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Sample records for potential pet ligand

  1. Radiosynthesis of [18F]ATPFU: a potential PET ligand for mTOR.

    PubMed

    Majo, Vattoly J; Simpson, Norman R; Prabhakaran, Jaya; Mann, J John; Kumar, J S Dileep

    2014-11-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a pivotal role in many aspects of cellular proliferation, and recent evidence suggests that an altered mTOR signaling pathway plays a central role in the pathogenesis of aging, tumor progression, neuropsychiatric, and major depressive disorder. Availability of a mTOR-specific PET tracer will facilitate monitoring early response to treatment with mTOR inhibitors that are under clinical development. Towards this we have developed the radiosynthesis of [(18)F]1-(4-(4-(8-oxa-3-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-3-yl)-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-6-yl)phenyl)-3-(2-fluoroethyl)urea [(18)F]ATPFU ([(18)F]1) as an mTOR PET ligand. Synthesis of reference 1 and the precursor for radiolabeling, 4-(4-8-oxa-3-azabicyclo[3.2.1]-octan-3yl)-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-6yl)aniline (10), were achieved from beta-chloroaldehyde 3 in 4 and 5 steps, respectively, with an overall yield of 25-28%. [(18)F]Fluoroethylamine was prepared by heating N-[2-(toluene-4-sulfonyloxy)ethyl]phthalimide with [(18)F]fluoride ion in acetonitrile. [(18)F]1 was obtained by slow distillation under argon of [(18) F]FCH2CH2NH2 into amine 10 that was pre-treated with triphosgene at 0-5 °C. The total time required for the two-step radiosynthesis including semi-preparative HPLC purification was 90 min, and the overall radiochemical yield of [(18)F]1 for the process was 15 ± 5% based on [(18)F]fluoride ion (decay corrected). At the end of synthesis (EOS), the specific activity was 37-74 GBq/µmol (N = 6). PMID:25359578

  2. Bis(methylpyridine)-EDTA derivative as a potential ligand for PET imaging: synthesis, complexation, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pooja; Aggarwal, Swati; Tiwari, Anjani K; Kumar, Vikas; Pratap, Ramendra; Chuttani, Krishna; Mishra, Anil K

    2014-12-01

    A novel transitional metal ligand derivatized from EDTA-conjugated 2-amino-4-methyl pyridine, an acyclic vehicle (EDTA-Mepy2 ) was designed, synthesized, and characterized for PET imaging with ⁶⁸Ga. The drug likeliness and appropriate lipophilicity were first analyzed by molecular docking studies which shows interactive property of ligand with serum albumin protein (HSA: PDB 1E78), at Lys199, Arg257, and His242 residues, which make it more appropriate in transportation as a specific ligand for PET imaging. As a confirmation, binding constant of the ligand with human serum albumin was calculated at λex = 350 nm which was found to be 4.9 × 10³ m⁻¹. The pharmacokinetics of (68) Ga-EDTA-Mepy2 was analyzed by blood kinetics (t(1/2) slow: 3 h 56 min and t(1/2) fast: 32 min) and biodistribution (maximum % ID/g was found in kidney at 1 h). Further the capability of this ligand was analyzed as optical marker also, by recording λex = 380 nm, RFU = 8000; 710 nm, RFU = 1000 units at fixed λem = 280 nm. Additionally, in physiological conditions where its stability was calculated, suggests 15-20 times selectivity over the endogenously present metal ions (KG aL /KZ nL = 14.3, KG aL /KC uL = 18.1).

  3. Development of indazolylpyrimidine derivatives as high-affine EphB4 receptor ligands and potential PET radiotracers.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Kristin; Wiemer, Jens; Caballero, Julio; Köckerling, Martin; Steinbach, Jörg; Pietzsch, Jens; Mamat, Constantin

    2015-09-01

    Due to their essential role in the pathogenesis of cancer, members of the Eph (erythropoietin-producing hepatoma cell line-A2) receptor tyrosine kinase family represent promising candidates for molecular imaging. Thus, the development and preparation of novel radiotracers for the noninvasive imaging of the EphB4 receptor via positron emission tomography (PET) is described. First in silico investigations with the indazolylpyrimidine lead compound which is known to be highly affine to EphB4 were executed to identify favorable labeling positions for an introduction of fluorine-18 to retain the affinity. Based on this, reference compounds as well as precursors were developed and labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18, respectively. For this purpose, a protecting group strategy essentially had to be generated to prevent unwanted methylation and to enable the introduction of fluorine-18. Further, a convenient radiolabeling strategy using [(11)C]methyl iodide was established which afforded the isotopically labeled radiotracer in 30-35% RCY (d.c.) which is identical with the original inhibitor molecule. A spiro ammonium precursor was prepared for radiolabeling with fluorine-18. Unfortunately, the labeling did not lead to the desired (18)F-radiotracer under the chosen conditions. PMID:26189032

  4. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of [18F]FECIMBI-36: A potential agonist PET ligand for 5-HT2A/2C receptors

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Jaya; Underwood, Mark D.; Dileep Kumar, J. S.; Simpson, Norman R.; Kassir, Suham A.; Bakalian, Mihran J.; Mann, J. John; Arango, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Radiosynthesis and in vitro evaluation of [18F]-2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzyl)ethanamine, ([18F]FECIMBI-36) or ([18F]1), a potential agonist PET imaging agent for 5-HT2A/2C receptors is described. Syntheses of reference standard 1 and the corresponding des-fluoroethyl radiolabeling precursor (2) were achieved with 75% and 65% yields, respectively. In vitro pharmacology assay of FECIMBI-36 by [3H]-ketanserin competition binding assay obtained from NIMH-PDSP showed high affinities to 5-HT2AR (Ki = 1 nM) and 5-HT2CR (Ki = 1.7 nM). Radiolabeling of FECIMBI-36 was achieved from the boc-protected precursor 2 using [18F]-fluoroethyltosylate in presence of Cs2CO3 in DMSO followed by removal of the protective group. [18F]1 was isolated using RP-HPLC in 25 ± 5% yield, purity ≥95% and specific activity 1–2 Ci/μmol (N = 6). In vitro autoradiography studies demonstrate that [18F]1 selectively label 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in slide-mounted sections of postmortem human brain using phosphor imaging. Our results indicate the potential of [18F]1 for imaging 5-HT2A/2C receptors in the high affinity state in vivo using PET imaging. PMID:26253634

  5. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of [18F]FECIMBI-36: A potential agonist PET ligand for 5-HT2A/2C receptors.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Jaya; Underwood, Mark D; Kumar, J S Dileep; Simpson, Norman R; Kassir, Suham A; Bakalian, Mihran J; Mann, J John; Arango, Victoria

    2015-09-15

    Radiosynthesis and in vitro evaluation of [(18)F]-2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzyl)ethanamine, ([(18)F]FECIMBI-36) or ([(18)F]1), a potential agonist PET imaging agent for 5-HT2A/2C receptors is described. Syntheses of reference standard 1 and the corresponding des-fluoroethyl radiolabeling precursor (2) were achieved with 75% and 65% yields, respectively. In vitro pharmacology assay of FECIMBI-36 by [(3)H]-ketanserin competition binding assay obtained from NIMH-PDSP showed high affinities to 5-HT2AR (Ki = 1nM) and 5-HT2CR (Ki=1.7 nM). Radiolabeling of FECIMBI-36 was achieved from the boc-protected precursor 2 using [(18)F]-fluoroethyltosylate in presence of Cs2CO3 in DMSO followed by removal of the protective group. [(18)F]1 was isolated using RP-HPLC in 25 ± 5% yield, purity > 95% and specific activity 1-2Ci/μmol (N = 6). In vitro autoradiography studies demonstrate that [(18)F]1 selectively label 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in slide-mounted sections of postmortem human brain using phosphor imaging. Our results indicate the potential of [(18)F]1 for imaging 5-HT2A/2C receptors in the high affinity state in vivo using PET imaging.

  6. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  7. Preclinical TSPO Ligand PET to Visualize Human Glioma Xenotransplants: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Buck, Jason R; McKinley, Eliot T; Fu, Allie; Abel, Ty W; Thompson, Reid C; Chambless, Lola; Watchmaker, Jennifer M; Harty, James P; Cooper, Michael K; Manning, H Charles

    2015-01-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) imaging biomarkers for detection of infiltrating gliomas are limited. Translocator protein (TSPO) is a novel and promising biomarker for glioma PET imaging. To validate TSPO as a potential target for molecular imaging of glioma, TSPO expression was assayed in a tumor microarray containing 37 high-grade (III, IV) gliomas. TSPO staining was detected in all tumor specimens. Subsequently, PET imaging was performed with an aryloxyanilide-based TSPO ligand, [18F]PBR06, in primary orthotopic xenograft models of WHO grade III and IV gliomas. Selective uptake of [18F]PBR06 in engrafted tumor was measured. Furthermore, PET imaging with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated infiltrative glioma growth that was undetectable by traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Preliminary PET with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated a preferential tumor-to-normal background ratio in comparison to 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG). These results suggest that TSPO PET imaging with such high-affinity radiotracers may represent a novel strategy to characterize distinct molecular features of glioma growth, as well as better define the extent of glioma infiltration for therapeutic purposes.

  8. (18)F-FECNT: validation as PET dopamine transporter ligand in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Masilamoni, Gunasingh; Votaw, John; Howell, Leonard; Villalba, Rosa M; Goodman, Mark; Voll, Ronald J; Stehouwer, Jeffrey; Wichmann, Thomas; Smith, Yoland

    2010-12-01

    The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(2-[18F]-fluoroethyl)-nortropane ((18)F-FECNT) is a highly specific ligand for dopamine transporter (DAT) that yields higher peak striatum-to-cerebellum ratios and offers more favorable kinetics than most (18)F-radiolabeled DAT ligands currently available. The goal of this study is to validate the use of (18)F-FECNT as a PET radiotracer to assess the degree of striatal dopamine terminals denervation and midbrain dopaminergic cell loss in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. Three rhesus monkeys received weekly injections of MPTP (0.2-0.5 mg/kg) for 21 weeks, which resulted in the progressive development of a moderate level of parkinsonism. We carried out (18)F-FECNT PET at baseline (twice; 10 weeks apart) and at week 21 post-MPTP injections. Postmortem stereological cell counts of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral midbrain, and intensity measurements of DAT and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity in the striatum were performed and correlated with striatal and ventral midbrain PET data. Three additional monkeys were used as controls for midbrain dopaminergic cell counts, and striatal DAT or TH immunoreactivity measurements. The correlation and coefficient of variance between (18)F-FECNT test-retest specific uptake ratios were 0.99 (R²) and 2.65%, respectively. The (18)F-FECNT binding potential of the ventral midbrain and striatal regions was tightly correlated with postmortem stereological cell counts of nigral dopaminergic neurons (R²=0.91), and striatal DAT (R²=0.83) or TH (R²=0.88) immunoreactivity intensity measurements. These findings demonstrate that (18)F-FECNT is a highly sensitive PET imaging ligand to quantify both striatal dopamine denervation and midbrain dopaminergic cell loss associated with parkinsonism.

  9. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of a novel σ1 selective PET ligand

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongjun; Fan, Jinda; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Junfeng; Flores, Hubert P.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Parsons, Stanley M.; Tu, Zhude

    2014-01-01

    The σ1 receptor is an important target for CNS disorders. We previously identified a σ1 ligand TZ3108 having highly potent (Ki-σ1 = 0.48 nM) and selective affinity for σ1 versus σ2 receptors. TZ3108 was 18F-labeled with F-18 for in vivo evaluation. Biodistribution and blocking studies of [18F]TZ3108 in male Sprague-Dawley rats demonstrated high brain uptake, which was σ1-specific with no in vivo defluorination. MicroPET studies in cynomolgus macaques showed high brain penetration of [18F]TZ3108; the regional brain distribution was consistent with that of the σ1 receptor. Pseudo-equilibrium in the brain was reached ~ 45 min post-injection. Metabolite analysis of [18F]TZ3108 in NHP blood and rodent blood and brain revealed that ~ 70% parent remained in the plasma of NHPs 60 min post-injection and the major radiometabolite did not cross the blood-brain barrier in rats. In summary, the potent, selective and metabolically stable σ1 specific radioligand [18F]TZ3108 represents a potentially useful PET radioligand for quantifying the σ1 receptor in the brain. PMID:25584182

  10. Characteristics of Tau and Its Ligands in PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-01-06

    Tau deposition is one of the neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer's disease as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies. Recent efforts to develop selective tau radiopharmaceuticals have allowed the visualization of tau deposits in vivo. In vivo tau imaging allows the assessment of the regional distribution of tau deposits in a single human subject over time for determining the pathophysiology of tau accumulation in aging and neurodegenerative conditions as well as for application in drug discovery of anti-dementia drugs as surrogate markers. However, tau deposits show complicated characteristics because of different isoform composition, histopathology, and ultrastructure in various neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, since tau radiopharmaceuticals possess different chemotype classes, they may show different binding characteristics with heterogeneous tau deposits. In this review, we describe the characteristics of tau deposits and their ligands that have β-sheet binding properties, and the status of tau imaging in clinical studies.

  11. Characteristics of Tau and Its Ligands in PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Tau deposition is one of the neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer’s disease as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies. Recent efforts to develop selective tau radiopharmaceuticals have allowed the visualization of tau deposits in vivo. In vivo tau imaging allows the assessment of the regional distribution of tau deposits in a single human subject over time for determining the pathophysiology of tau accumulation in aging and neurodegenerative conditions as well as for application in drug discovery of anti-dementia drugs as surrogate markers. However, tau deposits show complicated characteristics because of different isoform composition, histopathology, and ultrastructure in various neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, since tau radiopharmaceuticals possess different chemotype classes, they may show different binding characteristics with heterogeneous tau deposits. In this review, we describe the characteristics of tau deposits and their ligands that have β-sheet binding properties, and the status of tau imaging in clinical studies. PMID:26751494

  12. [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe - an attractive ligand for evaluation of muscarinic-cholinergic neuron activity by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Beets, A.L.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The stereoisomers of 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-{alpha}-(1-fluoropentan-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate ({open_quotes}FQNPe{close_quotes}) have been resolved. (-,-)- receptors (K{sub i}, nM; ml, 0.3; m2, 0.1). [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe demonstrated high cerebral and myocardial uptake in rats in vivo. We now report significant blocking of [F-18]-(-.-)-FQNPe uptake in receptor-rich tissues in rats in vivo after (R)-QNB pretreatment and the absence of any TLC detectable FQNPe metabolites in tissue extracts. Rats were injected with (R)-QNB (3 mg/kg) 1 h prior to [F-18]-FQNPe injection (370-629 KBq). After 1 h, rats were sacrificed and tissues removed and counted. (R)-QNB significantly decreased FQNPe uptake in heart and all receptor-rich regions but not blood (Table; Mean % ID/g, n=5); C, control; Q, (R)-QNB; Hrt, heart; Cer, cerebellum; Pon, pons; Med, medulla; Cor, cortex; Stri, striatum; Hip, hippocampus; Th, thallamus; SuC, superior colliculi; InC, inferior colliculi. Tissues from untreated rats were Folch-extracted and 71-77% of activity was in organic extracts from brain and heart. TLC of organic extracts indicated a single radioactive component with R{sub f} of FQNPe. These combined results demonstrate that [F-18]-(-,-)-FQNPe does not appear to be metabolized in heart and brain, shows good receptor localization and is thus an attractive ligand for evaluation as a potential imaging agent by PET.

  13. Structure and stability of hexadentate complexes of ligands based on AAZTA for efficient PET labelling with gallium-68.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Bradley P; Parker, David; Burchardt, Carsten; Yufit, Dmitry S; Zimny, Melanie; Roesch, Frank

    2013-01-21

    Pre-organised tricarboxylate ligands based on 6-amino-perhydro-1,4-diazepine bind (68)Ga rapidly and selectively in acetate buffer at pH 4 to 7, forming kinetically stable complexes suitable for use in PET imaging. PMID:23212712

  14. Improved PET Imaging of uPAR Expression Using new 64Cu-labeled Cross-Bridged Peptide Ligands: Comparative in vitro and in vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Morten; Hosseini, Masood; Madsen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Jensen, Knud J; Kjaer, Andreas; Ploug, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The correlation between uPAR expression, cancer cell invasion and metastases is now well-established and has prompted the development of a number of uPAR PET imaging agents, which could potentially identify cancer patients with invasive and metastatic lesions. In the present study, we synthesized and characterized two new cross-bridged 64Cu-labeled peptide conjugates for PET imaging of uPAR and performed a head-to-head comparison with the corresponding and more conventionally used DOTA conjugate. Based on in-source laser-induced reduction of chelated Cu(II) to Cu(I), we now demonstrate the following ranking with respect to the chemical inertness of their complexed Cu ions: DOTA-AE105 << CB-TE2A-AE105 < CB-TE2A-PA-AE105, which is correlated to their corresponding demetallation rate. No penalty in the uPAR receptor binding affinity of the targeting peptide was encountered by conjugation to either of the macrobicyclic chelators (IC50 ~ 5-10 nM) and high yields and radiochemical purities (>95%) were achieved in all cases by incubation at 95ºC. In vivo, they display identical tumor uptake after 1h, but differ significantly after 22 hrs, where the DOTA-AE105 uptake remains surprisingly high. Importantly, the more stable of the new uPAR PET tracers, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105, exhibits a significantly reduced liver uptake compared to 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 as well as 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AE105, (p<0.0001), emphasizing that our new in vitro stability measurements by mass spectrometry predicts in vivo stability in mice. Specificity of the best performing ligand, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105 was finally confirmed in vivo using a non-binding 64Cu-labeled peptide as control (64Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105mut). This control PET-tracer revealed significantly reduced tumor uptake (p<0.0001), but identical hepatic uptake compared to its active counterpart (64Cu-CB-TE2A-PA-AE105) after 1h. In conclusion, our new approach using in-source laser-induced reduction of Cu(II)-chelated PET-ligands provides useful

  15. Synthesis, Structure-affinity Relationships and Radiolabeling of Selective High-affinity 5-HT4 Receptor Ligands as Prospective Imaging Probes for PET

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.

    2010-01-01

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT4 receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT4 antagonist, (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron-emitter, either carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.7 min), and included, i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl or fluoro, ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT4 receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron-emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-11C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [11C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT4 receptors. PMID:20812727

  16. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Gary W.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L.

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  17. Characterization of a novel acetamidobenzoxazolone-based PET ligand for translocator protein (18 kDa) imaging of neuroinflammation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anjani K; Yui, Joji; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kumata, Katsushi; Shimoda, Yoko; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Xie, Lin; Hatori, Akiko; Maeda, Jun; Nengaki, Nobuki; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-05-01

    We developed the novel positron emission tomography (PET) ligand 2-[5-(4-[(11)C]methoxyphenyl)-2-oxo-1,3-benzoxazol-3(2H)-yl]-N-methyl-N-phenylacetamide ([(11)C]MBMP) for translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO) imaging and evaluated its efficacy in ischemic rat brains. [(11)C]MBMP was synthesized by reacting desmethyl precursor (1) with [(11)C]CH3 I in radiochemical purity of ≥ 98% and specific activity of 85 ± 30 GBq/μmol (n = 18) at the end of synthesis. Biodistribution study on mice showed high accumulation of radioactivity in the TSPO-rich organs, e.g., the lungs, heart, kidneys, and adrenal glands. The metabolite analysis in mice brain homogenate showed 80.1 ± 2.7% intact [(11)C]MBMP at 60 min after injection. To determine the specific binding of [(11)C]MBMP with TSPO in the brain, in vitro autoradiography and PET studies were performed in an ischemic rat model. In vitro autoradiography indicated significantly increased binding on the ipsilateral side compared with that on the contralateral side of ischemic rat brains. This result was supported firmly by the contrast of radioactivity between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides in PET images. Displacement experiments with unlabelled MBMP or PK11195 minimized the difference in uptake between the two sides. In summary, [(11)C]MBMP is a potential PET imaging agent for TSPO and, consequently, for the up-regulation of microglia during neuroinflammation.

  18. Nonneoplastic Neuroma After Radical Prostatectomy Is Not a Mimicker of Lymph Node Metastases on 68Ga-PSMA Ligand PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Schumacher, Udo; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic neuroma is frequently observed after surgery. PSMA expression has been demonstrated in neoplastic nerve sheath tumors, which may mimic metastases on PSMA imaging. In this case, histopathologic evaluation of a pelvic lesion with assumed intense tracer uptake on Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT in a patient with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer revealed an amputation neuroma. However, immunohistochemical evaluation showed absent PSMA expression, and follow-up PET confirmed persistence of the metastasis. Unlike neoplastic nerve sheath tumors, traumatic neuroma does not show PSMA expression and is not a mimicker of metastases on Ga-PSMA PET/CT. PMID:27556791

  19. Nonneoplastic Neuroma After Radical Prostatectomy Is Not a Mimicker of Lymph Node Metastases on 68Ga-PSMA Ligand PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Schumacher, Udo; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic neuroma is frequently observed after surgery. PSMA expression has been demonstrated in neoplastic nerve sheath tumors, which may mimic metastases on PSMA imaging. In this case, histopathologic evaluation of a pelvic lesion with assumed intense tracer uptake on Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT in a patient with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer revealed an amputation neuroma. However, immunohistochemical evaluation showed absent PSMA expression, and follow-up PET confirmed persistence of the metastasis. Unlike neoplastic nerve sheath tumors, traumatic neuroma does not show PSMA expression and is not a mimicker of metastases on Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

  20. (11) C-labeled and (18) F-labeled PET ligands for subtype-specific imaging of histamine receptors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Funke, Uta; Vugts, Danielle J; Janssen, Bieneke; Spaans, Arnold; Kruijer, Perry S; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Perk, Lars R; Windhorst, Albert D

    2013-01-01

    The signaling molecule histamine plays a key role in the mediation of immune reactions, in gastric secretion, and in the sensory system. In addition, it has an important function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, acting in pituitary hormone secretion, wakefulness, motor and cognitive functions, as well as in itch and nociception. This has raised interest in the role of the histaminergic system for the treatment and diagnosis of various pathologies such as allergy, sleeping and eating disorders, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, mood disorders, and pruritus. In the past 20 years, several ligands targeting the four different histamine receptor subtypes have been explored as potential radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). This contribution provides an overview of the developments of subtype-selective carbon-11-labeled and fluorine-18-labeled compounds for imaging in the brain. Using specific radioligands, the H1 R expression in human brain could be examined in diseases such as schizophrenia, depression, and anorexia nervosa. In addition, the sedative effects of antihistamines could be investigated in terms of H1 R occupancy. The H3 R is of special interest because of its regulatory role in the release of various other neurotransmitters, and initial H3 R PET imaging studies in humans have been reported. The H4 R is the youngest member of the histamine receptor family and is involved in neuroinflammation and various sensory pathways. To date, two H4 R-specific (11) C-labeled ligands have been synthesized, and the imaging of the H4 R in vivo is in the early stage.

  1. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  2. Dopamine transporter ligands: recent developments and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Runyon, Scott P; Carroll, F Ivy

    2006-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a target for the development of pharmacotherapies for a number of central disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, Tourette's syndrome, Lesch-Nyhan disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obesity, depression, and stimulant abuse as well as normal aging. Considerable effort continues to be devoted to the development of new ligands for the DAT. In this review, we present some of the more interesting ligands developed during the last few years from the 3-phenytropane, 1,4-dialkylpiperazine, phenylpiperidine, and benztropine classes of DAT uptake inhibitors as well as a few less studied miscellaneous DAT uptake inhibitors. Studies related to the therapeutic potential of some of the more studied compounds are presented. A few of the compounds have been studied as pharmacotherapies for Parkinson's disease, ADHD, and obesity. However, most of the drug discovery studies have been directed toward pharmacotherapies for stimulant abuse (mainly cocaine). A number of the compounds showed decreased cocaine maintained responding in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine. One compound, GBR 12,909, was evaluated in a Phase 1 clinical trial. PMID:17017960

  3. Optimization of Acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-Ligand PET/MRI in Patients with Local and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lütje, Susanne; Blex, Sebastian; Gomez, Benedikt; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt M.; Umutlu, Lale; Forsting, Michael; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Wetter, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this optimization study was to minimize the acquisition time of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) in patients with local and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) to obtain a sufficient image quality and quantification accuracy without any appreciable loss. Methods Twenty patients with PCa were administered intravenously with the 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA ligand (mean activity 99 MBq/patient, range 76–148 MBq) and subsequently underwent PET/MRI at, on average, 168 min (range 77–320 min) after injection. PET and MR imaging data were acquired simultaneously. PET acquisition was performed in list mode and PET images were reconstructed at different time intervals (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min). Data were analyzed regarding radiotracer uptake in tumors and muscle tissue and PET image quality. Tumor uptake was quantified in terms of the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax, SUVmean) within a spherical volume of interest (VOI). Reference VOIs were drawn in the gluteus maximus muscle on the right side. PET image quality was evaluated by experienced nuclear physicians/radiologists using a five-point ordinal scale from 5–1 (excellent—insufficient). Results Lesion detectability linearly increased with increasing acquisition times, reaching its maximum at PET acquisition times of 4 min. At this image acquisition time, tumor lesions in 19/20 (95%) patients were detected. PET image quality showed a positive correlation with increasing acquisition time, reaching a plateau at 4–6 min image acquisition. Both SUVmax and SUVmean correlated inversely with acquisition time and reached a plateau at acquisition times after 4 min. Conclusion In the applied image acquisition settings, the optimal acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/MRI in patients with local and metastatic PCa was identified to be 4 min per bed position. At this acquisition time, PET image quality and lesion detectability reach a maximum

  4. Initial investigation of three selective and potent small molecule oxytocin receptor PET ligands in New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron L; Freeman, Sara M; Barnhart, Todd E; Abbott, David H; Ahlers, Elizabeth O; Kukis, David L; Bales, Karen L; Goodman, Mark M; Young, Larry J

    2016-07-15

    The neuropeptide oxytocin is part of a neuroendocrine system that has physiological effects ranging from ensuring uterine myometrial contractions at parturition and post-partum mammary gland milk ejection to the modulation of neural control of social relationships. This initial study was performed to investigate the potential use of positron emission tomography (PET) for localizing oxytocin receptors in two New World primates. Three biomarkers for PET (1-3) that are known to have high affinity and selectivity for the human oxytocin receptor were investigated in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) via PET imaging. Brain penetration, and uptake in the salivary gland area were both observed with biomarkers 2 and 3. No brain penetration was observed with 1, but uptake was observed more specifically in several peripheral endocrine glands compared to 2 or 3. Biomarker 2, which displayed the best brain penetration of the three biomarkers in the marmoset, was then investigated in the monogamous coppery titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus) in a brain scan and a limited full body scan. No significant brain penetration of 2 was observed in the titi monkey, but significant uptake was observed in various locations throughout the periphery. Metabolism of 2 was suspected to have been significant based upon HPLC analysis of blood draws, but parent compound was still present near the end of the scan. Follow-up investigations will focus on next generation biomarkers bearing improved binding characteristics and brain penetrability as well as investigating tissue in regions where biomarker uptake was observed.

