using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Of the three CNMs, f SWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that f SWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that f SWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of f SWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with f SWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, f SWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug delivery, and the differential effects on the intestinal epithelium imparted by different types of CNMs would create unique opportunities for drug-specific oral

  11. Microvesicles: potential markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Lin; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Microvesicles (MVs, also known as microparticles) are small membranous structures that are released from platelets and cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microvesicles have been found in blood, urine, synovial fluid, extracellular spaces of solid organs, atherosclerotic plaques, tumors, and elsewhere. Here, we focus on new clinical and basic work that implicates MVs as markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction and hence novel contributors to cardiovascular and other diseases. Recent findings Advances in the detection of MVs and the use of cell type-specific markers to determine their origin have allowed studies that associated plasma concentrations of specific MVs with major types of endothelial dysfunction – namely, inappropriate or maladaptive vascular tone, leukocyte recruitment, and thrombosis. Recent investigations have highlighted microvesicular transport of key biologically active molecules besides tissue factor, such as ligands for pattern-recognition receptors, elements of the inflammasome, and morphogens. Microvesicles generated from human cells under different pathologic circumstances, e.g., during cholesterol loading or exposure to endotoxin, carry different subsets of these molecules and thereby alter endothelial function through several distinct, well-characterized molecular pathways. Summary Clinical and basic studies indicate that MVs may be novel markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction. This work has advanced our understanding of the development of cardiovascular and other diseases. Opportunites and obstacles to clinical applications are discussed. PMID:22248645

  12. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Debnath, Nitai; Ismail, Mohammed B.; Kumar, Arunoday; Kumar, Amit; Badiyani, Bhumika K.; Dubey, Pavan K.; Sukhtankar, Laxmi V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders and to determine the potential risk factors for its development in Indian population. Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 1241 individuals in Indore, Madhya Pradesh. A questionnaire was designed to record information about sociodemographic characteristics, oral hygiene practices, dietary habits, and risk factors for oral potentially malignant disorders. Oral mucosal lesions were examined by a skilled person. Results. The overall prevalence of oral potentially malignant disorders was found to be 13.7% with oral submucous fibrosis (8.06%) found to be more common and erythroplakia (0.24%) found to be least prevalent. Results of Logistic Regression analysis showed that males (OR = 2.09, P value < 0.0001) who were ever consumers of tobacco (OR = 2.06, P value = 0.030) and areca nut chewing (OR = 2.64, P value = 0.004) were more likely to develop oral potentially malignant disorders compared to never consumers. Diabetic (OR = 2.21, P value = 0.014) and underweight individuals (OR = 2.23, P value = 0.007) were more likely to suffer from oral potentially malignant disorders. Conclusion. The study reinforces the association of tobacco and areca nut consumption with oral potentially malignant disorders. An association of oral potentially malignant disorders with diabetes and BMI was confirmed by this study. PMID:26347822

  13. Advances in Optical Adjunctive Aids for Visualisation and Detection of Oral Malignant and Potentially Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Nirav; Lalla, Yastira; Vu, An N.; Farah, Camile S.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of screening for oral potentially malignant disorders and oral malignancies involve a conventional oral examination with digital palpation. Evidence indicates that conventional examination is a poor discriminator of oral mucosal lesions. A number of optical aids have been developed to assist the clinician to detect oral mucosal abnormalities and to differentiate benign lesions from sinister pathology. This paper discusses advances in optical technologies designed for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities. The literature regarding such devices, VELscope and Identafi, is critically analysed, and the novel use of Narrow Band Imaging within the oral cavity is also discussed. Optical aids are effective in assisting with the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further research is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from potentially malignant and malignant lesions. PMID:24078812

  14. Analysis of the invasive edge in primary and secondary oral squamous cell carcinoma: An independent prognostic marker: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nadaf, Afreen; Bavle, Radhika M; Soumya, M; D'mello, Sarah; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Govindan, Sindhu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common head and neck carcinomas and corresponds to 95% of all oral cancers with an increasing morbidity and mortality. Its prognosis is affected by several clinicopathologic factors, one of which is pattern of invasion (POI). The histological features of OSCC may differ widely, but there is general agreement that the most useful prognostic information can be deduced from the invasive front of the tumor. In this retrospective study, our aim was to compare the POI, the status of connective tissue and the status of inflammation at the tumor–host interface in primary and recurrent (secondary) OSCC and test the validity of POI, to serve as a potential marker to assess the prognosis of the patient. Materials and Methods: Differentiation of tumors, POI, status of connective tissue and inflammation was assessed in 168 cases of primary and recurrent cases of OSCC. Statistical Analysis: Fisher's exact test was used to determine the statistical significance and P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Our study showed that majority of the primary and secondary tumors were well differentiated, 117 [95.9%] and 34 [73.9%], respectively. Predominant POI in the primary and secondary tumor group was Pattern II and least was Pattern V. Worst pattern in primary tumor and highest distribution was seen for Pattern III (53.3%), and least for Pattern V (0.00%). In secondary tumors, the predominant worst pattern was Pattern IV (50.0%) and least distribution was seen for Pattern I (0.00%). Connective tissue status for both primary and secondary tumors showed the predominance of loose type (85.2% and 79.2%) and least was variable type (0.8% and 0.6%), respectively. Status of inflammation in the primary tumor group showed a predominance of moderate grade of inflammation (50.0%) and very mild grade of inflammation (6.6%) was the least type. In the secondary tumor group, moderate grade

  15. Analysis of the invasive edge in primary and secondary oral squamous cell carcinoma: An independent prognostic marker: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nadaf, Afreen; Bavle, Radhika M; Soumya, M; D'mello, Sarah; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Govindan, Sindhu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common head and neck carcinomas and corresponds to 95% of all oral cancers with an increasing morbidity and mortality. Its prognosis is affected by several clinicopathologic factors, one of which is pattern of invasion (POI). The histological features of OSCC may differ widely, but there is general agreement that the most useful prognostic information can be deduced from the invasive front of the tumor. In this retrospective study, our aim was to compare the POI, the status of connective tissue and the status of inflammation at the tumor–host interface in primary and recurrent (secondary) OSCC and test the validity of POI, to serve as a potential marker to assess the prognosis of the patient. Materials and Methods: Differentiation of tumors, POI, status of connective tissue and inflammation was assessed in 168 cases of primary and recurrent cases of OSCC. Statistical Analysis: Fisher's exact test was used to determine the statistical significance and P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Our study showed that majority of the primary and secondary tumors were well differentiated, 117 [95.9%] and 34 [73.9%], respectively. Predominant POI in the primary and secondary tumor group was Pattern II and least was Pattern V. Worst pattern in primary tumor and highest distribution was seen for Pattern III (53.3%), and least for Pattern V (0.00%). In secondary tumors, the predominant worst pattern was Pattern IV (50.0%) and least distribution was seen for Pattern I (0.00%). Connective tissue status for both primary and secondary tumors showed the predominance of loose type (85.2% and 79.2%) and least was variable type (0.8% and 0.6%), respectively. Status of inflammation in the primary tumor group showed a predominance of moderate grade of inflammation (50.0%) and very mild grade of inflammation (6.6%) was the least type. In the secondary tumor group, moderate grade

  16. Advances in carcinogenic metal toxicity and potential molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system's ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  17. Advances in Carcinogenic Metal Toxicity and Potential Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system’s ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  18. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-Lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer-macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression.

  19. Use of everted intestinal rings for in vitro examination of oral absorption potential.

    PubMed

    Leppert, P S; Fix, J A

    1994-07-01

    The ability to predict in vivo oral absorption potential based on ex vivo screening in an everted intestinal ring model was examined. In vitro drug accumulation in cross sectional rings of everted rat jejunum was determined with 12 compounds whose in vivo absorptions (as distinct from bioavailabilities) are well characterized. The compounds examined ranged from well- to poorly-absorbed and included compounds absorbed by active and passive mechanisms. The effects of drug concentration, pH, cosolvents, and tissue origin site on drug accumulation were determined. Light microscopic observation indicated that the mucosal tissue remained intact up to 3 h after the intestine was excised. Accumulations of two nonabsorbable markers were also determined as measures of tissue integrity. A strong correlation (slope = 23 pmol/mg of tissue weight per percent oral absorption, r2 = 0.9430 by linear regression analysis) of in vitro uptake into everted rings from a 10 mM drug solution versus the known in vivo bioavailability for each compound was observed. These results indicated that under appropriate conditions, in vitro uptake of drug by the everted intestinal ring model closely paralleled known in vivo bioavailability and was relatively independent of pH, cosolvent, and tissue origin.

  20. Cancer stem cells - new and potentially important targets for the therapy of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Costea, D E; Tsinkalovsky, O; Vintermyr, O K; Johannessen, A C; Mackenzie, I C

    2006-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that the growth and spread of cancers is driven by a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) - the only cells that are capable of long-term self-renewal and generation of the phenotypically diverse tumour cell population. Current failure of cancer therapies may be due to their lesser effect on potentially quiescent CSCs which remain vital and retain their full capacity to repopulate the tumour. Treatment strategies for the elimination of cancer therefore need to consider the consequences of the presence of CSCs. However, the development of new CSC-targeted strategies is currently hindered by the lack of reliable markers for the identification of CSCs and the poor understanding of their behaviour and fate determinants. Recent studies of cell lines derived from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) indicate the presence of subpopulations of cells with phenotypic and behavioural characteristics corresponding to both normal epithelial stem cells and to cells capable of initiating tumours in vivo. The present review discusses the relevance to OSCC of current CSC concepts, the state of various methods for CSC identification, characterization and isolation (clonal functional assay, cell sorting based on surface markers or uptake of Hoechst dye), and possible new approaches to therapy.

  1. Potential diagnostic markers for disseminated intravascular coagulation of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Ito, Takashi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Jilma, Bernd; Brenner, Thorsten; Müller, Marcella C A; Juffermans, Nicole P; Thachil, Jecko

    2016-03-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired thrombo-haemorrhagic disorder which arises in clinical scenarios like sepsis, trauma and malignancies. The clinic-laboratory diagnosis of DIC is made in a patient who develops the combination of laboratory abnormalities in the appropriate clinical scenario. The most common laboratory parameters in this setting have been the clotting profile, platelet count, serum fibrinogen and fibrin degradation markers. These tests had the advantage that they could be performed easily and in most laboratories. However, with the better understanding of the pathophysiology of DIC, in recent years, more specific tests have been suggested to be useful in this setting. The newer tests can also prove to be useful in prognostication in DIC. In addition, they may provide assistance in the selection and monitoring of patients diagnosed with DIC.

  2. Stress protein synthesis, a potential toxicity marker in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Odberg-Ferragut, C; Espigares, M; Dive, D

    1991-06-01

    Various chemicals were tested in Escherichia coli for the ability to modify the cellular growth rate and to induce the synthesis of heat shock and stress proteins. The toxicity of chemicals as observed by modification of the growth rate depended on concentration and duration of treatment, except for thiram. In this last case, no modification was observed up to a concentration of 10 micrograms.ml-1. In contrast, all toxicants tested enhanced the synthesis of heat shock and stress proteins. The stress response was similar but not identical. Heat shock proteins and stress proteins appear to be a more sensitive toxicity marker than growth inhibition. Suggestions for the use of stress proteins as a practical bioassay are made.

  3. A comparison of oral and intravenous pimonidazole in canine tumors using intravenous CCI-103F as a control hypoxia marker

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiter, Miriam M.; Thrall, Donald E.; Malarkey, David E.; Ji Xiaoshen; Lee, David Y.W.; Chou, S.-C.; Raleigh, James A. . E-mail: james_raleigh@med.unc.edu

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: Pimonidazole HCl is widely used in immunohistochemical analyses of hypoxia in normal and malignant tissues. The present study investigates oral administration as a means of minimizing invasiveness. Methods and Materials: Twelve dogs with confirmed malignancy received 0.5 g/m{sup 2} of pimonidazole HCl: 6 by mouth and 6 by i.v. infusion. All dogs received i.v. CCI-103F as a control. Plasma levels of pimonidazole, pimonidazole N-oxide, and CCI-103F were measured. Tumor biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded, sectioned, immunostained, and analyzed for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding. pH dependence for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding was studied in vitro. Results: Pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding in carcinomas and sarcomas was strongly correlated for both oral and i.v. pimonidazole HCl (r {sup 2} = 0.97). On average, the extent of pimonidazole binding exceeded that for CCI-103F by a factor of approximately 1.2, with the factor ranging from 1.0 to 1.65. Binding of both markers was pH dependent, but pimonidazole binding was greater at all values of pH. Conclusions: Oral pimonidazole HCl is effective as a hypoxia marker in spontaneously arising canine tumors. Selective cellular uptake and concomitant higher levels of binding in regions of hypoxia at the high end of pH gradients might account for the greater extent of pimonidazole binding.

  4. Microarray analysis of potential genes in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jingying; He, Zhiwei; Li, Kun; Hou, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcer seriously threatens patients’ daily life and health. This study investigated potential genes and pathways that participate in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer by high throughput bioinformatic analysis. RT-PCR and Western blot were applied to further verify screened interleukins effect. Recurrent oral ulcer related genes were collected from websites and papers, and further found out from Human Genome 280 6.0 microarray data. Each pathway of recurrent oral ulcer related genes were got through chip hybridization. RT-PCR was applied to test four recurrent oral ulcer related genes to verify the microarray data. Data transformation, scatter plot, clustering analysis, and expression pattern analysis were used to analyze recurrent oral ulcer related gene expression changes. Recurrent oral ulcer gene microarray was successfully established. Microarray showed that 551 genes involved in recurrent oral ulcer activity and 196 genes were recurrent oral ulcer related genes. Of them, 76 genes up-regulated, 62 genes down-regulated, and 58 genes up-/down-regulated. Total expression level up-regulated 752 times (60%) and down-regulated 485 times (40%). IL-2 plays an important role in the occurrence, development and recurrence of recurrent oral ulcer on the mRNA and protein levels. Gene microarray can be used to analyze potential genes and pathways in recurrent oral ulcer. IL-2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer. PMID:26722428

  5. Microarray analysis of potential genes in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingying; He, Zhiwei; Li, Kun; Hou, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcer seriously threatens patients' daily life and health. This study investigated potential genes and pathways that participate in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer by high throughput bioinformatic analysis. RT-PCR and Western blot were applied to further verify screened interleukins effect. Recurrent oral ulcer related genes were collected from websites and papers, and further found out from Human Genome 280 6.0 microarray data. Each pathway of recurrent oral ulcer related genes were got through chip hybridization. RT-PCR was applied to test four recurrent oral ulcer related genes to verify the microarray data. Data transformation, scatter plot, clustering analysis, and expression pattern analysis were used to analyze recurrent oral ulcer related gene expression changes. Recurrent oral ulcer gene microarray was successfully established. Microarray showed that 551 genes involved in recurrent oral ulcer activity and 196 genes were recurrent oral ulcer related genes. Of them, 76 genes up-regulated, 62 genes down-regulated, and 58 genes up-/down-regulated. Total expression level up-regulated 752 times (60%) and down-regulated 485 times (40%). IL-2 plays an important role in the occurrence, development and recurrence of recurrent oral ulcer on the mRNA and protein levels. Gene microarray can be used to analyze potential genes and pathways in recurrent oral ulcer. IL-2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of recurrent oral ulcer.

  6. Identification of potential genetic markers for improved growth rate in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of genetic polymorphism associated with muscle growth would improve selection efficiency of channel catfish broodstock. Because faster growth is typically associated with increased food intake, factors involved in food intake regulation may serve as potential gene markers for selecti...

  7. Identification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Marker STRO-1 in Oral Reactive Lesions by Immunofluorescence Method

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani Nazhvani, Ali; Hosseini, Seyed-Mojtaba; Tahoori, Bita; Tavangar, Maryam-Sadat; Attar, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Stem cells are considered as new implement for tissue regeneration. Several niches in adult human body are colonized by multipotent stem cells but access to these potential reservoirs is often limited. Although human dental pulp stem cells isolated from healthy teeth have been extensively characterized, it is still unknown whether stem cells also exist in reactive lesions of oral cavity such as pyogenic granuloma and peripheral ossifying fibroma which are deliberated as inflammatory proliferation of different cell families. Purpose The aim of this study was to explore for clues to see whether pyogenic granuloma or peripheral ossifying fibroma contain dental mesenchymal stem cell (DMSC). Materials and Method Four pyogenic granuloma and four peripheral ossifying fibroma specimens were collected by excisional biopsy and preserved in PBS-EDTA at -86 °C. Then we cut them in 5µm diameter using Cryostat. Having been rinsed with PBS, the samples were stained with a primary mouse anti-human STRO-1 monoclonal IgM antibody. Afterward, a secondary goat anti-mouse IgM-FITC antibody was applied to detect STRO-1+ cells as probable stem cells by immunofluorescence technique. Results Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed presence of STRO-1+ cells in these lesions, particularly localized on perivascular zone. The negative control group was not glowing. Conclusion Based on these results, it was found that reactive lesions of pyogenic granuloma and peripheral ossifying fibroma have STRO-1 positive cells, which raises the possibility that these cells may be DMSCs. PMID:26535404

  8. Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders: An Overview of More than 20 Entities

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam; Mehdipour, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity accounts for approximately 3% of all malignancies diagnosed annually in 270,000 patients world-wide. Oral cancer is the 12th most common cancer in women and the 6th in men. Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders (PMDs). Lack of awareness about the signs and symptoms of oralPMDs in the general population and even healthcare providers is believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay of these entities. The aim of this article is to update and improve the knowledge of healthcare providers about oral PMDs. PMID:25024833

  9. Non-Invasive Techniques for Detection and Diagnosis of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongjuan; Zhao, Xin; Zeng, Xin; Dan, Hongxia; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common oral and maxillofacial malignancy, and its morbidity and mortality rates are still high in most countries. Oral potentially malignant disorders (PMDs) are used to refer to a heterogeneous group of conditions that are characterized by increased risk for malignant transformation to OSCC. Currently identified oral PMDs include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, palatal lesions associated with reverse smoking, oral lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis, actinic keratosis, and discoid lupus erythematosus. The early detection and diagnosis of these lesions are important for cancer prevention and disease management. In recent years, there has been a growing and persistent demand for new non-invasive, practical diagnostic techniques that might facilitate the early detection of oral PMDs. The non-invasive detection techniques evaluated in this review are divided into four categories: vital staining with a solution that can be used as a mouth rinse or applied onto a suspected area of the mouth, light-based detection systems, optical diagnostic technologies that employ returned optical signals to reflect structural and morphological changes within tissues, and salivary biomarkers. Most of these techniques have shown great potential for screening and monitoring oral PMDs. In this review article, the authors critically assess these non-invasive detection techniques for oral PMDs. We also provide a summary of the sensitivity and specificity of each technique in detecting oral PMDs and oral cancer, as well as their advantages, disadvantages, clinical applications, and indications. PMID:26888696

  10. Interleukin-37 expression and its potential role in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Dongjuan; Liu, Sai; Xu, Hao; Ji, Ning; Zhou, Min; Zeng, Xin; Zhang, Dunfang; Li, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 37 (IL-37) has been reported to play a significant role in innate immune response and to be involved in several kinds of cancers. However, the investigation of association between IL-37 and oral mucosa carcinogenesis hasn't been clearly established. The aim of the study was to assess IL-37 expression and explore its role in oral mucosa carcinogenesis. The expression of IL-37 increased from normal control (NC) to Oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, statistically highly significant difference was present between scores of OLK with and without mild/moderate dysplasia (P < 0.001). In addition, IL-37 expression was lower in OSCC with lymph node metastasis than those without metastasis (P < 0.01). What’s more, overexpression of IL-37 in RAW264.7 cells remarkably reduced the pseudopodia, vacuolization and the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Finally, we found IL-37 and its receptor IL-18Rα but not its binding partner IL-18BP have similar tissue location and expression trend in different stages of oral mucosa carcinogenesis. Overall, IL-37 can be used as a biomarker for early oral tumorigenesis and for malignant transformation risk assessment of premalignant lesions. PMID:27225603

  11. Optical imaging for the diagnosis of oral cancer and oral potentially malignant disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Imaging is being conducted as a therapeutic non-invasive. Many kinds of the light source are selected for this purpose. Recently the oral cancer screening is conducted by using light-induced tissue autofluorescence examination such as several kinds of handheld devices. However, the mechanism of its action is still not clear. Therefore basic experimental research was conducted. One of auto fluorescence Imaging (AFI) device, VELscopeTM and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using ICG-labeled antibody as a probe were compared using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) mouse models. The experiments revealed that intracutaneous tumor was successfully visualized as low density image by VELscopeTM and high density image by NIR image. In addition, VELscopeTM showed higher sensitivity and lower specificity than that of NIR fluorescence imaging and the sensitivity of identification of carcinoma areas with the VELscopeTM was good results. However, further more studies were needed to enhance the screening and diagnostic uses, sensitivity and specificity for detecting malignant lesions and differentiation from premalignant or benign lesions. Therefore, additional studies were conducted using a new developed near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging method targeting podoplanine (PDPN) which consists of indocyanine green (ICG)-labeled anti-human podoplanin antibody as a probe and IVIS imaging system or a handy realtime ICG imaging device that is overexpressed in oral malignant neoplasm to improve imaging for detection of early oral malignant neoplasm. Then evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity for detection of oral malignant neoplasm in xenografted mice model and compared with VELscopeTM. The results revealed that ICG fluorescence imaging method and VELscopeTM had the almost the same sensitivity for detection of oral malignant neoplasm. The current topics of optical imaging about oral malignant neoplasm were reviewed.

  12. Levels of biological markers of nitric oxide in serum of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Antonowicz, Bozena; Dziemianczyk, Dorota; Grabowska, Stanislawa Zyta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was a determination of the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and its biological markers such as malonyldialdehyde (MDA) and nitrotyrosine in the serum of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity and identification of the relationships between NO and those markers. These studies were performed on patients with SCC of the oral cavity before and after treatment. Griess reaction was used for the estimation of the total concentration of NO in serum. The nitrotyrosine level in serum was assessed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, and MDA level using a spectrophotometric assay. Higher concentrations of NO in blood serum were determined in patients with stage IV of the disease before treatment in comparison to the control group and patients with stages II and III of the disease. Moreover, higher concentrations of MDA and nitrotyrosine were determined in the serum of patients in all stages of the disease in comparison to healthy people. After treatment, lower concentrations of NO in the serum of patients with stage IV of the disease were observed in comparison to the amounts obtained prior to treatment. In addition, lower levels of nitrotyrosine in the serum of patients with all stages of the disease were recorded, whereas higher concentrations of MDA were determined in these patients in comparison to results obtained before treatment. The compounds formed with the contribution of NO, such as MDA and nitrotyrosine, may lead to cancer progression in patients with SCC of the oral cavity, and contribute to formation of resistance to therapy in these patients as well. Moreover, the lack of a relationship between concentrations of NO and MDA, and between NO and nitrotyrosine in serum suggests that the process of lipid peroxidation and nitration in patients with SCC does not just depend on NO. PMID:23970140

  13. IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL MARKERS OF THE SUN'S GIANT CONVECTIVE SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Leamon, Robert J.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2014-04-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are analyzed using a diagnostic known as the magnetic range of influence (MRoI). The MRoI is a measure of the length over which a photospheric magnetogram is balanced and so its application gives the user a sense of the connective length scales in the outer solar atmosphere. The MRoI maps and histograms inferred from the SDO/HMI magnetograms primarily exhibit four scales: a scale of a few megameters that can be associated with granulation, a scale of a few tens of megameters that can be associated with super-granulation, a scale of many hundreds to thousands of megameters that can be associated with coronal holes and active regions, and a hitherto unnoticed scale that ranges from 100 to 250 Mm. We infer that this final scale is an imprint of the (rotationally driven) giant convective scale on photospheric magnetism. This scale appears in MRoI maps as well-defined, spatially distributed concentrations that we have dubbed ''g-nodes''. Furthermore, using coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO, we see that the vicinity of these g-nodes appears to be a preferred location for the formation of extreme-ultraviolet (and likely X-Ray) brightpoints. These observations and straightforward diagnostics offer the potential of a near real-time mapping of the Sun's largest convective scale, a scale that possibly reaches to the very bottom of the convective zone.

  14. Fenofibrate Suppresses Oral Tumorigenesis via Reprogramming Metabolic Processes: Potential Drug Repurposing for Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jan, Chia-Ing; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia Jen; Chang, Nai Wen

    2016-01-01

    One anticancer strategy suggests targeting mitochondrial metabolism to trigger cell death through slowing down energy production from the Warburg effect. Fenofibrate is a clinical lipid-lowering agent and an effective anticancer drug. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenofibrate provided novel mechanisms for delaying oral tumor development via the reprogramming of metabolic processes. Fenofibrate induced cytotoxicity by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied with increasing extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and reducing ATP content. Moreover, fenofibrate caused changes in the protein expressions of hexokinase II (HK II), pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which are associated with the Warburg effect. In addition, fenofibrate reprogrammed the metabolic pathway by interrupting the binding of HK II to VDAC. In an oral cancer mouse model, fenofibrate exhibited both preventive and therapeutic efficacy on oral tumorigenesis. Fenofibrate administration suppressed the incidence rate of tongue lesions, reduced the tumor sizes, decreased the tumor multiplicity, and decreased the immunoreactivities of VDAC and mTOR. The molecular mechanisms involved in fenofibrate's ability to delay tumor development included the down-regulation of mTOR activity via TSC1/2-dependent signaling through activation of AMPK and inactivation of Akt, or via a TSC1/2-independent pathway through direct suppression of raptor. Our findings provide a molecular rationale whereby fenofibrate exerts anticancer and additional beneficial effects for the treatment of oral cancer patients. PMID:27313493

  15. Fenofibrate Suppresses Oral Tumorigenesis via Reprogramming Metabolic Processes: Potential Drug Repurposing for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Chia-Ing; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia Jen; Chang, Nai Wen

    2016-01-01

    One anticancer strategy suggests targeting mitochondrial metabolism to trigger cell death through slowing down energy production from the Warburg effect. Fenofibrate is a clinical lipid-lowering agent and an effective anticancer drug. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenofibrate provided novel mechanisms for delaying oral tumor development via the reprogramming of metabolic processes. Fenofibrate induced cytotoxicity by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied with increasing extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and reducing ATP content. Moreover, fenofibrate caused changes in the protein expressions of hexokinase II (HK II), pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which are associated with the Warburg effect. In addition, fenofibrate reprogrammed the metabolic pathway by interrupting the binding of HK II to VDAC. In an oral cancer mouse model, fenofibrate exhibited both preventive and therapeutic efficacy on oral tumorigenesis. Fenofibrate administration suppressed the incidence rate of tongue lesions, reduced the tumor sizes, decreased the tumor multiplicity, and decreased the immunoreactivities of VDAC and mTOR. The molecular mechanisms involved in fenofibrate's ability to delay tumor development included the down-regulation of mTOR activity via TSC1/2-dependent signaling through activation of AMPK and inactivation of Akt, or via a TSC1/2-independent pathway through direct suppression of raptor. Our findings provide a molecular rationale whereby fenofibrate exerts anticancer and additional beneficial effects for the treatment of oral cancer patients. PMID:27313493

  16. Efficacy of light based detection systems for early detection of oral cancer and oral potentially malignant disorders: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy-Kantharaj, Yashoda-Bhoomi; Rakesh, Nagaraju; Janardhan-Reddy, Sujatha; Sahu, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Background Earlier detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) is essential for dental professionals to improve patient survival rates. The aim of this systematic review is to to evaluate the effectiveness of devices that utilise the principles of chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence as adjuncts in the detection of OSCC and OPMD. Material and Methods The electronic retrieval systems and databases searched for relevant articles were PubMed [MEDLINE] and Science direct. The search was for limited articles published in English or with an English abstract and articles published during the period from January 2005 to April 2014. Clinical trials utilized ViziLite, Microlux TM/DL and Visual Enhanced Light scope (VELscope) for early detection of OPMD and OSCC. Results Twenty primary studies published satisfied our criteria for selection - 10 utilised chemiluminescence and 10 tissue autofluorescence. Senstivity of Vizilite for detecting OSCC nad OPMD ranged from 77.1 % to 100% and specificity was low that ranged from 0% to 27.8%.Most have shown that chemiluminescence increases the brightness and margins of oral mucosal white lesions and thus assist in identification of mucosal lesions not considered under Conventional visual examination. However, it preferentially detects leukoplakia and may fail to spot red patches. Clinical trials demonstrated that sensitivity of VELscope in detecting malignancy and OPMD ranged from 22 % to 100 % and specificity ranged from 16 % to 100%. Most studies concluded that VELscope can help the experienced clinician to find oral precursor malignant lesions. But it couldnot differentiate between dysplasia and benign inflammatory conditions. Conclusions Both devices are simple, non-invasive test of the oral mucosa but are suited for clinicians with sufficient experience and training. More clinical trials in future should be conducted to establish optical imaging as an efficacious adjunct

  17. Potential therapeutic effects of oral bisphosphonates on the intestine.

    PubMed

    Pazianas, Michael; Russell, R Graham G

    2011-12-01

    Bisphosphonates are the principal drugs prescribed for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures. They are bone specific but poorly absorbed. In oral formulations, almost 99% of the administered dose remains within the intestinal tract and reaches the small and large bowel. Although the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates can irritate the distal esophageal/gastric mucosa, they improve drug-induced colitis in animal models and exhibit antitumor properties on intestinal cells in vitro. Several recent epidemiological studies provide evidence of a reduced risk of colorectal cancer in osteoporotic patients treated with oral bisphosphonates, notably alendronate. In this review, we will explore the possible mechanisms of action underlying these effects and raise the question of whether these agents might be used in the chemoprophylaxis against colorectal cancer.

  18. Potential Benefits of Oral Cryotherapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Wodzinski, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    Mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies that causes painful, erythematous lesions to develop in the gastrointestinal tract. These lesions can lead to malnutrition, increased risk for serious infection, prolonged hospital stays, and reduced quality of life. Oral cryotherapy, or the use of ice chips to cool the mucous membranes during bolus chemotherapy infusions (e.g., 5-fluorouracil [Adrucil®] and melphalan [Alkeran®]), is the most readily accessible and cost-effective intervention available. Although many factors may contribute to the development of mucositis during cancer treatment, studies have found a reduction in the incidence and the severity of mucositis with the use of oral cryotherapy.
. PMID:27668364

  19. Identification of methylation markers for the prediction of nodal metastasis in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melchers, L J; Clausen, M J A M; Mastik, M F; Slagter-Menkema, L; van der Wal, J E; Wisman, G B A; Roodenburg, J L N; Schuuring, E

    2015-01-01

    Hypermethylation is an important mechanism for the dynamic regulation of gene expression, necessary for metastasizing tumour cells. Our aim is to identify methylation tumour markers that have a predictive value for the presence of regional lymph node metastases in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Significantly differentially expressed genes were retrieved from four reported microarray expression profiles comparing pN0 and pN+ head-neck tumours, and one expression array identifying functionally hypermethylated genes. Additional metastasis-associated genes were included from the literature. Thus genes were selected that influence the development of nodal metastases and might be regulated by methylation. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) primers were designed and tested on 8 head-neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and technically validated on 10 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) OOSCC cases. Predictive value was assessed in a clinical series of 70 FFPE OOSCC with pathologically determined nodal status. Five out of 28 methylation markers (OCLN, CDKN2A, MGMT, MLH1 and DAPK1) were frequently differentially methylated in OOSCC. Of these, MGMT methylation was associated with pN0 status (P = 0.02) and with lower immunoexpression (P = 0.02). DAPK1 methylation was associated with pN+ status (P = 0.008) but did not associate with protein expression. In conclusion, out of 28 candidate genes, two (7%) showed a predictive value for the pN status. Both genes, DAPK1 and MGMT, have predictive value for nodal metastasis in a clinical group of OOSCC. Therefore DNA methylation markers are capable of contributing to diagnosis and treatment selection in OOSCC. To efficiently identify additional new methylation markers, genome-wide methods are needed. PMID:26213212

  20. Methylene blue as an early diagnostic marker for oral precancer and cancer.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Akhtar; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Kamboj, Mala; Natarajan, S

    2013-12-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common neoplasm's and is ranked eighth in the cancer incidence worldwide. Early detection is of critical importance because survival rates markedly improve. In vivo staining is a simple, inexpensive, and fairly sensitive method. Involved 120 patients (50 with Premalignant Lesion, 50 with OSCC and 20 controls) stained by Methylene Blue (MB). The results of MB uptake were compared with a simultaneous biopsy of these lesions. Pathologically confirmed precancers and cancers were the positive targets of this screening, while hyperkeratosis without dysplasia and no evidence of malignancy were sorted as negative subjects of screening. The results revealed sensitivity of 91.4%, specificity of 66.6%, positive predictive value 97.7% and negative predictive value 33% leading to diagnostic accuracy of MB stain to 90%. We state that MB staining is useful diagnostic tool in community oral cancer screening programmes for high-risk individuals.

  1. Evaluation of natural killer cell (CD57) as a prognostic marker in oral squamous cell carcinoma: An immunohistochemistry study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rashmi; Chaudhary, Minal; Bohra, Shruti; Bajaj, Shree

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Natural killer (NK) cells are important effector lymphocytes. NK cells are considered to represent innate immune system. NK cells target and kill aberrant cells such as virally infected and tumorigenic cells. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression of CD57 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to correlate the expression of CD57 with 3 years survival in patients with OSCC. Materials and Methods: About 100 histopathologically diagnosed cases of OSCC of various grades were divided into two groups, i.e., Group I (dead patients) and Group II (live patients) from the archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology. CD57 was detected in these tissues by immunohistochemistry. Result: The results were analyzed using Spearman's correlation coefficient and students unpaired t-test. The mean CD57 labeling index in Group II was significantly higher than that found in Group I (P = 0.000). There was a significant correlation (P = 0.00) in the mean CD57 levels between Groups I and II and prognosis of patient. Conclusion: CD57 could be a good prognostic marker for OSCC patients. PMID:27601804

  2. ICAM1 Is a Potential Cancer Stem Cell Marker of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Ta; Wang, Po-Jen; Liou, Nia-Jhen; Lin, Pei-Shan; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Chang, Wei-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for about 90% of esophageal cancer diagnosed in Asian countries, with its incidence on the rise. Cancer stem cell (CSC; also known as tumor-initiating cells, TIC) is inherently resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation and associates with poor prognosis and therapy failure. Targeting therapy against cancer stem cell has emerged as a potential therapeutic approach to develop effective regimens. However, the suitable CSC marker of ESCC for identification and targeting is still limited. In this study, we screened the novel CSC membrane protein markers using two distinct stemness characteristics of cancer cell lines by a comparative approach. After the validation of RT-PCR, qPCR and western blot analyses, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) was identified as a potential CSC marker of ESCC. ICAM1 promotes cancer cell migration, invasion as well as increasing mesenchymal marker expression and attenuating epithelial marker expression. In addition, ICAM1 contributes to CSC properties, including sphere formation, drug resistance, and tumorigenesis in mouse xenotransplantation model. Based on the analysis of ICAM1-regulated proteins, we speculated that ICAM1 regulates CSC properties partly through an ICAM1-PTTG1IP-p53-DNMT1 pathway. Moreover, we observed that ICAM1 and CD44 could have a compensation effect on maintaining the stemness characteristics of ESCC, suggesting that the combination of multi-targeting therapies should be under serious consideration to acquire a more potent therapeutic effect on CSC of ESCC. PMID:26571024

  3. Metaproteomics of saliva identifies human protein markers specific for individuals with periodontitis and dental caries compared to orally healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Jensen, Lars J.; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    Background The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. To identify characteristics of diseased and healthy saliva we thus wanted to compare saliva metaproteomes from patients with periodontitis and dental caries to healthy individuals. Methods Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 10 patients with periodontitis, 10 patients with dental caries and 10 orally healthy individuals. The proteins in the saliva samples were subjected to denaturing buffer and digested enzymatically with LysC and trypsin. The resulting peptide mixtures were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction and separated online with 2 h gradients by nano-scale C18 reversed-phase chromatography connected to a mass spectrometer through an electrospray source. The eluting peptides were analyzed on a tandem mass spectrometer operated in data-dependent acquisition mode. Results We identified a total of 35,664 unique peptides from 4,161 different proteins, of which 1,946 and 2,090 were of bacterial and human origin, respectively. The human protein profiles displayed significant overexpression of the complement system and inflammatory markers in periodontitis and dental caries compared to healthy controls. Bacterial proteome profiles and functional annotation were very similar in health and disease. Conclusions Overexpression of proteins related to the complement system and inflammation seems to correlate with oral disease status. Similar bacterial proteomes in healthy and diseased individuals suggests that the salivary microbiota predominantly thrives in a planktonic state expressing no disease-associated characteristics of metabolic activity.

  4. Metaproteomics of saliva identifies human protein markers specific for individuals with periodontitis and dental caries compared to orally healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Jensen, Lars J.; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    Background The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. To identify characteristics of diseased and healthy saliva we thus wanted to compare saliva metaproteomes from patients with periodontitis and dental caries to healthy individuals. Methods Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 10 patients with periodontitis, 10 patients with dental caries and 10 orally healthy individuals. The proteins in the saliva samples were subjected to denaturing buffer and digested enzymatically with LysC and trypsin. The resulting peptide mixtures were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction and separated online with 2 h gradients by nano-scale C18 reversed-phase chromatography connected to a mass spectrometer through an electrospray source. The eluting peptides were analyzed on a tandem mass spectrometer operated in data-dependent acquisition mode. Results We identified a total of 35,664 unique peptides from 4,161 different proteins, of which 1,946 and 2,090 were of bacterial and human origin, respectively. The human protein profiles displayed significant overexpression of the complement system and inflammatory markers in periodontitis and dental caries compared to healthy controls. Bacterial proteome profiles and functional annotation were very similar in health and disease. Conclusions Overexpression of proteins related to the complement system and inflammation seems to correlate with oral disease status. Similar bacterial proteomes in healthy and diseased individuals suggests that the salivary microbiota predominantly thrives in a planktonic state expressing no disease-associated characteristics of metabolic activity. PMID:27672500

  5. X-linked markers in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene associated with oral clefts.

    PubMed

    Patel, Poorav J; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C; Marazita, Mary L; Munger, Ronald G; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Wu, Tao; Murray, Tanda; Rose, Margaret; Redett, Richard J; Jin, Sheng C; Lie, Rolv T; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Wang, Hong; Ye, Xiaoqian; Yeow, Vincent; Chong, Samuel; Jee, Sun H; Shi, Bing; Scott, Alan F

    2013-04-01

    As part of an international consortium, case-parent trios were collected for a genome-wide association study of isolated, non-syndromic oral clefts, including cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and cleft lip and palate (CLP). Non-syndromic oral clefts have a complex and heterogeneous etiology. Risk is influenced by genes and environmental factors, and differs markedly by gender. Family-based association tests (FBAT) were used on 14,486 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the X chromosome, stratified by type of cleft and racial group. Significant results, even after multiple-comparisons correction, were obtained for the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, the largest single gene in the human genome, among CL/P (i.e., both CL and CLP combined) trios. When stratified into groups of European and Asian ancestry, stronger signals were obtained for Asian subjects. Although conventional sliding-window haplotype analysis showed no increase in significance, selected combinations of the 25 most significant SNPs in the DMD gene identified four SNPs together that attained genome-wide significance among Asian CL/P trios, raising the possibility of interaction between distant SNPs within the DMD gene. PMID:23489894

  6. Oral health technicians in Brazilian primary health care: potentials and constraints.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Dulce Maria Lucena de; Tomita, Nilce Emy; Machado, Maria de Fátima Antero Sousa; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    Different perspectives on the role of mid-level workers in health care might represent a constraint to health policies. This study aimed to investigate how different agents view the participation of oral health technicians in direct activities of oral healthcare with the goal of understanding the related symbolic dispositions. Theoretical assumptions related to inter-professional collaboration and conflicts in the field of healthcare were used for this analysis. A researcher conducted 24 in-depth interviews with general dental practitioners, oral health technicians and local managers. The concepts of Pierre Bourdieu supported the data interpretation. The results indicated inter-professional relations marked by collaboration and conflict that reflect an action space related to different perspectives of primary care delivery. They also unveiled the symbolic devices related to the participation of oral health technicians that represent a constraint to the implementation of oral health policy, thus reducing the potential of primary health care in Brazil. PMID:25166951

  7. Oral health technicians in Brazilian primary health care: potentials and constraints.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Dulce Maria Lucena de; Tomita, Nilce Emy; Machado, Maria de Fátima Antero Sousa; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    Different perspectives on the role of mid-level workers in health care might represent a constraint to health policies. This study aimed to investigate how different agents view the participation of oral health technicians in direct activities of oral healthcare with the goal of understanding the related symbolic dispositions. Theoretical assumptions related to inter-professional collaboration and conflicts in the field of healthcare were used for this analysis. A researcher conducted 24 in-depth interviews with general dental practitioners, oral health technicians and local managers. The concepts of Pierre Bourdieu supported the data interpretation. The results indicated inter-professional relations marked by collaboration and conflict that reflect an action space related to different perspectives of primary care delivery. They also unveiled the symbolic devices related to the participation of oral health technicians that represent a constraint to the implementation of oral health policy, thus reducing the potential of primary health care in Brazil.

  8. Identification of Ethanol and 4-Nitroquinoline-1-Oxide Induced Epigenetic and Oxidative Stress Markers During Oral Cavity Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Urvalek, Alison M.; Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Tang, Xiao-Han; Zhang, Tuo; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a cancer that is characterized by its high morbidity and mortality rates. While tobacco use and alcohol consumption are two major contributing factors for HNSCC carcinogenesis, how the combination of tobacco and alcohol increases HNSCC risk is not understood. Methods We combined the 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) oral carcinogenesis and Meadows-Cook alcohol mouse models to elucidate the molecular events and to identify novel biomarkers associated with oral cancer development. Results By genome-wide RNA-seq of tongue samples (three mice per group) we identified changes in transcripts that mediate alcohol metabolism and oxidative stress (Aldh2, Aldh1a3, Adh1, Adh7, and Cyp2a5) in mice treated with 4-NQO followed by ethanol (4-NQO/EtOH) as compared to the vehicle control/untreated samples (V.C./Untr.). We measured major, global increases in specific histone acetylation and methylation epigenetic marks (H3K27ac, H3K9/14ac, H3K27me3, and H3K9me3) in the oral cavities of V.C./EtOH, 4-NQO/Untr. and 4-NQO/EtOH treatment groups compared to the V.C./Untr. group. We detected changes in histone epigenetic marks near regulatory regions of genes involved in ethanol metabolism by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). For instance, the Aldh2 promoter showed increased H3K27me3 marks, and Aldh2 mRNA levels were reduced by 10-fold in 4NQO/EtOH vs. V.C./Untr. tongue samples. 4-NQO/EtOH treatment also caused increases in markers of oxidative stress, including 4-HNE, MCT4/Slc16a3, and TOM20, as measured by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions We delineate a mechanism by which 4-NQO and ethanol can regulate gene expression during the development of HNSCC, and suggest that histone epigenetic marks and oxidative stress markers could be novel biomarkers and targets for the prevention of HNSCC. PMID:26207766

  9. Screening of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders Using Exfoliative Cytology: A Diagnostic Modality

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Debarati; Ginjupally, Uday; Bir, Aritri; Chatterjee, Kushal

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Oral exfoliative cytology (OEC) has been implemented in the diagnosis of pathologic lesions for ages. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the cytomorphological features of some of the commonest potentially malignant disorders (leukoplakia, lichen planus, and oral submucous fibrosis) through a simple procedure and illustrate its importance in mass screening. Materials and Method. A total of 160 subjects with 25–50 years of age were included in the study. Among them, 40 were clinically diagnosed with oral leukoplakia, 40 were diagnosed with oral lichen planus, 40 were diagnosed with oral submucous fibrosis, and 40 were in the control group. The prepared smears were subjected to Papanicolaou stain and analyzed microscopically for the evaluation of the cytomorphological features. Results and Discussion. When analyzed microscopically, 36 (90%) out of the 40 oral leukoplakic lesions showed Class II cytological features whereas 4 (10%) revealed Class I features. Among 40 patients with oral lichen planus, 26 (65%) showed Class II features while the remaining 14 (35%) revealed Class I features. In 40 subjects with oral submucous fibrosis, 32 (80%) showed Class II features while the other 8 (20%) showed Class I features. All the 40 control subjects showed Class I features. Thus, OEC can be widely advocated as an addition to clinical conclusion and an adjunct to biopsy. PMID:27721828

  10. Characterization of phenotype markers and neuronotoxic potential of polarised primary microglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chhor, Vibol; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Oré, Marie-Virgine; Celador, Idoia Lara; Josserand, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Jacotot, Etienne; Hagberg, Henrik; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2013-01-01

    Microglia mediate multiple facets of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype is an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy but a comprehensive study of classical and more novel microglial phenotypic markers in vitro is lacking. The aim of this study was to outline the temporal expression of a battery of phenotype markers from polarised microglia to generate an in vitro tool for screening the immunomodulatory potential of novel compounds. We characterised expression of thirty-one macrophage/microglial phenotype markers in primary microglia over time (4, 12, 36, and 72 h), using RT-qPCR or multiplex protein assay. Firstly, we selected Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the strongest M1–M2 polarising stimuli, from six stimuli tested. At each time point, markers useful to identify that microglia were M1 included iNOS, Cox-2 and IL-6 and a loss of M2a markers. Markers useful for quantifying M2b-immunomodulatory microglia included, increased IL-1RA and SOCS3 and for M2a-repair and regeneration, included increased arginase-1, and a loss of the M1 and M2b markers were discriminatory. Additional markers were regulated at fewer time points, but are still likely important to monitor when assessing the immunomodulatory potential of novel therapies. Further, to facilitate identification of how novel immunomodulatory treatments alter the functional affects of microglia, we characterised how the soluble products from polarised microglia affected the type and rate of neuronal death; M1/2b induced increasing and M2a-induced decreasing neuronal loss. We also assessed any effects of prior activation state, to provide a way to identify how a novel compound may alter phenotype depending on the stage of injury/insult progression. We identified generally that a prior M1/2b reduced the ability of microglia to switch to

  11. Combination therapy of potential gene to enhance oral cancer therapeutic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-regulation related to uncontrolled cell division and promotes progression in tumor. Over-expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been detected in oral cancer cells. EGFR-targeting agents are potential therapeutic modalities for treating oral cancer based on our in vitro study. Liposome nanotechnology is used to encapsulate siRNA and were modified with target ligand to receptors on the surface of tumor cells. We used EGFR siRNA to treat oral cancer in vitro.

  12. Alternative markers for the long-term detection of oral testosterone misuse.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Pozo, Oscar J; Marcos, Josep; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa

    2011-11-01

    The screening of testosterone misuse in the doping control field is normally performed by the measurement of the ratio between the concentrations of testosterone and epitestosterone excreted as glucuronides (T/E). Despite the satisfactory results obtained with this approach, the measurement of T/E presents some limitations like the long-term detection of oral testosterone administration. Recently, several testosterone metabolites released after basic treatment of the urine have been reported (androsta-1,4-dien-3,17-dione, androsta-4,6-dien-3,17-dione, 17β-hydroxy-androsta-4,6-dien-3-one and 15-androsten-3,17-dione). In the present work, the usefulness of these metabolites for the detection of oral testosterone misuse has been evaluated and compared with the conventional T/E measurement. For this purpose, 173 urine samples collected from healthy volunteers were analysed in order to obtain reference concentrations for the four metabolites released after alkaline treatment. On the other hand, urine samples collected from five volunteers before and after testosterone undecanoate administration were also analysed. Concentrations of androsta-4,6-dien-3,17-dione and 17β-hydroxy-androsta-4,6-dien-3-one showed a similar behaviour as the T/E, allowing the detection of the misuse for several hours after administration. More promising results were obtained by quantifying androsta-1,4-dien-3,17-dione and 15-androsten-3,17-dione. The time in which the concentrations of these analytes could be differentiated from the basal level was between 3 and 6 times longer than the obtained with T/E, as a result, an improvement in the detection of testosterone abuse can be achieved. Moreover, several ratios between these compounds were evaluated. Some of them improved the detection of testosterone misuse when comparing with T/E. The best results were obtained with those ratios involving androsta-1,4-dien-3,17-dione. PMID:21782838

  13. FLOT-2 is an independent prognostic marker in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qiuyuan; Alnemah, Mohannad Ma; Luo, Jiadi; Wang, Weiyuan; Chu, Shuzhou; Chen, Lingjiao; Li, Jiao; Xu, Lina; Li, Meirong; Zhou, Jianhua; Fan, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Flotillin-2 (Flot-2) is an important component of cellular membrane, which involves in various cellular processes and recent studies have revealed that Flot-2 played important roles in cancer progression. The expression and prognostic impact of Flot-2 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have not been well studied. So, a tissue microarray (TMA) based on immunohistochemical analysis of surgical resection of tumor tissues of 78 cases of OSCC patients and 27 cases of adjacent non-cancerous squamous epithelium tissues was conducted. This study focused on detecting Flot-2 expression and analyzing its prognostic impact on OSCC. The result showed that the positive percentage of Flot-2 expression in OSCC (74.4%, 58/78) was significantly higher than that in adjacent non-cancerous squamous epithelium tissues (25.9%, 7/27) (P<0.001). Additionally, the positive expression of Flot-2 in OSCC patients with a history of alcohol consumption was significantly higher than those nonusers (P=0.027). Both univariate and multivariate survival analysis indicated that increased expression Flot-2 protein was significantly correlated inversely with overall survival rates in OSCC patients (P=0.046, P=0.002). Taken together, positive expression of Flot-2 protein may be an independent biomarker for poor prognosis in OSCC. PMID:26339392

  14. A Perceptuomotor and Oral Language Program for Children Identified as Potential Failures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weimer, Wayne Robert

    This study sought to determine whether the de Hirsch Predictive Index Tests would accurately identify children who were potential failures in school. The study also investigated whether a perceptual-motor and oral language program would aid those children identified as potential failures. The Predictive Index Tests were administered to 645 first…

  15. Evaluation of Colon Cancer – Specific Antigen 2 as a Potential Serum Marker for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Eddy S.; Schoen, Robert E.; Magheli, Ahmed; Sokoll, Lori J.; Chan, Daniel W.; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A blood test to detect colon cancer at a preventable stage would represent a major advancement. We have previously identified colon cancer – specific markers using focused proteomics analysis of nuclear structural proteins. Two of these markers, colon cancer – specific antigen (CCSA)-3 and CCSA-4, have been developed into blood-based markers that are able to distinguish individuals with colorectal cancer from those without. CCSA-2 is a distinct novel colon cancer marker identified using focused proteomics. Experimental Design Using an indirect ELISA on serum samples obtained from two institutions, we evaluated CCSA-2 as a serum-based colon cancer marker. A total of111serumsamples from individuals who underwent colonoscopy and were subsequently diagnosed as either being normal or having hyperplastic polyps, nonadvanced adenomas, advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer were evaluated. A diverse control population that consisted of 125 serum samples was also included in this study. Results Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CCSA-2. CCSA-2 at a cutoff of 10.8 µg/mL has overall specificity of 78.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 67.3–87.1%] and sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI, 85.8–99.5%) in separating individuals with advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer from normal, hyperplastic, and nonadvanced adenoma populations. The receiver operating characteristic curve for CCSA-2 has an area under the curve of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.83–0.95). Conclusion Our initial study shows that CCSA-2 is a potential serum-based marker for colon cancer detection with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:18316554

  16. Plasmodium falciparum kelch 13: a potential molecular marker for tackling artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Mita, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Although artemisinin combination therapies have been deployed as a first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in almost all endemic countries, artemisinin-resistant parasites have emerged and have gradually spread across the Greater Mekong subregions. There is growing concern that the resistant parasites may migrate to or emerge indigenously in sub-Saharan Africa, which might provoke a global increase in malaria-associated morbidity and mortality. Therefore, development of molecular markers that enable identification of artemisinin resistance with high sensitivity is urgently required to combat this issue. In 2014, a potential artemisinin-resistance responsible gene, Plasmodium falciparum kelch13, was discovered. Here, we review the genetic features of P. falciparum kelch13 and discuss its related resistant mechanisms and potential as a molecular marker.

  17. Sperm midpiece apoptotic markers: impact on fertilizing potential in in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Talarczyk-Desole, Joanna; Kotwicka, Małgorzata; Jendraszak, Magdalena; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Murawski, Marek; Jędrzejczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between apoptotic markers present in human spermatozoa, namely phosphatidylserine translocation (PST) from the inner to the outer layer of the cytomembrane and the active form of caspase-3 (c3) versus the fertilizing potential of male gametes in conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) models. A total of 116 male patients treated with their partners for infertility underwent basic semen analysis and an assessment of the presence of PST and the active c3 in sperm using flow cytometry. Forty patients underwent IVF, group A, while 76 patients underwent ICSI, group B. The fertilizing potential of the gametes was measured as the percentage of oocytes with pronuclei present after either procedure. PST and active c3 were identified in vital gametes, mainly in the midpiece area. Concentration, motility, morphology, and viability of spermatozoa strongly negatively correlated with both markers. In group A, a negative correlation between both markers and the success rate of conventional IVF was observed (r = -0.4, p = 0.04 for PST; r = -0.4, p = 0.02 for active c3, respectively). In group B, the success rate of ICSI did not correlate with either marker (r = -0.2, p = 0.85 for PST and r = 0.1, p = 0.51 for active c3). The two apoptotic markers localized in the sperm midpiece area may affect their function not only by decreasing basic andrologic parameters but also by reducing the probability of conception. Therefore, analysis of PST and active c3 in the sperm of patients undergoing infertility treatment should be recommended.

  18. Oral infectious diseases: a potential risk factor for HIV virus recrudescence?

    PubMed Central

    González, OA; Ebersole, JL; Huang, CB

    2014-01-01

    As the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transitioned human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a ‘chronic disease’ management strategy, there is growing evidence that infection with non-HIV pathogens in HIV+ patients may have important public health implications in undermining HAART success and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome progression. Several bacterial and host cell products during infections with non-HIV pathogens have shown the capacity to regulate HIV replication in latently infected cells. A high prevalence of oral infections caused by bacteria, viruses and fungi has been described in HIV+ patients, including periodontal disease. The oral cavity appears to be a site of HIV pathogenesis and potential reservoir for the disease as HIV RNA and DNA forms are present in saliva as well as in gingival crevicular fluid, and oral epithelial cells are susceptible to either cell free or cell-associated HIV infection. The clinical and biological bases of potential associations between chronic oral inflammatory disorders, such as periodontal disease, and exacerbation of HIV viraemia have received little attention. This review attempts to evaluate the current understanding of HIV reactivation as a result of co-infection and/or inflammation induced by non-HIV pathogens in HIV-infected patients, and presents a hypothetic model about the potential role of periodontitis as a global oral infection that potentially contributes to HIV recrudescence. PMID:19364391

  19. Ability of Dental Students in Spain to Identify Potentially Malignant Disorders and Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cerero-Lapiedra, Rocío; Esparza-Gómez, Germán C; Casado-de la Cruz, Laura; Domínguez-Gordillo, Adelaida A; Corral-Linaza, César; Seoane-Romero, Juan M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of students at the School of Dentistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, to diagnose oral cancer and other potentially malignant disorders, as well as to compare their ability at different stages of the learning process and evaluate their knowledge retention. Students were surveyed after they had studied oral medicine and oral pathology at two time points: midway through and near the end of their studies. The survey consisted of questions about 40 photographs of benign oral lesions, malignant oral lesions, and potentially malignant disorders. The response rate for all groups was greater than 70%. The results showed that these students' overall success rate in differentiating benign from malignant lesions averaged 73.9%. When the distinction for potentially malignant disorders was included, their average overall success rate decreased to 42.8% (p<0.001). Furthermore, the students' average success rate was at its lowest at the end of the dental program (p<0.001). Results from this study suggest that, given these students' difficulties in identifying potentially malignant disorders, an increased emphasis on cancer education in the dental curriculum may be needed for future practitioners to master this ability. PMID:26246535

  20. Oral infectious diseases: a potential risk factor for HIV virus recrudescence?

    PubMed

    González, O A; Ebersole, J L; Huang, C B

    2009-07-01

    As the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transitioned human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a 'chronic disease' management strategy, there is growing evidence that infection with non-HIV pathogens in HIV+ patients may have important public health implications in undermining HAART success and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome progression. Several bacterial and host cell products during infections with non-HIV pathogens have shown the capacity to regulate HIV replication in latently infected cells. A high prevalence of oral infections caused by bacteria, viruses and fungi has been described in HIV+ patients, including periodontal disease. The oral cavity appears to be a site of HIV pathogenesis and potential reservoir for the disease as HIV RNA and DNA forms are present in saliva as well as in gingival crevicular fluid, and oral epithelial cells are susceptible to either cell free or cell-associated HIV infection. The clinical and biological bases of potential associations between chronic oral inflammatory disorders, such as periodontal disease, and exacerbation of HIV viraemia have received little attention. This review attempts to evaluate the current understanding of HIV reactivation as a result of co-infection and/or inflammation induced by non-HIV pathogens in HIV-infected patients, and presents a hypothetic model about the potential role of periodontitis as a global oral infection that potentially contributes to HIV recrudescence. PMID:19364391

  1. Potential implications of adjuvant endocrine therapy for the oral health of postmenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Havens, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Current adjuvant treatment modalities for breast cancer that express the estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor include adjuvant anti-estrogen therapies, and tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Bone, including the jaw, is an endocrine-sensitive organ, as are other oral structures. This review examines the potential links between adjuvant anti-estrogen treatments in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer and oral health. A search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and the Web of Knowledge was conducted using combinations of key terms “breast,” “cancer,” “neoplasm,” “Tamoxifen,” “Aromatase Inhibitor,” “chemotherapy,” “hormone therapy,” “alveolar bone loss,” “postmenopausal bone loss,” “estrogen,” “SERM,” “hormone replacement therapy,” and “quality of life.” We selected articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English. The authors found no studies reporting on periodontal diseases, alveolar bone loss, oral health, or oral health-related quality of life in association with anti-estrogen breast cancer treatments in postmenopausal women. Periodontal diseases, alveolar bone density, tooth loss, and conditions of the soft tissues of the mouth have all been associated with menopausal status supporting the hypothesis that the soft tissues and bone of the oral cavity could be negatively affected by anti-estrogen therapy. As a conclusion, the impact of adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy on the oral health of postmenopausal women is undefined. The structures of the oral cavity are influenced by estrogen; therefore, anti-estrogen therapies may carry the risk of oral toxicities. Oral health care for breast cancer patients is an important but understudied aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:22986813

  2. Cystatin C: a new renal marker and its potential use in small animal medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghys, L; Paepe, D; Smets, P; Lefebvre, H; Delanghe, J; Daminet, S

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of chronic kidney disease is underestimated in both human and veterinary medicine. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered the gold standard for evaluating kidney function. However, GFR assessment is time-consuming and labor-intensive and therefore not routinely used in practice. The commonly used indirect GFR markers, serum creatinine (sCr) and urea, are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to detect early renal dysfunction. Serum cystatin C (sCysC), a proteinase inhibitor, has most of the properties required for an endogenous GFR marker. In human medicine, numerous studies have evaluated its potential use as a GFR marker in several populations. In veterinary medicine, this marker is gaining interest. The measurement is easy, which makes it an interesting parameter for clinical use. This review summarizes current knowledge about cystatin C (CysC) in humans, dogs, and cats, including its history, assays, relationship with GFR, and biological and clinical variations in both human and veterinary medicine. PMID:24814357

  3. Betel Quid and Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in a Periurban Township in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Zaw, Ko-Ko; Ohnmar, Mya; Hlaing, Moh-Moh; Oo, Yin-Thet-Nu; Win, Swe-Swe; Htike, Maung-Maung-Than; Aye, Phyu-Phyu; Shwe, Sein; Htwe, Moe-Thida; Thein, Zaw-Moe

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to describe betel quid chewing practice and compare oral potentially malignant disorders between chewers and non-chewers of betel quid among residents in Dagon Myothit (East) Township, Myanmar. The study used a cross-sectional design conducted with a representative sample of 542 adults aged 18 years and above in the township. The trained interviewers collected data using a pretested structured questionnaire. On-site oral examination was done for suspected oral lesions. The mean age of the respondents was 45 years and 59% were women. Fifty-two percent of the respondents were currently in the habit of chewing betel quids (72% of men and 39% of women). Among 284 current betel quid chewers, 240 (85%) chewed betel quids together with tobacco. Out of 284 current betel quid chewers, 24 (8.5%) were found to have oral potentially malignant disorders; out of 258 betel quid non-chewers, only 1 (0.4%) was found to have oral potentially malignant disorders. This highlights the growing importance of smokeless tobacco use as public health problem.