  5. Initial investigation of three selective and potent small molecule oxytocin receptor PET ligands in New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron L; Freeman, Sara M; Barnhart, Todd E; Abbott, David H; Ahlers, Elizabeth O; Kukis, David L; Bales, Karen L; Goodman, Mark M; Young, Larry J

    2016-07-15

    The neuropeptide oxytocin is part of a neuroendocrine system that has physiological effects ranging from ensuring uterine myometrial contractions at parturition and post-partum mammary gland milk ejection to the modulation of neural control of social relationships. This initial study was performed to investigate the potential use of positron emission tomography (PET) for localizing oxytocin receptors in two New World primates. Three biomarkers for PET (1-3) that are known to have high affinity and selectivity for the human oxytocin receptor were investigated in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) via PET imaging. Brain penetration, and uptake in the salivary gland area were both observed with biomarkers 2 and 3. No brain penetration was observed with 1, but uptake was observed more specifically in several peripheral endocrine glands compared to 2 or 3. Biomarker 2, which displayed the best brain penetration of the three biomarkers in the marmoset, was then investigated in the monogamous coppery titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus) in a brain scan and a limited full body scan. No significant brain penetration of 2 was observed in the titi monkey, but significant uptake was observed in various locations throughout the periphery. Metabolism of 2 was suspected to have been significant based upon HPLC analysis of blood draws, but parent compound was still present near the end of the scan. Follow-up investigations will focus on next generation biomarkers bearing improved binding characteristics and brain penetrability as well as investigating tissue in regions where biomarker uptake was observed. PMID:27209233

  6. Di-macrocyclic terephthalamide ligands as chelators for the PET radionuclide zirconium-89†

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Darpan N.; Pailloux, Sylvie; Tatum, David; Magda, Darren; Wadas, Thaddeus J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) which can stably chelate zirconium-89 (89Zr) while being conjugated to targeting molecules is an area of active research. Herein we report the first octadentate terephthalamide ligands, which are easily radiolabeled with 89Zr and are highly stable in vitro. They represent a novel class of chelators, which are worthy of further development as BFCs for 89Zr. PMID:25556851

  7. Di-macrocyclic terephthalamide ligands as chelators for the PET radionuclide zirconium-89.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Darpan N; Pailloux, Sylvie; Tatum, David; Magda, Darren; Wadas, Thaddeus J

    2015-02-11

    The development of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) which can stably chelate zirconium-89 ((89)Zr) while being conjugated to targeting molecules is an area of active research. Herein we report the first octadentate terephthalamide ligands, which are easily radiolabeled with (89)Zr and are highly stable in vitro. They represent a novel class of chelators, which are worthy of further development as BFCs for (89)Zr.

  8. Melanoma cell galectin-1 ligands functionally correlate with malignant potential*

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Erika M.; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E.; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C.; Barthel, Steven R.; Opperman, Matthew J.; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C.; Mihm, Martin C.; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Widlund, Hans R.; Murphy, George F.; Dimitroff, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening anti-tumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely-dysplastic nevi as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by α2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAMKD) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6O/E) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAMKD or ST6O/E melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1 – melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy. PMID:25756799

  9. Translational characterization of [11C]GSK931145, a PET ligand for the glycine transporter type 1.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Roger N; Murthy, Venkatesha; Catafau, Ana M; Searle, Graham; Bullich, Santiago; Slifstein, Mark; Ouellet, Daniele; Zamuner, Stefano; Herance, Raul; Salinas, Cristian; Pardo-Lozano, Ricardo; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Farre, Magi; Laruelle, Marc

    2011-12-01

    The current interest in developing Glycine transporter Type 1 (GlyT-1) inhibitors, for diseases such as schizophrenia, has led to the demand for a GlyT-1 PET molecular imaging tool to aid drug development and dose selection. We report on [(11) C]GSK931145 as a novel GlyT-1 imaging probe in primate and man. Primate PET studies were performed to determine the level of specific binding following homologous competition with GSK931145 and the plasma-occupancy relationship of the GlyT-1 inhibitor GSK1018921. Human PET studies were performed to determine the test-retest reproducibility of [(11) C]GSK931145 and the plasma-occupancy relationship of GSK1018921. [(11) C]GSK931145 entered primate and human brain and yielded a heterogeneous pattern of uptake which was similar in both species with highest uptake in midbrain, thalamus, and cerebellum. Homologous competition in primates indicated no viable reference region and gave binding potential estimates between 1.5 and 3 for midbrain, thalamus and cerebellum, While the distribution and binding potential values were similar across species, both the plasma free fraction (f(P) : 0.8 vs. 8%) and delivery (K(1) : 0.025 vs. 0.126 ml cm(-3) min(-1) ) were significantly lower in humans. Test-retest reproducibility in humans calculated using a two tissue compartmental model was poor (VAR(V(T) ): 29-38%), but was improved using a pseudo reference tissue model (VAR(BP(ND) ): 16-23%). GSK1018921 EC(50) estimates were 22.5 and 45.7 ng/ml in primates and humans, respectively. PMID:21688322

  10. THE POTENTIAL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO PET-BORNE DIAZINON RESIDUES FOLLOWING RESIDENTIAL LAWN APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This observational study examined the potential for indoor/outdoor pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objective was to investigate the potential exposures of chi...

  11. Evaluating the potential for recycling all PET bottles into new food packaging.

    PubMed

    Begley, T H; McNeal, T P; Biles, J E; Paquette, K E

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of recycling all PET bottles into food packaging, realistic estimates of the maximum concentration of contaminants that might be expected in the polymer are needed. To estimate the maximum concentration of a contaminant that might be in PET from the storage of non-food substances, sorption experiments into two types of PET were performed. These test materials were 0.8mm thick amorphous PET (a relative sink for contaminants) and commercial PET bottle wall. Using a commercial shampoo containing 1% lindane (C6H6Cl6), the test materials were stored in contact with the shampoo at 20 and 40 degrees C for 231 days. This commercial shampoo also represents an extreme case because it contains 7% acetone, a solvent which swells PET, further enhancing sorption of chemicals. Additional sorption experiments into PET were performed by preparing solutions of 10% toluene in Miglyol (a fractionated coconut oil), 10% benzophenone in Miglyol, 5% 2-butoxyethoxy ethanol (2-BE) in 50/50 water/ethanol, and 10% methyl stearate in heptane. Sorption data from the shampoo into PET illustrate Fickian behaviour. Specifically, the amount of sorption at room temperature is approximately40 times less than that at 40 degrees C. The amount of lindane sorbed into PET from the shampoo after 231 days was 0.1 and 3.7 mgdm(-2) at 20 and 40 degrees C respectively. These values correspond to 28 and 765 mg kg(-1) on a mass/mass basis. All sorptions are within the ranges measured and published by other authors using surrogate contamination testing schemes. Additionally, actual bottles from recycle bins were analysed for the amout of contamination. Results are discussed in terms of potential consumer exposure to non-food contaminants in food containers made of recycled PET and in relation to the surrogate testing methods recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for determining the compatibility of a PET recycling process to produce containers suitable for food

  12. Evaluating the potential for recycling all PET bottles into new food packaging.

    PubMed

    Begley, T H; McNeal, T P; Biles, J E; Paquette, K E

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of recycling all PET bottles into food packaging, realistic estimates of the maximum concentration of contaminants that might be expected in the polymer are needed. To estimate the maximum concentration of a contaminant that might be in PET from the storage of non-food substances, sorption experiments into two types of PET were performed. These test materials were 0.8mm thick amorphous PET (a relative sink for contaminants) and commercial PET bottle wall. Using a commercial shampoo containing 1% lindane (C6H6Cl6), the test materials were stored in contact with the shampoo at 20 and 40 degrees C for 231 days. This commercial shampoo also represents an extreme case because it contains 7% acetone, a solvent which swells PET, further enhancing sorption of chemicals. Additional sorption experiments into PET were performed by preparing solutions of 10% toluene in Miglyol (a fractionated coconut oil), 10% benzophenone in Miglyol, 5% 2-butoxyethoxy ethanol (2-BE) in 50/50 water/ethanol, and 10% methyl stearate in heptane. Sorption data from the shampoo into PET illustrate Fickian behaviour. Specifically, the amount of sorption at room temperature is approximately40 times less than that at 40 degrees C. The amount of lindane sorbed into PET from the shampoo after 231 days was 0.1 and 3.7 mgdm(-2) at 20 and 40 degrees C respectively. These values correspond to 28 and 765 mg kg(-1) on a mass/mass basis. All sorptions are within the ranges measured and published by other authors using surrogate contamination testing schemes. Additionally, actual bottles from recycle bins were analysed for the amout of contamination. Results are discussed in terms of potential consumer exposure to non-food contaminants in food containers made of recycled PET and in relation to the surrogate testing methods recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for determining the compatibility of a PET recycling process to produce containers suitable for food

  13. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach

    PubMed Central

    Ioakeimidis, C.; Fotopoulou, K. N.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Geraga, M.; Zeri, C.; Papathanassiou, E.; Galgani, F.; Papatheodorou, G.

    2016-01-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea–E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment. PMID:27000994

  14. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach.

    PubMed

    Ioakeimidis, C; Fotopoulou, K N; Karapanagioti, H K; Geraga, M; Zeri, C; Papathanassiou, E; Galgani, F; Papatheodorou, G

    2016-01-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea-E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment. PMID:27000994

  15. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioakeimidis, C.; Fotopoulou, K. N.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Geraga, M.; Zeri, C.; Papathanassiou, E.; Galgani, F.; Papatheodorou, G.

    2016-03-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea–E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment.

  16. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach.

    PubMed

    Ioakeimidis, C; Fotopoulou, K N; Karapanagioti, H K; Geraga, M; Zeri, C; Papathanassiou, E; Galgani, F; Papatheodorou, G

    2016-03-22

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea-E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment.

  17. Synthesis, In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of 18F-labeled PET Ligands for Imaging the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Efange, Simon M. N.; Xu, Jinbin; Li, Shihong; Jones, Lynne A.; Parsons, Stanley M.; Mach, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A new class of vesicular acetylcholine transporter inhibitor that incorporates a carbonyl group into the benzovesamicol structure was synthesized and analogs were evaluated in vitro. (±)-trans-2-Hydroxy-3-(4-(4-[18F]fluorobenzoyl)piperidino)tetralin (9e) has Ki values of 2.70 nM for VAChT, 191 nM for σ1 and 251 nM for σ2. The racemic precursor (9d) was resolved via chiral HPLC and (±)-[18F]9e, (-)-[18F]9e, and (+)-[18F]9e were respectively radiolabeled via microwave irradiation of the appropriate precursors with [18F]/F- and Kryptofix/K2CO3 in DMSO with radiochemical yields ∼50-60% and specific activities >2000 mCi/μmol. (-)-[18F]9e uptake in rat brain was consistent with in vivo selectivity for the VAChT with an initial uptake of 0.911 %ID/g in rat striatum and a striatum: cerebellum ratio of 1.88 by 30 min p.i.. MicroPET imaging of macaques demonstrated a 2.1 ratio of (-)-[18F]9e in putamen versus cerebellum at 2 h. p.i. (-)-[18F]9e has potential to be a PET tracer for clinical imaging of the VAChT. PMID:19203271

  18. PET Neuroimaging: Insights on Dystonia and Tourette Syndrome and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Iaccarino, Leonardo; Perani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Primary dystonia (pD) is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric developmental disorder characterized by motor and phonic tics, which could progress to behavioral changes. GTS and obsessive–compulsive disorders are often seen in comorbidity, also suggesting that a possible overlap in the pathophysiological bases of these two conditions. PET techniques are of considerable value in detecting functional and molecular abnormalities in vivo, according to the adopted radioligands. For example, PET is the unique technique that allows in vivo investigation of neurotransmitter systems, providing evidence of changes in GTS or pD. For example, presynaptic and post-synaptic dopaminergic studies with PET have shown alterations compatible with dysfunction or loss of D2-receptors bearing neurons, increased synaptic dopamine levels, or both. Measures of cerebral glucose metabolism with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (18F-FDG PET) are very sensitive in showing brain functional alterations as well. 18F-FDG PET data have shown metabolic changes within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical and cerebello-thalamo-cortical networks, revealing possible involvement of brain circuits not limited to basal ganglia in pD and GTS. The aim of this work is to overview PET consistent neuroimaging literature on pD and GTS that has provided functional and molecular knowledge of the underlying neural dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest potential applications of these techniques in monitoring treatments. PMID:25295029

  19. Imaging human brown adipose tissue under room temperature conditions with 11C-MRB, a selective norepinephrine transporter PET ligand

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Janice J.; Yeckel, Catherine W.; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Aguiar, Renata Belfort-De; Ersahin, Devrim; Gao, Hong; Kapinos, Michael; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Huang, Yiyun; Cheng, David; Carson, Richard E.; Sherwin, Robert; Ding, Yu-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a critical role in adaptive thermogenesis and is tightly regulated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). However, current BAT imaging modalities require cold stimulation and are often unreliable to detect BAT in the basal state, at room temperature (RT). We have shown previously that BAT can be detected in rodents under both RT and cold conditions with 11C-MRB ((S,S)-11C-O-methylreboxetine), a highly selective ligand for the norepinephrine transporter (NET). Here, we evaluate this novel approach for BAT detection in adult humans under RT conditions. Methods Ten healthy, Caucasian subjects (5 M: age 24.6±2.6, BMI 21.6±2.7 kg/m2; 5 F: age 25.4±2.1, BMI 22.1±1.0 kg/m2) underwent 11C-MRB PET-CT imaging for cervical/supraclavicular BAT under RT and cold-stimulated conditions (RPCM Cool vest; enthalpy 15°C) compared to 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging. Uptake of 11C-MRB, was quantified as the distribution volume ratio (DVR) using the occipital cortex as a low NET density reference region. Total body fat and lean body mass were assessed via bioelectrical impedance analysis. Results As expected, 18F-FDG uptake in BAT was difficult to identify at RT but easily detected with cold stimulation (p=0.01). In contrast, BAT 11C-MRB uptake (also normalized for muscle) was equally evident under both RT and cold conditions (BAT DVR: RT 1.0±0.3 vs. cold 1.1±0.3, p=0.31; BAT/muscle DVR: RT 2.3±0.7 vs. cold 2.5±0.5, p=0.61). Importantly, BAT DVR and BAT/muscle DVR of 11C-MRB at RT correlated positively with core body temperature (r=0.76, p=0.05 and r=0.92, p=0.004, respectively), a relationship not observed with 18F-FDG (p=0.63). Furthermore, there were gender differences in 11C-MRB uptake in response to cold (p=0.03), which reflected significant differences in the change in 11C-MRB as a function of both body composition and body temperature. Conclusions Unlike 18F-FDG, the uptake of 11C-MRB in BAT offers a unique opportunity to

  20. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  1. Potential Clinical Value of Multiparametric PET in the Prediction of Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueqi; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Rongfu; Cao, Haoyin; Reid, Savina; Gao, Rui; Han, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential clinical value of quantitative functional FDG PET and pathological amyloid-β PET with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and clinical assessments in the prediction of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. Methods We studied 82 subjects for up to 96 months (median = 84 months) in a longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. All preprocessed PET images were spatially normalized to standard Montreal Neurologic Institute space. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined on MRI template, and standard uptake values ratios (SUVRs) to the cerebellum for FDG and amyloid-β PET were calculated. Predictive values of single and multiparametric PET biomarkers with and without clinical assessments and CSF biomarkers for AD progression were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and logistic regression model. Results The posterior precuneus and cingulate SUVRs were identified for both FDG and amyloid-β PET in predicating progression in normal controls (NCs) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). FDG parietal and lateral temporal SUVRs were suggested for monitoring NCs and MCI group progression, respectively. 18F-AV45 global cortex attained (78.6%, 74.5%, 75.4%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy) in predicting NC progression, which is comparable to the 11C-PiB global cortex SUVR’s in predicting MCI to AD. A logistic regression model to combine FDG parietal and posterior precuneus SUVR and Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) Total Mod was identified in predicating NC progression with (80.0%, 94.9%, 93.9%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). The selected model including FDG posterior cingulate SUVR, ADAS-Cog Total Mod, and Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores for predicating MCI to AD attained (96.4%, 81.2%, 83.6%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). 11C-PiB medial temporal SUVR with MMSE significantly increased 11C-PiB PET AUC to 0.915 (p<0

  2. Synthesis, uptake mechanism characterization and biological evaluation of 18F labeled fluoroalkyl phenylalanine analogs as potential PET imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Qu, Wenchao; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Amino acids based tracers represent a promising class of tumor metabolic imaging agents with successful clinical applications. Two new phenylalanine derivatives, p-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-phenylalanine (FEP, [18F]2) and p-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-L-phenylalanine (FPP, [18F]3) were synthesized and evaluated in comparison to clinically utilized O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1). Methods FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step nucleophilic fluorination of tosylate precursors and deprotection reaction. In vitro cell uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cells. In vivo studies, 9L tumor xenografts were implanted in Fisher 344 rats. Results FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) could be efficiently labeled within 90 min with good enantiomeric purity (>95%), good yield (11–37%) and high specific activity (21–69 GBq/μmol). Cell uptake studies showed FEP had higher uptake than FPP as well as reference ligand FET ([18F]1). Uptake mechanism studies suggested that FEP is a selective substrate for system L and prefers its subtype LAT1. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated FEP had specific accumulation in tumor cells and tumor to background ratio reached 1.45 at 60 min. Small animal PET imaging studies showed FEP was comparable to FET for imaging rats bearing 9L tumor model. FEP had high uptake in 9L tumor compared to surrounding tissue and was quickly excreted through urinary tract. Conclusion Biological evaluations indicate that FEP ([18F]2) is a potential useful tracer for tumor imaging with PET. PMID:21220129

  3. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  4. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Singh, Prahlad R.

    1997-01-01

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g. .sup.99m Tc or .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re) or late transition metals (e.g., .sup.105 Rh or .sup.109 Pd). The complexes with these metals .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re, .sup.99m Tc and .sup.109 Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g. Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  5. Evoked Potentials and Neuropsychological Tests Validate Positron Emission Topography (PET) Brain Metabolism in Cognitively Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Eric R.; Blum, Kenneth; Damle, Uma J.; Kerner, Mallory; Dushaj, Kristina; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Topography (PET) brain hypometabolism (HM) correlates with diminished cognitive capacity and risk of developing dementia. However, because clinical utility of PET is limited by cost, we sought to determine whether a less costly electrophysiological measure, the P300 evoked potential, in combination with neuropsychological test performance, would validate PET HM in neuropsychiatric patients. We found that patients with amnestic and non-amnestic cognitive impairment and HM (n = 43) evidenced significantly reduced P300 amplitudes, delayed latencies, and neuropsychological deficits, compared to patients with normal brain metabolism (NM; n = 187). Data from patients with missing cognitive test scores (n = 57) were removed from the final sample, and logistic regression modeling was performed on the modified sample (n = 173, p = .000004). The logistic regression modeling, based on P300 and neuropsychological measures, was used to validate membership in the HM vs. NM groups. It showed classification validation in 13/25 HM subjects (52.0%) and in 125/148 NM subjects (84.5%), correlating with total classification accuracy of 79.8%. In this paper, abnormal P300 evoked potentials coupled with cognitive test impairment validates brain metabolism and mild/moderate cognitive impairment (MCI). To this end, we cautiously propose incorporating electrophysiological and neuropsychological assessments as cost-effective brain metabolism and MCI indicators in primary care. Final interpretation of these results must await required additional studies confirming these interesting results. PMID:23526928

  6. Prospects for vaccination against the ticks of pets and the potential impact on pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Villar, Margarita; Contreras, Marinela; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Merino, Octavio; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, Gabriela; Galindo, Ruth C

    2015-02-28

    Diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors such as ticks greatly impact human and animal health. In particular, many diseases of dogs and cats are potentially transmissible to people by arthropod vectors and therefore their control is important for the eradication of vector-borne diseases (VBD). Vaccination is an environmentally friendly alternative for vector control that allows control of several VBD by targeting their common vector. Recent results have shown that it is possible to use vector protective antigens for the control of arthropod vector infestations and pathogen infection. However, as reviewed in this paper, very little progress has been made for the control of ectoparasite infestations and VBD in pets using vaccination with vector protective antigens. The growing interaction between pets and people underlines the importance of developing new interventions for the monitoring and control of VBD. PMID:25555312

  7. Synthesis of Phthalimide Derivatives as Potential PPAR-γ Ligands.

    PubMed

    Eom, So Hyeon; Liu, Sen; Su, Mingzhi; Noh, Tae Hwan; Hong, Jongki; Kim, Nam Deuk; Chung, Hae Young; Yang, Min Hye; Jung, Jee H

    2016-01-01

    Paecilocin A, a phthalide derivative isolated from the jellyfish-derived fungus Paecilomyces variotii, activates PPAR-γ (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) in rat liver Ac2F cells. Based on a SAR (Structure-activity relationships) study and in silico analysis of paecilocin A-mimetic derivatives, additional N-substituted phthalimide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for PPAR-γ agonistic activity in both murine liver Ac2F cells and in human liver HepG2 cells by luciferase assay, and for adipogenic activity in 3T3-L1 cells. Docking simulation indicated PD6 was likely to bind most strongly to the ligand binding domain of PPAR-γ by establishing crucial H-bonds with key amino acid residues. However, in in vitro assays, PD1 and PD2 consistently displayed significant PPAR-γ activation in Ac2F and HepG2 cells, and adipogenic activity in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. PMID:27338418

  8. Synthesis of Phthalimide Derivatives as Potential PPAR-γ Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Eom, So Hyeon; Liu, Sen; Su, Mingzhi; Noh, Tae Hwan; Hong, Jongki; Kim, Nam Deuk; Chung, Hae Young; Yang, Min Hye; Jung, Jee H.

    2016-01-01

    Paecilocin A, a phthalide derivative isolated from the jellyfish-derived fungus Paecilomyces variotii, activates PPAR-γ (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) in rat liver Ac2F cells. Based on a SAR (Structure-activity relationships) study and in silico analysis of paecilocin A-mimetic derivatives, additional N-substituted phthalimide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for PPAR-γ agonistic activity in both murine liver Ac2F cells and in human liver HepG2 cells by luciferase assay, and for adipogenic activity in 3T3-L1 cells. Docking simulation indicated PD6 was likely to bind most strongly to the ligand binding domain of PPAR-γ by establishing crucial H-bonds with key amino acid residues. However, in in vitro assays, PD1 and PD2 consistently displayed significant PPAR-γ activation in Ac2F and HepG2 cells, and adipogenic activity in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. PMID:27338418

  9. The Potential Roles of 18F-FDG-PET in Management of Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bunevicius, Adomas; Yuan, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Extensive efforts have recently been devoted to developing noninvasive imaging tools capable of delineating brain tissue viability (penumbra) during acute ischemic stroke. These efforts could have profound clinical implications for identifying patients who may benefit from tPA beyond the currently approved therapeutic time window and/or patients undergoing neuroendovascular treatments. To date, the DWI/PWI MRI and perfusion CT have received the most attention for identifying ischemic penumbra. However, their routine use in clinical settings remains limited. Preclinical and clinical PET studies with [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) have consistently revealed a decreased 18F-FDG uptake in regions of presumed ischemic core. More importantly, an elevated 18F-FDG uptake in the peri-ischemic regions has been reported, potentially reflecting viable tissues. To this end, this paper provides a comprehensive review of the literature on the utilization of 14C-2-DG and 18F-FDG-PET in experimental as well as human stroke studies. Possible cellular mechanisms and physiological underpinnings attributed to the reported temporal and spatial uptake patterns of 18F-FDG are addressed. Given the wide availability of 18F-FDG in routine clinical settings, 18F-FDG PET may serve as an alternative, non-invasive tool to MRI and CT for the management of acute stroke patients. PMID:23762852

  10. Correlation of amyloid PET ligand florbetapir F 18 (18F-AV-45) binding with β-amyloid aggregation and neuritic plaque deposition in postmortem brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seok Rye; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.; Beach, Thomas G.; Bedell, Barry J.; Zehntner, Simone P.; Krautkramer, Michael; Kung, Hank F.; Skovronsky, Daniel M.; Hefti, Franz; Clark, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Florbetapir F 18 (18F-AV-45) is a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging ligand for the detection of amyloid aggregation associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Earlier data showed that florbetapir F 18 binds with high affinity to β-amyloid plaques in human brain homogenates (Kd = 3.7 nM) and has favorable imaging pharmacokinetic properties, including rapid brain penetration and washout. The present study used human autopsy brain tissue to evaluate the correlation between in vitro florbetapir F 18 binding and β-amyloid density measured by established neuropathological methods. Methods The localization and density of florbetapir F 18 binding in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of postmortem brain tissue from 40 subjects with a varying degree of neurodegenerative pathology was assessed by standard florbetapir F 18 autoradiography and correlated with the localization and density of β-amyloid identified by silver staining, thioflavin S staining, and immunohistochemistry. Results There were strong quantitative correlations between florbetapir F 18 tissue binding and both β-amyloid plaques identified by light microscopy (sliver staining and thioflavin S fluorescence) and by immunohistochemical measurements of β-amyloid using three antibodies recognizing different epitopes of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Florbetapir F 18 did not bind to neurofibrillary tangles. Conclusion Florbetapir F 18 selectively binds β-amyloid in human brain tissue. The binding intensity was quantitatively correlated with the density of β-amyloid plaques identified by standard neuropathological techniques and correlated with the density of Aβ measured by immunohistochemistry. Since β-amyloid plaques are a defining neuropathological feature for Alzheimer’s disease, these results support the use of florbetapir F 18 as an amyloid PET ligand to identify the presence of AD pathology in patients with signs and symptoms of progressive late-life cognitive

  11. Single-step High-yield Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of a Sensitive 18F-Labeled Ligand for Imaging Brain Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptors with PET

    PubMed Central

    Briard, Emmanuelle; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Siméon, Fabrice G.; Imaizumi, Masao; Gourley, Jonathan P.; Shetty, H. Umesha; Lu, Shuiyu; Fujita, Masahiro; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated levels of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) are associated with activated microglia in their response to inflammation. Hence, PBR imaging in vivo is valuable for investigating brain inflammatory conditions. Sensitive, easily prepared and readily available radioligands for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) are desirable for this purpose. We describe a new 18F-labeled PBR radioligand, namely [18F]N-fluoroacetyl-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-phenoxyaniline ([18F]9). [18F]9 was produced easily through a single and highly efficient step, the reaction of [18F]fluoride ion with the corresponding bromo precursor, 8. Ligand 9 exhibited high affinity for PBR in vitro. PET showed that [18F]9 was avidly taken into monkey brain and gave a high ratio of PBR-specific to nonspecific binding. [18F]9 was devoid of defluorination in rat and monkey and gave predominantly polar radiometabolite(s). In rat, a low level radiometabolite of intermediate lipophilicity was identified as [18F]2-fluoro-N-(2-phenoxyphenyl)acetamide ([18F]11). [18F]9 is a promising radioligand for future imaging of PBR in living human brain. PMID:19119848

  12. Potential Toxicity of Up-Converting Nanoparticles Encapsulated with a Bilayer Formed by Ligand Attraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cellular toxicity of nanoparticles that were capped with a bilayered ligand was studied using an up-converting (UC) phosphor material as a representative nanoparticle (NP). The results indicate that although UC NPs are known to be nontoxic, the toxicity of the NPs depends strongly on ligand coordination conditions, in addition to the other commonly known parameters such as size, structure, surface charge etc. Oleate-capped hydrophobic NaYF4:Yb,Er NPs were surface modified to yield three extreme conditions: bare particles that were stripped of the oleate ligands; particles with covalently bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ligands; and particles with an bilayer of PEG-oleate ligands using the oleate surface group that was remained after synthesis. It was found that the bare particles and the covalent PEG NPs induced little toxicity. However, particles that were rendered biocompatible by forming a bilayer with an amphiphilic ligand (i.e., PEG-oleate) resulted in significant cell toxicity. These findings strongly suggest that the PEG-oleate group dissociated from the bilayered oleate-capped NPs, resulting in significant toxicity by exposing the hydrophobic oleate-capped NPs to the cell. Based on results with bare particles, the NaLnF4:Yb,Er (Ln = Y, Gd) up-converting phosphors are essentially less-toxic. Capping and functionalizing these particles with ligand intercalation may, however, not be a suitable method for rendering the NPs suitable for bioapplication as the ligand can potentially dissociate upon cellular interaction, leading to significant toxicity. PMID:24971524

  13. Phthalocyanines: a new class of G-quadruplex-ligands with many potential applications.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Fujimoto, Takeshi; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2012-06-25

    A G-quadruplex is a four-stranded DNA structure featuring stacked guanine tetrads, G-quartets. Formation of a G-quadruplex in telomere DNA can inhibit telomerase activity; therefore, development of G-quadruplex-ligands, which induce and/or stabilize G-quadruplexes, has become an area of great interest. Phthalocyanine derivatives have substantial potential as high-affinity G-quadruplex-ligands because these planar chromophores are similar in size and shape to the G-quartets. Here, we focus on the latest findings on phthalocyanine derivatives as G-quadruplex-ligands, and discuss the mechanisms by which phthalocyanines bind to G-quadruplexes with high affinity and selectivity. We also discuss potential biomedical and organic electronic applications of phthalocyanines that are dependent on their photophysical properties.