  4. Betel Quid and Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in a Periurban Township in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Zaw, Ko-Ko; Ohnmar, Mya; Hlaing, Moh-Moh; Oo, Yin-Thet-Nu; Win, Swe-Swe; Htike, Maung-Maung-Than; Aye, Phyu-Phyu; Shwe, Sein; Htwe, Moe-Thida; Thein, Zaw-Moe

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to describe betel quid chewing practice and compare oral potentially malignant disorders between chewers and non-chewers of betel quid among residents in Dagon Myothit (East) Township, Myanmar. The study used a cross-sectional design conducted with a representative sample of 542 adults aged 18 years and above in the township. The trained interviewers collected data using a pretested structured questionnaire. On-site oral examination was done for suspected oral lesions. The mean age of the respondents was 45 years and 59% were women. Fifty-two percent of the respondents were currently in the habit of chewing betel quids (72% of men and 39% of women). Among 284 current betel quid chewers, 240 (85%) chewed betel quids together with tobacco. Out of 284 current betel quid chewers, 24 (8.5%) were found to have oral potentially malignant disorders; out of 258 betel quid non-chewers, only 1 (0.4%) was found to have oral potentially malignant disorders. This highlights the growing importance of smokeless tobacco use as public health problem. PMID:27611195

  5. Betel Quid and Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in a Periurban Township in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Zaw, Ko-Ko; Ohnmar, Mya; Hlaing, Moh-Moh; Oo, Yin-Thet-Nu; Win, Swe-Swe; Htike, Maung-Maung-Than; Aye, Phyu-Phyu; Shwe, Sein; Htwe, Moe-Thida; Thein, Zaw-Moe

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to describe betel quid chewing practice and compare oral potentially malignant disorders between chewers and non-chewers of betel quid among residents in Dagon Myothit (East) Township, Myanmar. The study used a cross-sectional design conducted with a representative sample of 542 adults aged 18 years and above in the township. The trained interviewers collected data using a pretested structured questionnaire. On-site oral examination was done for suspected oral lesions. The mean age of the respondents was 45 years and 59% were women. Fifty-two percent of the respondents were currently in the habit of chewing betel quids (72% of men and 39% of women). Among 284 current betel quid chewers, 240 (85%) chewed betel quids together with tobacco. Out of 284 current betel quid chewers, 24 (8.5%) were found to have oral potentially malignant disorders; out of 258 betel quid non-chewers, only 1 (0.4%) was found to have oral potentially malignant disorders. This highlights the growing importance of smokeless tobacco use as public health problem. PMID:27611195

  6. Molecular Markers of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Screening Tool of the Future?

    PubMed Central

    Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Abdul Kadir, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is among the leading causes of new onset blindness in adults. Effective treatment may delay the onset and progression of this disease provided it is diagnosed early. At present retinopathy can only be diagnosed via formal examination of the eye by a trained specialist, which limits the population that can be effectively screened. An easily accessible, reliable screening biomarker of diabetic retinopathy would be of tremendous benefit in detecting the population in need of further assessment and treatment. This review highlights specific biomarkers that show promise as screening markers to detect early diabetic retinopathy or even to detect patients at increased risk of DR at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. The pathobiology of DR is complex and multifactorial giving rise to a wide array of potential biomarkers. This review provides an overview of these pathways and looks at older markers such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), inflammatory markers, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as other newer proteins with a role in the pathogenesis of DR including neuroprotective factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF); SA100A12, pentraxin 3, brain natriuretic peptide, apelin 3, and chemerin as well as various metabolites such as lipoprotein A, folate, and homocysteine. We also consider the possible role of proteins identified through proteomics work whose levels are altered in the sera of patients with DR as screening markers though their role in pathophysiology remains to be characterized. The role of microRNA as a promising new screening marker is also discussed. PMID:27313539

  7. Chromogranin A – unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  8. Localization and osteoblastic differentiation potential of neural crest-derived cells in oral tissues of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Miki; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Gou; Hosono, Tomohiko; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Watahiki, Junichi; Hayashi, Ryuhei; Arata, Satoru; Mishima, Kenji; Nishida, Kohji; Osumi, Noriko; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-09-01

    In embryos, neural crest cells emerge from the dorsal region of the fusing neural tube and migrate throughout tissues to differentiate into various types of cells including osteoblasts. In adults, subsets of neural crest-derived cells (NCDCs) reside as stem cells and are considered to be useful cell sources for regenerative medicine strategies. Numerous studies have suggested that stem cells with a neural crest origin persist into adulthood, especially those within the mammalian craniofacial compartment. However, their distribution as well as capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts in adults is not fully understood. To analyze the precise distribution and characteristics of NCDCs in adult oral tissues, we utilized an established line of double transgenic (P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP) mice in which NCDCs express green fluorescent protein (GFP) throughout their life. GFP-positive cells were scattered like islands throughout tissues of the palate, gingiva, tongue, and buccal mucosa in adult mice, with those isolated from the latter shown to form spheres, typical cell clusters composed of stem cells, under low-adherent conditions. Furthermore, GFP-positive cells had markedly increased alkaline phosphatase (a marker enzyme of osteoblast differentiation) activity and mineralization as shown by alizarin red staining, in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. These results suggest that NCDCs reside in various adult oral tissues and possess potential to differentiate into osteoblastic cells. NCDCs in adults may be a useful cell source for bone regeneration strategies.

  9. Use of electrical impedance spectroscopy to detect malignant and potentially malignant oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Craig; Brown, Brian H; Hearnden, Vanessa; Speight, Paul M; D’Apice, Katy; Hegarty, Anne M; Tidy, John A; Healey, T Jamie; Highfield, Peter E; Thornhill, Martin H

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of tissues depend on their architecture and cellular composition. We have previously shown that changes in electrical impedance can be used to differentiate between different degrees of cervical dysplasia and cancer of the cervix. In this proof-of-concept study, we aimed to determine whether electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) could distinguish between normal oral mucosa; benign, potentially malignant lesions (PML); and oral cancer. EIS data were collected from oral cancer (n=10), PML (n=27), and benign (n=10) lesions. EIS from lesions was compared with the EIS reading from the normal mucosa on the contralateral side of the mouth or with reference spectra from mucosal sites of control subjects (n=51). Healthy controls displayed significant differences in the EIS obtained from different oral sites. In addition, there were significant differences in the EIS of cancer and high-risk PML versus low-risk PML and controls. There was no significant difference between benign lesions and normal controls. Study subjects also deemed the EIS procedure considerably less painful and more convenient than the scalpel biopsy procedure. EIS shows promise at distinguishing among malignant, PML, and normal oral mucosa and has the potential to be developed into a clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:25285005

  10. Potential use of oral fluid samples for serological diagnosis of African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Mur, Lina; Gallardo, Carmina; Soler, Alejandro; Zimmermman, Jeffrey; Pelayo, Virginia; Nieto, Raquel; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Arias, Marisa

    2013-07-26

    African swine fever (ASF) is a complex, highly lethal, notifiable disease of swine. ASF is wide-spread in sub-Saharan Africa and East European countries and there is presently a great risk of spread to neighboring countries. Since there is no vaccine for ASF virus (ASFV), control is based on rapid and early detection of the disease via surveillance. This approach requires collecting blood samples from large number of animals. Laborious and expensive of itself, this process also presents an additional risk because ASFV is present at high concentrations in the blood. The objective of this study was to initiate studies into the potential use of oral fluid as an alternative to serum for ASF diagnosis, for latter studying its possible use in surveillance and control programs. To this end, oral fluid samples collected at different times post infection from eight pigs experimentally inoculated with an attenuated ASFV were assayed using modified protocols of the two validated serological techniques, the enzyme-immune-liked assay (ELISA) and immunoperoxidase technique (IPT). Antibodies against ASFV were detected in oral fluid samples of all animals from early post infection through the end of the experiment by ELISA and IPT. These results confirmed the presence of ASFV antibodies in swine oral fluids samples, the possibility of an oral fluid-based approach in ASF diagnosis and, potentially in ASF surveillance.

  11. It's Story Time!: Exploring the Potential of Multimodality in Oral Storytelling to Support Children's Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lwin, Soe Marlar

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies have been done on the benefits of parent/teacher-child interactions during shared storybook reading or read'aloud sessions, very few have examined the potential of professional storytellers' oral discourse to support children's vocabulary learning. In those storytelling sessions conducted by professional storytellers, the…

  12. E-cadherin in non-tumor epithelium adjacent to oral cancer as risk marker for the development of multiple tumors.

    PubMed

    González-Moles, M A; Bravo, M; Ruiz-Avila, I; Gil-Montoya, J A; Acebal, F; Esteban, F

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to find out whether the loss of E-cadherin is a risk factor for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and whether it could serve as a diagnostic marker for oral premalignant fields. We studied 77 oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) with associated non-tumour epithelia from 61 patients. Immunohistochemical studies (antibody NHC-38) were used to investigate E-cadherin expression, which was completely lost in basal (48% of cases) and parabasal (43%) layers of non-tumour epithelia close to the tumour and in basal (47%) and parabasal (38%) layers of non-tumour epithelia distant from the tumour. In multiple tumours E-cadherin expression was significantly lower than in single tumours in the basal, parabasal layers, and the middle third of close (p=0.002, <0.001, <0.001) and distant (p=0.041, p<0.001, p=0.005) non-tumour epithelia, respectively. Downregulation of E-cadherin may be valuable as a risk marker for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and for the diagnosis of premalignant fields.

  13. Surface display of Clonorchis sinensis enolase on Bacillus subtilis spores potentializes an oral vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Tian, Yanli; Mao, Qiang; Lv, Xiaoli; Shang, Mei; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing; Huang, Yan

    2014-03-10

    Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) infections remain the common public health problem in freshwater fish consumption areas. New effective prevention strategies are still the urgent challenges to control this kind of foodborne infectious disease. The biochemical importance and biological relevance render C. sinensis enolase (Csenolase) as a potential vaccine candidate. In the present study, we constructed Escherichia coli/Bacillus subtilis shuttle genetic engineering system and investigated the potential of Csenolase as an oral vaccine candidate for C. sinensis prevention in different immunization routes. Our results showed that, compared with control groups, both recombinant Csenolase protein and nucleic acid could induce a mixed IgG1/IgG2a immune response when administrated subcutaneously (P<0.001), intraperitoneally (P<0.01) and intramuscularly (P<0.001) with worm reduction rate of 56.29%, 15.38% and 37.42%, respectively. More importantly, Csenolase could be successfully expressed as a fusion protein (55kDa) on B. subtilis spore indicated by immunoblot and immunofluorescence assays. Killed spores triggered reactive Th1/Th2 immune response and exhibited protective efficacy against C. sinensis infection. Csenolase derived oral vaccine conferred worm reduction rate and egg reduction rate at 60.07% (P<0.001) and 80.67% (P<0.001), respectively. The shuttle genetic engineering system facilitated the development of oral vaccine with B. subtilis stably overexpressing target protein. Comparably vaccinal trails with Csenolase in different immunization routes potentialize Csenolase an oral vaccine candidate in C. sinensis prevention.

  14. Longitudinal evaluation of patients with oral potentially malignant disorders using optical imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard A.; Pierce, Mark C.; Mondrik, Sharon; Gao, Wen; Quinn, Mary K.; Bhattar, Vijayashree; Williams, Michelle D.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-02-01

    Dysplastic and cancerous alterations in oral tissue can be detected noninvasively in vivo using optical techniques including autofluorescence imaging, high-resolution imaging, and spectroscopy. Interim results are presented from a longitudinal study in which optical imaging and spectroscopy were used to evaluate the progression of lesions over time in patients at high risk for development of oral cancer. Over 100 patients with oral potentially malignant disorders have been enrolled in the study to date. Areas of concern in the oral cavity are measured using widefield autofluorescence imaging and depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy during successive clinical visits. Autofluorescence intensity patterns and autofluorescence spectra are tracked over time and correlated with clinical observations. Patients whose lesions progress and who undergo surgery are also measured in the operating room immediately prior to surgery using autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy, with the addition of intraoperative high-resolution imaging to characterize nuclear size, nuclear crowding, and tissue architecture at selected sites. Optical measurements are compared to histopathology results from biopsies and surgical specimens collected from the measured sites. Autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy measurements are continued during post-surgery followup visits. We examined correlations between clinical impression and optical classification over time with an average followup period of 4 months. The data collected to date suggest that multimodal optical techniques may aid in noninvasive monitoring of the progression of oral premalignant lesions, biopsy site selection, and accurate delineation of lesion extent during surgery.

  15. Evaluating the potential of cubosomal nanoparticles for oral delivery of amphotericin B in treating fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiwen; Chen, Meiwan; Yang, Muhua; Chen, Jian; Fang, Weijun; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The oral administration of amphotericin B (AmB) has a major drawback of poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of glyceryl monoolein (GMO) cubosomes as lipid nanocarriers to improve the oral efficacy of AmB. Antifungal efficacy was determined in vivo in rats after oral administration, to investigate its therapeutic use. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2) was used in vitro to evaluate transport across a model of the intestinal barrier. In vivo antifungal results showed that AmB, loaded in GMO cubosomes, could significantly enhance oral efficacy, compared against Fungizone®, and that during a 2 day course of dosage 10 mg/kg the drug reached effective therapeutic concentrations in renal tissue for treating fungal infections. In the Caco-2 transport studies, GMO cubosomes resulted in a significantly larger amount of AmB being transported into Caco-2 cells, via both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, but not macropinocytosis. These results suggest that GMO cubosomes, as lipid nanovectors, could facilitate the oral delivery of AmB. PMID:24421641

  16. The rationale and potential for the reduction of oral malodour using Streptococcus salivarius probiotics.

    PubMed

    Burton, J P; Chilcott, C N; Tagg, J R

    2005-01-01

    The primary treatment for oral malodour is the reduction of bacterial populations, especially those present on the tongue, by use of a variety of antimicrobial agents or mechanical devices. However, shortly after treatment the problematic bacteria quickly repopulate the tongue and the malodour returns. In our studies, we have used a broadly-active antimicrobial (chlorhexidine) to effect temporary depletion of the oral microbiota and then have attempted to repopulate the tongue surface with Streptococcus salivarius K12, a benign commensal probiotic. The objective of this is to prevent re-establishment of non-desirable bacterial populations and thus help limit the re-occurrence of oral malodour over a prolonged period. In this paper, we discuss why contemporary probiotics are inadequate for treatment of oral malodour and examine the rationale for selection of particular bacterial species for future use in the treatment of this condition. In our preliminary trials of the use of a chlorhexidine rinse followed by strain K12 lozenges, the majority (8/13) of subjects with confirmed halitosis maintained reduced breath levels of volatile sulphur compounds for at least 2 weeks. We conclude that probiotic bacterial strains originally sourced from the indigenous oral microbiotas of healthy humans may have potential application as adjuncts for the prevention and treatment of halitosis. PMID:15752094

  17. Programmable Bio-Nano-Chip based Cytologic Testing of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Floriano, Pierre; Abram, Tim; Taylor, Leander; Le, Cathy; Talavera, Humberto; Nguyen, Michael; Raja, Rameez; Gillenwater, Ann; McDevitt, John; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is caused by mutations of DNA repair genes. The risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) among FA patients is 800-folds higher than in the general population. Early detection of OSCC, preferably at it precursor stage is critical in FA patients to improve their survival. In an ongoing clinical trial, we are evaluating the effectiveness of the programmable bio-nano-chip (p-BNC)-based oral cytology test in diagnosing oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) in non-FA patients. We used this test to compare the cytomorphometric and molecular biomarkers in OSCC cell lines derived from FA patients and non-FA patients and brush biopsy samples of a FA patient’s OPMD and normal mucosa of healthy volunteers. Our data showed that expression patterns of molecular biomarkers were not notably different between sporadic and FA OSCC cell lines. The p-BNC assay revealed significant differences in cytometric parameters and biomarker MCM2 expression between cytobrush samples of the FA patient and cytobrush samples of normal oral mucosa obtained from healthy volunteers. Microscopic examination of the FA patient’s OPMD confirmed the presence of dysplasia. Our pilot data suggests that p-BNC brush biopsy test recognizes dysplastic oral epithelial cells in a brush biopsy sample of a FA patient. PMID:25662766

  18. Maltose-binding protein is a potential carrier for oral immunizations.

    PubMed

    Bellot, P; Tiels, P; Melkebeek, V; Devriendt, B; Goddeeris, B M; Cox, E

    2013-03-15

    Maltose binding protein (MBP) is often fused to a relevant protein to improve its yield and facilitate its purification, but MBP can also enhance the immunogenicity of the fused proteins. Recent data suggest that MBP may potentiate antigen-presenting functions in immunized animals by providing intrinsic maturation stimuli to dendritic cells through TLR4. The aim of this study was to examine if an MBP-specific immune response can be elicited by oral administration of MBP. Therefore, in a first experiment the MBP specific immune response was analyzed after oral immunization with MBP or MBP+CT to piglets and both the systemic and mucosal immune responses were examined Although no high systemic response was observed in the MBP-group, a local mucosal IgM MBP-specific response in the jejunal Peyer's patches was observed. In the second experiment MBPFedF was orally administered to piglets. A significant systemic response against MBP and a weak response against FedF were found after oral administration of MBPFedF+CT. Also the presence of MBP-specific IgA ASC in the lamina propria indicates that a local intestinal immune response against MBP was induced. Our data suggests that MBP can cross the epithelial barrier reaching the gut-associated lymphoid tissue after oral administration to pigs, which implicates that MBP could act as a carrier and delivery system for fused proteins to target the vaccine antigens to intestinal immune cells. PMID:23078905

  19. Evaluating the potential of cubosomal nanoparticles for oral delivery of amphotericin B in treating fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwen; Chen, Meiwan; Yang, Muhua; Chen, Jian; Fang, Weijun; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The oral administration of amphotericin B (AmB) has a major drawback of poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of glyceryl monoolein (GMO) cubosomes as lipid nanocarriers to improve the oral efficacy of AmB. Antifungal efficacy was determined in vivo in rats after oral administration, to investigate its therapeutic use. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2) was used in vitro to evaluate transport across a model of the intestinal barrier. In vivo antifungal results showed that AmB, loaded in GMO cubosomes, could significantly enhance oral efficacy, compared against Fungizone, and that during a 2 day course of dosage 10 mg/kg the drug reached effective therapeutic concentrations in renal tissue for treating fungal infections. In the Caco-2 transport studies, GMO cubosomes resulted in a significantly larger amount of AmB being transported into Caco-2 cells, via both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, but not macropinocytosis. These results suggest that GMO cubosomes, as lipid nanovectors, could facilitate the oral delivery of AmB.

  20. Ameliorative potential of gingerol: Promising modulation of inflammatory factors and lipid marker enzymes expressions in HFD induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Brahma Naidu, Parim; Uddandrao, V V Sathibabu; Ravindar Naik, Ramavat; Suresh, Pothani; Meriga, Balaji; Begum, Mustapha Shabana; Pandiyan, Rajesh; Saravanan, Ganapathy

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, generally linked to hyperlipidemia, has been occurring of late with distressing alarm and has now become a global phenomenon casting a huge economic burden on the health care system of countries around the world. The present study investigated the effects of gingerol over 30 days on the changes in HFD-induced obese rats in marker enzymes of lipid metabolism such as fatty-acid synthase (FAS), Acetyl CoA Carboxylase (ACC), Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase-1(CPT-1), HMG co-A Reductase (HMGR), Lecithin Choline Acyl Transferase (LCAT) and Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL) and inflammatory markers (TNF-α and IL-6). The rats were treated orally with gingerol (75 mg kg(-1)) once daily for 30 days with a lorcaserin-treated group (10 mg kg(-1)) included for comparison. Changes in body weight, glucose, insulin resistance and expressions of lipid marker enzymes and inflammatory markers in tissues were observed in experimental rats. The administration of gingerol resulted in a significant reduction in body weight gain, glucose and insulin levels, and insulin resistance, which altered the activity, expressions of lipid marker enzymes and inflammatory markers. It showed that gingerol had significantly altered these parameters when compared with HFD control rats. This study confirms that gingerol prevents HFD-induced hyperlipidemia by modulating the expression of enzymes important to cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26493465

  1. Marker residue determination of tritium-labeled ivermectin in the muscle of aquacultured largemouth bass, hybrid striped bass, and yellow perch following oral treatment.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Badar; Rummel, Nathan; Yu, Donglei; Gieseker, Charles; Evans, Eric; Hasbrouck, Nicholas; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2012-05-01

    The residue depletion profiles of tritium-labeled ivermectin and its metabolites in the muscle of aquacultured largemouth bass (LMB), hybrid striped bass (HSB), and yellow perch (YP) following oral treatment are reported. Fish were administered ³H-ivermectin at the dose level of 0.1 mg/kg body weight (7-9 μCi) in a gel capsule via stomach tube. At each postdose withdrawal time, six fish of each species were sedated with buffered MS-222 and blood samples taken. Fish were then euthanized, and fillets with adhering skin (scales removed) and bile samples were collected. The muscle fillets were homogenized in dry ice to a fine powder. Aliquots of tissue, plasma, and bile were assayed for total radioactive residue (TRR). The homogenized muscle was extracted in acetonitrile or methanol followed by high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis to determine the presence of parent ivermectin and its potential metabolites. The highest TRR concentrations (ivermectin equivalents) of 53, 45, and 44 ng/g (ppb) were obtained on postdose day 1 for HSB, LMB, and YP, respectively. The TRR depleted most slowly in HSB to 25 ppb at day 91, followed by YP to 19 ppb at day 42 and then by LMB to 22 ppb at day 35. The total residue of ivermectin and its metabolites by HPLC analysis followed the same depletion pattern in the three species. Additionally, the depletion rate of TRR of ³H-ivermectin in the three species followed the pattern bile > plasma > muscle. The results further indicate that one of the polar metabolites of ivermectin could serve as a potential marker residue as an indication of use, rather than the parent ivermectin. PMID:22452736

  2. Marker residue determination of tritium-labeled ivermectin in the muscle of aquacultured largemouth bass, hybrid striped bass, and yellow perch following oral treatment.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Badar; Rummel, Nathan; Yu, Donglei; Gieseker, Charles; Evans, Eric; Hasbrouck, Nicholas; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2012-05-01

    The residue depletion profiles of tritium-labeled ivermectin and its metabolites in the muscle of aquacultured largemouth bass (LMB), hybrid striped bass (HSB), and yellow perch (YP) following oral treatment are reported. Fish were administered ³H-ivermectin at the dose level of 0.1 mg/kg body weight (7-9 μCi) in a gel capsule via stomach tube. At each postdose withdrawal time, six fish of each species were sedated with buffered MS-222 and blood samples taken. Fish were then euthanized, and fillets with adhering skin (scales removed) and bile samples were collected. The muscle fillets were homogenized in dry ice to a fine powder. Aliquots of tissue, plasma, and bile were assayed for total radioactive residue (TRR). The homogenized muscle was extracted in acetonitrile or methanol followed by high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis to determine the presence of parent ivermectin and its potential metabolites. The highest TRR concentrations (ivermectin equivalents) of 53, 45, and 44 ng/g (ppb) were obtained on postdose day 1 for HSB, LMB, and YP, respectively. The TRR depleted most slowly in HSB to 25 ppb at day 91, followed by YP to 19 ppb at day 42 and then by LMB to 22 ppb at day 35. The total residue of ivermectin and its metabolites by HPLC analysis followed the same depletion pattern in the three species. Additionally, the depletion rate of TRR of ³H-ivermectin in the three species followed the pattern bile > plasma > muscle. The results further indicate that one of the polar metabolites of ivermectin could serve as a potential marker residue as an indication of use, rather than the parent ivermectin.

  3. Crystal structure of human esterase D: a potential genetic marker of retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Li, Yang; Song, Gaojie; Zhang, David; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2009-07-10

    Retinoblastoma (RB), a carcinoma of the retina, is caused by mutations in the long arm of chromosome 13, band 13q14. The esterase D (ESD) gene maps at a similar location as the RB gene locus and therefore serves as a potential marker for the prognosis of retinoblastoma. Because very little is known about the structure and function of ESD, we determined the 3-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution using X-ray crystallography. ESD shows a single domain with an {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold. A number of insertions are observed in the canonical {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold. The active site is located in a positively charged, shallow cleft on the surface lined by a number of aromatic residues. Superimposition studies helped identify the typical catalytic triad residues -- Ser-153, His264, and Asp230 -- involved in catalysis. Mutagenesis of any of the catalytic triad residues to alanine abolished the enzyme activity. Backbone amides of Leu54 and Met150 are involved in the formation of the oxyanion hole. Interestingly, a M150A mutation increased the enzyme activity by 62%. The structure of human ESD determined in this study will aid the elucidation of the physiological role of the enzyme in the human body and will assist in the early diagnosis of retinoblastoma. Wu, D., Li, Y., Song, G., Zhang, D., Shaw, N., Liu, Z. J. Crystal structure of human esterase D: a potential genetic marker of retinoblastoma.

  4. Analysis of laser-microdissected prostate cancer tissues reveals potential tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Lindstrot, Andreas; Buettner, Reinhard; Wernert, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is a clinically heterogeneous and often multifocal disease with a clinical outcome difficult to predict. A deeper knowledge of the molecular basis of the disease may lead to a better prediction of prognosis. Therefore, in this study we investigated the molecular basis of PCA by identifying potential tumor markers in laser-microdisected PCA tissues. Among a group of PCA patients, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed to compare the expression of 70 genes. These genes were selected from the results of two microarrays which investigated the gene expression profile differences between moderately or poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma glands and the corresponding normal glands. Among the genes examined, CDKN2A, GATA3, CREBBP, ITGA2, NBL1 and TGM4 were down-regulated in the prostate carcinoma glands compared to the corresponding normal glands, whereas TFF3, TMPRSS2 and ERG were up-regulated. Our findings indicate that these genes may play roles as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in PCA, and may serve as potential tumor markers and novel therapeutic targets.

  5. Enhanced gastric retention of solid resin beads as a marker for emetic potential of agents in rats.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kentaro; Takagi, Kan; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Whereas nausea and emesis are burdensome side effects that lead to poor treatment compliance especially in chemotherapy, it is difficult to predict the emetic potential of agents in rats and mice because rodents do not vomit. We examined the effect of emetics on gastric retention and role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)3 receptor in chemotherapeutic-induced enhancement of gastric retention in rats. The gastric retention of solid material was determined using resin beads, which were suitable to beads made with metals or glasses in size, hardness and weight. Each rat was orally given distilled water (0.5 ml/rat) containing 40 resin beads via a plastic feeding tube. The stomach was removed at 1 hr post-dose and cut along the greater curvature under carbon dioxide anesthesia. Beads were given immediately after administration of the drugs except with cisplatin, when there was a 1 hr delay. Cancer chemotherapeutics including cisplatin(0.1-3 mg/kg i.v.) and doxorubicin(0.3-10 mg/kg i.v.) and a nauseant, copper sulfate(1-30 mg/kg p.o.) enhanced gastric retention of beads. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently antagonized the enhanced gastric retention by cisplatin and doxorubicin. The copper sulfate-induced enhancement was also reversed by ondansetron. Our results suggest that 5-HT3 receptors mediate the cancer chemotherapeutic-enhanced gastric retention of solid material in rats. This implicates that the gastric retention of solid material is a useful marker to predict the potential of compounds to induce nausea and/or emesis in non-vomiting rodents. PMID:22687994

  6. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers: A potential resource for studies in plant molecular biology1

    PubMed Central

    Robarts, Daniel W. H.; Wolfe, Andrea D.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, many investigations in the field of plant biology have employed selectively neutral, multilocus, dominant markers such as inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to address hypotheses at lower taxonomic levels. More recently, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers have been developed, which are used to amplify coding regions of DNA with primers targeting open reading frames. These markers have proven to be robust and highly variable, on par with AFLP, and are attained through a significantly less technically demanding process. SRAP markers have been used primarily for agronomic and horticultural purposes, developing quantitative trait loci in advanced hybrids and assessing genetic diversity of large germplasm collections. Here, we suggest that SRAP markers should be employed for research addressing hypotheses in plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and beyond. We provide an overview of the SRAP literature to date, review descriptive statistics of SRAP markers in a subset of 171 publications, and present relevant case studies to demonstrate the applicability of SRAP markers to the diverse field of plant biology. Results of these selected works indicate that SRAP markers have the potential to enhance the current suite of molecular tools in a diversity of fields by providing an easy-to-use, highly variable marker with inherent biological significance. PMID:25202637

  7. Trehalose as an indicator of desiccation stress in Drosophila melanogaster larvae: A potential marker of anhydrobiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Thorat, Leena J.; Gaikwad, Sushama M.; Nath, Bimalendu B.

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report confirming anhydrobiosis in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis and accumulation in larvae that hydrolyzed on rehydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis in concert with the enzymes involved in trehalose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of trehalose hydrolysis in presence of a specific trehalase inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose proposed as a reliable marker for biomonitoring of climate change studies. -- Abstract: In the current scenario of global climate change, desiccation is considered as one of the major environmental stressors for the biota exposed to altered levels of ambient temperature and humidity. Drosophila melanogaster, a cosmopolitan terrestrial insect has been chosen as a humidity-sensitive bioindicator model for the present study since its habitat undergoes frequent stochastic and/or seasonally aggravated dehydration regimes. We report here for the first time the occurrence of anhydrobiosis in D. melanogaster larvae by subjecting them to desiccation stress under laboratory conditions. Larvae desiccated for ten hours at <5% relative humidity could enter anhydrobiosis and could revive upon rehydration followed by resumption of active metabolism. As revealed by FTIR and HPLC analyzes, our findings strongly indicated the synthesis and accumulation of trehalose in the desiccating larvae. Biochemical measurements pointed out the desiccation-responsive trehalose metabolic pathway that was found to be coordinated in concert with the enzymes trehalose 6-phosphate synthase and trehalase. Further, an inhibitor-based experimental approach using deoxynojirimycin, a specific trehalase inhibitor, demonstrated the pivotal role of trehalose in larval anhydrobiosis of D. melanogaster. We therefore propose trehalose as a potential marker for the assessment of anhydrobiosis in Drosophila. The present findings thus add

  8. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers.

  9. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers. PMID:27455559

  10. Differentially expressed genes in human peripheral blood as potential markers for statin response.

    PubMed

    Won, Hong-Hee; Kim, Suk Ran; Bang, Oh Young; Lee, Sang-Chol; Huh, Wooseong; Ko, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyung-Gun; McLeod, Howard L; O'Connell, Thomas M; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2012-02-01

    There is a considerable inter-individual variation in response to statin therapy and one third of patients do not meet their treatment goals. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes that might be involved in the effects of statin treatment and to suggest potential markers to guide statin therapy. Forty-six healthy Korean subjects received atorvastatin; their whole-genome expression profiles in peripheral blood were analyzed before and after atorvastatin administration in relation with changes in lipid profiles. The expression patterns of the differentially expressed genes were also compared with the data of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients and controls. Pairwise comparison analyses revealed differentially expressed genes involved in diverse biological processes and molecular functions related with immune responses. Atorvastain mainly affected antigen binding, immune or inflammatory response including interleukin pathways. Similar expression patterns of the genes were observed in patients with FH and controls. The Charcol-Leyden crystal (CLC), CCR2, CX3CR1, LRRN3, FOS, LDLR, HLA-DRB1, ERMN, and TCN1 genes were significantly associated with cholesterol levels or statin response. Interestingly, the CLC gene, which was significantly altered by atorvastatin administration and differentially expressed between FH patients and controls, showed much bigger change in high-responsive group than in low-responsive group. We identified differentially expressed genes that might be involved in mechanisms underlying the known pleiotropic effects of atorvastatin, baseline cholesterol levels, and drug response. Our findings suggest CLC as a new candidate marker for statin response, and further validation is needed.

  11. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients. PMID:27599779

  12. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-02-29

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo.

  13. Analysis of water soluble polysaccharides as a potential chemotaxonomic marker for landraces in Bixa orellana.

    PubMed

    Parimalan, Rangan; Mahendranath, Gondi; Giridhar, Parvatam

    2014-02-01

    Annatto tree (Bixa orellana L.) is native to Brazil and is now under cultivation in many parts of world for its reddish orange 'annatto' dye. There are three types of landraces in annatto and they are distinguished based on fruit shape i.e., ovate, conical and hemispherical, whose pigment yield differs. Since annatto pigment yield varies with landrace, it is necessary to characterize markers towards the identification of landraces. In this study, we characterized water soluble polysaccharides (WSP) of twigs from three landraces using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier-transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas liquid chromatography (GLC) for their potential use as chemotaxonomic markers to distinguish the landraces. GLC analysis on WSP showed hemispherical type contained 38% rhamnose, while conical and ovate types contained 17% and 34% glucose, respectively. Thus, glucose and rhamnose content of WSP could be used to distinguish the three landraces. Further, differences in calculated molecular weight as revealed by SEC (281.8, 151.3 and 79.4 kDa for conical, hemispherical and ovate types, respectively) could also be used to distinguish the three landraces. PMID:24791421

  14. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  15. Marine-continental tephra correlations (Pantelleria, Italy, and Ionian Basin): the potential for Mediterranean marker horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Palaeo-environmental records from marine and terrestrial archives in the Mediterranean show broad-scale and millennial-scale climatic changes. Synchronising these records requires robust chronological control which may be achieved using isochronous tephra marker horizons. These need to be widespread and sufficiently unique in chemistry to be distinguished from each other. Pantelleria volcano, Italy, satisfies these criteria, with eruptions blanketing the Mediterranean Sea and being distinct from every other volcano in the region. This peralkaline volcano is already well-known for its 46 ka marker horizon (Y-6) but there is potential for extending correlations further back in time. Until recently, correlations were limited by scarce onshore glass data and few sediment cores covering sufficiently long time periods to compare with Pantelleria's >200 ka explosive volcanic history. Building on recent work that has established a detailed onshore stratigraphy, glass data are presented from Pantelleria and site 964 of ODP leg 160 which is situated ~400 km downwind from the volcano. New correlations can be established and previous suggestions are discussed in the light of this new data, representing a significant step forward in confident marine-continental tephra correlations.

  16. Comparative study of frequency of micronuclei in normal, potentially malignant diseases and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sangle, Varsha Ajit; Bijjaragi, Shobha; Shah, Nishat; Kangane, Suresh; Ghule, Hrishikesh M.; Rani, SR Ashwini

    2016-01-01

    Context: The assessment of micronuclei (MN) in exfoliated oral epithelial cells is a promising tool for the study of epithelial carcinogens and can be used to detect chromosome breakage or mitotic interference, thought to be relevant to carcinogenesis. Aims: To detect MN in exfoliated oral mucosal cells in individuals using various tobacco forms and also to detect frequency of MN in premalignant lesions and conditions (potentially malignant diseases [PMD's]) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). To correlate frequency of MN in oral exfoliated cells in clinically diagnosed cases of OSCC followed by a histopathological grading. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 subjects (30 smokeless tobacco users, 30 smokers and 30 nontobacco users) consisted of clinically diagnosed cases of PMD's and OSCC were selected for the study. Cytosmears from the groups were stained with rapid Papanicolaou stain. MN was identified according to the Tolbert et al. criteria. Results: MN cells were found to be significantly higher in smokeless tobacco users than in smokers. The frequency of MN was three to four times higher in patients with OSCC as compared to patients in PMD's (P < 0.0001). The frequency of MN correlated with the histopathological grade was statistically significant. Conclusion: MN index can be used as a biomarker/screening test among the high-risk groups particularly the smokeless tobacco users and PMD's. MN can be a candidate to serve as a biomarker for prediction of the grade of OSCC. PMID:27003966

  17. Preliminary analysis of salivary microbiome and their potential roles in oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Lu, Wenxin; Tu, Qichao; Ge, Yichen; He, Jinzhi; Zhou, Yu; Gou, Yaping; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Qin, Yujia; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Yan; Xiao, Liying; Zhou, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored the origin and development mechanism of oral lichen planus (OLP) with limited attention to the role of bacteria in the progression of this common oral disease. Here we utilized MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to identify complex oral microbiota associated with OLP from saliva samples of two subtypes (reticular and erosive) of OLP patients and healthy controls. Our analyses indicated that the overall structure of the salivary microbiome was not significantly affected by disease status. However, we did observe evident variations in abundance for several taxonomic groups in OLP. Porphyromonas and Solobacterium showed significantly higher relative abundances, whereas Haemophilus, Corynebacterium, Cellulosimicrobium and Campylobacter showed lower abundances in OLP patients, as compared with healthy controls. In addition, we explored specific microbial co-occurrence patterns in OLP, and revealed significantly fewer linkers of Streptococcus comprising species in erosive OLP. Furthermore, the disease severity and immune dysregulation were also genus-associated, including with Porphyromonas that correlated to disease scores and salivary levels of interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23. Overall, this study provides a general description of oral microbiome in OLP, and it will be useful for further investigation of their potential roles in the initiation and immune modulation of OLP. PMID:26961389

  18. Corpus Callosum Pathology as a Potential Surrogate Marker of Cognitive Impairment in Diffuse Axonal Injury.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Shiho; Ueda, Keita; Sugihara, Genichi; Yassin, Walid; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is a major form of traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychological assessments and high-resolution structural MRI were conducted using T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. This study included 10 patients with diffuse axonal injury (all men, mean age 30.8±10.5 years) and 12 age- and sex-matched normal control participants. Patients with diffuse axonal injury had widespread volume reductions and lower fractional anisotropy in the corpus callosum (CC) compared with controls. Furthermore, cognitive processing speed was associated with reductions in white matter volume and fractional anisotropy in the CC. These findings suggest that CC pathology may be a potential surrogate marker of the cognitive deficits in these patients. PMID:26569151

  19. The fenestrin antigen in submembrane skeleton of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is proposed as a marker of cell polarity during cell division and in oral replacement.

    PubMed

    Kaczanowska, Janina; Joachimiak, Ewa; Kiersnowska, Mauryla; Krzywicka, Anna; Golinska, Krystyna; Kaczanowski, Andrzej

    2003-07-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila cells have two types of polarized morphogenesis: divisional morphogenesis and oral reorganization (OR). The aim of this research is the analysis of cortical patterns of immunostaining during cell division and in OR using previously characterized antibodies against fenestrin and epiplasm B proteins. During cell division, the anarchic field of basal body proliferation of the new developing oral apparatus (AF) showed concomitant strong binding of the fenestrin antigen and withdrawal of a signal of the epiplasm B antigen. At a specific stage, the fenestrin antigen also appeared as a character of the anterior cortex pole, with a co-localized decrease in the detected epiplasm B antigen. The fenestrin antigen also showed a polarity of duplicating basal bodies in ciliary rows. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling experiments were performed in the absence and presence of an inhibitor of activity of serine/threonine kinases, 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) as an inducer of the oral replacement process. In the presence of 6-DMAP, one class of cells started OR, and some others were trapped and affected in cell division. Both types of cells showed an instability of oral structures and formed enlarged primordial oral fields. These anarchic fields (AFs) bind the fenestrin antigen, with disappearance of epiplasmic antigen staining. Only one protein (about 64 kDa) is detected in western blots by the anti-fenestrin antibody and it accumulated in 6-DMAP-treated cells that are involved in uncompleted morphogenetic activity. At a defined stage of oral development, both during cell division and in OR, the fenestrin antigen served as a marker of polarity of the cell of the anterior pole character.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus oris J-1, a Potential Probiotic Isolated from the Human Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli can exert health-promoting effects in the human oral microbiome through many mechanisms, including pathogen inhibition, maintenance of microbial balance, immunomodulation, and enhancement of the epithelial barrier function. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a potential probiotic, Lactobacillus oris J-1, that was isolated from the oral cavity of a health child. PMID:27634996

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus oris J-1, a Potential Probiotic Isolated from the Human Oral Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli can exert health-promoting effects in the human oral microbiome through many mechanisms, including pathogen inhibition, maintenance of microbial balance, immunomodulation, and enhancement of the epithelial barrier function. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a potential probiotic, Lactobacillus oris J-1, that was isolated from the oral cavity of a health child. PMID:27634996

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus oris J-1, a Potential Probiotic Isolated from the Human Oral Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli can exert health-promoting effects in the human oral microbiome through many mechanisms, including pathogen inhibition, maintenance of microbial balance, immunomodulation, and enhancement of the epithelial barrier function. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a potential probiotic, Lactobacillus oris J-1, that was isolated from the oral cavity of a health child.

  3. Endocrine markers for identifying prolificacy potential and predicting fetal number in goats.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Avijit; Pal, Saumen K; Chakraborty, Sandip; Hazorika, Mausumi; Pan, Subhransu; Majumdar, Debasis; Biswas, Chanchal K; Patra, Aditi; Mirmahmoudi, Rouhollah; Prakash, Bukkaaraya S

    2013-07-01

    Identifying prolificacy potential and determination of fetal number during pregnancy for proper care and management of the pregnant goats bearing multiple fetuses and achieving the benefits out of multiple births are essential for sustainable goat farming. Our objectives were (1) to examine prolificacy potential in goats by using pituitary response to gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge test, (2) to investigate hormonal profiles for the prediction of fetal number in pregnant goats and (3) to find out the most reliable timing of blood sampling for discriminating prolificacy trait and differentiating the goats bearing single, twin and triplet fetuses. In first experiment (GnRH challenge test), plasma FSH concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.01) among the goats belonging to triplet vs. twin vs. single kidding size groups after GnRH administration. Multivariate stepwise discriminant function analysis recognized that one blood sampling at 220min after GnRH administration can be used to distinguish prolificacy potential in goats. In second experiment, plasma progesterone levels were significantly higher (P<0.01) in goats bearing triplet vs. twin vs. single fetus between day 84 and 21 prior to parturition. Plasma estrone sulphate concentrations were found to be higher (P<0.05) in does bearing multiple fetuses than the does bearing single fetus between day 126 and 28 prior to parturition. A single blood sampling at day 63 prior to parturition was the most probable suitable time for discriminating kidding size by using plasma progesterone as marker. PMID:23787106

  4. Evaluation of Potential Clinical Surrogate Markers of a Trauma Induced Alteration of Clotting Factor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Payas, Arzu; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Wegner, Alexander; Kauther, Max Daniel; Lendemans, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify routinely available clinical surrogate markers for potential clotting factor alterations following multiple trauma. Methods. In 68 patients admitted directly from the scene of the accident, all soluble clotting factors were analyzed and clinical data was collected prospectively. Ten healthy subjects served as control group. Results. Patients showed reduced activities of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X and calcium levels (all P < 0.0001 to 0.01). Levels of hemoglobin and base deficit correlated moderately to highly with the activities of a number of clotting factors. Nonsurvivors and patients who needed preclinical intubation or hemostatic therapy showed significantly reduced factor activities at admission. In contrast, factor VIII activity was markedly elevated after injury in general (P < 0.0001), but reduced in nonsurvivors (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Multiple trauma causes an early reduction of the activities of nearly all soluble clotting factors in general. Initial hemoglobin and, with certain qualifications, base deficit levels demonstrated a potential value in detecting those underlying clotting factor deficiencies. Nevertheless, their role as triggers of a hemostatic therapy as well as the observed response of factor VIII to multiple trauma and also its potential prognostic value needs further evaluation. PMID:27433474

  5. Inhaled vs. oral alprazolam: subjective, behavioral and cognitive effects, and modestly increased abuse potential

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Chad J.; Harrison, Joseph A.; Carter, Lawrence P.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Infrahuman and human studies suggest that a determinant of the abuse potential of a drug is rate of onset of subjective effects. Objectives This study sought to determine if the rate of onset of subjective effects and abuse potential of alprazolam would be increased when administered via inhalation vs. the oral route. Methods Placebo, inhaled alprazolam (0.5, 1, 2 mg), and oral alprazolam (1, 2, 4 mg) were administered under double-blind, double-dummy conditions using a cross-over design in 14 healthy participants with histories of drug abuse. Participant and observer ratings, and behavioral and cognitive performance measures were assessed repeatedly during 9 hour sessions. Results Both routes of administration produced orderly dose and time-related effects, with higher doses producing greater and longer lasting effects. Onset of subjective effects following inhaled alprazolam was very rapid (e.g., 2 vs. 49 minutes after 2 mg inhaled vs. oral). On measures of abuse potential (e.g., liking and good effects), inhaled alprazolam was more potent, as evidenced by a leftward shift in the dose response curve. Despite the potency difference, at the highest doses, peak ratings of subjective effects related to abuse potential (e.g., “drug liking”) were similar across the two routes. On other measures (e.g., sedation and performance) the routes were equipotent. Conclusions The inhaled route of administration modestly increased the abuse potential of alprazolam despite significantly increasing its rate of onset. If marketed, the reduced availability and increased cost of inhaled alprazolam may render the societal risk of increased abuse to be low. PMID:25199955

  6. Prevalence of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions among tobacco users in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Attas, Safia Ali; Ibrahim, Suzan Seif; Amer, Hala Abbas; Darwish, Zeinab El-Said; Hassan, Mona Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is recognized as a health problem worldwide and there is an established tobacco epidemic in Saudi Arabia as in many other countries, with tobacco users at increased risk of developing many diseases. This cross sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal, potentially malignant or malignant, lesions associated with tobacco use among a stratified cluster sample of adults in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A sample size of 599 was collected and each participant underwent clinical conventional oral examination and filled a questionnaire providing information on demographics, tobacco use and other relevant habits. The most common form of tobacco used was cigarette smoking (65.6 %) followed by Shisha or Moasel (38.1%), while chewing tobacco, betel nuts and gat accounted for 21-2%, 7.7%, and 5% respectively. A high prevalence (88.8%) of soft tissue lesions was found among the tobacco users examined, and a wide range of lesions were detected, about 50% having hairy tongue, 36% smoker's melanosis, 28.9% stomatitis nicotina, 27% frictional keratosis, 26.7% fissured tongue, 26% gingival or periodontal inflammation and finally 20% leukodema. Suspicious potentially malignant lesions affected 10.5% of the subjects, most prevalent being keratosis (6.3%), leukoplakia (2.3%), erythroplakia (0.7%), oral submucous fibrosis (0.5%) and lichenoid lesions (0.4%), these being associated with male gender, lower level of education, presence of diabetes and a chewing tobacco habit. It is concluded that smoking was associated with a wide range of oral mucosal lesions , those suspicious for malignancy being linked with chewable forms, indicating serious effects.

  7. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Montzka, Katrin; Lassonczyk, Nina; Tschöke, Beate; Neuss, Sabine; Führmann, Tobias; Franzen, Rachelle; Smeets, Ralf; Brook, Gary A; Wöltje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b) are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP) could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as well as contributing to the

  8. Novel mucus-penetrating liposomes as a potential oral drug delivery system: preparation, in vitro characterization, and enhanced cellular uptake

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuying; Chen, Dan; Le, Chaoyi; Zhu, Chunliu; Gan, Yong; Hovgaard, Lars; Yang, Mingshi

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal mucus-penetrating properties and intestinal cellular uptake of two types of liposomes modified by Pluronic F127 (PF127). Methods The two types of liposomes, ie, PF127-inlaid liposomes and PF127-adsorbed liposomes, were prepared by a thin-film hydration method followed by extrusion, in which coumarin 6 was loaded as a fluorescence marker. A modified Franz diffusion cell mounted with the intestinal mucus of rats was used to study the diffusion characteristics of the two types of PF127 liposomes. Cell uptake studies were conducted in Caco-2 cells and analyzed using confocal laser scanning microcopy as well as flow cytometry. Results The diffusion efficiency of the two types of PF127-modified liposomes through intestinal rat mucus was 5–7-fold higher than that of unmodified liposomes. Compared with unmodified liposomes, PF127-inlaid liposomes showed significantly higher cellular uptake of courmarin 6. PF127-adsorbed liposomes showed a lower cellular uptake. Moreover, and interestingly, the two types of PF127-modified liposomes showed different cellular uptake mechanisms in Caco-2 cells. Conclusion PF127-inlaid liposomes with improved intestinal mucus-penetrating ability and enhanced cellular uptake might be a potential carrier candidate for oral drug delivery. PMID:22163166

  9. SMAD4 is a potential prognostic marker in human breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-nan; Xi, Yue; Callaghan, Michael U.; Fribley, Andrew; Moore-Smith, Lakisha; Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Pasche, Boris

    2014-01-01

    SMAD4 is a downstream mediator of transforming growth factor beta. While its tumor suppressor function has been investigated as a prognostic biomarker in several human malignancies, its role as a prognostic marker in breast carcinoma is still undefined. We investigated SMAD4 expression in breast carcinoma samples of different histologic grades to evaluate the association between SMAD4 and outcome in breast cancer. We also investigated the role of SMAD4 expression status in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells in responding to TGF-β stimulation. SMAD4 expression was assessed in 53 breast ductal carcinoma samples and in the surrounding normal tissue from 50 of the samples using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR. TGF-β-SMAD and non-SMAD signaling was assessed by Western blot in MDA-MB-468 cells with and without SMAD4 restoration. SMAD4 expression was reduced in ductal breast carcinoma as compared to surrounding uninvolved ductal breast epithelia (p <0.05). SMAD4 expression levels decreased from Grade 1 to Grade 3 ductal breast carcinoma as assessed by immunohistochemistry (p <0.05). Results were recapitulated by tissue array. In addition, immunohistochemistry results were further confirmed at the protein and mRNA level. We then found that non-SMAD MEK/MAPK signaling was significantly different between SMAD4 expressing MDA-MB-468 cells and SMAD4-null MDA-MB-468 cells. This is the first study indicating that SMAD4 plays a key role in shifting MAPK signaling. Further, we have demonstrated that SMAD4 has a potential role in the development of breast carcinoma and SMAD4 was a potential prognostic marker of breast carcinoma. Our findings further support the role of SMAD4 in breast carcinoma development. In addition, we observed an inverse relationship between SMAD4 levels and breast carcinoma histological grade. Our finding indicated that SMAD4 expression level in breast cancer cells played a role in responding non-SMAD signaling but not the canonic SMAD

  10. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 as an early potential diagnostic marker for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaeho; Lee, Hye-Ja; Song, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang Ick; Kim, Hyunyoung

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in individuals over 65 years old. However, to date, no useful early diagnostic markers for AD have been discovered. We examined the utility of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a potential biomarker for AD in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD, as well as in nondemented healthy controls. Plasma PAI-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in samples collected from 76 patients with MCI, 74 patients with AD, and 76 healthy controls. Our results show that plasma PAI-1 levels gradually increased as dementia progressed. The mean levels of plasma PAI-1 in patients with MCI and AD patients were significantly higher than those of in healthy controls. Consistently, neuropsychological examination (e.g., MMSE, CDR) also demonstrated significant correlations between the plasma PAI-1 levels and cognitive function. In conclusion, the level of plasma PAI-1 is a potential biomarker for the early detection and diagnosis of AD.

  11. Sustained attention deficits in relation to psychometrically identified schizotypy: evaluating a potential endophenotypic marker.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Diane C; Matts, Christie W; Rollmann, Elizabeth A

    2006-02-15

    Sustained attention deficits have been posited as a potential endophenotypic marker of vulnerability to schizophrenia. Prior studies have indicated that schizophrenia patients, their first-degree relatives, and psychosis-prone individuals, identified on the basis of measures of positive schizotypy, have demonstrated sustained attention deficits. To date, there have been no published reports of sustained attention deficits in individuals with negative schizotypy, as measured by the revised Social Anhedonia Scale. In this study, we examined sustained attention, measured with the CPT-Identical Pairs version, in 160 individuals with elevated scores on the Chapman Perceptual Aberration and/or Magical Ideation Scales, 96 individuals with elevated scales on the Social Anhedonia Scale, and 137 controls. Both psychosis-prone groups performed more poorly than the controls in terms of discrimination ability, as measured by d', though the groups did not differ in terms of either their reaction time or overall response criterion (lnbeta). These results provide evidence that both positive and negative aspects of schizotypy are associated with sustained attention deficits, as measured by the Continuous Performance Test. The findings add to the converging evidence indicating that sustained attention deficits are a potential endophenotypic indicator of a schizophrenia diathesis.

  12. Genetic variants in DNA repair genes as potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin chemotherapy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kap, E J; Seibold, P; Richter, S; Scherer, D; Habermann, N; Balavarca, Y; Jansen, L; Becker, N; Pfütze, K; Popanda, O; Hoffmeister, M; Ulrich, A; Benner, A; Ulrich, C M; Burwinkel, B; Brenner, H; Chang-Claude, J

    2015-12-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy exerts its effects through generating DNA damage. Hence, genetic variants in DNA repair pathways could modulate treatment response. We used a prospective cohort of 623 colorectal cancer patients with stage II-IV disease treated with adjuvant/palliative chemotherapy to comprehensively investigate 1727 genetic variants in the DNA repair pathways as potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associations with overall survival and recurrence-free survival were assessed using a Cox regression model. Pathway analysis was performed using the gamma method. Patients carrying variant alleles of rs3783819 (MNAT1) and rs1043953 (XPC) experienced a longer overall survival after treatment with oxaliplatin than patients who did not carry the variant allele, while the opposite association was found in patients who were not treated with oxaliplatin (false discovery rate-adjusted P-values for heterogeneity 0.0047 and 0.0237, respectively). The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway was found to be most likely associated with overall survival in patients who received oxaliplatin (P-value=0.002). Our data show that genetic variants in the NER pathway are potentially predictive of treatment response to oxaliplatin.

  13. Molecular markers and imaging tools to identify malignant potential in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Due to its rapidly rising incidence and high mortality, esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major public health concern, particularly in Western countries. The steps involved in the progression from its predisposing condition, gastroesophageal reflux disease, to its premalignant disorder, Barrett’s esophagus, and to cancer, are incompletely understood. Current screening and surveillance methods are limited by the lack of population-wide utility, incomplete sampling of standard biopsies, and subjectivity of evaluation. Advances in endoscopic ablation have raised the hope of effective therapy for eradication of high-risk Barrett’s lesions, but improvements are needed in determining when to apply this treatment and how to follow patients clinically. Researchers have evaluated numerous potential molecular biomarkers with the goal of detecting dysplasia, with varying degrees of success. The combination of biomarker panels with epidemiologic risk factors to yield clinical risk scoring systems is promising. New approaches to sample tissue may also be combined with these biomarkers for less invasive screening and surveillance. The development of novel endoscopic imaging tools in recent years has the potential to markedly improve detection of small foci of dysplasia in vivo. Current and future efforts will aim to determine the combination of markers and imaging modalities that will most effectively improve the rate of early detection of high-risk lesions in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25400987

  14. The anti-tubercular drug delamanid as a potential oral treatment for visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Stephen; Wyllie, Susan; Norval, Suzanne; Stojanovski, Laste; Simeons, Frederick RC; Auer, Jennifer L; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Read, Kevin D; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent requirement for safe, oral and cost-effective drugs for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). We report that delamanid (OPC-67683), an approved drug for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, is a potent inhibitor of Leishmania donovani both in vitro and in vivo. Twice-daily oral dosing of delamanid at 30 mg kg-1 for 5 days resulted in sterile cures in a mouse model of VL. Treatment with lower doses revealed a U-shaped (hormetic) dose-response curve with greater parasite suppression at 1 mg kg-1 than at 3 mg kg-1 (5 or 10 day dosing). Dosing delamanid for 10 days confirmed the hormetic dose-response and improved the efficacy at all doses investigated. Mechanistic studies reveal that delamanid is rapidly metabolised by parasites via an enzyme, distinct from the nitroreductase that activates fexinidazole. Delamanid has the potential to be repurposed as a much-needed oral therapy for VL. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09744.001 PMID:27215734

  15. Identification and evaluation of potential forensic marker proteins in vaginal fluid by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Igoh, Akihisa; Doi, Yusuke; Sakurada, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal fluid is one of the most common body fluids found at crime scenes. Discriminating vaginal fluid from other body fluids is important in forensic science; however, few potential protein markers have been reported to date. Proteomic methods for identifying protein markers have gained attention, although few reports have applied this technology to forensic protein markers. Therefore, to identify characteristic vaginal proteins, we examined various body fluids (nasal secretions, saliva, urine, semen, vaginal fluids, and sweat) using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting. We identified three components (average molecular mass values 17,237 ± 2, 18,063 ± 2, and 15,075 ± 1) detectable only in vaginal samples: two human small proline-rich protein 3 (SPRR3) isoforms and a human fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) with an acetylated (+42) N-terminal region lacking the initiator methionine residue (-131). Using ELISA, these yielded markedly high average values in vaginal fluids. The mass spectra of these proteins were not detected in infant saliva but were detected in the vaginal fluid throughout the menstrual cycle. The results of forensic analysis (detection limit, mixed body fluid samples, casework samples, and blind samples) suggest that these proteins are potential forensic markers. In conclusion, high SPRR3 and FABP5 expression levels, which may be used as potential markers for vaginal fluid identification in forensic science, were detected in vaginal fluids from healthy adults.

  16. Potentials and Limitations of Guiding Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Set-Up on Liver-Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderink, Wouter; Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Boer, Hans de; Levendag, Peter; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated the potentials and limitations of guiding liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) set-up on liver-implanted fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing compression-supported SBRT in a stereotactic body frame received fluoroscopy at treatment preparation and before each treatment fraction. In fluoroscopic videos we localized the markers and diaphragm tip at expiration and the spine (measurements on free-breathing and abdominal compression). Day-to-day displacements, rotations (markers only), and deformations were determined. Marker guidance was compared to conventional set-up strategies in treatment set-up simulations. Results: For compression, day-to-day motion of markers with respect to their centers of mass (COM) was {sigma} = 0.9 mm (random error SD), {Sigma} = 0.4 mm (systematic error SD), and <2.1 mm (maximum). Consequently, assuming that markers were closely surrounding spherical tumors, marker COM-guided set-up would have required safety margins of {approx}2 mm. Using marker COM as the gold standard, other set-up methods (using no correction, spine registration, and diaphragm tip craniocaudal registration) resulted in set-up errors of 1.4 mm < {sigma} < 2.8 mm, 2.6 mm < {Sigma} < 5.1 mm, and 6.3 mm < max < 12.4 mm. Day-to-day intermarker motion of <16.7%, 2.2% median, and rotations between 3.5{sup o} and 7.2{sup o} were observed. For markers not surrounding the tumor, e.g., 5 cm between respective COMs, these changes could effect residual tumor set-up errors up to 8.4 mm, 1.1 mm median (deformations), and 3.1 mm to 6.3 mm (rotations). Compression did not systematically contribute to deformations and rotations, since similar results were observed for free-breathing. Conclusions: If markers can be implanted near and around the tumor, residual set-up errors by marker guidance are small compared to those of conventional set-up methods, allowing high-precision tumor radiation set-up. However, substantial

  17. A hierarchy of event-related potential markers of auditory processing in disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Beukema, Steve; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Finoia, Paola; Kamau, Evelyn; Allanson, Judith; Chennu, Srivas; Gibson, Raechelle M; Pickard, John D; Owen, Adrian M; Cruse, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging of covert perceptual and cognitive processes can inform the diagnoses and prognoses of patients with disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states (VS;MCS). Here we report an event-related potential (ERP) paradigm for detecting a hierarchy of auditory processes in a group of healthy individuals and patients with disorders of consciousness. Simple cortical responses to sounds were observed in all 16 patients; 7/16 (44%) patients exhibited markers of the differential processing of speech and noise; and 1 patient produced evidence of the semantic processing of speech (i.e. the N400 effect). In several patients, the level of auditory processing that was evident from ERPs was higher than the abilities that were evident from behavioural assessment, indicating a greater sensitivity of ERPs in some cases. However, there were no differences in auditory processing between VS and MCS patient groups, indicating a lack of diagnostic specificity for this paradigm. Reliably detecting semantic processing by means of the N400 effect in passively listening single-subjects is a challenge. Multiple assessment methods are needed in order to fully characterise the abilities of patients with disorders of consciousness. PMID:27595064

  18. Assessment of volatile profile as potential marker of chilling injury of basil leaves during postharvest storage.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Rosaria; Pace, Bernardo; Cefola, Maria; Martignetti, Antonella; Stocchero, Matteo; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Giulio, Beatrice

    2016-12-15

    The volatile profile of three sweet basil cultivars, "Italico a foglia larga", "Cammeo" and "Italiano classico", packaged in air at 4 or 12°C until 9days, was monitored by solid phase microextraction with GC-MS. Chilling injury (CI) score and electrolyte leakage were also assessed. In total, 71 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified in the headspace of basil samples. A preliminary principal component analysis highlighted the dominant effect of the cultivar on VOCs profiles. Data analysis by post-transformation of projection to latent structures regression (ptPLS2) clarified the role played by time and temperature of storage. Temperature influenced the emission of volatiles during storage, with much lower total volatile emissions at 4°C compared to 12°C. Finally, a ptPLS2 regression model performed on VOCs and the two CI parameters allowed selection of 10 metabolites inversely correlated to both CI parameters, which can be considered potential markers of CI in basil leaves. PMID:27451192

  19. Gpnmb Is a Potential Marker for the Visceral Pathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aten, Jan; van Roomen, Cindy P. A. A.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Claessen, Nike; Alfonso, Pilar; Irún, Pilar; Giraldo, Pilar; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; van Eijk, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Impaired function of NPC1 or NPC2 lysosomal proteins leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol, the primary defect underlying Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease. In addition, glycosphingolipids (GSLs) accumulate in lysosomes as well. Intralysosomal lipid accumulation triggers the activation of a set of genes, including potential biomarkers. Transcript levels of Gpnmb have been shown to be elevated in various tissues of an NPC mouse model. We speculated that Gpnmb could serve as a marker for visceral lipid accumulation in NPC disease. We report that Gpnmb expression is increased at protein level in macrophages in the viscera of Npc1nih/nih mice. Interestingly, soluble Gpnmb was also found to be increased in murine and NPC patient plasma. Exposure of RAW264.7 macrophages to the NPC-phenotype-inducing drug U18666A also upregulated Gpnmb expression. Inhibition of GSL synthesis with the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor N-butyl-1-deoxynojirimycin prevented U18666A-induced Gpnmb induction and secretion. In summary, we show that Gpnmb is upregulated in NPC mice and patients, most likely due to GSL accumulation. PMID:26771826

  20. Gpnmb Is a Potential Marker for the Visceral Pathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    PubMed

    Marques, André R A; Gabriel, Tanit L; Aten, Jan; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Claessen, Nike; Alfonso, Pilar; Irún, Pilar; Giraldo, Pilar; Aerts, Johannes M F G; van Eijk, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Impaired function of NPC1 or NPC2 lysosomal proteins leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol, the primary defect underlying Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease. In addition, glycosphingolipids (GSLs) accumulate in lysosomes as well. Intralysosomal lipid accumulation triggers the activation of a set of genes, including potential biomarkers. Transcript levels of Gpnmb have been shown to be elevated in various tissues of an NPC mouse model. We speculated that Gpnmb could serve as a marker for visceral lipid accumulation in NPC disease. We report that Gpnmb expression is increased at protein level in macrophages in the viscera of Npc1nih/nih mice. Interestingly, soluble Gpnmb was also found to be increased in murine and NPC patient plasma. Exposure of RAW264.7 macrophages to the NPC-phenotype-inducing drug U18666A also upregulated Gpnmb expression. Inhibition of GSL synthesis with the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor N-butyl-1-deoxynojirimycin prevented U18666A-induced Gpnmb induction and secretion. In summary, we show that Gpnmb is upregulated in NPC mice and patients, most likely due to GSL accumulation. PMID:26771826

  1. Event-related potential markers of brain changes in preclinical familial Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Ally, B.A.; Celone, K.; McKeever, J.; Ruiz-Rizzo, A.L.; Lopera, F.; Stern, C.E.; Budson, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Event-related potentials (ERPs) can reflect differences in brain electrophysiology underlying cognitive functions in brain disorders such as dementia and mild cognitive impairment. To identify individuals at risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) we used high-density ERPs to examine brain physiology in young presymptomatic individuals (average age 34.2 years) who carry the E280A mutation in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene and will go on to develop AD around the age of 45. Methods: Twenty-one subjects from a Colombian population with familial AD participated: 10 presymptomatic subjects positive for the PSEN1 mutation (carriers) and 11 siblings without the mutation (controls). Subjects performed a visual recognition memory test while 128-channel ERPs were recorded. Results: Despite identical behavioral performance, PSEN1 mutation carriers showed less positivity in frontal regions and more positivity in occipital regions, compared to controls. These differences were more pronounced during the 200–300 msec period. Discriminant analysis at this time interval showed promising sensitivity (72.7%) and specificity (81.8%) of the ERP measures to predict the presence of AD pathology. Conclusions: Presymptomatic PSEN1 mutation carriers show changes in brain physiology that can be detected by high-density ERPs. The relative differences observed showing greater frontal positivity in controls and greater occipital positivity in carriers indicates that control subjects may use frontally mediated processes to distinguish between studied and unstudied visual items, whereas carriers appear to rely more upon perceptual details of the items to distinguish between them. These findings also demonstrate the potential usefulness of ERP brain correlates as preclinical markers of AD. PMID:21775732

  2. Vitamin D receptor expression is linked to potential markers of human thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Izkhakov, Elena; Somjen, Dalia; Sharon, Orli; Knoll, Esther; Aizic, Asaf; Fliss, Dan M; Limor, Rona; Stern, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Genes regulated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been screened as potential markers of malignant thyroid nodules. The mRNA expression levels of two of them, the ECM protein-1 (ECM1) and the type II transmembrane serine protease-4 (TMPRSS4), were shown to be an independent predictor of an existing thyroid carcinoma. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in epithelial cells of the normal thyroid gland, as well as in malignant dividing cells, which respond to the active metabolite of vitamin D by decreased proliferative activity in vitro. We evaluated the relationship between mRNA gene expressions of TMPRSS4, ECM1 and VDR in 21 papillary thyroid carcinoma samples and compared it to 21 normal thyroid tissues from the same patients. Gene expression was considered as up- or down-regulated if it varied by more or less than 2-fold in the cancer tissue relative to the normal thyroid tissue (Ca/N) from the same patient. We found an overall significant adjusted correlation between the mRNA expression ratio (ExR) of VDR and that of ECM1 in Ca/N thyroid tissue (R=0.648, P<0.001). There was a high ExR of VDR between Ca/N thyroid tissue from the same patient (3.06±2.9), which also exhibited a high Ca/N ExR of ECM1 and/or of TMPRSS4 (>2, P=0.05).The finding that increased VDR expression in human thyroid cancer cells is often linked to increased ECM1 and/or TPMRSS4 expression warrants further investigation into the potential role of vitamin D analogs in thyroid carcinoma.

  3. Global Gene Expression Profiling Reveals SPINK1 as a Potential Hepatocellular Carcinoma Marker

    PubMed Central

    Kutter, Claudia; Davies, Susan; Alexander, Graeme; Odom, Duncan T.

    2013-01-01

    potential as a diagnostic HCC marker and should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:23527199

  4. Evaluation of oral bioavailability and anticancer potential of raloxifene solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Battani, Somashekhar; Pawar, Harish; Suresh, Sarasija

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation was formulation of raloxifene loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (R-SLN) for oral administration and evaluation of its anticancer potential in 7,12- dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in Sprague-Dawley rats. Optimized R-SLN formulation prepared by modified micro-emulsion method resulted in R-SLN of 288.0±28.5 nm size and 95.56% entrapment efficiency. R-SLN exhibited in vitro prolonged release of raloxifene for 72 h in phosphate buffered saline. R-SLN was stable in simulated gastro-intestinal (GIT) fluids consisting of pH 1.2, pH 7.4, simulated gastric fluid and simulated intestinal fluid. A two-fold increase was observed in raloxifene oral bioavailability from R-SLN. R-SLN exhibited enhanced efficacy and chemopreventive activity over pure raloxifene as indicated by evaluation of tumor burden (P < 0.001) and tumor incidence (P < 0.001). The results indicate the potential of raloxifene solid lipid nanoparticles in optimizing chemoprevention of breast cancer by R-SLN. PMID:25935981

  5. Plant and Fungal Food Components with Potential Activity on the Development of Microbial Oral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Daglia, Maria; Papetti, Adele; Mascherpa, Dora; Grisoli, Pietro; Giusto, Giovanni; Lingström, Peter; Pratten, Jonathan; Signoretto, Caterina; Spratt, David A.; Wilson, Michael; Zaura, Egija; Gazzani, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the content in macronutrients, free sugars, polyphenols, and inorganic ions, known to exert any positive or negative action on microbial oral disease such as caries and gingivitis, of seven food/beverages (red chicory, mushroom, raspberry, green and black tea, cranberry juice, dark beer). Tea leaves resulted the richest material in all the detected ions, anyway tea beverages resulted the richest just in fluoride. The highest content in zinc was in chicory, raspberry and mushroom. Raspberry is the richest food in strontium and boron, beer in selenium, raspberry and mushroom in copper. Beer, cranberry juice and, especially green and black tea are very rich in polyphenols, confirming these beverages as important sources of such healthy substances. The fractionation, carried out on the basis of the molecular mass (MM), of the water soluble components occurring in raspberry, chicory, and mushroom extracts (which in microbiological assays revealed the highest potential action against oral pathogens), showed that both the high and low MM fractions are active, with the low MM fractions displaying the highest potential action for all the fractionated extracts. Our findings show that more compounds that can play a different active role occur in these foods. PMID:22013381

  6. Plant and fungal food components with potential activity on the development of microbial oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Daglia, Maria; Papetti, Adele; Mascherpa, Dora; Grisoli, Pietro; Giusto, Giovanni; Lingström, Peter; Pratten, Jonathan; Signoretto, Caterina; Spratt, David A; Wilson, Michael; Zaura, Egija; Gazzani, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the content in macronutrients, free sugars, polyphenols, and inorganic ions, known to exert any positive or negative action on microbial oral disease such as caries and gingivitis, of seven food/beverages (red chicory, mushroom, raspberry, green and black tea, cranberry juice, dark beer). Tea leaves resulted the richest material in all the detected ions, anyway tea beverages resulted the richest just in fluoride. The highest content in zinc was in chicory, raspberry and mushroom. Raspberry is the richest food in strontium and boron, beer in selenium, raspberry and mushroom in copper. Beer, cranberry juice and, especially green and black tea are very rich in polyphenols, confirming these beverages as important sources of such healthy substances. The fractionation, carried out on the basis of the molecular mass (MM), of the water soluble components occurring in raspberry, chicory, and mushroom extracts (which in microbiological assays revealed the highest potential action against oral pathogens), showed that both the high and low MM fractions are active, with the low MM fractions displaying the highest potential action for all the fractionated extracts. Our findings show that more compounds that can play a different active role occur in these foods. PMID:22013381

  7. Potential Compounds for Oral Cancer Treatment: Resveratrol, Nimbolide, Lovastatin, Bortezomib, Vorinostat, Berberine, Pterostilbene, Deguelin, Andrographolide, and Colchicine

    PubMed Central

    Bundela, Saurabh; Sharma, Anjana; Bisen, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the main causes of cancer-related deaths in South-Asian countries. There are very limited treatment options available for oral cancer. Research endeavors focused on discovery and development of novel therapies for oral cancer, is necessary to control the ever rising oral cancer related mortalities. We mined the large pool of compounds from the publicly available compound databases, to identify potential therapeutic compounds for oral cancer. Over 84 million compounds were screened for the possible anti-cancer activity by custom build SVM classifier. The molecular targets of the predicted anti-cancer compounds were mined from reliable sources like experimental bioassays studies associated with the compound, and from protein-compound interaction databases. Therapeutic compounds from DrugBank, and a list of natural anti-cancer compounds derived from literature mining of published studies, were used for building partial least squares regression model. The regression model thus built, was used for the estimation of oral cancer specific weights based on the molecular targets. These weights were used to compute scores for screening the predicted anti-cancer compounds for their potential to treat oral cancer. The list of potential compounds was annotated with corresponding physicochemical properties, cancer specific bioactivity evidences, and literature evidences. In all, 288 compounds with the potential to treat oral cancer were identified in the current study. The majority of the compounds in this list are natural products, which are well-tolerated and have minimal side-effects compared to the synthetic counterparts. Some of the potential therapeutic compounds identified in the current study are resveratrol, nimbolide, lovastatin, bortezomib, vorinostat, berberine, pterostilbene, deguelin, andrographolide, and colchicine. PMID:26536350

  8. Potential Use of Quantitative Tissue Phenotype to Predict Malignant Risk for Oral Premalignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Guillaud, Martial; Zhang, Lewei; Poh, Catherine; Rosin, Miriam P.; MacAulay, Calum

    2009-01-01

    The importance of early diagnosis in improving mortality and morbidity rates of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has long been recognized. However, a major challenge for early diagnosis is our limited ability to differentiate oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) at high risk of progressing into invasive SCC from those at low risk. We investigated the potential of Quantitative Tissue Phenotype (QTP), measured by high-resolution image analysis, to recognize severe dysplasia/carcinoma in situ (CIS) (known to have an increased risk of progression) and to predict progression within hyperplasia or mild/moderate dysplasia (termed HMD). We generated a Nuclear Phenotypic Score (NPS), a combination of 5 nuclear morphometric features that best discriminate 4,027 “normal” nuclei (selected from 29 normal oral biopsies) from 4,298 “abnormal” nuclei (selected from 30 SCC biopsies). This NPS was then determined for a set of 69 OPLs. Severe dysplasia/CIS, showed a significant increase in NPS compared to HMD. However, within the latter group, elevated NPS was strongly associated with the presence of high-risk LOH patterns. There was a statistical difference between NPS of HMD that progressed to cancer and those that did not. Individuals with a high NPS had a 10-fold increase in relative risk of progression. In the multivariate Cox model, LOH and NPS together were the strongest predictors for cancer development. These data suggest that QTP could be used to identify lesions that require molecular evaluation and should be integrated with such approaches to facilitate the identification of HMD OPLs at high risk of progression. PMID:18451134

  9. Congruence and indifference between two molecular markers for understanding oral evolution in the Marynidae sensu lato (Ciliophora, Colpodea)

    PubMed Central

    Dunthorn, Micah; Katz, Laura A.; Stoeck, Thorsten; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of oral structures within the Colpodida is confounded by the low number of morphological characters that can be used in constructing hypotheses, and by the low taxon and character sampling in molecular phylogenetic analyses designed to assess these hypotheses. Here we increase character sampling by sequencing the mitochondrial SSU-rDNA locus for three isolates of the Marynidae sensu lato. We show that the inferred mitochondrial and nuclear SSU-rDNA trees, as well as concatenated and constrained analyses, are congruent in not recovering a monophyletic Marynidae. However, due to low node support, the trees are indifferent to whether the morphological characters used to unite the Marynidae are the result of retention of ancestral states or convergence. In light of this indifference and an increased amount of nuclear and mitochondrial SSU-rDNA data, alternative hypotheses of oral evolution in the Colpodida are presented. PMID:22356924

  10. Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Potential Markers and Bioprocesses Altered in Bladder Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K.; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T.; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R.; Fischer, Steven M.; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J.; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z.; Terris, Martha K.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    While alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer (BCa), the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in BCa. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from BCa. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing BCa from controls, and also non-muscle from muscle-invasive BCa. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in BCa. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 promoters of BCa tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR, and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 BCa cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Further, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of BCa specimens compared to matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of BCa, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression. PMID:21990318

  11. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression. PMID:21990318

  12. LFA-1 expression on exocrine glands as a potential novel marker of malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Futagami-Mizoguchi, E; Yamada, A; Mizoguchi, A; Imai, Y; Yokoyama, M M

    1993-09-01

    The lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 has been found only on leukocytes and lymphoid tissues; however, the expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on nonhematopoietic cells has not been reported previously. In this study, immunohistochemical expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was examined on various tissues from 35 patients with malignant diseases and 36 patients with benign diseases including benign tumors. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was found on various exocrine tissues (eg, gastric glands, bronchial epithelium, alveolar epithelium, duodenal glands, bile ducts, pancreatic acini, and salivary glands) uninvolved by tumor in patients with malignant diseases. Localization of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was limited to the exocrine glands and differed from tissue-infiltrating leukocytes. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on exocrine tissues was confirmed in all 35 cases of malignant diseases that were examined. These included a wide spectrum of carcinomas and hematopoietic tumors. In contrast, none of the 36 cases with benign diseases examined expressed lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on their exocrine glands. These results indicate a strong correlation between lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 expression on exocrine glands and malignant disease. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on nonhematopoietic cells was further confirmed in nonhematopoietic cell lines. Two of 19 nonhematopoietic cell lines (MKN45 and PANC-1; exocrine gland cell lines) examined expressed lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on both cell surface and cytoplasm. These results suggested that immunohistochemically defined lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 molecules on nontumorous exocrine gland cells are a potential marker for the presence of malignant diseases.

  13. In vivo confocal microscopy for the oral cavity: Current state of the field and future potential.

    PubMed

    Maher, N G; Collgros, H; Uribe, P; Ch'ng, S; Rajadhyaksha, M; Guitera, P

    2016-03-01

    Confocal microscopy (CM) has been shown to correlate with oral mucosal histopathology in vivo. The purposes of this review are to summarize what we know so far about in vivo CM applications for oral mucosal pathologies, to highlight some current developments with CM devices relevant for oral applications, and to formulate where in vivo CM could hold further application for oral mucosal diagnosis and management. Ovid Medline® and/or Google® searches were performed using the terms 'microscopy, confocal', 'mouth neoplasms', 'mouth mucosa', 'leukoplakia, oral', 'oral lichen planus', 'gingiva', 'cheilitis', 'taste', 'inflammatory oral confocal', 'mucosal confocal' and 'confocal squamous cell oral'. In summary, inclusion criteria were in vivo use of any type of CM for the human oral mucosa and studies on normal or pathological oral mucosa. Experimental studies attempting to identify proteins of interest and microorganisms were excluded. In total 25 relevant articles were found, covering 8 main topics, including normal oral mucosal features (n=15), oral dysplasia or neoplasia (n=7), inflamed oral mucosa (n=3), taste impairment (n=3), oral autoimmune conditions (n=2), pigmented oral pathology/melanoma (n=1), delayed type hypersensitivity (n=1), and cheilitis glandularis (n=1). The evidence for using in vivo CM in these conditions is poor, as it is limited to mainly small descriptive studies. Current device developments for oral CM include improved probe design. The authors propose that future applications for in vivo oral CM may include burning mouth syndrome, intra-operative mapping for cancer surgery, and monitoring and targeted biopsies within field cancerization. PMID:26786962

  14. Identification of serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prolactin as potential tumor markers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Who-Whong; Ang, Soo Fan; Kumar, Rajneesh; Heah, Charmain; Utama, Andi; Tania, Navessa Padma; Li, Huihua; Tan, Sze Huey; Poo, Desmond; Choo, Su Pin; Chow, Wan Cheng; Tan, Chee Kiat; Toh, Han Chong

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of hepatocellullar carcinoma (HCC) remains a challenge. The current practice of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) measurement is inadequate. Here we utilized a proteomic approach to identify novel serum biomarkers for distinguishing HCC patients from non-cancer controls. We profiled the serum proteins in a group of 58 resectable HCC patients and 11 non-HCC chronic hepatitis B (HBV) carrier samples from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) using the RayBio® L-Series 507 Antibody Array and found 113 serum markers that were significantly modulated between HCC and control groups. Selected potential biomarkers from this list were quantified using a multiplex sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) array in an expanded SGH cohort (126 resectable HCC patients and 115 non-HCC chronic HBV carriers (NC group)), confirming that serum prolactin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly upregulated in HCC patients. This finding of serum MCP-1 elevation in HCC patients was validated in a separate cohort of serum samples from the Mochtar Riady Institute for Nanotechnology, Indonesia (98 resectable HCC, 101 chronic hepatitis B patients and 100 asymptomatic HBV/HCV carriers) by sandwich ELISA. MCP-1 and prolactin levels were found to correlate with AFP, while MCP-1 also correlated with disease stage. Subsequent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of AFP, prolactin and MCP-1 in the SGH cohort and comparing their area under the ROC curve (AUC) indicated that neither prolactin nor MCP-1 on their own performed better than AFP. However, the combination of AFP+MCP-1 (AUC, 0.974) had significantly superior discriminative ability than AFP alone (AUC, 0.942; p<0.001). In conclusion, prolactin and MCP-1 are overexpressed in HCC and are conveniently quantifiable in patients' sera by ELISA. MCP-1 appears to be a promising complementary biomarker for HCC diagnosis and this MCP-1+AFP model should be further evaluated as potential

  15. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects.

    PubMed

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic; Leese, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  16. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects

    PubMed Central

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  17. The potential role of microbes in oncogenesis with particular emphasis on oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Faden, Asmaa A.

    2016-01-01

    For over a century, non-virus microorganisms, notably bacteria have been implicated as causal agents of cancers, a relatively small number of researchers have provided evidence to support the so-called “cancer germ” hypothesis. With the exception of the link between Helicobacter pylori and stomach cancer, other supposed links have been ignored. A wide range of bacteria and other non-virus microbes, including fungi, have been implicated over the years in oncogenesis, as well as the ability to induce inflammation, which may cause cancer. It seems that there is no single “cancer germ,” as most bacteria can apparently induce cancer. Here, the role of bacteria and other non-virus microorganisms and oral cancers will be discussed. By ignoring bacteria as a causal agent of cancer, we set back our understanding of this crucially important disease and, as a result, have hindered the development of potential cures. PMID:27279505

  18. Potential of Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers for DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized tritordeums and their respective parents.

    PubMed

    Cabo, Sandra; Ferreira, Luciana; Carvalho, Ana; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Martín, António; Lima-Brito, José Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Hexaploid tritordeum (H(ch)H(ch)AABB; 2n = 42) results from the cross between Hordeum chilense (H(ch)H(ch); 2n = 14) and cultivated durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (AABB; 2n = 28). Morphologically, tritordeum resembles the wheat parent, showing promise for agriculture and wheat breeding. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) polymorphism is a recently developed technique that generates gene-targeted markers. Thus, we considered it interesting to evaluate its potential for the DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized hexaploid tritordeums and their respective parents. In this study, 60 SCoT primers were tested, and 18 and 19 of them revealed SCoT polymorphisms in the newly synthesized tritordeum lines HT27 and HT22, respectively, and their parents. An analysis of the presence/absence of bands among tritordeums and their parents revealed three types of polymorphic markers: (i) shared by tritordeums and one of their parents, (ii) exclusively amplified in tritordeums, and (iii) exclusively amplified in the parents. No polymorphism was detected among individuals of each parental species. Three SCoT markers were exclusively amplified in tritordeums of lines HT22 and HT27, being considered as polyploidization-induced rearrangements. About 70% of the SCoT markers of H. chilense origin were not transmitted to the allopolyploids of both lines, and most of the SCoTs scored in the newly synthesized allopolyploids originated from wheat, reinforcing the potential use of tritordeum as an alternative crop.

  19. In vitro analysis of the cariogenic and erosive potential of paediatric antitussive liquid oral medications.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Alessandro L; De Sousa, Rayanne I M; Clementino, Marayza A; Vieira, Fernando F; Cavalcanti, Christiane L; Xavier, Alidianne F C

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated in vitro the cariogenic and erosive potential of antitussive liquid oral medications for paediatric use. Fifteen paediatric liquid antitussives were sampled. The endogenous pH was evaluated by potentiometry, titratable acidity was measured according to the method adopted by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists, total soluble solids content (TSSC) readings were performed by Brix refractometry using the Abbé refractometer, and the total sugar content was determined according to the Fehling methodology. The experiments were performed in triplicate and the obtained data were entered in the Excel software, analyzed and presented by descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations). Endogenous pH values ranged from 2.49 ± 0.09 (Iodetox®) to 6.75 ± 0.005 (Carbocysteine®) and twelve medications showed pHs below the critical value of 5.5 for enamel demineralization. Iodetox® (0.021 ± 0.01) presented the lowest titratable acidity and Aerofrin® (1.171 ± 0.01) presented the highest titratable acidity. Celergin® presented the highest TSSC (62.26 ± 0.40) and Acetyleysteine® (100 mg granules bags) presented the lowest TSSC (3.25 ± 0.43). Only 5 medications contained sugar, with total sugar content ranging from 35.93% ± 6.65 (Iodetox®) to 59.60% DP ± 6.66 (Celergin®). The paediatric antitussive medications showed low endogenous pH, some of them even below the critical value for enamel dissolution (pH<5.5). These antitussives are potentially cariogenic and erosive to dental structures if used frequently because of the high titratable acidity and high sugar concentration, especially when adequate oral clearance is not performed after administration of each dose.

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis of Multiple FISH Markers in Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Suggests that a Diverse Distribution of Copy Number Changes Is Associated with Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wangsa, Darawalee; Chowdhury, Salim Akhter; Ryott, Michael; Gertz, E. Michael; Elmberger, Göran; Auer, Gert; Lundqvist, Elisabeth Åvall; Küffer, Stefan; Ströbel, Philipp; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Schwartz, Russell; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Ried, Thomas; Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is associated with poor prognosis. To improve prognostication, we analyzed four gene probes (TERC, CCND1, EGFR, and TP53) and the centromere probe CEP4 as a marker of chromosomal instability, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in single cells from the tumors of sixty-five OTSCC patients (Stage I, n=15; Stage II, n=30; Stage III, n=7; Stage IV, n=13). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the FISH data distinguished three clusters related to smoking status. Copy number increases of all five markers were found to be correlated to non-smoking habits, while smokers in this cohort had low-level copy number gains. Using the phylogenetic modeling software FISHtrees, we constructed models of tumor progression for each patient based on the four gene probes. Then, we derived test statistics on the models that are significant predictors of disease-free and overall survival, independent of tumor stage and smoking status in multivariate analysis. The patients whose tumors were modeled as progressing by a more diverse distribution of copy number changes across the four genes have poorer prognosis. This is consistent with the view that multiple genetic pathways need to become deregulated in order for cancer to progress. PMID:26175310

  1. Discovery and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Aflatoxin-Resistance: Evaluating Their Potential as Breeding Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilit...

  2. Differences in allergenic potential of food extracts following oral exposure in mice reflect differences in digestibility: potential approaches to safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Christal C; Selgrade, Maryjane K

    2008-03-01

    An animal model for food allergy is needed to assess genetically modified food crops for potential allergenicity. The ideal model must produce allergic antibody (IgE) to proteins differentially according to known allergenicity before being used to accurately identify potential allergens among novel proteins. The oral route is the most relevant for exposure to food antigens, and a protein's stability to digestion is a current risk assessment tool based on this natural route. However, normal laboratory animals do not mount allergic responses to proteins administered orally due to oral tolerance, an immunologic mechanism which specifically suppresses IgE. To circumvent oral tolerance and evoke differential IgE responses to a panel of allergenic and nonallergenic food extracts, female C3H/HeJ mice were exposed subcutaneously or orally with cholera toxin as an adjuvant. All foods elicited IgE by the subcutaneous route. Oral exposure, however, resulted in IgE to allergens (peanut, Brazil nut, and egg white) but not to nonallergens (spinach and turkey), provided that the dose and exposures were limited. Additionally, in vitro digestibility assays demonstrated the presence of digestion-stable proteins in the allergenic food extracts but not in the nonallergenic foods. Our results suggest that the subcutaneous route is inadequate to distinguish allergens from nonallergens, but oral exposure under the appropriate experimental conditions will result in differential allergic responses in accordance with known allergenicity. Moreover, those foods containing digestion-resistant proteins provoke allergic responses in this model, supporting the current use of pepsin resistance in the decision tree for potential allergenicity assessment.

  3. Geriatric forensics - Part 2 “Prevalence of elder abuse and their potential forensic markers among medical and dental patients”

    PubMed Central

    Mattoo, Khurshid A.; Garg, Rishabh; Kumar, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Context: This study is a continuation of the earlier studies and has been extended to investigate the potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Aims: To determine the prevalence of elder abuse in various outpatient departments (OPDs). To study the associated parameters related to the abuser and the abused. To determine the existence of potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Settings and Design: The subjects were randomly selected from the medical and the dental OPDs of the university. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and thirty two elderly subjects in the age range 40-60 years were interviewed using a questionnaire to determine the existence of elder abuse. The subjects were investigated and examined for weight, nutrition and hydration, vital signs, habits, existing visual and auditory capabilities, medications, disclosure of wills/deeds, signs of depression, and documented cleanliness. The mini-mental state examination, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Clock drawing test, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale were used to determine the potential forensic markers. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean values in percentage were determined by dividing the number of determined subjects by the total number of subjects for that parameter. Results: About 37% in medical and 41% in dental OPDs were found to have suffered from abuse, mostly in the age group 60-70 years. Females received more abuse and a combination of son and daughter-in-law constituted most abusers. Various potential markers of elder abuse and neglect investigated among the elder abuse victims included depression (89%), signs of improper feeding (83%), changes in personal hygiene (69%), need for medical/dental treatment (78%), medication misuse (67%), changes in wills/deeds (26%), decubiti (10%), bruises (17%), skin tears (27%), and confusion (23%). Conclusions: Elder abuse exists in one or more forms in both medical and dental OPDs among both males and females in all age groups. PMID:26816460

  4. DNA methylome profiling of maternal peripheral blood and placentas reveal potential fetal DNA markers for non-invasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Junyu; Li, Qiaoli; Zhou, Xinyao; Wang, Teng; Xu, Mingqing; Xia, Shihui; Xing, Qinghe; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Utilizing epigenetic (DNA methylation) differences to differentiate between maternal peripheral blood (PBL) and fetal (placental) DNA has been a promising strategy for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) have yet to be fully ascertained. In the present study, we performed genome-wide comparative methylome analysis between maternal PBL and placental DNA from pregnancies of first trimester by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assays. A total of 36 931 DMRs and 45 804 differentially methylated sites (DMSs) covering the whole genome, exclusive of the Y chromosome, were identified via MeDIP-Seq and Infinium 450k array, respectively, of which 3759 sites in 2188 regions were confirmed by both methods. Not only did we find the previously reported potential fetal DNA markers in our identified DMRs/DMSs but also we verified fully the identified DMRs/DMSs in the validation round by MassARRAY EpiTYPER. The screened potential fetal DNA markers may be used for NIPT on aneuploidies and other chromosomal diseases, such as cri du chat syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In addition, these potential markers may have application in the early diagnosis of placental dysfunction, such as pre-eclampsia. PMID:24996894

  5. Accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral potentially malignant disorders: a comparative study with aero-digestive lesions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaobo; Xu, Hao; He, Mingjing; Han, Qi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Chongkui; Li, Jing; Jiang, Lu; Zhou, Yu; Dan, Hongxia; Feng, Xiaodong; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Presently, various studies had investigated the accuracy of autofluorescence in diagnosing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) with diverse conclusions. This study aimed to assess its accuracy for OSCC and OPMD and to investigate its applicability in general dental practice. After a comprehensive literature search, a meta-analysis was conducted to calculate the pooled diagnostic indexes of autofluorescence for premalignant lesions (PML) and malignant lesions (ML) of the oral cavity, lung, esophagus, stomach and colorectum and to compute indexes regarding the detection of OSCC aided by algorithms. Besides, a u test was performed. Twenty-four studies detecting OSCC and OPMD in 2761 lesions were included. This demonstrated that the overall accuracy of autofluorescence for OSCC and OPMD was superior to PML and ML of the lung, esophagus and stomach, slightly inferior to the colorectum. Additionally, the sensitivity and specificity for OSCC and OPMD were 0.89 and 0.8, respectively. Furthermore, the specificity could be remarkably improved by additional algorithms. With relatively high accuracy, autofluorescence could be potentially applied as an adjunct for early diagnosis of OSCC and OPMD. Moreover, approaches such as algorithms could enhance its specificity to ensure its efficacy in primary care. PMID:27416981

  6. Antibacterial potential of Manuka honey against three oral bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, PatrickSchmidlin R; English, Helen; Duncan, Warwick; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Thurnheer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Honey is an ancient natural remedy for the treatment of infected wounds. It has regained attention in the medical profession, as it has recently been reported to have a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect against bacteria. Data concerning Manuka honey of New Zealand origin, which is claimed to provide additional non-peroxide antimicrobial activity (so-called standard NPA) against oral pathogens, is still scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to screen for the antibacterial efficacy of different Manuka honey products against S. mutans (OMZ 918), P. gingivalis (OMZ 925) and A. actinomycetemcomitans (OMZ 299). Chlorhexidine and saline served as positive and negative controls, respectively, whereas a Swiss multifloral honey served as control honey without intrinsic non-peroxide activity. Chlorhexidine showed the highest inhibiting potential against all specimens tested. Manuka honey below an NPA value of 15 showed the least bacterial growth-inhibiting potential, even less – although not significantly so – than multifloral Swiss honey. Manuka honey above an NPA value of 15 showed a significantly higher antibacterial effect compared to the other honeys tested. All Manuka honey preparations were more effective in inhibiting the growth of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans, rather than S. mutans. In conclusion, the study showed an NPA dose-dependent antibacterial efficacy of Manuka honey. Further investigations of this natural product are now open for scrutiny. PMID:25253413

  7. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: Comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goethals, Laurence; Debucquoy, Annelies; Perneel, Christiaan; Geboes, Karel; Ectors, Nadine; De Schutter, Harlinde; Penninckx, Freddy; McBride, William H.; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin M. . E-mail: karin.haustermans@uzleuven.be

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intrinsic markers of hypoxia. Methods and Material: Twenty patients with an adenocarcinoma of the left colon and rectum treated by primary surgery were injected with pimonidazole and IdUrd. Serial sections of tumor biopsies were single stained for VEGF, EGFR, Ki67, and double stained for blood vessels in combination with either pimonidazole, IdUrd, or CA IX. Percentage of expression was scored as well as colocalization of pimonidazole with CA IX. Results: The median percentage of hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole staining, was 16.7% (range, 0-52.4%). The expression of pimonidazole correlated inversely with the total MVD and endothelial cord MVD (R = -0.55, p = 0.01; R = -0.47, p = 0.04). Good colocalization was found between pimonidazole and CA IX in only 30% of tumors, with no correlation overall between pimonidazole and CA IX, VEGF, or EGFR or between the different intrinsic markers. Cells around some vessels (0.08-11%) were negative for IdUrd but positive for Ki 67, which indicated their lack of perfusion at the time of injection. Conclusion: Chronic and acute hypoxic regions are present in colorectal tumors, as shown by pimonidazole and IdUrd staining. Only in a minority of tumors did an association exist between the areas stained by pimonidazole and those positive for CA IX. Pimonidazole also did not correlate with expression of other putative intrinsic hypoxia markers (VEGF, EGFR)

  8. Caffeic Acid phenethyl ester is a potential therapeutic agent for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  9. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs.

  10. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Is a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  11. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs. PMID:25088158

  12. Identification of innovative potential quality markers in rocket and melon fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Cavaiuolo, Marina; Cocetta, Giacomo; Bulgari, Roberta; Spinardi, Anna; Ferrante, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Ready-to-eat fresh cut produce are exposed to pre- and postharvest abiotic stresses during the production chain. Our work aimed to identify stress responsive genes as new molecular markers of quality that can be widely applied to leaves and fruits and easily determined at any stage of the production chain. Stress responsive genes associated with quality losses were isolated in rocket and melon fresh-cut produce and their expression levels analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) at different time points after harvest at 20 °C and 4 °C. qRT-PCR results were supported by correlation analysis with physiological and biochemical determinations evaluated at the same conditions such as chlorophyll a fluorescence indices, total, reducing sugars, sucrose, ethylene, ascorbic acid, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species. In both species the putative molecular markers increased their expression soon after harvest suggesting a possible use as novel and objective quality markers of fresh-cut produces.

  13. Circulating miR-223 in Oral Cancer: Its Potential as a Novel Diagnostic Biomarker and Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hirohiko; Sho, Ri; Takeda, Yuji; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Yukie; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Otani, Katsumi; Ishikawa, Shigeo; Fukao, Akira; Asao, Hironobu; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been detected in various types of cancer and have been proposed as novel biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment. Until recently, however, no studies had comprehensively examined circulating miRNAs in oral cancer. The current study used an ultra-sensitive genome-wide miRNA array to investigate changes in circulating miRNAs in plasma from five patients with oral cancer and ten healthy individuals. Results indicated that there were only a few circulating miRNAs, including miR-223, miR-26a, miR-126, and miR-21, that were up-regulated in patients with oral cancer. A subsequent validation test indicated that circulating miR-223 levels were significantly higher (~2-fold, P< 0.05) in patients with oral cancer (n = 31) than in those without cancer (n = 31). Moreover, miR-223 was found to be up-regulated in tumor-adjacent normal tissue compared to tumor tissue from patients with oral cancer. A gain-of-function assay was performed to explore the potential roles of circulating miR-223 in the development of oral cancer. Results revealed that miR-223 functions as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. In conclusion, this study suggested that circulating miR-223 may serve as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and that it may represent a novel therapeutic target for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:27441818

  14. Potential therapeutic targets for oral cancer: ADM, TP53, EGFR, LYN, CTLA4, SKIL, CTGF, CD70.

    PubMed

    Bundela, Saurabh; Sharma, Anjana; Bisen, Prakash S

    2014-01-01

    In India, oral cancer has consistently ranked among top three causes of cancer-related deaths, and it has emerged as a top cause for the cancer-related deaths among men. Lack of effective therapeutic options is one of the main challenges in clinical management of oral cancer patients. We interrogated large pool of samples from oral cancer gene expression studies to identify potential therapeutic targets that are involved in multiple cancer hallmark events. Therapeutic strategies directed towards such targets can be expected to effectively control cancer cells. Datasets from different gene expression studies were integrated by removing batch-effects and was used for downstream analyses, including differential expression analysis. Dependency network analysis was done to identify genes that undergo marked topological changes in oral cancer samples when compared with control samples. Causal reasoning analysis was carried out to identify significant hypotheses, which can explain gene expression profiles observed in oral cancer samples. Text-mining based approach was used to detect cancer hallmarks associated with genes significantly expressed in oral cancer. In all, 2365 genes were detected to be differentially expressed genes, which includes some of the highly differentially expressed genes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1/3/10/13), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligands (IL8, CXCL-10/-11), PTHLH, SERPINE1, NELL2, S100A7A, MAL, CRNN, TGM3, CLCA4, keratins (KRT-3/4/13/76/78), SERPINB11 and serine peptidase inhibitors (SPINK-5/7). XIST, TCEAL2, NRAS and FGFR2 are some of the important genes detected by dependency and causal network analysis. Literature mining analysis annotated 1014 genes, out of which 841 genes were statistically significantly annotated. The integration of output of various analyses, resulted in the list of potential therapeutic targets for oral cancer, which included targets such as ADM, TP53, EGFR, LYN, CTLA4, SKIL, CTGF and CD70.

  15. Effects of a single, high oral dose of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on the mineral metabolism markers in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Merino, Jose Luis; Teruel, Jose Luis; Fernández-Lucas, Milagros; Villafruela, Juan José; Bueno, Blanca; Gomis, Antonio; Paraíso, Vicente; Quereda, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common in dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease. Low levels have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk and mortality. We evaluated the administration of a high, single oral dose of 25-OH cholecalciferol (3 mg of Hidroferol, 180 000 IU) in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The 94 chronic hemodialysis patients with vitamin D deficiency 25 (OH)D <30 ng/mL included in the study were randomized into two groups. Follow-up time was 16 weeks. Neither the usual treatment for controlling Ca/P levels nor the dialysis bath (calcium of 2.5 mEq/L) were modified. Of the 86 patients who finished the study, 42 were in the treated group and 44 in the control group. An increase in 25(OH)D levels was observed in the treated group that persisted after 16 weeks and was associated with a significant decrease in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels during the 8 weeks post-treatment. Baseline 1,25(OH)2 D levels of the treated group increased two weeks after treatment (5.9 vs. 21.9 pg/mL, P<0.001) but gradually reduced to 8.4 at week 16. The administration of a single 3 mg dose of 25-OH cholecalciferol seems safe in patients on hemodialysis and maintains sufficient levels of 25(OH)D with a decrease in PTH for 3 months.

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity: analysis of 30 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, A. L. N.; Correr, W. R.; Azevedo, L. H.; Galletta, V. K.; Pinto, C. A. L.; Kowalski, L. P.; Kurachi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide and although early diagnosis of potentially malignant and malignant diseases is associated with better treatment results, a large number of cancers are initially misdiagnosed, with unfortunate consequences for long-term survival. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive modality of diagnostic approach using induced fluorescence emission in tumors that can improve diagnostic accuracy. The objective of this study was to determine the ability to discriminate between normal oral mucosa and potentially malignant disorders by fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence investigation under 408 and 532 nm excitation wavelengths was performed on 60 subjects, 30 with potentially malignant disorders and 30 volunteers with normal mucosa. Data was analyzed to correlate fluorescence patterns with clinical and histopathological diagnostics. Fluorescence spectroscopy used as a point measurement technique resulted in a great variety of spectral information. In a qualitative analysis of the fluorescence spectral characteristics of each type of injury evaluated, it was possible to discriminate between normal and abnormal oral mucosa. The results show the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy for an improved discrimination of oral disorders.

  17. MicroRNA Levels as Prognostic Markers for the Differentiation Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Donors.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Nicole; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Raiss, Christian C; Groen, Nathalie; Portalska, Karolina Janaeczek; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan; Post, Janine N; van Wijnen, Andre J; Karperien, Marcel

    2015-08-15

    The ability of human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages makes them a promising cell source for the use in tissue repair strategies. Since the differentiation potential of hMSCs differs between donors, it is necessary to establish biomarkers for the identification of donors with high differentiation potential. In this study, we show that microRNA (miRNA) expression levels are effective for distinguishing donors with high differentiation potential from low differentiation potential. Twenty hMSC donors were initially tested for marker expression and differentiation potential. In particular, the chondrogenic differentiation potential was evaluated on the basis of histological matrix formation, mRNA expression levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and quantitative glycosaminoglycan deposition. Three donors out of twenty were identified as donors with high chondrogenic potential, whereas nine showed moderate and eight showed low chondrogenic potential. Expression profiles of miRNAs involved in chondrogenesis and cartilage homeostasis were used for the distinction between high-performance hMSCs and low-performance hMSCs. Global mRNA expression profiles of the donors before the onset of chondrogenic differentiation revealed minor differences in gene expression between low and high chondrogenic performers. However, analysis of miRNA expression during a 7-day differentiation period identified miR-210 and miR-630 as positive regulators of chondrogenesis. In contrast, miR-181 and miR-34a, which are negative regulators of chondrogenesis, were upregulated during differentiation in low-performing donors. In conclusion, profiling of hMSC donors for a specific panel of miRNAs may have a prognostic value for selecting donors with high differentiation potential to improve hMSC-based strategies for tissue regeneration.

  18. Potential of Text-Based Internet Chats for Improving Oral Fluency in a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Although a number of studies have reported on the positive effects of Internet chats in the second language classroom, to the best of my knowledge no studies to date have examined the effect of text-based chats on oral fluency development. This exploratory study addressed the above question by examining the oral fluency development of 34 English…

  19. The oral microbiome in health and disease and the potential impact on personalized dental medicine.

    PubMed

    Zarco, M F; Vess, T J; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-03-01

    Every human body contains a personalized microbiome that is essential to maintaining health but capable of eliciting disease. The oral microbiome is particularly imperative to health because it can cause both oral and systemic disease. The oral microbiome rests within biofilms throughout the oral cavity, forming an ecosystem that maintains health when in equilibrium. However, certain ecological shifts in the microbiome allow pathogens to manifest and cause disease. Severe forms of oral disease may result in systemic disease at different body sites. Microbiomics and metagenomics are two fields of research that have emerged to identify the presence of specific microbes in the body and understand the nature of the microbiome activity during both health and disease. The analysis of the microbiome and its genomes will pave the way for more effective therapeutic and diagnostic techniques and, ultimately, contribute to the development of personalized medicine and personalized dental medicine.

  20. The oral microbiome in health and disease and the potential impact on personalized dental medicine.

    PubMed

    Zarco, M F; Vess, T J; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-03-01

    Every human body contains a personalized microbiome that is essential to maintaining health but capable of eliciting disease. The oral microbiome is particularly imperative to health because it can cause both oral and systemic disease. The oral microbiome rests within biofilms throughout the oral cavity, forming an ecosystem that maintains health when in equilibrium. However, certain ecological shifts in the microbiome allow pathogens to manifest and cause disease. Severe forms of oral disease may result in systemic disease at different body sites. Microbiomics and metagenomics are two fields of research that have emerged to identify the presence of specific microbes in the body and understand the nature of the microbiome activity during both health and disease. The analysis of the microbiome and its genomes will pave the way for more effective therapeutic and diagnostic techniques and, ultimately, contribute to the development of personalized medicine and personalized dental medicine. PMID:21902769

  1. KAI-1 and p53 expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas: Markers of significance in future diagnostics and possibly therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Namrata N; Wadhwan, Vijay; Chaudhary, Minal; Nayyar, Abhishek Singh

    2016-01-01

    Context: KAI-1/CD82 is a tumor suppressor gene with decreased gene expression being associated with increased invasive ability of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). p53 protein functions in the G1-S phase of the cell cycle to allow repair of damaged DNA. In the present study, p53 and KAI-1 expression was investigated using monoclonal antibodies in OSCC. Aims: The aim of this study was to detect KAI-1 and p53 expression in OSCCs and to assess the relation between both in OSCCs. Materials and Methods: The present study included histopathologically diagnosed thirty cases of well- and moderately differentiated OSCCs to study the expression of KAI-1 and p53 antibodies. Statistical Analysis: The results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis; one-way ANOVA; least square difference method and independent t-test. Results: OSCCs exhibited 41.62% positivity for KAI-1 while p53 positive cells were recorded to an extent of 60.82%. A significant positive correlation was observed between KAI-1 and p53 expression in OSCCs. Conclusions: Although a significant amount of work is still required to uncover the mechanisms of action and regulation of KAI-1 and p53 expression, control of the complex metastatic processes would be of interest in controlling the tumor biology in OSCCs as well as other types of malignancies to enhance prognosis in the affected patients and to help protect against future metastasis in the going to be treated and treated patients. PMID:27721601

  2. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  3. Antitumor potential of three herbal extracts against human oral squamous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qing; Satoh, Kazue; Kanamoto, Taisei; Terakubo, Shigemi; Nakashima, Hideki; Wang, Qintao; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    Three Chinese herbal extracts of Drynaria baronii, Angelica sinensis and Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc (referred to as DB, AS, CO, respectively) were investigated for their antitumor potential. These extracts showed very weak cytotoxicity against all nine cultured human cells (normal and tumor cells), but with some tumor-specific cytotoxicity displayed by DB and CO. These extracts showed little or no growth stimulation effects at lower concentrations (so-called 'hormetic effect'). Human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC-2, NA) were relatively resistant to committing apoptosis, as compared with human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells. Electron-spin resonance spectroscopy shows that DB and CO scavenged superoxide anion (generated by hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase reaction) and hydroxyl radical (generated by Fenton reaction) more efficiently than AS. DB and CO, but not AS, produced broad radical peak(s) and enhanced the superoxide scavenging activity of vitamin C. However, none of the extracts clearly enhanced the cytotoxicity of mitoxantrone, an anthracycline antitumor antibiotic. DB, but not CO and AS, showed weak anti-HIV activity. These data demonstrate several unique antitumor properties of DB. PMID:19661337

  4. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling.

  5. Molecular and immunologic markers of kidney cancer-potential applications in predictive, preventive and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mickley, Amanda; Kovaleva, Olga; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gratchev, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Kidney cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies due to frequent late diagnosis (33 % or renal cell carcinoma are metastatic at diagnosis) and poor treatment options. There are two major subtypes of kidney cancer: renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and renal pelvis carcinoma. The risk factors for RCC, accounting for more than 90 % of all kidney cancers, are smoking, obesity, hypertension, misuse of pain medication, and some genetic diseases. The most common molecular markers of kidney cancer include mutations and epigenetic inactivation of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, genes of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CIAX). The role of epigenetic pathways, including DNA methylation and chromatin structure remodeling, was also demonstrated. Immunologic properties of RCC enable this type of tumor to escape immune response effectively. An important role in this process is played by tumor-associated macrophages that demonstrate mixed M1/M2 phenotype. In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular aspects for RCC development and current state of knowledge allowing personalized approaches for diagnostics and prognostic prediction of this disease. A set of macrophage markers is suggested for the analysis of the association of macrophage phenotype and disease prognosis. PMID:26500709

  6. Soluble mesothelin-related peptides (SMRP) - high stability of a potential tumor marker for mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel G; Taeger, Dirk; Pesch, Beate; Kraus, Thomas; Brüning, Thomas; Johnen, Georg

    2007-01-01

    SMRP (soluble mesothelin-related peptides) is a promising marker for detection of malignant mesotheliomas (MM) in serum that has not yet been validated in appropriate epidemiological studies. Field studies might not always provide optimal conditions for storage and transport of samples, and follow-up studies have to rely on sample integrity. Proper validation of the marker would require sufficient stability of the antigen and robustness of the assay. SMRP concentrations were evaluated in serum samples of 98 healthy donors, using the MESOMARK ELISA kit. The SMRP distribution in the healthy study population was determined and biological and pre-analytical variations were examined regarding their influence on SMRP concentrations. For diagnostic decisions a best statistical and unbiased cut-off between 1.5 and 1.6 nmol/L was determined (95th percentile). No age- or gender-specific differences could be observed. SMRP exhibits excellent stability regarding short-term storage, long-term storage, and repeated freeze/thaw cycles. Scientific studies as well as real life applications that employ SMRP would not be limited by sample stability issues.

  7. Discovery and characterization of proteins associated with aflatoxin-resistance: evaluating their potential as breeding markers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert L; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Warburton, Marilyn; Luo, Meng; Menkir, Abebe; Fakhoury, Ahmad; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-04-01

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilitate the transfer of resistance into commercially useful genetic backgrounds without transfer of unwanted traits. To accomplish this, research efforts have focused on the identification of kernel resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) including the employment of comparative proteomics to investigate closely-related maize lines that vary in aflatoxin accumulation. RAPs have been identified and several further characterized through physiological and biochemical investigations to determine their causal role in resistance and, therefore, their suitability as breeding markers. Three RAPs, a 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor, pathogenesis-related protein 10 and glyoxalase I are being investigated using RNAi gene silencing and plant transformation. Several resistant lines have been subjected to QTL mapping to identify loci associated with the aflatoxin-resistance phenotype. Results of proteome and characterization studies are discussed. PMID:22069617

  8. Statistical strategies to reveal potential vibrational markers for in vivo analysis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira Mendes, Thiago de; Pinto, Liliane Pereira; Santos, Laurita dos; Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of biological systems by spectroscopic techniques involves the evaluation of hundreds to thousands of variables. Hence, different statistical approaches are used to elucidate regions that discriminate classes of samples and to propose new vibrational markers for explaining various phenomena like disease monitoring, mechanisms of action of drugs, food, and so on. However, the technical statistics are not always widely discussed in applied sciences. In this context, this work presents a detailed discussion including the various steps necessary for proper statistical analysis. It includes univariate parametric and nonparametric tests, as well as multivariate unsupervised and supervised approaches. The main objective of this study is to promote proper understanding of the application of various statistical tools in these spectroscopic methods used for the analysis of biological samples. The discussion of these methods is performed on a set of in vivo confocal Raman spectra of human skin analysis that aims to identify skin aging markers. In the Appendix, a complete routine of data analysis is executed in a free software that can be used by the scientific community involved in these studies.

  9. Liver protein profiling in chronic hepatitis C: identification of potential predictive markers for interferon therapy outcome.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Ariel Basulto; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Iacono, Oreste Lo; Angeletti, Claudio; Corazzari, Marco; Daniele, Nicola; Testa, Angela; Pisa, Roberto; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Antonucci, Giorgio; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2012-02-01

    The current anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy, based on pegylated-interferon alpha and ribavirin, has limited success rate and is accompanied by several side effects. The aim of this study was to identify protein profiles in pretreatment liver biopsies of HCV patients correlating with the outcome of antiviral therapy. Cytosolic or membrane/organelle-enriched protein extracts from liver biopsies of eight HCV patients were analyzed by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Overall, this analysis identified 21 proteins whose expression levels correlate with therapy response. These factors are involved in interferon-mediated antiviral activity, stress response, and energy metabolism. Moreover, we found that post-translational modifications of dihydroxyacetone kinase were also associated with therapy outcome. Differential expression of the five best performing markers (STAT1, Mx1, DD4, DAK, and PD-ECGF) was confirmed by immunoblotting assays in an independent group of HCV patients. Finally, we showed that a prediction model based on the expression levels of these markers classifies responder and nonresponder patients with an accuracy of 85.7%. These results provide evidence that the analysis of pretreatment liver protein profiles is valuable for discriminating between responder and nonresponder HCV patients, and may contribute to reduce the number of nonresponder patients exposed to therapy-associated risks.

  10. Discovery and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Aflatoxin-Resistance: Evaluating Their Potential as Breeding Markers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert L.; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Warburton, Marilyn; Luo, Meng; Menkir, Abebe; Fakhoury, Ahmad; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilitate the transfer of resistance into commercially useful genetic backgrounds without transfer of unwanted traits. To accomplish this, research efforts have focused on the identification of kernel resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) including the employment of comparative proteomics to investigate closely-related maize lines that vary in aflatoxin accumulation. RAPs have been identified and several further characterized through physiological and biochemical investigations to determine their causal role in resistance and, therefore, their suitability as breeding markers. Three RAPs, a 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor, pathogenesis-related protein 10 and glyoxalase I are being investigated using RNAi gene silencing and plant transformation. Several resistant lines have been subjected to QTL mapping to identify loci associated with the aflatoxin-resistance phenotype. Results of proteome and characterization studies are discussed. PMID:22069617

  11. Potential of optical coherence tomography for early diagnosis of oral malignancies

    PubMed Central

    DeCoro, Michael; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2014-01-01

    With nearly 1,500,000 new patients diagnosed every year in the USA, cancer poses a considerable challenge to healthcare today. Oral cancer is responsible for a sizeable portion of deaths due to cancer, primarily because it is diagnosed at a late stage when the prognosis is poor. Current methods for diagnosing oral cancer need to be augmented by better early detection, monitoring and screening modalities. A new approach is needed that provides real-time, accurate, noninvasive diagnosis. The results of early clinical trials using in vivo optical coherence tomography for the diagnosis of oral dysplasia and malignancy are encouraging. PMID:20214513

  12. [Polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence as a source of enhancement of the discrimination potential of the STR-markers].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Timoshenko, T V; Leonov, S N; Ivanov, P L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present pilot investigation was to reveal and to study polymorphism of nucleotide sequence in the alleles of STR loci of human autosomal DNA with special reference to the role of this phenomenon as a source of the differences between homonymous allelic variants. The secondary objection was to evaluate the possibility of using the data thus obtained for the enhancement of the informative value of the forensic medical genotyping of STR loci by means of identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for the purpose of extending their allelic spectrum. The methodological basis of the study was constituted by the comprehensive amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and amplified fragment sequence polymorphisms (AFSP) analysis of DNA with the use of the PLEX-ID^TM analytical mass-spectrometry platform (Abbot Molecular, USA). The study has demonstrated that polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence can be regarded as the possible source of enhancement of the discriminating potential of STR markers. It means that the analysis of polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence for genotyping AFLP-type markers of chromosomal DNA can considerably increase the effectiveness of their application as individualizing markers for the purpose of molecular genetic expertises.