  14. Phthalocyanines: a new class of G-quadruplex-ligands with many potential applications.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Fujimoto, Takeshi; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2012-06-25

    A G-quadruplex is a four-stranded DNA structure featuring stacked guanine tetrads, G-quartets. Formation of a G-quadruplex in telomere DNA can inhibit telomerase activity; therefore, development of G-quadruplex-ligands, which induce and/or stabilize G-quadruplexes, has become an area of great interest. Phthalocyanine derivatives have substantial potential as high-affinity G-quadruplex-ligands because these planar chromophores are similar in size and shape to the G-quartets. Here, we focus on the latest findings on phthalocyanine derivatives as G-quadruplex-ligands, and discuss the mechanisms by which phthalocyanines bind to G-quadruplexes with high affinity and selectivity. We also discuss potential biomedical and organic electronic applications of phthalocyanines that are dependent on their photophysical properties. PMID:22590705

  15. PILOT STUDY OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO PET-BORNE DIAZINON RESIDUES FOLLOWING LAWN APPLICATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the potential for indoor/outdoor pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objective was to investigate the potential exposures of children and thei...

  16. Novel properties and potential applications of functional ligand-modified polyoxotitanate cages.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Matthews, Peter D; Luo, He-Kuan; Wright, Dominic S

    2016-09-28

    Functional ligand-modified polyoxotitanate (L-POT) cages of the general type [TixOy(OR)z(L)m] (OR = alkoxide, L = functional ligand) can be regarded as molecular fragments of surface-sensitized solid-state TiO2, and are of value as models for studying the interfacial charge and energy transfer between the bound functional ligands and a bulk semiconductor surface. These L-POTs have also had a marked impact in many other research fields, such as single-source precursors for TiO2 deposition, inorganic-organic hybrid material construction, photocatalysis, photoluminescence, asymmetric catalysis and gas adsorption. Their atomically well-defined structures provide the basis for the understanding of structure/property relationships and ultimately for the rational design of new cages targeting specific uses. This highlight focuses on recent advances in L-POTs research, with emphasis on their novel properties and potential applications. PMID:27332621

  17. Use of natural AhR ligands as potential therapeutic modalities against inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Busbee, Philip B; Rouse, Michael; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss research involving ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in immunomodulation. While activation of the AhR is well known for its ability to regulate the biochemical and toxic effects of environmental chemicals, more recently an exciting discovery has been made indicating that AhR ligation can also regulate T-cell differentiation, specifically through activation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of the proinflammatory Th17 cells. Such findings have opened new avenues of research on the possibility of targeting the AhR to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Specifically, this review will discuss the current research involving natural and dietary AhR ligands. In addition, evidence indicating the potential use of these ligands in regulating inflammation in various diseases will be highlighted. The importance of the AhR in immunological processes can be illustrated by expression of this receptor on a majority of immune cell types. In addition, AhR signaling pathways have been reported to influence a number of genes responsible for mediating inflammation and other immune responses. As interest in the AhR and its ligands increases, it seems prudent to consolidate current research on the contributions of these ligands to immune regulation during the course of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23731446

  18. Potential uses of silica-bonded macrocyclic ligands for separation of metal ions from nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bruening, R.L.; Camaioni, D.M.; Colton, N.G.; Morrey, J.R.

    1991-11-01

    This paper explores the potential of a relatively new separation material that is obtained by covalently binding macrocyclic ligands to silica gel. Fortunately, neutral macrocyclic ligands can be bound to silica gel such that metal binding constants do not differ significantly from the binding constants of the free ligands so that selectivities of free macrocyclic ligands can be used in designing silica-bound materials with appropriate selectivities. Accordingly, macrocyclic ligands known to have selectivities for Pd{sup +2}, Ag{sup +}, Ru{sup +3}, Sr{sup +2}, and Cs{sup +} were covalently bound to silica gel. These materials were then tested for their ability to separate these ions from a synthetic test solution representative of a nuclear process waste stream. Cs{sup +} and Sr{sup +2} are of interest because their radioactive isotopes are major radioactive constituents of defense nuclear wastes accumulated at the Hanford site. Removal of precious metals such as Pd{sup +2}, Ag{sup +} and Ru{sup +3} present in nuclear defense waste are of interest not just because of their obvious economic value, but also because these metals may hinder the waste vitrification process for confining radionuclides.

  19. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Singh, P.R.

    1997-02-11

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds are derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g., {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) or late transition metals (e.g., {sup 105}Rh or {sup 109}Pd). The complexes with these metals {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 109}Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  20. Emerging clinical applications of PET based molecular imaging in oncology: the promising future potential for evolving personalized cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Vandana K; Mahajan, Abhishek; Basu, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the potential of advanced applications of functional molecular imaging in assessing tumor biology and cellular characteristics with emphasis on positron emission tomography (PET) applications with both 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and non-FDG tracers. The inherent heterogeneity of cancer cells with their varied cellular biology and metabolic and receptor phenotypic expression in each individual patient and also intra-and inter-lesionally in the same individual mandates for transitioning from a generalized “same-size-fits-all” approach to personalized medicine in oncology. The past two decades have witnessed improvement of oncological imaging through CT, MR imaging, PET, subsequent movement through hybrid or fusion imaging with PET/CT and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT-CT), and now toward the evolving PET/MR imaging. These recent developments have proven invaluable in enhancing oncology care and have the potential to help image the tumor biology at the cellular level, followed by providing a tailored treatment. Molecular imaging, integrated diagnostics or Radiomics, biology-driven interventional radiology and theranostics, all hold immense potential to serve as a guide to give “start and stop” treatment for a patient on an individual basis. This will likely have substantial impact on both treatment costs and outcomes. In this review, we bring forth the current trends in molecular imaging with established techniques (PET/CT), with particular emphasis on newer molecules (such as amino acid metabolism and hypoxia imaging, somatostatin receptor based imaging, and hormone receptor imaging) and further potential for FDG. An introductory discussion on the novel hybrid imaging techniques such as PET/MR is also made to understand the futuristic trends. PMID:26752813

  1. A FEASIBILITY STUDY EXAMINING THE POTENTIAL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PET-BORNE DIAZINON RESIDUES FOLLOWING RESIDENTIAL TURF APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The domestic dog may be a vehicle for translocation of pesticide residues following residential applications to turf. In addition, human occupants may be exposed to residues deposited inside homes by pets or by intimate contacts with them. This study examines the potential of ...

  2. A FEASIBILITY STUDY EXAMINING THE POTENTIAL FOR HUMAN HEALTH EXPOSURE TO PET-BORNE DIAZINON RESIDUES FOLLOWING RESIDENTIAL TURF APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The domestic dog may be a vehicle for translocation of pesticide residues following residential applications to turf. In addition, human occupants may be exposed to residues deposited inside homes by pets or by intimate contacts with them. This study examines the potential of a...

  3. Deoxyfluoro-d-trehalose (FDTre) analogues as potential PET probes for imaging mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Sarah R; Wagar, Zachary L; Meints, Lisa M; Olson, Claire D; O'Neill, Mara K; Piligian, Brent F; Poston, Anne W; Hood, Robin J; Woodruff, Peter J; Swarts, Benjamin M

    2016-09-28

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human tuberculosis, requires the non-mammalian disaccharide trehalose for growth and virulence. Recently, detectable trehalose analogues have gained attention as probes for studying trehalose metabolism and as potential diagnostic imaging agents for mycobacterial infections. Of particular interest are deoxy-[(18)F]fluoro-d-trehalose ((18)F-FDTre) analogues, which have been suggested as possible positron emission tomography (PET) probes for in vivo imaging of M. tuberculosis infection. Here, we report progress toward this objective, including the synthesis and conformational analysis of four non-radioactive deoxy-[(19)F]fluoro-d-trehalose ((19)F-FDTre) analogues, as well as evaluation of their uptake by M. smegmatis. The rapid synthesis and purification of several (19)F-FDTre analogues was accomplished in high yield using a one-step chemoenzymatic method. Conformational analysis of the (19)F-FDTre analogues using NMR and molecular modeling methods showed that fluorine substitution had a negligible effect on the conformation of the native disaccharide, suggesting that fluorinated analogues may be successfully recognized and processed by trehalose metabolic machinery in mycobacteria. To test this hypothesis and to evaluate a possible route for delivery of FDTre probes specifically to mycobacteria, we showed that (19)F-FDTre analogues are actively imported into M. smegmatis via the trehalose-specific transporter SugABC-LpqY. Finally, to demonstrate the applicability of these results to the efficient preparation and use of short-lived (18)F-FDTre PET radiotracers, we carried out (19)F-FDTre synthesis, purification, and administration to M. smegmatis in 1 hour. PMID:27560008

  4. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  5. Chemical potential of bound ligand, an important parameter for free energy transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, Charles

    1981-01-01

    The chemical potential (μL,b) of a ligand L bound to a protein or enzyme can be rigorously defined, and this paper describes some of its properties in relation to other thermodynamic parameters, with emphasis on thermodynamic parameters that may be used in the elucidation of the mechanism of biological free energy transduction. Free energy transduction involves the transfer of free energy from one molecule to another, and the actual transfer may often occur while both molecules are bound to the transducer enzyme, which means that μL,b for one bound ligand increases at the expense of μL,b for the other. The free energy change for the overall reaction may be very small, and it is not possible to express the phenomenon of transfer, in thermodynamic terms, without the explicit use of μL,b as a parameter. PMID:16592948

  6. Antibody-based PET imaging of amyloid beta in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sehlin, Dag; Fang, Xiaotian T.; Cato, Linda; Antoni, Gunnar; Lannfelt, Lars; Syvänen, Stina

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their specificity and high-affinity binding, monoclonal antibodies have potential as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands and are currently used to image various targets in peripheral organs. However, in the central nervous system, antibody uptake is limited by the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Here we present a PET ligand to be used for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease. The amyloid β (Aβ) antibody mAb158 is radiolabelled and conjugated to a transferrin receptor antibody to enable receptor-mediated transcytosis across the BBB. PET imaging of two different mouse models with Aβ pathology clearly visualize Aβ in the brain. The PET signal increases with age and correlates closely with brain Aβ levels. Thus, we demonstrate that antibody-based PET ligands can be successfully used for brain imaging. PMID:26892305

  7. Detection of monoamine oxidase a in brain of living rats with [18F]fluoroethyl-harmol PET.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Paul; Skaper, Dirk; Kuwert, Torsten; Maschauer, Simone; Prante, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The efficient radiosynthesis for the MAO-A ligand [(18) F]fluoroethyl-harmol is reported. Initial PET examinations reveal the ligand to be retained throughout rat brain during 90 min, whereas pretreatment with pargyline results in substantially increased washout, from which binding potentials in the range of 1.4-2.1 can be calculated.

  8. [Potential place of FDG-PET for the GTV delineation in head and neck and lung cancers].

    PubMed

    Geets, X; Lee, J A; Castadot, P; Bol, A; Grégoire, V

    2009-10-01

    The recent progresses performed in imaging, computational and technological fields bring new opportunities to achieve high precision radiation dose delivery. However, IMRT requires a particular attention at the target delineation step to avoid inadequate dosage to TVs/OARs. In this context, the biological information provided by PET might advantageously complete CT-Scan to refine the target delineation in HNSCC and lung cancer. Integrating PET into the treatment planning however requires the use and validation of accurate and reproducible segmentation methods, which adequately integrate the PET image properties such as the blur effect and the high level of noise. In this context, we developed specific tools, i.e. edge-preserving filters for denoising and deconvolution algorithms for deblurring that allowed the detection of gradient intensity peaks. Our gradient-based method has been validated on phantom and patient materials, and proved to be more accurate than threshold-based approaches. With this tool in hand, we demonstrated that the use of FDG-PET resulted in smaller TVs than the CT-based TVs, on both pre- and per-treatment images, and significantly improved the dose distributions to the TVs/OARs. This opens avenues for dose escalation strategies that might potentially improve the tumor local control.

  9. Potential medical applications of the plasma focus in the radioisotope production for PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, M. V.; Razaghi, S.; Asghari, F.; Rawat, R. S.; Springham, S. V.; Lee, P.; Lee, S.; Tan, T. L.

    2014-06-01

    Devices other than the accelerators are desired to be investigated for generating high energy particles to induce nuclear reaction and positron emission tomography (PET) producing radioisotopes. The experimental data of plasma focus devices (PF) are studied and the activity scaling law for External Solid Target (EST) activation is established. Based on the scaling law and the techniques to enhance the radioisotopes production, the feasibility of generating the required activity for PET imaging is studied.

  10. Tiny Turtles Purchased at Pet Stores are a Potential High Risk for Salmonella Human Infection in the Valencian Region, Eastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Marin, Clara; Vega, Santiago; Marco-Jiménez, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Turtles may be considered unsafe pets, particularly in households with children. This study aimed to assess Salmonella carriage by turtles in pet stores and in private ownership to inform the public of the potential health risk, enabling informed choices around pet selection. During the period between September and October 2013, 24 pet stores and 96 private owners were sampled in the Valencian Region (Eastern Spain). Salmonella identification procedure was based on ISO 6579: 2002 recommendations (Annex D). Salmonella strains were serotyped in accordance with Kauffman-White-Le-Minor technique. The rate of isolation of Salmonella was very high from pet store samples (75.0% ± 8.8%) and moderate for private owners (29.0% ± 4.6%). Serotyping revealed 18 different serotypes among two Salmonella enterica subspecies: S. enterica subsp. enterica and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae. Most frequently isolated serotypes were Salmonella Typhimurium (39.5%, 17/43) and Salmonella Pomona (9.3%, 4/43). Serotypes identified have previously been reported in turtles, and child Salmonella infections associate with pet turtle exposure. The present study clearly demonstrates that turtles in pet stores, as well as in private owners, could be a direct or indirect source of a high risk of human Salmonella infections. In addition, pet stores should advise their customers of the potential risks associated with reptile ownership. PMID:27228194

  11. Tiny Turtles Purchased at Pet Stores are a Potential High Risk for Salmonella Human Infection in the Valencian Region, Eastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Marin, Clara; Vega, Santiago; Marco-Jiménez, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Turtles may be considered unsafe pets, particularly in households with children. This study aimed to assess Salmonella carriage by turtles in pet stores and in private ownership to inform the public of the potential health risk, enabling informed choices around pet selection. During the period between September and October 2013, 24 pet stores and 96 private owners were sampled in the Valencian Region (Eastern Spain). Salmonella identification procedure was based on ISO 6579: 2002 recommendations (Annex D). Salmonella strains were serotyped in accordance with Kauffman-White-Le-Minor technique. The rate of isolation of Salmonella was very high from pet store samples (75.0% ± 8.8%) and moderate for private owners (29.0% ± 4.6%). Serotyping revealed 18 different serotypes among two Salmonella enterica subspecies: S. enterica subsp. enterica and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae. Most frequently isolated serotypes were Salmonella Typhimurium (39.5%, 17/43) and Salmonella Pomona (9.3%, 4/43). Serotypes identified have previously been reported in turtles, and child Salmonella infections associate with pet turtle exposure. The present study clearly demonstrates that turtles in pet stores, as well as in private owners, could be a direct or indirect source of a high risk of human Salmonella infections. In addition, pet stores should advise their customers of the potential risks associated with reptile ownership.

  12. [C-11]{beta}CNT: A new monoamine uptake ligand for studying serotonin and dopamine transporter sites in the living brain with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.K.; Zheng, Q.H.; Zhou, F.C.

    1996-05-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) function in the human brain. Altered levels of 5HT and DA are recognized in drug abuse, neurotoxicities, psychiatric disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease. Several phenyltropane analogs of cocaine bind tightly to both DA and 5HT uptake proteins. We have made a new agent from this class called {beta}CNT, 2{beta}-carboxymethyl-3{beta}-(2-naphthyl)-tropane, the isosteric O-for-CH{sub 2} analog of a compound reported to have among the highest measured affinities for DA and 5HT transporters and studied its in vivo brain distributions in animals for the first time. Optically pure {beta}CNT was made from cocaine, and labeled at the O-methyl position by esterification of {beta}CNT-acid with [C-11]CH{sub 3}OTfl under conditions similar to Wilson`s. HPLC-purified (99+%) final products (15-50% eob yield from CO{sub 2}, 40 min synth) had specific activities 0.1-1.2 Ci/{mu}mol at the time of injection. Preliminary [C-11]{beta}{beta}CNT rodent distribution showed very high brain uptake (3% ID at 60 min) and localization (striat: fr cort: hypo: cer: blood, 11: 5: 4: 1: 06). {beta}CNT-PET studies in juvenile pigs (5-20 mCi, 20-35 kg) found rapid brain uptake, and prominent retention (85 min) in midbrain, anterior brainstem and striatum, followed by cortex and olfactory bulb. Paroxetine pretreatment (5HT uptake blocker, 2mg/kg), diminished retention in most brain areas; nomifensine (DA/NE uptake blocker, 6 mg/kg) reduced striatum selectively. Direct comparisons of [C-11]{beta}CNT with other PET transporter radioligands {beta}CFT, {beta}CIT, and {beta}CTT (RTI-32) in the same pig found {beta}CNT had highest overall brain uptake among the agents. These initial results suggest {beta}CNT has favorable properties for imaging both 5HT and DA transporters in vivo, and further evaluation of its potential as a human PET agent is warranted.

  13. An observational study of the potential for human exposures to pet-borne diazinon residues following lawn applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Marsha K. Stout, Daniel M.; Jones, Paul A.; Barr, Dana B.

    2008-07-15

    This study examined the potential for pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto its occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objectives were to investigate the potential exposures of occupants and their pet dogs to diazinon after an application to turf at their residences and to determine if personal contacts between occupants and their pet dogs resulted in measurable exposures. It was conducted from April to August 2001 before the Agency phased out all residential uses of diazinon in December 2004. Six families and their pet dogs were recruited into the study. Monitoring was conducted at pre-, 1, 2, 4, and 8 days post-application of a commercial, granular formulation of diazinon to the lawn by the homeowner. Environmental samples collected included soil, indoor air, carpet dust, and transferable residues from lawns and floors. Samples collected from the pet dogs consisted of paw wipes, fur clippings, and transferable residues from the fur by a technician or child wearing a cotton glove(s). First morning void (FMV) urine samples were collected from each child and his/her parent on each sampling day. Diazinon was analyzed in all samples, except urine, by GC-MS. The metabolite 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMPy) was analyzed in the urine samples by HPLC-MS/MS. Mean airborne residues of diazinon on day 1 post-application were at least six times higher in both the living rooms (235{+-}267 ng/m{sup 3}) and children's bedrooms (179{+-}246 ng/m{sup 3}) than at pre-application. Mean loadings of diazinon in carpet dust samples were at least 20 times greater on days 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.03{+-}0.04 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The pet dogs had over 900 times higher mean loadings of diazinon residues on their paws on day 1 post-application (88.1{+-}100.1 ng/cm{sup 2}) compared to mean loadings (<0.09 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The mean diazinon loadings

  14. Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of [11C]EMPA as a potential PET Tracer for Orexin 2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changning; Moseley, Christian K.; Carlin, Stephen M.; Wilson, Colin M.; Neelamegam, Ramesh; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2013-01-01

    EMPA is a selective antagonist of orexin 2 (OX2) receptors. Previous literature with [3H]-EMPA suggest that it may be used as an imaging agent for OX2 receptors; however, brain penetration is known to be modest. To evaluate the potential of EMPA as a PET radiotracer in non-human primate (as a step to imaging in man), we radiolabeled EMPA with carbon-11. Radiosynthesis of [11C]N-ethyl-2-(N-(6-methoxypyridin-3-yl)-2-methylphenylsulfonamido)-N-(pyridin-3-ylmethyl)acetamide ([11C]EMPA), and evaluation as a potential PET tracer for OX2 receptors is described. Synthesis of an appropriate non-radioactive O-desmethyl precursor was achieved from EMPA with sodium iodide and chlorotrimethylsilane. Selective O-methylation using [11C]CH3I in the presence of cesium carbonate in DMSO at room temp afforded [11C]EMPA in 1.5–2.5% yield (non-decay corrected relative to trapped [11C]CH3I at EOS) with ≥95 % chemical and radiochemical purities. The total synthesis time was 34–36 min from EOB. Studies in rodent suggested that uptake in tissue was dominated by nonspecific binding. However, [11C]EMPA also showed poor uptake in both rats and baboon as measured with PET imaging. PMID:23601709

  15. Cholinergic modulation by opioid receptor ligands: potential application to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Motel, William C; Coop, Andrew; Cunningham, Christopher W

    2013-03-01

    Morphinans have a storied history in medicinal chemistry as pain management drugs but have received attention as modulators of cholinergic signaling for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Galantamine is a reversible, competitive acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor and allosteric potentiating ligand of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR-APL) that shares many common structural elements with morphinan-based opioids. The structurally diverse opioids codeine and eseroline, like galantamine, are also nAChR-APL that have greatly diminished affinity for AChE, representing potential lead compounds for selective nAChR-APL development. In accordance with the emerging repurposing trend of evaluating known compounds for novel pharmacological activity, ongoing research on augmentation of cholinergic signaling that has been aided by the use of opioids will be reviewed. PMID:22931533

  16. A perspective on the future role of brain pet imaging in exercise science.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Henning; Drzezga, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) bears a unique potential for examining the effects of physical exercise (acute or chronic) within the central nervous system in vivo, including cerebral metabolism, neuroreceptor occupancy, and neurotransmission. However, application of Neuro-PET in human exercise science is as yet surprisingly sparse. To date the field has been dominated by non-invasive neuroelectrical techniques (EEG, MEG) and structural/functional magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI/fMRI). Despite PET having certain inherent disadvantages, in particular radiation exposure and high costs limiting applicability at large scale, certain research questions in human exercise science can exclusively be addressed with PET: The "metabolic trapping" properties of (18)F-FDG PET as the most commonly used PET-tracer allow examining the neuronal mechanisms underlying various forms of acute exercise in a rather unconstrained manner, i.e. under realistic training scenarios outside the scanner environment. Beyond acute effects, (18)F-FDG PET measurements under resting conditions have a strong prospective for unraveling the influence of regular physical activity on neuronal integrity and potentially neuroprotective mechanisms in vivo, which is of special interest for aging and dementia research. Quantification of cerebral glucose metabolism may allow determining the metabolic effects of exercise interventions in the entire human brain and relating the regional cerebral rate of glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) with behavioral, neuropsychological, and physiological measures. Apart from FDG-PET, particularly interesting applications comprise PET ligand studies that focus on dopaminergic and opioidergic neurotransmission, both key transmitter systems for exercise-related psychophysiological effects, including mood changes, reward processing, antinociception, and in its most extreme form 'exercise dependence'. PET ligand displacement approaches even allow quantifying specific endogenous

  17. Characterization of a Ligand Binding Site in the Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Pore

    PubMed Central

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule. PMID:23442958

  18. Characterization of a ligand binding site in the human transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 pore.

    PubMed

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-02-19

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of two novel 2-nitroimidazole derivatives as potential PET radioligands for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhihao; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yajing; Du, Fenghua; Gan, Hongmei; Qiao, Jinpin; Kung, Hank F.

    2011-01-01

    group, were successfully prepared. Further biological evaluations are warranted to investigate their potential as PET radioligands for imaging tumor. PMID:21531287

  20. Evaluation of Potential PET Imaging Probes for the Orexin 2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changning; Wilson, Colin M.; Moseley, Christian K.; Carlin, Stephen M.; Hsu, Shirley; Arabasz, Grae; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Sander, Christin Y.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, particularly those related to sleep, are associated with the abnormal function of orexin (OX) receptors. Several orexin receptor antagonists have been reported in recent years, but currently there are no imaging tools to probe the density and function of orexin receptors in vivo. To date there are no published data on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and accumulation of some lead orexin receptor antagonists. Evaluation of CNS pharmacokinetics in the pursuit of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer development could be used to elucidate the association of orexin receptors with diseases and to facilitate the drug discovery and development. To this end, we designed and evaluated carbon-11 labeled compounds based on diazepane orexin receptor antagonists previously described. One of the synthesized compounds, [11C]CW4 showed high brain uptake in rats and further evaluated in non-human primate (NHP) using PET-MR imaging. PET scans performed in a baboon showed appropriate early brain uptake for consideration as a radiotracer. However, [11C]CW4 exhibited fast kinetics and high nonspecific binding, as determined after co-administration of [11C]CW4 and unlabeled CW4. These properties indicate that [11C]CW4 has excellent brain penetrance and could be used as a lead compound for developing new CNS-penetrant PET imaging probes of orexin receptors. PMID:23953751

  1. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy for characterisation of membrane protein-ligand interactions and its potential for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy is a rapidly developing technique for the study of ligand binding interactions with membrane proteins, which are the major molecular targets for validated drugs and for current and foreseeable drug discovery. SPR is label-free and capable of measuring real-time quantitative binding affinities and kinetics for membrane proteins interacting with ligand molecules using relatively small quantities of materials and has potential to be medium-throughput. The conventional SPR technique requires one binding component to be immobilised on a sensor chip whilst the other binding component in solution is flowed over the sensor surface; a binding interaction is detected using an optical method that measures small changes in refractive index at the sensor surface. This review first describes the basic SPR experiment and the challenges that have to be considered for performing SPR experiments that measure membrane protein-ligand binding interactions, most importantly having the membrane protein in a lipid or detergent environment that retains its native structure and activity. It then describes a wide-range of membrane protein systems for which ligand binding interactions have been characterised using SPR, including the major drug targets G protein-coupled receptors, and how challenges have been overcome for achieving this. Finally it describes some recent advances in SPR-based technology and future potential of the technique to screen ligand binding in the discovery of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterisation of membrane protein-ligand binding.

  2. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes. PMID:17168764

  3. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes.