  13. Ameliorative potential of Coccinia grandis extract on serum and liver marker enzymes and lipid profile in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumari, S.; Bhuvaneswari, P.; Rajeswari, P.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most severe metabolic pandemic of the 21st century, affecting essential biochemical activities in almost every cell in the body. Indian literatures have already mentioned herbal remediation for a number of human ailments. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of Coccinia grandis extract on serum and liver marker enzymes (ALP, AST, ALT and LDH) and lipid profile (total cholesterol, phospholipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids in serum and liver) in streptozotocin induced diabetic animals. The experimental animals were treated with methanolic extract of Coccinia grandis and the levels of marker enzymes and lipid profile were estimated. The ALP, AST, ALT and LDH levels were increased in diabetic rats and restored to near normal levels after administration of plant extract. The lipid profile increased in diabetic group and after the treatment with the plant extract the levels were reverted to near normal. Thus the methanolic extract of Coccinia grandis has a potent ability to restore the marker enzymes and the lipid profile was reverted to near normal levels. PMID:22736887

  14. [Polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence as a source of enhancement of the discrimination potential of the STR-markers].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Timoshenko, T V; Leonov, S N; Ivanov, P L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present pilot investigation was to reveal and to study polymorphism of nucleotide sequence in the alleles of STR loci of human autosomal DNA with special reference to the role of this phenomenon as a source of the differences between homonymous allelic variants. The secondary objection was to evaluate the possibility of using the data thus obtained for the enhancement of the informative value of the forensic medical genotyping of STR loci by means of identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for the purpose of extending their allelic spectrum. The methodological basis of the study was constituted by the comprehensive amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and amplified fragment sequence polymorphisms (AFSP) analysis of DNA with the use of the PLEX-ID^TM analytical mass-spectrometry platform (Abbot Molecular, USA). The study has demonstrated that polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence can be regarded as the possible source of enhancement of the discriminating potential of STR markers. It means that the analysis of polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence for genotyping AFLP-type markers of chromosomal DNA can considerably increase the effectiveness of their application as individualizing markers for the purpose of molecular genetic expertises. PMID:27500481

  15. MTHFR Gene Mutations: A Potential Marker of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2015-01-01

    Recent epigenome-wide association studies have confirmed the importance of epigenetic effects mediated by DNA methylation in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Metabolic folate pathways and methyl donor reactions facilitated by B-group vitamins may be critical in the pathogenesis of LOAD. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutations were studied in consecutive Alzheimer's Disease & Memory Clinic patients up to December 2014. DNA analyses of MTHFR-C667T and - A1298C homozygous and heterozygous polymorphisms in 93 consecutive elderly patients revealed high prevalence of MTHFR mutations (92.5%). Findings require confirmation in a larger series, but MTHFR mutations may become a LOAD marker, opening novel possibilities for prevention and treatment.

  16. Hypoxia-Related Marker GLUT-1, CAIX, Proliferative Index and Microvessel Density in Canine Oral Malignant Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Valeria; Guscetti, Franco; Roos, Malgorzata; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Pruschy, Martin; Rohrer Bley, Carla

    2016-01-01

    For various types of tumor therapy, it is suggested that co-targeting of tumor microenvironment, mainly tumor vasculature, mediates tumor response mechanisms. Immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), Ki-67, and von Willebrand factor VIII for microvessel density (MVD) were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of canine oral malignant neoplasms. Polarographic oxygen measurements (median pO2) and perfusion data via contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (median vascularity, median blood volume) provided additional information. Ninety-two samples were analyzed: sarcomas (n = 32), carcinomas (n = 30), and malignant melanomas (n = 30). Polarographic oxygen and perfusion data was available in 22.8% (sarcomas n = 9, carcinomas n = 7, melanomas n = 5), and 27.1% (sarcomas n = 10, carcinomas n = 8, melanomas n = 7) of cases, respectively. GLUT-1 expression was detected in 46.7% of all samples, and was generally weak. CAIX expression was found in 34.8% of all samples. Median Ki-67 score and MVD count was 19% and 17, respectively. The evaluation of the GLUT-1 score and continuous data showed significantly lower GLUT-1 levels in sarcomas (mean 5.1%, SD 6.2) versus carcinomas and melanomas (mean 16.5%/ 19.0%, SD 17.3/ 20.9, p = 0.001). The expression of CAIX correlated mildly positively with GLUT-1 (p = 0.018, rho = 0.250) as well as with Ki-67 (p = 0.014, rho = 0.295). MVD showed a significantly lower level in melanomas (mean 12.6, SD 7.7) versus sarcomas and carcinomas (mean 21.8/ 26.9, SD 13.0/20.4, p = 0.001). Median vascularity and blood volume were significantly lower in sarcomas (mean 10.4%, SD 11.0, and mean 6.3%, SD 6.5, respectively) versus carcinomas (mean 39.2%, SD 16.4 and mean 33.0%, SD 25.6, respectively) and melanomas (mean 36.0%, SD 18.3, and 31.5%, SD 24.5). Between the 3 histological groups, there was neither a significant difference in the GLUT-1 and CAIX score and continuous data, nor the Ki

  17. Assessment of Four Molecular Markers as Potential DNA Barcodes for Red Algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H.; Hurtado, Anicia Q.

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment. PMID:23285223

  18. Assessment of four molecular markers as potential DNA barcodes for red algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H; Hurtado, Anicia Q

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment.

  19. Assessment of four molecular markers as potential DNA barcodes for red algae Kappaphycus Doty and Eucheuma J. Agardh (Solieriaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Tan, Ji; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Phang, Siew-Moi; Hong, Dang Diem; Sunarpi, H; Hurtado, Anicia Q

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been a major advancement in the field of taxonomy, seeing much effort put into the barcoding of wide taxa of organisms, macro and microalgae included. The mitochondrial-encoded cox1 and plastid-encoded rbcL has been proposed as potential DNA barcodes for rhodophytes, but are yet to be tested on the commercially important carrageenophytes Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. This study gauges the effectiveness of four markers, namely the mitochondrial cox1, cox2, cox2-3 spacer and the plastid rbcL in DNA barcoding on selected Kappaphycus and Eucheuma from Southeast Asia. Marker assessments were performed using established distance and tree-based identification criteria from earlier studies. Barcoding patterns on a larger scale were simulated by empirically testing on the commonly used cox2-3 spacer. The phylogeny of these rhodophytes was also briefly described. In this study, the cox2 marker which satisfies the prerequisites of DNA barcodes was found to exhibit moderately high interspecific divergences with no intraspecific variations, thus a promising marker for the DNA barcoding of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma. However, the already extensively used cox2-3 spacer was deemed to be in overall more appropriate as a DNA barcode for these two genera. On a wider scale, cox1 and rbcL were still better DNA barcodes across the rhodophyte taxa when practicality and cost-efficiency were taken into account. The phylogeny of Kappaphycus and Eucheuma were generally similar to those earlier reported. Still, the application of DNA barcoding has demonstrated our relatively poor taxonomic comprehension of these seaweeds, thus suggesting more in-depth efforts in taxonomic restructuring as well as establishment. PMID:23285223

  20. Identification of MicroRNAs as Potential Prognostic Markers in Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Fabricio F.; Lulla, Rishi R.; Wang, Min; Sredni, Simone T.; Rajaram, Veena; de Fátima Bonaldo, Maria; Wang, Deli; Goldman, Stewart; Tomita, Tadanori; Soares, Marcelo B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We have examined expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in ependymomas to identify molecular markers of value for clinical management. miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that can block mRNA translation and affect mRNA stability. Changes in the expression of miRNAs have been correlated with many human cancers. Materials and Methods We have utilized TaqMan Low Density Arrays to evaluate the expression of 365 miRNAs in ependymomas and normal brain tissue. We first demonstrated the similarity of expression profiles of paired frozen tissue (FT) and paraffin-embedded specimens (FFPE). We compared the miRNA expression profiles of 34 FFPE ependymoma samples with 8 microdissected normal brain tissue specimens enriched for ependymal cells. miRNA expression profiles were then correlated with tumor location, histology and other clinicopathological features. Results We have identified miRNAs that are over-expressed in ependymomas, such as miR-135a and miR-17-5p, and down-regulated, such as miR-383 and miR-485-5p. We have also uncovered associations between expression of specific miRNAs which portend a worse prognosis. For example, we have identified a cluster of miRNAs on human chromosome 14q32 that is associated with time to relapse. We also found that miR-203 is an independent marker for relapse compared to the parameters that are currently used. Additionally, we have identified three miRNAs (let-7d, miR-596 and miR-367) that strongly correlate to overall survival. Conclusion We have identified miRNAs that are differentially expressed in ependymomas compared with normal ependymal tissue. We have also uncovered significant associations of miRNAs with clinical behavior. This is the first report of clinically relevant miRNAs in ependymomas. PMID:22053178

  1. Label-free visualization of collagen in submucosa as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jingting; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    The collagen signature in colorectal submucosa is changed due to remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the malignant process and plays an important role in noninvasive early detection of human colorectal cancer. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the changes of collagen in normal colorectal submucosa (NCS) and cancerous colorectal submucosa (CCS). What's more, the collagen content was quantitatively measured. It was found that in CCS the morphology of collagen becomes much looser and the collagen content is significantly reduced compared to NCS. These results suggest that MPM has the ability to provide collagen signature as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  2. Is poor oral health a risk marker for incident cardiovascular disease hospitalisation and all-cause mortality? Findings from 172 630 participants from the prospective 45 and Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Joshy, Grace; Arora, Manish; Korda, Rosemary J; Chalmers, John; Banks, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between oral health and incident hospitalisation for ischaemic heart disease (IHD), heart failure (HF), ischaemic stroke and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and all-cause mortality. Design Prospective population-based study of Australian men and women aged 45 years or older, who were recruited to the 45 and Up Study between January 2006 and April 2009; baseline questionnaire data were linked to hospitalisations and deaths up to December 2011. Study exposures include tooth loss and self-rated health of teeth and gums at baseline. Setting New South Wales, Australia. Participants Individuals aged 45–75 years, excluding those with a history of cancer/cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline; n=172 630. Primary outcomes Incident hospitalisation for IHD, HF, ischaemic stroke and PVD and all-cause mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 3.9 years, 3239 incident hospitalisations for IHD, 212 for HF, 283 for ischaemic stroke and 359 for PVD, and 1908 deaths, were observed. Cox proportional hazards models examined the relationship between oral health indicators and incident hospitalisation for CVD and all-cause mortality, adjusting for potential confounding factors. All-cause mortality and incident CVD hospitalisation risk increased significantly with increasing tooth loss for all outcomes except ischaemic stroke (ptrend<0.05). In those reporting no teeth versus ≥20 teeth left, risks were increased for HF (HR, 95% CI 1.97, 1.27 to 3.07), PVD (2.53, 1.81 to 3.52) and all-cause mortality (1.60, 1.37 to 1.87). The risk of IHD, PVD and all-cause mortality (but not HF or ischaemic stroke) increased significantly with worsening self-rated health of teeth and gums (ptrend<0.05). In those reporting poor versus very good health of teeth and gums, risks were increased for IHD (1.19, 1.03 to 1.38), PVD (1.66, 1.13 to 2.43) and all-cause mortality (1.76, 1.50 to 2.08). Conclusions Tooth loss and, to a lesser extent, self

  3. The potential of immobilized artificial membrane chromatography to predict human oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Tsopelas, Fotios; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography to estimate human oral absorption (%HOA) was investigated. For this purpose, retention indices on IAM stationary phases reported previously by our group or measured by other authors under similar conditions were used to model %HOA data, compiled from literature sources. Considering the pH gradient in gastrointestinal tract, the highest logkw(IAM) values were considered, obtained either at pH7.4 or 5.5, defined as logkw(IAM)(best). Non linear models were established upon introduction of additional parameters and after exclusion of drugs which are substrates either to efflux or uptake transporters. The best model included Abraham's hydrogen-bond acidity parameter, molecular weight as well as the positively and negatively charged molecular fractions. For reasons of comparison between IAM chromatography and traditional lipophilicity, corresponding models were derived by replacing IAM retention factors with octanol-water distribution coefficients (logD). An overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions was observed in the case of IAM retention as expressed by the negative contribution of the positively charged fraction F(+). The same parameter is statistically significant also in the logD model, but with a positive sign, indicating the attraction of basic drugs in the negatively charged inner membrane. To validate the obtained models a blind test set of 22 structurally diverse drugs was used, whose logkw(IAM)(best) values were determined and analyzed in the present study under similar conditions. IAM retention factors were further compared with MDCK cell lines permeability data taken from literature for a set of validation drugs. The overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions on IAM surface was also evident in respect to MDCK permeability. In contrast to the clear classification between drugs with high and poor (or intermediate) absorption provided by MDCK

  4. The potential of immobilized artificial membrane chromatography to predict human oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Tsopelas, Fotios; Vallianatou, Theodosia; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography to estimate human oral absorption (%HOA) was investigated. For this purpose, retention indices on IAM stationary phases reported previously by our group or measured by other authors under similar conditions were used to model %HOA data, compiled from literature sources. Considering the pH gradient in gastrointestinal tract, the highest logkw(IAM) values were considered, obtained either at pH7.4 or 5.5, defined as logkw(IAM)(best). Non linear models were established upon introduction of additional parameters and after exclusion of drugs which are substrates either to efflux or uptake transporters. The best model included Abraham's hydrogen-bond acidity parameter, molecular weight as well as the positively and negatively charged molecular fractions. For reasons of comparison between IAM chromatography and traditional lipophilicity, corresponding models were derived by replacing IAM retention factors with octanol-water distribution coefficients (logD). An overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions was observed in the case of IAM retention as expressed by the negative contribution of the positively charged fraction F(+). The same parameter is statistically significant also in the logD model, but with a positive sign, indicating the attraction of basic drugs in the negatively charged inner membrane. To validate the obtained models a blind test set of 22 structurally diverse drugs was used, whose logkw(IAM)(best) values were determined and analyzed in the present study under similar conditions. IAM retention factors were further compared with MDCK cell lines permeability data taken from literature for a set of validation drugs. The overexpression of electrostatic interactions with phosphate anions on IAM surface was also evident in respect to MDCK permeability. In contrast to the clear classification between drugs with high and poor (or intermediate) absorption provided by MDCK

  5. The chloroplast DNA locus psbZ-trnfM as a potential barcode marker in Phoenix L. (Arecaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ballardini, Marco; Mercuri, Antonio; Littardi, Claudio; Abbas, Summar; Couderc, Marie; Ludeña, Bertha; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genus Phoenix (Arecaceae) comprises 14 species distributed from Cape Verde Islands to SE Asia. It includes the economically important species Phoenix dactylifera. The paucity of differential morphological and anatomical useful characters, and interspecific hybridization, make identification of Phoenix species difficult. In this context, the development of reliable DNA markers for species and hybrid identification would be of great utility. Previous studies identified a 12 bp polymorphic chloroplast minisatellite in the trnG (GCC)-trnfM (CAU) spacer, and showed its potential for species identification in Phoenix. In this work, in order to develop an efficient DNA barcode marker for Phoenix, a longer cpDNA region (700 bp) comprising the mentioned minisatellite, and located between the psbZ and trnfM (CAU) genes, was sequenced. One hundred and thirty-six individuals, representing all Phoenix species except P. andamanensis,were analysed. The minisatellite showed 2-7 repetitions of the 12 bp motif, with 1-3 out of seven haplotypes per species. Phoenix reclinata and P. canariensis had species-specific haplotypes. Additional polymorphisms were found in the flanking regions of the minisatellite, including substitutions, indels and homopolymers. All this information allowed us to identify unambiguously eight out of the 13 species, and overall 80% of the individuals sampled. Phoenix rupicola and P. theophrasti had the same haplotype, and so had P. atlantica, P. dactylifera, and P. sylvestris (the “date palm complex” sensu Pintaud et al. 2013). For these species, additional molecular markers will be required for their unambiguous identification. The psbZ-trnfM (CAU) region therefore could be considered as a good basis for the establishment of a DNA barcoding system in Phoenix, and is potentially useful for the identification of the female parent in Phoenix hybrids. PMID:24453552

  6. The chloroplast DNA locus psbZ-trnfM as a potential barcode marker in Phoenix L. (Arecaceae).

    PubMed

    Ballardini, Marco; Mercuri, Antonio; Littardi, Claudio; Abbas, Summar; Couderc, Marie; Ludeña, Bertha; Pintaud, Jean-Christophe

    2013-12-30

    The genus Phoenix (Arecaceae) comprises 14 species distributed from Cape Verde Islands to SE Asia. It includes the economically important species Phoenix dactylifera. The paucity of differential morphological and anatomical useful characters, and interspecific hybridization, make identification of Phoenix species difficult. In this context, the development of reliable DNA markers for species and hybrid identification would be of great utility. Previous studies identified a 12 bp polymorphic chloroplast minisatellite in the trnG (GCC)-trnfM (CAU) spacer, and showed its potential for species identification in Phoenix. In this work, in order to develop an efficient DNA barcode marker for Phoenix, a longer cpDNA region (700 bp) comprising the mentioned minisatellite, and located between the psbZ and trnfM (CAU) genes, was sequenced. One hundred and thirty-six individuals, representing all Phoenix species except P. andamanensis,were analysed. The minisatellite showed 2-7 repetitions of the 12 bp motif, with 1-3 out of seven haplotypes per species. Phoenix reclinata and P. canariensis had species-specific haplotypes. Additional polymorphisms were found in the flanking regions of the minisatellite, including substitutions, indels and homopolymers. All this information allowed us to identify unambiguously eight out of the 13 species, and overall 80% of the individuals sampled. Phoenix rupicola and P. theophrasti had the same haplotype, and so had P. atlantica, P. dactylifera, and P. sylvestris (the "date palm complex" sensu Pintaud et al. 2013). For these species, additional molecular markers will be required for their unambiguous identification. The psbZ-trnfM (CAU) region therefore could be considered as a good basis for the establishment of a DNA barcoding system in Phoenix, and is potentially useful for the identification of the female parent in Phoenix hybrids. PMID:24453552

  7. Detection and Isolation of Swine Influenza A Virus in Spiked Oral Fluid and Samples from Individually Housed, Experimentally Infected Pigs: Potential Role of Porcine Oral Fluid in Active Influenza A Virus Surveillance in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Decorte, Inge; Steensels, Mieke; Lambrecht, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Background The lack of seasonality of swine influenza A virus (swIAV) in combination with the capacity of swine to harbor a large number of co-circulating IAV lineages, resulting in the risk for the emergence of influenza viruses with pandemic potential, stress the importance of swIAV surveillance. To date, active surveillance of swIAV worldwide is barely done because of the short detection period in nasal swab samples. Therefore, more sensitive diagnostic methods to monitor circulating virus strains are requisite. Methods qRT-PCR and virus isolations were performed on oral fluid and nasal swabs collected from individually housed pigs that were infected sequentially with H1N1 and H3N2 swIAV strains. The same methods were also applied to oral fluid samples spiked with H1N1 to study the influence of conservation time and temperature on swIAV infectivity and detectability in porcine oral fluid. Results All swIAV infected animals were found qRT-PCR positive in both nasal swabs and oral fluid. However, swIAV could be detected for a longer period in oral fluid than in nasal swabs. Despite the high detectability of swIAV in oral fluid, virus isolation from oral fluid collected from infected pigs was rare. These results are supported by laboratory studies showing that the PCR detectability of swIAV remains unaltered during a 24 h incubation period in oral fluid, while swIAV infectivity drops dramatically immediately upon contact with oral fluid (3 log titer reduction) and gets lost after 24 h conservation in oral fluid at ambient temperature. Conclusions Our data indicate that porcine oral fluid has the potential to replace nasal swabs for molecular diagnostic purposes. The difficulty to isolate swIAV from oral fluid could pose a drawback for its use in active surveillance programs. PMID:26431039

  8. A potent oral P-selectin blocking agent improves microcirculatory blood flow and a marker of endothelial cell injury in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kutlar, Abdullah; Ataga, Kenneth I; McMahon, Lillian; Howard, Joanna; Galacteros, Frederic; Hagar, Ward; Vichinsky, Elliott; Cheung, Anthony T W; Matsui, Neil; Embury, Stephen H

    2012-05-01

    Abnormal blood flow accounts for most of the clinical morbidity of sickle cell disease (SCD) [1,2]. Most notably, occlusion of flow in the microvasculature causes the acute pain crises [3] that are the commonest cause for patients with SCD to seek medical attention [4] and major determinants of their quality of life [5]. Based on evidence that endothelial P-selectin is central to the abnormal blood flow in SCD we provide results from four of our studies that are germane to microvascular blood flow in SCD. A proof-of-principle study established that doses of heparin lower than what are used for anticoagulation but sufficient to block P-selectin improved microvascular blood flow inpatients with SCD. An in vitro study showed that Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium (PPS) had greater P-selectin blocking activity than heparin. A Phase I clinical study demonstrated that a single oral dose of PPS increased microvascular blood flow in patients with SCD. A Phase II clinical study that was not completed documented that daily oral doses of PPS administered for 8 weeks lowered plasma levels of sVCAM-1 and tended to improve microvascular blood flow in patients with SCD. These data support the concept that P-selectin on the microvascular endothelium is critical to both acute vascular occlusion and chronically impaired microvascular blood flow in SCD. They also demonstrate that oral PPS is beneficial to microvascular sickle cell blood flow and has potential as an efficacious agent for long-term prophylactic therapy of SCD.

  9. Investigating the potential of fluorescent fingerprint powders as a marker for blow fly larvae (Diptera: calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Rosati, Jennifer Y; Robinson, Scott D; Devine, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Four fluorescent fingerprint powders (RedWop(™) , GreenWop(™) , Basic Yellow(™) , and Yellow Powder(™) ) were evaluated as a marker for blow fly larvae. Administration methods included ingestion (high vs. low concentration) or topical. Ingestion of high concentrations of Basic Yellow(™) and RedWop(™) caused higher larval mortality. Basic Yellow(™) delayed development and adult emergence while RedWop(™) and Yellow Powder(™) had a significant effect on particular stages of development, however, emergence time was not altered. Optimal administration is through ingestion at low concentration levels (<10%) or topically, with GreenWop(™) demonstrating minimal adverse effects. Optimum wavelength for discrimination between powders was 450 nm. This research can aid in investigative training to increase visibility of larval and pupal blow flies. It can also be used in entomological studies to differentiate between larval blow flies (or other dipteran) species or individuals to further understand complex interactions and behavior during larval development.

  10. Mutations in p53 as potential molecular markers for human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Runnebaum, I.B.; Nagarajan, M.; Bowman, M.; Soto, D.; Sukumar, S. )

    1991-12-01

    Based on the high incidence of loss of heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p in the vicinity of the p53 locus in human breast tumors. The authors investigated the frequency and effects of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene in mammary neoplasia. They examined the p53 gene in 20 breast cancer cell lines and 59 primary breast tumors. Northern blot analysis, immunoprecipitation, and nucleotide sequencing analysis revealed aberrant mRNA expression, over-expression of protein, and point mutations in the p53 gene in 50% of the cell line tested. A multiplex PCR assay was developed to search for deletions in the p53 genomic locus. Multiplex PCR of genomic DNA showed that up to 36% of primary tumors contained aberrations in the p53 locus. Mutations in exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were found in 10 out of 59 (17%) of the primary tumors studied by single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. They conclude that, compared to amplification of HER2/NEU, MYC, or INT2 oncogene loci, p53 gene mutations and deletions are the most frequently observed genetic change in breast cancer related to a single gene. Correlated to disease status, p53 gene mutations could prove to be a valuable marker for diagnosis and/or prognosis of breast neoplasia.

  11. Cytochrome c as a Potentially Clinical Useful Marker of Mitochondrial and Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts derived from bacteria. Thus, they bear molecules, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that contains CpG DNA repeats and N-formyl peptides (FPs), found in bacteria. Upon cell necrosis or apoptosis, these molecules are released into the interstitial space and the circulation and recognized by the immune cells through the same receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leading to inflammation. Other mitochondrial molecules are not of bacterial origin, but they may serve as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) when due to cell injury are translocated into inappropriate compartments. There they are recognized by pattern recognition receptors of the immune cells. Cytochrome c is such a molecule. In this review, experimental and clinical data are presented that confirms cytochrome c release into the extracellular space in pathological conditions characterized by cell death. This indicates that serum cytochrome c, which can be easily measured, may be a clinically useful marker for diagnosing and assessing the severity of such pathological entities. Reasonably, detection of high cytochrome c level into the circulation means release of various other molecules that serves as DAMPs when found extracellularly, the mtDNA and FPs included. Finally, because the release of this universally found compound into the extracellular space makes cytochrome c an ideal molecule to play the role of a DAMP per se, the available experimental and clinical data that support such a role are provided. PMID:27489552

  12. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Sung; Kim, Hye Lim; Kim, Yeo Jin; Weon, Jong-Il; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hai Won; Seo, Young Rok

    2014-01-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual's genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction) is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke) and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation) is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk. PMID:25243052

  13. Fate of CL-20 in sandy soils: degradation products as potential markers of natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Monteil-Rivera, Fanny; Halasz, Annamaria; Manno, Dominic; Kuperman, Roman G; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is an emerging explosive that may replace the currently used explosives such as RDX and HMX, but little is known about its fate in soil. The present study was conducted to determine degradation products of CL-20 in two sandy soils under abiotic and biotic anaerobic conditions. Biotic degradation was prevalent in the slightly acidic VT soil, which contained a greater organic C content, while the slightly alkaline SAC soil favored hydrolysis. CL-20 degradation was accompanied by the formation of formate, glyoxal, nitrite, ammonium, and nitrous oxide. Biotic degradation of CL-20 occurred through the formation of its denitrohydrogenated derivative (m/z 393 Da) while hydrolysis occurred through the formation of a ring cleavage product (m/z 156 Da) that was tentatively identified as CH(2)=N-C(=N-NO(2))-CH=N-CHO or its isomer N(NO(2))=CH-CH=N-CO-CH=NH. Due to their chemical specificity, these two intermediates may be considered as markers of in situ attenuation of CL-20 in soil.

  14. Fate of CL-20 in sandy soils: degradation products as potential markers of natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Monteil-Rivera, Fanny; Halasz, Annamaria; Manno, Dominic; Kuperman, Roman G; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is an emerging explosive that may replace the currently used explosives such as RDX and HMX, but little is known about its fate in soil. The present study was conducted to determine degradation products of CL-20 in two sandy soils under abiotic and biotic anaerobic conditions. Biotic degradation was prevalent in the slightly acidic VT soil, which contained a greater organic C content, while the slightly alkaline SAC soil favored hydrolysis. CL-20 degradation was accompanied by the formation of formate, glyoxal, nitrite, ammonium, and nitrous oxide. Biotic degradation of CL-20 occurred through the formation of its denitrohydrogenated derivative (m/z 393 Da) while hydrolysis occurred through the formation of a ring cleavage product (m/z 156 Da) that was tentatively identified as CH(2)=N-C(=N-NO(2))-CH=N-CHO or its isomer N(NO(2))=CH-CH=N-CO-CH=NH. Due to their chemical specificity, these two intermediates may be considered as markers of in situ attenuation of CL-20 in soil. PMID:18801604

  15. Cytochrome c as a Potentially Clinical Useful Marker of Mitochondrial and Cellular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts derived from bacteria. Thus, they bear molecules, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that contains CpG DNA repeats and N-formyl peptides (FPs), found in bacteria. Upon cell necrosis or apoptosis, these molecules are released into the interstitial space and the circulation and recognized by the immune cells through the same receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leading to inflammation. Other mitochondrial molecules are not of bacterial origin, but they may serve as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) when due to cell injury are translocated into inappropriate compartments. There they are recognized by pattern recognition receptors of the immune cells. Cytochrome c is such a molecule. In this review, experimental and clinical data are presented that confirms cytochrome c release into the extracellular space in pathological conditions characterized by cell death. This indicates that serum cytochrome c, which can be easily measured, may be a clinically useful marker for diagnosing and assessing the severity of such pathological entities. Reasonably, detection of high cytochrome c level into the circulation means release of various other molecules that serves as DAMPs when found extracellularly, the mtDNA and FPs included. Finally, because the release of this universally found compound into the extracellular space makes cytochrome c an ideal molecule to play the role of a DAMP per se, the available experimental and clinical data that support such a role are provided. PMID:27489552

  16. Differential protein mapping of ovarian serous adenocarcinomas: identification of potential markers for distinct tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Wu, Rong; Cho, Kathleen R; Thomas, Dafydd G; Gossner, Gabrielle; Liu, J Rebecca; Giordano, Thomas J; Shedden, Kerby A; Misek, David E; Lubman, David M

    2009-03-01

    Ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) comprise over half of all ovarian carcinomas and account for the majority of ovarian cancer-related deaths. We used a 2-dimensional liquid-based protein mapping strategy to characterize global protein expression patterns in 19 OSC tumor samples from 15 different patients to facilitate molecular classification of tumor stage. Protein expression profiles were produced, using pI-based separation in the first dimension and hydrophobicity-based separation in the second dimension, over a pH range of 4.0-7.0. Hierarchical clustering was applied to protein maps to indicate the tumor interrelationships. The 19 tumor samples could be classified into two different groups, one group associated with low stage (Stage 1) tumors and the other group associated with high stage (Stages 3/4) tumors. Proteins that were differentially expressed in different groups were selected for identification by LTQ-ESI-MS/MS. Fourteen of the selected proteins were overexpressed in the low stage tumors; 46 of the proteins were overexpressed in the high stage tumors. These proteins are known to play an important role in cellular functions such as glycolysis, protein biosynthesis, and cytoskeleton rearrangement and may serve as markers associated with different stages of OSCs. To further confirm the stage-dependent protein identifications, Lamin A/C and Vimentin expression in ovarian serous carcinomas was assessed by immunohistochemistry using ovarian tumor tissue microarrays for 66 samples.

  17. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential markers of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vlagea, Alexandru; Gil, Antonio; Cuesta, Maria V; Arribas, Florencia; Diez, Jesús; Lavilla, Paz; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora

    2013-06-01

    The antiphospholipid antibodies present in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are directed at a number of phospholipid-binding proteins: β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin, and so on. Antibodies directed at β2GPI are accepted as a classification criterion for APS, while the presence of antiprothrombin antibodies is not. In the present article, we investigated the possible role of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as marker of APS on a cohort of 295 individuals with APS (95 primary APS and 45 secondary APS) and APS-related diseases. We found aPS/PT to be highly associated with venous thrombosis (immunoglobulin G [IgG] aPS/PT odds ratio [OR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97-13.92 and IgM aPS/PT OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.35-4.77) and obstetric abnormalities (IgG aPS/PT OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.04-5.43), but not with arterial thrombosis. A very high degree of concordance between the concentration of aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant activity was demonstrated. Therefore, we support the inclusion of aPS/PT determination as second-level assay to confirm APS classification.

  18. Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase may serve as a potential marker and therapeutic target for prostate cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    YIN, BO; YANG, YANG; ZHAO, ZHIQIANG; ZENG, YU; MOONEY, STEVEN M.; LI, MING; XU, XUEWEN; SONG, YONGSHENG; WU, BIN; YANG, ZHIBO

    2014-01-01

    The presence of arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) potentiates prostate cancer (PCa) progression and therefore may be a good therapeutic target and/or a potential diagnostic predictor for PCa. In this study, we examined the expression of 12-LOX in PCa stem cells (PCa SCs) to test if it can serve as a unique marker and therapeutic target for PCa SCs. To this end, we isolated the cancer stem cell-like side population (SP) cells from the human PCa cell line DU-145 by a flow cytometry-based SP technique. The isolated DU-145 SP cells comprised a small population of the DU-145 cells. The SP cells had an up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2) which enables these cells to efflux vital dyes and chemotherapeutic drugs. Furthermore, we detected a strong up-regulation of 12-LOX in these DU-145 SP cells compared to the parental DU-145 cells by RT-PCR and Western blot approaches. We also detected 12-LOX overexpression in PCa SCs in human PCa tissue samples by paraffin-section based immunofluorescent 4-channel confocal microscopy. However, no 12-LOX was detected in normal prostate epithelial SCs in normal prostate tissue samples. These multiple lines of evidence support the possibility that 12-LOX may serve as a unique marker and therapeutic target for PCa SCs. PMID:21225230

  19. In situ marker-based assessment of leaf trait evolutionary potential in a marginal European beech population.

    PubMed

    Bontemps, A; Lefèvre, F; Davi, H; Oddou-Muratorio, S

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary processes are expected to be crucial for the adaptation of natural populations to environmental changes. In particular, the capacity of rear edge populations to evolve in response to the species limiting conditions remains a major issue that requires to address their evolutionary potential. In situ quantitative genetic studies based on molecular markers offer the possibility to estimate evolutionary potentials manipulating neither the environment nor the individuals on which phenotypes are measured. The goal of this study was to estimate heritability and genetic correlations of a suite of leaf functional traits involved in climate adaptation for a natural population of the tree Fagus sylvatica, growing at the rear edge of the species range. Using two marker-based quantitative genetics approaches, we obtained consistent and significant estimates of heritability for leaf phenological (phenology of leaf flush), morphological (mass, area, ratio mass/area) and physiological (δ(13)C, nitrogen content) traits. Moreover, we found only one significant positive genetic correlation between leaf area and leaf mass, which likely reflected mechanical constraints. We conclude first that the studied population has considerable genetic diversity for important ecophysiological traits regarding drought adaptation and, second, that genetic correlations are not likely to impose strong genetic constraints to future population evolution. Our results bring important insights into the question of the capacity of rear edge populations to evolve. PMID:26679342

  20. The potential for a suite of isotope and chemical markers to differentiate sources of nitrate contamination: a review.

    PubMed

    Fenech, C; Rock, L; Nolan, K; Tobin, J; Morrissey, A

    2012-05-01

    Nitrate is naturally found within the environment as part of the nitrogen cycle. However, anthropogenic inputs have greatly increased nitrate loads within ground and surface waters. This has had a severe impact on aquatic ecosystems and has given rise to health considerations in humans and livestock. Therefore, the identification of nitrate sources is important in preserving water quality and achieving sustainability of our water resources. Nitrate sources can be determined based on the nitrate nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotopic compositions (δ(15)N, δ(18)O). However, sewage and manure have overlapping δ(15)N and δ(18)O values making their differentiation on this basis problematic. The specific differentiation between sources of faecal contamination is of particular importance, because the risk to humans is usually considered higher from human faecal contamination (sewage) than from animal faecal contamination. This review summarises the current state of knowledge in using isotope tracers to differentiate various nitrate sources and identifies potential chemical tracers for differentiating sewage and manure. In particular, an in depth review of the current state of knowledge regarding the necessary considerations in using chemical markers, such as pharmaceuticals and food additives, to differentiate sewage and manure sources of nitrate contamination will be given, through an understanding of their use, occurrence and fate, in order to identify the most suitable potential chemical markers.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered terbinafine in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus) for potential treatment of aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Bechert, Ursula; Christensen, J Mark; Poppenga, Robert; Le, Hang; Wyatt, Jeff; Schmitt, Todd

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of orally administered terbinafine hydrochloride based on 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg single- as well as multiple-dosage trials in order to calculate dosing requirements for potential treatment of aspergillosis in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus). Ten adult African penguins were used in each of these trials, with a 2-wk washout period between trials. Mean plasma concentrations of terbinafine peaked in approximately 4 hrs at 0.11 +/- 0.017 microg/ml (mean +/- SD) following administration of 3 mg/kg terbinafine, while 7 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg dosages resulted in peak plasma concentrations of 0.37 +/- 0.105 and 0.33 +/- 0.054 microg/ml, respectively. The volume of distribution increased with increasing dosages, being 37 +/- 28.5, 40 +/- 28.1, and 52 +/- 18.6 mg/L for 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. The mean half-life was biphasic with initial terminal half-life (t(1/2)) values of 9.9 +/- 4.5, 17.2 +/- 4.9 and 16.9 +/- 5.4 hrs, for 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. A rapid first elimination phase was followed by a slower second phase, and final elimination was estimated to be 136 +/- 9.7 and 131 +/- 9.9 hrs, for 7 and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. Linearity was demonstrated for area under the curve but not for peak plasma concentrations for the three dosages used. Calculations based on pharmacokinetic parameter values indicate that a 15 mg/kg terbinafine q24h dosage regimen would result in steady-state trough plasma concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (0.8-1.6 microg/ ml), and this dosage is recommended as a potential treatment option for aspergillosis in penguins. However, additional research is required to determine both treatment efficacy and safety. PMID:20597218

  2. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered terbinafine in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus) for potential treatment of aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Bechert, Ursula; Christensen, J Mark; Poppenga, Robert; Le, Hang; Wyatt, Jeff; Schmitt, Todd

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of orally administered terbinafine hydrochloride based on 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg single- as well as multiple-dosage trials in order to calculate dosing requirements for potential treatment of aspergillosis in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus). Ten adult African penguins were used in each of these trials, with a 2-wk washout period between trials. Mean plasma concentrations of terbinafine peaked in approximately 4 hrs at 0.11 +/- 0.017 microg/ml (mean +/- SD) following administration of 3 mg/kg terbinafine, while 7 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg dosages resulted in peak plasma concentrations of 0.37 +/- 0.105 and 0.33 +/- 0.054 microg/ml, respectively. The volume of distribution increased with increasing dosages, being 37 +/- 28.5, 40 +/- 28.1, and 52 +/- 18.6 mg/L for 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. The mean half-life was biphasic with initial terminal half-life (t(1/2)) values of 9.9 +/- 4.5, 17.2 +/- 4.9 and 16.9 +/- 5.4 hrs, for 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. A rapid first elimination phase was followed by a slower second phase, and final elimination was estimated to be 136 +/- 9.7 and 131 +/- 9.9 hrs, for 7 and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. Linearity was demonstrated for area under the curve but not for peak plasma concentrations for the three dosages used. Calculations based on pharmacokinetic parameter values indicate that a 15 mg/kg terbinafine q24h dosage regimen would result in steady-state trough plasma concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (0.8-1.6 microg/ ml), and this dosage is recommended as a potential treatment option for aspergillosis in penguins. However, additional research is required to determine both treatment efficacy and safety.

  3. Gene Expression Changes in Developing Zebrafish as Potential Markers for Rapid Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sparse information exists on many chemicals to guide developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) risk assessments. As DNT testing using rodents is laborious and expensive, alternative species such as zebrafish are being adapted for toxicity screening. Assessing the DNT potential of chem...

  4. Oral tolerance in neonates: from basics to potential prevention of allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Verhasselt, V

    2010-07-01

    Oral tolerance refers to the observation that prior feeding of an antigen induces local and systemic immune tolerance to that antigen. Physiologically, this process is probably of central importance for preventing inflammatory responses to the numerous dietary and microbial antigens present in the gut. Defective oral tolerance can lead to gut inflammatory disease, food allergies, and celiac disease. In the last two cases, the diseases develop early in life, stressing the necessity of understanding how oral tolerance is set up in neonates. This article reviews the parameters that have been outlined in adult animal models as necessary for tolerance induction and assesses whether these factors operate in neonates. In addition, we highlight the factors that are specific for this period of life and discuss how they could have an impact on oral tolerance. We pay particular attention to maternal influence on early oral tolerance induction through breast-feeding and outline the major parameters that could be modified to optimize tolerance induction in early life and possibly prevent allergic diseases. PMID:20485330

  5. Assessment of adhesion, invasion and cytotoxicity potential of oral Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Ben Nejma, Mouna; Helali, Imen; Hentati, Hajer; Bongiovanni, Antonino; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2015-09-01

    The oral cavity is regarded as a relevant site for Staphylococcus aureus colonization. However, characterization of virulence mechanisms of oral S. aureus remains to be uncovered. In this study, twenty one S. aureus strains isolated from the oral cavity of Tunisian patients were screened for adherence, invasion and cytotoxicity against HeLa cells. In addition, the presence of adhesins (icaA, icaD, can, fnbA and fnbB) and α-hemolysin (hla) genes in each strain was achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our finding revealed that oral S. aureus strains were able to adhere and invade epithelial cells, with variable degrees (P < 0.05). Moreover they exhibited either low (23.8%) or moderate (76.2%) cytotoxic effects. In addition 76.2% of strains were icaA and icaD positive and 90.5% harbor both the fnbA and the fnbB gene. While the cna gene was detected in 12 strains (57.2%). Furthermore, the hla gene encoding the α-toxin was found in 52.4% of the isolates. All these virulence factors give to S. aureus the right qualities to become a redoubtable pathogen associated to oral infections.

  6. Marker-Trait Association for Biomass Yield of Potential Bio-fuel Feedstock Miscanthus sinensis from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Gang; Huang, Linkai; Zhang, Xinquan; Taylor, Megan; Jiang, Yiwei; Yu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Xinchun; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    As a great potential bio-fuel feedstock, the genus Miscanthus has been widely studied around the world, especially Miscanthus × giganteus owing to its high biomass yield in Europe and North America. However, the narrow genetic basis and sterile characteristics of M. × giganteus have become a limitation for utilization and adaptation to extreme climate conditions. In this study, we focused on one of the progenitors of M. × giganteus, Miscanthus sinensis, which was originally distributed in East Asia with abundant genetic resources and comparable biomass yield potential to M. × giganteus in some areas. A collection of 138 individuals was selected for conducting a 3-year trial of biomass production and analyzed by using 104 pairs of SRAP, ISAP, and SSR primers for genetic diversity as well as marker-trait association. Significant differences in biomass yield and related traits were observed among individuals. Tiller number, fresh biomass yield per plant and dry biomass yield per plant had a high level of phenotypic variation among individuals and the coefficient of variation were all above 40% in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The majority of the traits had a significant correlation with the biomass yield except for the length and width of flag leaves. Plant height was a highly stable trait correlated with biomass yield. A total of 1059 discernible loci were detected by markers across individuals. The population structure (Q) and cluster analyses identified three subpopulations in the collection and family relative kinship (K) represented high gene flow among M. sinensis populations from Southwest China. Model testing identified that Q+K was the best model for describing the associations between the markers and traits, compared to the simple linear, Q or K model. Using the Q+K model, 12 significant associations (P < 0.001) were identified including four markers with plant height and one with biomass yield. Such associations would serve an efficient tool for an early

  7. Marker-Trait Association for Biomass Yield of Potential Bio-fuel Feedstock Miscanthus sinensis from Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Gang; Huang, Linkai; Zhang, Xinquan; Taylor, Megan; Jiang, Yiwei; Yu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Xinchun; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yajie

    2016-01-01

    As a great potential bio-fuel feedstock, the genus Miscanthus has been widely studied around the world, especially Miscanthus × giganteus owing to its high biomass yield in Europe and North America. However, the narrow genetic basis and sterile characteristics of M. × giganteus have become a limitation for utilization and adaptation to extreme climate conditions. In this study, we focused on one of the progenitors of M. × giganteus, Miscanthus sinensis, which was originally distributed in East Asia with abundant genetic resources and comparable biomass yield potential to M. × giganteus in some areas. A collection of 138 individuals was selected for conducting a 3-year trial of biomass production and analyzed by using 104 pairs of SRAP, ISAP, and SSR primers for genetic diversity as well as marker-trait association. Significant differences in biomass yield and related traits were observed among individuals. Tiller number, fresh biomass yield per plant and dry biomass yield per plant had a high level of phenotypic variation among individuals and the coefficient of variation were all above 40% in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The majority of the traits had a significant correlation with the biomass yield except for the length and width of flag leaves. Plant height was a highly stable trait correlated with biomass yield. A total of 1059 discernible loci were detected by markers across individuals. The population structure (Q) and cluster analyses identified three subpopulations in the collection and family relative kinship (K) represented high gene flow among M. sinensis populations from Southwest China. Model testing identified that Q+K was the best model for describing the associations between the markers and traits, compared to the simple linear, Q or K model. Using the Q+K model, 12 significant associations (P < 0.001) were identified including four markers with plant height and one with biomass yield. Such associations would serve an efficient tool for an early

  8. Arm Swing as a Potential New Prodromal Marker of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirelman, Anat; Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Thaler, Avner; Giladi-Yacobi, Eytan; Gurevich, Tanya; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Raymond, Deborah; Doan, Nancy; Bressman, Susan B.; Marder, Karen S.; Alcalay, Roy N.; Rao, Ashwini K.; Berg, Daniela; Brockmann, Kathrin; Aasly, Jan; Waro, Bjørg Johanne; Tolosa, Eduardo; Vilas, Dolores; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Giladi, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reduced arm swing is a well-known clinical feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD), often observed early in the course of the disease. We hypothesized that subtle changes in arm swing and axial rotation may also be detectable in the prodromal phase. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the LRRK2-G2019S mutation, arm swing, and axial rotation in healthy nonmanifesting carriers and noncarriers of the G2019S mutation and in patients with PD. Methods A total of 380 participants (186 healthy nonmanifesting controls and 194 PD patients) from 6 clinical sites underwent gait analysis while wearing synchronized 3-axis body-fixed sensors on the lower back and bilateral wrists. Participants walked for 1 minute under the following 2 conditions: (1) usual walking and (2) dual-task walking. Arm swing amplitudes, asymmetry, variability, and smoothness were calculated for both arms along with measures of axial rotation. Results A total of 122 nonmanifesting participants and 67 PD patients were carriers of the G2019S mutation. Nonmanifesting mutation carriers walked with greater arm swing asymmetry and variability and lower axial rotation smoothness under the dual task condition when compared with noncarriers (P < .04). In the nonmanifesting mutation carriers, arm swing asymmetry was associated with gait variability under dual task (P = .003). PD carriers showed greater asymmetry and variability of movement than PD noncarriers, even after controlling for disease severity (P < .009). Conclusions The G2019S mutation is associated with increased asymmetry and variability among nonmanifesting participants and patients with PD. Prospective studies should determine if arm swing asymmetry and axial rotation smoothness may be used as motor markers of prodromal PD. PMID:27430880

  9. Monitoring response to treatment in melanoma patients: potential of a serum glycomic marker.

    PubMed

    Selvan, Senthamil R; Dillman, Robert O; Fowler, Abner W; Carbonell, Denysha J; Ravindranath, Mepur H

    2008-03-15

    A mechanistic marker correlating with tumor progression and clinical response is useful for assessing therapeutic response and determining the course of therapy. Since serum-total-ganglioside (sTG) and antiganglioside-IgM antibody levels reflected tumor progression, the feasibility of utilizing sTG for assessing the response to immunotherapy of metastatic-melanoma was tested. Patients (n = 34) were immunized with dendritic cells cocultured with irradiated, IFN gamma-treated autologous tumor cells admixed with GM-CSF. Levels of sTG and antiganglioside-IgM antibody titers were measured in sera of vaccine recipients at 0, 4 and 24 weeks of treatment. Based on sTG-level, whether lower (L) or higher (H) than the mean + 1 SD of normal and healthy volunteers on weeks 0, 4 and 24, patients were categorized into cohorts-I (LLL, n = 16), II (HHL/HLL, n = 4), III (LLH/LHH/LHL, n = 7) and IV (HHH/HLH, n = 7). The cohorts were regrouped as sTG- downregulators (sTG-DR; n = 20) and upregulators (sTG-UR; n = 14). These two cohorts differed significantly in their overall (p < 0.012) and progression-free (p = 0.0001) survival post-treatment. 43% sTG-UR died within 39 months, with a median survival of 39 months, whereas 61% of the sTG-DR survived for 48 months. Both endogenous and vaccine-induced antiganglioside-IgM antibodies appeared to regulate sTG levels. Nonresponders had increased sTG with no or low IgM antibody response. The sTG level is regulated within 24 weeks post-treatment and therefore, may serve as an ideal biomarker for assessing therapeutic responses in patients. Clinical correlations of sTG indicate that sTG-downregulating therapy may be an effective treatment strategy for melanoma. PMID:17960619

  10. The potential of microRNAs as biofluid markers of neurodegenerative diseases--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Danborg, Pia B; Simonsen, Anja H; Waldemar, Gunhild; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are biological molecules transcribed from non-protein coding regions of the genome, participating in regulating cellular processes. MiRNAs in biofluids may possess neurodegenerative disease biomarker potential for screening tests, differential diagnosis and disease progression monitoring. This systematic review clarifies biomarker potential of miRNAs detected in biofluids of neurodegenerative disease patients. Thirty-three and ten miRNAs displayed significant expression between patients with multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, compared to healthy controls in minimum two studies. Thirty-eight miRNAs showed biomarker potential by distinguishing significantly between minimum two diseases. Summarized data directs future research towards discovering new biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. A novel series of potent and selective PDE5 inhibitors with potential for high and dose-independent oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Allerton, Charlotte M N; Barber, Christopher G; Beaumont, Kevin C; Brown, David G; Cole, Susan M; Ellis, David; Lane, Charlotte A L; Maw, Graham N; Mount, Natalie M; Rawson, David J; Robinson, Colin M; Street, Stephen D A; Summerhill, Nicholas W

    2006-06-15

    Sildenafil (5-[2-ethoxy-5-(4-methyl-1-piperazinylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1-methyl-3-n-propyl-1,6-dihydro-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one), a potent and selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, provided the first oral treatment for male erectile dysfunction. The objective of the work reported in this paper was to combine high levels of PDE5 potency and selectivity with high and dose-independent oral bioavailability, to minimize the impact on the C(max) of any interactions with coadministered drugs in the clinic. This goal was achieved through identification of a lower clearance series with a high absorption profile, by replacing the 5'-piperazine sulfonamide in the sildenafil template with a 5'-methyl ketone. This novel series provided compounds with low metabolism in human hepatocytes, excellent caco-2 flux, and the potential for good aqueous solubility. The in vivo oral and iv pharmacokinetic profiles of example compounds confirmed the high oral bioavailability predicted from these in vitro screens. 5-(5-Acetyl-2-butoxy-3-pyridinyl)-3-ethyl-2-(1-ethyl-3-azetidinyl)-2,6-dihydro-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (2) was selected for progression into the clinic. PMID:16759100

  12. Potential for Metabolomics-Based Markers of Exposure:Encouraging Evidence from Studies using Model Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic techniques (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) have the potential to significantly improve the way chemical risk is managed in the 21st century. Indeed, a significant amount of research has been devoted to the use of these techniques to screen chemicals for h...

  13. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster genome: abundance, distribution, and potential for marker development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Qi, Haigang; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are a ubiquitous component of the eukaryote genome and constitute one of the most popular sources of molecular markers for genetic studies. However, no data are currently available regarding microsatellites across the entire genome in oysters, despite their importance to the aquaculture industry. We present the first genome-wide investigation of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas by analysis of the complete genome, resequencing, and expression data. The Pacific oyster genome is rich in microsatellites. A total of 604 653 repeats were identified, in average of one locus per 815 base pairs (bp). A total of 12 836 genes had coding repeats, and 7 332 were expressed normally, including genes with a wide range of molecular functions. Compared with 20 different species of animals, microsatellites in the oyster genome typically exhibited 1) an intermediate overall frequency; 2) relatively uniform contents of (A)n and (C)n repeats and abundant long (C)n repeats (≥24 bp); 3) large average length of (AG)n repeats; and 4) scarcity of trinucleotide repeats. The microsatellite-flanking regions exhibited a high degree of polymorphism with a heterozygosity rate of around 2.0%, but there was no correlation between heterozygosity and microsatellite abundance. A total of 19 462 polymorphic microsatellites were discovered, and dinucleotide repeats were the most active, with over 26% of loci found to harbor allelic variations. In all, 7 451 loci with high potential for marker development were identified. Better knowledge of the microsatellites in the oyster genome will provide information for the future design of a wide range of molecular markers and contribute to further advancements in the field of oyster genetics, particularly for molecular-based selection and breeding.

  14. Behavior of the polycyclic musks HHCB and AHTN in lakes, two potential anthropogenic markers for domestic wastewater in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Buerge, Ignaz J; Buser, Hans-Rudolf; Müller, Markus D; Poiger, Thomas

    2003-12-15

    The synthetic polycyclic musks HHCB and AHTN are potential chemical markers for domestic wastewater contamination of surface waters. Understanding their environmental behavior is important to evaluate their suitability as markers. This study focuses on the quantification of the processes that lead to an elimination in lakes. Rate constants for all relevant processes were estimated based on laboratory studies and models previously described. In lake Zurich, during winter time, both compounds are eliminated primarily by outflowing water and due to losses to the atmosphere. In summer, direct photolysis represents the predominant elimination process for AHTN in the epilimnion of lake Zurich (quantum yield, 0.12), whereas for HHCB, photochemical degradation is still negligible. HHCB and AHTN were then measured in effluents of Swiss wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), in remote and anthropogenically influenced Swiss surface waters, and in Mediterranean seawater using an analytical procedure based on SPE and GC-MS-SIM with D6-HHCB as internal standard (LODs for natural waters, 2 and 1 ng/L, respectively). In winter, concentrations of HHCB and AHTN in lakes (<2-47 and <1-18 ng/L, respectively) correlated with the anthropogenic burden by domestic wastewater (ratio population per water throughflow), demonstrating the suitability of these compounds as quantitative, source-specific markers. In summer, however, no such correlations were observed. Vertical concentration profiles in lake Zurich indicated significant losses in the epilimnion during summer, mainly for AHTN, and could be rationalized with a lake modeling program (MASASlight), considering measured, average loads from WWTP effluents (0.80 +/- 0.22 and 0.32 +/- 0.11 mg person(-1) d(-1) for HHCB and AHTN, respectively) and the estimated rate constants for elimination processes.

  15. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c–d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors. PMID:26999178

  16. Biochemical markers and somatosensory evoked potentials in patients after cardiac arrest: the role of neurological outcome scores.

    PubMed

    Rana, Obaida R; Saygili, Erol; Schiefer, Johannes; Marx, Nikolaus; Schauerte, Patrick

    2011-06-15

    Biochemical markers, e.g. NSE or S100B, and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) are considered promising candidates for neurological prognostic predictors in patients after cardiac arrest (CA). The Utstein Templates recommend the use of the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories (GP-CPC) to divide patients according to their neurological outcome. However, several studies investigating biochemical markers and SSEP are based on the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). We noticed that many studies failed to exclude patients who died without certified brain damage from patients classified as poor outcome, instead including all patients who died into this category. Therefore, we summarized the published NSE cut-off values and the derived sensitivity and specificity to predict poor outcome of those studies which only included patients with certified brain death in GOS-1 or GP-CPC-5 (group A) vs. those studies which did not differentiate between death from any cause or death due to primary brain damage (group B). On average, mean NSE cut-off values and sensitivity were higher (56 ± 35 ng/ml, 56 ± 18%) in group A than in group B (41 ± 17 ng/ml, 44 ± 25%), respectively. The specificity remained equally high in both groups. In analogy, the average sensitivity of SSEP to predict poor outcome was higher in group A (76 ± 11%) than in group B (50 ± 15%), while the specificity was similar in both groups. Conclusively, inclusion of deaths without certified brain damage after CA in neurological outcome studies will lead to underestimation of the prognostic power of biochemical or electrophysiological markers for brain damage. A modified GOS and GP-CPC score might help to avoid this bias.

  17. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers.

    PubMed

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-03-17

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c-d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors.

  18. Transgelin: a potentially useful diagnostic marker differentially expressed in triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Deepthi; Kimler, Bruce F; Nothnick, Warren B; Davis, Marilyn K; Fan, Fang; Tawfik, Ossama

    2015-06-01

    Triple negative (TN) (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR] and HER2-) are highly aggressive, rapidly growing, hormone-unresponsive tumors diagnosed at later stage that affect younger women with shorter overall survival. Most TN tumors are of the basal type. For the remainder, identification of target markers for effective treatment strategies remains a challenge. Transgelin (TGLN) is a 22-kd actin-binding protein of the calponin family. It is one of the earliest markers of smooth muscle differentiation. TGLN has been shown to have important biologic activities including regulating muscle fiber contractility, cell migration, and tumor suppression. We examined TGLN expression in the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. TGLN expression was examined as a function of tumor size, grade, histologic type, lymph node status, patients' age and overall survival, ER, PR, HER2, and Ki-67 in 101 tumors that included 35 luminal A, 28 luminal B, 4 HER2, and 34 TN types. TGLN positivity (defined as 2+ or 3+) was associated with more aggressive tumors (10% of grade I/II tumors were TGLN+ versus 53% of grade III tumors; P < .001), high Ki-67 count, and low ER and PR expression (P < .001) but not with tumor size, age, or lymph node metastasis. TN (n = 34) tumors were 7.7 times more likely to be TGLN+ than non-TN (n = 67) tumors (77% versus 10%, respectively; P < .001). TGLN may be an excellent diagnostic marker of TN tumors and could be useful in stratification of patients. TGLN may also prove a potential target for future treatment strategies.

  19. Objective markers of drug effects on brain function from recordings of scalp potential in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Boeijinga, Peter H.

    2002-01-01

    In order to stress the importance of P300 responses in drug development, we describe the spatiotemporal characteristics of this objective, evoked event-related potential. These brain activations reflect mnemonic function, in which limbic structures play a role. It is demonstrated that a pharmacological challenge concerning, for example, the cholinergic system in young healthy volunteers induces modifications in P300 reminiscent of the aging brain. We use this type of observation to build a model in which it can be verified whether the deterioration can be counteracted by treatment with “cognition-enhancing” drugs. If we accept the extrapolation of the pharmacological effects to symptomatology, scalp potential analysis offers an appropriate tool for the study of drug interactions in early proof-of-concept models. PMID:22033496

  20. New 1-C-(5-thio-D-xylopyranosyl) derivatives as potential orally active venous antithrombotics.

    PubMed

    Mignon, Laurent; Goichot, Christophe; Ratel, Philippe; Cagnin, Gérald; Baudry, Michel; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Boubia, Benaïssa; Barberousse, Véronique

    2003-06-16

    In the search for new orally active antithrombotic drugs that are metabolically stable, we explored the synthesis of 1-C-(5-thio-D-xylosyl) derivatives, examining radical and nucleophilic methods. Thus synthesized were aryl, benzyl, alkylcarboxymethylenyl, arylsulfonylmethylenyl and alkylaminocarboxymethylenyl C-linked analogues of 5-thio-D-xylopyranosides. PMID:12791280

  1. Potential Use of Salivary Markers for Longitudinal Monitoring of Inflammatory Immune Responses to Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, Johan; Sandalova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination, designed to trigger a protective immune response against infection, is a trigger for mild inflammatory responses. Vaccination studies can address the question of inflammation initiation, levels, and resolution as well as its regulation for respective studied pathogens. Such studies largely based on analyzing the blood components including specific antibodies and cytokines were usually constrained by number of participants and volume of collected blood sample. Hence, blood-based studies may not be able to cover the full dynamic range of inflammation responses induced by vaccination. In this review, the potential of using saliva in addition to blood for studying the kinetics of inflammatory response studies was assessed. Saliva sampling is noninvasive and has a great potential to be used for studies aimed at analysing the magnitude, time course, and variance in immune responses, including inflammation after vaccination. Based on a literature survey of inflammatory biomarkers that can be determined in saliva and an analysis of how these biomarkers could help to understand the mechanisms and dynamics of immune reactivity and inflammation, we propose that the saliva-based approach might have potential to add substantial value to clinical studies, particularly in vulnerable populations such as infants, toddlers, and ill individuals. PMID:27022211

  2. Identification of species-specific nuclear insertions of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas and their potential as population genetic markers

    PubMed Central

    Clark Nicholas, Jonathan; Wildschutte Julia, Vera Halo; DiMattio, Kelly; Jensen-Seaman, Michael Ignatius; Anthony, Nicola Mary

    2014-01-01

    The first hyper-variable region (HV1) of the mitochondrial control region (MCR) has been widely used as a molecular tool in population genetics, but inadvertent amplification of nuclear translocated copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas has compromised the use of mitochondrial DNA in population genetic studies. At least three putative classes (I, II, III) of gorilla-specific HV1 MCR numts have been uncovered over the past decade. However, the number, size and location of numt loci in gorillas and other apes are completely unknown. Furthermore, little work to date has assessed the utility of numts as candidate population genetic markers. In the present study, we screened Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic libraries in the chimpanzee and gorilla to compare patterns of mitochondrial-wide insertion in both taxa. We conducted an intensive BLAST search for numts in the gorilla genome and compared the prevalence of numt loci originating from the MCR with other great ape taxa. Additional gorilla-specific MCR numts were retrieved either through BAC library screens or using an anchored-PCR (A-PCR) amplification using genomic DNA from five unrelated gorillas. Locus-specific primers were designed to identify numt insertional polymorphisms and evaluate their potential as population genetic markers. Mitochondrial-wide surveys of chimpanzee and gorilla BACs showed that the number of numts does not differ between these two taxa. However, MCR numts are more abundant in chimpanzees than in other great apes. We identified and mapped 67 putative gorilla-specific numts, including two that contain the entire HV1 domain, cluster with sequences from two numt classes (I, IIb) and will likely co-amplify with mitochondrial sequences using most published HV1 primers. However, phylogenetic analysis coupled with post-hoc analysis of mitochondrial variation can successfully differentiate nuclear sequences. Insertional polymorphisms were evident in three out of five numts

  3. Identification of species-specific nuclear insertions of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas and their potential as population genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Soto-Calderón, Iván Darío; Clark, Nicholas Jonathan; Wildschutte, Julia Vera Halo; DiMattio, Kelly; Jensen-Seaman, Michael Ignatius; Anthony, Nicola Mary

    2014-12-01

    The first hyper-variable region (HV1) of the mitochondrial control region (MCR) has been widely used as a molecular tool in population genetics, but inadvertent amplification of nuclear translocated copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas has compromised the use of mitochondrial DNA in population genetic studies. At least three putative classes (I, II, III) of gorilla-specific HV1 MCR numts have been uncovered over the past decade. However, the number, size and location of numt loci in gorillas and other apes are completely unknown. Furthermore, little work to date has assessed the utility of numts as candidate population genetic markers. In the present study, we screened Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic libraries in the chimpanzee and gorilla to compare patterns of mitochondrial-wide insertion in both taxa. We conducted an intensive BLAST search for numts in the gorilla genome and compared the prevalence of numt loci originating from the MCR with other great ape taxa. Additional gorilla-specific MCR numts were retrieved either through BAC library screens or using an anchored-PCR (A-PCR) amplification using genomic DNA from five unrelated gorillas. Locus-specific primers were designed to identify numt insertional polymorphisms and evaluate their potential as population genetic markers. Mitochondrial-wide surveys of chimpanzee and gorilla BACs showed that the number of numts does not differ between these two taxa. However, MCR numts are more abundant in chimpanzees than in other great apes. We identified and mapped 67 putative gorilla-specific numts, including two that contain the entire HV1 domain, cluster with sequences from two numt classes (I, IIb) and will likely co-amplify with mitochondrial sequences using most published HV1 primers. However, phylogenetic analysis coupled with post-hoc analysis of mitochondrial variation can successfully differentiate nuclear sequences. Insertional polymorphisms were evident in three out of five numts

  4. Mitosis Is a Source of Potential Markers for Screening and Survival and Therapeutic Targets in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Ana María; Alfaro, Ana; Roman-Basaure, Edgar; Guardado-Estrada, Mariano; Palma, Ícela; Serralde, Cyntia; Medina, Ingrid; Juárez, Eligia; Bermúdez, Miriam; Márquez, Edna; Borges-Ibáñez, Manuel; Muñoz-Cortez, Sergio; Alcántara-Vázquez, Avissai; Alonso, Patricia; Curiel-Valdez, José; Kofman, Susana; Villegas, Nicolas; Berumen, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The effect of preventive human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on the reduction of the cervical cancer (CC) burden will not be known for 30 years. Therefore, it’s still necessary to improve the procedures for CC screening and treatment. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize cellular targets that could be considered potential markers for screening or therapeutic targets. A pyramidal strategy was used. Initially the expression of 8,638 genes was compared between 43 HPV16-positive CCs and 12 healthy cervical epitheliums using microarrays. A total of 997 genes were deregulated, and 21 genes that showed the greatest deregulation were validated using qRT-PCR. The 6 most upregulated genes (CCNB2, CDC20, PRC1, SYCP2, NUSAP1, CDKN3) belong to the mitosis pathway. They were further explored in 29 low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN1) and 21 high-grade CIN (CIN2/3) to investigate whether they could differentiate CC and CIN2/3 (CIN2+) from CIN1 and controls. CCNB2, PRC1, and SYCP2 were mostly associated with CC and CDC20, NUSAP1, and CDKN3 were also associated with CIN2/3. The sensitivity and specificity of CDKN3 and NUSAP1 to detect CIN2+ was approximately 90%. The proteins encoded by all 6 genes were shown upregulated in CC by immunohistochemistry. The association of these markers with survival was investigated in 42 CC patients followed up for at least 42 months. Only CDKN3 was associated with poor survival and it was independent from clinical stage (HR = 5.9, 95%CI = 1.4–23.8, p = 0.01). CDKN3 and NUSAP1 may be potential targets for the development of screening methods. Nevertheless, further studies with larger samples are needed to define the optimal sensitivity and specificity. Inhibition of mitosis is a well-known strategy to combat cancers. Therefore, CDKN3 may be not only a screening and survival marker but a potential therapeutic target in CC. However, whether it’s indispensable for tumor growth remains to be

  5. Oral cavity as a potential source of gastric reinfection by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Karczewska, Elzbieta; Konturek, Joanna E; Konturek, Peter C; Cześnikiewicz, Marta; Sito, Edward; Bielański, Władysław; Kwiecień, Nina; Obtułowicz, Wojciech; Ziemniak, Witold; Majka, Jolanta; Hahn, Eckhart G; Konturek, Stanislaw J

    2002-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is a common pathogen colonizing the a gastric mucosa, but some reports indicated that it may also be found in the oral cavity, which could serve as a reservoir of the bacteria and a source of gastric reinfection. Accordingly, we aimed to study whether the oral cavity, particularly gingival pockets, are colonized by Hp and whether it could be the source of gastric reinfection. We studied 329 patients with dyspeptic symptoms (257 with chronic gastritis, 15 with gastric ulcer, and 57 with duodenal ulcer). The [13C]urea breath test (UBT), gastroscopy, and Hp culture from gastric biopsies were carried out, and material was collected from the oral cavity (gingival pocket) for bacteriological culture and genomic DNA studies. The serum was obtained for anti-Hp IgG and anti-CagA assays and saliva for anti-Hp IgA determination using the ELISA technique. Bacteria in material from gingival pockets and biopsies from the corpus and antrum of stomach of 30 DU patients before and after Hp eradication were also examined by PCR technique, using primers specific for 16S rRNA. All Hp-positive patients (276) were subjected to one week of triple therapy (omeprazole 2 x 20 mg twice a day, clarithromycin 2 x 500 mg twice a day, and metronidazole 2 x 500 mg twice a day). The measurements described above were then repeated at four weeks and six months. Bacteriological culture showed the presence of Hp in the material from oral cavity in about 50% of patients, whereas UBT, used as a gold standard, revealed gastric Hp infection in about 84% of these patients. The eradication was successful in the majority of patients (87%), but about 13% of them were still Hp positive after four weeks and about 21% after six months. Four weeks after Hp therapy, Hp was found in culture from oral samples in 23% (P < 0.05 vs initial) and after six months in 35.1%. The IgA levels recorded in saliva were in a close agreement with UBT results. Hp DNA assessed by PCR in 30 DUs before

  6. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals.

  7. Levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in gingival crevicular fluid as potential markers of inflammation in patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt Doğan, Şeyma; Öngöz Dede, Figen; Ballı, Umut; Sertoğlu, Erdim

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine the levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to evaluate GCF vaspin and omentin-1 levels after non-surgical periodontal therapy. The study included 60 subjects: 15 systemically and periodontally healthy individuals, 15 periodontally healthy patients with T2DM, 15 systemically healthy patients with CP, and 15 patients with both CP and T2DM. GCF and clinical periodontal parameters were examined at the baseline and 6 weeks after periodontal therapy. Levels of vaspin, omentin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were measured by ELISA, and their relative ratios were calculated. GCF vaspin and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in the CP groups than in the periodontally healthy groups (P < 0.008) and decreased after therapy in the former (P < 0.025). GCF omentin-1 levels were significantly lower in the CP groups than in the periodontally healthy groups (P < 0.008) and increased after therapy in the former (P < 0.05). Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the total amount of vaspin and TNF-α, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), clinical attachment level and gingival index, whereas the level of omentin-1 was negatively correlated with these parameters in all groups (P < 0.05). We found that non-surgical periodontal therapy influenced the GCF levels of both vaspin and omentin-1 in the CP groups. Our results suggest that the levels of vaspin and omentin-1 in GCF could have potential application as inflammatory markers of diabetes, periodontal disease and treatment outcome. (J Oral Sci 58, 379-389, 2016). PMID:27665978

  8. SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation as a potential bio-marker for myeloproliferative neoplasms associated with mutant JAK2 kinases

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Joanne; Suessmuth, Yvonne; Scott, Linda M.; Nahlik, Krystyna; McMullin, Mary Frances; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Green, Anthony R.; Johnston, James A.

    2009-01-01

    JAK2 V617F, identified in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, tyrosine phosphorylates SOCS3 and escapes its inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that the JAK2 exon 12 mutants described in a subset of V617F-negative MPN cases, also stabilize tyrosine phosphorylated SOCS3. SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation was also observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and granulocytes isolated from patients with JAK2 H538QK539L or JAK2 F537-K539delinsL mutations. JAK kinase inhibitors, which effectively inhibited the proliferation of cells expressing V617F or K539L, also caused a dose-dependent reduction in both mutant JAK2 and SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation. We propose, therefore, that SOCS3 tyrosine phosphorylation may be a novel bio-marker of myeloproliferative neoplasms resulting from a JAK2 mutation and a potential reporter of effective JAK2 inhibitor therapy currently in clinical development. PMID:19229050

  9. A diagnostic molecular marker for zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and potentially co-occurring bivalves: mitochondrial COI.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B S; Black, M; Sanjur, O; Gustafson, R; Lutz, R A; Vrijenhoek, R C

    1996-03-01

    We report diagnostic differences in the nucleotide sequences of a 710-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) from the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and potentially co-occurring bivalves: the quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis); the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea), the dark false mussel (Mytilopsis leucophaeata), and the wedge clam (Rangia cuneata). The COI sequence of the deep-water "profunda" phenotype of the quagga mussel was nearly identical to that of shallow-water quagga mussels. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in this portion of COI produced species-specific differences in fragment numbers and sizes that could be used as diagnostic markers to distinguish the free-living larvae produced by these bivalves.

  10. Mathematically combined half-cell reduction potentials of low-molecular-weight thiols as markers of seed ageing.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Colville, Louise; Pritchard, Hugh W; Pearce, Stephen R; Kranner, Ilse

    2011-09-01

    The half-cell reduction potential of the glutathione disulphide (GSSG)/glutathione (GSH) redox couple appears to correlate with cell viability and has been proposed to be a marker of seed viability and ageing. This study investigated the relationship between seed viability and the individual half-cell reduction potentials (E(i)s) of four low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols in Lathyrus pratensis seeds subjected to artificial ageing: GSH, cysteine (Cys), cysteinyl-glycine (Cys-Gly) and γ-glutamyl-cysteine (γ-Glu-Cys). The standard redox potential of γ-Glu-Cys was previously unknown and was experimentally determined. The E(i)s were mathematically combined to define a LMW thiol-disulphide based redox environment (E(thiol-disulphide)). Loss of seed viability correlated with a shift in E(thiol-disulphide) towards more positive values, with a LD(50) value of -0.90 ± 0.093 mV M (mean ± SD). The mathematical definition of E(thiol-disulphide) is envisaged as a step towards the definition of the overall cellular redox environment, which will need to include all known redox-couples.

  11. Potential for use of retinoic acid as an oral vaccine adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Mwanza-Lisulo, Mpala; Kelly, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Despite the heavy burden of diarrhoeal disease across much of the tropical world, only two diarrhoea-causing pathogens, cholera and rotavirus, are the target of commercially available vaccines. Oral vaccines are generally less immunogenic than the best parenteral vaccines, but the reasons for this are still debated. Over the past decade, several lines of evidence from work in experimental animals have suggested that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a form of vitamin A which is highly transcriptionally active, can alter the homing receptor expression of T lymphocytes. Increased expression of α4β7 integrin and the chemokine receptor CCR9 following exposure to ATRA can be used to redirect T cells to the gut. Early work in human volunteers suggests that oral ATRA administration 1 h prior to dosing with oral typhoid vaccine can augment secretion of specific IgA against vaccine-derived lipopolysaccharide into gut secretions. In this review, we set out the rationale for using ATRA in this way and assess its likely applicability to vaccination programmes for protection of children in low-income countries from the considerable mortality caused by diarrhoeal disease. Comparison of recent work in experimental animals, non-human primates and men suggests that a more detailed understanding of ATRA dosage and kinetics will be important to taking forward translational work into human vaccinology. PMID:25964457

  12. Hypoxia inducible factor: a potential prognostic biomarker in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jiang; Wenguang, Xu; Zhiyong, Wang; Yuntao, Zou; Wei, Han

    2016-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common oral cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is involved in many malignant tumors' growth and metastasis and upregulated by hypoxia, including oral cancer. Many studies have studied about the prognostic value of HIF expression in OSCC; however, they do not get the consistent results. Therefore, this study explored the correlation between the HIF expression and the prognosis of OSCC. It conducted a meta-analysis of relevant publications searched in the Web of Science, PubMed, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases. Totally, this study identified 12 relevant articles reporting a total of 1112 patients. This analysis revealed a significant association between increased risk of mortality (RR = 1.20; 95 % CI 0.74-1.95; I (2) 85.4 %) and overexpression of HIFs. Furthermore, different HIF isoforms were associated with overall survival [HIF-1α (RR = 1.18; 95 % CI 0.66-2.11; I (2) 87.2 %) and HIF-2α (RR = 1.40; 95 % CI 0.93-2.09; I(2) 0.0 %)]. These results show that overexpression of HIFs, regardless of whether the HIF-1α or HIF-2α isoforms are overexpressed is significantly associated with increased risk of mortality in OSCC patients. In this study, the funnel is symmetric, suggesting existed no publication bias.

  13. Aerobic bacterial oral flora of garter snakes: development of normal flora and pathogenic potential for snakes and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Agyare, E O; Vagvolgyi, A E; Halpern, M

    1981-01-01

    Garter snakes that are used for scientific laboratory studies or kept as exotic pets often become ill and die early in captivity. They may also act as reservoirs of potential human pathogens or transmit infection to man. A total of 126 strains of aerobic and facultative bacteria, most potential human and snake pathogens, were isolated from 82 garter snake oropharyngeal cultures. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were the most common species isolated. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var. anitratus, Hafnia alvei, Arizona hinshawii, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were among the potential pathogens isolated. The spectrum of bacteria with potential for causing oral and pulmonary infections in garter snakes is greater than has been previously appreciated. Garter snakes should also be considered reservoirs of human pathogens, and appropriate precautions should be taken by laboratory personnel and pet owners. PMID:7240404

  14. Potential of carotenoids in aquatic yeasts as a phylogenetically reliable marker and natural colorant for aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Ishida, Masami; Urano, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Apart from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, pink colony-forming yeasts have not been examined as a pigmentation source in captive animals. In this study, aquatic yeasts were screened with a view to abundances of carotenoids. Phylogenetic analyses of these caroetnoid-rich yeasts based on large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (LSU rDNA) partial sequences showed that all belonged to the order Sporidiobolales. Both the qualitative and the quantitative differences in carotenoids between the yeasts appeared to be consistent with their phylogenetic affiliations. This information might be useful in the selection of pigment-rich yeasts containing specific carotenoids from a large number of strains. We also found, for the first time, the potential of a pigment-rich Rhodotorula strain as a colorant for aquaculture. The integuments of tilapia and carp fed the alkali-treated cells of strain Rhodotorula dairenensis Sag 17 were pigmented after 3 months of cultivation. The fish integuments retained the yeast carotenes shortly after the start of feeding, and were converted to the fish-specific xanthophylls in vivo. PMID:21897034

  15. Blood DNA methylation markers in potentially identified Chinese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongying; Yan, Haixiu; Zhang, Jinshu

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether blood DNA methylation is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for Chinese patients, we used genome-wide DNA methylation detection to access the blood samples of Chinese patients by Illumina Human methylation 450K arrays. Sixty potentially gene locis which had different methylated levels significantly among tumor and adjacent normal tissues would be tested in this study. A previous study was conducted in China communities and followed with 7 years. The DNA from white blood cells (WBC) from 192 patients with HCC and 215 matched controls were assayed in this study. The χ2 test was used to measure data to categorize variables and t -test was used to evaluate the different characteristics among groups. Besides, odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI was calculated for matching factors by conditional logistic regression models. We found that high methylation in WNK2 was related to increased risk of HCC, and high methylation in TPO were related to decreased risk of HCC. In our multivariable conditional logistic regression models, these results all exist. Those findings support the methylated changes of WNK2 and TPO may become a new detection index for HCC patients in clinical laboratory. However, the results should be replicated in additional prospective studies with lager samples. PMID:27592479

  16. Endosialin expression in soft tissue sarcoma as a potential marker of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Thway, Khin; Robertson, David; Jones, Robin L; Selfe, Joanna; Shipley, Janet; Fisher, Cyril; Isacke, Clare M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Soft tissue sarcomas are a group of neoplasms with differentiation towards mesenchymal tissue, many of which are aggressive and chemotherapy resistant. Histology and immunoprofiles often overlap with neoplasms of other lineages, and establishing an accurate histopathological diagnosis is crucial for correct management, and therapeutic stratification. The endosialin cell surface glycoprotein is predominantly expressed by stromal fibroblasts and pericytes in epithelial neoplasms; however, tumour cell expression has been reported in small series of sarcomas. Methods: We assessed endosialin expression by immunohistochemistry in a large set of 514 human soft tissue sarcomas. Results: Tumour cell endosialin expression was seen in 89% of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas (104/117), 77% adult fibrosarcomas/spindle cell sarcomas (20/26), 62% synovial sarcomas (37/60), 51% leiomyosarcomas (94/185) and 31% rhabdomyosarcomas (39/126). Conclusions: Endosialin immunohistochemistry has potential to distinguish undifferentiated and poorly differentiated sarcomas from other poorly differentiated, non-mesenchymal neoplasms. A Phase II trial randomising patients with advanced sarcomas to receive chemotherapy with/without an endosialin therapeutic antibody has recently completed enrolment. Endosialin expression could be used to select patients for such clinical trials. Based on our results, patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma may be particularly suitable for such a therapeutic approach. PMID:27434038

  17. Gene expression screening of salivary gland neoplasms: molecular markers of potential histogenetic and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Shin-Ichiro; Kim, Hyung-Woo; Weber, Randal S; Lee, Jack J; Kies, Merril; Luna, Mario A; Batsakis, John G; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2004-08-01

    Salivary gland neoplasms comprise phenotypically and biologically diverse lesions of uncertain histogenesis. The molecular events associated with their development and clinicopathological heterogeneity remain unknown. To reveal these events, we performed microarray expression analysis using a nylon-filter membrane platform on 18 primary lesions representing the most common benign and malignant types. Our study identified a small set of genes that are differentially altered between normal salivary gland tissues and benign and malignant tumors. Of the 5000 genes arrayed, 136 genes were differentially expressed by normal tissue, benign tumors, and various malignant neoplasms. Hierarchical clustering analysis differentiated between adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) and other malignant subtypes. Non-ACC specimens manifested overlapping patterns of gene expression within and between tumors. Most of the differentially expressed genes share functional similarities with members of the adhesion, proliferation, and signal transduction pathways. Our study identified: 1) a set of genes that differentiate normal tissue from tumor specimens, 2) genes that differentiate pleomorphic adenoma and ACCs from other malignant salivary gland neoplasms, and 3) different patterns of expression between ACCs arising from major and minor salivary gland sites. The differentially expressed genes provide new information on potential genetic events of biological significance in future studies of salivary gland tumorigenesis.

  18. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are potential predictive biomarkers in early stage oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC).

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Synnøve; Rikardsen, Oddveig G; Hadler-Olsen, Elin; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Steigen, Sonja E; Svineng, Gunbjørg

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is often associated with metastatic disease and a poor 5 year survival rate. Patients diagnosed with small tumours generally have a more favourable outcome, but some of these small tumours are aggressive and lead to early death. To avoid harmful overtreatment of patients with favourable prognosis, there is a need for predictive biomarkers that can be used for treatment stratification. In this study we assessed the possibility to use components of the plasminogen activator (PA) system as prognostic markers for OSCC outcome and compared this to the commonly used biomarker Ki-67. A tissue-micro-array (TMA) based immunohistochemical analysis of primary tumour tissue obtained from a North Norwegian cohort of 115 patients diagnosed with OSCC was conducted. The expression of the biomarkers was compared with clinicopathological variables and disease specific death. The statistical analyses revealed that low expression of uPAR (p = 0.031) and PAI-1 (p = 0.021) in the tumour cells was significantly associated with low disease specific death in patients with small tumours and no lymph node metastasis (T1N0). The commonly used biomarker, Ki-67, was not associated with disease specific death in any of the groups of patients analysed. The conclusion is that uPAR and PAI-1 are potential predictive biomarkers in early stage tumours and that this warrants further studies on a larger cohort of patients.

  19. Suprabasin, a novel epidermal differentiation marker and potential cornified envelope precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon Tae; Lim, Susan E; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Morasso, Maria I

    2002-11-22

    The suprabasin gene is a novel gene expressed in mouse and human differentiating keratinocytes. We identified a partial cDNA encoding suprabasin using a suppression subtractive hybridization method between the proliferative basal and differentiating suprabasal populations of the mouse epidermis. A 3' gene-specific probe hybridized to transcripts of 0.7- and 2.2-kb pairs on Northern blots with specific detection in differentiated keratinocytes of stratified epithelia. The mouse gene was mapped to chromosome 7 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This region is syntenic to human chromosome band 19q13.1, which contained the only region in the data bases with homology to the mouse suprabasin sequence. During embryonic mouse development, suprabasin mRNA was detected at day 15.5, coinciding with epidermal stratification. Suprabasin was detected in the suprabasal layers of the epithelia in the tongue, stomach, and epidermis. Differentiation of cultured primary epidermal keratinocytes with 0.12 mm Ca(2+) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment resulted in the induction of suprabasin. The 2.2-kb cDNA transcript encodes a protein of 72 kDa with a predicted isoelectric point of 6.85. The translated sequence has an amino-terminal domain, a central domain composed of repeats rich in glycine and alanine, and a carboxyl-terminal domain. The alternatively spliced 0.7-kb transcript encodes a smaller protein that shares the NH(2)- and COOH-terminal regions but lacks the repeat domain region. Cross-linking experiments indicate that suprabasin is a substrate for transglutaminase 2 and 3 activity. Altogether, these results indicate that the suprabasin protein potentially plays a role in the process of epidermal differentiation. PMID:12228223

  20. A Preclinical Study of Laryngeal Motor-Evoked Potentials as a Marker Vagus Nerve Activation.

    PubMed

    Grimonprez, Annelies; Raedt, Robrecht; De Taeye, Leen; Larsen, Lars Emil; Delbeke, Jean; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for refractory epilepsy and depression. Previous studies using invasive recording electrodes showed that VNS induces laryngeal motor-evoked potentials (LMEPs) through the co-activation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and subsequent contractions of the laryngeal muscles. The present study investigates the feasibility of recording LMEPs in chronically VNS-implanted rats, using a minimally-invasive technique, to assess effective current delivery to the nerve and to determine optimal VNS output currents for vagal fiber activation. Three weeks after VNS electrode implantation, signals were recorded using an electromyography (EMG) electrode in the proximity of the laryngeal muscles and a reference electrode on the skull. The VNS output current was gradually ramped up from 0.1 to 1.0 mA in 0.1 mA steps. In 13/27 rats, typical LMEPs were recorded at low VNS output currents (median 0.3 mA, IQR 0.2-0.3 mA). In 11/27 rats, significantly higher output currents were required to evoke electrophysiological responses (median 0.7 mA, IQR 0.5-0.7 mA, p < 0.001). The latencies of these responses deviated significantly from LMEPs (p < 0.05). In 3/27 rats, no electrophysiological responses to simulation were recorded. Minimally invasive LMEP recordings are feasible to assess effective current delivery to the vagus nerve. Furthermore, our results suggest that low output currents are sufficient to activate vagal fibers.

  1. Tissue microarray-based study of hepatocellular carcinoma validating SPIB as potential clinical prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Yueh-Min; Huang, Yen-Chi; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Lin, Liang-In; Lu, Jeng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the prognostic significance of SPIB protein overexpression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of SPIB expression in human HCC in order to determine possible correlations between SPIB expression and clinicopathological findings. The expression of SPIB proteins was detected using immunohistochemical staining in commercial multiple-tissue microarrays as a means of examining expression profiles in patients. Using online biomarker validation tool SurvExpress, we focused on the correlation between SPIB overexpression and survival as well as relapse-free survival (RFS). Results show that SPIB protein expression levels were significantly higher in colon, liver, and stomach tumors than in non-tumor tissues (p<0.05). SPIB overexpression in patients with HCC was also significantly higher than that of the normal samples (p<0.001). Among patients with liver disease, SPIB protein expression levels differ significantly according to the stage of liver disease, specifically between stages I, II, and III of HCC (p<0.05). SPIB expression was also shown to be significantly correlated with age (p=0.046) and histological grade (p=0.027). Furthermore, the SurvExpress analysis suggested that high SPIB and KI-67 mRNA expression were significantly associated with the poor survival of patients with HCC (p<0.05). Our results indicate that cross-talk in the expression of SPIB and KI-67 may be associated with poor prognosis and may potentially serve as a clinical prognostic indicator of HCC. This is the first time that such an association has been reported. PMID:26610895

  2. Predictive value of bovine follicular components as markers of oocyte developmental potential.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Satoko; Bender, Katrin; Fahey, Alan G; Mamo, Solomon; Brennan, Lorraine; Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2014-01-01

    The follicle is a unique micro-environment within which the oocyte can develop and mature to a fertilisable gamete. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a panel of follicular parameters, including intrafollicular steroid and metabolomic profiles and theca, granulosa and cumulus cell candidate gene mRNA abundance, to predict the potential of bovine oocytes to develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro. Individual follicles were dissected from abattoir ovaries, carefully ruptured under a stereomicroscope and the oocyte was recovered and individually processed through in vitro maturation, fertilisation and culture. The mean (±s.e.m.) follicular concentrations of testosterone (62.8±4.8 ngmL(-1)), progesterone (616.8±31.9 ngmL(-1)) and oestradiol (14.4±2.4 ngmL(-1)) were not different (P>0.05) between oocytes that formed (competent) or failed to form (incompetent) blastocysts. Principal-component analysis of the quantified aqueous metabolites in follicular fluid showed differences between oocytes that formed blastocysts and oocytes that degenerated; l-alanine, glycine and l-glutamate were positively correlated and urea was negatively correlated with blastocyst formation. Follicular fluid associated with competent oocytes was significantly lower in palmitic acid (P=0.023) and total fatty acids (P=0.031) and significantly higher in linolenic acid (P=0.036) than follicular fluid from incompetent oocytes. Significantly higher (P<0.05) transcript abundance of LHCGR in granulosa cells, ESR1 and VCAN in thecal cells and TNFAIP6 in cumulus cells was associated with competent compared with incompetent oocytes.

  3. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M.

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid.

  4. Hydrogen emission in meteors as a potential marker for the exogenous delivery of organics and water.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Mandell, Avram M

    2004-01-01

    We detected hydrogen Balmer-alpha (H(alpha)) emission in the spectra of bright meteors and investigated its potential use as a tracer for exogenous delivery of organic matter. We found that it is critical to observe the meteors with high enough spatial resolution to distinguish the 656.46 nm H(alpha) emission from the 657.46 nm intercombination line of neutral calcium, which was bright in the meteor afterglow. The H(alpha) line peak stayed in constant ratio to the atmospheric emissions of nitrogen during descent of the meteoroid. If all of the hydrogen originates in the Earth's atmosphere, the hydrogen atoms are expected to have been excited at T = 4400 K. In that case, we measured an H(2)O abundance in excess of 150 +/- 20 ppm at 80-90 km altitude (assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium in the air plasma). This compares with an expected <20 ppm from H(2)O in the gas phase. Alternatively, meteoric refractory organic matter (and water bound in meteoroid minerals) could have caused the observed H(alpha) emission, but only if the line is excited in a hot T approximately 10000 K plasma component that is unique to meteoric ablation vapor emissions such as Si(+). Assuming that the Si(+) lines of the Leonid spectrum would need the same hot excitation conditions, and a typical [H]/[C] = 1 in cometary refractory organics, we calculated an abundance ratio [C]/[Si] = 3.9 +/- 1.4 for the dust of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This range agreed with the value of [C]/[Si] = 4.4 measured for comet 1P/Halley dust. Unless there is 10 times more water vapor in the upper atmosphere than expected, we conclude that a significant fraction of the hydrogen atoms in the observed meteor plasma originated in the meteoroid.

  5. Soluble CD14 and toll-like receptor-2 are potential salivary biomarkers for oral lichen planus and burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Kodumudi, Krithika N; Zunt, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) and burning mouth syndrome (BMS) are chronic conditions affecting the oral mucosa characterized by pain and burning sensation. Saliva plays a significant role in the maintenance of physical and functional integrity of normal oral mucosa. Identification of potential "salivary biomarkers" for early diagnosis and/or monitoring of human diseases is being explored. We investigated the soluble forms of innate immune associated proteins CD14 and toll-like receptor-2 in unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) as potential biomarkers for OLP and BMS. Our results suggest that the levels of sCD14 and sTLR-2 in UWS were upregulated in OLP and BMS respectively. In addition, oral epithelial cells in the saliva of patients with OLP and BMS exhibited elevated levels of CD14 mRNA and decreased levels of TLR-2 mRNA. Interestingly, presence of co-existent oral candidiasis nullified these changes.

  6. Diffusion imaging changes in grey matter in Alzheimer's disease: a potential marker of early neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Weston, Philip S J; Simpson, Ivor J A; Ryan, Natalie S; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is recognized to have a long presymptomatic period, during which there is progressive accumulation of molecular pathology, followed by inexorable neuronal damage. The ability to identify presymptomatic individuals with evidence of neurodegenerative change, to stage their disease, and to track progressive changes will be important for early diagnosis and for prevention trials. Despite recent advances, particularly in magnetic resonance imaging, our ability to identify early neurodegenerative changes reliably is limited. The development of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, which is sensitive to microstructural changes not visible with conventional volumetric techniques, has led to a number of diffusion imaging studies in AD; these have largely focused on white matter changes. However, in AD cerebral grey matter is affected very early, with pathological studies suggesting that grey matter changes predate those in white matter. In this article we review the growing number of studies that assess grey matter diffusivity changes in AD. Although use of the technique is still at a relatively early stage, results so far have been promising. Initial studies identified changes in diffusion measures in the hippocampi of patients with mild cognitive impairment, which predated macroscopic volume loss, with positive predictive value for progression to AD dementia. More recent studies have identified abnormalities in multiple neocortical areas (particularly the posterior cingulate) at various stages of disease progression. Studies of patients who carry genetic mutations predisposing to autosomal dominant familial AD have shown cortical and subcortical grey matter diffusivity changes several years before the expected onset of the first clinical symptoms. The technique is not without potential methodological difficulties, especially relating to partial volume effects, although recent advances appear to be reducing such issues. Going forward

  7. Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15) is a potential marker of radiation response and radiation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Benedek, Anett; Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated the importance of GDF-15 (secreted cytokine belonging to the TGF-β superfamily) in low and high dose radiation-induced cellular responses. A telomerase immortalized human fibroblast cell line (F11hT) was used in the experiments. A lentiviral system encoding small hairpin RNAs (shRNA) was used to establish GDF-15 silenced cells. Secreted GDF-15 levels were measured in culture medium by ELISA. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The experiments demonstrated that in irradiated human fibroblasts GDF-15 expression increased with dose starting from 100mGy. Elevated GDF-15 expression was not detected in bystander cells. The potential role of GDF-15 in radiation response was investigated by silencing GDF-15 in immortalized human fibroblasts with five different shRNA encoded in lentiviral vectors. Cell lines with considerably reduced GDF-15 levels presented increased radiation sensitivity, while a cell line with elevated GDF-15 was more radiation resistant than wild type cells. We have investigated how the reduced GDF-15 levels alter the response of several known radiation inducible genes. In F11hT-shGDF-15 cells the basal expression level of CDKN1A was unaltered relative to F11hT cells, while GADD45A and TGF-β1 mRNA levels were slightly higher, and TP53INP1 was considerably reduced. The radiation-induced expression of TP53INP1 was lower in the silenced than in wild type fibroblast cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that radiation-induced early G2/M arrest was abrogated in GDF-15 silenced cells. Moreover, radiation-induced bystander effect was less pronounced in GDF-15 silenced fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results suggest that GDF-15 works as a radiation inducible radiation resistance increasing factor in normal human fibroblast cells, acts by regulating the radiation-induced transcription of several genes and might serve as a radiation-induced early biomarker in exposed cells. PMID:26520384

  8. Investigations on the potential of a low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Wurm, Holger; Hausladen, Florian; Wagner, Sophia; Hibst, Raimund

    2015-02-01

    Flash lamp pumped Er:YAG-lasers are used in clinical practice for dental applications successfully. As an alternative, several diode pumped Er:YAG laser systems (Pantec Engineering AG) become available, with mean laser power of 2W, 15W, and 30W. The aim of the presented study is to investigate the potential of the 2W Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery. At first an appropriate experimental set-up was realized with a beam delivery and both, a focusing unit for non-contact tissue cutting and a fiber tip for tissue cutting in contact mode. In order to produce reproducible cuts, the samples (porcine gingiva) were moved by a computer controlled translation stage. On the fresh samples cutting depth and quality were determined by light microscopy. Afterwards histological sections were prepared and microscopically analyzed regarding cutting depth and thermal damage zone. The experiments show that low laser power ≤ 2W is sufficient to perform efficient oral soft tissue cutting with cut depth up to 2mm (sample movement 2mm/s). The width of the thermal damage zone can be controlled by the irradiation parameters within a range of about 50μm to 110μm. In general, thermal injury is more pronounced using fiber tips in contact mode compared to the focused laser beam. In conclusion the results reveal that even the low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser is an appropriate tool for oral surgery.

  9. Poly-α,β-Polyasparthydrazide-Based Nanogels for Potential Oral Delivery of Paclitaxel: In Vitro and In Vivo Properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingwen; Ma, Mingxin; Chang, Di; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chen; Yue, Yang; Liu, Jia; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2015-12-01

    A family of nanogel drug carriers has been designed to enhance the oral absorption of paclitaxel (PTX). The PAHy-based nanogels were prepared by the interpenetration of poly-α,β-polyasparthydrazide (PAHy) chains and dicarboxyl-poly (ethylene glycol) (CPEG), forming a smart chain network. The PAHy-based nanogels were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adhesion and retention properties of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanogels in vivo were investigated using an in vivo imaging system and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The smart nanogels had a particle size of -200 nm, increased the degree and rate of release, and spent over 12 h in the gastrointestinal tract. They also produced excellent adhesion, permeability and retention (APR) effects and increased oral absorption, confirming their use as potential sustained-release carriers for the oral delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer agent PTX. PMID:26510316

  10. Liposomes containing glycocholate as potential oral insulin delivery systems: preparation, in vitro characterization, and improved protection against enzymatic degradation

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Mengmeng; Lu, Yi; Hovgaard, Lars; Wu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background: Oral delivery of insulin is challenging and must overcome the barriers of gastric and enzymatic degradation as well as low permeation across the intestinal epithelium. The present study aimed to develop a liposomal delivery system containing glycocholate as an enzyme inhibitor and permeation enhancer for oral insulin delivery. Methods: Liposomes containing sodium glycocholate were prepared by a reversed-phase evaporation method followed by homogenization. The particle size and entrapment efficiency of recombinant human insulin (rhINS)-loaded sodium glycocholate liposomes can be easily adjusted by tuning the homogenization parameters, phospholipid:sodium glycocholate ratio, insulin:phospholipid ratio, water:ether volume ratio, interior water phase pH, and the hydration buffer pH. Results: The optimal formulation showed an insulin entrapment efficiency of 30% ± 2% and a particle size of 154 ± 18 nm. A conformational study by circular dichroism spectroscopy and a bioactivity study confirmed the preserved integrity of rhINS against preparative stress. Transmission electron micrographs revealed a nearly spherical and deformed structure with discernable lamella for sodium glycocholate liposomes. Sodium glycocholate liposomes showed better protection of insulin against enzymatic degradation by pepsin, trypsin, and α-chymotrypsin than liposomes containing the bile salt counterparts of sodium taurocholate and sodium deoxycholate. Conclusion: Sodium glycocholate liposomes showed promising in vitro characteristics and have the potential to be able to deliver insulin orally. PMID:21822379

  11. Genetic Structure and Inferences on Potential Source Areas for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) Based on Mitochondrial and Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Kerdelhué, Carole; Ye, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) is mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical Asia and in the Pacific region. Despite its economic importance, very few studies have addressed the question of the wide genetic structure and potential source area of this species. This pilot study attempts to infer the native region of this pest and its colonization pathways in Asia. Combining mitochondrial and microsatellite markers, we evaluated the level of genetic diversity, genetic structure, and the gene flow among fly populations collected across Southeast Asia and China. A complex and significant genetic structure corresponding to the geographic pattern was found with both types of molecular markers. However, the genetic structure found was rather weak in both cases, and no pattern of isolation by distance was identified. Multiple long-distance dispersal events and miscellaneous host selection by this species may explain the results. These complex patterns may have been influenced by human-mediated transportation of the pest from one area to another and the complex topography of the study region. For both mitochondrial and microsatellite data, no signs of bottleneck or founder events could be identified. Nonetheless, maximal genetic diversity was observed in Myanmar, Vietnam and Guangdong (China) and asymmetric migration patterns were found. These results provide indirect evidence that the tropical regions of Southeast Asia and southern coast of China may be considered as the native range of the species and the population expansion is northward. Yunnan (China) is a contact zone that has been colonized from different sources. Regions along the southern coast of Vietnam and China probably served to colonize mainly the southern region of China. Southern coastal regions of China may also have colonized central parts of China and of central Yunnan. PMID:22615898

  12. Genetic structure and inferences on potential source areas for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) based on mitochondrial and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Kerdelhué, Carole; Ye, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) is mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical Asia and in the Pacific region. Despite its economic importance, very few studies have addressed the question of the wide genetic structure and potential source area of this species. This pilot study attempts to infer the native region of this pest and its colonization pathways in Asia. Combining mitochondrial and microsatellite markers, we evaluated the level of genetic diversity, genetic structure, and the gene flow among fly populations collected across Southeast Asia and China. A complex and significant genetic structure corresponding to the geographic pattern was found with both types of molecular markers. However, the genetic structure found was rather weak in both cases, and no pattern of isolation by distance was identified. Multiple long-distance dispersal events and miscellaneous host selection by this species may explain the results. These complex patterns may have been influenced by human-mediated transportation of the pest from one area to another and the complex topography of the study region. For both mitochondrial and microsatellite data, no signs of bottleneck or founder events could be identified. Nonetheless, maximal genetic diversity was observed in Myanmar, Vietnam and Guangdong (China) and asymmetric migration patterns were found. These results provide indirect evidence that the tropical regions of Southeast Asia and southern coast of China may be considered as the native range of the species and the population expansion is northward. Yunnan (China) is a contact zone that has been colonized from different sources. Regions along the southern coast of Vietnam and China probably served to colonize mainly the southern region of China. Southern coastal regions of China may also have colonized central parts of China and of central Yunnan. PMID:22615898

  13. Association between Mutation and Expression of TP53 as a Potential Prognostic Marker of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Park, Kyunghee; Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Eunjin; Cho, Eun Yoon; Lee, Kwang Hee; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose TP53, the most frequently mutated gene in breast cancer, is more frequently altered in HER2-enriched and basal-like breast cancer. However, no studies have clarified the role of TP53 status as a prognostic and predictive marker of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Materials and Methods We performed p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC), nCounter mRNA expression assay, and DNA sequencing to determine the relationship between TP53 alteration and clinical outcomes of TNBC patients. Results Seventy-seven of 174 TNBC patients were found to harbor a TP53 mutation. Patients with missense mutations showed high protein expression in contrast to patients with deletion mutations (positivity of IHC: wild type vs. missense vs. deletion mutation, 53.6% vs. 89.8% vs. 25.0%, respectively; p < 0.001). TP53 mRNA expression was influenced by mutation status (mRNA expression [median]: wild type vs. missense vs. deletion mutation, 207.36± 132.73 vs. 339.61±143.21 vs. 99.53±99.57, respectively; p < 0.001). According to survival analysis, neither class of mutation nor protein or mRNA expression status had any impact on patient prognosis. In subgroup analysis, low mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis in patients with a TP53 missense mutation (5-year distant recurrence-free survival [5Y DRFS]: low vs. high, 50.0% vs. 87.8%; p=0.009), while high mRNA expression with a TP53 deletion mutation indicated poor prognosis (5Y DRFS: low vs. high, 91.7% vs. 75.0%; p=0.316). Conclusion Association between TP53 mutation and expression indicates a potential prognostic marker of TNBC; hence both DNA sequencing and mRNA expression analysis may be required to predict the prognosis of TNBC patients. PMID:26910472

  14. Evaluation of a 3A-truncated foot-and-mouth disease virus in pigs for its potential as a marker vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of cloven-hoofed animals in the world. The disease can be effectively controlled by vaccination of susceptible animals with the conventional inactivated vaccine. However, one major concern of the inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) vaccine is that it does not allow serological discrimination between infected and vaccinated animals, and therefore interferes with serologic surveillance and the epidemiology of disease. A marker vaccine has proven to be of great value in disease eradication and control programs. In this study, we constructed a marker FMDV containing a deletion of residues 93 to 143 in the nonstructural protein 3A using a recently developed FMDV infectious cDNA clone. The marker virus, r-HN/3A93–143, had similar growth kinetics as the wild type virus in culture cell and caused a symptomatic infection in pigs. Pigs immunized with chemically inactivated marker vaccine were fully protected from the wild type virus challenge, and the potency of this marker vaccine was 10 PD50 (50% pig protective dose) per dose, indicating it could be an efficacious vaccine against FMDV. In addition, we developed a blocking ELISA targeted to the deleted epitope that could clearly differentiate animals infected with the marker virus from those infected with the wild type virus. These results indicate that a marker FMDV vaccine can be potentially developed by deleting an immunodominant epitope in NSP 3A. PMID:24885414

  15. Lipid-based oral delivery systems for skin deposition of a potential chemopreventive DIM derivative: characterization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boakye, Cedar H A; Patel, Ketan; Patel, Apurva R; Faria, Henrique A M; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Safe, Stephen; Singh, Mandip

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the oral route as a viable potential for the skin deposition of a novel diindolylmethane derivative (DIM-D) for chemoprevention activity. Various lipid-based oral delivery systems were optimized and compared for enhancing DIM-D's oral bioavailability and skin deposition. Preformulation studies were performed to evaluate the log P and solubility of DIM-D. Microsomal metabolism, P-glycoprotein efflux, and caco-2 monolayer permeability of DIM-D were determined. Comparative evaluation of the oral absorption and skin deposition of DIM-D-loaded various lipid-based formulations was performed in rats. DIM-D showed pH-dependent solubility and a high log P value. It was not a strong substrate of microsomal degradation and P-glycoprotein. SMEDDs comprised of medium chain triglycerides, monoglycerides, and kolliphor-HS15 (36.70 ± 0.42 nm). SNEDDs comprised of long chain triglycerides, cremophor RH40, labrasol, and TPGS (84.00 ± 14.14 nm). Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) consisted of compritol, miglyol, and surfactants (116.50 ± 2.12 nm). The blank formulations all showed >70 % cell viability in caco-2 cells. Differential Scanning Calorimetry confirmed the amorphization of DIM-D within the lipid matrices while Atomic Force Microscopy showed particle size distribution similar to the dynamic light scattering data. DIM-D also showed reduced permeation across caco-2 monolayer that was enhanced (p < 0.05) by SNEDDs in comparison to SMEDDs and NLC. Fabsolute for DIM-D SNEDDs, SMEDDs, and NLC was 0.14, 0.04, and 0.007, respectively. SNEDDs caused 53.90, 11.32, and 15.08-fold more skin deposition of DIM-D than the free drug, SMEDDs, and NLC, respectively, at 2 h following oral administration and shows a viable potential for use in skin cancer chemoprevention. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27405772

  16. Lipid-based oral delivery systems for skin deposition of a potential chemopreventive DIM derivative: characterization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boakye, Cedar H A; Patel, Ketan; Patel, Apurva R; Faria, Henrique A M; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Safe, Stephen; Singh, Mandip

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the oral route as a viable potential for the skin deposition of a novel diindolylmethane derivative (DIM-D) for chemoprevention activity. Various lipid-based oral delivery systems were optimized and compared for enhancing DIM-D's oral bioavailability and skin deposition. Preformulation studies were performed to evaluate the log P and solubility of DIM-D. Microsomal metabolism, P-glycoprotein efflux, and caco-2 monolayer permeability of DIM-D were determined. Comparative evaluation of the oral absorption and skin deposition of DIM-D-loaded various lipid-based formulations was performed in rats. DIM-D showed pH-dependent solubility and a high log P value. It was not a strong substrate of microsomal degradation and P-glycoprotein. SMEDDs comprised of medium chain triglycerides, monoglycerides, and kolliphor-HS15 (36.70 ± 0.42 nm). SNEDDs comprised of long chain triglycerides, cremophor RH40, labrasol, and TPGS (84.00 ± 14.14 nm). Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) consisted of compritol, miglyol, and surfactants (116.50 ± 2.12 nm). The blank formulations all showed >70 % cell viability in caco-2 cells. Differential Scanning Calorimetry confirmed the amorphization of DIM-D within the lipid matrices while Atomic Force Microscopy showed particle size distribution similar to the dynamic light scattering data. DIM-D also showed reduced permeation across caco-2 monolayer that was enhanced (p < 0.05) by SNEDDs in comparison to SMEDDs and NLC. Fabsolute for DIM-D SNEDDs, SMEDDs, and NLC was 0.14, 0.04, and 0.007, respectively. SNEDDs caused 53.90, 11.32, and 15.08-fold more skin deposition of DIM-D than the free drug, SMEDDs, and NLC, respectively, at 2 h following oral administration and shows a viable potential for use in skin cancer chemoprevention. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palombo, Enzo A.

    2011-01-01

    Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described. PMID:19596745

  18. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Enzo A

    2011-01-01

    Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described.

  19. Readily restoring freeze-dried probilosomes as potential nanocarriers for enhancing oral delivery of cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Guan, Peipei; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Formulating vesicular nanocarriers into dried precursors so as to overcome the drawbacks associated with liquid formulations is challengeable due to low efficiency of restoration. In this study, bilosomes interiorly thickened with gelatin (G-BLs) was evaluated for the ability to withstand freeze-drying stress and enhanced oral bioavailability of a model drug, cyclosporine A (CyA). The restoration efficiency of freeze-dried pro-G-BLs is investigated by comparing the particle size distribution, entrapment efficiency and morphology of the bilosomes before and after freeze-drying. Particle size and polydispersity index (PI) of pro-G-BLs after restoration was similar to that before freeze-drying, whereas freeze-dried bilosomes without gelatin thickening (pro-BLs) show irreversible damage and aggregation along with significantly increased particle size and PI after restoration. Entrapment efficiency of pro-G-BLs remains as high as 83.7%, in sharp contrast with 66.7% for pro-BLs. Pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs show improved absorption of CyA in pro-G-BLs as compared to pro-BLs, G-BLs and microemulsion-based Sandimmun Neoral(®). The relative oral bioavailability of CyA-loaded pro-G-BLs, pro-BLs and G-BLs was 165.2%, 123.5% and 130.1%, respectively, with Neoral(®) as the reference. It is concluded that interior thickening with gelatin significantly enhanced the stability against freeze-drying stress, which as a result improves the restoring efficiency and oral bioavailability. PMID:27085046

  20. Proteomics of stress responses in wheat and barley—search for potential protein markers of stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Prášil, Ilja T.

    2014-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum; T. durum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) agricultural production is severely limited by various abiotic and biotic stress factors. Proteins are directly involved in plant stress response so it is important to study proteome changes under various stress conditions. Generally, both abiotic and biotic stress factors induce profound alterations in protein network covering signaling, energy metabolism (glycolysis, Krebs cycle, ATP biosynthesis, photosynthesis), storage proteins, protein metabolism, several other biosynthetic pathways (e.g., S-adenosylmethionine metabolism, lignin metabolism), transport proteins, proteins involved in protein folding and chaperone activities, other protective proteins (LEA, PR proteins), ROS scavenging enzymes as well as proteins affecting regulation of plant growth and development. Proteins which have been reported to reveal significant differences in their relative abundance or posttranslational modifications between wheat, barley or related species genotypes under stress conditions are listed and their potential role in underlying the differential stress response is discussed. In conclusion, potential future roles of the results of proteomic studies in practical applications such as breeding for an enhanced stress tolerance and the possibilities to test and use protein markers in the breeding are suggested. PMID:25566285

  1. Stroma derived COL6A3 is a potential prognosis marker of colorectal carcinoma revealed by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents the third most common cancer in males and second in females worldwide. Here, we performed a quantitative 8-plex iTRAQ proteomics analysis of the secreted proteins from five colonic fibroblast cultures and three colon cancer epithelial cell lines. We identified 1114 proteins at 0% FDR, including 587 potential secreted proteins. We further recognized 116 fibroblast-enriched proteins which were significantly associated with cell movement, angiogenesis, proliferation and wound healing, and 44 epithelial cell-enriched proteins. By interrogation of Oncomine database, we found that 20 and 8 fibroblast-enriched proteins were up- and downregulated in CRC, respectively. Western blots confirmed the fibroblast-specific secretion of filamin C, COL6A3, COL4A1 and spondin-2. Upregulated mRNA and stroma expression of COL6A3 in CRC, which were revealed by Oncomine analyses and tissue-microarray-immunohistochemistry, indicated poor prognosis. COL6A3 expression was significantly associated with Dukes stage, T stage, stage, recurrence and smoking status. Circulating plasma COL6A3 in CRC patients was upregulated significantly comparing with healthy peoples. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that COL6A3 has better predictive performance for CRC with an area under the curve of 0.885 and the best sensitivity/specificity of 92.9%/81.3%. Thus we demonstrated that COL6A3 was a potential diagnosis and prognosis marker of CRC. PMID:26338966

  2. Impairment of mesenchymal stem cells derived from oral leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihui; Song, Jiangyuan; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Su, Sha; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the common precancerous lesions in oral mucosa. To compare the biological characteristics and regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from oral leukoplakia (epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia) and normal oral mucosa, MSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion. Then these cells were identified by the expression of MSC related markers, STRO-1, CD105 and CD90, with the absent for the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 by flow cytometric detection. The self-renewal ability of MSCs from oral leukoplakia was enhanced, while the multipotent differentiation was descended, compared with MSCs from normal oral mucosa. Fibrin gel was used as a carrier for MSCs transplanted into immunocompromised mice to detect their regenerative capacity. The regenerative capacities of MSCs from oral leukoplakia became impaired partly. Collagen IV (Col IV) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were selected to analyze the potential mechanism for the functional changes of MSCs from oral leukoplakia by immunochemical and western blot analysis. The expression of Col IV was decreased and that of MMP-9 was increased by MSCs with the progression of oral leukoplakia, especially in MSCs from epithelial dysplasia. The imbalance between regenerative and metabolic self-regulatory functions of MSCs from oral leukoplakia may be related to the progression of this premalignant disorder.

  3. Impairment of mesenchymal stem cells derived from oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihui; Song, Jiangyuan; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Su, Sha; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the common precancerous lesions in oral mucosa. To compare the biological characteristics and regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from oral leukoplakia (epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia) and normal oral mucosa, MSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion. Then these cells were identified by the expression of MSC related markers, STRO-1, CD105 and CD90, with the absent for the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 by flow cytometric detection. The self-renewal ability of MSCs from oral leukoplakia was enhanced, while the multipotent differentiation was descended, compared with MSCs from normal oral mucosa. Fibrin gel was used as a carrier for MSCs transplanted into immunocompromised mice to detect their regenerative capacity. The regenerative capacities of MSCs from oral leukoplakia became impaired partly. Collagen IV (Col IV) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were selected to analyze the potential mechanism for the functional changes of MSCs from oral leukoplakia by immunochemical and western blot analysis. The expression of Col IV was decreased and that of MMP-9 was increased by MSCs with the progression of oral leukoplakia, especially in MSCs from epithelial dysplasia. The imbalance between regenerative and metabolic self-regulatory functions of MSCs from oral leukoplakia may be related to the progression of this premalignant disorder. PMID:26617710

  4. Microsatellite markers for the endangered Roanoke logperch, Percina rex (Percidae) and their potential utility for other darter species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, D.J.; Roberts, J.H.; Angermeier, P.L.; Hallerman, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Roanoke logperch (Percina rex Jordan and Evermann), an endangered fish, occurs in only six watersheds in the Roanoke and Chowan river drainages of Virginia, USA. The species' population genetic structure is poorly known. We developed 16 microsatellite markers that were reliably scorable and polymorphic P. rex. Markers were also screened in seven other darter species of the genus Percina. Most markers exhibited successful amplification and polymorphism in several species. These markers may therefore prove useful for population genetic studies in other darters, a diverse but highly imperiled group. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  5. Do oral bacteria alter the regenerative potential of stem cells? A concise review.

    PubMed

    Chatzivasileiou, Kyriaki; Kriebel, Katja; Steinhoff, Gustav; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lang, Hermann

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely recognized as critical players in tissue regeneration. New insights into stem cell biology provide evidence that MSCs may also contribute to host defence and inflammation. In case of tissue injury or inflammatory diseases, e.g. periodontitis, stem cells are mobilized towards the site of damage, thus coming in close proximity to bacteria and bacterial components. Specifically, in the oral cavity, complex ecosystems of commensal bacteria live in a mutually beneficial state with the host. However, the formation of polymicrobial biofilm communities with pathogenic properties may trigger an inadequate host inflammatory-immune response, leading to the disruption of tissue homoeostasis and development of disease. Because of their unique characteristics, MSCs are suggested as crucial regulators of tissue regeneration even under such harsh environmental conditions. The heterogeneous effects of bacteria on MSCs across studies imply the complexity underlying the interactions between stem cells and bacteria. Hence, a better understanding of stem cell behaviour at sites of inflammation appears to be a key strategy in developing new approaches for in situ tissue regeneration. Here, we review the literature on the effects of oral bacteria on cell proliferation, differentiation capacity and immunomodulation of dental-derived MSCs.