  4. Organometallic Palladium Complexes with a Water-Soluble Iminophosphorane Ligand as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Monica; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Sanaú, Mercedes; Marzo, Isabel; Contel, María

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new water-soluble iminophosphorane ligand TPA=N-C(O)-2BrC6H4 (C,N-IM; TPA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) 1 is reported. Oxidative addition of 1 to Pd2(dba)3 affords the orthopalladated dimer [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) as a mixture of cis and trans isomers (1:1 molar ratio) where the iminophosphorane moeity behaves as a C,N-pincer ligand. By addition of different neutral or monoanionic ligands to 2, the bridging bromide can be cleaved and a variety of hydrophilic or water-soluble mononuclear organometallic palladium(II) complexes of the type [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L-L)] (L-L = acac (3); S2CNMe2 (4); 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthrolinedisulfonic acid disodium salt C12H6N2(C6H4SO3Na)2 (5)); [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L)Br] (L = P(mC6H4SO3Na)3 (6); P(3-Pyridyl)3 (7)) and, [Pd(C6H4(C(O)N=TPA)-2}(TPA)2Br] (8) are obtained as single isomers. All new complexes were tested as potential anticancer agents and their cytotoxicity properties were evaluated in vitro against human Jurkat-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, normal T-lymphocytes (PBMC) and DU-145 human prostate cancer cells. Compounds [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) and [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(acac)] 3 (which has been crystallographically characterized) display the higher cytotoxicity against the above mentioned cancer cell lines while being less toxic to normal T-lymphocytes (peripheral blood mononuclear cells: PBMC). In addition, 3 is very toxic to cisplatin resistant Jurkat shBak indicating a cell death pathway that may be different to that of cisplatin. The interaction of 2 and 3 with plasmid (pBR322) DNA is much weaker than that of cisplatin pointing to an alternative biomolecular target for these cytotoxic compounds. All the compounds show an interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) faster than that of cisplatin. PMID:23066172

  5. Recent Progress on the Identification of Metabotropic Glutamate 4 Receptor Ligands and Their Potential Utility as CNS Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This Review describes recent activity in the advancement of ligands for the metabotropic glutamate 4 receptor subtype and their potential utility as central nervous system (CNS) therapeutics. Until recently, there was a paucity of compounds with suitable selectivity and druglike properties to elucidate the value of this target. The search for selective entities has led several groups to the investigation of allosteric modulators as a path to optimization of potential ligands. Recent efforts, discussed here, have afforded a variety of derivatives with improvements in potency, solubility, and pharmacokinetic properties that garner support for continued investigation and optimization. PMID:22860170

  6. Macrophage Membrane Potential Changes Associated with γ 2b/γ 1 Fc Receptor-Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John Ding-E; Unkeless, Jay C.; Kaback, H. Ronald; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1983-03-01

    We have studied the effects of specific ligands of the receptor for the IgG Fc fragment (FcR) on the membrane potential (Δ Psi ) of the macrophage cell line J774 by the [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium ion equilibration technique. We observe a membrane depolarization with binding of FcR ligands that is dependent on the degree of receptor crosslinking. Binding of the FcR by monovalent ligands is not sufficient to induce a significant drop in Δ Psi , but a sustained depolarization lasting ≈ 20 min occurs with insoluble multivalent ligands. This FcR-mediated depolarization can be inhibited by substitution of Na+ from the cell incubation medium with monovalent choline cation, indicating that depolarization is due to Na+ influx into the cell. The extracellular Ca2+ does not play a significant role in membrane depolarization. The depolarization response is not triggered by monoclonal antibodies directed against three other major macrophage surface antigens. The cell depolarization mediated by FcR ligands is followed by a prolonged hyperpolarization that can be partially blocked by ouabain and quinine, indicating that the hyperpolarization response is a result of a combination of a Na+, K+-ATPase activity and a Ca2+-activated K+ conductance. These data support our hypothesis that the mouse macrophage IgG FcR is a ligand-dependent ion channel.

  7. Paget Disease: A Potential Pitfall in PSMA PET for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blazak, John Kenneth; Thomas, Paul

    2016-09-01

    We present a case of an 81-year-old man with multifocal Paget disease found on bone scan that was performed for incidentally diagnosed prostate cancer. The subsequent Ga-PSMA (HBED-CC) PET scan also displayed increased uptake in the same distribution. Multiple known tumors display increased Ga-PSMA uptake due to neovasculature. We postulate that increased Ga-PSMA uptake within the pagetoid bone relates to neovascularity known to occur in Paget disease. Such pagetic uptake could result in false-positive studies for bone metastases, particularly in the setting of less typical Paget disease. PMID:27405026

  8. Latest advances in novel cannabinoid CB2 ligands for drug abuse and their therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2012-01-01

    The field of cannabinoid (CB) drug research is experiencing a challenge as the CB1 antagonist Rimonabant, launched in 2006 as an anorectic/anti-obesity drug, was withdrawn from the European market due to the complications of suicide and depression as side effects. There is interest in developing CB2 drugs without CB1 psychotropic side effects for drug-abuse treatment and therapeutic medication. The CB1 receptor was discovered predominantly in the brain, whereas the CB2 is mainly expressed in peripheral cells and tissues, and is involved in immune signal transduction. Conversely, the CB2 receptor was recently detected in the CNS, for example, in the microglial cells and the neurons. While the CB2 neurons activity remains controversial, the CB2 receptor is an attractive therapeutic target for neuropathic pain, immune system, cancer and osteoporosis without psychoactivity. This review addresses CB drug abuse and therapeutic potential with a focus on the most recent advances on new CB2 ligands from the literature as well as patents. PMID:22300098

  9. F-FDG PET/CT as a potential valuable adjunct to MRI in characterising the Brodie's abscess.

    PubMed

    Fathinul, F; Nordin, Aj

    2010-01-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis (Brodie's abscess) is essentially a problem of diagnosis, and there may be considerable difficulty in distinguishing it from other benign and malignant bone lesions. Early diagnosis of Brodie's abscess is deemed important as the disease has a good curative potential following an appropriate antibiotic treatment. Of late, PET/CT using (18)F-FDG is taking a centre stage in the imaging of bone infection though documentation on its role in characterising the feature of Brodie's abscess is exceedingly scarce. On the other hand, it is well known that MRI imaging plays a very important role in distinguishing abscess loculation from malignancy. The authors present the case of a 13-year-old boy with pain in the right heel for few months. Radiograph of the right foot revealed a lucent focus with sclerotic margin in the right calcaneum. MRI T1-weighted images were inconclusive of penumbra sign to characterise abscess cavity due to the small volume lesion. Whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan showed multiple small avid lesions at the margin of the sclerotic rim in the right calcaneum. Final diagnosis of Brodie's abscess with Klebsiella culture was confirmed via bone debridement.

  10. Synthesis of fluorine-18 labeled rhodamine B: A potential PET myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Tobias K.; Gottumukkala, Vijay; Snay, Erin; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S. Ted; Packard, Alan B.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing an 18F-labeled PET myocardial perfusion agent. Rhodamine dyes share several properties with 99mTc-MIBI, the most commonly used single-photon myocardial perfusion agent, suggesting that an 18F-labeled rhodamine dye might prove useful for this application. In addition to being lipophilic cations, like 99mTc-MIBI, rhodamine dyes are known to accumulate in the myocardium and are substrates for Pgp, the protein implicated in MDR1 multidrug resistance. As the first step in determining whether 18F-labeled rhodamines might be useful as myocardial perfusion agents for PET, our objective was to develop synthetic methods for preparing the 18F-labeled compounds so that they could be evaluated in vivo. Rhodamine B was chosen as the prototype compound for development of the synthesis because the ethyl substituents on the amine moieties of rhodamine B protect them from side reactions, thus eliminating the need to include (and subsequently remove) protecting groups. The 2′-[18F]fluoroethyl ester of rhodamine B was synthesized by heating rhodamine B lactone with [18F]fluoroethyltosylate in acetonitrile at 165°C for 30 min.using [18F]fluoroethyl tosylate, which was prepared by the reaction of ethyleneglycol ditosylate with Kryptofix 2.2.2, K2CO3, and [18F]NaF in acetonitrile for 10 min. at 90°C. The product was purified by semi-preparative HPLC to produce the 2′-[18F]-fluoroethylester in >97% radiochemical purity with a specific activity of 1.3 GBq/μmol, an isolated decay corrected yield of 35%, and a total synthesis time of 90 min. PMID:19783150

  11. Potential Application of Alchemical Free Energy Simulations to Discriminate GPCR Ligand Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Sun; Seok, Chaok; Im, Wonpil

    2015-03-10

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play fundamental roles in physiological processes by modulating diverse signaling pathways and thus have been one of the most important drug targets. Based on the fact that GPCR-mediated signaling is modulated in a ligand-specific manner such as agonist, inverse agonist, and neutral antagonist (termed ligand efficacy), quantitative characterization of the ligand efficacy is essential for rational design of selective modulators for GPCR targets. As experimental approaches for this purpose are time-, cost-, and labor-intensive, computational tools that can systematically predict GPCR ligand efficacy can have a big impact on GPCR drug design. Here, we have performed free energy perturbation molecular dynamics simulations to calculate absolute binding free energy of an inverse agonist, a neutral antagonist, and an agonist to β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) active and inactive states, respectively, in explicit lipid bilayers. Relatively short alchemical free energy calculations reveal that both the time-series of the total binding free energy and decomposed energy contributions can be used as relevant physical properties to discriminate β2-AR ligand efficacy. This study illustrates a merit of the current approach over simple, fast docking calculations or highly expensive millisecond-time scale simulations. PMID:26579772

  12. Bovine Norovirus: Carbohydrate Ligand, Environmental Contamination, and Potential Cross-Species Transmission via Oysters ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zakhour, Maha; Maalouf, Haifa; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Haugarreau, Larissa; Le Guyader, Françoise S.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are major agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Previous studies showed that some human strains bind to oyster tissues through carbohydrate ligands that are similar to their human receptors. Thus, based on presentation of shared norovirus carbohydrate ligands, oysters could selectively concentrate animal strains with increased ability to overcome species barriers. In comparison with human GI and GII strains, bovine GIII NoV strains, although frequently detected in bovine feces and waters of two estuaries of Brittany, were seldom detected in oysters grown in these estuaries. Characterization of the carbohydrate ligand from a new GIII strain indicated recognition of the alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) epitope not expressed by humans, similar to the GIII.2 Newbury2 strain. This ligand was not detectable on oyster tissues, suggesting that oysters may not be able to accumulate substantial amounts of GIII strains due to the lack of shared carbohydrate ligand and that they should be unable to contribute to select GIII strains with an increased ability to recognize humans. PMID:20709837

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bile acid compound: a potential PET imaging agent for FXR-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lina; Jiang, Dawei; Hu, Pengcheng; Li, Xiao; Shi, Hongcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng; Zhang, Lan

    2014-07-01

    The farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. The FXR has critical functions in maintaining bile acid synthesis and homeostasis, liver regeneration and tumorigenesis, intestinal diseases, intestinal tumorigenesis, cholesterol gallstone disease, cholestasis, and atherosclerosis. FXR expression is strongly downregulated in liver fibrosis, hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma compared to expression levels in adjacent normal tissues. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) is the most potent physiological ligand for FXR. CDCA was radiolabeled with (18)F based on the efficiency click reaction of 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal alkynes and organic azides for noninvasively evaluating the relationship between FXR and FXR-related disease. The PET tracer [(18)F]8 was produced by 'click' labeling and showed a high non-decay corrected radiochemical yield (end of synthesis (EOS) yield=42±3% (n=5) from aqueous [(18)F]fluoride), high radiochemical purity ( >99%), and high specific activity (>320GBq/μmol). [(18)F]8 had a high metabolic stability in vitro and in vivo. PET imaging studies in nude mice indicated a rapid uptake of the tracer into liver tissue with uniform distribution of radioactivity in the liver. Significant accumulation of radioactivity was found in the liver, gallbladder, and intestine, while no obvious uptake was observed in other organs, such as the bladder, heart, and brain. Thus, this PET tracer represents a novel tool for early detection of abnormalities in the liver and staging of neoplasms.

  14. [11C]PR04.MZ, a promising DAT ligand for low concentration imaging: synthesis, efficient 11C-0-methylation and initial small animal PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Riss, P.J.; Hooker, J.; Alexoff, D.; Kim, Sung-Won; Fowler, J.S.; Roesch, F.

    2009-05-01

    PR04.MZ was designed as a highly selective dopamine transporter inhibitor, derived from natural cocaine. Its binding profile indicates that [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ may be suited as a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of striatal and extrastriatal DAT populations. As a key feature, its structural design facilitates both, labelling with fluorine-18 at its terminally fluorinated butynyl moiety and carbon-11 at its methyl ester function. The present report concerns the efficient [{sup 11}C]MeI mediated synthesis of [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ from an O-desmethyl precursor trifluoroacetic acid salt with Rb{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in DMF in up to 95 {+-} 5% labelling yield. A preliminary {mu}PET-experiment demonstrates the reversible, highly specific binding of [{sup 11}C]PR04.MZ in the brain of a male Sprague-Dawley rat.

  15. Classification and comparison of ligand-binding sites derived from grid-mapped knowledge-based potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Christian; Steinbeck, Christoph; Wohlfahrt, Gerd

    2006-03-01

    We describe the application of knowledge-based potentials implemented in the MOE program to compare the ligand-binding sites of several proteins. The binding probabilities for a polar and a hydrophobic probe are calculated on a grid to allow easy comparison of binding sites of superimposed related proteins. The method is fast and simple enough to simultaneously use structural information of multiple proteins of a target family. The method can be used to rapidly cluster proteins into subfamilies according to the similarity of hydrophobic and polar fields of their ligand-binding sites. Regions of the binding site which are common within a protein family can be identified and analysed for the design of family-targeted libraries or those which differ for improvement of ligand selectivity. The field-based hierarchical clustering is demonstrated for three protein families: the ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors, the ATP-binding sites of protein kinases and the substrate binding sites of proteases. More detailed comparisons are presented for serine proteases of the chymotrypsin family, for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subfamily of nuclear receptors and for progesterone and androgen receptor. The results are in good accordance with structure-based analysis and highlight important differences of the binding sites, which have been also described in the literature.

  16. Effect of temperature on the release of intentionally and non-intentionally added substances from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water: chemical analysis and potential toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bach, Cristina; Dauchy, Xavier; Severin, Isabelle; Munoz, Jean-François; Etienne, Serge; Chagnon, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of temperature on the release of PET-bottle constituents into water and to assess the potential health hazard using in vitro bioassays with bacteria and human cell lines. Aldehydes, trace metals and other compounds found in plastic packaging were analysed in PET-bottled water stored at different temperatures: 40, 50, and 60°C. In this study, temperature and the presence of CO2 increased the release of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and antimony (Sb). In parallel, genotoxicity assays (Ames and micronucleus assays) and transcriptional-reporter gene assays for estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity were performed on bottled water extracts at relevant consumer exposure levels. As expected, and in accordance with the chemical formulations specified for PET bottles, neither phthalates nor UV stabilisers were present in the water extracts. However, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, a degradation compound of phenolic antioxidants, was detected. In addition, an intermediary monomer, bis(2-hydroxyethyl)terephthalate, was found but only in PET-bottled waters. None of the compounds are on the positive list of EU Regulation No. 10/2011. However, the PET-bottled water extracts did not induce any cytotoxic, genotoxic or endocrine-disruption activity in the bioassays after exposure.

  17. Potential Application of Kläui Ligands in Actinide Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Wester, Dennis W.; Li, Jun; Latesky, Stanley L.

    2006-07-31

    We have undertaken a systematic study of the complexation of Cp*Co[P(O)(OR)2]3- (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ligands with f-block metal ions (i.e., lanthanides and actinides). As part of this work, the complexation of La3+ ion with Cp*Co[P(O)(OR)2]3- ligands has been studied as the alkyl group was systematically varied from methyl to n-propyl (R = -CH3, -CH2CH3, and -CH2 CH2CH3). For ligands in which R = -CH3 or -CH2CH3, complexes with ligand-to-La stoichiometries of 1:1 and 2:1 were formed. In contrast, only the 1:1 complex was isolated when R = CH2CH2CH3. A prototypical extraction chromatography resin containing Cp*Co[P(O)(OEt)2]3- (1b) has been prepared. The resin consists of 0.75 wt% 1b on Amberlite? XAD-7. This resin strongly sorbs Am3+ and Pu4+. The sorption of these ions decreases with increasing nitric acid concentration, but this effect is more pronounced for Am3+. This allows for convenient separation of Am3+ from Pu4+ by simple adjustments in the HNO3 concentration. The tripodal geometry of 1b disfavors the complexation of UO22+, so sorption of U(VI) by the 1b-containing resin is weak.

  18. Biological redundancy of endogenous GPCR ligands in the gut and the potential for endogenous functional selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Georgina L.; Canals, Meritxell; Poole, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals. PMID:25506328

  19. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of the antipsychotic sigma receptor ligand E-5842.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Antonio; García, Concepción; Fernández de Henestrosa, Antonio R; Riley, Sue; Ruiz, Maria Teresa; Marín, Ana-Paz; Tortajada, Araceli

    2006-06-16

    The genotoxic potential of E-5842, a sigma ligand compound being developed as an antipsychotic drug, was evaluated by means of an extensive battery of in vitro and in vivo assays. Negative results were obtained in an Ames test (up to 5000 μg/plate), a mouse lymphoma assay (up to 535.1 μg/ml (-S9) and 891.8 μg/ml (+S9)), an in vivo rat hepatocyte micronucleus assay (up to 100 mg/kg/day on 2 days), and a two-dose mouse micronucleus assay (up to 40 mg/kg/day on 2 days). In a single-dose mouse bone-marrow micronucleus assay (up to 400 mg/kg; 24, 48 and 72 h sampling) a slight and non-statistically significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) was observed 48 h after administration of a 200 mg/kg dose, in the absence of bone-marrow toxicity. This minor increase in MNPCE frequency was considered of questionable biological relevance, because it was observed under conditions of marked animal toxicity including mortality. In addition, it occurred in association with a strong hypothermic effect produced by administration of E-5842. A clear increase in the frequency of structural chromosomal aberrations was observed in human lymphocytes at concentrations ≥350.6 and 1685.4 μg/ml in the presence and absence of S9, respectively. Mitotic accumulation was observed at those concentrations at which clastogenic effects were observed, a condition that may have masked toxicity. Concentrations lacking clastogenic effects in this chromosome aberration assay (300.7 and 173.2 μg/ml in the presence and absence of S9, respectively) were well in excess of maximum human plasma concentrations attained in clinical studies at the maximum tolerated dose (19.1 ng/ml). A weight-of-evidence analysis, taking into consideration the results obtained in the different in vitro and in vivo assays and the conditions of clinical use, suggest that E-5842 would not pose a genotoxic risk under clinical conditions.

  20. In-vivo human brain molecular imaging with a brain-dedicated PET/MRI system.

    PubMed

    Cho, Zang Hee; Son, Young Don; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Hang Keun; Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sang Yoon; Ogawa, Seiji; Kim, Young Bo

    2013-02-01

    Advances in the new-generation of ultra-high-resolution, brain-dedicated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) systems have begun to provide many interesting insights into the molecular dynamics of the brain. First, the finely delineated structural information from ultra-high-field MRI can help us to identify accurate landmark structures, thereby making it easier to locate PET activation sites that are anatomically well-correlated with metabolic or ligand-specific organs in the neural structures in the brain. This synergistic potential of PET/MRI imaging is discussed in terms of neuroscience and neurological research from both translational and basic research perspectives. Experimental results from the hippocampus, thalamus, and brainstem obtained with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and (11)C-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)benzonitrile are used to demonstrate the potential of this new brain PET/MRI system.

  1. Herbo-mineral based Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic potential and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Kareem, Abdul; Laxmi; Arshad, Mohammad; Nami, Shahab A A; Nishat, Nahid

    2016-07-01

    Schiff base ligand, (L), derived from condensation reaction of 1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione, (curcumin), with pyridine-3-carboxamide, (nicotinamide), and its complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions, containing 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand were synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. From the micro analytical data, the stoichiometry of the complexes 1:1 (metal: ligand) was ascertained. The Co(II) and Cu(II) forms octahedral complexes, while the geometric structure around Ni(II) atom can be described as square planar. The catalytic potential of the metal complexes have been evaluated by recording the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the percent decomposition of H2O2increases with time and the highest value (50.50%) was recorded for Co(II) complex. The ligand and its complexes were also screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The relative order of antibacterial activity against S. Pyogenes, S. aureus and E. coli is Cu(II)>Ni(II)>Co(II)>(L); while with P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae the order of activity is Cu(II)>Co(II)>Ni(II)>(L). The anthelmintic screening was performed using Pheretima posthuma. The order of anthelmintic activity of ligand and its complexes is [(Phen)CuLCl2]>[(Phen)CoLCl2]>[(Phen)NiL]Cl2>(L).

  2. Synthesis, characterisation, spectral, thermal, XRD, molecular modelling and potential antibacterial study of metal complexes containing octadentate azodye ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Bipin Bihari; Chaulia, Satyanarayan; Sarangi, Ashish Kumar; Dehury, Satyanarayan; Panda, Jnyanaranjan

    2015-05-01

    Twelve tetrametallic complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) with two new octadentate azodye ligands, 4,4‧-bis(2‧,4‧-dihydroxy-5‧carboxyphenylazo) diphenylether (LH6) and 4,4‧-bis(2‧,4‧-dihydroxy-5‧-acylphenylazo) diphenylether (L‧H4) have been synthesised. The structural elucidation of the complexes was made basing upon analytical, conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, electronic spectra, ESR, NMR, ESI-MS, TG, DTG, DTA and X-ray diffraction (powder pattern) data. The cobalt (II) and nickel (II) complexes are found to be octahedral, copper (II) complexes are distorted octahedral and a tetrahedral stereochemistry has been suggested to zinc (II), cadmium (II) and mercury (II) complexes. The thermal analysis data provided the kinetic parameters as order of decomposition reaction, activation energy and frequency factor. The geometry of the ligands and their Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes were optimised and their physicochemical properties were calculated by using molecular modelling procedure. The ESI-MS determination supports the molecular formula and molecular weight of the ligands and the complexes. The Ni(II) complex is found to have a triclinic crystal system. The potential antibacterial study of the two ligands and eight metal complexes was made by cup-plate method against one gram positive and one gram negative bacteria. The results showed increase in the activity of some metal complexes as compare with azodye ligands.

  3. Herbo-mineral based Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic potential and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Kareem, Abdul; Laxmi; Arshad, Mohammad; Nami, Shahab A A; Nishat, Nahid

    2016-07-01

    Schiff base ligand, (L), derived from condensation reaction of 1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione, (curcumin), with pyridine-3-carboxamide, (nicotinamide), and its complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions, containing 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand were synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. From the micro analytical data, the stoichiometry of the complexes 1:1 (metal: ligand) was ascertained. The Co(II) and Cu(II) forms octahedral complexes, while the geometric structure around Ni(II) atom can be described as square planar. The catalytic potential of the metal complexes have been evaluated by recording the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the percent decomposition of H2O2increases with time and the highest value (50.50%) was recorded for Co(II) complex. The ligand and its complexes were also screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The relative order of antibacterial activity against S. Pyogenes, S. aureus and E. coli is Cu(II)>Ni(II)>Co(II)>(L); while with P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae the order of activity is Cu(II)>Co(II)>Ni(II)>(L). The anthelmintic screening was performed using Pheretima posthuma. The order of anthelmintic activity of ligand and its complexes is [(Phen)CuLCl2]>[(Phen)CoLCl2]>[(Phen)NiL]Cl2>(L). PMID:27107703

  4. Potential role of pet animals in household transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Bramble, Manuel; Morris, Daniel; Tolomeo, Pam; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-06-01

    In this narrative review, we found numerous reports suggesting that dogs and cats may play a role in household methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and recurrent MRSA infection in human contacts. Future work should emphasize elucidating more clearly the prevalence of MRSA in household pets and characterize transmission dynamics of MRSA humans and pet animals.

  5. Potential role of pet animals in household transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Bramble, Manuel; Morris, Daniel; Tolomeo, Pam; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-06-01

    In this narrative review, we found numerous reports suggesting that dogs and cats may play a role in household methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and recurrent MRSA infection in human contacts. Future work should emphasize elucidating more clearly the prevalence of MRSA in household pets and characterize transmission dynamics of MRSA humans and pet animals. PMID:21142959

  6. Electrophilic PPARγ ligands inhibit corneal fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation in vitro: a potentially novel therapy for corneal scarring.

    PubMed

    Kuriyan, A E; Lehmann, G M; Kulkarni, A A; Woeller, C F; Feldon, S E; Hindman, H B; Sime, P J; Huxlin, K R; Phipps, R P

    2012-01-01

    A critical component of corneal scarring is the TGFβ-induced differentiation of corneal keratocytes into myofibroblasts. Inhibitors of this differentiation are potentially therapeutic for corneal scarring. In this study, we tested the relative effectiveness and mechanisms of action of two electrophilic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands: cyano-3,12-dioxolean-1,9-dien-28-oic acid-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) and 15-deoxy-Δ(-12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) for inhibiting TGFβ-induced myofibroblast differentiation in vitro. TGFβ was used to induce myofibroblast differentiation in cultured, primary human corneal fibroblasts. CDDO-Me and 15d-PGJ(2) were added to cultures to test their ability to inhibit this process. Myofibroblast differentiation was assessed by measuring the expression of myofibroblast-specific proteins (αSMA, collagen I, and fibronectin) and mRNA (αSMA and collagen III). The role of PPARγ in the inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation by these agents was tested in genetically and pharmacologically manipulated cells. Finally, we assayed the importance of electrophilicity in the actions of these agents on TGFβ-induced αSMA expression via Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Both electrophilic PPARγ ligands (CDDO-Me and 15d-PGJ(2)) potently inhibited TGFβ-induced myofibroblast differentiation, but PPARγ was only partially required for inhibition of myofibroblast differentiation by either agent. Electrophilic PPARγ ligands were able to inhibit myofibroblast differentiation more potently than non-electrophilic PPARγ ligands, suggesting an important role of electrophilicity in this process. CDDO-Me and 15d-PGJ(2) are strong inhibitors of TGFβ-induced corneal fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation in vitro, suggesting this class of agents as potential novel therapies for corneal scarring warranting further study in pre-clinical animal models.

  7. Detection of brain metastasis with 68Ga-labeled PSMA ligand PET/CT: a novel radiotracer for imaging of prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Kumar, Rajiv; Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan Jyoti; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastasis in prostate cancer is rare and not expected at initial presentation especially when the patient is asymptomatic for the same. A 45-year-old male patient undergoing initial evaluation for newly diagnosed prostatic adenocarcinoma was referred to our department for 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy. As part of the study protocol, he also underwent Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)] (68Ga-PSMA) PET/CT, which revealed tracer accumulation in brain lesions, apart from localization in the primary, lymph node, and bone metastases. A subsequent MR evaluation confirmed brain metastases.

  8. Opioid ligands having delayed long-term antagonist activity: potential pharmacotherapies for opioid abuse.

    PubMed

    Husbands, Stephen M; Lewis, John W

    2003-03-01

    Buprenorphine is a partial agonist at the micro -opioid receptor with long duration of action and also exhibits delayed antagonist activity. Buprenorphine is finding increasing use as a treatment agent for opioid abuse, though its low efficacy is not well tolerated by all addicts. There is interest in developing a higher efficacy version of buprenorphine and in this mini-review some of the ligands recently discovered, that share with buprenorphine a profile of agonism followed by delayed antagonism, are discussed.

  9. Household Hazards to Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... health by becoming aware of the most common health hazards found in many pet-owning households. Hazards in the Kitchen Foods Many foods are perfectly safe for humans, but could be harmful or potentially deadly to ...

  10. Selective fluorescence sensing of Cu(II) and Zn(II) using a simple Schiff base ligand: naked eye detection and elucidation of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Soumen; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2015-05-15

    A simple Schiff base compound 2-((cyclohexylmethylimino)-methyl)-naphthalen-1-ol (2CMIMN1O) has been synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. A significantly low emission yield of the compound has been rationalized in anticipation with photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the imine receptor moiety to the naphthalene fluorophore unit. Consequently, an evaluation of the transition metal ion-induced modification of the fluorophore-receptor communication reveals the promising prospect of the title compound to function as a chemosensor for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions selectively, through remarkable fluorescence enhancement as well as visual changes. While perturbation of the PET process has been argued to be the plausible mechanism behind the fluorescence enhancement, the selectivity for these two metal ions has been interpreted on the grounds of an appreciably strong binding interaction. Particularly notable aspects regarding the chemosensory activity of the compound is its ability to detect the aforesaid transition metal ions down to the level of micromolar concentration (detection limit being 2.74 and 2.27ppm respectively), along with a simple and efficient synthetic procedure.