  6. Contaminated tooth brushes–potential threat to oral and general health

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Rashmi; Ahmed Mujib, B. R.; Telagi, Neethu; Anil, B. S.; Spoorthi, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tooth brushing is most common method of maintaining oral hygiene. In removing plaque and other soft debris from the teeth, tooth brushes become contaminated with bacteria, blood, saliva and oral debris. These contaminated tooth brushes can be a source of infection. Aims and objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of microorganisms in the tooth brushes and to investigate the effect of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine gluconate, sodium hypochlorite and water to decontaminate them. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one children were asked to brush their teeth for 5 days with a tooth brush. The tooth brushes were put in Robertson's Cooked Meat broth and were observed for growth of Streptococcal microorganisms. These tooth brushes were then placed in disinfectants such as 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (Group I), 1% sodium hypochlorite (Group II) and water (Group III) for 24 hrs and then cultured again. Reduction of growth of microorganisms was seen in Group I, Group II and remnants of growth seen in Group III. Conclusion: We conclude that the use of disinfectant for a tooth brush is a must for every individual at least at regular intervals. PMID:26288790

  7. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SV4089 as a potential carrier of oral DNA vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Ideris, Aini; Zakaria, Zunita; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella has been used as a carrier for DNA vaccine. However, in vitro and in vivo studies on the bacteria following transfection of plasmid DNA were poorly studied. In this paper, eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H5N1 genes, pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP, were transfected into an attenuated Salmonella enteric typhimurium SV4089. In vitro stability of the transfected plasmids into Salmonella were over 90% after 100 generations. The attenuated Salmonella were able to invade MCF-7 (1.2%) and MCF-10A (0.5%) human breast cancer cells. Newly hatched specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicks were inoculated once by oral gavage with 10(9) colony-forming unit (CFU) of the attenuated Salmonella. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths were recorded after inoculation. Viable bacteria were detected 3 days after inoculation by plating from spleen, liver, and cecum. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were carried out for confirmation. Salmonella was not detected in blood cultures although serum antibody immune responses to Salmonella O antiserum group D1 factor 1, 9, and 12 antigens were observed in all the inoculated chickens after 7 days up to 35 days. Our results showed that live attenuated S. typhimurium SV4089 harboring pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP may provide a unique alternative as a carrier for DNA oral vaccine in chickens.

  8. Microsatellite Markers of Willow Species and Characterization of 11 Polymorphic Microsatellites for Salix eriocephala (Salicaceae), a Potential Native Species for Biomass Production in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Pitre, Frédéric E; Brouillet, Luc; Labrecque, Michel

    2013-03-27

    Biomass produced from dedicated plantations constitutes a source of renewable energy and is expected to play an important role in several countries in the coming decades. The cultivation of woody crops such as willows therefore raises several environmental issues. In North America, several native willows are potentially interesting for biomass producers. Willow trees are diverse but few species used for environmental applications have been the object of molecular genetic studies. Based on the sequenced poplar genome, 24 microsatellite markers were assayed on five native North American willow species: Salix amygdaloides, S. discolor, S. eriocephala, S. interior and S. nigra. Polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to characterize the allele data on the shrub Salix eriocephala, a North American species with economic potential. Eleven markers amplified and confirmed the potential of this species. Analysis of samples from six populations in eastern Canada showed that all markers were variable as well as polymorphic in at least one population. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 1 to 9 (mean 2.95) and showed that these microsatellite markers can be used to assess genetic diversity of North American willow species.

  9. Microsatellite Markers of Willow Species and Characterization of 11 Polymorphic Microsatellites for Salix eriocephala (Salicaceae), a Potential Native Species for Biomass Production in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Pitre, Frédéric E.; Brouillet, Luc; Labrecque, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Biomass produced from dedicated plantations constitutes a source of renewable energy and is expected to play an important role in several countries in the coming decades. The cultivation of woody crops such as willows therefore raises several environmental issues. In North America, several native willows are potentially interesting for biomass producers. Willow trees are diverse but few species used for environmental applications have been the object of molecular genetic studies. Based on the sequenced poplar genome, 24 microsatellite markers were assayed on five native North American willow species: Salix amygdaloides, S. discolor, S. eriocephala, S. interior and S. nigra. Polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to characterize the allele data on the shrub Salix eriocephala, a North American species with economic potential. Eleven markers amplified and confirmed the potential of this species. Analysis of samples from six populations in eastern Canada showed that all markers were variable as well as polymorphic in at least one population. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 1 to 9 (mean 2.95) and showed that these microsatellite markers can be used to assess genetic diversity of North American willow species. PMID:27137372

  10. Solitary fibrous tumor of the oral cavity with a predominant leiomyomatous-like pattern: A potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Amico, Paolo; Colella, Giuseppe; Rossiello, Raffaele; Maria Vecchio, Giada; Leocata, Pietro; Magro, Gaetano

    2010-07-15

    The diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is usually straightforward if the typical morphologic features, including a wide variety of growth patterns, are identified. We report the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings of a rare case of intraoral SFT which exhibited a predominant leiomyomatous-like appearance, closely reminiscent of a leiomyoma, at both incisional and excisional biopsy. Histologically, the tumor was composed predominantly of intersecting fascicles of eosinophilic spindle-shaped cells, variably set in a fibrous stroma. A focal hemangiopericytoma-like growth pattern with alternating hypercellular and hypocellular areas, as well as the deposition of dense keloid-type collagen, raising the suspicion of SFT, could be identified only after a careful examination of the whole tumor. Immunohistochemistry was helpful in confirming the diagnosis of SFT, revealing a diffuse staining of neoplastic cells for vimentin, CD34, bcl-2 protein, and, focally, CD99. Myogenic markers (alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, h-caldesmon) were not expressed. The pathologist should be aware of this variant of intraoral leiomyomatous-like SFT to avoid a misdiagnosis of leiomyoma. The distinction of SFT from leiomyoma in the oral cavity is important to assure both correct treatment and prognostic information.

  11. Potential of ordered mesoporous silica for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Vialpando, Monica; Martens, Johan A; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2011-08-01

    The use of ordered mesoporous silica is one of the more recent and rapidly developing formulation techniques for enhancing the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. Their large surface area and pore volume make ordered mesoporous silica materials excellent candidates for efficient drug loading and rapid release. While this new approach offers many promising advantages, further research is still necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and to improve our scientific insight into the behavior of this system. In this review, the significant developments to date are presented and research challenges highlighted. Aspects of downstream processability are discussed in view of their special bulk powder properties and unique pore architecture. Lastly, perspectives for successful oral dosage form development are presented. PMID:22833866

  12. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  13. Ascending parabrachio-thalamo-striatal pathways: potential circuits for integration of gustatory and oral motor functions.

    PubMed

    Iwai, H; Kuramoto, E; Yamanaka, A; Sonomura, T; Uemura, M; Goto, T

    2015-05-21

    The medial parabrachial nucleus (MPB) and external part of the medial parabrachial nucleus (MPBE) relay gustatory, oral mechanosensory and other visceral information in the rat brain and reportedly project not only to the parvicellular part of the posteromedial ventral thalamic nucleus (VPMpc) but also to the ventrocaudal part of the intralaminar thalamic nuclei. Generally, the intralaminar thalamic nuclei project topographically to the caudate putamen (CPu); however, it is unclear where the ventrocaudal part of the intralaminar thalamic nuclei projects within the CPu. Thus, we visualized neural pathways from the MPB and MPBE to the CPu via the ventrocaudal part of the intralaminar thalamic nuclei using an anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine, and a retrograde tracer, cholera toxin B subunit. We found that the MPB and MPBE sent a relatively stronger input to the ventrocaudal part of the intralaminar thalamic nuclei such as the oval paracentral thalamic nucleus (OPC), central medial thalamic nucleus (CM) and parafascicular thalamic nucleus (PF) and retroreuniens area (RRe) as compared to the VPMpc. In turn, these thalamic nuclei projected to the ventral part of the CPu with the topographical arrangement as follows: the OPC to the ventrocentral part of the CPu; ventrolateral part of the PF to the ventrolateral part of the CPu; and the caudal part of the CM, ventromedial part of the PF and RRe to the ventromedial part of the CPu. Further, we found that the VPMpc rather projected to the interstitial nucleus of the posterior limb of the anterior commissure than the CPu. The ventral part of the CPu is reported to be involved in jaw movement as well as food and water intake functions. Therefore, these parabrachio-thalamo-striatal pathways that we demonstrated here suggest that gustatory and oral mechanosensory information affects feeding behavior within the ventral part of the CPu.

  14. Investigation and Sensory Characterization of 1,4-Cineole: A Potential Aromatic Marker of Australian Cabernet Sauvignon Wine.

    PubMed

    Antalick, Guillaume; Tempère, Sophie; Šuklje, Katja; Blackman, John W; Deloire, Alain; de Revel, Gilles; Schmidtke, Leigh M

    2015-10-21

    This work reports the quantitation and sensory characterization of 1,4-cineole in red wine for the first time. A headspace-solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) method was developed to quantitate 1,4-cineole and 1,8-cineole in 104 commercial Australian red wines. 1,4-Cineole was detected in all of the wines analyzed, with concentrations ranging from 0.023 to 1.6 μg/L. An important varietal effect was observed, with concentrations of 1,4-cineole in Cabernet Sauvignon wines (mean of 0.6 ± 0.3 μg/L) significantly higher than in Shiraz (0.07 ± 0.04 μg/L) and Pinot Noir (0.2 ± 0.2 μg/L) wines. Regional variations of both cineole isomer concentrations have been measured between wines originating from different Australian regions. Sensory studies demonstrated that the addition of 0.54 μg/L 1,4-cineole in a Cabernet Sauvignon wine, to produce a final concentration of 0.63 μg/L, was perceived significantly by a sensory panel (p < 0.05). Descriptive analyses revealed that 1,4-cineole and 1,8-cineole may contribute to the hay, dried herbs, and blackcurrant aromas reported in Australian Cabernet Sauvignon wines and may be potential markers of regional typicality of these wines.

  15. CD146 is a novel marker for highly tumorigenic cells and a potential therapeutic target in malignant rhabdoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    Nodomi, S; Umeda, K; Saida, S; Kinehara, T; Hamabata, T; Daifu, T; Kato, I; Hiramatsu, H; Watanabe, K-i; Kuwahara, Y; Iehara, T; Adachi, S; Konishi, E; Nakahata, T; Hosoi, H; Heike, T

    2016-01-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a rare, highly aggressive pediatric malignancy that primarily develops during infancy and early childhood. Despite the existing standard of intensive multimodal therapy, the prognosis of patients with MRT is dismal; therefore, a greater understanding of the biology of this disease is required to establish novel therapies. In this study, we identified a highly tumorigenic sub-population in MRT, based on the expression of CD146 (also known as melanoma cell adhesion molecule), a cell adhesion molecule expressed by neural crest cells and various derivatives. CD146+ cells isolated from four MRT cell lines by cell sorting exhibited enhanced self-renewal and invasive potential in vitro. In a xenograft model using immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid IL-2Rγ-null mice, purified CD146+ cells obtained from MRT cell lines or a primary tumor exhibited the exclusive ability to form tumors in vivo. Blocking of CD146-related mechanisms, either by short hairpin RNA knockdown or treatment with a polyclonal antibody against CD146, effectively suppressed tumor growth of MRT cells both in vitro and in vivo via induction of apoptosis by inactivating Akt. Furthermore, CD146 positivity in immunohistological analysis of 11 MRT patient samples was associated with poor patient outcomes. These results suggest that CD146 defines a distinct sub-population in MRT with high tumorigenic capacity and that this marker represents a promising therapeutic target. PMID:27041577

  16. Identification of potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis of gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Jian; Xu, Lixiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE) genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DE genes identified in the meta-analysis. Three microarray datasets (26 cases and 29 controls in total) were collected for meta-analysis. 905 consistently DE genes were identified in ankylosing spondylitis, among which 482 genes were upregulated and 423 genes were downregulated. The upregulated gene with the smallest combined rank product (RP) was GNG11 (combined RP=299.64). The downregulated gene with the smallest combined RP was S100P (combined RP=335.94). In the gene ontology (GO) analysis, the most significantly enriched GO term was "immune system process" (P=3.46×10(-26)). The most significant pathway identified in the pathway analysis was antigen processing and presentation (P=8.40×10(-5)). The consistently DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and biological pathways associated with those DE genes identified provide valuable information for studying the pathophysiology of ankylosing spondylitis.

  17. Trisomy 8 Acute Myeloid Leukemia Analysis Reveals New Insights of DNA Methylome with Identification of HHEX as Potential Diagnostic Marker

    PubMed Central

    Saied, Marwa H; Marzec, Jacek; Khalid, Sabah; Smith, Paul; Molloy, Gael; Young, Bryan D

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy 8 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the commonest numerical aberration in AML. Here we present a global analysis of trisomy 8 AML using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-seq). The study is based on three diagnostic trisomy 8 AML and their parallel relapse status in addition to nine non-trisomic AML and four normal bone marrows (NBMs). In contrast to non-trisomic DNA samples, trisomy 8 AML showed a characteristic DNA methylation distribution pattern because an increase in the frequency of the hypermethylation signals in chromosome 8 was associated with an increase in the hypomethylation signals in the rest of the chromosomes. Chromosome 8 hypermethylation signals were found mainly in the CpG island (CGI) shores and interspersed repeats. Validating the most significant differentially methylated CGI (P = 7.88 × 10−11) identified in trisomy 8 AML demonstrated a specific core region within the gene body of HHEX, which was significantly correlated with HHEX expression in both diagnostic and relapse trisomy 8 AMLs. Overall, the existence of extra chromosome 8 was associated with a global impact on the DNA methylation distribution with identification of HHEX gene methylation as a potential diagnostic marker for trisomy 8 AML. PMID:25674022

  18. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-12-08

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia.

  19. A Potential Epigenetic Marker Mediating Serum Folate and Vitamin B12 Levels Contributes to the Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Keat Wei, Loo; Sutherland, Heidi; Au, Anthony; Camilleri, Emily; Haupt, Larisa M.; Gan, Siew Hua; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a multifactorial disease that may be associated with aberrant DNA methylation profiles. We investigated epigenetic dysregulation for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene among ischemic stroke patients. Cases and controls were recruited after obtaining signed written informed consents following a screening process against the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Serum vitamin profiles (folate, vitamin B12, and homocysteine) were determined using immunoassays. Methylation profiles for CpGs A and B in the MTHFR gene were determined using a bisulfite-pyrosequencing method. Methylation of MTHFR significantly increased the susceptibility risk for ischemic stroke. In particular, CpG A outperformed CpG B in mediating serum folate and vitamin B12 levels to increase ischemic stroke susceptibility risks by 4.73-fold. However, both CpGs A and B were not associated with serum homocysteine levels or ischemic stroke severity. CpG A is a potential epigenetic marker in mediating serum folate and vitamin B12 to contribute to ischemic stroke. PMID:25705649

  20. CA153 in Breast Secretions as a Potential Molecular Marker for Diagnosing Breast Cancer: A Meta Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fang; Zhu, Shengbo; Yang, Renqi; Huang, Yiyong; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Hong; Yang, Jianqing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many studies have reported that carbohydrate antigen 153 (CA153) in breast secretions (BS) can discriminate breast cancer (BC) patients from healthy individuals, indicating CA153 in BS as a potential index for BC. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the actual diagnostic value of CA153 in BS. Methods Related papers were obtained from Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, Ovid, Sciverse, the Cochrane library, Chinese Biomedical literature Database (CBM), Technology of Chongqing (VIP), Wan Fang Data, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). Pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of CA153 in BS for BC diagnosis were analyzed with the random effect model. SROC and the area under the curve (AUC) were applied to assess overall diagnostic efficiency. Results This meta-analysis included five studies with a total of 329 BC patients and 381 healthy subjects. For CA153 in BS, the summary sensitivity, specificity, and DOR to diagnose BC were 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57∼0.68), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.78∼0.86), and 9.18 (95% CI: 4.22∼19.95), respectively. Furthermore, the AUC of BS CA153 in the diagnosis of BC was 0.8614. Conclusions CA153 in BS is a valuable molecular marker in diagnosing BC and should be applied in standard clinical practices of BC screening upon confirmation of our findings in a larger prospective study. PMID:27636552

  1. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  2. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  3. The influence of elastin-like recombinant polymer on the self-renewing potential of a 3D tissue equivalent derived from human lamina propria fibroblasts and oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kinikoglu, Beste; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Damour, Odile; Hasirci, Vasif

    2011-09-01

    Three-dimensional epithelial tissue equivalents tend to lose their self-renewing potential progressively during culture as their epithelial cells lose their proliferative capacity with time. Even though the tissue engineered construct can mimic the native tissue well, it rapidly degrades after implantation due to the insufficient number of proliferating cells in the equivalent. In the present study we demonstrate for the first time that the use of an elastin-like recombinant polymer (ELR) engineered to contain the cell adhesion peptide RGD can result in a 3D tissue equivalent with high self-renewing potential, containing as many proliferative cells as the native tissue itself. The 3D tissue equivalent was reconstructed by the coculture of human lamina propria fibroblasts and oral epithelial cells in the nanofibrous ELR-collagen scaffold. Histological, immunohistological and transmission electron microscopic analyses of this oral mucosa equivalent demonstrated the expression of markers characteristic of epithelial proliferation (Ki67) and differentiation (keratin 13), and also the presence of a pluristratified epithelium and an ultrastructurally well-organized basement membrane expressing laminin 332. The synthesis of new extracellular matrix by the fibroblasts was also demonstrated. The scaffold proposed here presents great potential for tissue engineering applications, and also for studies of epithelial proliferation, and epithelial disorders including carcinogenesis. PMID:21592566

  4. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo anti-tumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone). Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse) was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 μg, 35 μg, and 52.5 μg per animal) were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom) and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. PMID:27799739

  5. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Potential of Liquid and Vapor Phase Phenolic Essential Oil Compounds against Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi-Hao; Ko, Shun-Yao; Chen, Michael Yuanchien; Shih, Yin-Hua; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Chuang, Li-Chuan; Wu, Ching-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antibacterial activities of the phenolic essential oil (EO) compounds hinokitiol, carvacrol, thymol, and menthol against oral pathogens. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus mutans, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Escherichia. coli were used in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), bacterial growth curves, temperature and pH stabilities, and synergistic effects of the liquid and vapor EO compounds were tested. The MIC/MBC of the EO compounds, ranging from the strongest to weakest, were hinokitiol (40–60 μg/mL/40-100 μg/mL), thymol (100–200 μg/mL/200-400 μg/mL), carvacrol (200–400 μg/mL/200-600 μg/mL), and menthol (500-more than 2500 μg/mL/1000-more than 2500 μg/mL). The antibacterial activities of the four EO phenolic compound based on the agar diffusion test and bacterial growth curves showed that the four EO phenolic compounds were stable under different temperatures for 24 h, but the thymol activity decreased when the temperature was higher than 80°C. The combination of liquid carvacrol with thymol did not show any synergistic effects. The activities of the vaporous carvacrol and thymol were inhibited by the presence of water. Continual violent shaking during culture enhanced the activity of menthol. Both liquid and vaporous hinokitiol were stable at different temperatures and pH conditions. The combination of vaporous hinokitiol with zinc oxide did not show synergistic effects. These results showed that the liquid and vapor phases of hinokitiol have strong anti-oral bacteria abilities. Hinokitiol has the potential to be applied in oral health care products, dental materials, and infection controls to exert antimicrobial activity. PMID:27681039

  6. Computer vision approach to morphometric feature analysis of basal cell nuclei for evaluating malignant potentiality of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muthu Rama Krishnan, M; Pal, Mousumi; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Chakraborty, Chandan; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Ray, Ajoy K

    2012-06-01

    This research work presents a quantitative approach for analysis of histomorphometric features of the basal cell nuclei in respect to their size, shape and intensity of staining, from surface epithelium of Oral Submucous Fibrosis showing dysplasia (OSFD) to that of the Normal Oral Mucosa (NOM). For all biological activity, the basal cells of the surface epithelium form the proliferative compartment and therefore their morphometric changes will spell the intricate biological behavior pertaining to normal cellular functions as well as in premalignant and malignant status. In view of this, the changes in shape, size and intensity of staining of the nuclei in the basal cell layer of the NOM and OSFD have been studied. Geometric, Zernike moments and Fourier descriptor (FD) based as well as intensity based features are extracted for histomorphometric pattern analysis of the nuclei. All these features are statistically analyzed along with 3D visualization in order to discriminate the groups. Results showed increase in the dimensions (area and perimeter), shape parameters and decreasing mean nuclei intensity of the nuclei in OSFD in respect to NOM. Further, the selected features are fed to the Bayesian classifier to discriminate normal and OSFD. The morphometric and intensity features provide a good sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 98.53% and positive predicative accuracy of 97.35%. This comparative quantitative characterization of basal cell nuclei will be of immense help for oral onco-pathologists, researchers and clinicians to assess the biological behavior of OSFD, specially relating to their premalignant and malignant potentiality. As a future direction more extensive study involving more number of disease subjects is observed.

  7. Evaluation of the mutagenic potential and acute oral toxicity of standardized extract of Ocimum sanctum (OciBest™).

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, C V; Srikanth, H S; Anand, M S; Allan, J Joshua; Viji, M M Hipolith; Amit, A

    2013-09-01

    Ocimum sanctum L. (Lamiaceae) is found throughout India and in many parts of world. O. sanctum is used for the treatment of various health indications. In this lieu, it is of prime importance to investigate the safety aspects of the plant. Hence, the present study was conducted to investigate the possible genotoxic potential and acute oral toxicity of the extract of O. sanctum (OciBest™). The standard battery of in vitro genotoxicity tests, namely bacterial reverse mutation, chromosome aberration and micronucleus (MN) tests were employed to assess the possible mutagenic activity. The results showed that OciBest™ (7.9-2500.0 µg/mL) did not increase the number of histidine revertant colonies in Salmonella typhimurium strains (TA98 and TAMix) with and without exogenous metabolic activation (S9). OciBest™ (10.0-100.0 µg/mL) did not show structural chromosomal aberrations or increase in MN induction, with and without S9, at the tested dose range in both 4-h and 18-h exposure cell cultures. Thus, OciBest™ is not genotoxic in bacterial reverse mutation, chromosomal aberration and MN tests. In an acute oral toxicity test, rats were treated with 5 g/kg of OciBest™ and observed for signs of toxicity for 14 days and the results did not show any treatment-related toxic effects to Wistar rats. PMID:23424203

  8. Mathematical Models to Explore Potential Effects of Supersaturation and Precipitation on Oral Bioavailability of Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kleppe, Mary S; Forney-Stevens, Kelly M; Haskell, Roy J; Bogner, Robin H

    2015-07-01

    Poorly soluble drugs are increasingly formulated into supersaturating drug delivery systems which may precipitate during oral delivery. The link between in vitro drug concentration profiles and oral bioavailability is under intense investigation. The objective of the present work was to develop closed-form analytical solutions that relate in vitro concentration profiles to the amount of drug absorbed using several alternate assumptions and only six parameters. Three parameters define the key features of the in vitro drug concentration-time profile. An additional three parameters focus on physiological parameters. Absorption models were developed based on alternate assumptions; the drug concentration in the intestinal fluid: (1) peaks at the same time and concentration as in vitro, (2) peaks at the same time as in vitro, or (3) reaches the same peak concentration as in vitro. The three assumptions provide very different calculated values of bioavailability. Using Case 2 assumptions, bioavailability enhancement was found to be less than proportional to in silico examples of dissolution enhancement. Case 3 assumptions lead to bioavailability enhancements that are more than proportional to dissolution enhancements. Using Case 1 predicts drug absorption amounts that fall in between Case 2 and 3. The equations developed based on the alternate assumptions can be used to quickly evaluate the potential improvement in bioavailability due to intentional alteration of the in vitro drug concentration vs. time curve by reformulation. These equations may be useful in making decisions as to whether reformulation is expected to provide sufficient bioavailability enhancement to justify the effort.

  9. A potential oral anticancer drug candidate, Moringa oleifera leaf extract, induces the apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, IL LAE; LEE, JU HYE; KANG, SE CHAN

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been reported that cold water-extracts of Moringa oleifera leaf have anticancer activity against various human cancer cell lines, including non-small cell lung cancer. In the present study, the anticancer activity of M. oleifera leaf extracts was investigated in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. By the analysis of apoptotic signals, including the induction of caspase or poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, and the Annexin V and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assays, it was demonstrated that M. oleifera leaf extracts induce the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. In the hollow fiber assay, oral administration of the leaf extracts significantly reduced (44–52%) the proliferation of the HepG2 cells and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. These results support the potential of soluble extracts of M. oleifera leaf as orally administered therapeutics for the treatment of human liver and lung cancers. PMID:26622717

  10. Expression level of chromodomain Y (CDY): potential marker for prediction of sperm recovery in non-obstructive azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Heydarian, Neda; Favaedi, Raha; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: The availability of testis specific genes will be of help in choosing the most promising biomarkers for the detection of testicular sperm retrieval in patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Testis specific chromodomain protein Y 1 (CDY1) is a histone acetyltransferase which concentrates in the round spermatid nucleus, where histone hyperacetylation occurs and causes the replacement of histones by the sperm-specific DNA packaging proteins, TNPs and PRMs. Objective: The aim was to evaluate CDY1 gene as a marker for predicting of successful sperm retrieval in NOA patients. Materials and Methods: This research was conducted on 29 patients with NOA who had undergone testicular sperm extraction (TESE) procedure. NOA patients were subdivided into patients with successful sperm retrieval (NOA+, n=12) and patients with unsuccessful sperm retrieval (NOA-, n=17). Relative expression of CDY1 gene and chromatin incorporation of CDY1 protein were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and ELISA assay, respectively. Results: Quantification of mRNA relative expression and incorporation of CDY1 protein in chromatin showed significant lower expressions and protein levels of CDY1 in testis tissues of NOA- in comparison to NOA+ group. Conclusion: The findings in this study demonstrated a correlation between the low levels of CDY1 function and unsuccessful sperm recovery in the testicular tissues of NOA- compared to NOA+ patients. Therefore, it can be reasonable to consider CDY1 as a potential biomarker for predicting the presence of spermatozoa, although the claim needs more samples to be confirmed. PMID:27525321

  11. Myc Promoter-Binding Protein-1 (MBP-1) Is a Novel Potential Prognostic Marker in Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Flavia; Mazzarella, Claudia; Sbacchi, Silvia; Roz, Elena; Lupo, Carmelo; Perconti, Giovanni; Giallongo, Agata; Migliorini, Paola; Marrazzo, Antonio; Feo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Background Alpha-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the formation of phosphoenolpyruvate in the cell cytoplasm. α-Enolase and the predominantly nuclear Myc promoter-binding protein-1 (MBP-1) originate from a single gene through the alternative use of translational starting sites. MBP-1 binds to the P2 c-myc promoter and competes with TATA-box binding protein (TBP) to suppress gene transcription. Although several studies have shown an antiproliferative effect of MBP-1 overexpression on several human cancer cells, to date detailed observations of α-enolase and MBP-1 relative expression in primary tumors versus normal tissues and their correlation with clinicopathological features have not been undertaken. Methodology and Findings We analyzed α-enolase and MBP-1 expression in normal breast epithelium and primary invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC) from 177 patients by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, using highly specific anti-α-enolase monoclonal antibodies. A significant increase in the expression of cytoplasmic α-enolase was observed in 98% of the tumors analysed, compared to normal tissues. Nuclear MBP-1 was found in almost all the normal tissues while its expression was retained in only 35% of the tumors. Statistically significant associations were observed among the nuclear expression of MBP-1 and ErbB2 status, Ki-67 expression, node status and tumor grade. Furthermore MBP-1 expression was associated with good survival of patients with IDC. Conclusions MBP-1 functions in repressing c-myc gene expression and the results presented indicate that the loss of nuclear MBP-1 expression in a large number of IDC may be a critical step in the development and progression of breast cancer and a predictor of adverse outcome. Nuclear MBP-1 appears to be a novel and valuable histochemical marker with potential prognostic value in breast cancer. PMID:20886042

  12. Potential role of differentially expressed lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanchuan; Tian, Lili; Ma, Penghua; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Kai; GuanchaoWang; Liu, Hongchen; Xu, Baohua

    2015-10-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently attracted more attention about the role in a broad range of biological processes and complex cancers. We aimed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs that play an important role in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Microarray data GSE25099 consisting of 57 samples from patients with OSCC and 22 normal samples were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and lncRNAs were identified between OSCC samples and control using samr package in R and noncoder software. Co-expression network was constructed for lncRNAs and candidate target DEGs, followed by functional and pathway enrichment analysis using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tool. OSCC-related genes were screened by Genetic-Association-DB-Database analysis, and then protein-protein interaction (PPI) network construction of OSCC-related and co-expressed genes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there were 998 DEGs and 160 differentially expressed lncRNAs between OSCC and normal control. We found LOC100130547, FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1 targeted most of DEGs. Predicted targets-related functional annotation showed significant changes in inflammation-related functions and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. By further conducting PPI network with lncRNA co-expressed DEGs, we found that OSCC-associated genes including MMP1 (matrix metallopeptidase), MMP3, MMP9, PLAU (plasminogen activator, urokinase) and IL8 (interleukin 8) were targeted by FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1. Our results indicate that lncRNAs FTH1P3, PDIA3F and GTF2IRD2P1 may responsible for progression and metastasis of OSCC via targeting MMP1, MMP3, MMP9, PLAU and IL8 which are key regulators of tumorigenesis. PMID:26276270

  13. Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a promising target for cholangiocarcinoma treatment and bile LCN2 level is a potential cholangiocarcinoma diagnostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Wu, Ren-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Juang, Horng-Heng; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating disease due to resistance to traditional chemotherapies and radiotherapies. New therapeutic strategies against CCA are urgently needed. This study investigated the role of lipocalin-2 (LCN2) in human cholangiocarcinoma as a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. So far, the role of LCN2 in cancer is still controversial and studies regarding the role of LCN2 in CCA are limited. LCN2 knockdown inhibited CCA cell growth in vitro and in vivo through induction of cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phases and decreased metastatic potential due to repression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Overexpression of LCN2 in CCA cells increased cell metastatic potential. We showed for the first time that the N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) and NDRG2, known as tumor suppressor genes, are negatively regulated by LCN2 in CCA cells. LCN2 concentration in bile was higher in patients with CCA than that in patients with gallstones, with a cutoff value of 20.08 ng/ml making this a potential diagnostic marker. Higher LCN2 expression was associated with worse survival in patients with CCA. LCN2 is a promising target for CCA treatment and bile LCN2 level is a potential diagnostic marker for CCA. PMID:27782193

  14. Development of simple sequence repeat markers in persimmon (Diospyros L.) and their potential use in related species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Jing, Z B; Ruan, X F; Cheng, J M

    2015-01-30

    Persimmon (Diospyros L.) is an economically important fruit in the world, and it has been recognized as a healthy nutrient supply for human consumption. In this study, 14 microsatellite markers were developed from an AG/TC and AC/TG-enriched genomic library of Chinese persimmon Mopanshi. Twelve polymorphic markers were selected in 4 related species; these markers showed transferability to the 4 related persimmon species. In addition, 10 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to detect the genetic diversity among 51 persimmon accessions from China, Japan, and Korea. A total of 57 polymorphic bands with an average of 5.7 bands per primer pair were observed. According to cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis, all persimmon accessions could be divided into 4 groups. A close relationship existed between D. kaki and D. oleifera, and D. glaucifolia and D. lotus. Jinzaoshi could be considered a separate species of persimmon. These new SSR markers provide tools for evaluating genetic relatedness among different persimmon species.

  15. Usefulness of field potential as a marker of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, and endpoint analysis of embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Naoteru; Deguchi, Jiro; Yamada, Toru; Funabashi, Hitoshi; Seki, Takaki

    2010-12-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a validated method and a useful screening tool for drug discovery. EST requires microscopic observation of beating cells to be considered cardiomyocytes as an endpoint assay. However, this procedure is time-consuming and limits the throughput performance. Instead of microscopic observation, we previously established a novel assay method based on cardiac field potential as an endpoint. However, cardiac specificity of this field potential is not yet clarified, because beating cells have not been rigorously evaluated as skeletal or cardiomyocyte. Here, we investigated the relationships between field potential, beating, and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) expression, selected as a cardiomyocyte-specific marker, and evaluated suitability of the field potential as a marker for cardiomyocyte in vehicle or 5-fluorouracil treated embryo bodies. Embryoid bodies of mouse embryonic stem cells (D3) were differentiated in a chamber with multi-electrode array for 5 days, and field potential and beating were measured at the end of differentiation. In addition, these chambers were immunohistochemically stained with anti-cTnT antibody, and the correlation between field potential, beating, and cTnT expression was examined. These results indicated the area of field potential or beating mainly coincided with that of cTnT expression. 5-fluorouracil treatment decreased not only the number of field potential detecting electrodes and beating area, but also cTnT expression, and the area of these parameters was also nearly identical. These results indicate that field potential can be used as a suitable cardiac differentiation marker, and can be a promising parameter of EST.

  16. Summary of impact markers and potential impact mechanisms for the YDB impact event at 12.9 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Schultz, P. H.; Wittke, J. H.; West, A.; Kennett, J.; Kennett, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Until the announcements of a possible impact event (Firestone et al. 2007; Kennett et al., 2009a; 2009b) at the beginning of the Younger Dryas (YD) around 12.9 ka, the KT impact layer (KTB) that resulted from the Chicxulub impact at 65 mya was the only geological boundary layer known to contain coeval peaks in various impact markers, including diamonds. Here, we compare impact markers from the KTB, YD boundary layer (YDB), and the 1908 Tunguska airburst layer (TAL). First order markers, related to impact and biomass burning, include: magnetic spherules, carbon spherules, nanodiamonds (cubic and lonsdaleite), iridium anomalies, charcoal, fullerenes (with high 3He to 4He ratio), grape-like soot, and widespread extinctions. Observations and analytical data for the YDB are consistent with all of the KTB markers, while the last three markers are unknown or inconclusive for the Tunguska layer. Selected markers for cratering events, e.g, Chicxulub, are: a visible crater, shocked minerals, impact breccia, and microtektites. None of these are known for the YD event or Tunguska. The discussion here is limited to possible origins of the impact markers and not with impact consequences (climate change, extinctions, etc.). Several origins may account for impact materials in the YDB: (1) An extraordinary accretion of micrometeorites (Pinter and Ishman, 2008). However, this is inconsistent with YDB carbon spherule compositions, including the large concentrations of nanodiamonds found embedded in those carbon spherules. (2) Oblique impact(s) into the Laurentide Ice Sheet. This model is consistent with the lack of a visible crater and apparent lack of cratering markers (above), and yet also provides for shock production of the many cubic nanodiamonds and lonsdaleite found in the YDB. (3) Impact-induced aerial burst. e.g, Boslough and Crawford (2007); Shuvalov (2008). The lack of high shock pressures in an aerial detonation does not necessarily preclude the formation of cubic and

  17. MicroRNAs-208b-3p, 204-5p, 129-2-3p and 3065-5p as predictive markers of oral leukoplakia that progress to cancer.

    PubMed

    Philipone, Elizabeth; Yoon, Angela J; Wang, Shuang; Shen, Jing; Ko, Yen Chen Kevin; Sink, Jill M; Rockafellow, Andrew; Shammay, Nathanel A; Santella, Regina M

    2016-01-01

    Leukoplakia is the most common precursor lesion of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Currently, the risk of progression to OSCC is assessed based on histopathologic examination alone. However, this method fails to identify the subset of microscopically innocuous leukoplakia that ultimately transforms to OSCC. The aim of this study was to determine if microRNAs (miRNAs) can be utilized to identify non- and low-grade dysplastic oral lesions at risk for cancer progression. A retrospective study of genome-wide miRNA expression level analyses was performed in the training cohort (n=20) using deep sequencing formalin-fixed paraffin embedded incisional biopsy tissues from patients with oral leukoplakic lesions diagnosed with non- or low-grade dysplasia and known clinical outcome. The promising miRNA candidates were then evaluated in the validation cohort (n=80) using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Four promising miRNAs-208b-3p, 204-5p, 129-2-3p and 3065-5p were identified. Combining these four miRNAs as a panel with age and histologic diagnosis (p<0.004), our final model had a predictive value for the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.792, sensitivity of 76.9% and specificity of 73.7% to accurately identify non- and low-grade dysplastic lesions at risk of cancer progression, which is a significant improvement over histopathologic examination alone (AUC of 0.645). While further investigation is needed, discovery of predictive markers that can accurately identify histologically innocuous oral lesions at high risk for progression to OSSC will significantly improve clinical outcome by means of early intervention. PMID:27508095

  18. MicroRNAs-208b-3p, 204-5p, 129-2-3p and 3065-5p as predictive markers of oral leukoplakia that progress to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Philipone, Elizabeth; Yoon, Angela J; Wang, Shuang; Shen, Jing; Ko, Yen Chen Kevin; Sink, Jill M; Rockafellow, Andrew; Shammay, Nathanel A; Santella, Regina M

    2016-01-01

    Leukoplakia is the most common precursor lesion of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Currently, the risk of progression to OSCC is assessed based on histopathologic examination alone. However, this method fails to identify the subset of microscopically innocuous leukoplakia that ultimately transforms to OSCC. The aim of this study was to determine if microRNAs (miRNAs) can be utilized to identify non- and low-grade dysplastic oral lesions at risk for cancer progression. A retrospective study of genome-wide miRNA expression level analyses was performed in the training cohort (n=20) using deep sequencing formalin-fixed paraffin embedded incisional biopsy tissues from patients with oral leukoplakic lesions diagnosed with non- or low-grade dysplasia and known clinical outcome. The promising miRNA candidates were then evaluated in the validation cohort (n=80) using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Four promising miRNAs-208b-3p, 204-5p, 129-2-3p and 3065-5p were identified. Combining these four miRNAs as a panel with age and histologic diagnosis (p<0.004), our final model had a predictive value for the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.792, sensitivity of 76.9% and specificity of 73.7% to accurately identify non- and low-grade dysplastic lesions at risk of cancer progression, which is a significant improvement over histopathologic examination alone (AUC of 0.645). While further investigation is needed, discovery of predictive markers that can accurately identify histologically innocuous oral lesions at high risk for progression to OSSC will significantly improve clinical outcome by means of early intervention. PMID:27508095

  19. Proteomic analysis allows for early detection of potential markers of metabolic impairment in very young obese children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Apo A1 (IR vs. non-IR). Assays routinely used in the clinical setting (ELISA/kinetic nephelometry), only partially confirmed the changes observed by proteomic analysis (ApoA1 and haptoglobin). Conclusion Proteomic analysis can allow for the identification of potential new candidate biomarkers as a complement to routinely used assays to detect initial changes in serum markers of inflammation and lipid metabolism impairment in young obese children. PMID:24949022

  20. Monoclonal antibodies raised to paraffin wax embedded archival tissue; feasibility study of their potential to detect novel antigenic markers.

    PubMed

    Moran, E; Larkin, A; Cleary, I; Barnes, C; Kennedy, S M; Kelehan, P; Clynes, M

    1998-10-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of using archival paraffin wax embedded tissue to generate monoclonal antibodies is described. Specifically, monoclonal antibodies were raised to paraffin wax embedded normal human kidney tissue to test the possibility of producing antibodies to such tissue samples prior to attempting generation of antibodies to valuable archival tissue. Multiple sections (10 x 5 microm) were pooled and dewaxed as for immunohistochemical procedures and combined with Freund's adjuvant for immunization of BALB/c mice in vivo. Immunized spleen cells were fused with SP2 myeloma cells and subsequent clones screened on paraffin wax embedded normal human kidney sections, a range of cell lines and normal mouse tissue. Supernatants from 11 wells (from a total of 90 wells screened) showed different staining patterns on sections of paraffin wax embedded kidney. One clone, 1/11C, (isotype IgG1) which exhibited strong staining on all kidney tubules by immunohistochemical studies (glomeruli interstitium and vessels were unstained) and identified a band at 52 kDa on immunoblots of dewaxed kidney tissue (as used for immunogen) was chosen for further characterization. Immunoblotting of five mammalian cell lines showed differential expression of this 52 kDa band (distinct expression on 3/5, weak expression on 2/5 cell lines) whereas, all cell lines displayed a band at 44 kDa and a third band at 70 kDa was observed on 2/5 cell lines. In mouse tissue extracts, the 52 kDa band was identified in kidney tissue only (not in the lung, liver or spleen) with the 44 kDa and 70 kDa bands weakly expressed in all tissues. This preliminary investigation of a novel approach to identifying possible new antigenic markers or producing monoclonal antibodies which react better to known antigens on sections of paraffin wax embedded tissue showed that this method is feasible. The need to have a comprehensive screening system in place and the ability to identify potentially useful

  1. Reducing the risk of xerostomia and mandibular osteoradionecrosis: the potential benefits of intensity modulated radiotherapy in advanced oral cavity carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 +/- 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 +/- 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 +/- 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 +/- 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 +/- 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 +/- 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 +/- 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 +/- 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC.

  2. Reducing the Risk of Xerostomia and Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis: The Potential Benefits of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Advanced Oral Cavity Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2009-10-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 {+-} 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 {+-} 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 {+-} 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 {+-} 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 {+-} 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 {+-} 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 {+-} 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 {+-} 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 {+-} 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 {+-} 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC.

  3. Preclinical comprehensive physicochemical and pharmacokinetic profiling of novel nitroimidazole derivative IIIM-019 - A potential oral treatment for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kour, Gurleen; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Sharma, Sumit; Bhagat, Asha; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Ahmed, Zabeer

    2016-10-01

    New compounds against tuberculosis are urgently needed to combat the crisis of drug resistance in tuberculosis (TB). We have identified a nitrodihydroimidazooxazole analog, IIIM-019 as a new anti-tubercular agent with a MIC of 0.23 μM against H37Rv. Physicochemical properties, in-vitro pharmacokinetics and in-vivo multiple-doses pharmacokinetics were studied for the compound. In silico physicochemical parameters and Lipinski's violations were determined for drug like properties. Lipophilicity was determined experimentally as Octanol-PBS partition coefficient (log P). Passive and active permeability of the compound was determined by PAMPA and Caco-2 cell permeability analysis, respectively. Plasma protein binding was determined by Rapid equilibrium dialysis. Metabolism by liver microsomes revealed the t1/2 and intrinsic clearance of the compound. Hepatotoxicity of IIIM-019 was determined alone and in combination to first line anti-tubercular drugs. The compound was also estimated for nuclear DNA damage. Single doses of IIIM-019 (2.5, 10, 25 and 100 mg/kg) were administered orally to Balb/c mice and the blood samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). IIIM-019 exhibited very good lipophilicity (log P) of 2.47 which makes it optimal for oral administration. The compound showed low solubility and permeability and high plasma protein binding. However, it was highly stable in rat liver microsomes with t1/2 > 2 h and very low intrinsic clearance. It was found to be non-hepatotoxic and did not induce any significant DNA damage at high concentrations even up to 100 μM. IIIM-019 showed satisfactory in-vivo pharmacokinetic properties. By increasing the dose from 2.5 mg/kg to 10 mg/kg, AUC0-t increased from 14935 ng h/ml to 81,478 ng h/ml. However the exposure of IIIM-019 in plasma suggested that the levels reached saturation at higher concentrations. The compound showed a good oral bioavailability of 58.7%. The results

  4. Thiolated polycarbophil/glutathione: defining its potential as a permeation enhancer for oral drug administration in comparison to sodium caprate.

    PubMed

    Perera, Glen; Barthelmes, Jan; Vetter, Anja; Krieg, Christof; Uhlschmied, Cindy; Bonn, Günther K; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Thiolated polyacrylates were shown to be permeation enhancers with notable potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the permeation enhancing properties of a thiolated polycarbophil/glutathione (PCP-Cys/GSH) system for oral drug application in comparison to a well-established permeation enhancer, namely sodium caprate. In vitro permeation studies were conducted in Ussing-type chambers with sodium fluoresceine (NaFlu) and fluoresceine isothiocyanate labeled dextran (molecular mass 4 kDa; FD4) as model compounds. Bioavailability studies were carried out in Sprague Dawley rats with various formulations. Moreover, cytotoxic effects of both permeation enhancers were compared. Permeation enhancement ratios of 1% sodium caprate were found to be 3.0 (FD4) and 2.3 (NaFlu), whereas 1% PCP-Cys/0.5% GSH displayed enhancement ratios of 2.4 and 2.2. Both excipients performed at a similar level in vivo. Sodium caprate solutions increased oral bioavailability 2.2-fold (FD4) and 2.3-fold (NaFlu), while PCP-Cys hydrogels led to a 3.2-fold and 2.2-fold enhancement. Cell viability experiments revealed a significantly higher tolerance of Caco-2 cells towards 0.5% PCP-Cys (81% survival) compared to 0.5% sodium caprate (5%). As PCP-Cys is not absorbed from mucosal membranes due to its comparatively high molecular mass, systemic side-effects can be excluded. In conclusion, both systems displayed a similar potency for permeation enhancement of hydrophilic compounds. However, PCP-Cys seems to be less harmful to cultured cells.

  5. Short-term Effects of Air Temperature on Blood Markers of Coagulation and Inflammation in Potentially Susceptible Individuals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives: Changes in air temperature are associated with an increase in cardiovascular events, but the role of pro-coagulant and pro-inflammatory blood markers is still poorly understood. We investigated the association between air temperature and fibrinogen, plasminogen act...

  6. Acylcarnitines as markers of exercise-associated fuel partitioning, xenometabolism, and potential signals to muscle afferent neurons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With insulin-resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus, mismatches between mitochondrial fatty acid fuel delivery and oxidative phosphorylation/tricarboxylic acid cycle activity may contribute to inordinate accumulation of short- or medium-chain acylcarnitine fatty acid derivatives (markers of incomple...

  7. Investigation of potential non-HLA rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a European cohort increases the evidence for nine markers

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Darren; Flynn, Edward; Mbarek, Hamdi; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornelis, François; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Goulielmos, George; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Johansen, Julia S; Ørnbjerg, Lykke M; Hetland, Merete Lund; Klareskog, Lars; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D; Raza, Karim; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Worthington, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic factors have a substantial role in determining development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and are likely to account for 50–60% of disease susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies have identified non-human leucocyte antigen RA susceptibility loci which associate with RA with low-to-moderate risk. Objectives To investigate recently identified RA susceptibility markers using cohorts from six European countries, and perform a meta-analysis including previously published results. Methods 3311 DNA samples were collected from patients from six countries (UK, Germany, France, Greece, Sweden and Denmark). Genotype data or DNA samples for 3709 controls were collected from four countries (not Sweden or Denmark). Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using Sequenom MassArray technology. Samples with a >95% success rate and only those SNPs with a genotype success rate of >95% were included in the analysis. Scandinavian patient data were pooled and previously published Swedish control data were accessed as a comparison group. Meta-analysis was used to combine results from this study with all previously published data. Results After quality control, 3209 patients and 3692 controls were included in the study. Eight markers (ie, rs1160542 (AFF3), rs1678542 (KIF5A), rs2476601 (PTPN22), rs3087243 (CTLA4), rs4810485 (CD40), rs5029937 (6q23), rs10760130 (TRAF1/C5) and rs7574865 (STAT4)) were significantly associated with RA by meta-analysis. All 18 markers were associated with RA when previously published studies were incorporated in the analysis. Data from this study increased the significance for association with RA and nine markers. Conclusions In a large European RA cohort further evidence for the association of 18 markers with RA development has been obtained. PMID:20498205

  8. Evaluation of amitrole (aminotriazole) for potential carcinogenicity in orally dosed rats, mice, and golden hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, D.; Weber, H.; Mohr, U.; Boehme, K.

    1983-06-30

    Amitrole was evaluated for carcinogenic potential in lifespan studies on Wistar rats, NMRI mice, and golden hamsters. At the start of the studies the animals were 6 weeks old. Amitrole was administered, mixed with pulverized chow, at dietary concentrations of 0, 1, 10, and 100 micrograms/g (ppm). Each treated group and control group consisted of 75 male and 75 female rats and mice and of 76 male and 76 female golden hamsters. Additional animals were used to evaluate the functional state of the thyroid. Somewhat lower body weights, slightly reduced survival times, and transient effects on thyroid function were observed in golden hamsters at 100 ppm. In mice, a slight increase in pituitary gland hyperemias was seen at 100 ppm; also an effect on thyroid function usually occurred at the same concentration. In rats, a very large number of cystic dilatations of follicles in the thyroid at 100 ppm and a dose-unrelated increase in hemorrhages and hyperemias in the pituitary gland were indicative of an effect of amitrole on these organs. The strongest effect of amitrole on thyroid function, as compared to golden hamsters and mice, was seen in rats at 100 ppm. At this concentration a highly increased number of thyroid and pituitary gland tumors was observed in rats. In golden hamsters and mice, no tumor induction was seen.

  9. Assessment of Oral Toxicity and Safety of Pentamethylchromanol (PMCol), A Potential Chemopreventative Agent, in Rats and Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lindeblad, Matthew; Kapetanovic, Izet M.; Kabirov, Kasim K.; Detrisac, Carol J.; Dinger, Nancy; Mankovskaya, Irina; Zakharov, Alexander; Lyubimov, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    lower levels is considered to be less likely to result in toxicity following 28 days of exposure. Sex-related differences were seen in rats. Male rats appeared to have greater sensitivity to nephrotoxicity, while female animals had a greater incidence of hepatoxicity and changes in hematological parameters evaluated, especially at a dose of 500 mg/kg/day, which correlated to the higher plasma drug levels in female rats. It appeared that dogs were generally more sensitive than rats to oral administration of PMCol. Further examination of the potential toxic effects of PMCol in longer term studies is required prior to understanding the full risks of PMCol administration as a chemopreventative agent. PMID:20430063

  10. Subthalamic and Cortical Local Field Potentials Associated with Pilocarpine-Induced Oral Tremor in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lauren L.; Podurgiel, Samantha J.; Haque, Aileen F.; Errante, Emily L.; Chrobak, James J.; Salamone, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) are rapid vertical deflections of the lower jaw that resemble chewing but are not directed at any particular stimulus. In rodents, TJMs are induced by neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including neurotoxic or pharmacological depletion of striatal dopamine (DA), DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration. Moreover, TJMs in rodents can be attenuated by antiparkinsonian agents, including levodopa (L-DOPA), DA agonists, muscarinic antagonists, and adenosine A2A antagonists. In human Parkinsonian patients, exaggerated physiological synchrony is seen in the beta frequency band in various parts of the cortical/basal ganglia/thalamic circuitry, and activity in the tremor frequency range (3–7 Hz) also has been recorded. The present studies were undertaken to determine if tremor-related local field potential (LFP) activity could be recorded from motor cortex (M1) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) during the TJMs induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, which is a well-known tremorogenic agent. Pilocarpine induced a robust TJM response that was marked by rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity in the temporalis muscle. Compared to periods with no tremor activity, TJM epochs were characterized by increased LFP activity in the tremor frequency range in both neocortex and STN. Tremor activity was not associated with increased synchrony in the beta frequency band. These studies identified tremor-related LFP activity in parts of the cortical/basal ganglia circuitry that are involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism. This research may ultimately lead to identification of the oscillatory neural mechanisms involved in the generation of tremulous activity, and promote development of novel treatments for tremor disorders. PMID:27378874

  11. Proteomics of Genetically Engineered Mouse Mammary Tumors Identifies Fatty Acid Metabolism Members as Potential Predictive Markers for Cisplatin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Warmoes, Marc; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Xu, Guotai; Sampadi, Bharath K.; Pham, Thang V.; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Boven, Epie; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to various signatures that predict the prognosis of breast cancer patients, markers that predict chemotherapy response are still elusive. To detect such predictive biomarkers, we investigated early changes in protein expression using two mouse models for distinct breast cancer subtypes who have a differential knock-out status for the breast cancer 1, early onset (Brca1) gene. The proteome of cisplatin-sensitive BRCA1-deficient mammary tumors was compared with that of cisplatin-resistant mammary tumors resembling pleomorphic invasive lobular carcinoma. The analyses were performed 24 h after administration of the maximum tolerable dose of cisplatin. At this time point, drug-sensitive BRCA1-deficient tumors showed DNA damage, but cells were largely viable. By applying paired statistics and quantitative filtering, we identified highly discriminatory markers for the sensitive and resistant model. Proteins up-regulated in the sensitive model are involved in centrosome organization, chromosome condensation, homology-directed DNA repair, and nucleotide metabolism. Major discriminatory markers that were up-regulated in the resistant model were predominantly involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty-acid synthase. Specific inhibition of fatty-acid synthase sensitized resistant cells to cisplatin. Our data suggest that exploring the functional link between the DNA damage response and cancer metabolism shortly after the initial treatment may be a useful strategy to predict the efficacy of cisplatin. PMID:23397111

  12. Dental neglect as a marker of broader neglect: a qualitative investigation of public health nurses’ assessments of oral health in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Child neglect is a pernicious child protection issue with adverse consequences that extend to adulthood. Simultaneously, though it remains prevalent, childhood dental caries is a preventable disease. Public health nurses play a pivotal role in assessing oral health in children as part of general health surveillance. However, little is known about how they assess dental neglect or what their thresholds are for initiating targeted support or instigating child protection measures. Understanding these factors is important to allow improvements to be made in care pathways. Methods We investigated public health nurses’ assessment of oral health in preschool children in relation to dental neglect and any associations they make with child neglect more broadly. A qualitative study was conducted in Scotland during 2011/12. Sixteen public health nurses were recruited purposively from one health region. Individual, semi-structured interviews were undertaken and data were analyzed inductively using a framework approach. Categories were subsequently mapped to the research questions. Results Public health nurses assess oral health through proxy measures, opportunistic observation and through discussion with parents. Dental neglect is rarely an isolated issue that leads on its own to child protection referral. It tends to be other presenting issues that initiate a response. Threshold levels for targeted support were based on two broad indicators: social issues and concerns about child (and parental) dental health. Thresholds for child protection intervention were untreated dental caries or significant dental pain. Barriers to intervention are that dental neglect may be ‘unseen’ and ‘unspoken’. The study revealed a communication gap in the care pathway for children where a significant dental problem is identified. Conclusions Public health nurses take their child protection role seriously, but rarely make a link between dental caries and child neglect. Clear

  13. Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Samaneh; Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Homayoni, Solmaz

    2014-01-01

    Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering. PMID:25242838

  14. Oral curcumin mitigates the clinical and neuropathologic phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse: a potential therapy for inherited neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Mehrdad; Shiga, Kensuke; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; He, Feng; Shaw, Chad A; Yan, Jiong; Wensel, Theodore G; Snipes, G Jackson; Lupski, James R

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in myelin genes cause inherited peripheral neuropathies that range in severity from adult-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 to childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Many myelin gene mutants that cause severe disease, such as those in the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ) and the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), appear to make aberrant proteins that accumulate primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in Schwann cell death by apoptosis and, subsequently, peripheral neuropathy. We previously showed that curcumin supplementation could abrogate ER retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing MPZ mutants. We now show reduced apoptosis after curcumin treatment of cells in tissue culture that express PMP22 mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oral administration of curcumin partially mitigates the severe neuropathy phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse model in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of curcumin significantly decreases the percentage of apoptotic Schwann cells and results in increased number and size of myelinated axons in sciatic nerves, leading to improved motor performance. Our findings indicate that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and improves the neuropathologic phenotype in an animal model of human neuropathy, suggesting a potential therapeutic role in selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:17701891

  15. Positive/negative surface charge of chitosan based nanogels and its potential influence on oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Mengxue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Kong, Ming; Liu, Ya; Feng, Chao; Chen, Xiguang

    2016-01-20

    To develop insulin delivery system for the treatment of diabetes, two insulin-loaded nanogels with opposite zeta potential (-15.94 ± 0.449 mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) and +17.15 ± 0.492 mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+)) were obtained. Ex vivo results showed that the nanogels with opposite surface charge exhibited different adhesion and permeation in specific intestinal segments. There was no significant differences in adhesion and permeation in rat duodenum, but in rat jejunum, insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) exhibited enhanced adhesion and permeation, which were about 3 folds (adhesion) and 1.7 folds (permeation) higher than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+). These results demonstrated that the surface charge property of nanogels determined the absorption sites of CMCS/CS-NGs in small intestine. In vivo study, the blood glucose level in insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) group had 3 mmol/L lower than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+) group during 1h to 11h after the oral administration, which demonstrated that negative insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs had a better management of blood glucose than positive ones. PMID:26572423

  16. MicroRNAs in oral lichen planus and potential miRNA-mRNA pathogenesis with essential cytokines: a review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Wu, Yuanqin; Yang, Huamei; Liu, Jiajia; Dan, Hongxia; Zeng, Xin; Zhou, Yu; Jiang, Lu; Chen, Qianming

    2016-08-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a potentially premalignant condition with unknown pathogenesis. Immune and inflammatory factors are thought to play important roles in the development of OLP, and cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, can act as critical players in the immunopathogenesis of OLP. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are closely correlated with cytokines in various inflammation-related diseases. In patients with OLP, miRNA-146a and miRNA-155 are increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and numerous miRNAs have been shown to exhibit altered expression profiles in lesions. Although the microRNA-messenger RNA (miRNA-mRNA) network is thought to be involved in the development of OLP, in-depth studies are lacking. Here, we summarize current data on the mechanisms of action of miRNAs regulating typical cytokines in OLP, including interleukin (IL)-10, IL-17, IL-22, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, to study the genetic basis of the pathogenesis of OLP and to provide prospects of therapy. PMID:27282956

  17. Comparative Correlation Structure of Colon Cancer Locus Specific Methylation: Characterisation of Patient Profiles and Potential Markers across 3 Array-Based Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Barat, Ana; Ruskin, Heather J.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal DNA-methylation is well known to play an important role in cancer onset and development, and colon cancer is no exception to this rule. Recent years have seen the increased use of large-scale technologies, (such as methylation microarray assays or specific sequencing of methylated DNA), to determine whole genome profiles of CpG island methylation in tissue samples. Comprehensive study of methylation array data from transcriptome high-throughput platforms permits determination of gene methylation markers, important for cancer profiling. Here, three large-scale methylation datasets for colon cancer have been compared to determine locus-specific methylation agreement. These data are from the GEO database, where colon cancer and apparently healthy adjacent tissues are represented by sample sizes 125 and 29 respectively in the first dataset, 24 of each in the second and 118 of each in the third. Several data analysis techniques have been employed, including Clustering, Discriminant Principal Component Analysis, Discriminant Analysis and ROC curves, in order (i) to obtain a better insight on the locus-specific concomitant methylation structures for these diverse data and (ii) to determine a robust potential marker set for indicative screening, drawn from all data taken together. The extent of the agreement between the analysed datasets is reported. Further, potential screening methylation markers, for which methylation profiles are consistent across tissue samples and several datasets, are highlighted and discussed. PMID:26185542

  18. Putting a finger on potential predictors of oral contraceptive side effects: 2D:4D and middle-phalangeal hair.

    PubMed

    Oinonen, Kirsten A

    2009-06-01

    Many women experience emotional or physical side effects when taking oral contraceptives (OCs). Despite the potential impact on women's health and well-being, there are no valid methods to screen women for their risk of OC side effects. The present paper presents the results of two studies where anthropometric indicators of androgen exposure, 2D:4D and middle-phalangeal hair, were examined for their potential as predictors of OC side effects. In study 1, 2D:4D was associated with women's reports of a history of: (a) negative mood side effects; (b) discontinuation due to negative mood side effects; (c) specific mood side effects (i.e., crying, sadness, and altered trust in one's partners) and (d) specific physical side effects (i.e., headaches, fatigue, and decreased sex drive). In study 2, 2D:4D and/or middle-phalangeal hair was/were associated with a reported history of: (a) discontinuation due to negative mood side effects; (b) specific mood-related side effects (i.e., negative mood, disrupted sleep, increased aggression, and altered trust in one's partner) and (c) specific physical side effects (i.e., headaches, decreased menstrual cramps, and increased sex drive/arousal). The general pattern was that adverse OC side effects were experienced by women with lower 2D:4D and fewer middle-phalangeal hairs. Almost all relationships remained significant when response bias was controlled. These results suggest a possible role for prenatal testosterone exposure and both androgen action and sensitivity in women's experience of OC side effects. Furthermore, these two digit measures may be useful predictors of hormonal contraceptive side effects in women. PMID:19131172

  19. Development and characterization of a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system for potential application in oral delivery of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwu; Liu, Kaiyun; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wenxiu; Guo, Chunliang; Tang, Bin; Gu, Jiang; Zhang, Jinyong; Li, Haibo; Mao, Xuhu; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Background: The stability of protein drugs remains one of the key hurdles to their success in the market. The aim of the present study was to design a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system (NEDDS) that would encapsulate a standard-model protein drug – bovine serum albumin (BSA) – to improve drug stability. Methods: The BSA NEDDS was prepared using a phase-inversion method and pseudoternary phase diagrams. The following characteristics were studied: morphology, size, zeta potential, drug loading, and encapsulation efficiency. We also investigated the stability of the BSA NEDDS, bioactivity of BSA encapsulated within the NEDDS, the integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and specificity. Results: The BSA NEDDS consisted of Cremophor EL-35, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate, and normal saline. The average particle diameter of the BSA NEDDS was about 21.8 nm, and the system showed a high encapsulation efficiency (>90%) and an adequate drug-loading capacity (45 mg/mL). The thermodynamic stability of the system was investigated at different temperatures and pH levels and in room-temperature conditions for 180 days. BSA NEDDS showed good structural integrity and specificity for the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and good bioactivity of the loaded BSA. Conclusions: BSA NEDDS showed the properties of a good nanoemulsion-delivery system. NEDDS can greatly enhance the stability of the protein drug BSA while maintaining high levels of drug bioactivity, good specificity, and integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary protein structures. These findings indicate that the nanoemulsion is a potential formulation for oral administration of protein drugs. PMID:23118537

  20. Marker development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  1. Strong Relationship between Oral Dose and Tenofovir Hair Levels in a Randomized Trial: Hair as a Potential Adherence Measure for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Albert Y.; Yang, Qiyun; Huang, Yong; Bacchetti, Peter; Anderson, Peter L.; Jin, Chengshi; Goggin, Kathy; Stojanovski, Kristefer; Grant, Robert; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Gandhi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials using tenofovir-based regimens have demonstrated that high levels of adherence are required to evaluate efficacy; the incorporation of objective biomarkers of adherence in trial design has been essential to interpretation, given the inaccuracy of self-report. Antiretroviral measurements in scalp hair have been useful as a marker of long-term exposure in the HIV treatment setting, and hair samples are relatively easy and inexpensive to collect, transport, and store for analysis. To evaluate the relationship between dose and tenofovir concentrations in hair, we examined the dose proportionality of tenofovir in hair in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults. Methods A phase I, crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed in 24 HIV-negative adults receiving directly-observed oral tenofovir tablets administered 2, 4, and 7 doses/week for 6 weeks, with a ≥3-week break between periods. Small samples of hair were collected after each six-week period and analyzed for tenofovir concentrations. Geometric-mean-ratios compared levels between each pair of dosing conditions. Intensive plasma pharmacokinetic studies were performed during the daily-dosing period to calculate areas-under-the-time-concentration curves (AUCs). Results Over 90% of doses were observed per protocol. Median tenofovir concentrations in hair increased monotonically with dose. A log-linear relationship was seen between dose and hair levels, with an estimated 76% (95% CI 60–93%) increase in hair level per 2-fold dose increase. Tenofovir plasma AUCs modestly predicted drug concentrations in hair. Conclusions This study found a strong linear relationship between frequency of dosing and tenofovir levels in scalp hair. The analysis of quantitative drug levels in hair has the potential to improve adherence measurement in the PrEP field and may be helpful in determining exposure thresholds for protection and explaining failures in PrEP trials. Hair measures for

  2. Characterization of different tissue changes in normal, betel chewers, potentially malignant lesions, conditions and oral squamous cell carcinoma using reflectance confocal microscopy: correlation with routine histopathology.

    PubMed

    Anuthama, Krishnamurthy; Sherlin, Herald J; Anuja, N; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Chandrasekar, T

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the features of normal mucosa, mucosa in betel chewers and smokers, potentially malignant lesions and squamous cell carcinoma of oral mucosa using reflectance confocal microscopy. Oral cavity biopsies were acquired from 25 patients from College of Dental Surgery, Saveetha University who underwent screening for suspected lesions of Oral precancer and Oral cancer along with normal patients who underwent impaction. Biopsies were acquired from the clinically suspicious area and immediately placed in Dulbecco modified eagles growth medium (DMEM). Reflectance confocal images were obtained at multiple image plane depths from biopsies within 6h of excision. After imaging, biopsies were fixed in 10% formalin and submitted for routine histopathological examination by an experienced oral and maxillofacial pathologist. Reflectance confocal images were compared with histological images from the same sample to determine the tissue features which contribute to early cellular changes, image contrast and early diagnosis. The confocal images were obtained to a depth of up to 150 microns on intact biopsy specimens and subsequent 3-dimensional images, keratin thickness measurements, cell measurements, cell density analysis and graphical representations were performed using Leica image analysis software. In normal mucosa keratin deposition were seen as alternating dark and bright stacks and in different cell layers the nuclei were seen as disks of varying intensities. In pre-cancerous lesions the keratin thickness and cell nuclear density were found to be increased when compared to normal controls. In OSMF cases confocal images of fibrosis show scattering from individual fibres as hyperdense areas. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cases demonstrated extensive variations in cell size, nuclear size and nuclear morphology. At cellular level, dysplastic features like increased nuclear density, increased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, nuclear and cellular

  3. 1’-Acetoxychavicol acetate inhibits growth of human oral carcinoma xenograft in mice and potentiates cisplatin effect via proinflammatory microenvironment alterations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral cancers although preventable, possess a low five-year survival rate which has remained unchanged over the past three decades. In an attempt to find a more safe, affordable and effective treatment option, we describe here the use of 1’S-1’-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Malaysian ginger traditionally used for various medicinal purposes. Methods Whether ACA can inhibit the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells alone or in combination with cisplatin (CDDP), was explored both in vitro using MTT assays and in vivo using Nu/Nu mice. Occurrence of apoptosis was assessed using PARP and DNA fragmentation assays, while the mode of action were elucidated through global expression profiling followed by Western blotting and IHC assays. Results We found that ACA alone inhibited the growth of oral SCC cells, induced apoptosis and suppressed its migration rate, while minimally affecting HMEC normal cells. ACA further enhanced the cytotoxic effects of CDDP in a synergistic manner as suggested by combination index studies. We also found that ACA inhibited the constitutive activation of NF-κB through suppression of IKKα/β activation. Human oral tumor xenografts studies in mice revealed that ACA alone was as effective as CDDP in reducing tumor volume, and further potentiated CDDP effects when used in combination with minimal body weight loss. The effects of ACA also correlated with a down-regulation of NF-κB regulated gene (FasL and Bim), including proinflammatory (NF-κB and COX-2) and proliferative (cyclin D1) biomarkers in tumor tissue. Conclusion Overall, our results suggest that ACA inhibits the growth of oral SCC and further potentiates the effect of standard CDDP treatment by modulation of proinflammatory microenvironment. The current preclinical data could form the basis for further clinical trials to improve the current standards for oral cancer care using this active component from the Malaysian ginger. PMID:23043547

  4. [Oral viral infections].

    PubMed

    Parent, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Exclude herpes infection in the presence of acute oral ulcers of unknown origin, particularly in patients in poor general condition. Remember that asymptomatic HSV-1 shedding in saliva may result in an oral-genital transmission. Perform an anogenital examination and a screening for other sexually transmitted diseases when oral warts are diagnosed. Search for immunosuppression and monitor the patient (screening for a potential associated carcinoma) when there is rapid growth of oral warts. Consider all the clinical signs (systemic, skin, other mucosa, immunity...) when a patient has an enanthem or oral ulcerations. Ask for a HIV test when an oral Kaposi's sarcoma, a hairy leukoplakia or major aphthae are diagnosed. PMID:26854091

  5. Spleen-specific isoforms of Pax5 and Ataxin-7 as potential proteomic markers of lymphoma-affected spleen.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Brij; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2015-04-01

    The splenomegaly, enlargement of spleen, has been observed in several diseases. It has been intended to evaluate histochemical alterations, spleen-specific enzymatic and proteomic markers during splenomegaly, and lympho-proliferative disorders from spleen of mice bearing Dalton's lymphoma. The higher expression of c-fos, c-jun, and MAPK testifies proliferation of lymphocytes. The lower expression of Pax5, higher expression of CD3, and the presence of additional form of Zap-70 suggest hypertrophy of follicles and splenomegaly influenced by weak B-cell receptor-mediated signaling, but activated T-cell receptor-mediated signaling. Simultaneously, lower levels of SOD, NDR2, and MIB2 and higher expression levels of Ataxin-7 and LDH also suggest impact of stress either as a cause or effect of cell proliferation. Spleen-specific isoform of Pax5, NDR2, MIB2, and Ataxin-7 can be considered as spleen-specific unique molecular markers for the evaluation of splenomegaly and lympho-proliferative disorders.

  6. Claudin-3 expression in radiation-exposed rat models: A potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Sehwan; Lee, Jong-geol; Bae, Chang-hwan; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Irradiation increased intestinal bacterial translocation, accompanied by claudin protein expression in rats. • Neurotensin decreased the bacterial translocation and restored claudin-3 expression. • Claudin-3 can be used as a marker in evaluating radiation induced intestinal injury. - Abstract: The molecular events leading to radiation-induced intestinal barrier failure are not well known. The influence of the expression of claudin proteins in the presence and absence of neurotensin was investigated in radiation-exposed rat intestinal epithelium. Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, irradiation, and irradiation + neurotensin groups, and bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node and expression of claudins were determined. Irradiation led to intestinal barrier failure as demonstrated by significant bacterial translocation. In irradiated terminal ilea, expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 was significantly decreased, and claudin-2 expression was increased. Administration of neurotensin significantly reduced bacterial translocation and restored the structure of the villi as seen by histologic examination. Among the three subtype of claudins, only claudin-3 expression was restored. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of neurotensin on the disruption of the intestinal barrier is associated with claudin-3 alteration and that claudin-3 could be used as a marker in evaluating radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  7. Molecular characterization of oilseed rape accessions collected from multi continents for exploitation of potential heterotic group through SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Younas, Muhammad; Xiao, Yingjie; Cai, Dongfang; Yang, Wei; Ye, Wei; Wu, Jiangsheng; Liu, Kede

    2012-05-01

    Evaluation of the genetic diversity in conventional and modern rapeseed cultivars is essential for conservation, management and utilization of these genetic resources for high yielding hybrid production. The objective of this research was to evaluate a collection of 86 oilseed rape cultivars with 188 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to assess the genetic variability, heterotic group identity and relationships within and between the groups identified among the genotypes. A total of 631 alleles at 188 SSR markers were detected including 53 and 84 unique and private alleles respectively, which indicated great richness and uniqueness of genetic variation in these selected cultivars. The mean number of alleles per locus was 3.3 and the average polymorphic information content was 0.35 for all microsatellite loci. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean clustering and principal component analysis consistently divided all the cultivars into four distinct groups (I, II, III and IV) which largely coincided with their geographical distributions. The Chinese origin cultivars are predominantly assembled in Group II and showed wide genetic base because of its high allelic abundance at SSR loci while most of the exotic cultivars grouped into Group I and were highly distinct owing to the abundant private and unique alleles. The highest genetic distance was found between Group I and IV, which mainly comprised of exotic and newly synthesized yellow seeded (1728-1 and G1087) breeding lines, respectively. Our study provides important insights into further utilization of exotic Brassica napus accessions in Chinese rapeseed breeding and vice versa.

  8. Identification of potential marker genes for Trichoderma harzianum strains with high antagonistic potential against Rhizoctonia solani by a rapid subtraction hybridization approach.

    PubMed

    Scherm, Barbara; Schmoll, Monika; Balmas, Virgilio; Kubicek, Christian P; Migheli, Quirico

    2009-02-01

    A rapid subtraction hybridization approach was used to isolate genes differentially expressed during mycelial contact between Trichoderma harzianum (Hypocrea lixii) and Rhizoctonia solani, and could serve as marker genes for selection of superior biocontrol strains. Putatively positive clones were evaluated by transcription analysis during mycelial contact with R. solani versus growth on glucose, and for their differential transcription between two strains with either strong or poor biocontrol capability before, at, and after contact with R. solani. Besides four clones, which had similarity to putative but as yet uncharacterized proteins, they comprised ribosomal proteins, proteins involved in transcriptional switch and regulation, amino acid and energy catabolism, multidrug resistance, and degradation of proteins and glucans. Transcription of three clones was evaluated in five T. harzianum strains under confrontation conditions with R. solani. Two clones-acetyl-xylane esterase AXE1 and endoglucanase Cel61b-showed significant upregulation during in vivo confrontation of a T. harzianum strain that successively demonstrated a very high antagonistic capability towards R. solani, while expression was progressively lower in a series of T. harzianum strains with intermediate to poor antagonistic activity. These clones are promising candidates for use as markers in the screening of improved T. harzianum biocontrol strains.

  9. In Vivo Curative and Protective Potential of Orally Administered 5-Aminolevulinic Acid plus Ferrous Ion against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shigeo; Hikosaka, Kenji; Balogun, Emmanuel O.; Komatsuya, Keisuke; Niikura, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Fumie; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Tanaka, Tohru; Nakajima, Motowo

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid present in diverse organisms and a precursor of heme biosynthesis. ALA is commercially available as a component of cosmetics, dietary supplements, and pharmaceuticals for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent reports demonstrated that the combination of ALA and ferrous ion (Fe2+) inhibits the in vitro growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To further explore the potential application of ALA and ferrous ion as a combined antimalarial drug for treatment of human malaria, we conducted an in vivo efficacy evaluation. Female C57BL/6J mice were infected with the lethal strain of rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XL and orally administered ALA plus sodium ferrous citrate (ALA/SFC) as a once-daily treatment. Parasitemia was monitored in the infected mice, and elimination of the parasites was confirmed using diagnostic PCR. Treatment of P. yoelii 17XL-infected mice with ALA/SFC provided curative efficacy in 60% of the mice treated with ALA/SFC at 600/300 mg/kg of body weight; no mice survived when treated with vehicle alone. Interestingly, the cured mice were protected from homologous rechallenge, even when reinfection was attempted more than 230 days after the initial recovery, indicating long-lasting resistance to reinfection with the same parasite. Moreover, parasite-specific antibodies against reported vaccine candidate antigens were found and persisted in the sera of the cured mice. These findings provide clear evidence that ALA/SFC is effective in an experimental animal model of malaria and may facilitate the development of a new class of antimalarial drug. PMID:26324278

  10. Preservation of high phenylalanine ammonia lyase activities in roots of Japanese Striped corn: a potential oral therapeutic to treat phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    López-Villalobos, Arturo; Lücker, Joost; López-Quiróz, Ana Angela; Yeung, Edward C; Palma, Kristoffer; Kermode, Allison R

    2014-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by deficient phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity, the enzyme responsible for the disposal of excess amounts of the essential amino acid phenylalanine (Phe). Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) has potential to serve as an enzyme substitution therapy for this human genetic disease. Using 7-day-old Japanese Striped corn seedlings (Japonica Striped maize, Zea mays L. cv. japonica) that contain high activities of PAL, we investigated a number of methods to preserve the roots as an intact food and for long-term storage. The cryoprotectant effects of maple syrup and other edible sugars (mono- and oligosaccharides) were evaluated. Following thawing, the preserved roots were then examined to determine whether the rigid plant cell walls could protect the PAL enzyme from proteolysis during simulated (in vitro) digestion comprised of gastric and intestinal phases. While several treatments led to retention of PAL activity during freezing, upon thawing and in vitro digestion, root tissues that had been previously frozen in the presence of maple syrup exhibited the highest residual PAL activities (∼50% of the initial enzyme activity), in marked contrast to all of the treatments using other edible sugars. The structural integrity of the root cells, and the stability of the functional PAL tetramer were also preserved with the maple syrup protocol. These results have significance for the formulation of oral enzyme/protein therapeutics. When plant tissues are adequately preserved, the rigid cell walls constitute a protective barrier even under harsh (e.g. gastrointestinal-like) conditions.

  11. Genetic expression of adipose derived stem cell and smooth muscle cell markers to monitor differentiation potential following low intensity laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of cell types that could potentially be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been shown to induce a significant increase in cell viability and proliferation. Growth factors such as retinoic acid (RA) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) play important roles in the differentiation of cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILI in combination with growth factors could induce the differentiation of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The study used primary and continuous ADSC cell lines and a SMC line (SKUT-1) as control. Cells were co-cultured directly at a ratio of 1:1 using established methods, with and without growth factors and then exposed to LILI at 5 J/cm2 using a 636 nm diode laser. The cellular morphology, viability and proliferation of the co-cultures were assessed over a period of one week. The study also monitored the expression of cell specific markers over the same period of time. Genetic expression of the markers for both adipose derived stem cells (β1 Integrin and Thymidine 1) and smooth muscle cells (Heavy Myosin Chain) was monitored using flow cytometry. Cell viability and proliferation increased significantly in the co-cultured groups that were exposed to laser alone, as well as in combination with growth factors. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the expression of stem cell markers in the ADSCs over time. The results indicate that LILI in combination with growth factors not only increases the viability and proliferation of co-cultured cells but also decreases the expression of ADSC stem cell markers. This could indicate the possible differentiation of ADSCs into SMCs.

  12. DNA Barcoding in the Cycadales: Testing the Potential of Proposed Barcoding Markers for Species Identification of Cycads

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Chodon; Little, Damon P.; Stevenson, Dennis Wm.; Specht, Chelsea D.

    2007-01-01

    Barcodes are short segments of DNA that can be used to uniquely identify an unknown specimen to species, particularly when diagnostic morphological features are absent. These sequences could offer a new forensic tool in plant and animal conservation—especially for endangered species such as members of the Cycadales. Ideally, barcodes could be used to positively identify illegally obtained material even in cases where diagnostic features have been purposefully removed or to release confiscated organisms into the proper breeding population. In order to be useful, a DNA barcode sequence must not only easily PCR amplify with universal or near-universal reaction conditions and primers, but also contain enough variation to generate unique identifiers at either the species or population levels. Chloroplast regions suggested by the Plant Working Group of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBoL), and two alternatives, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic spacer and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nrITS), were tested for their utility in generating unique identifiers for members of the Cycadales. Ease of amplification and sequence generation with universal primers and reaction conditions was determined for each of the seven proposed markers. While none of the proposed markers provided unique identifiers for all species tested, nrITS showed the most promise in terms of variability, although sequencing difficulties remain a drawback. We suggest a workflow for DNA barcoding, including database generation and management, which will ultimately be necessary if we are to succeed in establishing a universal DNA barcode for plants. PMID:17987130

  13. MEK2 is a prognostic marker and potential chemo-sensitizing target for glioma patients undergoing temozolomide treatment.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Yao, Maojin; Zhang, Wenhao; Tao, Bangbao; Liu, Feili; Li, Shu; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Chenran; Meng, Yicheng; Li, Yuxin; Hu, Guohan; Luo, Chun; Zong, Hui; Lu, Yicheng

    2016-09-01

    Although temozolomide (TMZ) is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for glioblastoma, it is often non-curative due to drug resistance. To overcome the resistance of glioblastoma cells to TMZ, it is imperative to identify prognostic markers for outcome prediction and to develop chemo-sensitizing agents. Here, the gene expression profiles of TMZ-resistant and TMZ-sensitive samples were compared by microarray analysis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was upregulated specifically in resistant glioma cells but not in sensitive tumor cells or non-tumor tissues. Moreover, a comprehensive analysis of patient data revealed that the increased level of MEK2 expression correlated well with the advancement of glioma grade and worse prognosis in response to TMZ treatment. Furthermore, reducing the level of MEK2 in U251 glioma cell lines or xenografted glioma models through shRNA-mediated gene knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced the sensitivity of cells toward TMZ treatment. Further analysis of tumor samples from glioma patients by real-time PCR indicated that an increased MEK2 expression level was closely associated with the activation of many drug resistance genes. Finally, these resistance genes were downregulated after MEK2 was silenced in vitro, suggesting that the mechanism of MEK2-induced chemo-resistance could be mediated by the transcriptional activation of these resistance genes. Collectively, our data indicated that the expression level of MEK2 could serve as a prognostic marker for glioma chemotherapy and that MEK2 antagonists can be used as chemo-sensitizers to enhance the treatment efficacy of TMZ.

  14. MEK2 is a prognostic marker and potential chemo-sensitizing target for glioma patients undergoing temozolomide treatment

    PubMed Central

    He, Hua; Yao, Maojin; Zhang, Wenhao; Tao, Bangbao; Liu, Feili; Li, Shu; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Chenran; Meng, Yicheng; Li, Yuxin; Hu, Guohan; Luo, Chun; Zong, Hui; Lu, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    Although temozolomide (TMZ) is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for glioblastoma, it is often non-curative due to drug resistance. To overcome the resistance of glioblastoma cells to TMZ, it is imperative to identify prognostic markers for outcome prediction and to develop chemo-sensitizing agents. Here, the gene expression profiles of TMZ-resistant and TMZ-sensitive samples were compared by microarray analysis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was upregulated specifically in resistant glioma cells but not in sensitive tumor cells or non-tumor tissues. Moreover, a comprehensive analysis of patient data revealed that the increased level of MEK2 expression correlated well with the advancement of glioma grade and worse prognosis in response to TMZ treatment. Furthermore, reducing the level of MEK2 in U251 glioma cell lines or xenografted glioma models through shRNA-mediated gene knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced the sensitivity of cells toward TMZ treatment. Further analysis of tumor samples from glioma patients by real-time PCR indicated that an increased MEK2 expression level was closely associated with the activation of many drug resistance genes. Finally, these resistance genes were downregulated after MEK2 was silenced in vitro, suggesting that the mechanism of MEK2-induced chemo-resistance could be mediated by the transcriptional activation of these resistance genes. Collectively, our data indicated that the expression level of MEK2 could serve as a prognostic marker for glioma chemotherapy and that MEK2 antagonists can be used as chemo-sensitizers to enhance the treatment efficacy of TMZ. PMID:26189368

  15. DNA barcoding in the cycadales: testing the potential of proposed barcoding markers for species identification of cycads.

    PubMed

    Sass, Chodon; Little, Damon P; Stevenson, Dennis Wm; Specht, Chelsea D

    2007-01-01

    Barcodes are short segments of DNA that can be used to uniquely identify an unknown specimen to species, particularly when diagnostic morphological features are absent. These sequences could offer a new forensic tool in plant and animal conservation-especially for endangered species such as members of the Cycadales. Ideally, barcodes could be used to positively identify illegally obtained material even in cases where diagnostic features have been purposefully removed or to release confiscated organisms into the proper breeding population. In order to be useful, a DNA barcode sequence must not only easily PCR amplify with universal or near-universal reaction conditions and primers, but also contain enough variation to generate unique identifiers at either the species or population levels. Chloroplast regions suggested by the Plant Working Group of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBoL), and two alternatives, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic spacer and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nrITS), were tested for their utility in generating unique identifiers for members of the Cycadales. Ease of amplification and sequence generation with universal primers and reaction conditions was determined for each of the seven proposed markers. While none of the proposed markers provided unique identifiers for all species tested, nrITS showed the most promise in terms of variability, although sequencing difficulties remain a drawback. We suggest a workflow for DNA barcoding, including database generation and management, which will ultimately be necessary if we are to succeed in establishing a universal DNA barcode for plants. PMID:17987130

  16. DNA barcoding in the cycadales: testing the potential of proposed barcoding markers for species identification of cycads.

    PubMed

    Sass, Chodon; Little, Damon P; Stevenson, Dennis Wm; Specht, Chelsea D

    2007-11-07

    Barcodes are short segments of DNA that can be used to uniquely identify an unknown specimen to species, particularly when diagnostic morphological features are absent. These sequences could offer a new forensic tool in plant and animal conservation-especially for endangered species such as members of the Cycadales. Ideally, barcodes could be used to positively identify illegally obtained material even in cases where diagnostic features have been purposefully removed or to release confiscated organisms into the proper breeding population. In order to be useful, a DNA barcode sequence must not only easily PCR amplify with universal or near-universal reaction conditions and primers, but also contain enough variation to generate unique identifiers at either the species or population levels. Chloroplast regions suggested by the Plant Working Group of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBoL), and two alternatives, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic spacer and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (nrITS), were tested for their utility in generating unique identifiers for members of the Cycadales. Ease of amplification and sequence generation with universal primers and reaction conditions was determined for each of the seven proposed markers. While none of the proposed markers provided unique identifiers for all species tested, nrITS showed the most promise in terms of variability, although sequencing difficulties remain a drawback. We suggest a workflow for DNA barcoding, including database generation and management, which will ultimately be necessary if we are to succeed in establishing a universal DNA barcode for plants.

  17. High Level of Tregs Is a Positive Prognostic Marker in Patients with HPV-Positive Oral and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lukesova, E.; Boucek, J.; Rotnaglova, E.; Salakova, M.; Koslabova, E.; Grega, M.; Eckschlager, T.; Rihova, B.; Prochazka, B.; Klozar, J.; Tachezy, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been proved as one of the etiological factors of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Patients with tumors of viral etiology have a lower recurrence rate and better prognosis. OPSCC is linked to an alteration in the immune system. Only a limited number of studies have correlated both the immunological parameters and HPV status with patient prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether HPV infection and the immunological status influence patient prognosis individually or in concurrence. Material and Methods. Sixty patients with oral and oropharyngeal carcinomas were enrolled. They were divided into HPV-positive and HPV-negative groups based on the expression of HPV 16 E6 mRNA. Basic lymphocyte subpopulations were determined in the peripheral blood by means of flow cytometry. Results. Significantly better disease-specific survival (DSS) was observed in patients with HPV-positive tumors. Nodal status, tumor grade, recurrence, and CD8+/Tregs ratio were identified as factors influencing DSS. A higher level of Tregs and a lower ratio of CD8/Tregs influenced overall survival (OS) independently of HPV status and age. Patients with HPV-positive tumors and high levels of Tregs survived significantly better than patients from the other groups. Conclusion. Better survival is associated with HPV positivity and elevated Tregs levels. Our data suggest that HPV infection and Tregs do not influence patient prognosis in concurrence. PMID:24864233

  18. Levels of Salivary IFN-gamma, TNF-Alfa, and TNF Receptor-2 As Prognostic Markers in (Erosive) Oral Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Ghallab, Noha A.; El-Wakeel, Naglaa; Shaker, Olfat G.

    2010-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of detecting salivary levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and sTNFR-2 from erosive oral lichen planus (ELP) patients for clinical application, 20 ELP patients were enrolled in the study as were 20 age-sex-matched controls. From all subjects, saliva level of the tested biomarkers was determined by ELISA. Salivary profiles were assessed in ELP patients by ELISA after being treated with prednisone. A significantly higher level of IFN-γ (P ≤ .01), TNF-α (P ≤ .0001), and sTNFR-2 (P ≤ .01) was detected in ELP patients before treatment than in controls. Following treatment, the salivary levels of IFN-γ (P ≤ .01), TNF-α (P ≤ .05), and sTNFR-2 (P ≤ .01) decreased significantly when compared to their pretreatment levels. This study demonstrated that salivary IFN-γ, TNF-α, and sTNFR-2 can be detectable in ELP patients and decreased significantly after treatment with prednisone, which may reveal the possibility of using these disease-related biomarkers in diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:21403886

  19. Glucose tolerance factor extracted from yeast: oral insulin-mimetic and insulin-potentiating agent: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Weksler-Zangen, Sarah; Mizrahi, Tal; Raz, Itamar; Mirsky, Nitsa

    2012-09-01

    In search for an effective oral treatment for diabetes, we examined the capacity of glucose tolerance factor (GTF) extracted from yeast and administered orally to reduce hyperglycaemia in rat models exhibiting insulin deficiency. The cellular effect of GTF on the insulin signalling pathway was investigated in vitro. GTF (oral bolus), insulin (intraperitoneal) or their combination was administered to streptozotocin-diabetic (STZ) or hyperglycaemic Cohen diabetic-sensitive (hyp-CDs) rats. Blood glucose (BG) and insulin levels were measured in the postprandial (PP) state and during an oral glucose tolerance test. Deoxy-glucose transport and insulin signal transduction were assessed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and myoblasts incubated with the GTF. Low dose of insulin produced a 34 and 12·5 % reduction in the PP-BG levels of hyp-CDs and STZ rats, respectively. GTF induced a 33 and 17 % reduction in the PP-BG levels of hyp-CDs and STZ rats, respectively. When combined with insulin, a respective decrease (58 and 42 %) in BG levels was observed, suggesting a partially additive (hyp-CDs) or synergistic (STZ rats) effect of the GTF and insulin. GTF did not induce insulin secretion in hyp-CDs rats, yet it lowered their BG levels, proposing an effect on glucose clearance by peripheral tissues. GTF induced a dose-dependent increase in deoxy-glucose transport into myoblasts and fat cells similar to insulin, while the combined treatment resulted in augmented transport rate. GTF induced a dose- and time-dependent phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1, Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase independent of insulin receptor phosphorylation. GTF exerts remarkable insulin-mimetic and insulin-potentiating effects, both in vivo and in vitro. It produces an insulin-like effect by acting on cellular signals downstream of the insulin receptor. These results demonstrate a potential source for a novel oral medication for diabetes.

  20. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  1. Prolactin-induced protein as a potential therapy response marker of adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jablonska, Karolina; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzenna; Stasiolek, Mariusz; Pula, Bartosz; Olbromski, Mateusz; Gomulkiewicz, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Rys, Janusz; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Ong, Siew Hwa; Zabel, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Many studies are dedicated to exploring the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-resistance in breast cancer (BC). Some of them are focused on searching for candidate genes responsible for this process. The aim of this study was typing the candidate genes associated with the response to standard chemotherapy in the case of invasive ductal carcinoma. Frozen material from 28 biopsies obtained from IDC patients with different responses to chemotherapy were examined using gene expression microarray, Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot (WB). Based on the microarray results, further analysis of candidate gene expression was evaluated in 120 IDC cases by RT-PCR and in 224 IDC cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The results were correlated with clinical outcome and molecular subtype of the BC. Gene expression microarray revealed Prolactin-Induced Peptide (PIP) as a single gene differentially expressed in BC therapy responder or non-responder patients (p <0.05). The level of PIP expression was significantly higher in the BC therapy responder group than in the non-responder group at mRNA (p=0.0092) and protein level (p=0.0256). Expression of PIP mRNA was the highest in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) BC cases (p=0.0254) and it was the lowest in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (p=0.0336). Higher PIP mRNA expression was characterized by significantly longer disease free survival (DFS, p=0.0093), as well as metastasis free survival (MFS, p=0.0144). Additionally, PIP mRNA and PIP protein expression levels were significantly higher in luminal A than in other molecular subtypes and TNBC. Moreover significantly higher PIP expression was observed in G1, G2 vs. G3 cases (p=0.0027 and p=0.0013, respectively). Microarray analysis characterized PIP gene as a candidate for BC standard chemotherapy response marker. Analysis of clinical data suggests that PIP may be a good prognostic and predictive marker in IDC patients. Higher levels of PIP were related to longer DFS and MFS

  2. Construction of chimeric bovine viral diarrhea viruses containing glycoprotein E rns of heterologous pestiviruses and evaluation of the chimeras as potential marker vaccines against BVDV.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yugang; Yuan, Ying; Ankenbauer, Robert G; Nelson, Lynn D; Witte, Steven B; Jackson, James A; Welch, Siao-Kun W

    2012-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections are enzootic in the cattle population and continue to cause significant economic losses to the beef and dairy industries worldwide. Extent of the damages has stimulated increasing interest in control programs directed at eradicating BVDV infections. Use of a BVDV marker vaccine would facilitate eradication efforts as a negatively marked vaccine would enable differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). We describe here the construction of three chimeric BVDVs containing glycoprotein E(rns) of heterologous pestiviruses and the evaluation of the chimera viruses as potential marker vaccines against BVDV infections. Chimeric NADL/G-E(rns), NADL/R-E(rns), and NADL/P-E(rns) were constructed by replacing the E(rns) gene of the full-length BVDV (NADL strain) genome with the E(rns) genes of giraffe (G-E(rns)), reindeer (R-E(rns)), or pronghorn antelope (P-E(rns)) pestiviruses, respectively. Each chimeric NADL virus was viable and infectious in RD 420 (bovine testicular) and BK-6 (bovine kidney) cells. By immunohistochemistry assays, NADL/G-E(rns) and NADL/R-E(rns) chimeric viruses reacted to BVDV E(rns) specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 15C5, whereas the NADL/P-E(rns) chimeric virus did not. In an animal vaccination study, inactivated vaccines made from two chimeric viruses and the wild type NADL BVDV induced similar neutralizing antibody responses. NADL/P-E(rns)-vaccinated animals were distinguished from animals vaccinated with the wild type virus by means of a companion serological DIVA assay. These results show that chimeric NADL/P-E(rns) virus containing the E(rns) gene of pronghorn antelope pestivirus could be a potential marker vaccine candidate for use in a BVDV control and eradication program. PMID:22521286

  3. Mutation at embB Codon 306, a Potential Marker for the Identification of Multidrug Resistance Associated with Ethambutol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Juárez-Eusebio, Dulce María; Almaraz-Velasco, Raquel; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Laniado-Laborin, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Ethambutol inhibits arabinogalactan and lipoarabinomannan biosynthesis in mycobacteria. The occurrence of mutations in embB codon 306 in ethambutol-susceptible isolates and their absence in resistant isolates has raised questions regarding the utility of this codon as a potential marker for resistance against ethambutol. The characterization of mutations on embB 306 will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to this drug; therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between embB 306 mutations and first-line drug resistance profiles in tuberculosis isolates. We sequenced the region surrounding the embB 306 codon in 175 tuberculosis clinical isolates, divided according to drug sensitivity, in three groups: 110 were resistant to at least one first-line drug, of which 61 were resistant to ethambutol (EMBr), 49 were sensitive to ethambutol (EMBs) but were resistant to another drug, and 65 were pansensitive isolates (Ps). The associations between embB 306 mutations and phenotypic resistance to all first-line drugs were determined, and their validity and safety as a diagnostic marker were assessed. One of the Ps isolates (1/65), one of the EMBs isolates (1/49), and 20 of the EMBr isolates (20/61) presented with an embB 306 mutation. Four different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at embB 306 were associated with simultaneous resistance to ethambutol, isoniazid, and rifampin (odds ratio [OR], 17.7; confidence interval [CI], 5.6 to 56.1) and showed a positive predictive value of 82%, with a specificity of 97% for diagnosing multidrug resistance associated with ethambutol, indicating its potential as a molecular marker for several drugs. PMID:26124153

  4. The potential role of oral pH in the persistence of Trichomonas gallinae in Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii).

    PubMed

    Urban, Elizabeth H; Mannan, R William

    2014-01-01

    Trichomoniasis, caused by the protozoan Trichomonas gallinae, affects a variety of species worldwide including avivorious raptors. Existing information suggests that the disease is most prevalent in young birds, and differential susceptibility to trichomoniasis among individuals in different age groups was documented in Cooper's Hawks (Accipiter cooperii) nesting in Tucson, Arizona. In that population, 85% of nestling Cooper's Hawks had T. gallinae in their oral cavity, compared to only 1% of breeding-age hawks. Trichomonads generally are sensitive to environmental pH and we explored the possibility that differences in oral pH may contribute to the differential prevalence of infection between age groups. We measured the pH of the fluid in the oral cavity in 375 Cooper's Hawks from three age groups (nestlings, fledglings, and breeding age) in Tucson, Arizona, in 2010 and 2011 and clinically tested for T. gallinae in a subsample of hawks. Oral pH of nestlings (∼ 6.8) was 7.3 times less acidic than in fledgling or breeding Cooper's Hawks (∼ 6.1). The incidence of T. gallinae was higher in nestlings (16%) than in either fledglings or breeding hawks (0%). Our findings indicate that oral pH becomes more acidic in Cooper's Hawks soon after they leave the nest. Trichomonas gallinae thrives when pH is between 6.5 and 7.5 (optimum 7.2), but is less viable in more acidic conditions. Higher levels of acidity in the oral cavity of fledglings and breeding Cooper's Hawks may reduce their susceptibility to trichomoniasis, and play a role in the differential prevalence of infection among age groups.

  5. Oral hygiene status in a general population of Iran, 2011: a key lifestyle marker in relation to common risk factors of non-communicable diseases

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Fereshteh; Majidi, Azam; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Etemad, Koorosh; Rafei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: To estimate Oral Hygiene (OH) status in the Iranian population in 2011, and to determine the influence of socio-economic characteristics on OH, and its interrelation with common risk factors of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). Methods: Data including a total of 12,105 individuals aged 6-70 years were obtained from the sixth round of the surveys of NCDs risk factors in Iran. OH was recorded through a structured questionnaire measuring daily frequencies of tooth brushing and dental flossing. Descriptive analyses were performed on demographic characteristics in the complex sample survey setting. We also employed weighted binary logistic regression to compute Odds Ratio (OR) as a measure of association between the response and explanatory factors. Furthermore, to construct an asset index, we utilized Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Results: The percentage with minimum recommended daily OH practices was 3.7% among men and 7.7% among women (OR= 2.3; P< 0.001). Urban citizens were more likely to have their teeth cleaned compared to rural people (OR= 2.8; P< 0.001). For both genders, a relatively better condition was observed in the 25–34 age group (male: 5.6%; female: 10.3%). In addition, OH status improved significantly by increase in both level of education (P< 0.001) and economic status (P< 0.001). There were also apparent associations between self-care practices and specific behavioral risk factors, though the correlation with dietary habits and tobacco use could be largely explained by socio-economic factors. Conclusion: OH situation in Iran calls for urgent need to assign proper interventions and strategies toward raising public awareness and reducing disparities in access to health facilities. PMID:26029893

  6. The first mitochondrial genome of Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Veneroida: Mactridae) from Guangxi (China) and potential molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Meng, Xueping; Tian, Mei; Yan, Binlun; Cheng, Hanliang; Lu, Wei; Chai, Yuling

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Coelomactra antiquata (Guangxi, in China, GX) was determined. It is 16 801 bp in length and is the first representative from this province. The mitochondrial genome encodes 35 genes, including 12 PCGs, two ribosomal RNA, and 21 transfer RNA genes. Atp8 and trnSer(UCN) genes are missing, compared with the typical gene content of animal mitochondrial genomes. Three (cob, nad1, nad4, and nad6) of the 12 PCGs in the mitochondrial genome initiate with the ATA, while other PCGs start with ATG. Two PCGs (atp6 and nad4L) end with incomplete stop codons (T-), and the remaining ones have complete stop codons (TAA or TAG). The largest non-coding region of the C. antiquata (GX) contains one section of tandem repeats (5 × 99 bp). Among all PCGs and rRNAs, the nad5 gene contains the maximum polymorphic sites (430), followed by nad4 (261) and cox2 (240). Two ribosomal RNA genes (srRNA and lrRNA) and cox1 are most conservative. The proportions of polymorphic sites in six genes (nad4, nad2, nad6, nad5, cox2, and nad3) are more than 20% (ranging from 20.25% to 25.21%). These high variable genes can be used as molecular markers in the population genetic analysis of the species.

  7. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cancer procoagulant and its potential as a new tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Cross, B A

    1990-10-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a Mr 68,000 cysteine proteinase that initiates blood coagulation and is expressed by a variety of malignant cells but not by normally differentiated cells. Polyclonal immunoglobulin G and monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibodies were developed to purified CP and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to analyze the antigen in human serum samples. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine whether or not the analysis of CP in the serum might be a useful tumor marker. Pure CP was added to normal serum to establish a quantitative standard curve; the correlation coefficient of seven standard curves was 0.99. The upper limit of the normal range was established with 46 normal sera (mean +/- 2 SD = 0.57 microgram/ml). A total of 128 blinded serum samples were analyzed: 54 were from cancer patients (29 with gastrointestinal cancer, 22 with lung cancer, and three with urogenital cancer); 20 were from benign disease patients; and 54 were from normal individuals. All of the 13 early stage cancers were greater than 0.57 microgram/ml (positive), 31 of 41 (76%) of the late stage cancers were positive; overall, 44 of the 54 cancers (81%) were positive. Forty-nine of 54 (91%) of the normal sera and 16 of 20 (80%) of the benign disease sera were negative. Overall, the assay had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 88%.

  8. Enhanced oral bioavailability of a sterol-loaded microemulsion formulation of Flammulina velutipes, a potential antitumor drug

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengxue; Zhong, Hui; Tong, Shanshan; Cao, Xia; Firempong, Caleb K; Liu, Hongfei; Fu, Min; Yang, Yan; Feng, Yingshu; Zhang, Huiyun; Xu, Ximing; Yu, Jiangnan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the growth inhibition activity of Flammulina velutipes sterol (FVS) against certain human cancer cell lines (gastric SGC and colon LoVo) and to evaluate the optimum microemulsion prescription, as well as the pharmacokinetics of encapsulated FVS. Methods Molecules present in the FVS isolate were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. The cell viability of FVS was assessed with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) bioassay. Based on the solubility study, phase diagram and stability tests, the optimum prescription of F. velutipes sterol microemulsions (FVSMs) were determined, followed by FVSMs characterization, and its in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats. Results The chemical composition of FVS was mainly ergosterol (54.8%) and 22,23-dihydroergosterol (27.9%). After 72 hours of treatment, both the FVS (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 11.99 μg · mL−1) and the standard anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (IC50 = 0.88 μg · mL−1) exhibited strong in vitro antiproliferative activity against SGC cells, with IC50 > 30.0 μg · mL−1; but the FVS performed poorly against LoVo cells (IC50 > 40.0 μg · mL−1). The optimal FVSMs prescription consisted of 3.0% medium chain triglycerides, 5.0% ethanol, 21.0% Cremophor EL and 71.0% water (w/w) with associated solubility of FVS being 0.680 mg · mL−1 as compared to free FVS (0.67 μg · mL−1). The relative oral bioavailability (area-under-the-curve values of ergosterol and 22,23-dihydroergosterol showed a 2.56-fold and 4.50-fold increase, respectively) of FVSMs (mean diameter ~ 22.9 nm) as against free FVS were greatly enhanced. Conclusion These results indicate that the FVS could be a potential candidate for the development of an anticancer drug and it is readily bioavailable via microemulsion formulations. PMID:23049254

  9. A mixture of oleic, erucic and conjugated linoleic acids modulates cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory markers and improve somatosensorial evoked potential in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy female carriers.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Marco; Bizzarri, Carla; Petroni, Anna; Carta, Gianfranca; Cordeddu, Lina; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Vollono, Catello; De Pasquale, Loredana; Blasevich, Milena; Banni, Sebastiano

    2012-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a rare inherited demyelinating disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, mainly hexacosanoic acid (26:0), due to a mutation of the gene encoding for a peroxisomal membrane protein. The only available, and partially effective, therapeutic treatment consists of dietary intake of a 4:1 mixture of triolein and trierucin, called Lorenzo's oil (LO), targeted to inhibit the elongation of docosanoic acid (22:0) to 26:0. In this study we tested whether, besides inhibiting elongation, an enhancement of peroxisomal beta oxidation induced by conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), will improve somatosensory evoked potentials and modify inflammatory markers in adrenoleukodystrophy females carriers. We enrolled five heterozygous women. They received a mixture of LO (40 g/day) with CLA (5 g/day) for 2 months. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by the means of plasma levels of 26:0, 26:0/22:0 ratio, modification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory markers and somatosensory evoked potentials. Changes of fatty acid profile, and in particular CLA incorporation, were also evaluated in CSF and plasma. The results showed that CLA promptly passes the blood brain barrier and the mixture was able to lower both 26:0 and 26:0/22:0 ratio in plasma. The mixture improved somatosensory evoked potentials, which were previously found unchanged or worsened with dietary LO alone, and reduced IL-6 levels in CSF in three out of five patients. Our data suggest that the synergic activity of CLA and LO, by enhancing peroxisomal beta-oxidation and preventing 26:0 formation, improves the somatosensory evoked potentials and reduces neuroinflammation.

  10. Postural sway in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a potential marker of prodromal Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tuan-Zhi; Xu, Guang-Jun; Zhou, Guang-An; Wang, Jing-Ru; Chan, Piu; Du, Yi-Feng

    2014-04-22

    There is compelling evidence that postural instability occurs at very early clinical stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), making it tempting to speculate that changes in postural sway may even occur at a prodromal phase. Studies estimate that approximately half of patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) will eventually develop PD, so RBD may be an indicator of prodromal PD. This study was undertaken to investigate postural sway and its relation to stereopsis function in patients with RBD. We examined 24 patients with polysomnography-confirmed RBD and 23 healthy, sex-and age-matched control subjects. Postural sway was measured with an accelerometer at the center of mass at the lower spine. Subjects were asked to stand quietly for 30s under two usual conditions (eyes open and eyes closed) and three challenging conditions (eyes open with dual task, eyes closed with dual task, and tandem standing). Stereopsis was assessed using the Titmus fly test. RBD patients showed an increased variability of trunk acceleration and a decrease of smoothness of sway, compared to control subjects. These differences reached significance in the challenging conditions. RBD patients demonstrated significant impairment in stereopsis. There were statistically significant correlations between log seconds of arc of the Titmus test and some sway parameters within the RBD group. RBD patients with abnormal stereopsis showed a significant increase of JERK values compared to patients with normal stereopsis in the challenging conditions. Our results indicate that idiopathic RBD patients, especially with abnormal stereopsis, have subtle signs of postural instability under challenging conditions. Postural sway performance may serve as a biological marker for prodromal PD.

  11. Alpha-enolase as a potential cancer prognostic marker promotes cell growth, migration, and invasion in glioma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The success of using glycolytic inhibitors for cancer treatment relies on better understanding the roles of each frequently deregulated glycolytic genes in cancer. This report analyzed the involvement of a key glycolytic enzyme, alpha-enolase (ENO1), in tumor progression and prognosis of human glioma. Methods ENO1 expression levels were examined in glioma tissues and normal brain (NB) tissues. The molecular mechanisms of ENO1 expression and its effects on cell growth, migration and invasion were also explored by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, Transwell chamber assay, Boyden chamber assay, Western blot and in vivo tumorigenesis in nude mice. Results ENO1 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in glioma tissues compared to NB. In addition, increased ENO1 was associated disease progression in glioma samples. Knocking down ENO1 expression not only significantly decreased cell proliferation, but also markedly inhibited cell migration and invasion as well as in vivo tumorigenesis. Mechanistic analyses revealed that Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, pRb, and NF-κB were downregulated after stable ENO1 knockdown in glioma U251 and U87 cells. Conversely, knockdown of ENO1 resulted in restoration of E-cadherin expression and suppression of mesenchymal cell markers, such as Vimentin, Snail, N-Cadherin, β-Catenin and Slug. Furthermore, ENO1 suppression inactivated PI3K/Akt pathway regulating the cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) progression. Conclusion Overexpression of ENO1 is associated with glioma progression. Knockdown of ENO1 expression led to suppressed cell growth, migration and invasion progression by inactivating the PI3K/Akt pathway in glioma cells. PMID:24650096

  12. Assessment in Higher Education: The Potential for a Community of Practice to Improve Inter-Marker Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Ian P.; Joyce, John; Hassall, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    The design, delivery and assessment of a complete educational scheme, such as a degree programme or a professional qualification course, is a complex matter. Maintaining alignment between the stated aims of the curriculum and the scoring of student achievement is an overarching concern. The potential for drift across individual aspects of an…

  13. Identification of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) as a potential marker of impaired growth in the newborn piglet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between the circulating levels of the acute phase proteins haptoglobin (HP) and alpha 1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) and growth potential in neonatal pigs. In runts, the circulating level of AGP, but not HP in serum of newborn piglets was higher...

  14. Spatial variation in fatty acid trophic markers in albacore tuna from the southwestern Pacific Ocean-A potential 'tropicalization' signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Christopher C.; Pethybridge, Heidi; Young, Jock W.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2015-03-01

    Signature fatty acids were used to explore trophic variations in albacore and skipjack tuna sampled from the southwestern Pacific Ocean. There were clear spatial differences in fatty acid profiles between albacore sampled in the Coral (tropical zone centered at ~20°S) and Tasman (temperate zone centered at ~42°S) Seas; however, few differences were observed in fatty acid profiles of albacore sampled off Tasmania and New Zealand. Fatty acid signatures of the Tasman Sea samples reflected a food web based more on diatoms and included: 20:5ω3 (EPA), 18:1ω7, 22:1ω11, 18:2ω6, 18:4ω3, 18:3ω3, and 20:4ω3. In contrast, albacore from the Coral Sea had a distinct fatty acid signature which included 20:4ω6, 22:5ω6, 17:0, 22:4ω6, 24:0, and 17:1. Multivariate analyses revealed the importance of 22:6ω3 (DHA) in Coral Sea-caught albacore which also had a DHA/EPA ratio more than twice that in all other groups suggesting a greater dinoflagellate contribution and/or a higher trophic position. Fatty acid markers indicative of krill consumption were significantly higher in temperate-caught albacore although skipjack were closest in fatty acid composition to krill. These results were likely due to differences at the base of the food web in these two seas suggesting that signature fatty acids can be used as indicators of ecosystem change: in this case the gradual 'tropicalization' of the eastern seaboard of Australia through the southward extension of the East Australian Current. Our findings also indicate comparatively lower concentrations of healthful ω3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular the content of DHA and EPA, in the tropical samples. This suggests that tropicalization could adversely affect the dietary intake of albacore and other marine predators in the region. Such changes are readily detectable by fatty acid analysis.

  15. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  16. Essentials of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  17. Potential role of autophagy in smokeless tobacco extract-induced cytotoxicity and in morin-induced protection in oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Arnab; Das, Amlan; Nag, Debasish; Bhattacharya, Surela; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2016-04-01

    Toxic components of STE induced serious, adverse human oral health outcomes. In the present study, we observed that STE was involved in oral toxicity by reducing the viability of human squamous epithelial cells, SCC-25, along with the simultaneous induction of both apoptosis and autophagic signaling. STE was also found to induce significant amount ROS generation in SCC-25 cells. The dietary flavonoid morin, found abundantly in a variety of herbs, fruits and wine, has been reported to attenuate ROS-induced pathogenesis including autophagy. In this study we designed three different treatment regimes of morin treatment, such as pre, co, and post - treatment of STE challenged SCC-25 cells. In all cases morin provided cytoprotection to STE challenged SCC-25 cells by augmenting STE induced ROS-dependent cytotoxic autophagy. Hence, morin is a potential option for antioxidant therapy in treatment of STE induced toxicity. PMID:26891815

  18. Long-term oral administration of memory-enhancing doses of tacrine in mice: a study of potential toxicity and side effects.

    PubMed

    Fitten, L J; Flood, J F; Baxter, C F; Tachiki, K H; Perryman, K

    1987-11-01

    Recently, tacrine (1, 2, 3, 4-tetrahydro-9-aminoacridine; THA; TAC) has received international attention as an oral agent capable of relieving some of the cognitive symptoms accompanying Alzheimer's disease (AD). When given acutely and parenterally (by injection), tacrine has also enhanced memory retention in animals and man. This study evaluates the clinical potential of this agent by assessing toxicity and major side effects of a memory-enhancing dose of tacrine in mice. Groups of mice received either tacrine or vehicle (placebo) orally for 4 to 6 months. A lack of toxicity after this prolonged treatment with TAC was indicated by: (a) no significant impairment on a battery of behavioral toxicity tests; (b) improved memory retention; (c) a significant but only slight elevation of ornithine transcarbamylase activity in blood serum; (d) no abnormality as revealed with light microscopy of liver tissue; and (e) no gross organ pathology in visceral organs.

  19. Potential role of linagliptin as an oral once-daily treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hoimark, Lene; Laursen, Torben; Rungby, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Linagliptin is an oral antihyperglycemic agent that selectively inhibits the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). Inhibition of DPP-4 increases the levels of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide by preventing their degradation. Objective: We reviewed the role of linagliptin as an oral once-daily treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using the term “linagliptin.” Original research articles and review articles were included in our examination. Results: Linagliptin has a similar mode of action as other gliptins, with comparable efficacy, safety profile, and tolerability. Differences in pharmacokinetic parameters that distinguish linagliptin from other gliptins include that linagliptin is not renally excreted and does not require dose reduction with renal impairment. Conclusion: Linagliptin is an oral, once-daily, antihyperglycemic agent that significantly reduces glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) when used alone or in combination with other antidiabetic drugs in people with type 2 diabetes. Pharmacokinetics, such as the lack of renal excretion, distinguishes linagliptin from other gliptins. PMID:22952411

  20. Mechanisms of the harmful effects of bacterial semen infection on ejaculated human spermatozoa: potential inflammatory markers in semen.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Monika; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The invasion of the male reproductive tract by microorganisms, and its subsequent consequences for sperm fertilizing potential, has been intensely discussed. The role of the bacteria that are responsible for the colonization and contamination of the male urogenital tract, rather than its infection, in diminished sperm parameters raises the most controversy. There are numerous premises suggesting that bacterial semen infection is associated with male infertility. However, the molecular mechanism by which the fertility is affected is complex and multifactorial, and still presents a puzzle. Some authors have suggested that direct interactions between bacteria and human spermatozoa facilitate sperm immobilization, affect sperm morphology, and thus weaken the ability of sperm to fertilize. On the other hand, the massive infiltration of activated leukocytes into the inflammatory site may be associated with impairment of sperm fertilizing potential, due to oxidative, apoptotic, and immune processes. This review presents current research trends and aims to summarize the present knowledge of semen inflammation and causative bacterial agents in the male urogenital tract, with its consequence on seminological parameters, and male fertility status. PMID:26306512

  1. RAPD and SCAR markers as potential tools for detection of milk origin in dairy products: Adulterant sheep breeds in Serra da Estrela cheese production.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Joana T; Ribeiro, Tânia I B; Rocha, João B; Nunes, João; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2016-11-15

    Serra da Estrela Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese is the most famous Portuguese cheese and has a high commercial value. However, the adulteration of production with cheaper/lower-quality milks from non-autochthones ovine breeds compromises the quality of the final product and undervalues the original PDO cheese. A Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was developed for efficient detection of adulterant breeds in milk mixtures used for fraudulent production of this cheese. Furthermore, Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) markers were designed envisioning the detection of milk adulteration in processed dairy foods. The RAPD-SCAR technique is here described, for the first time, to be potentially useful for detection of milk origin in dairy products. In this sense, our findings will play an important role on the valorization of Serra da Estrela cheese, as well as on other high-quality dairy products prone to adulteration, contributing to the further development of the dairy industry. PMID:27283677

  2. Isolation and RNA gel blot analysis of genes that could serve as potential molecular markers for leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Ito, M; Nishida, I; Watanabe, A

    2001-02-01

    Nine cDNAs, representing genes in which the transcripts accumulated in senescent leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, were isolated by differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) and the genes were designated yellow-leaf-specific gene 1 to 9 (YLS1-YLS9). Sequence analysis revealed that none of the YLS genes, except YLS6, had been reported as senescence-up-regulated genes. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that the transcripts of YLS3 accumulated at the highest level at an early senescence stage, whereas the transcripts from the other YLS genes reached their maximum levels in late senescence stages. Transcripts of YLS genes showed various accumulation patterns under natural senescence, and under artificial senescence induced by darkness, ethylene or ABA. These expression characteristics of YLS genes will be useful as potential molecular markers, which will enhance our understanding of natural and artificial senescence processes.

  3. RAPD and SCAR markers as potential tools for detection of milk origin in dairy products: Adulterant sheep breeds in Serra da Estrela cheese production.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Joana T; Ribeiro, Tânia I B; Rocha, João B; Nunes, João; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2016-11-15

    Serra da Estrela Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese is the most famous Portuguese cheese and has a high commercial value. However, the adulteration of production with cheaper/lower-quality milks from non-autochthones ovine breeds compromises the quality of the final product and undervalues the original PDO cheese. A Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was developed for efficient detection of adulterant breeds in milk mixtures used for fraudulent production of this cheese. Furthermore, Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) markers were designed envisioning the detection of milk adulteration in processed dairy foods. The RAPD-SCAR technique is here described, for the first time, to be potentially useful for detection of milk origin in dairy products. In this sense, our findings will play an important role on the valorization of Serra da Estrela cheese, as well as on other high-quality dairy products prone to adulteration, contributing to the further development of the dairy industry.