  11. Selective fluorescence sensing of Cu(II) and Zn(II) using a simple Schiff base ligand: naked eye detection and elucidation of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Soumen; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2015-05-15

    A simple Schiff base compound 2-((cyclohexylmethylimino)-methyl)-naphthalen-1-ol (2CMIMN1O) has been synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. A significantly low emission yield of the compound has been rationalized in anticipation with photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the imine receptor moiety to the naphthalene fluorophore unit. Consequently, an evaluation of the transition metal ion-induced modification of the fluorophore-receptor communication reveals the promising prospect of the title compound to function as a chemosensor for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions selectively, through remarkable fluorescence enhancement as well as visual changes. While perturbation of the PET process has been argued to be the plausible mechanism behind the fluorescence enhancement, the selectivity for these two metal ions has been interpreted on the grounds of an appreciably strong binding interaction. Particularly notable aspects regarding the chemosensory activity of the compound is its ability to detect the aforesaid transition metal ions down to the level of micromolar concentration (detection limit being 2.74 and 2.27ppm respectively), along with a simple and efficient synthetic procedure. PMID:25721777

  12. Selective fluorescence sensing of Cu(II) and Zn(II) using a simple Schiff base ligand: Naked eye detection and elucidation of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Soumen; Kar, Samiran; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2015-05-01

    A simple Schiff base compound 2-((cyclohexylmethylimino)-methyl)-naphthalen-1-ol (2CMIMN1O) has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. A significantly low emission yield of the compound has been rationalized in anticipation with photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the imine receptor moiety to the naphthalene fluorophore unit. Consequently, an evaluation of the transition metal ion-induced modification of the fluorophore-receptor communication reveals the promising prospect of the title compound to function as a chemosensor for Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions selectively, through remarkable fluorescence enhancement as well as visual changes. While perturbation of the PET process has been argued to be the plausible mechanism behind the fluorescence enhancement, the selectivity for these two metal ions has been interpreted on the grounds of an appreciably strong binding interaction. Particularly notable aspects regarding the chemosensory activity of the compound is its ability to detect the aforesaid transition metal ions down to the level of micromolar concentration (detection limit being 2.74 and 2.27 ppm respectively), along with a simple and efficient synthetic procedure.

  13. Pet Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for your family. What is each ... Does anyone have pet allergies? What type of animal suits your lifestyle and budget? Once you own ...

  14. Potential New Ligand Systems for Binding Uranyl Ions in Seawater Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2014-12-13

    Work began this quarter on a new project involving a combined computational and biosynthetic approach to selective recognition of uranyl ion in aqueous solution. This project exploits the results of computational studies to discover new ligand classes. Synthetic studies will follow to generate target systems for uranyl binding and determination of binding constants. The process will be iterative, with results from computation informing synthesis, and vice versa. The theme of the ligand classes to be examined initially will be biologically based. New phosphonate-containing α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers were used recently to prepare well-defined phosphonate-containing poly-peptides and block copolypeptides. Our first approach is to utilize these phosphate- and phosphonate-containing NCAs for the coordination of uranyl. The work includes the laboratory-scale preparation of a series of NCAs and the full thermodynamic and spectroscopic characterization of the resulting uranyl complexes. We are also evaluating the sequestering activity in different physiological and environmental conditions of these copolymers as well as their biodegradability.

  15. Recent developments in adenosine receptor ligands and their potential as novel drugs☆

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christa E.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal chemical approaches have been applied to all four of the adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) to create selective agonists and antagonists for each. The most recent class of selective AR ligands to be reported is the class of A2BAR agonists. The availability of these selective ligands has facilitated research on therapeutic applications of modulating the ARs and in some cases has provided clinical candidates. Prodrug approaches have been developed which improve the bioavailability of the drugs, reduce side-effects, and/or may lead to site-selective effects. The A2A agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan®), a diagnostic drug for myocardial perfusion imaging, is the first selective AR agonist to be approved. Other selective agonists and antagonists are or were undergoing clinical trials for a broad range of indications, including capadenoson and tecadenoson (A1 agonists) for atrial fibrillation, or paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, respectively, apadenoson and binodenoson (A2A agonists) for myocardial perfusion imaging, preladenant (A2A antagonist) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, and CF101 and CF102 (A3 agonists) for inflammatory diseases and cancer, respectively. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: “Adenosine Receptors”. PMID:21185259

  16. 18F-FDG PET/CT for identifying the potential causes and extent of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Leilei; Kan, Ying; Meeks, Jacqui K.; Ma, Daqing; Yang, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the value of 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for identifying the possible causes of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). METHODS Forty-five cases (17 female, 28 male; age, 17–79 years) with secondary HLH were included. The standard of reference for diagnosis in all patients was a combination of histology, clinical results (medical history, physical examination, and laboratory test results), and follow-up imaging for at least 12 months. All cases underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT to identify the possible trigger in HLH. RESULTS Of 45 secondary HLH cases 10 (22.2%) were associated with infection, seven (15.6%) with rheumatic disease, and 28 (62.2%) with lymphoma. PET/CT images of 22 secondary HLH cases (48.9%) showed true positive results. PET/CT images demonstrated obvious tracer uptake in five of 10 secondary HLH cases with infection, one of three cases with lupus, two of two cases with rheumatoid arthritis, one of two cases with adult-onset Still disease, and 13 of 28 cases with lymphoma. CONCLUSION PET/CT is helpful for identifying the possible trigger (infection or malignant disease) and extent of secondary HLH. However, PET/CT alone is not sufficient to make a correct differential diagnosis. PMID:27537853

  17. An alternative Fc gamma-receptor ligand: potential role in T-cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, M; Galon, J; Takacs, L; Tatsumi, Y; Mueller, A L; Sautes, C; Lynch, R G

    1994-01-01

    Fetal pre-T cells express low-affinity receptors for IgG (Fc gamma R) at a developmental stage prior to the rearrangement and expression of immunoglobulin genes. The present studies investigated the possible functional significance of Fc gamma R on fetal pre-T cells. Between 13 and 17 days of fetal development a subpopulation of T-cell receptor-, Thy-1+ thymocytes express for gamma R. The same cells contain mRNA for several forms of Fc gamma R (Fc gamma RII beta 1, beta 2, and Fc gamma RIII). Concurrently, a Pgp-1-, Thy-1-, surface-immunoglobulin- fetal thymic cell binds recombinant soluble Fc gamma R. In principle this cell can interact with the pre-T cells through this counter-receptor. To test this possibility anti-Fc gamma RII/III antibody (2.4G2) was injected into pregnant mice and then into their offspring for 6 wk postpartum. The injected antibody induced a slight increase in the proportion of CD4 or CD8 single-positive, alpha/beta T cells in the thymus. However, in fetal thymic cultures in the presence of 2.4G2 or the recombinant soluble Fc gamma R there was an accelerated differentiation of thymocytes to single-positive, CD3-bright, heat-stable antigen-dull, alpha/beta T cells. These experiments show that Fc gamma Rs are present on pre-T cells during early fetal thymic development, and that a non-IgG ligand of the Fc gamma R is expressed concurrently on Thy- fetal thymocytes. Furthermore, the presumed interaction of Fc gamma R and the alternative ligand(s) influences T-cell development. IgG binding could be an adapted function of Fc gamma Rs, and, as shown for many members of the Ig super family, these receptors may have originally served as cell-cell recognition/interaction molecules required for hematopoietic development. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7809135

  18. Nitroimidazole conjugates of bis(thiosemicarbazonato)64Cu(II) - Potential combination agents for the PET imaging of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bonnitcha, Paul D; Bayly, Simon R; Theobald, Mark B M; Betts, Helen M; Lewis, Jason S; Dilworth, Jonathan R

    2010-02-01

    Combination agents comprising two different pharmacophores with the same biological target have the potential to show additive or synergistic activity. Bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) complexes (e.g. (64)Cu-ATSM) and nitroimidazoles (e.g. (18)F-MISO) are classes of tracer used for the delineation of tumor hypoxia by positron emission tomography (PET). Three nitroimidazole-bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) conjugates were produced in order to investigate their potential as combination hypoxia imaging agents. Two were derived from the known bifunctional bis(thiosemicarbazone) H(2)ATSM/A and the third from the new precursor diacetyl-2-(4-N-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone)-3-(4-N-ethylamino-3-thiosemicarbazone) - H(2)ATSM/en. Oxygen-dependent uptake studies were performed using the (64)Cu radiolabelled complexes in EMT6 carcinoma cells. All the complexes displayed appreciable hypoxia selectivity, with the nitroimidazole conjugates displaying greater selectivity than a simple propyl derivative used as a control. Participation of the nitroimidazole group in the trapping mechanism is indicated by the increased hypoxic uptake of the 2- vs. the 4-substituted (64)Cu-ATSM/A derivatives. The 2-nitroimidazole derivative of (64)Cu-ATSM/en demonstrated superior hypoxia selectivity to (64)Cu-ATSM over the range of oxygen concentrations tested. Biodistribution of the radiolabelled 2-nitroimidazole conjugates was carried out in EMT6 tumor-bearing mice. The complexes showed significantly different uptake trends in comparison to each other and previously studied Cu-ATSM derivatives. Uptake of the Cu-ATSM/en conjugate in non-target organs was considerably lower than for derivatives based on Cu-ATSM/A.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of novel tropane derivatives as potential PET imaging agents for the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hongwen; Zhu, Lin; Lieberman, Brian P.; Zha, Zhihao; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    A novel series of tropane derivatives containing a fluorinated tertiary amino or amide at the 2β position was synthesized, labeled with the positron-emitter fluorine-18 (T1/2 = 109.8 min), and tested as potential in vivo dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging agents. The corresponding chlorinated analogs were prepared and employed as precursors for radiolabeling leading to the fluorine-18-labeled derivatives via a one-step nucleophilic aliphatic substitution reaction. In vitro binding results showed that the 2β-amino compounds 6b, 6d and 7b displayed moderately high affinities to DAT (Ki < 10 nM). Biodistribution studies of [18F]6b and [18F]6d showed that the brain uptakes in rats were low. This is likely due to their low lipophilicities. Further structural modifications of these tropane derivatives will be needed to improve their in vivo properties as DAT imaging agents. PMID:22658558

  20. The Dipole Potential Modifies the Clustering and Ligand Binding Affinity of ErbB Proteins and Their Signaling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Tamás; Batta, Gyula; Hajdu, Tímea; Szabó, Ágnes; Váradi, Tímea; Zákány, Florina; Csomós, István; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although activation of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbB1-4) is driven by oligomerization mediated by intermolecular interactions between the extracellular, the kinase and the transmembrane domains, the transmembrane domain has been largely neglected in this regard. The largest contributor to the intramembrane electric field, the dipole potential, alters the conformation of transmembrane peptides, but its effect on ErbB proteins is unknown. Here, we show by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and number and brightness (N&B) experiments that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced increase in the homoassociation of ErbB1 and ErbB2 and their heteroassociation are augmented by increasing the dipole potential. These effects were even more pronounced for ErbB2 harboring an activating Val → Glu mutation in the transmembrane domain (NeuT). The signaling capacity of ErbB1 and ErbB2 was also correlated with the dipole potential. Since the dipole potential decreased the affinity of EGF to ErbB1, the augmented growth factor-induced effects at an elevated dipole potential were actually induced at lower receptor occupancy. We conclude that the dipole potential plays a permissive role in the clustering of ErbB receptors and that the effects of lipid rafts on ligand binding and receptor signaling can be partially attributed to the dipole potential. PMID:27775011

  1. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    reinnervation, and understand the pathogenesis of arrhytmias. The other uncommon applications of cardiac PET include NaF imaging to identify calcium deposition in atherosclerotic plaques and β-amyloid imaging to diagnose cardiac amyloid involvement. 18F-FDG imaging with a novel PET/MR camera has been reported to be very sensitive and specific for the differentiation between malignant and nonmalignant cardiac masses. The other potential applications of PET/MR are cardiac infectious/inflammatory conditions such as endocarditis. PMID:26035516

  2. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry in Humans of a New PET Ligand, 18F-PBR06, to Image Translocator Protein (18 kDa)

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yota; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Siméon, Fabrice G.; Dickstein, Leah P.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    As a PET biomarker for inflammation, translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) can be measured with an 18F-labeled aryloxyanilide, 18F-N-fluoroacetyl-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-phenoxyaniline (18F-PBR06), in the human brain. The objective of this study was to estimate the radiation absorbed doses of 18F-PBR06 based on biodistribution data in humans. Methods After the injection of 18F-PBR06, images were acquired from head to thigh in 7 healthy humans. Urine was collected at various time points. Radiation absorbed doses were estimated by the MIRD scheme. Results Moderate to high levels of radioactivity were observed in organs with high densities of TSPO and in organs of metabolism and excretion. Bone had low levels of radioactivity. The effective dose was 18.5 µSv/MBq. Conclusion The effective dose of 18F-PBR06, compared with other 18F radioligands, was moderate. This radioligand had negligible defluorination, as indirectly assessed by bone radioactivity. Doses to the gallbladder wall and spleen may limit the amount of permissible injected radioactivity. PMID:20008980

  3. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  4. False Suggestion of Malignant Transformation of Benign Bone Tumor by 18F-FDG PET/CT: A Potential Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ren; Kuo, Yu-Cheng; Hsu, Cheng-Nan; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-10-01

    A 68-year-old man underwent serial F-FDG PET/CT scan follow-up for lung cancer. Then 5.5 years after the initial F-FDG PET/CT scan, the presumed benign bone tumor in the left clavicle showed markedly increased FDG uptake during follow-up; in contrast, the Tc-MDP bone scan paradoxically exhibited no apparent interval change since last bone scan 5.5 years earlier. He underwent a CT-guided biopsy, and the pathological diagnosis was benign fibrous histiocytoma. The result was consistent with the lack of progression in Tc-MDP bone scan, whereas the F-FDG PET/CT scan gave a false-positive impression of malignant transformation. PMID:27556801

  5. A novel ligand of calcitonin receptor reveals a potential new sensor that modulates programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Furness, SGB; Hare, DL; Kourakis, A; Turnley, AM; Wookey, PJ

    2016-01-01

    We have discovered that the accumulation of an anti-calcitonin receptor (anti-CTR) antibody conjugated to a fluorophore (mAb2C4:AF568) provides a robust signal for cells undergoing apoptotic programmed cell death (PCD). PCD is an absolute requirement for normal development of metazoan organisms. PCD is a hallmark of common diseases such as cardiovascular disease and tissue rejection in graft versus host pathologies, and chemotherapeutics work by increasing PCD. This robust signal or high fluorescent events were verified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in several cell lines and a primary culture in which PCD had been induced. In Jurkat cells, GBM-L2 and MG63 cells, the percentage undergoing PCD that were positive for both mAb2C4:AF568 and annexin V ranged between 70 and >90%. In MG63 cells induced for the preapoptotic cell stress response (PACSR), the normal expression of α-tubulin, a key structural component of the cytoskeleton, and accumulation of mAb2C4:AF568 were mutually exclusive. Our data support a model in which CTR is upregulated during PACSR and recycles to the plasma membrane with apoptosis. In cells committed to apoptosis (α-tubulin negative), there is accumulation of the CTR-ligand mAb2C4:AF568 generating a high fluorescent event. The reagent mAb2C4:AF568 effectively identifies a novel event linked to apoptosis. PMID:27777788

  6. Kinetics of protein-ligand unbinding via smoothed potential molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Luca; Decherchi, Sergio; Zia, Syeda Rehana; Gaspari, Roberto; Cavalli, Andrea; Rocchia, Walter

    2015-06-01

    Drug discovery is expensive and high-risk. Its main reasons of failure are lack of efficacy and toxicity of a drug candidate. Binding affinity for the biological target has been usually considered one of the most relevant figures of merit to judge a drug candidate along with bioavailability, selectivity and metabolic properties, which could depend on off-target interactions. Nevertheless, affinity does not always satisfactorily correlate with in vivo drug efficacy. It is indeed becoming increasingly evident that the time a drug spends in contact with its target (aka residence time) can be a more reliable figure of merit. Experimental kinetic measurements are operatively limited by the cost and the time needed to synthesize compounds to be tested, to express and purify the target, and to setup the assays. We present here a simple and efficient molecular-dynamics-based computational approach to prioritize compounds according to their residence time. We devised a multiple-replica scaled molecular dynamics protocol with suitably defined harmonic restraints to accelerate the unbinding events while preserving the native fold. Ligands are ranked according to the mean observed scaled unbinding time. The approach, trivially parallel and easily implementable, was validated against experimental information available on biological systems of pharmacological relevance.

  7. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Belinda A.; Callahan, Jason; Bressel, Mathias; Simoens, Nathalie; Everitt, Sarah; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Burbury, Kate; MacManus, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required.

  8. FDG PET imaging in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sobic-Saranovic, Dragana; Artiko, Vera; Obradovic, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the clinical utility of FDG-PET/CT for evaluation of patients with chronic sarcoidosis. The emphasis was on the potential advantages and disadvantages of this technique in these patients based on which recommendations were made. The advantage of FDG-PET/CT technique is that it can visualize FDG accumulation in activated inflammatory cells and simultaneously provide PET and CT images. Of particular interest is the use of FDG-PET/CT for the staging and identification of occult sites and sites suitable for biopsy and for the assessment of inflammatory active sarcoidosis in patients with prolonged symptoms, especially when other markers of the disease are within normal values. FDG-PET/CT also provides a better visualization of extrathoracic sites of active sarcoidosis, such as in the bones, liver, spleen, and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The use of FDG-PET/CT is of special interest in cardiac sarcoidosis because this potentially life-threatening disease is sometimes present in asymptomatic patients. FDG-PET/CT also has a role in the clinical management of patients with chronic persistent sarcoidosis, such as for planning treatment, monitoring response, and long-term follow-up. The limitations of FDG-PET/CT in patients with sarcoidosis are discussed in the context of a "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome" and potentially excessive radiation exposure. Further prospective multicentre studies are needed to refine the clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in patients with sarcoidosis and drive the field forward.

  9. A ¹¹C-labeled 1,4-dihydroquinoline derivative as a potential PET tracer for imaging of redox status in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Toshimitsu; Okada, Maki; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2015-12-01

    A disturbance in redox balance has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. This study sought to examine the feasibility of imaging brain redox status using a (11)C-labeled dihydroquinoline derivative ([(11)C]DHQ1) for positron emission tomography (PET). The lipophilic PET tracer [(11)C]DHQ1 was rapidly oxidized to its hydrophilic form in mouse brain homogenate. The redox modulators diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin significantly reduced the initial velocity of [(11)C]DHQ1 oxidation, and apocynin also caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the initial velocity. Moreover, [(11)C]DHQ1 readily entered the brain by diffusion after administration and underwent oxidation into the hydrophilic cationic form, which then slowly decreased. By contrast, apocynin treatment inhibited the in vivo oxidation of [(11)C]DHQ1 to the hydrophilic cationic form, leading to a rapid decrease of radioactivity in the brain. Thus, the difference in the [(11)C]DHQ1 kinetics reflects the alteration in redox status caused by apocynin. In conclusion, [(11)C]DHQ1 is a potential PET tracer for imaging of redox status in the living brain.

  10. SU-D-9A-01: Listmode-Driven Optimal Gating (OG) Respiratory Motion Management: Potential Impact On Quantitative PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K; Hristov, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential impact of listmode-driven amplitude based optimal gating (OG) respiratory motion management technique on quantitative PET imaging. Methods: During the PET acquisitions, an optical camera tracked and recorded the motion of a tool placed on top of patients' torso. PET event data were utilized to detect and derive a motion signal that is directly coupled with a specific internal organ. A radioactivity-trace was generated from listmode data by accumulating all prompt counts in temporal bins matching the sampling rate of the external tracking device. Decay correction for 18F was performed. The image reconstructions using OG respiratory motion management technique that uses 35% of total radioactivity counts within limited motion amplitudes were performed with external motion and radioactivity traces separately with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) with 2 iterations and 21 subsets. Standard uptake values (SUVs) in a tumor region were calculated to measure the effect of using radioactivity trace for motion compensation. Motion-blurred 3D static PET image was also reconstructed with all counts and the SUVs derived from OG images were compared with SUVs from 3D images. Results: A 5.7 % increase of the maximum SUV in the lesion was found for optimal gating image reconstruction with radioactivity trace when compared to a static 3D image. The mean and maximum SUVs on the image that was reconstructed with radioactivity trace were found comparable (0.4 % and 4.5 % increase, respectively) to the values derived from the image that was reconstructed with external trace. Conclusion: The image reconstructed using radioactivity trace showed that the blurring due to the motion was reduced with impact on derived SUVs. The resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with radioactivity trace were comparable to the resolution and contrast of the images reconstructed with external respiratory traces. Research supported by Siemens.

  11. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  12. A 3-D QSAR-BASED IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHM FOR POTENTIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports concerning the lethal effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on amphibians suggest that this stressor has the potential to impact some amphibian populations. In this study embryos and larvae of three anuran species, Rana pipiens, R. clamitans, and R. septe...

  13. Radiosynthesis of Carbon-11 Labeled Puromycin as a Potential PET Candidate for Imaging Protein Synthesis in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Milicevic Sephton, Selena; Aigbirhio, Franklin I

    2016-06-01

    In order to address the limitations associated with the present range of PET radiotracers used for imaging protein synthesis in vivo we have synthesized a candidate PET radiotracer based on Puromycin (3, PURO), a protein synthesis inhibitor. The desmethylPURO 9 precursor for radiolabeling with carbon-11 radioisotope was synthesized in two steps employing EDC/HOBt amide coupling in overall 76% yield. Optimal conditions for radiolabeling were then established via methylation/deprotection sequence. Under these conditions as determined by NMR analysis 9 showed partial stability (ca. 80%) under acidic conditions. Limited evidence of stereochemical stability of 3 was also found. The radiolabeling of intermediate [(11)C]12 was accomplished with up to 57% conversion from [(11)C]iodomethane. An automated method was then developed for high radioactivity radiosynthesis to produce [(11)C]3 ([(11)C]PURO) in 16 ± 6% (n = 3) decay corrected radiochemical yields. PMID:27326342

  14. Estrogen Receptors Alpha (ERα) and Beta (ERβ): Subtype-Selective Ligands and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Paterni, Ilaria; Granchi, Carlotta; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Minutolo, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological processes in humans. Modulation of these receptors by prospective therapeutic agents is currently being considered for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and osteoporosis. This review provides an overview and update of compounds that have been recently reported as modulators of ERs, with a particular focus on their potential clinical applications. PMID:24971815

  15. Recycled-PET fibre based panels for building thermal insulation: environmental impact and improvement potential assessment for a greener production.

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Carlo; Lo Giudice, Agata; Tricase, Caterina; Rana, Roberto; Mbohwa, Charles; Siracusa, Valentina

    2014-09-15

    A screening of Life Cycle Assessment for the evaluation of the damage arising from the production of 1 kg of recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (RPET) fibre-based panel for building heat insulation was carried out according to the ISO 14040:2006 and 14044:2006. All data used were collected on site based on observations during site visits, review of documents and interviews with technical personnel and management. These data were processed by using SimaPro 7.3.3, accessing the Ecoinvent v.2.2 database and using the Impact 2002+ method. The study showed damage to be equal to 0.000299 points mostly due to the: 1) PET thermo-bonding fibre supply from China by means of a freight-equipped intercontinental aircraft; 2) production of bottle-grade granulate PET; 3) medium voltage electricity consumption during the manufacturing of RPET fibre panel. It was also highlighted that there were environmental benefits due to recycling through mainly avoiding significant emissions and reduced resource consumption. An improvement assessment was carried out to find solutions aimed at reducing the damage coming from the most impacting phases. Furthermore, the environmental impacts due to the production of the analysed RPET fibre-based panel were compared to other materials with the same insulating function, such as polystyrene foam, rock wool and cork slab. Finally, the environmental benefits of the recycling of PET bottles for flake production were highlighted compared to other treatment scenarios such as landfill and municipal incineration.

  16. Adsorbents made from waste ashes and post-consumer PET and their potential utilization in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Shen; Itoh, Hideaki

    2003-08-01

    This study was carried out to prepare low-cost adsorbents from different types of waste ashes and post-consumer PET for use in industrial wastewater treatment. PET was melted and blended with ashes. The mixture was then carbonized to form different types of adsorbents. Heavy metal leaching from the adsorbents was greatly reduced compared to leaching from the bulk ashes. The BET surface area of the adsorbents ranged from 115 to 485m(2)/g. The acidic sites on the adsorbents varied from 0.84 to 1.56meq./g, higher than that of the PET carbon. The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) or heavy metals on the adsorbents was not in accordance with their surface areas because acidic sites reaction, affinity adsorption and cation exchange all contribute to the adsorption of the adsorbents. The isotherm for MB adsorption on the adsorbents can be well described by the Langmuir or Freundlich equation but heavy metal adsorption cannot. It is believed that the adsorbents produced in this manner can be used in wastewater treatments for discoloration and heavy metal removal.

  17. Adsorbents made from waste ashes and post-consumer PET and their potential utilization in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Shen; Itoh, Hideaki

    2003-08-01

    This study was carried out to prepare low-cost adsorbents from different types of waste ashes and post-consumer PET for use in industrial wastewater treatment. PET was melted and blended with ashes. The mixture was then carbonized to form different types of adsorbents. Heavy metal leaching from the adsorbents was greatly reduced compared to leaching from the bulk ashes. The BET surface area of the adsorbents ranged from 115 to 485m(2)/g. The acidic sites on the adsorbents varied from 0.84 to 1.56meq./g, higher than that of the PET carbon. The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) or heavy metals on the adsorbents was not in accordance with their surface areas because acidic sites reaction, affinity adsorption and cation exchange all contribute to the adsorption of the adsorbents. The isotherm for MB adsorption on the adsorbents can be well described by the Langmuir or Freundlich equation but heavy metal adsorption cannot. It is believed that the adsorbents produced in this manner can be used in wastewater treatments for discoloration and heavy metal removal. PMID:12935763

  18. Potential Pitfall in the Assessment of Lung Cancer with FDG-PET/CT: Talc Pleurodesis Causes Intrathoracic Nodal FDG Avidity

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Brett W.; Muse, Victorine; Digumarthy, Subba; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Sharma, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Talc pleurodesis is a common procedure performed to treat complications related to lung cancer. The purpose of our study was to characterize any thoracic nodal findings on FDG PET/CT associated with prior talc pleurodesis. Materials and Methods. The electronic medical record identified 44 patients who underwent PET/CT between January 2006 and December 2010 and had a history of talc pleurodesis. For each exam, we evaluated the distribution pattern, size, and attenuation of intrathoracic lymph nodes and the associated standardized uptake value. Results. High-attenuation intrathoracic lymph nodes were noted in 11 patients (25%), and all had corresponding increased FDG uptake (range 2–9 mm). Involved nodal groups were anterior peridiaphragmatic (100%), paracardiac (45%), internal mammary (25%), and peri-IVC (18%) nodal stations. Seven of the 11 patients (63%) had involvement of multiple lymph nodal groups. Mean longitudinal PET/CT and standalone CT followups of 15 ± 11 months showed persistence of both high-attenuation and increased uptake at these sites, without increase in nodal size suggesting metastatic disease involvement. Conclusions. FDG avid, high-attenuation lymph nodes along the lymphatic drainage pathway for parietal pleura are a relatively common finding following talc pleurodesis and should not be mistaken for nodal metastases during the evaluation of patients with history of lung cancer. PMID:26316941

  19. Recycled-PET fibre based panels for building thermal insulation: environmental impact and improvement potential assessment for a greener production.