  4. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) and Its Receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 May Be Putative Biomarkers of Malignant Transformation of Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions into Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Seema; Goel, Madhu Mati; Makker, Annu; Bhatia, Vikram; Chandra, Saumya; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    There are several factors like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, genetic alterations, mutational factors that are involved in malignant transformation of potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOLs) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is one of the prototypes of the large family of growth factors that bind heparin. FGF-2 induces angiogenesis and its receptors may play a role in synthesis of collagen. FGFs are involved in transmission of signals between the epithelium and connective tissue, and influence growth and differentiation of a wide variety of tissue including epithelia. The present study was undertaken to analyze expression of FGF-2 and its receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 in 72 PMOLs, 108 OSCC and 52 healthy controls, and their role in risk assessment for malignant transformation of Leukoplakia (LKP) and Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) to OSCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3. IHC results were validated by Real Time PCR. Expression of FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 was upregulated from PMOLs to OSCC. While 90% (9/10) of PMOLs which showed malignant transformation (transformed) expressed FGF-2, only 24.19% cases (15/62) of PMOLs which were not transformed (untransformed) to OSCC expressed FGF-2. Similarly, FGFR-2 expression was seen in 16/62 (25.81%) of untransformed PMOLs and 8/10 (80%) cases of transformed PMOLs. FGFR-3 expression was observed in 23/62 (37.10%) cases of untransformed PMOLs and 6/10 (60%) cases of transformed PMOLs. A significant association of FGF-2 and FGFR-2 expression with malignant transformation from PMOLs to OSCC was observed both at phenotypic and molecular level. The results suggest that FGF-2 and FGFR-2 may be useful as biomarkers of malignant transformation in patients with OSMF and LKP. PMID:26465941

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) and Its Receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 May Be Putative Biomarkers of Malignant Transformation of Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions into Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Seema; Goel, Madhu Mati; Makker, Annu; Bhatia, Vikram; Chandra, Saumya; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S P

    2015-01-01

    There are several factors like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, genetic alterations, mutational factors that are involved in malignant transformation of potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOLs) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is one of the prototypes of the large family of growth factors that bind heparin. FGF-2 induces angiogenesis and its receptors may play a role in synthesis of collagen. FGFs are involved in transmission of signals between the epithelium and connective tissue, and influence growth and differentiation of a wide variety of tissue including epithelia. The present study was undertaken to analyze expression of FGF-2 and its receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 in 72 PMOLs, 108 OSCC and 52 healthy controls, and their role in risk assessment for malignant transformation of Leukoplakia (LKP) and Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) to OSCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3. IHC results were validated by Real Time PCR. Expression of FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 was upregulated from PMOLs to OSCC. While 90% (9/10) of PMOLs which showed malignant transformation (transformed) expressed FGF-2, only 24.19% cases (15/62) of PMOLs which were not transformed (untransformed) to OSCC expressed FGF-2. Similarly, FGFR-2 expression was seen in 16/62 (25.81%) of untransformed PMOLs and 8/10 (80%) cases of transformed PMOLs. FGFR-3 expression was observed in 23/62 (37.10%) cases of untransformed PMOLs and 6/10 (60%) cases of transformed PMOLs. A significant association of FGF-2 and FGFR-2 expression with malignant transformation from PMOLs to OSCC was observed both at phenotypic and molecular level. The results suggest that FGF-2 and FGFR-2 may be useful as biomarkers of malignant transformation in patients with OSMF and LKP. PMID:26465941

  6. A selectable bifunctional beta-galactosidase::phleomycin-resistance fusion protein as a potential marker for eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Baron, M; Reynes, J P; Stassi, D; Tiraby, G

    1992-05-15

    The Sh ble gene, conferring phleomycin resistance (PhR), was fused in frame to both the 3' and 5' ends of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene. The bifunctionality of the resulting 130-kDa hybrid proteins was demonstrated in E. coli and in the fungus, Tolypocladium geodes. PhR transformants of both organisms could be selected for. All transformants from E. coli and most from T. geodes displayed beta Gal activity. In the fungal host, higher transformation frequencies and greater levels of beta Gal activity were observed in clones harboring the lacZ::Sh ble fusion, as compared to the Sh ble::lacZ configuration. This system appears to be a potentially useful tool for the direct selection of transformants, and the evaluation of gene expression and regulation in a wide variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts.

  7. Gene Expression Changes in Phosphorus Deficient Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Leaves and the Potential for Diagnostic Gene Expression Markers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John P.; Broadley, Martin R.; Bowen, Helen C.; Spracklen, William P.; Hayden, Rory M.; White, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background There are compelling economic and environmental reasons to reduce our reliance on inorganic phosphate (Pi) fertilisers. Better management of Pi fertiliser applications is one option to improve the efficiency of Pi fertiliser use, whilst maintaining crop yields. Application rates of Pi fertilisers are traditionally determined from analyses of soil or plant tissues. Alternatively, diagnostic genes with altered expression under Pi limiting conditions that suggest a physiological requirement for Pi fertilisation, could be used to manage Pifertiliser applications, and might be more precise than indirect measurements of soil or tissue samples. Results We grew potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants hydroponically, under glasshouse conditions, to control their nutrient status accurately. Samples of total leaf RNA taken periodically after Pi was removed from the nutrient solution were labelled and hybridised to potato oligonucleotide arrays. A total of 1,659 genes were significantly differentially expressed following Pi withdrawal. These included genes that encode proteins involved in lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism, characteristic of Pi deficient leaves and included potential novel roles for genes encoding patatin like proteins in potatoes. The array data were analysed using a support vector machine algorithm to identify groups of genes that could predict the Pi status of the crop. These groups of diagnostic genes were tested using field grown potatoes that had either been fertilised or unfertilised. A group of 200 genes could correctly predict the Pi status of field grown potatoes. Conclusions This paper provides a proof-of-concept demonstration for using microarrays and class prediction tools to predict the Pi status of a field grown potato crop. There is potential to develop this technology for other biotic and abiotic stresses in field grown crops. Ultimately, a better understanding of crop stresses may improve our management of the crop, improving

  8. A review of transcriptome studies combined with data mining reveals novel potential markers of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Melaiu, Ombretta; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Melissari, Erika; Di Russo, Manuela; Bonotti, Alessandra; Bruno, Rossella; Foddis, Rudy; Gemignani, Federica; Pellegrini, Silvia; Landi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a cancer of the serosal pleural cavities, is one of the most aggressive human tumors. In order to identify genes crucial for the onset and progression of MPM, we performed an extensive literature review focused on transcriptome studies (RTS). In this kind of studies a great number of transcripts are analyzed without formulating any a priori hypothesis, thus preventing any bias coming from previously established knowledge that could lead to an over-representation of specific genes. Each study was thoroughly analyzed paying particular attention to: (i) the employed microarray platform, (ii) the number and type of samples, (iii) the fold-change, and (iv) the statistical significance of deregulated genes. We also performed data mining (DM) on MPM using three different tools (Coremine, SNPs3D, and GeneProspector). Results from RTS and DM were compared in order to restrict the number of genes potentially deregulated in MPM. Our main requirement for a gene to be a "mesothelioma gene" (MG) is to be reproducibly deregulated among independent studies and confirmed by DM. A list of MGs was thus produced, including PTGS2, BIRC5, ASS1, JUNB, MCM2, AURKA, FGF2, MKI67, CAV1, SFRP1, CCNB1, CDK4, and MSLN that might represent potential novel biomarkers or therapeutic targets for MPM. Moreover, it was found a sub-group of MGs including ASS1, JUNB, PTGS2, EEF2, SULF1, TOP2A, AURKA, BIRC5, CAV1, IFITM1, PCNA, and PKM2 that could explain, at least in part, the mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, one first-line chemotherapeutic drug used for the disease. Finally, the pathway analysis showed that co-regulation networks related to the cross-talk between MPM and its micro-environment, in particular involving the adhesion molecules, integrins, and cytokines, might have an important role in MPM. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the role played by these genes in MPM.

  9. Potential involvement of miR-375 in the premalignant progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma mediated via transcription factor KLF5.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen; Yang, Jing; Li, Siyuan; Shan, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaosong; Hua, Hong; Zhao, Chuanke; Feng, Zhendong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin

    2015-11-24

    To elucidate the genetic effect involved in the premalignant progression of chronic inflammation to cancer, we performed microRNA and mRNA profiling in oral lichen planus (OLP), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and normal tissue from the same patients. We demonstrate the involvement of a suppressive microRNA, miR-375, in the regulation of this premalignant progression via KLF5, a transcription factor that modulates the expression of genes contributing to proliferation and apoptosis. We found that miR-375 abundance decreased in tissues with progression from the normal state to OLP and subsequently to OSCC. Restoration of miR-375 by transduction of a synthetic mimic into OSCC cells repressed cellular proliferation and promoted apoptosis, with concomitant down-regulation of KLF5, and vice versa. The direct binding of miR-375 to the 3'-untranslated region of KLF5 was further confirmed. Additionally, Survivin (BIRC5), a target of KLF5, was also regulated by miR-375, explaining the susceptibility of miR-375-mimic transfected cells to apoptosis. Further analysis of clinical specimens suggested that expression of KLF5 and BIRC5 is up-regulated during the progression from inflammation to cancer. Our findings provide novel insights into the involvement of microRNAs in progression of inflammation to carcinoma and suggest a potential early-stage biomarker or therapy target for oral carcinoma. PMID:26474386

  10. Effects of amitriptyline and intra-oral device appliance on clinical and laser-evoked potentials features in chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Shevel, E; Libro, G; Guido, M; Di Venere, D; Genco, S; Monetti, C; Serpino, C; Barile, G; Lamberti, P; Livrea, P

    2005-05-01

    In the present study, we examined clinical and laser-evoked potentials (LEP) features in two groups of chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) patients treated with two different approaches: intra-oral appliance of prosthesis, aiming to reduce muscular tenderness, and 10 mg daily amitriptyline. Eighteen patients suffering from CTTH (IHS, 2004) participated in the study. We performed a basal evaluation of clinical features and LEPs in all patients (T0) vs. 12 age- and sex-matched controls; successively, patients were randomly assigned to a two-month treatment by amitriptyline or intra-oral device appliance. The later LEPs, especially the P2 component, were significantly increased in amplitude in the CTTH group. Both the intra-oral prosthesis and amitriptyline significantly reduced headache frequency. Total Tenderness Score was significantly reduced in the group treated by the prosthesis. The amplitude of P2 response elicited by stimulation of pericranial zones showed a reduction after amitriptyline treatment. The results of this study may confirm that pericranial tenderness is primarily a phenomenon initiating a self-perpetuating circuit, favoured by central sensitisation at the level of the cortical nociceptive areas devoted to the attentive and emotive compounds of pain. Both the interventions at the peripheral and central levels may interrupt this reverberating circuit, improving the outcome of headache. PMID:15926017

  11. Effects of amitriptyline and intra-oral device appliance on clinical and laser-evoked potentials features in chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Shevel, E; Libro, G; Guido, M; Di Venere, D; Genco, S; Monetti, C; Serpino, C; Barile, G; Lamberti, P; Livrea, P

    2005-05-01

    In the present study, we examined clinical and laser-evoked potentials (LEP) features in two groups of chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) patients treated with two different approaches: intra-oral appliance of prosthesis, aiming to reduce muscular tenderness, and 10 mg daily amitriptyline. Eighteen patients suffering from CTTH (IHS, 2004) participated in the study. We performed a basal evaluation of clinical features and LEPs in all patients (T0) vs. 12 age- and sex-matched controls; successively, patients were randomly assigned to a two-month treatment by amitriptyline or intra-oral device appliance. The later LEPs, especially the P2 component, were significantly increased in amplitude in the CTTH group. Both the intra-oral prosthesis and amitriptyline significantly reduced headache frequency. Total Tenderness Score was significantly reduced in the group treated by the prosthesis. The amplitude of P2 response elicited by stimulation of pericranial zones showed a reduction after amitriptyline treatment. The results of this study may confirm that pericranial tenderness is primarily a phenomenon initiating a self-perpetuating circuit, favoured by central sensitisation at the level of the cortical nociceptive areas devoted to the attentive and emotive compounds of pain. Both the interventions at the peripheral and central levels may interrupt this reverberating circuit, improving the outcome of headache.

  12. Potential involvement of miR-375 in the premalignant progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma mediated via transcription factor KLF5

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siyuan; Shan, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaosong; Hua, Hong; Zhao, Chuanke; Feng, Zhendong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the genetic effect involved in the premalignant progression of chronic inflammation to cancer, we performed microRNA and mRNA profiling in oral lichen planus (OLP), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and normal tissue from the same patients. We demonstrate the involvement of a suppressive microRNA, miR-375, in the regulation of this premalignant progression via KLF5, a transcription factor that modulates the expression of genes contributing to proliferation and apoptosis. We found that miR-375 abundance decreased in tissues with progression from the normal state to OLP and subsequently to OSCC. Restoration of miR-375 by transduction of a synthetic mimic into OSCC cells repressed cellular proliferation and promoted apoptosis, with concomitant down-regulation of KLF5, and vice versa. The direct binding of miR-375 to the 3′-untranslated region of KLF5 was further confirmed. Additionally, Survivin (BIRC5), a target of KLF5, was also regulated by miR-375, explaining the susceptibility of miR-375-mimic transfected cells to apoptosis. Further analysis of clinical specimens suggested that expression of KLF5 and BIRC5 is up-regulated during the progression from inflammation to cancer. Our findings provide novel insights into the involvement of microRNAs in progression of inflammation to carcinoma and suggest a potential early-stage biomarker or therapy target for oral carcinoma. PMID:26474386

  13. Protection against cognitive deficits and markers of neurodegeneration by long-term oral administration of melatonin in a transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Olcese, James M; Cao, Chuanhai; Mori, Takashi; Mamcarz, Malgorzata B; Maxwell, Anne; Runfeldt, Melissa J; Wang, Li; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Guixin; Arendash, Gary W

    2009-08-01

    The neurohormone melatonin has been reported to exert anti-beta-amyloid aggregation, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory actions in various in vitro and animal models. To comprehensively determine the potential for long-term melatonin treatment to protect Alzheimer's transgenic mice against cognitive impairment and development of beta-amyloid (Abeta) neuropathology, we administered melatonin (100 mg/L drinking water) to APP + PS1 double transgenic (Tg) mice from 2-2.5 months of age to their killing at age 7.5 months. A comprehensive behavioral battery administered during the final 6 weeks of treatment revealed that Tg mice given melatonin were protected from cognitive impairment in a variety of tasks of working memory, spatial reference learning/memory, and basic mnemonic function; Tg control mice remained impaired in all of these cognitive tasks/domains. Immunoreactive Abeta deposition was significantly reduced in hippocampus (43%) and entorhinal cortex (37%) of melatonin-treated Tg mice. Although soluble and oligomeric forms of Abeta1-40 and 1-42 were unchanged in the hippocampus and cortex of the same melatonin-treated Tg mice, their plasma Abeta levels were elevated. These Abeta results, together with our concurrent demonstration that melatonin suppresses Abeta aggregation in brain homogenates, are consistent with a melatonin-facilitated removal of Abeta from the brain. Inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were decreased in hippocampus (but not plasma) of Tg+ melatonin mice. Finally, the cortical mRNA expression of three antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase) was significantly reduced to non-Tg levels by long-term melatonin treatment in Tg mice. Thus, melatonin's cognitive benefits could involve its anti-Abeta aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and/or antioxidant properties. Our findings provide support for long-term melatonin therapy as a primary or complementary strategy for abating the progression of

  14. Organic anion transporting polypeptides expressed in pancreatic cancer may serve as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for early stage adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Amanda; Apte, Udayan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides (OATPs) are expressed in various epithelial tissues in the body. Because they can be expressed in cancers and because they can transport anticancer drugs, OATPs could be potential targets for cancer therapy. Therefore we examined their expression in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. Methods Expression of all eleven human OATPs was measured at the mRNA level and OATPs with highest expression were characterized at the protein level. Results Transcripts of SLCO1B3, SLCO2A1, SLCO3A1 and SLCO4A1 were detected in all the tested pancreatic tissues. OATP1B3, OATP2A1, OATP3A1 and OATP4A1 protein expression was confirmed in these tissues and expression of all four transporters increased in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared to normal pancreas. OATP1B3 expression was highest in pancreatic hyperplasia and stage one adenocarcinomas compared to stage two and three adenocarcinomas. Conclusion OATP1B3, OATP2A1, OATP3A1 and OATP4A1 are up-regulated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and could potentially be used to target anticancer drugs to pancreatic cancer. Additionally, because expression of OATP1B3 is highest in pancreatitis and stage one adenocarcinoma, which leads to pancreatic cancer, OATP1B3 is a potential marker to diagnose patients with early stage pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:23307416

  15. Lateral Ventricular Cerebrospinal Fluid Diffusivity as a Potential Neuroimaging Marker of Brain Temperature in Multiple Sclerosis: A Hypothesis and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Khader M.; Lincoln, John A.; Nelson, Flavia M.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2014-01-01

    In this retrospective study we tested the hypothesis that the net effect of impaired electrical conduction and therefore increased heat dissipation in multiple sclerosis (MS) results in elevated lateral ventricular (LV) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffusivity as a measure of brain temperature estimated in vivo using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used validated DTI-based segmentation methods to obtain normalized LV-CSF volume and its corresponding CSF diffusivity in 108 MS patients and 103 healthy controls in the age range of 21-63 years. The LV CSF diffusivity was ~2% higher in MS compared to controls that corresponds to a temperature rise of ~1 °C that could not be explained by changes in the CSF viscosity due to altered CSF protein content in MS. The LV diffusivity decreased with age in healthy controls (r=−0.29; p=0.003), but not in MS (r=0.15; p=0.11), possibly related to MS pathology. Age-adjusted LV diffusivity increased with lesion load (r=0.518; p=1x10−8). Our data suggest that the total brain lesion load is the primary contributor to the increase in LV CSF diffusivity in MS. These findings suggest that LV diffusivity is a potential in vivo biomarker of the mismatch between heat generation and dissipation in MS. We also discuss limitations and possible confounders. PMID:25485790

  16. Lateral ventricular cerebrospinal fluid diffusivity as a potential neuroimaging marker of brain temperature in multiple sclerosis: a hypothesis and implications.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Khader M; Lincoln, John A; Nelson, Flavia M; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2015-04-01

    In this retrospective study we tested the hypothesis that the net effect of impaired electrical conduction and therefore increased heat dissipation in multiple sclerosis (MS) results in elevated lateral ventricular (LV) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffusivity as a measure of brain temperature estimated in vivo using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used validated DTI-based segmentation methods to obtain normalized LV-CSF volume and its corresponding CSF diffusivity in 108 MS patients and 103 healthy controls in the age range of 21-63 years. The LV CSF diffusivity was ~2% higher in MS compared to controls that correspond to a temperature rise of ~1°C that could not be explained by changes in the CSF viscosity due to altered CSF protein content in MS. The LV diffusivity decreased with age in healthy controls (r=-0.29; p=0.003), but not in MS (r=0.15; p=0.11), possibly related to MS pathology. Age-adjusted LV diffusivity increased with lesion load (r=0.518; p=1×10(-8)). Our data suggest that the total brain lesion load is the primary contributor to the increase in LV CSF diffusivity in MS. These findings suggest that LV diffusivity is a potential in vivo biomarker of the mismatch between heat generation and dissipation in MS. We also discuss limitations and possible confounders. PMID:25485790

  17. Comparative genotyping of Clostridium thermocellum strains isolated from biogas plants: genetic markers and characterization of cellulolytic potential.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Daniela E; Zverlov, Vladimir V; Liebl, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Wolfgang H

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is among the most prevalent of known anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria. In this study, genetic and phenotypic variations among C. thermocellum strains isolated from different biogas plants were determined and different genotyping methods were evaluated on these isolates. At least two C. thermocellum strains were isolated independently from each of nine different biogas plants via enrichment on cellulose. Various DNA-based genotyping methods such as ribotyping, RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) and VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) were applied to these isolates. One novel approach - the amplification of unknown target sequences between copies of a previously discovered Random Inserted Mobile Element (RIME) - was also tested. The genotyping method with the highest discriminatory power was found to be the amplification of the sequences between the insertion elements, where isolates from each biogas plant yielded a different band pattern. Cellulolytic potentials, optimal growth conditions and substrate spectra of all isolates were characterized to help identify phenotypic variations. Irrespective of the genotyping method used, the isolates from each individual biogas plant always exhibited identical patterns. This is suggestive of a single C. thermocellum strain exhibiting dominance in each biogas plant. The genotypic groups reflect the results of the physiological characterization of the isolates like substrate diversity and cellulase activity. Conversely, strains isolated across a range of biogas plants differed in their genotyping results and physiological properties. Both strains isolated from one biogas plant had the best specific cellulose-degrading properties and might therefore achieve superior substrate utilization yields in biogas fermenters.

  18. Potential Markers of Aggressive Behavior: The Fear of Other Persons' Laughter and Its Overlaps with Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Elisabeth M.; Schulter, Günter; Freudenthaler, H. Harald; Hofer, Ellen; Pichler, Natascha; Papousek, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence suggested that some outbreaks of aggression and violence may be related to a fear of being laughed at and ridiculed. The present study examined the potential association of the fear of other persons' laughter (gelotophobia) with emotion-related deficits predisposing for aggression, anger and aggression proneness, and its overlaps with relevant mental disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings Gelotophobic individuals were compared to a non-phobic control group with respect to emotion regulation skills and strategies, alexithymia, anger proneness, and aggressive behavior. Social phobia was diagnosed using the Structural Clinical Interview (SCID-I) for DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition). Additionally, the SCID-II modules for Cluster A Personality Disorders, which includes schizoid, paranoid, and schizotypal personality disorder were administered to all participants. The findings show that gelotophobia is associated with deficits in the typical handling of an individual's own affective states, greater anger proneness and more aggressive behavior according to self-report as compared to non-phobic individuals. 80% of the subjects in the gelotophobia group had an additional diagnosis of social phobia and/or Cluster A personality disorder. The additional diagnoses did not predict additional variance of anger or aggressive behavior as compared to gelotophobia alone. Conclusions/Significance Features related to aggression and violence that are inherent in mental disorders such as social phobia and Cluster A personality disorders may be particularly evident in the symptom of fear of other persons' laughter. PMID:22675438

  19. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Emily G.; Kotze, Helen L.; Allwood, J. William; Dunn, Warwick B.; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments. PMID:26508589

  20. Posttraumatic knee osteoarthritis following anterior cruciate ligament injury: Potential biochemical mediators of degenerative alteration and specific biochemical markers

    PubMed Central

    LI, HONG; CHEN, CHEN; CHEN, SHIYI

    2015-01-01

    As a common injury, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is unable to heal itself naturally, which possibly increases knee instability, accelerates the risk of joint degeneration and leads to knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the ACL-injured knee. Thus, ACL reconstruction using an autograft or allograft tendon is proposed to maintain the biomechanical stability of the knee joint. However, previous studies demonstrate that surgical management of ACL reconstruction failed to abrogate the development of OA completely, indicating that biochemical disturbance is responsible for the osteoarthritic changes observed following ACL injury. Inflammatory mediators are elevated subsequent to ACL injury or rupture, inducing matrix metalloproteinase production, proteoglycan degradation, collagen destruction, chondrocyte necrosis and lubricin loss. These potential biochemical mediators may aid in the development of effective biological management to reduce the onset of future posttraumatic OA. Furthermore, during the degenerative process of cartilage, there are a number of cartilage-specific biomarkers, which play a critical step in the loss of structural and functional integrity of cartilage. The present review illustrates several specific biomarkers in the ACL-injured knee joint, which may provide effective diagnostic and prognostic tools for investigating cartilage degenerative progression and future posttraumatic OA of ACL-injured patients. PMID:25798238

  1. Intervarietal variations in various oxidative stress markers and antioxidant potential of finger millet (Eleusine coracana) subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Bartwal, Arti; Pande, Anjali; Sharma, Priyadarshini; Arora, Sandeep

    2016-07-01

    Drought is a major form of abiotic stress leading to lower crop productivity. Experiment was carried out for selecting the most tolerant genotype among six different genotypes of finger millet under drought stress. Seeds of six finger millet genotypes were sown in pots and grown for 35 days. After this period, drought was induced by withholding watering for stressed plants while control plants were watered regularly for comparison. Among all six different varieties of finger millet screened (PR202, PES400, PRM6107, VL283, VL328 and VL149) under varying intensities of drought stress,PRM6107 and PR202 showed highest stress tolerance by limiting excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through activation of ROS scavenging antioxidative enzymes. A 200% increase in ascorbate content was recorded in PRM6107 and PR202, while in other varieties limited increase in ascorbate content was observed. Maximum decrease in chlorophyll content was observed in VL328 (83%) while least drop was observed in VL149 (65%). Relative water content indicated that PR202 was able to retain maximum water content under stress, as it recorded least drop in relative water content (55%), contributing to its better survival under stress. In conclusion finger millet genotypes PRM6107 and PR202 possessed maximum drought tolerance potential and thus may be used for allele mining of drought tolerant genes, which can further be employed for the development of more drought stress tolerant staple crops using biotechnological approach.

  2. Intervarietal variations in various oxidative stress markers and antioxidant potential of finger millet (Eleusine coracana) subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Bartwal, Arti; Pande, Anjali; Sharma, Priyadarshini; Arora, Sandeep

    2016-07-01

    Drought is a major form of abiotic stress leading to lower crop productivity. Experiment was carried out for selecting the most tolerant genotype among six different genotypes of finger millet under drought stress. Seeds of six finger millet genotypes were sown in pots and grown for 35 days. After this period, drought was induced by withholding watering for stressed plants while control plants were watered regularly for comparison. Among all six different varieties of finger millet screened (PR202, PES400, PRM6107, VL283, VL328 and VL149) under varying intensities of drought stress,PRM6107 and PR202 showed highest stress tolerance by limiting excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through activation of ROS scavenging antioxidative enzymes. A 200% increase in ascorbate content was recorded in PRM6107 and PR202, while in other varieties limited increase in ascorbate content was observed. Maximum decrease in chlorophyll content was observed in VL328 (83%) while least drop was observed in VL149 (65%). Relative water content indicated that PR202 was able to retain maximum water content under stress, as it recorded least drop in relative water content (55%), contributing to its better survival under stress. In conclusion finger millet genotypes PRM6107 and PR202 possessed maximum drought tolerance potential and thus may be used for allele mining of drought tolerant genes, which can further be employed for the development of more drought stress tolerant staple crops using biotechnological approach. PMID:27498495

  3. Comparative study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains to identify potential marker genes correlated to desiccation stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Capece, Angela; Votta, Sonia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The most diffused formulation of starter for winemaking is active dry yeast (ADY). ADYs production process is essentially characterized by air-drying stress, a combination of several stresses, including thermal, hyperosmotic and oxidative and cell capacity to counteract such multiple stresses will determine its survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying cell stress response to desiccation have been mostly studied in laboratory and commercial yeast strains, but a growing interest is currently developing for indigenous yeast strains which represent a valuable and alternative source of genetic and molecular biodiversity to be exploited. In this work, a comparative study of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae indigenous wine strains, previously selected for their technological traits, has been carried out to identify potentially relevant genes involved in desiccation stress tolerance. Cell viability was evaluated along desiccation treatment and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR before and during the stress. Our data show that the observed differences in individual strain sensitivity to desiccation stress could be associated to specific gene expression over time. In particular, either the basal or the stress-induced mRNA levels of certain genes, such as HSP12, SSA3, TPS1, TPS2, CTT1 and SOD1, result tightly correlated to the strain survival advantage. This study provides a reliable and sensitive method to predict desiccation stress tolerance of indigenous wine yeast strains which could be preliminary to biotechnological applications.

  4. Comparative study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains to identify potential marker genes correlated to desiccation stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Capece, Angela; Votta, Sonia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The most diffused formulation of starter for winemaking is active dry yeast (ADY). ADYs production process is essentially characterized by air-drying stress, a combination of several stresses, including thermal, hyperosmotic and oxidative and cell capacity to counteract such multiple stresses will determine its survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying cell stress response to desiccation have been mostly studied in laboratory and commercial yeast strains, but a growing interest is currently developing for indigenous yeast strains which represent a valuable and alternative source of genetic and molecular biodiversity to be exploited. In this work, a comparative study of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae indigenous wine strains, previously selected for their technological traits, has been carried out to identify potentially relevant genes involved in desiccation stress tolerance. Cell viability was evaluated along desiccation treatment and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR before and during the stress. Our data show that the observed differences in individual strain sensitivity to desiccation stress could be associated to specific gene expression over time. In particular, either the basal or the stress-induced mRNA levels of certain genes, such as HSP12, SSA3, TPS1, TPS2, CTT1 and SOD1, result tightly correlated to the strain survival advantage. This study provides a reliable and sensitive method to predict desiccation stress tolerance of indigenous wine yeast strains which could be preliminary to biotechnological applications. PMID:26882930

  5. The Cultivable Human Oral Gluten-Degrading Microbiome and its Potential Implications in Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Feo, Martin; Wei, Guoxian; Blumenkranz, Gabriel; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Schuppan, Detlef; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal inflammation caused by gluten, proteins which are widely contained in the Western diet. Mammalian digestive enzymes are only partly capable of cleaving gluten, and fragments remain that induce toxic responses in celiac patients. We found that the oral microbiome is a novel and rich source of gluten degrading enzymes. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of the cultivable resident oral microbes that are capable of cleaving gluten, with special emphasis on its immunogenic domains. Bacteria were obtained by a selective culturing approach and enzyme activities were characterised by: 1) Hydrolysis of paranitroanilide-derivatised gliadin-derived tripeptide substrates; 2) Gliadin degradation in-gel (gliadin zymography); 3) Gliadin degradation in solution; 4) Proteolysis of the highly immunogenic α-gliadin-derived 33-mer. For select strains pH activity profiles were determined. The culturing strategy yielded 87 aerobic and 63 anaerobic strains. Species with activity in at least two of the four assays were typed as: Rothia mucilaginosa HOT-681, Rothia aeria HOT-188, Actinomyces odontolyticus HOT-701, Streptococcus mitis HOT-677, Streptococcus sp. HOT-071, Neisseria mucosa HOT-682 and Capnocytophaga sputigena HOT-775, with Rothia species being active in all four assays. Cleavage specificities and substrate preferences differed among the strains identified. The approximate molecular weights of the enzymes were ~75 kD (Rothia spp.), ~60 kD (A. odontolyticus) and ~150 kD (Streptococcus spp.). In conclusion, this study identified new gluten-degrading microorganisms in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. A cocktail of the most active oral bacteria, or their isolated enzymes, may offer promising new treatment modalities for celiac disease. PMID:23714165

  6. Semaphorin 3A - a marker for disease activity and a potential putative disease-modifying treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Vadasz, Z; Toubi, E

    2012-10-01

    Semaphorin 3A (sema3A) and neuropilin-1 (NP-1) play a regulatory role in immune responses and have a demonstrated effect on the course of collagen-induced arthritis. Sema3A was also found to be involved in other immune-mediated diseases, e.g. psoriasis and allergic rhinitis. In this review we concentrated on the involvement of sema3A and NP-1 in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and on the specific effect of sema3A on the auto-reactive properties of B cells in SLE patients. We demonstrated the expression of sema3A in renal biopsies from lupus glomerulonephritis patients. This expression was found to be inversely correlated with proteinuria and kidney function tests. Sema3A serum levels in SLE patients were found to be significantly lower than in RA patients (disease control) and lower yet than in normal individuals. Altered serum sema3A levels were found to be in inverse correlation with SLE disease activity, mainly with renal damage and the presence of anti-cardiolipin antibodies. The expression of both sema3A and NP-1 on B cells from SLE patients was significantly different in comparison with normal healthy individuals. Finally, we demonstrated that when sema3A was co-cultured with CpG-ODN-stimulated memory B cells of SLE patients, their TLR-9 expression was significantly reduced by almost 50% (p = 0.001). These findings, along with the observation of sema3A being reduced in SLE patients in correlation with disease severity and autoimmunity, and memory B cells being beneficially responsive to sema3A, suggest this regulatory molecule may be considered as a potential therapy for SLE. Such focused therapies will help in achieving the maintenance of self-tolerance and alter pro-inflammatory status in lupus.

  7. Proteomic analysis of human papillomavirus-related oral squamous cell carcinoma: identification of thioredoxin and epidermal-fatty acid binding protein as upregulated protein markers in microdissected tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Winkler, Robert; Schimmel, Bettina; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Wittekindt, Claus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2009-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been identified as an etiologic agent for a subset of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with increasing incidence. HPV DNA-positivity may confer better prognosis but the related oncogenic mechanisms are unknown. For the identification of HPV relevant proteins, we analyzed microdissected cells from HPV DNA-positive (n = 17) and HPV DNA-negative (n = 7) OSCC tissue samples. We identified 18 proteins from tumor tissues by peptide fingerprint mapping and SELDI MS that were separated using 2-DE. Among a number of signals that were detected as significantly different in the protein profiling analysis, we identified thioredoxin (TRX) and epidermal-fatty acid binding protein as upregulated in HPV related tumor tissue. This study, investigating for the first time proteomic changes in microdissected HPV infected tumor tissue, provides an indication on the oncogenic potential of viruses. PMID:19337991

  8. In vitro Evaluation of Copaifera oblongifolia Oleoresin Against Bacteria Causing Oral Infections and Assessment of Its Cytotoxic Potential.

    PubMed

    da S Moraes, Thaís; Leandro, Luis F; de O Silva, Larissa; Santiago, Mariana B; Souza, Ariana B; Furtado, Ricardo A; Tavares, Denise C; Veneziani, Rodrigo C S; Ambrósio, Sérgio R; Bastos, Jairo K; Martins, Carlos H G

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity, which harbors more than 750 bacterial species, is one of the most diverse sites of the human body. Some of these bacteria have been associated with oral diseases, such as dental caries and endodontic infections. We report on the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of Copaifera oblongifolia oleoresin against bacteria that cause caries and endodontic infections. The aim of this study is to determine the minimum (MIC) and the bactericidal (MBC) inhibitory concentrations as well as the biofilm inhibition ability (through determination of MBIC50) of the C. oblongifolia oleoresin. This study also investigated the bactericidal kinetics (time-kill curves) and the synergistic effect of the C. oblongifolia oleoresin. Additionally, this study evaluated the cytotoxic activity of the oleoresin toward V79 cells by means of the colony-forming assay. The C. oblongifolia oleoresin gave promising MIC and MBC values, which ranged from 25 to 200 μg/mL. Analysis of the MBIC50values of the oleoresin revealed it displayed biofilm inhibitory activity against all the assayed bacteria. Analysis of the bactericidal kinetics showed different behaviors of the oleoresin against the tested bacteria at the different time intervals and concentrations assayed in this study. An additive effect of the oleoresin with chlorhexidine dihydrochloride occurred only for S. mitis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The C. oblongifolia oleoresin showed cytotoxic activity at concentrations ≥ 625 μg/mL.

  9. Effects of 6-month daily supplementation with oral beta-carotene in combination or not with benzo[a]pyrene on cell-cycle markers in the lung of ferrets.

    PubMed

    Fuster, Antonia; Picó, Catalina; Sánchez, Juana; Oliver, Paula; Zingaretti, Maria Cristina; Murano, Incoronata; Morroni, Manrico; Hoeller, Ulrich; Goralczyk, Regina; Cinti, Saverio; Palou, Andreu

    2008-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that people who eat more fruits and vegetables (rich in carotenoids) and people who have higher serum beta-carotene (BC) levels have a lower risk of cancer, particularly lung cancer. However, the two main human intervention studies of BC supplementation (the ATBC and the CARET trials) revealed an increased risk of lung cancer among smokers and asbestos workers. Previous studies carried out in the ferret have reported that BC effects are related to dose. Here, we treated ferrets with two concentrations of oral BC (0.8 and 3.2 mg/kg body weight per day) for 6 months, using BC in a formulation also containing dl-alpha-tocopherol and ascorbyl palmitate. The effect of the smoke-derived carcinogenic agent benzo[a]pyrene (BP), with or without low-dose BC, was also analysed. We determined the protein levels and mRNA expression levels of activator protein 1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), c-Myc, cyclin D1, proliferating cellular nuclear antigen and retinoic acid receptor beta. We did not find higher levels of cell proliferation markers in the lung of ferrets treated with BC or signals of squamous metaplasia lesions either. On the other hand, although no evident signals of pulmonary carcinogenesis were observed in animals exposed to BP, BC supplementation in these animals may prevent against excess cell proliferation, since this reestablishes Jun protein and cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the lung of BP-exposed animals. In summary, these results show that the combination of BC with alpha-tocopherol and ascorbyl palmitate does not induce pro-oxidant effects in the lung of ferrets.

  10. Surrogate markers for cerebral blood flow correlate with [¹⁸F]-fallypride binding potential at dopamine D(2/3) receptors in human striatum.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Paul; Xiong, Guoming; la Fougère, Christian; Rominger, Axel; Bartenstein, Peter; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Piel, Markus; Rösch, Frank; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with the high affinity dopamine D(2/3) receptor ligand [¹⁸F]-fallypride affords estimates of the binding potential (BP(ND) ) in extra-striatal regions of low receptor abundance, but the sufficient recording time for accurate measurements in striatum has been called into question. We have earlier argued that transient equilibrium measurements are obtained in striatum with [¹⁸F]-fallypride PET recordings of 3 h duration, which may be the practical limit for clinical investigations without interrupted scanning. However, the high extraction fraction of [¹⁸F]-fallypride predicts flow-dependence of tracer delivery to brain, which may be a source of variance of the apparent BP(ND) in regions of high binding. To test this prediction, we conducted a retrospective analysis of [¹⁸F]-fallypride PET data from a group of 50 healthy volunteers (age 18-58 years [mean ± SD: 32.6 ± 10.6), who had participated in clinical studies without arterial input measurements. We used the initial 120-s integral (AUC) of the venous confluence (VC) as a surrogate marker for cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tested for correlations between regional estimates of BP(ND) calculated by the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) and the individual VC-AUC. The magnitude of BP(ND) in a high binding region (putamen), but not in a low binding region (thalamus) correlated positively with VC-AUC, suggesting that approximately 9% of the variance in the [¹⁸F]-fallypride BP(ND) in putamen can be attributed to individual differences in this surrogate marker for CBF, a contribution equal in magnitude to the effects of age on BP(ND) in putamen of the present healthy control group. PMID:23239525

  11. A Label-free Selected Reaction Monitoring Workflow Identifies a Subset of Pregnancy Specific Glycoproteins as Potential Predictive Markers of Early-onset Pre-eclampsia*

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Richard T.; Fisher, Christal; Westwood, Melissa; North, Robyn; Baker, Philip N.; Walker, Michael J.; Williamson, Andrew; Whetton, Anthony D.; Lin, Wanchang; McCowan, Lesley; Roberts, Claire T.; Cooper, Garth J. S.; Unwin, Richard D.; Myers, Jenny E.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious complication of pregnancy with potentially life threatening consequences for both mother and baby. Presently there is no test with the required performance to predict which healthy first-time mothers will go on to develop PE. The high specificity, sensitivity, and multiplexed nature of selected reaction monitoring holds great potential as a tool for the verification and validation of putative candidate biomarkersfor disease states. Realization of this potential involves establishing a high throughput, cost effective, reproducible sample preparation workflow. We have developed a semi-automated HPLC-based sample preparation workflow before a label-free selected reaction monitoring approach. This workflow has been applied to the search for novel predictive biomarkers for PE. To discover novel candidate biomarkers for PE, we used isobaric tagging to identify several potential biomarker proteins in plasma obtained at 15 weeks gestation from nulliparous women who later developed PE compared with pregnant women who remained healthy. Such a study generates a number of “candidate” biomarkers that require further testing in larger patient cohorts. As proof-of-principle, two of these proteins were taken forward for verification in a 100 women (58 PE, 42 controls) using label-free SRM. We obtained reproducible protein quantitation across the 100 samples and demonstrated significant changes in protein levels, even with as little as 20% change in protein concentration. The SRM data correlated with a commercial ELISA, suggesting that this is a robust workflow suitable for rapid, affordable, label-free verification of which candidate biomarkers should be taken forward for thorough investigation. A subset of pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) had value as novel predictive markers for PE. PMID:23897580

  12. Dental status, dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and oncological data as potential risk factors for infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw after radiotherapy for oral neoplasms: a retrospective evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retrospective evaluation of the dental status of patients with oral cancer before radiotherapy, the extent of dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and radiotherapy data as potential risk factors for development of infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw. Methods A total of 90 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for oral cancer were included into this retrospective evaluation. None of them had distant metastases. After tumour surgery the patients were referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for dental examination and the necessary dental rehabilitation procedures inclusive potential tooth extraction combined with primary soft tissue closure. Adjuvant radiotherapy was started after complete healing of the gingiva (> 7 days after potential extraction). The majority of patients (n = 74) was treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses ranging from 50-70Gy whereas further 16 patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy up to 72Gy. The records of the clinical data were reviewed. Furthermore, questionnaires were mailed to the patients’ general practitioners and dentists in order to get more data concerning tumour status and osteoradionecrosis during follow-up. Results The patients’ dental status before radiotherapy was generally poor. On average 10 teeth were present, six of them were regarded to remain conservable. Extensive dental rehabilitation procedures included a mean of 3.7 tooth extractions. Chronic periodontitis with severe attachment loss was found in 40%, dental biofilm in 56%. An infected osteoradionecrosis (IORN) grade II according to (Schwartz et al., Am J Clin Oncol 25:168-171, 2002) was diagnosed in 11 of the 90 patients (12%), mostly within the first 4 years after radiotherapy. We could not find significant prognostic factors for the occurrence of IORN, but a trendwise correlation with impaired dental status, rehabilitation procedures, fraction size and tumour outcome. Conclusion The

  13. Collagen-graft mixed cellulose esters membrane maintains undifferentiated morphology and markers of potential pluripotency in feeder-free culture of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lotfalah Moradi, Sadegh; Hajishafieeha, Zahra; Nojedehi, Shahrzad; Dinarvand, Vida; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Roy, Ram V; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are unique and unlimited clinical sources of stem cell therapy for the regenerative medicine. Feeder layer preparation is an important step for iPSCs production, which is expensive, time-consuming and requires conversance. In the present study, we investigated the maintenance of pluripotency, and stemness of the iPSCs through feeder-free culture on a collagen-grafted Mixed Cellulose Esters membrane (MCE-COL) after three passages during twelve days. Results have demonstrated that the iPSCs cultured on MCE-COL membrane had a fine, typical undifferentiated morphology, increased proliferation rate and significant multi-lineage differentiation potential. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and pluripotency associated gene markers expression further confirmed that iPSCs cultured on the surface of MCE-COL had more ALP positive colonies and enhanced expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and ALP in comparison with MCE and control groups. Since MCE-COL membrane has three dimensional structure and bioactivity, it has the potential for usage in the feeder-free culture of iPSCs, and could be a suitable candidate to use as a feeder layer in stem cells preparation. PMID:27449919

  14. Astemizole-based anticancer therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and Eag1 channels as potential early-stage markers of HCC.

    PubMed

    de Guadalupe Chávez-López, María; Pérez-Carreón, Julio Isael; Zuñiga-García, Violeta; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis A; Caro-Sánchez, Claudia Haydee; Acuña-Macías, Isabel; Gariglio, Patricio; Hernández-Gallegos, Elizabeth; Chiliquinga, Andrea Jazmín; Camacho, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has very poor prognosis. Astemizole has gained great interest as a potential anticancer drug because it targets several proteins involved in cancer including the Eag1 (ether à-go-go-1) potassium channel that is overexpressed in human HCC. Eag1 channels are regulated by cancer etiological factors and have been proposed as early tumor markers. Here, we found that HepG2 and HuH-7 HCC cells displayed Eag1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression, determined by real-time RT-PCR and immunochemistry, respectively. Astemizole inhibited human HCC cell proliferation (assessed by metabolic activity assay) and induced apoptosis (studied with flow cytometry) in both cell lines. The subcellular Eag1 protein localization was modified by astemizole in the HepG2 cells. The treatment with astemizole prevented diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced rat HCC development in vivo (followed by studying γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activity). The Eag1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in most DEN-treated groups but decreased after astemizole treatment. GGT activity was decreased by astemizole. The Eag1 protein was detected in cirrhotic and dysplastic rat livers. Astemizole might have clinical utility for HCC prevention and treatment, and Eag1 channels may be potential early HCC biomarkers. These data provide significant basis to include astemizole in HCC clinical trials. PMID:25783527

  15. A novel vector for lactic acid bacteria that uses a bile salt hydrolase gene as a potential food-grade selection marker.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sheng; Zhai, Zhengyuan; Wang, Guohong; An, Haoran; Luo, Yunbo; Hao, Yanling

    2011-03-10

    A novel vector pM4aB for lactic acid bacterial was developed using a bile salt hydrolase gene from Lactobacillus plantarum as a potential food-grade selection marker. The 3.0-kb pM4aB consisted of the replicon of Lactobacillus plasmid pM4, a multiple cloning site and the bsh gene, which was constructed by elimination of a 5.5-kb non-food-grade DNA fragment from an 8.5-kb intermediate vector pBEmpM4aB. For electroporation into Lactobacillus paracasei X9, a high transformation efficiency of 4.0±1.0×10(4) CFU/μg plasmid DNA was yielded with 0.1% (wt/vol) glycodeoxycholic acid sodium selection. A high segregation stability of the vector was also observed as only 0.1% plasmid was lost after 50 generations of growth without selection pressure. The application potential of pM4aB was further confirmed by expression of a catalase gene from Lactobacillus sakei in L. paracasei. These results revealed that the novel vector pM4aB constructed in this study would be a useful tool for genetic modification of the industrially important LAB.

  16. Dual inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase by the orally active inhibitor mixanpril: a potential therapeutic approach in hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Gonzalez, W; Turcaud, S; Pham, I; Roques, B P; Michel, J B

    1994-01-01

    In the treatment of cardiovascular disease, it could be of therapeutic interest to associate the hypotensive effects due to the inhibition of angiotensin II formation with the diuretic and natriuretic responses induced by the protection of the endogenous atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Investigation of this hypothesis requires an orally active compound able to simultaneously inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP), which is involved in renal ANP metabolism. Such compounds have been rationally designed by taking into account the structural characteristics of the active site of both peptidases. Among them, RB 105, N-[(2S,3R)-2-mercaptomethyl-1-oxo-3-phenylbutyl]-(S)-alanine, inhibited NEP and ACE with Ki values of 1.7 +/- 0.3 nM and 4.2 +/- 0.5 nM, respectively. Intravenous infusion of RB 105 in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats prevented the pressor response to exogenous angiotensin I and potentiated the natriuretic response to ANP. Infusion of RB 105, at 2.5, 5, 10, 25, and 50 mg/kg per hr decreased blood pressure dose-dependently in conscious catheterized spontaneously hypertensive rats and increased diuresis and natriuresis. Infusion of RB 105 as a bolus of 25 mg/kg followed by 25 mg/kg per hr similarly decreased blood pressure and increased natriuresis in three different models of hypertension (renovascular, deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt, and spontaneously hypertensive rats). Mixanpril, a lipophilic prodrug of RB 105 (ED50 values when given orally to mice, 0.7 mg/kg for NEP; 7 mg/kg for ACE), elicited dose-dependent hypotensive effects of long duration in spontaneously hypertensive rats after oral administration [-37 mmHg for 50 mg/kg twice a day (1 mmHg = 133 Pa) and is therefore the first dual NEP/ACE inhibitor potentially useful for clinical investigations. Images PMID:8171037

  17. Markers of vulnerability in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Prelipceanu, D

    2009-01-01

    Vulnerability in schizophrenia is an integrative concept, which tries to explain the development of schizophrenia as an interaction between different individual susceptibility factors and environmental risk factors. Vulnerability markers used in genetic studies include biochemical indicators, neuroanatomical, neurophysiologic, and cognitive abnormalities. Among those, the most extensive studied markers were: evoked potentials, smooth pursuit eye movements, and attentional deficits. Some of the potential indicators presented in this paper satisfy most of the criteria necessary for a vulnerability marker, but none meets all of them. Nevertheless, they represent important markers of risk to schizophrenia. Key words: vulnerability, evoked potentials, eye movements, attentional deficits PMID:20108534

  18. Healing Potentials of Oral Moringa Oleifera Leaves Extract and Tetracycline on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infected Wounds of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Eyarefe, Oghenemega D; Idowu, Aderayo; Afolabi, Jeremiah M

    2015-01-01

    The effects of oral dose of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera and tetracycline antibiotics on cutaneous wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus were studied in eighteen adult wistar rats (159±31.5g) randomized into three groups: Group A, n = 6, Moringa oleifera-(300 mg/kg). Group B, n = 6, tetracycline (9.4 mg/kg) and Group C, n = 6, Sterile water (control). Six millimetres diameter nape wound, created on each rat under 2% xylazine (5 mg/kg) and 5% ketamine (35 mg/kg), was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (108 Colony Forming Unit (CFU). Following infection, treatment was commenced with daily oral dose of test preparations and the wounds were evaluated every other day i.e., day 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 for wetness (wound exudation), wound edge oedema, hyperaemia, granulation tissues and contraction (diameter). Severe wound exudation existed in all the groups between days 0-3 (p = 1.00). A significantly less wound exudation was observed at days 3-5 (p = 0.000) and 5-9 (p = 0.003) (Control< Tetracycline Moringa> Tetracycline). Differences in wound diameter was not significant except at days 5-9 (p = 0.013) (Control> Moringa >Tetracycline). Oral doses of Moringa oleifera extract (300mg/kg) and tetracycline (9.4mg/kg) are not effective as antimicrobial or immune-boosting agents to enhance healing of wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus and hence not recommended for rapid clearance of Staphylococcus aureus infected wounds.

  19. Comparison of oral treatment of uncomplicated urogenital and rectal gonorrhoea with cefuroxime axetil ester or clavulanic acid potentiated amoxycillin (Augmentin).

    PubMed Central

    Schift, R; van Ulsen, J; Ansink-Schipper, M C; van Joost, T; Michel, M F; Woudstra, R K; Stolz, E

    1986-01-01

    In a randomised study of two drugs for the oral treatment of uncomplicated urogenital and rectal gonorrhoea the therapeutic effect of cefuroxime axetil ester (CAE) and amoxycillin plus clavulanic acid (A + C) was compared. Cefuroxime axetil ester 1.5 g was given to 129 men and 118 women. Amoxycillin 3.0 g and clavulanic acid 0.25 g was given to 131 men and 122 women. Both treatments were combined with probenecid 1.0 g and administered in a single oral dose. Of the 500 patients thus treated, 376 were assessable. In the group taking CAE, failure rates were 0.9% for the men and 0% for the women; and the overall failure rate was 0.5%. In the group taking A + C the equivalent failure rates were 4.6%, 1.2%, and 3.1%. The differences were not significant. Penicillinase producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) was isolated from 5.6% of the assessable patients. All 10 PPNG infections in the group taking CAE and four of 11 PPNG infections in the group taking A + C were cured. These numbers were too small to draw a definite conclusion about the efficacy of both drugs in this type of infection. Postgonococcal urethritis was observed in 35% of the men in the group taking CAE and in 32% of those in the group taking A + C. Side effects were noted in 38% of the group taking CAE and 28% of the group taking A + C. Nausea and vomiting were more commonly observed in the group taking CAE; and diarrhoea was more commonly observed in the group taking A + C. PMID:3533755

  20. Grave Markers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMuro, Ted

    1985-01-01

    Junior high school students studied the cultural uses, symbolic meanings, and general physical forms of tombs and tombstones and then used basic slab building techniques to construct large clay grave markers. (RM)

  1. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  2. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  3. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  4. Some newer marker phytoconstituents in methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaves and evaluation of its immunomodulatory and splenocytes proliferation potential in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jayanthi, M.; Garg, Satish K.; Yadav, Prashant; Bhatia, A. K.; Goel, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was undertaken to unravel the newer marker phytoconstituents in methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaves (MOLE) and evaluation of its immunomodulatory and splenocytes proliferation potential in rats. Materials and Methods: Hot methanolic extract of MOLE was subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Immunomodulatory potential was studied in four groups of rats following administration of MOLE at 62.5 and 125 mg/kg for 21 days, followed by immunization with Salmonella typhimurium “O” antigen and antibody titer determined using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Total lymphocytes and T- and B-lymphocytes count were determined in control and after MOLE administration (62.5 and 125 mg/kg) to rats for 42 days. Splenocytes (2 × 106 spleen cells/ml) from MOLE treated rats were harvested and stimulated using concanavalin A and optical density (OD) and stimulation index were determined. Splenocytes from healthy control rats were also collected and treated in vitro with different concentrations of MOLE (5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 µg/ml) and concanavalin A to determine effect of MOLE on OD and stimulation index. Results: GC-MS analysis revealed presence of 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid ethyl ester, 6-octadecenoic acid, cis-vaccenic acid and 2-octyl-cyclopropaneoctanal in MOLE. MOLE at 125 mg/kg increased the antibody titer by 50%. Although there was slight decline in lymphocytes count (total, B- and T-lymphocytes) in MOLE treated rats, percentage of T-lymphocytes was increased nonsignificantly. Ex vivo and in vitro studies revealed marked increase in OD and stimulation index indicating MOLE-induced splenocytes proliferation. Conclusion: GC-MS study revealed four new compounds in MOLE apart from promising its immunomodulatory potential based on humoral immune response, percentage increase in T-lymphocytes count, and induction of splenocytes proliferation. PMID:26600641

  5. Genome-Wide Computational Analysis of Musa Microsatellites: Classification, Cross-Taxon Transferability, Functional Annotation, Association with Transposons & miRNAs, and Genetic Marker Potential

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Liu, Yuxuan; Li, Chunyu; Sheng, Ou; Mayer, Christoph; Yi, Ganjun

    2015-01-01

    The development of organized, informative, robust, user-friendly, and freely accessible molecular markers is imperative to the Musa marker assisted breeding program. Although several hundred SSR markers have already been developed, the number of informative, robust, and freely accessible Musa markers remains inadequate for some breeding applications. In view of this issue, we surveyed SSRs in four different data sets, developed large-scale non-redundant highly informative therapeutic SSR markers, and classified them according to their attributes, as well as analyzed their cross-taxon transferability and utility for the genetic study of Musa and its relatives. A high SSR frequency (177 per Mbp) was found in the Musa genome. AT-rich dinucleotide repeats are predominant, and trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant in transcribed regions. A significant number of Musa SSRs are associated with pre-miRNAs, and 83% of these SSRs are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic SSR markers. Overall, 74% of the SSR markers were polymorphic, and 94% were transferable to at least one Musa spp. Two hundred forty-three markers generated a total of 1047 alleles, with 2-8 alleles each and an average of 4.38 alleles per locus. The PIC values ranged from 0.31 to 0.89 and averaged 0.71. We report the largest set of non-redundant, polymorphic, new SSR markers to be developed in Musa. These additional markers could be a valuable resource for marker-assisted breeding, genetic diversity and genomic studies of Musa and related species. PMID:26121637

  6. Genome-Wide Computational Analysis of Musa Microsatellites: Classification, Cross-Taxon Transferability, Functional Annotation, Association with Transposons & miRNAs, and Genetic Marker Potential.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Liu, Yuxuan; Li, Chunyu; Sheng, Ou; Mayer, Christoph; Yi, Ganjun

    2015-01-01

    The development of organized, informative, robust, user-friendly, and freely accessible molecular markers is imperative to the Musa marker assisted breeding program. Although several hundred SSR markers have already been developed, the number of informative, robust, and freely accessible Musa markers remains inadequate for some breeding applications. In view of this issue, we surveyed SSRs in four different data sets, developed large-scale non-redundant highly informative therapeutic SSR markers, and classified them according to their attributes, as well as analyzed their cross-taxon transferability and utility for the genetic study of Musa and its relatives. A high SSR frequency (177 per Mbp) was found in the Musa genome. AT-rich dinucleotide repeats are predominant, and trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant in transcribed regions. A significant number of Musa SSRs are associated with pre-miRNAs, and 83% of these SSRs are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic SSR markers. Overall, 74% of the SSR markers were polymorphic, and 94% were transferable to at least one Musa spp. Two hundred forty-three markers generated a total of 1047 alleles, with 2-8 alleles each and an average of 4.38 alleles per locus. The PIC values ranged from 0.31 to 0.89 and averaged 0.71. We report the largest set of non-redundant, polymorphic, new SSR markers to be developed in Musa. These additional markers could be a valuable resource for marker-assisted breeding, genetic diversity and genomic studies of Musa and related species.

  7. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation is a potential biomarker for the prediction of response to oral fluoropyrimidines in microsatellite stable and CpG island methylator phenotype-negative colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kazuyuki; Matsunoki, Aika; Kaneko, Mami; Saito, Kenichiro; Watanabe, Go; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the clinical value of methylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) for the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and for the survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidines. LINE-1 methylation in tumor DNA was measured by quantitative methylation-specific PCR in 155 samples of stage II and stage III CRC. The presence of microsatellite instability and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) were assessed and 131 microsatellite stable/CIMP- cases were selected for survival analysis, of which 77 patients had received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidines. The CRC cell lines were used to investigate possible mechanistic links between LINE-1 methylation and effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). High LINE-1 methylation was a marker for better prognosis in patients treated by surgery alone. Patients with low LINE-1 methylation who were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy survived longer than those treated by surgery alone, suggestive of a survival benefit from the use of oral fluoropyrimidines. In contrast, a survival benefit from chemotherapy was not observed for patients with high LINE-1 methylation. The CRC cell lines treated with 5-FU showed increased expression of LINE-1 mRNA. This was associated with upregulation of the phospho-histone H2A.X in cells with low LINE-1 methylation, but not in cells with high LINE-1 methylation. The 5-FU-mediated induction of phospho-histone H2A.X, a marker of DNA damage, was inhibited by knockdown of LINE-1. These results suggest that LINE-1 methylation is a novel predictive marker for survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidines in CRC patients. This finding could be important for achieving personalized chemotherapy.

  8. Marker imputation in barley association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping requires higher marker density than linkage mapping, potentially leading to more missing marker data and to higher genotyping costs. In human genetics, methods exist to impute missing marker data and whole markers that were typed in a reference panel but not in the experimental d...

  9. Regulation of the potential marker for intestinal cells, Bmi1, by β-catenin and the zinc finger protein KLF4: implications for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianxin; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wen; Colon, Deannon; Shi, Jiandang; Napier, Dana; Rychahou, Piotr; Lu, Wange; Lee, Eun Y; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark; Liu, Chunming

    2012-02-01

    B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (Bmi1) is a Polycomb Group (PcG) protein important in gene silencing. It is a component of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), which is required to maintain the transcriptionally repressive state of many genes. Bmi1 was initially identified as an oncogene that regulates cell proliferation and transformation, and is important in hematopoiesis and the development of nervous systems. Recently, it was reported that Bmi1 is a potential marker for intestinal stem cells. Because Wnt signaling plays a key role in intestinal stem cells