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Carlo; Lo Giudice, Agata; Tricase, Caterina; Rana, Roberto; Mbohwa, Charles; Siracusa, Valentina

    2014-09-15

    A screening of Life Cycle Assessment for the evaluation of the damage arising from the production of 1 kg of recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (RPET) fibre-based panel for building heat insulation was carried out according to the ISO 14040:2006 and 14044:2006. All data used were collected on site based on observations during site visits, review of documents and interviews with technical personnel and management. These data were processed by using SimaPro 7.3.3, accessing the Ecoinvent v.2.2 database and using the Impact 2002+ method. The study showed damage to be equal to 0.000299 points mostly due to the: 1) PET thermo-bonding fibre supply from China by means of a freight-equipped intercontinental aircraft; 2) production of bottle-grade granulate PET; 3) medium voltage electricity consumption during the manufacturing of RPET fibre panel. It was also highlighted that there were environmental benefits due to recycling through mainly avoiding significant emissions and reduced resource consumption. An improvement assessment was carried out to find solutions aimed at reducing the damage coming from the most impacting phases. Furthermore, the environmental impacts due to the production of the analysed RPET fibre-based panel were compared to other materials with the same insulating function, such as polystyrene foam, rock wool and cork slab. Finally, the environmental benefits of the recycling of PET bottles for flake production were highlighted compared to other treatment scenarios such as landfill and municipal incineration. PMID:25006757

  20. Reproducibility of quantitative measures of binding potential in rat striatum: A test re-test study using DTBZ dynamic PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Avendaño-Estrada, A. Lara-Camacho, V. M. Ávila-García, M. C. Ávila- Rodríguez, M. A.

    2014-11-07

    There is great interest in the study of dopamine (DA) pathways due to the increasing number of patients with illnesses related to the dopaminergic system and molecular imaging based in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been proven helpful for this task. Among the different radiopharmaceuticals available to study DA interaction, [{sup 11}C]Dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has a high affinity for the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) and its binding potential (BP) is a marker of DA terminal integrity. This paper reports on the intersubject reproducibility of BP measurements in rat striatum with [11C]DTBZ using the Logańs method.

  1. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christine M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  2. Progress in developing cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin receptor ligands which have therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Tapia, Jose A.; Sancho, Veronica; Jensen, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gastrin and CCK are two of the oldest hormones and within the last 15 years there has been an exponential increase in knowledge of their pharmacology, cell biology, receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) and roles in physiology and pathological conditions. Despite these advances there is no approved disease indication for CCK receptor antagonists and only minor use of agonists. In this review the important factors determining this slow therapeutic development are reviewed. To assess this it is necessary to briefly review what is known about the roles of CCK receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) in normal human physiology, their role in pathologic conditions, the selectivity of available potent CCKR agonists/antagonists as well as review their use in human conditions to date and the results. Despite extensive studies in animals and some in humans, recent studies suggest that monotherapy with CCK1R agonists will not be effective in obesity, nor CCK2R antagonists in panic disorders or CCK2R antagonists to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer. Areas that require more study include the use of CCK2R agonists for imaging tumors and radiotherapy, CCK2R antagonists in hypergastrinemic states especially with long term PPI use and for potentiation of analgesia as well as use of CCK1R antagonists for a number of gastrointestinal disorders [motility disorders (irritable bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, constipation) and pancreatitis (acute, chronic)]. PMID:17997137

  3. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component of PET/CT and PET/MRI in MM patients. The study includes 30 MM patients. All patients initially underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT (60 min p.i.), followed by PET/MRI (120 min p.i.). PET/CT and PET/MRI data were assessed and compared based on qualitative (lesion detection) and quantitative (SUV) evaluation. The hybrid PET/MRI system provided good image quality in all cases without artefacts. PET/MRI identified 65 of the 69 lesions, which were detectable with PET/CT (94.2%). Quantitative PET evaluations showed the following mean values in MM lesions: SUVaverage=5.5 and SUVmax=7.9 for PET/CT; SUVaverage=3.9 and SUVmax=5.8 for PET/MRI. Both SUVaverage and SUVmax were significantly higher on PET/CT than on PET/MRI. Spearman correlation analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between both lesional SUVaverage (r=0.744) and lesional SUVmax (r=0.855) values derived from PET/CT and PET/MRI. Regarding detection of myeloma skeletal lesions, PET/MRI exhibited equivalent performance to PET/CT. In terms of tracer uptake quantitation, a significant correlation between the two techniques was demonstrated, despite the statistically significant differences in lesional SUVs between PET/CT and PET/MRI. PMID:26550538

  4. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Aminoalkylindole Derivatives as Cannabinoid Receptor Ligands with Potential for Treatment of Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Vasiljevik, Tamara; Franks, Lirit N.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Douglas, Justin T.; Prather, Paul L.; Fantegrossi, William E.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation of increased endocannabinoid signaling with a CB1R neutral antagonist might offer a new therapeutic direction for treatment of alcohol abuse. We have recently reported that a mono-hydroxylated metabolite of the synthetic aminoalkylindole cannabinoid JHW-073 (3) exhibits neutral antagonist activity at CB1Rs and thus may serve as a promising lead for the development of novel alcohol abuse therapies. In the current study, we show that systematic modification of an aminoalkylindole scaffold identified two new compounds with dual CB1R antagonist/CB2R agonist activity. Similar to the CB1R antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant, analogues 27 and 30 decrease oral alcohol self-administration, without affecting total fluid intake and block the development of alcohol-conditioned place preference. Collectively, these initial findings suggest that design and systematic modification of aminoalkylindoles such as 3 may lead to development of novel cannabinoid ligands with dual CB1R antagonist/CB2R agonist activity with potential for use as treatments of alcohol abuse. PMID:23631463

  5. System with potential dual modes of metal-ligand cooperation: highly catalytically active pyridine-based PNNH-Ru pincer complexes.

    PubMed

    Fogler, Eran; Garg, Jai Anand; Hu, Peng; Leitus, Gregory; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2014-11-24

    Metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) plays an important role in catalysis. Systems reported so far are generally based on a single mode of MLC. We report here a system with potential for MLC by both amine-amide and aromatization-dearomatization ligand transformations, based on a new class of phosphino-pyridyl ruthenium pincer complexes, bearing sec-amine coordination. These pincer complexes are effective catalysts under unprecedented mild conditions for acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols to esters at 35 °C and hydrogenation of esters at room temperature and 5 atm H2. The likely actual catalyst, a novel, crystallographically characterized monoanionic de-aromatized enamido-Ru(II) complex, was obtained by deprotonation of both the N-H and the methylene proton of the N-arm of the pincer ligand. PMID:25331061

  6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of ¹⁸F-labeled fluoropropyl tryptophan analogs as potential PET probes for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Chiotellis, Aristeidis; Mu, Linjing; Müller, Adrienne; Selivanova, Svetlana V; Keller, Claudia; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    In the search for an efficient, fluorine-18 labeled amino acid based radiotracer for tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET), two new tryptophan analogs were synthesized and characterized in vitro and in vivo. Both are tryptophan alkyl-derivatives, namely 2-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-DL-tryptophan ([(18)F]2-FPTRP) and 5-(3-[(18)F]fluoro-propyl)-DL-tryptophan ([(18)F]5-FPTRP). Standard reference compounds and precursors were prepared by multi step approaches. Radiosynthesis was achieved by no-carrier-added nucleophilic [(18)F]fluorination in 29-34% decay corrected yields with radiochemical purity over 99%. In vitro cell uptake assays showed that both compounds are substrates for amino acid transport and enter small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H69) most probably almost exclusively via large neutral amino acids transporter(s) (LAT). Small animal PET imaging with xenograft bearing mice revealed high tumor/background ratios for [(18)F]2-FPTRP comparable to the well established tyrosine analog O-(2-[(18)F]fluroethyl)-L-tyrosine ([(18)F]FET). Radiometabolite studies showed no evidence of involvement of a biotransformation step in tumor accumulation.

  9. Imatinib Analogs as Potential Agents for PET Imaging of Bcr-Abl/c-KIT Expression at a Kinase Level

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenghong; Maxwell, David S.; Sun, Duoli; Bhanu Prasad, Basvoju A.; Pal, Ashutosh; Wang, Shimei; Balatoni, Julius; Ghosh, Pradip; Lim, Seok T.; Volgin, Andrei; Shavrin, Aleksander; Alauddin, Mian M.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Bornmann, William G.

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized two series of imatinib mesylate (STI-571) analogs to develop a Bcr-Abl and c-KIT receptor-specific labeling agent for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure Bcr-Abl and c-KIT expression levels in a mouse model. The methods of molecular modeling, synthesis of STI-571 and its analogs, in vitro kinase assays, and radiolabeling are described. Molecular modeling revealed that these analogs bind the same Bcr-Abl and c-KIT binding sites as those bound by STI-571. The analogs potently inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl and c-KIT, similarly to STI-571. [18F]-labeled STI-571 was prepared with high specific activity (75 GBq/μmol) by nucleophilic displacement and an average radiochemical yield of 12%. [131I]-labeled STI-571 was prepared with high purity (>95%) and an average radiochemical yield of 23%. The uptake rates of [18F]-STI-571 in K562 cells expressing Abl and in U87WT cells overexpressing c-KIT were significantly higher than those in the U87 cell and could be inhibited by STI-71 (confirming the specificity of uptake). PET scans of K562 and U87WT tumor-bearing mice with [18F]-STI-571 as a contrast agent showed visible tumor uptake and tumor-to-non-target contrast. PMID:24280068

  10. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL): a potential candidate for combined treatment of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Secchiero, Paola; Vaccarezza, Mauro; Gonelli, Arianna; Zauli, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF gene superfamily, which induces apoptosis through engagement of death receptors. TRAIL is unusual as compared to the other cytokines of this family, as it interacts with a complex system of receptors consisting of two pro-apoptotic death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2) and three decoy receptors (TRAIL-R3, TRAIL-R4 and osteoprotegerin). Moreover, with respect to other members of the TNF superfamily, such as CD95L and TNF-alpha, TRAIL has generated great interest as a potential tumor-specific cancer therapeutic because as a stable soluble trimer it selectively induces apoptosis in many transformed cells but not in normal cells. Of note, TRAIL cytotoxicity is at least partially independent of the major systems involved in resistance to chemotherapy, such as p53 wild-type function and multidrug resistance (MDR) genes. Since one fundamental problem of most cancers is the development of multiple mechanisms of resistance, which progressively reduce or suppress the therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapy, new therapeutic approaches that either restore the pro-apoptotic activity of chemotherapeutic drugs or by-pass the mechanisms of resistance are highly desirable. This review will focus on the potential of TRAIL for its application in the therapy of hematological malignancies, used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The scenario emerging from the literature is that the treatment and management of hematological malignancies will require the rational combination of TRAIL plus conventional or new drugs in a regimen that would optimize the anti-neoplastic activity in malignant cells resistant to chemotherapy through restoration of the pro-apoptotic activity of TRAIL. PMID:15579063

  11. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  12. Uptake of 18F-DCFPyL in Paget’s Disease of Bone, an Important Potential Pitfall in Clinical Interpretation of PSMA PET Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Deville, Curtiland; Paller, Channing; Cho, Steve Y.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Pomper, Martin G.; Ross, Ashley E.; Gorin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging is an emerging technique for evaluating patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in a variety of clinical contexts. As with any new imaging modality, there are interpretive pitfalls that are beginning to be recognized. In this image report, we describe the findings in a 63-year-old male with biochemically recurrent PCa after radical prostatectomy who was imaged with 18F-DCFPyL, a small molecule inhibitor of PSMA. Diffuse radiotracer uptake was noted throughout the sacrum, corresponding to imaging findings on contrast-enhanced CT, bone scan, and pelvic MRI consistent with Paget’s disease of bone. The uptake of 18F-DCFPyL in Paget’s disease is most likely due to hyperemia and increased radiotracer delivery. In light of the overlap in patients affected by PCa and Paget’s, it is important for nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists interpreting PSMA PET/CT scans to be aware of the potential for this diagnostic pitfall. Correlation to findings on conventional imaging such as diagnostic CT and bone scan can help confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26807444

  13. The potential of FDG PET/CT for early diagnosis of cardiac device and prosthetic valve infection before morphologic damages ensue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wengen; Kim, Jongho; Molchanova-Cook, Olga P; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac mechanical device or prosthesis valve infection, and more importantly accurate localization of the infection site, such as defibrillator pocket, pacemaker lead, annular or peri-annular valve ring abscesses remain clinically challenging. Inconclusive diagnosis can lead to delayed antibiotic therapy, device extraction or surgical intervention, which may have dire consequences to the patient. Among patients with suspected cardiac mechanical device or prosthetic valve infection, recent publications advocate the use of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography (FDG PET/CT), particularly when anatomy based imaging studies, such as echocardiography or CT, are uncertain or negative. A potential advantage of FDG PET/CT is in its detection of inflammatory cells early in the infection process, before morphologic damages ensue. However, there are many unanswered questions in the literature. There is a need for standardization amongst the various imaging studies, such as dietary preparation, duration and timing of image acquisition, image processing with and without CT attenuation correction, and more importantly image interpretation criteria. The answer for these issues awaits well designed, prospective studies.

  14. 18F-FDG PET/CT as a potential valuable adjunct to MRI in characterising the Brodie’s abscess

    PubMed Central

    Fathinul, F; Nordin, AJ

    2010-01-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis (Brodie’s abscess) is essentially a problem of diagnosis, and there may be considerable difficulty in distinguishing it from other benign and malignant bone lesions. Early diagnosis of Brodie’s abscess is deemed important as the disease has a good curative potential following an appropriate antibiotic treatment. Of late, PET/CT using 18F-FDG is taking a centre stage in the imaging of bone infection though documentation on its role in characterising the feature of Brodie’s abscess is exceedingly scarce. On the other hand, it is well known that MRI imaging plays a very important role in distinguishing abscess loculation from malignancy. The authors present the case of a 13-year-old boy with pain in the right heel for few months. Radiograph of the right foot revealed a lucent focus with sclerotic margin in the right calcaneum. MRI T1-weighted images were inconclusive of penumbra sign to characterise abscess cavity due to the small volume lesion. Whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan showed multiple small avid lesions at the margin of the sclerotic rim in the right calcaneum. Final diagnosis of Brodie’s abscess with Klebsiella culture was confirmed via bone debridement. PMID:21611044

  15. Evaluation of carbon-11-labeled 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-[4'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl]nortropane as a potential radioligand for imaging the serotonin transporter by PET.

    PubMed

    Plisson, Christophe; Jarkas, Nachwa; McConathy, Jon; Voll, Ronald J; Votaw, John; Williams, Larry; Howell, Leonard L; Kilts, Clinton D; Goodman, Mark M

    2006-02-01

    The nortropane cocaine analogue, 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-[4'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl]nortropane (ZIENT), is a high affinity, selective serotonin transporter (SERT) ligand that has shown promise as a SERT imaging agent for single photon computed tomography (SPECT) when labeled with I-123. Synthesis of the labeling precursor, radiosynthesis of [(11)C]ZIENT, and in vivo evaluation in anesthetized and awake monkeys have been performed to determine the suitability of [(11)C]ZIENT as a PET agent for SERT imaging. PMID:16451060

  16. Determination of ζ-potential, charge, and number of organic ligands on the surface of water soluble quantum dots by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Voráčová, Ivona; Klepárník, Karel; Lišková, Marcela; Foret, František

    2015-03-01

    The number of charges and/or organic ligands covalently attached to the surface of CdTe quantum dot nanoparticles has been determined from their electrophoretic mobilities measured in capillaries filled with free electrolyte buffers. Three sizes of water soluble CdTe quantum dots with 3-mercaptopropionic and thioglycolic acids as surface ligands were prepared. Their electrophoretic mobilities in different pH and ionic strength values of separation buffers were measured by capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection. The ζ-potentials determined from electrophoretic mobilities using analytical solution of Henry function proposed by Ohshima were in the range from -30 to -100 mV. Charges of QDs were calculated from ζ-potentials. As a result, numbers of organic ligands bonded to QDs surface were determined to be 13, 14, and 15 for the sizes of 3.1, 3.5, and 3.9 nm, respectively. The dissociation constants of organic ligands bonded on QDs surfaces estimated from the dependence of QDs charge on pH of the separation buffer were 7.8 and 7.9 for 3-mercaptopropionic acid and 6.9 for thioglycolic acid. PMID:25521532

  17. Syntheses of 2-amino and 2-halothiazole derivatives as high-affinity metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 ligands and potential radioligands for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T; Pike, Victor W

    2011-02-10

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu(5) ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu(5) ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed subnanomolar mGlu(5) affinity. 10b also displayed >10000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [(18)F]fluoride ion (t(1/2) = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu(5) with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu(5) and may also serve as a lead to a potential (123)I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu(5) with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  18. Syntheses of 2-Amino and 2-Halothiazole Derivatives as High-Affinity Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Ligands and Potential Radioligands for In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T.; Pike, Victor W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu5 ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu5 ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed sub-nanomolar mGlu5 affinity. 10b also displayed >10,000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [18F]fluoride ion (t1/2 = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu5 with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu5 and may also serve as a lead to a potential 123I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu5 with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  19. Tuning redox potentials of bis(imino)pyridine cobalt complexes: an experimental and theoretical study involving solvent and ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Moyses Araujo, C.; Doherty, Mark D.; Konezny, Steven J.; Luca, Oana R.; Usyatinsky, Alex; Grade, Hans; Lobkovsky, Emil; Soloveichik, Grigorii L.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Batista, Victor S.

    2012-01-01

    The structure and electrochemical properties of a series of bis(imino)pyridine CoII complexes (NNN)CoX₂ and [(NNN)₂Co][PF₆]₂ (NNN = 2,6-bis[1-(4-R-phenylimino)ethyl]pyridine, with R = CN, CF₃, H, CH₃, OCH₃, N(CH₃)₂; NNN = 2,6-bis[1-(2,6-(iPr)₂-phenylimino)ethyl]pyridine and X = Cl, Br) were studied using a combination of electrochemical and theoretical methods. Cyclic voltammetry measurements and DFT/B3LYP calculations suggest that in solution (NNN)CoCl₂ complexes exist in equilibrium with disproportionation products [(NNN)₂Co]²⁺ [CoCl₄]²⁻ with the position of the equilibrium heavily influenced by both the solvent polarity and the steric and electronic properties of the bis(imino)pyridine ligands. In strong polar solvents (e.g., CH₃CN or H₂O) or with electron donating substituents (R = OCH₃ or N(CH₃)₂) the equilibrium is shifted and only oxidation of the charged products [(NNN)₂Co]²⁺ and [CoCl₄]²⁻ is observed. Conversely, in nonpolar organic solvents such as CH₂Cl₂ or with electron withdrawing substituents (R = CN or CF₃), disproportionation is suppressed and oxidation of the (NNN)CoCl₂ complexes leads to 18e⁻ CoIII complexes stabilized by coordination of a solvent moiety. In addition, the [(NNN)₂Co][PF₆]₂ complexes exhibit reversible CoII/III oxidation potentials that are strongly dependent on the electron withdrawing/donating nature of the N-aryl substituents, spanning nearly 750 mV in acetonitrile. The resulting insight on the regulation of redox properties of a series of bis(imino)pyridine cobalt(II) complexes should be particularly valuable to tune suitable conditions for reactivity.

  20. Symposium on research advances in clinical PET. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Michael McGehee

    1992-01-01

    The Institute for Clinical PET and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) co-sponsored a symposium entitled 'Research in PET: International and Institutional Perspectives' that highlighted the activities of many leading investigators in the U.S. and throughout the world. Research programs at the DOE were discussed as were potential directions of PET research. International as well as institutional perspectives on PET research were presented. This symposium was successful in reaching those interested in research advances of clinical PET.

  1. Highly efficient one-pot labeling of new phosphonium cations with fluorine-18 as potential PET agents for myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zuoquan; Yu, Qian; Mou, Tiantian; Liu, Chang; Yang, Wenjiang; Fang, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Lu, Jie; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2014-11-01

    Lipophilic cations such as phosphonium salts can accumulate in mitochondria of heart in response to the negative inner-transmembrane potentials. Two phosphonium salts [(18)F]FMBTP and [(18)F]mFMBTP were prepared and evaluated as potential myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) agents in this study. The cations were radiolabeled via a simplified one-pot method starting from [(18)F]fluoride and followed by physicochemical property tests, in vitro cellular uptake assay, ex vivo mouse biodistribution, and in vivo rat microPET imaging. The total radiosynthesis time was less than 60 min including HPLC purification. The [(18)F] labeled compounds were obtained in high radiolabeling yield (∼50%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). Both compounds were electropositive, and their log P values at pH 7.4 were 1.16 ± 0.003 (n = 3) and 1.05 ± 0.01 (n = 3), respectively. Both [(18)F]FMBTP and [(18)F]mFMBTP had high heart uptake (25.24 ± 2.97% ID/g and 31.02 ± 0.33% ID/g at 5 min postinjection (p.i.)) in mice with good retention (28.99 ± 3.54% ID/g and 26.82 ± 3.46% ID/g at 120 min p.i.). From the PET images in rats, the cations exhibited high myocardium uptake and fast clearance from liver and small intestine to give high-contrast images across all time points. These phosphonium cations were radiosynthesized via a highly efficient one-pot procedure for potential MPI offering high heart accumulation and rapid nontarget clearance.

  2. Identification of diaryl ether-based ligands for estrogen-related receptor α as potential antidiabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Patch, Raymond J; Searle, Lily L; Kim, Alexander J; De, Debyendu; Zhu, Xizhen; Askari, Hossein B; O'Neill, John C; Abad, Marta C; Rentzeperis, Dionisios; Liu, Jianying; Kemmerer, Michael; Lin, Ling; Kasturi, Jyotsna; Geisler, John G; Lenhard, James M; Player, Mark R; Gaul, Micheal D

    2011-02-10

    Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) is an orphan nuclear receptor that has been functionally implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Herein is described the development of diaryl ether based thiazolidenediones, which function as selective ligands against this receptor. Series optimization provided several potent analogues that inhibit the recruitment of a coactivator peptide fragment in in vitro biochemical assays (IC(50) < 150 nM) and cellular two-hybrid reporter assays against the ligand binding domain (IC(50) = 1-5 μM). A cocrystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of ERRα with lead compound 29 revealed the presence of a covalent interaction between the protein and ligand, which has been shown to be reversible. In diet-induced murine models of obesity and in an overt diabetic rat model, oral administration of 29 normalized insulin and circulating triglyceride levels, improved insulin sensitivity, and was body weight neutral. This provides the first demonstration of functional activities of an ERRα ligand in metabolic animal models.

  3. Recent Developments in PET Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used in the clinic and in vivo small animal research to study molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders, and to guide the discovery and development of new treatments. This paper reviews current challenges of advancing PET technology and some of newly developed PET detectors and systems. The paper focuses on four aspects of PET instrumentation: high photon detection sensitivity; improved spatial resolution; depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution and time-of-flight (TOF). Improved system geometry, novel non-scintillator based detectors, and tapered scintillation crystal arrays are able to enhance the photon detection sensitivity of a PET system. Several challenges for achieving high resolution with standard scintillator-based PET detectors are discussed. Novel detectors with 3-D positioning capability have great potential to be deployed in PET for achieving spatial resolution better than 1 mm, such as cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) and position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). DOI capability enables a PET system to mitigate parallax error and achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view (FOV). Six common DOI designs, as well as advantages and limitations of each design, are discussed. The availability of fast scintillation crystals such as LaBr3, and the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) greatly advances TOF-PET development. Recent instrumentation and initial results of clinical trials are briefly presented. If successful, these technology advances, together with new probe molecules, will substantially enhance the molecular sensitivity of PET and thus increase its role in preclinical and clinical research as well as evaluating and managing disease in the clinic. PMID:20497121

  4. A fast chemo-enzymatic synthesis of [11C]-N5,N10-methylenetetrahydrofolate as a potential PET tracer for proliferating cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Muhammad; Tewson, Timothy J.; Erdahl, Colbin E.; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thymidylate synthase (TSase) and folate receptors (FRs) are well developed targets of cancer therapy. Discovery of a simple and fast method for the conversion of 11CH3I to [11C]-formaldehyde (11CH2O) encouraged us to label the co-factor of this enzyme. Preliminary studies conducted on cell lines have demonstrated a preferential uptake of [11-14C]-(R)-N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (14CH2H4folate) by cancerous cell vs. normal cells from the same organ [1] pointing out 11CH2H4folate as a PET tracer for cancer imaging. Herein we report the synthesis of 11CH2H4folate, which may serve as a potential positron emission tomography (PET) tracer. Methods In a remotely controlled module, 11CH3I was bubbled into a reaction vial containing trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) in DMF and heated to 70 °C for 2 min. 11CH2O formed after the completion of reaction was then mixed with a solution of freshly prepared tetrahydrofolate (H4folate) by using a fast chemo-enzymatic approach to accomplish synthesis of 11CH2H4folate. Purification of the product was carried out by loading the crude reaction mixture on a SAX cartridge, washing with water to remove unbound impurities and finally eluting with a saline solution. Results The synthesis and purification of 11CH2H4folate was completed within 5 min. HPLC analysis of the product after SAX purification indicate more than 90% of the radioactivity that was retained on the SAX cartridge was in 11CH2H4folate with minor (<10%) radioactivity due to unreacted 11CH2O. Conclusion We present a fast (~5 min) synthesis and purification of 11CH2H4folate, as a potential PET tracer. The final product is received in physiological compatible buffer (100 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7.0 containing 500 mM NaCl) and ready for use in vivo. PMID:22300960

  5. Pet Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Kim

    1994-01-01

    This resource guide presents information on a variety of ways that animals can be used as a therapeutic modality with people having disabilities. Aspects addressed include: pet ownership and selection criteria; dogs (including service dogs, hearing/signal dogs, seeing leader dogs, and social/specialty dogs); horseriding for both therapy and fun;…

  6. Reduced retinoid signaling in the skin after systemic retinoid-X receptor ligand treatment in mice with potential relevance for skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Mihály, Johanna; Gericke, Janine; Aydemir, Gamze; Weiss, Kathrin; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Garcia, Javier; Rühl, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Retinoid-X receptor (RXR)- and retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-mediated signaling is induced by retinoic acids (RA), which are involved in the regulation of skin permeability, differentiation and immune response. Dysregulation of retinoid signaling is present in various skin disorders. Topically and systemically administered synthetic RAR or RXR agonists might influence retinoid-mediated signaling in the skin of RARE reporter animals and gene expression analysis for retinoid, skin homeostasis and skin inflammation marker genes and local retinoid concentrations. Mice were treated orally and topically with synthetic ligands and bioimaging, QRT-PCR and retinoid analysis were performed. Topical application of the synthetic RAR ligand AM580 significantly enhanced retinoid signaling in skin while topical application of the RXR ligand LG268 did not influence retinoic acid receptor response elements (RARE)-mediated signaling. Systemic treatments with LG268 decreased the expression of genes involved in skin homeostasis, RA synthesis and skin RA concentrations, while it increased various markers for skin inflammation and RA degradation, which corresponds to decreased skin RARE signaling. We conclude from these observations that increased systemic concentrations of an RXR -ligand may be one reason for reduced retinoid signaling, -reduced all-trans RA levels in the skin, reduced epidermal homeostasis and increased skin inflammation marker expression with potential relevance for various skin disorders, like atopic dermatitis.

  7. High performance polyester concrete using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic wastes could be used in production of unsaturated polyester resins. In turn, these resins could be mixed with inorganic aggregates to produce polymer concrete (PC). Unsaturated polyesters based on recycled PET might be a potentially lower source cost of resins for producing useful PC based-products. The advantage of recycling PET in PC is that the PET materials do not have to be purified, including removal of colors, to the same extent as other PET recycling applications, which should facilitate the recycling operation and minimize its cost. The recycling of PET in PC could also help save energy and allow the long term disposal of the PET waste, an important advantage in recycling applications.

  8. Novel synthesis and initial preclinical evaluation of (18)F-[FDG] labeled rhodamine: a potential PET myocardial perfusion imaging agent.

    PubMed

    AlJammaz, Ibrahim; Al-Otaibi, Basim; AlHindas, Hussein; Okarvi, Subhani M

    2015-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is one of the most commonly performed investigations in nuclear medicine studies. Due to the clinical importance of [(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) and its availability in almost every PET center, a new radiofluorinated [(18)F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate was synthesized using [(18)F]-FDG as a prosthetic group. In a convenient and simple one-step radiosynthesis, [(18)F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate was prepared in quantitative radiochemical yields, with total synthesis time of nearly 20 min and radiochemical purity of greater than 98%, without the need for HPLC purification, which make these approaches amenable for automation. Biodistribution studies in normal rats at 60 min post-injection demonstrated a high uptake in the heart (>11% ID/g) and favorable pharmacokinetics. Additionally, [(18)F]-FDG-rhodamine showed an extraction value of 27.63%±5.12% in rat hearts. These results demonstrate that [(18)F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate may be useful as an imaging agent for the positron emission tomography evaluation of myocardial perfusion. PMID:26160144

  9. An attractive cis-effect of hydride on neighbor ligands: Experimental and theoretical studies on the structure and intramolecular rearrangements of Fe(H) sub 2 (. eta. sup 2 -H sub 2 )(PEtPh sub 2 ) sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Sluys, L.S.; Huffman, J.C.; Caulton, K.G. ); Eckert, J.; Hall, J.H.; Kubas, G.J.; Vergamini, P.J. ); Eisenstein, O.; Jackson, S.A. ); Koetzle, T.F. )

    1990-06-06

    The compound of formula FeH{sub 4}(PEtPh{sub 2}){sub 3} has been established by neutron diffraction to possess the structure and linkage cis,mer-Fe(H{sub 2})(PEtPh{sub 2}){sub 3}, and thus be generally similar in structure to cis,mer-Fe(H){sub 2}(N{sub 2})(PEtPh{sub 2}){sub 3}, whose structure has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The Fe-hydride distances in Fe(H){sub 2}(PEtPh{sub 2}){sub 3} are 1.538 (7) {angstrom} (trans to H{sub 2}) and 1.514 (6) {angstrom} (trans to PEtPh{sub 2}), and the Fe-H (of H{sub 2}) distances are 1.607 (8) and 1.576 (9) {angstrom}. The H-H distance in coordinated dihydrogen is 0.821 (10) {angstrom}, but the H-H bond adopts an orientation unique among structurally characterized octahedral H{sub 2} complexes: staggered with respect to the cis Fe-P and Fe-H axes. Vibrational frequencies of the Fe(H){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) substructure have been measured by difference inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy. Neutron scattering also reveals the low-frequency rotational tunneling splitting, allowing estimation of the height of the torsional barrier for coordinated H{sub 2} rotating about its midpoint ({approximately}1 kcal/mol).

  10. Some metal complexes of three new potentially heptadentate (N4O3) tripodal Schiff base ligands; synthesis, characterizatin and X-ray crystal structure of a novel eight coordinate Gd(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Moradi, Somaeyh; Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Blackman, Allan G.

    2016-03-01

    The symmetrical and asymmetrical potentially heptadentate (N4O3) tripodal Schiff base ligands (H3L1-H3L3) were synthesized from the condensation reaction of three tripodal tetraamine ligands tpt (trpn), tris (3-aminopropyl) amine; ppe (abap), (2-aminoethyl)bis(3-aminopropyl)amine, and tren, tris(2-aminoethyl)amine, with 5-methoxysalicylaldehyde. Then, the reaction of Ln(III) (Ln = Gd, La and Sm), Al(III), and Fe(III) metal ions with the above ligands was investigated. The resulting compounds were characterized by IR, mass spectrometry and elemental analysis in all cases and NMR spectroscopy in the case of the Schiff base ligands. The X-ray crystal structure of the Gd complex of H3L3 ligand showed that in addition to all donor atoms of the ligand one molecule of H2O is also coordinated to the metal ion and a neutral eight-coordinate complex is formed.

  11. Simple synthesis of carbon-11 labeled styryl dyes as new potential PET RNA-specific, living cell imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Gao, Mingzhang; Miller, Kathy D; Sledge, George W; Hutchins, Gary D; Zheng, Qi-Huang

    2009-05-01

    A new type of styryl dyes have been developed as RNA-specific, live cell imaging probes for fluorescent microscopy technology to study nuclear structure and function. This study was designed to develop carbon-11 labeled styryl dyes as new probes for biomedical imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of RNA in living cells. Precursors (E)-2-(2-(1-(triisopropylsilyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)vinyl)quinoline (2), (E)-2-(2,4,6-trimethoxystyryl)quinoline (3) and (E)-4-(2-(6-methoxyquinolin-2-yl)vinyl)-N,N-diemthylaniline (4), and standards styryl dyes E36 (6), E144 (7) and F22 (9) were synthesized in multiple steps with moderate to high chemical yields. Precursor 2 was labeled by [(11)C]CH(3)OTf, trapped on a cation-exchange CM Sep-Pak cartridge following a quick deprotecting reaction by addition of (n-Bu)(4)NF in THF, and isolated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) purification to provide target tracer [(11)C]E36 ([(11)C]6) in 40-50% radiochemical yields, decay corrected to end of bombardment (EOB), based on [(11)C]CO(2). The target tracers [(11)C]E144 ([(11)C]7) and [(11)C]F22 ([(11)C]9) were prepared by N-[(11)C]methylation of the precursors 3 and 4, respectively, using [(11)C]CH(3)OTf and isolated by SPE method in 50-70% radiochemical yields at EOB. The specific activity of the target tracers [(11)C]6, [(11)C]7 and [(11)C]9 was in a range of 74-111GBq/mumol at the end of synthesis (EOS).

  12. Measuring dopaminergic function in the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat: a comparison of PET and microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background [18 F]fluorodopa (FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of levodopa (LDOPA) metabolism and is widely used to study Parkinson's disease. We examined how [18 F]FDOPA PET-derived kinetic parameters relate the dopamine (DA) and DA metabolite content of extracellular fluid measured by microdialysis to aid in the interpretation of data from both techniques. Methods [18 F]FDOPA PET imaging and microdialysis measurements were performed in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats (n = 8) and normal control rats (n = 3). Microdialysis testing included baseline measurements and measurements following acute administration of LDOPA. PET imaging was also performed using [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ), which is a ligand for the vesicular monoamine transporter marker and allowed assessment of denervation severity. Results The different methods provided highly correlated data. Lesioned rats had reduced DA metabolite concentrations ipsilateral to the lesion (p < 0.05 compared to controls), with the concentration being correlated with FDOPA's effective distribution volume ratio (EDVR; r = 0.86, p < 0.01) and DTBZ's binding potential (BPND; r = 0.89, p < 0.01). The DA metabolite concentration in the contralateral striatum of severely (>80%) lesioned rats was lower (p < 0.05) than that of less severely lesioned rats (<80%) and was correlated with the ipsilateral PET measures (r = 0.89, p < 0.01 for BPND) but not with the contralateral PET measures. EDVR and BPND in the contralateral striatum were not different from controls and were not correlated with the denervation severity. Conclusions The demonstrated strong correlations between the PET and microdialysis measures can aid in the interpretation of [18 F]FDOPA-derived kinetic parameters and help compare results from different studies. The contralateral striatum was affected by the lesioning and so cannot always serve as an unaffected control. PMID:24088510

  13. Ligands Binding and Molecular Simulation: the Potential Investigation of a Biosensor Based on an Insect Odorant Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  14. Ligands binding and molecular simulation: the potential investigation of a biosensor based on an insect odorant binding protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xin; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Peidan; Qi, Jiangwei; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Based on mimicking biological olfaction, biosensors have been applied for the detection of various ligands in complex environment, which could represent one of the most promising research fields. In this study, the basic characters of one insect odorant binding protein (OBP) as a biosensor were explored. To explore the molecular recognition process, the tertiary structure of the protein was modeled and the protein-ligand interactions with 1,536,550 chemicals were investigated by the molecular docking. The availability of large amount of recombinant SlitOBP1 overcame the difficulty to obtain biological sensing material. After obtained the purified recombinant protein, the result of fluorescence binding assays proved the candidate protein has good affinities with the majority of the tested chemicals. With the aid of simulation docking, the key conserved amino acids within the binding site were identified and then mutated to alanine. After mutation, the protein-ligand binding characteristics were recorded, and the competitive binding assays were carried out to provide experimental verification. The detailed information on its structure and affinities investigated in this study could allow the design of specific mutants with desired characteristics, which provides a solid base for tailoring OBP for biosensor and provides a role model for screening the other elements in olfactory system for different applications. PMID:25552932

  15. Functional Selectivity in CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Signaling and Regulation: Implications for the Therapeutic Potential of CB2 Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K.; Wager-Miller, James; Haskins, Christopher; Straiker, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Receptor internalization increases the flexibility and scope of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors undergo internalization after sustained exposure to agonists. However, it is not known whether different agonists internalize CB2 to different extents. Because CB2 is a promising therapeutic target, understanding its trafficking in response to different agonists is necessary for a complete understanding of its biology. Here we profile a number of cannabinoid receptor ligands and provide evidence for marked functional selectivity of cannabinoid receptor internalization. Classic, aminoalkylindole, bicyclic, cannabilactone, iminothiazole cannabinoid, and endocannabinoid ligands varied greatly in their effects on CB1 and CB2 trafficking. Our most striking finding was that (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl) pyrrolo-[1,2,3-d,e]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (WIN55,212-2) (and other aminoalkylindoles) failed to promote CB2 receptor internalization, whereas 5-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-2-(5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexyl)phenol (CP55,940) robustly internalized CB2 receptors. Furthermore, WIN55,212-2 competitively antagonized CP55,940-induced CB2 internalization. Despite these differences in internalization, both compounds activated CB2 receptors as measured by extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and recruitment of β-arrestin2 to the membrane. In contrast, whereas CP55,940 inhibited voltage-gated calcium channels via CB2 receptor activation, WIN55,212-2 was ineffective on its own and antagonized the effects of CP55,940. On the basis of the differences we found between these two ligands, we also tested the effects of other cannabinoids on these signaling pathways and found additional evidence for functional selectivity of CB2 ligands. These novel data highlight that WIN55,212-2 and other cannabinoids show strong functional selectivity at CB2 receptors and suggest that

  16. Efficiency gains in tracer identification for nuclear imaging: can in vivo LC-MS/MS evaluation of small molecules screen for successful PET tracers?

    PubMed

    Joshi, Elizabeth M; Need, Anne; Schaus, John; Chen, Zhaogen; Benesh, Dana; Mitch, Charles; Morton, Stuart; Raub, Thomas J; Phebus, Lee; Barth, Vanessa

    2014-12-17

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has become a useful noninvasive technique to explore molecular biology within living systems; however, the utility of this method is limited by the availability of suitable radiotracers to probe specific targets and disease biology. Methods to identify potential areas of improvement in the ability to predict small molecule performance as tracers prior to radiolabeling would speed the discovery of novel tracers. In this retrospective analysis, we characterized the brain penetration or peak SUV (standardized uptake value), binding potential (BP), and brain exposure kinetics across a series of known, nonradiolabeled PET ligands using in vivo LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry) and correlated these parameters with the reported PET ligand performance in nonhuman primates and humans available in the literature. The PET tracers studied included those reported to label G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), intracellular enzymes, and transporters. Additionally, data for each tracer was obtained from a mouse brain uptake assay (MBUA), previously published, where blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration and clearance parameters were assessed and compared against similar data collected on a broad compound set of central nervous system (CNS) therapeutic compounds. The BP and SUV identified via nonradiolabeled LC-MS/MS, while different from the published values observed in the literature PET tracer data, allowed for an identification of initial criteria values we sought to facilitate increased potential for success from our early discovery screening paradigm. Our analysis showed that successful, as well as novel, clinical PET tracers exhibited BP of greater than 1.5 and peak SUVs greater than approximately 150% at 5 min post dose in rodents. The brain kinetics appeared similar between both techniques despite differences in tracer dose, suggesting linearity across these dose ranges. The assessment of tracers in a

  17. Synthesis and characterisation of new 4-oxo-N-(substituted-thiazol-2-yl)-4H-chromene-2-carboxamides as potential adenosine receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda; Gomes, Ligia R.; Low, John Nicolson

    2015-06-01

    Chromones are 4H-benzopyran-4-one heterocycles that have been thoroughly studied due to their interesting biological activities. Thiazole based compounds have been used in therapeutics as antimicrobial, antiviral and as antifungal agents for a long time but, in the past decades, they have been identified as potent and selective ligands for adenosine receptor. In continuation of our project related to the syntheses of pharmacologically important heterocycles, a new series of chromone-thiazole hybrids have been designed as potential ligands for human adenosine receptors. In this context, new 4-oxo-N-(substituted-thiazol-2-yl)-4H-chromene-2-carboxamides were synthesized from chromone-2-carboxylic acid by two different amidation methods. The development of dissimilar synthetic approaches provided the possibility of working with diverse reaction conditions, namely with conventional heating and/or microwave irradiation. The structure of the compounds has been established on the basis of NMR and MS spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Relevant data related to the molecular geometry and conformation of the chromone-thiazole hybrids has been acquired which can be of the utmost importance to understand ligand-receptor binding.

  18. Synthesis, structure activity relationship, radiolabeling and preclinical evaluation of high affinity ligands for the ion channel of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor as potential imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Klein, Pieter J; Christiaans, Johannes A M; Metaxas, Athanasios; Schuit, Robert C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M; Windhorst, Albert D

    2015-03-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) is involved in many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Currently, it is not possible to assess NMDAr availability in vivo. The purpose of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for the NMDAr ion channel. A series of di- and tri-N-substituted diarylguanidines was synthesized. In addition, in vitro binding affinity for the NMDAr ion channel in rat forebrain membrane fractions was assessed. Compounds 10, 11 and 32 were radiolabeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Ligands [(11)C]10 and [(18)F]32 were evaluated ex vivo in B6C3 mice. Biodistribution studies showed higher uptake of [(11)C]10 and [(18)F]32 in forebrain regions compared with cerebellum. In addition, for [(11)C]10 54% and for [(18)F]32 70% of activity in the brain at 60min was due to intact tracer. Pre-treatment with MK-801 (0.6mg·kg(-1), ip) slightly decreased uptake in NMDAr-specific regions for [(18)F]32, but not for [(11)C]10. As such [(18)F]32 has the best characteristics as a PET tracer for the ion channel of the NMDAr. PMID:25648682

  19. Low energy cyclotron production of multivalent transition metals for PET imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel

    Recent advances in high-resolution tomographs for small animals require the production of nonconventional long-lived positron emitters to label novel radiopharmaceuticals for PET-based molecular imaging. Radioisotopes with an appropriate half life to match the kinetics of slow biological processes will allow to researchers to study the phamacokinetics of PET ligands over several hours, or even days, on the same animal, with the injection of a single dose. In addition, radionuclides with a suitable half life can potentially be distributed from a central production site making them available in PET facilities that lack an in-house cyclotron. In the last few years there has been a growing interest in the use of PET ligands labeled with radiometals, particularly isotopes of copper, yttrium and zirconium. Future clinical applications of these tracers will require them to be produced reliably and efficiently. This thesis work deals with implementing and optimizing the production of the multivalent transition metals 61,64Cu, 86Y and 89Zr for molecular PET imaging and therapy. Our findings in the production of these radionuclides at high specific activity on an 11 MeV proton-only cyclotron are presented. Local applications of these tracers, including Cu-ATSM for in vivo quantification of hypoxia, synthesis of targeted radiopharmaceuticals using activated esters of DOTA, and a novel development of positron emitting resin microspheres, are also be discussed. As a result of this thesis work, metallic radionuclides are now efficiently produced on a weekly basis in sufficient quality and quantity for collaborating scientists at UW-Madison and external users in other Universities across the country.

  20. Pet Bonding and Pet Bereavement among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied adolescent-pet bonding and bereavement following pet loss (n=55). Hypothesized that highly-bonded adolescents experience more intense grief when a pet dies than do those less bonded; degree of bonding is greater for girls than for boys; and intensity of bereavement is greater for girls than for boys. Results supported the hypotheses. (RB)

  1. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  2. A comparative study of zwitterionic ligands-mediated mineralization and the potential of mineralized zwitterionic matrices for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pingsheng; Emmons, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Cationic and anionic residues of the extracellular matrices (ECM) of bone play synergistic roles in recruiting precursor ions and templating the nucleation, growth and crystalline transformations of calcium apatite in natural biomineralization. We previously reported that zwitterionic sulfobetaine ligands can template extensive 3-dimensional (3-D) hydroxyapaptite (HA)-mineralization of photo-crosslinked polymethacrylatehydrogels. Here, we compared the potency of two other major zwitterionic ligands, phosphobetaine and carboxybetaine, with that of the sulfobetaine in mediating 3-D mineralization using the crosslinked polymethacrylate hydrogel platform. We confirmed that all three zwitterionic hydrogels were able to effectively template 3-D mineralization, supporting the general ability of zwitterions to mediate templated mineralization. Among them, however, sulfobetaine and phosphobetaine hydrogels templated denser 3-D mineralizationthan the carboxybetaine hydrogel, likely due to their higher free water fractions and better maintenance of zwitterionic nature throughout the pH-changes during the in vitro mineralization process. We further demonstrated that the extensively mineralized zwitterionic hydrogels could be exploited for efficient retention (e.g. 99% retention after 24-h incubation in PBS) of osteogenic growth factor recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and subsequent sustained local release with retained bioactivity. Combined with the excellent cytocompatibility of all three zwitterionic hydrogels and the significantly improved cell adhesive properties of their mineralized matrices, these materials could find promising applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25558374

  3. Synthesis of syn- and anti-1-amino-3-[18F]fluoromethyl-cyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FMACBC), potential PET ligands for tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Martarello, Laurent; McConathy, Jonathan; Camp, Vernon M; Malveaux, Eugene J; Simpson, Nicholas E; Simpson, Chiab P; Olson, Jeffrey J; Bowers, Geoffrey D; Goodman, Mark M

    2002-05-23

    syn- and anti-1-amino-3-[18F]fluoromethyl-cyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FMACBC, 16 and 17), analogues of anti-1-amino-3-[18F]fluorocyclobutyl-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC), were prepared to evaluate the contributions of C-3 substitution and configuration on the uptake of these radiolabeled amino acids in a rodent model of brain tumors. Radiofluorinated targets [18F]16 and [18F]17 were prepared by no-carrier-added radiofluorination from their corresponding methanesulfonyl esters 12 and 13, respectively, with decay-corrected radiochemical yields of 30% for [18F]16 and 20% for [18F]17. In amino acid transport assays performed in vitro using 9L gliosarcoma cells, both [18F]16 and [18F]17 were substrates for L type amino acid transport, while [18F]17 but not [18F]16 was a substrate for A type transport. Biodistribution studies in normal Fischer rats with [18F]16 and [18F]17 showed high uptake of radioactivity (>2.0% dose/g) in the pancreas while other tissues studied, including liver, heart, lung, kidney, blood, muscle, and testis, showed relatively low uptake of radioactivity (<1.0% dose/g). In rats implanted intracranially with 9L gliosarcoma cells, the retention of radioactivity in tumor tissue was high at 5, 60, and 120 min after intravenous injection of [18F]16 and [18F]17 while the uptake of radioactivity in brain tissue contralateral to the tumor remained low (<0.3% dose/g). Ratios of tumor uptake to normal brain uptake for [18F]16 were 7.5:1, 7:1, and 5:1 at 5, 60, and 120 min, respectively, while for [18F]17 the ratios were 7.5:1, 9:1, and 9:1 at the same time points. This work demonstrates that like anti-[18F]FACBC, [18F]16 and [18F]17 are excellent candidates for imaging brain tumors.

  4. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs.

  5. Advances in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Karp, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a review and an update on time-of-flight PET imaging with a focus on PET instrumentation, ranging from hardware design to software algorithms. We first present a short introduction to PET, followed by a description of TOF PET imaging and its history from the early days. Next, we introduce the current state-of-art in TOF PET technology and briefly summarize the benefits of TOF PET imaging. This is followed by a discussion of the various technological advancements in hardware (scintillators, photo-sensors, electronics) and software (image reconstruction) that have led to the current widespread use of TOF PET technology, and future developments that have the potential for further improvements in the TOF imaging performance. We conclude with a discussion of some new research areas that have opened up in PET imaging as a result of having good system timing resolution, ranging from new algorithms for attenuation correction, through efficient system calibration techniques, to potential for new PET system designs. PMID:26778577

  6. POTENTIAL CROSS-CONTAMINATION OF SIMILAR Giardia duodenalis ASSEMBLAGE IN CHILDREN AND PET DOGS IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL, AS DETERMINED BY PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    de QUADROS, Rosiléia Marinho; WEISS, Paulo Henrique Exterchoter; MARQUES, Sandra Marcia Tietz; MILETTI, Luiz Claudio

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Giardia duodenalis is an enteric parasite that has distinct genetic groups. Human infections are mainly caused by assemblages A and B, although sporadic infections by assemblages C and D have also been reported. Animals can be infected by a wide range of assemblages (A to H). The aim of this study is to identify the assemblages and sub-assemblages of G. duodenalis with zoonotic features in fecal samples of school-aged children, and in dogs that coexist in the same households in Lages, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Fecal samples of 91 children and 108 dogs were obtained and G. duodenalis cysts were detected in samples from 11 (12.08%) children and 10 (9.25%) dogs. DNA extracted from the 21 positive samples was analyzed by PCR-RFLP, using the gdh gene. Results showed the presence of sub-assemblages AI (2/11), AII (4/11), BIII (2/11), and BIV(3/11) among children and AI (5/10) and BIV(3/10) in dogs, with zoonotic characteristics, and the carnivore specific assemblage C (2/10). G. duodenalis was found to infect both children and dogs living in the same household, with the same sub-assemblage (BIV) indicating that pet dogs are a potential risk of transmission of G. duodenalis to humans. PMID:27680171

  7. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-12-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA-small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA-ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a "meta-predictor" leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl.

  8. A potential endogenous ligand for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor has potent agonist activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Henry, E C; Bemis, J C; Henry, O; Kende, A S; Gasiewicz, T A

    2006-06-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is best known as a mediator of toxicity of a diverse family of xenobiotic chemicals such as dioxins and PCBs. However, many naturally occurring compounds also activate AhR. One such compound, 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), was isolated from tissue and found to be potent in preliminary tests [J. Song, M. Clagett-Dame, R.E. Peterson, M.E. Hahn, W.M. Westler, R.R. Sicinski, H.F. DeLuca, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 14694-14699]. We have synthesized ITE and [(3)H]ITE and further evaluated its AhR activity in several in vitro and in vivo assays in comparison with the toxic ligand, TCDD. AhR in Hepa1c1c7 cell cytosol bound [(3)H]ITE with high affinity and the AhR.ITE complex formed in vitro bound dioxin response element (DRE) oligonucleotide as potently as TCDD.AhR. In cells treated with ITE, nuclear translocation of AhR, and induction of CYP1A1 protein and of a DRE-dependent luciferase reporter gene were observed. ITE administered to pregnant DRE-LacZ transgenic mice activated fetal AhR, observed as X-gal staining in the same sites as in TCDD-treated mice. However, unlike TCDD, ITE did not induce cleft palate or hydronephrosis. TCDD but not ITE induced thymic atrophy in young adult mice, but both ITE and TCDD caused similar loss of cells and alterations of cell profiles in cultured fetal thymi. These data demonstrate that ITE is a potent AhR agonist in cell extracts, cultured cells, and intact animals, but does not cause the toxicity associated with the more stable xenobiotic ligand, TCDD.

  9. A potential role for the midbrain in integrating fat-free mass determined energy needs: An H2 (15) O PET study.

    PubMed

    Weise, Christopher M; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Little is known on how sensing of energy needs is centrally represented, integrated, and translated into the behavioral aspects of energy homeostasis. Fat free mass (FFM) is the major determinant of energy expenditure. We investigated how interindividual variances in FFM relate to neuronal activity in humans. Healthy adults (n = 64, 21F/43M; age 31.3 ± 9.1y; percentage of body fat [PFAT] 25.6 ± 10.7%; BMI 30.4 ± 9) underwent a 36h fast and subsequent H(2) (15) O positron emission tomographic (PET) measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Multiple variable regression analysis revealed significant associations of FFM with rCBF within the midbrain [including parts of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), ventral tegmental area (VTA), thalamic and hypothalamic regions], the bilateral parahippocampal region, left anterior cingulate, left insular cortex, right cerebellum, and distinct regions within the temporal and occipital cortex. In contrast, no significant associations were found for fat mass (FM). We investigated the potential functional-anatomical link between FFM and central regulation of food intake by performing a conjunction analysis of FFM and the perceived hunger feelings. This showed a significant overlap within the midbrain PAG. Mediation analysis demonstrated a significant indirect effect of FFM on hunger with PAG rCBF as mediator. Most regions we found to be associated with FFM form part in ascending homeostatic pathways and cortical circuitries implicated in the regulation of basic bodily functions indicating a potential role of these central networks in the integration of FFM determined energy needs. PMID:25766283

  10. A potential role for the midbrain in integrating fat-free mass determined energy needs: An H2 (15) O PET study.

    PubMed

    Weise, Christopher M; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Little is known on how sensing of energy needs is centrally represented, integrated, and translated into the behavioral aspects of energy homeostasis. Fat free mass (FFM) is the major determinant of energy expenditure. We investigated how interindividual variances in FFM relate to neuronal activity in humans. Healthy adults (n = 64, 21F/43M; age 31.3 ± 9.1y; percentage of body fat [PFAT] 25.6 ± 10.7%; BMI 30.4 ± 9) underwent a 36h fast and subsequent H(2) (15) O positron emission tomographic (PET) measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Multiple variable regression analysis revealed significant associations of FFM with rCBF within the midbrain [including parts of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), ventral tegmental area (VTA), thalamic and hypothalamic regions], the bilateral parahippocampal region, left anterior cingulate, left insular cortex, right cerebellum, and distinct regions within the temporal and occipital cortex. In contrast, no significant associations were found for fat mass (FM). We investigated the potential functional-anatomical link between FFM and central regulation of food intake by performing a conjunction analysis of FFM and the perceived hunger feelings. This showed a significant overlap within the midbrain PAG. Mediation analysis demonstrated a significant indirect effect of FFM on hunger with PAG rCBF as mediator. Most regions we found to be associated with FFM form part in ascending homeostatic pathways and cortical circuitries implicated in the regulation of basic bodily functions indicating a potential role of these central networks in the integration of FFM determined energy needs.

  11. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide: A potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Takeo; Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky; Senda, Michio; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PET images showed high uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide in the normal pancreas. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide specifically binds to somatostatin receptors in the pancreas. •The pancreatic uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide was decreased in the diabetic rats. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a candidate PET probe to measure the beta cell mass. -- Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with {sup 68}Gallium ({sup 68}Ga). After intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM.

  12. Potentiation of the teratogenic effects induced by coadministration of retinoic acid or phytanic acid/phytol with synthetic retinoid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Elmazar, M M A; Nau, H

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory identified retinoid-induced defects that are mediated by RAR-RXR heterodimerization using interaction of synthetic ligands selective for the retinoid receptors RAR and RXR in mice (Elmazar et al. 1997, Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 146:21-28; Elmazar et al. 2001, Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 170:2-9; Nau and Elmazar 1999, Handbook of experimental pharmacology, vol 139, Retinoids, Springer-Verlag, pp 465-487). The present study was designed to investigate whether these RAR-RXR heterodimer-mediated defects can be also induced by interactions of natural and synthetic ligands for retinoid receptors. A non-teratogenic dose of the natural RXR agonist phytanic acid (100 mg/kg orally) or its precursor phytol (500 mg/kg orally) was coadministered with a synthetic RARalpha-agonist (Am580; 5 mg/kg orally) to NMRI mice on day 8.25 of gestation (GD8.25). Furthermore, a non-teratogenic dose of the synthetic RXR agonist LGD1069 (20 mg/kg orally) was also coadministered with the natural RAR agonist, all- trans-retinoic acid (atRA, 20 mg/kg orally) or its precursor retinol (ROH, 50 mg/kg orally) to NMRI mice on GD8.25. The teratogenic outcome was scored in day-18 fetuses. The incidence of Am580-induced resorptions, spina bifida aperta, micrognathia, anotia, kidney hypoplasia, dilated bladder, undescended testis, atresia ani, short and absent tail, fused ribs and fetal weight retardation were potentiated by coadministration of phytanic acid or its precursor phytol. Am580-induced exencephaly and cleft palate, which were not potentiated by coadministration with the synthetic RXR agonists, were also not potentiated by coadministration with either phytanic acid or its precursor phytol. LGD1069 potentiated atRA- and ROH-induced resorption, exencephaly, spina bifida, aperta, ear anotia and microtia, macroglossia, kidney hypoplasia, undescended testis, atresia ani, tail defects and fetal weight retardation, but not cleft palate. These results suggest that synergistic

  13. Ligand Control of Manganese Telluride Molecular Cluster Core Nuclearity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bonnie; Paley, Daniel W; Siegrist, Theo; Steigerwald, Michael L; Roy, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    We report the synthesis, structural diversity, and chemical behavior of a family of manganese telluride molecular clusters whose charge-neutral cores are passivated by two-electron donor ligands. We describe three different core structures: a cubane-type Mn4Te4, a prismane Mn6Te6, and a dicubane Mn8Te8. We use various trialkylphosphines and N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) as surface ligands and demonstrate that the formation of the different cluster core structures is controlled by the choice of ligand: bulky ligands such as P(i)Pr3, PCy3, or (i)Pr2NHC ((i)Pr2NHC = 1,3-diisopropyl-4,5-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene) form the cubane-type core, while the smaller PMe3 produces the prismane core. The intermediate-sized PEt3 produces both cubane and prismane species. These manganese telluride molecular clusters are labile, and the capping phosphines can be replaced by stronger ligands, while the internal core structure of the cluster remains intact. The interplay of structural diversity and ligand versatility and lability makes these clusters potentially useful building blocks for the assembly of larger aggregates and extended structures. We demonstrate the simplest prototype of these solid-forming reactions: the direct coupling of two Mn4Te4((i)Pr2NHC)4 units to form the dicubane Mn8Te8((i)Pr2NHC)6. We also postulate the prismatic Mn6Te6 as the common ancestor of both Chevrel-type M6E8 and octanuclear rhombododecahedral M8E6 molecular clusters (M = transition metal and E = chalcogen), and we discuss the core structure of our molecular clusters as recognizable building units for the zinc blende and the hypothetical wurtzite lattices of MnTe.

  14. Preliminary Assessment of Potential for Metal-Ligand Speciation in Aqueous Solution via the Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge (LS-APGD) Ionization Source: Uranyl Acetate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lynn X; Manard, Benjamin T; Powell, Brian A; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2015-07-21

    The determination of metals, including the generation of metal-ligand speciation information, is essential across a myriad of biochemical, environmental, and industrial systems. Metal speciation is generally affected by the combination of some form of chromatographic separation (reflective of the metal-ligand chemistry) with element-specific detection for the quantification of the metal composing the chromatographic eluent. Thus, the identity of the metal-ligand is assigned by inference. Presented here, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) is assessed as an ionization source for metal speciation, with the uranyl ion-acetate system used as a test system. Molecular mass spectra can be obtained from the same source by simple modification of the sustaining electrolyte solution. Specifically, chemical information pertaining to the degree of acetate complexation of uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) is assessed as a function of pH in the spectral abundance of three metallic species: inorganic (nonligated) uranyl, UO2Ac(H2O)n(MeOH)m(+), and UO2Ac2(H2O)n(MeOH)(m)H(+) (n = 1, 2, 3, ...; m = 1, 2, 3, ...). The product mass spectra are different from what are obtained from electrospray ionization sources that have been applied to this system. The resulting relationships between the speciation and pH values have been compared to calculated concentrations of the corresponding uranyl species: UO2(2+), UO2Ac(+), UO2Ac2. The capacity for the LS-APGD to affect both atomic mass spectra and structurally significant spectra for organometallic complexes is a unique and potentially powerful combination.

  15. Imaging and PET-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Von Schulthess, Gustav K; Hany, Thomas F

    2008-03-01

    PET-CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes "hardware-fusion" to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. For this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several well-designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT.

  16. Sequence-specific minor groove binding ligands as potential regulators of gene expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Belikov, S V; Grokhovsky, S L; Isaguliants, M G; Surovaya, A N; Gursky, G V

    2005-10-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by glucocorticoid hormone. A robust hormone- and receptor-dependent gene activation could be reproduced in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The homogeneous response in this system allowed a detailed analysis of the DNA-protein interactions following hormone activation. The strategy of artificial regulating of gene activity by sequence-specific minor groove binding ligands is very attractive. We have synthesized and studied the interaction with DNA of bis-linked netropsin derivatives in which two monomers are attached via short linkers in head-to-head and tail-to-tail manners. We have found that cis-diammine-platinum bridged bis-netropsin added to Xenopus oocytes media penetrates cellular and nuclear membrane and binds selectively to the MMTV promoter at the DNA segment that partly overlaps with the site recognized by glucocorticoid receptor. DNase I footprinting studies demonstrate that there are more stronger binding sites for cis-diammine-platinum bridged bis-netropsin on the naked MMTV DNA which are found to be inaccessible for its binding in oocytes. PMID:16060693

  17. A comparison of novel organoiridium(III) complexes and their ligands as a potential treatment for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hockey, Samantha C; Barbante, Gregory J; Francis, Paul S; Altimari, Jarrad M; Yoganantharajah, Prusothman; Gibert, Yann; Henderson, Luke C

    2016-02-15

    A range of 1,4-substituted 2-pyridyl-N-phenyl triazoles were synthesised and evaluated for their antiproliferative properties against lymph node cancer of the prostate (LNCaP) and bone metastasis of prostate cancer (PC-3) cells. Excellent-to-low IC50 values were determined (5.6-250 μM), and a representative group of 4 ligands were then complexed to iridium(III) giving highly luminescent species. Re-evaluation of these compounds against both cell lines was then undertaken and improved potency (up to 72-fold) was observed, giving IC50 values of 0.36-11 μM for LNCaP and 0.85-5.9 μM for PC-3. Preliminary screens for in vivo toxicity were conducted using a zebrafish model showing a wide range of induced toxicity depending of the compound evaluated. Apoptosis and Caspase-3 levels were also determined and showed no statistical difference between some of the treated specimens and the controls. This study may identify novel therapeutic agents for advanced stage of prostate cancer in humans.

  18. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Bivalent Benzoxazolone and Benzothiazolone Ligands as Potential Anti-inflammatory/Analgesic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Abdelazeem, Ahmed H.; Khan, Shabana I.; White, Stephen W.; Sufka, Kenneth J.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Benzoxazolone and benzothiazolone were used as template blocks to develop two series of dimers as anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents based on the concept of bivalent ligands. The first series (I) involved varying the carbon chain lengths extending from the piperazine core to the nitrogen atom of the dibenzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one or dibenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-one. The second series (II) was designed by changing the attachment point. All compounds were screened for their in vitro anti-inflammatory activity in terms of the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB). Seventeen compounds inhibited both targets. Eleven of them exhibited IC50 values below 3 μM while five compounds showed IC50 values of 1 μM or below. Most of the compounds were found to be devoid of cytotoxicity against mammalian kidney and solid tumors cell lines up to 25μg/mL. In vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive studies revealed that compounds 3j, 5t and 8b have significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity comparable to that of indomethacin and ketorolac, respectively. PMID:25975638

  19. The non-ligand binding beta-isoform of the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR beta): tissue levels, mechanism of action, and potential physiologic role.

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, M.; Elliot, S.; Kino, T.; Bamberger, C.; Karl, M.; Webster, E.; Chrousos, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alternative splicing of the transcripts of the human glucocorticoid receptor gene results in two mutually exclusive products, the classic, ligand-binding glucocorticoid receptor (hGR alpha), and a dominant negative non-ligand-binding isoform, hGR beta. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the existence of and quantified both hGR alpha and hGR beta isoforms in a panel of human tissues, as well as in intact and fractionated HeLa cells, using specific quantitative Western blots and/or immunocytochemistry. We studied the potential interactions of hGR beta with heat shock protein (hsp) 90 and/or hGR alpha using cross-immunoadsorption/precipitation procedures followed by Western blots. RESULTS: For the first time, we demonstrated the natural existence of the hGR beta protein, which was widely expressed in human tissues. The ratio of immunoreactive hGR alpha to hGR beta varied from 0.2 to 1.0 among different tissues, and was approximately 0.2 in HeLa cells. In the latter, both isoforms were distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus in the absence of the hormonal ligand, and translocated into the nucleus after addition of dexamethasone. The cytosolic and nuclear hGR alpha-to-hGR beta ratio remained the same before and after dexamethasone exposure, suggesting that upon activation the two isoforms translocated into the nucleus in equal proportions. hGR alpha- and hGR beta-specific antibodies cross-adsorbed and precipitated cytosolic and nuclear glucocorticoid hGR alpha and hGR beta, respectively, as well as hsp90, suggesting that hGR alpha and hGR beta are in complex with hsp90 and/or each other. CONCLUSIONS: The hGR beta protein is widely expressed throughout the human body and present mostly in the cytoplasm of human cells, in complex with hsp90 and other proteins. In the presence of glucocorticoid, hGR beta probably heterodimerizes with ligand-bound hGR alpha and translocates into the nucleus to act as a dominant negative inhibitor of the classic receptor. Images

  20. [Innovation and Future Technologies for PET Scanners].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis, neuroimaging and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and manufacturing costs. Higher spatial resolution is essential to enable earlier diagnosis, and improved sensitivity results in reduced radiation exposure and shortened measurement time. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, innovation and future technologies for the next generation PET scanners, such as time-of-flight measurement and simultaneous PET/MRI measurement, are described. Among them, depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement in the radiation sensor will be a key technology to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment, is under development. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers. PMID:26753392

  1. Immobilizing CC chemokine receptor 4's N-terminal extracellular tail on a capillary to study its potential ligands by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjing; Li, Meina; Yakufu, Pazilaiti; Ling, Xiaomei; Qi, Hui; Xiao, Junhai; Wang, Ying

    2012-04-01

    ML40 is the equivalent peptide derived from the N terminal of CCC4 (CC chemokine receptor 4), which plays a pivotal role in allergic inflammation. A new capillary electrophoresis method was developed to study the interactions between ML40 and its potential ligands in which ML40 was immobilized on the inner wall of capillary as the stationary phase based on the covalent linking technique. The interaction between S009, a known CCR4 antagonist, and the immobilized ML40 was studied to validate the bioactivity of ML40. The electropherogram of S009 showed that the peak height was reduced and the peak width was broadened in the ML40 immobilized capillary. Otherwise, 25 computer-aided design and drafting compounds were screened out using this method. Four compounds' peak widths were broadened and their peak heights were reduced, as with S009. Meanwhile, nonlinear chromatography was used to calculate the constants for the ligand-receptor complex formation. Furthermore, the tertiary amine compounds belonging to the chiral tertiary amines of the type NRR'R″, which are optically inactive resulting from rapid pyramide inversion, were chiral separated by our protein immobilization method for the first time. In general, the methodology presented would be applicable to study compound-ML40 interactions as a reliable and robust screening method for CCR4 antagonist discovery. PMID:22245764

  2. Identification of novel markers of alternative activation and potential endogenous PPARγ ligand production mechanisms in human IL-4 stimulated differentiating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Czimmerer, Zsolt; Varga, Tamas; Poliska, Szilard; Nemet, Istvan; Szanto, Attila; Nagy, Laszlo

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed global gene expression profiles of IL-4 induced alternatively activated as well as IFNγ+TNFα stimulated classically activated human monocyte derived macrophages and identified novel IL-4 regulated alternative activation marker genes including MS4A4A, SLA, CD180, and ENPP2. Transcription factor prediction analysis of IL-4 regulated genes suggested that the regulated genes are involved in a complex regulation of lipid metabolism, defense against cell metabolism derived reactive oxygen species, and basal expression of inflammation linked genes. Both an in silico transcription activation prediction as well as experimental data suggested the presence of alternative macrophage activation specific endogenous PPARγ ligand producing mechanisms. We found the induction of three enzymes whose activity can potentially generate endogenous PPARγ ligands in an IL-4 dependent manner. These are MAOA, ENPP2, and ALOX15 producing 5-methoxy-indole acetate, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and 13-hydroxyoctadienoic acid (13-HODE), and/or 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), respectively. Our data suggest that global gene expression profiling, combined with computational transcription activity prediction, can lead to identification of transcriptional networks that underpin cellular subtype specification.

  3. New data analysis in a population study raises the hypothesis that particle size contributes to the pro-asthmatic potential of small pet animal allergens

    PubMed Central

    Patelis, Antonios; Dosanjh, Amrita; Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria; Borres, Magnus P.; Högman, Marieann; Alving, Kjell; Janson, Christer; Malinovschi, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Background The size of inhaled particles influences where they deposit and theoretically should be important for the development of airway inflammation and responsiveness. Our aim was to assess if sensitization to smaller-sized aeroallergens relates to higher prevalence of treated asthma, increased airway responsiveness, and airway and systemic inflammation. Methods Molecular-based IgE antibody determination was done in 467 subjects. Sensitized subjects were grouped based on the particle size of the aeroallergen: (1) Large particles only (mainly pollen); (2) Medium-sized particles (sensitized to mainly mite and mold and possibly to large particles); and 3) Small particles (sensitized to pet allergens and possibly to medium- and/or large-sized particles). Airway responsiveness to methacholine, exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), and serum eosinophil cationic protein (S-ECP) were measured. Asthma and rhinitis were questionnaire-assessed. Results Subjects sensitized to small particles had higher prevalence of treated asthma (35% versus 10%, P < 0.001), higher FENO50 (32 versus 17 ppb, P < 0.001), higher S-ECP (10 versus 7.5 ng/mL, P = 0.04), and increased bronchial responsiveness (dose-response slope, 5.6 versus 7.5, P < 0.001) compared with non-atopics. This was consistent after adjusting for potential confounders. Sensitization to only large or to medium and possibly also large aeroallergen particles was not related to any of these outcomes after adjustments. Conclusions Sensitization to smaller particles was associated with a higher prevalence of asthma under treatment, higher airway responsiveness, and airway and systemic inflammation. Mapping of IgE sensitization to small particles might help to detect subjects having increased airway and systemic inflammation and bronchial responsiveness, indicating increased risk of developing asthma. PMID:26610050

  4. Trends in PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  5. DNA detection and genotypic identification of potentially human-pathogenic microsporidia from asymptomatic pet parrots in South Korea as a risk factor for zoonotic emergence.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Lee, Sung-Seok; Lyoo, Young S; Park, Hee-Myung

    2011-12-01

    We detected and identified genotypes of human-pathogenic microsporidia in fecal samples from 51 asymptomatic captive-bred pet parrots in South Korea. Microsporidia were identified in 8 samples (15.7%); 7 parrots tested positive for Encephalitozoon hellem, and 1 parrot tested positive for both E. hellem and Encephalitozoon cuniculi. In genotypic identifications, E. hellem was present in genotypes 1A and 2B and E. cuniculi was present in genotype II. Pet parrots might be a source of human microsporidian infection.

  6. PET/MRI – Technical Review

    PubMed Central

    Muzic, Raymond F.; DiFilippo, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    PET/MR is a hybrid imaging technology with the potential to combine the molecular and functional information of PET with the soft-tissue contrast of MR. Herein we review the technical features and challenges of putting these different technologies together. We emphasize the conceptual to make the material accessible to a wide audience. We begin by reviewing PET/CT, a more mature multi-modality imaging technology, to provide a basis for comparison to the history of PET/MR development. We discuss the motivation and challenges of PET/MR and different approaches that have been used to meet the challenges. We conclude with a speculation about the future of this exciting imaging method. PMID:25497909

  7. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  8. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    neoadjuvant treatment attenuated adverse oncologic impact of high preoperative MTV2.5 (P = 0.210). Preoperatively determined volume-based PET parameter, MTV2.5, can potentially be used as a surrogate marker to estimate tumor biology and tumor recurrence. Individual treatment strategies for pancreatic cancer can be suggested based on patients' preoperative MTV2.5. PMID:26945350

  9. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    neoadjuvant treatment attenuated adverse oncologic impact of high preoperative MTV2.5 (P = 0.210). Preoperatively determined volume-based PET parameter, MTV2.5, can potentially be used as a surrogate marker to estimate tumor biology and tumor recurrence. Individual treatment strategies for pancreatic cancer can be suggested based on patients' preoperative MTV2.5.

  10. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    neoadjuvant treatment attenuated adverse oncologic impact of high preoperative MTV2.5 (P = 0.210). Preoperatively determined volume-based PET parameter, MTV2.5, can potentially be used as a surrogate marker to estimate tumor biology and tumor recurrence. Individual treatment strategies for pancreatic cancer can be suggested based on patients’ preoperative MTV2.5. PMID:26945350

  11. Birds Kept as Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... restricts the importation of pet birds from certain countries and enforces a 30-day quarantine for all imported birds except those that come from Canada. People interested in importing pet birds should visit the USDA non-US Origin Pet Bird Importation website . Choosing a bird Match ...

  12. Measurements and Modeling To Determine the Reduction Potential of Uncomplexed Bi(III) in Nitrate Solutions for Application in Bi(III)-Ligand Equilibria Studies by Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Billing, Caren; Cukrowski, Ignacy

    2016-05-12

    The free metal ion potential, E(M), is a critical parameter in the calculation of formation constants when using voltammetry. When studying complex formation of Bi(III), however, E(Bi) cannot be directly measured. In this work a nitrate background electrolyte was employed to obtain reversible reduction waves. To determine E(Bi), measurements have to be made below pH ∼ 2 before the bismuth-oxy-nitrate species precipitates and thus corrections for the diffusion junction potential (monitored using Tl(I) as an internal reference ion) must be made. Additionally shifts in potential due to both Bi(III) hydrolysis and Bi(III) nitrate formation must also be compensated for before E(Bi) can be evaluated. The value of E(Bi) was determined relative to E(Tl) so that in an experiments where ligand is added to determine formation constants, E(Bi) can be determined as accurately as possible (since E(Tl) can generally still be measured). The value of E(Bi) - E(Tl) was found to be 495.6 ± 1.4 mV for the conditions employed. PMID:27088843

  13. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G; Winlove, C Peter; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent membrane probe, 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[β[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl]vinyl] pyridinium betaine, to investigate whether these effects are connected via influences on the membrane dipole potential (MDP), an intrinsic property of biological membranes previously demonstrated to modulate P-gp activity. α-Tocopherol and its non-free radical-scavenging succinate analog induced similar decreases in the MDP of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. α-Tocopherol succinate also reduced the MDP of T-lymphocytes, subsequently decreasing the binding affinity of saquinavir for P-gp. Additionally, α-tocopherol succinate demonstrated a preference for cholesterol-treated (membrane microdomain enriched) cells over membrane cholesterol-depleted cells. Microdomain disruption via cholesterol depletion decreased saquinavir's affinity for P-gp, potentially implicating these structures in the influence of α-tocopherol succinate on P-gp. This study provides evidence of a microdomain dipole potential-dependent mechanism by which α-tocopherol analogs influence P-gp activity. These findings have implications for the use of α-tocopherol derivatives for drug delivery across biological barriers.

  14. Evaluating the potential of a new isotope-labelled glyco-ligand for estimating the remnant liver function of schistosoma-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, P-C; Chiang, P-F; Lee, K-M; Yeh, C-H; Hsu, K-L; Liu, S-W; Shen, L-H; Peng, C-L; Fan, C-K; Luo, T-Y

    2013-01-01

    A new glyco-derivative compound (OCTAM) was developed and labelled with isotope to form (188) Re-OCTAM as a candidate nuclear medicine imaging agent for testing the liver function. We evaluated the potential of isotope-labelled OCTAM for estimating the remnant liver function in vitro and in vivo schistosoma-infected mice. The affinity of OCTAM to liver asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) was assessed by competitive inhibition assay in vitro. In vivo assessments were performed to score the remnant liver function in mice at different schistosomal infection stages. OCTAM binds specifically to ASGPR and showed competitive inhibition of anti-ASGPR antibody binding to hepatocytes, and was higher than that of other galactosyl ligands. Micro-SPECT/CT images of uninfected mice revealed strong liver uptake. Quantified serial images of mice infected for 9, 12 and 18 weeks showed delayed liver uptake, and the retention of uptake was inversely correlated with stage and grade of schistosoma infection. Pathological and biochemical analysis demonstrated that gradually accumulating liver injury caused by infection significantly influenced uptake of (188) Re-OCTAM. Hepatic ASGPR expression diminished only in the chronic infection stage. This study demonstrated that the isotope-labelled OCTAM could accumulate in the liver, might have potential as an imaging agent for in vivo hepatic function evaluation of schistosomiasis.

  15. Targeting TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor by natural products as a potential therapeutic approach for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jingwen; Arfuso, Frank; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, ME; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Kumar, Alan Prem

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to selectively induce apoptotic cell death in various tumor cells by engaging its death-inducing receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). This property has led to the development of a number of TRAIL–receptor agonists such as the soluble recombinant TRAIL and agonistic antibodies, which have shown promising anticancer activity in preclinical studies. However, besides activating caspase-dependent apoptosis in several cancer cells, TRAIL may also activate nonapoptotic signal transduction pathways such as nuclear factor-kappa B, mitogen-activated protein kinases, AKT, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3, which may contribute to TRAIL resistance that is being now frequently encountered in various cancers. TRAIL resistance can be overcome by the application of efficient TRAIL-sensitizing pharmacological agents. Natural compounds have shown a great potential in sensitizing cells to TRAIL treatment through suppression of distinct survival pathways. In this review, we have summarized both apoptotic and nonapoptotic pathways activated by TRAIL, as well as recent advances in developing TRAIL–receptor agonists for cancer therapy. We also briefly discuss combination therapies that have shown great potential in overcoming TRAIL resistance in various tumors. PMID:25854879

  16. Potential use of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize hypermetabolism associated with muscle pain in patients with adult spinal deformity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yuki; Takahashi, Miwako; Matsudaira, Ko; Oka, Hiroyuki; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2016-11-01

    Patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) are surgically treated for pain relief; however, visualization of the exact origin of the pain with imaging modalities is still challenging. We report the first case of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with painful degenerative kyphoscoliosis and was evaluated with flourine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) preoperatively. Because her low back pain was resistant to conservative treatment, she was treated with posterior spinal correction and fusion surgery from Th2 to the ilium. One year after the surgery, her low back pain had disappeared completely. In accordance with her clinical course, (18)F-FDG-PET imaging revealed the uptake of (18)F-FDG in the paravertebral muscles preoperatively and showed the complete absence of uptake at 1 year after surgery. The uptake site coincided with the convex part of each curve of the lumbar spine and was thought to be the result of the increased activity of paravertebral muscles due to their chronic stretched state in the kyphotic posture. This case report suggests the possibility of using (18)F-FDG-PET/CT to visualize increased activity in paravertebral muscles and the ensuing pain in ASD patients. PMID:27562570

  17. PSMA Ligands for Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer: Clinical Status

    PubMed Central

    Lütje, Susanne; Heskamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Alexander S.; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; van den Broek, Sebastiaan A. M. W.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra; Bockisch, Andreas; Gotthardt, Martin; Rijpkema, Mark; Boerman, Otto C.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy in men worldwide, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. At present, imaging of PCa has become increasingly important for staging, restaging, and treatment selection. Until recently, choline-based positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) represented the state-of-the-art radionuclide imaging technique for these purposes. However, its application is limited to patients with high PSA levels and Gleason scores. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising new target for specific imaging of PCa, because it is upregulated in the majority of PCa. Moreover, PSMA can serve as a target for therapeutic applications. Currently, several small-molecule PSMA ligands with excellent in vivo tumor targeting characteristics are being investigated for their potential in theranostic applications in PCa. Here, a review of the recent developments in PSMA-based diagnostic imaging and therapy in patients with PCa with radiolabeled PSMA ligands is provided. PMID:26681984

  18. PSMA Ligands for Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer: Clinical Status.

    PubMed

    Lütje, Susanne; Heskamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Alexander S; Poeppel, Thorsten D; van den Broek, Sebastiaan A M W; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra; Bockisch, Andreas; Gotthardt, Martin; Rijpkema, Mark; Boerman, Otto C

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy in men worldwide, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. At present, imaging of PCa has become increasingly important for staging, restaging, and treatment selection. Until recently, choline-based positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) represented the state-of-the-art radionuclide imaging technique for these purposes. However, its application is limited to patients with high PSA levels and Gleason scores. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising new target for specific imaging of PCa, because it is upregulated in the majority of PCa. Moreover, PSMA can serve as a target for therapeutic applications. Currently, several small-molecule PSMA ligands with excellent in vivo tumor targeting characteristics are being investigated for their potential in theranostic applications in PCa. Here, a review of the recent developments in PSMA-based diagnostic imaging and therapy in patients with PCa with radiolabeled PSMA ligands is provided.

  19. Clinical Utility and Future Applications of PET/CT and PET/CMR in Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jonathan A.; Salerno, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, there have been major advances in cardiovascular positron emission tomography (PET) in combination with either computed tomography (CT) or, more recently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). These multi-modality approaches have significant potential to leverage the strengths of each modality to improve the characterization of a variety of cardiovascular diseases and to predict clinical outcomes. This review will discuss current developments and potential future uses of PET/CT and PET/CMR for cardiovascular applications, which promise to add significant incremental benefits to the data provided by each modality alone. PMID:27598207

  20. Clinical Utility and Future Applications of PET/CT and PET/CMR in Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jonathan A; Salerno, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, there have been major advances in cardiovascular positron emission tomography (PET) in combination with either computed tomography (CT) or, more recently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). These multi-modality approaches have significant potential to leverage the strengths of each modality to improve the characterization of a variety of cardiovascular diseases and to predict clinical outcomes. This review will discuss current developments and potential future uses of PET/CT and PET/CMR for cardiovascular applications, which promise to add significant incremental benefits to the data provided by each modality alone. PMID:27598207

  1. Gold Nanorods Conjugated with Doxorubicin and cRGD for Combined Anticancer Drug Delivery and PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuling; Hong, Hao; Matson, Vyara Z.; Javadi, Alireza; Xu, Wenjin; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Nickles, Robert J.; Cai, Weibo; Steeber, Douglas A.; Gong, Shaoqin

    2012-01-01

    A multifunctional gold nanorod (GNR)-based nanoplatform for targeted anticancer drug delivery and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumors was developed and characterized. An anti-cancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin (DOX)) was covalently conjugated onto PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) GNR nanocarriers via a hydrazone bond to achieve pH-sensitive controlled drug release. Tumor-targeting ligands (i.e., the cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys) peptides, cRGD) and 64Cu-chelators (i.e., 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N, N', N''-triacetic acid (NOTA)) were conjugated onto the distal ends of the PEG arms to achieve active tumor-targeting and PET imaging, respectively. Based on flow cytometry analysis, cRGD-conjugated nanocarriers (i.e., GNR-DOX-cRGD) exhibited a higher cellular uptake and cytotoxicity than non-targeted ones (i.e., GNR-DOX) in vitro. However, GNR-DOX-cRGD and GNR-DOX nanocarriers had similar in vivo biodistribution according to in vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies. Due to the unique optical properties of GNRs, this multifunctional GNR-based nanoplatform can potentially be optimized for combined cancer therapies (chemotherapy and photothermal therapy) and multimodality imaging (PET, optical, X-ray computed tomography (CT), etc.). PMID:22916075

  2. Recent Advances and Future Progress in PET Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Piotr J; Pan, Tinsu; Germano, Guido

    2016-01-01

    PET is an important and growing imaging modality. PET instrumentation has undergone a steady evolution improving various aspects of imaging. In this review, we discuss recent and future software and hardware technologies for PET/CT. The improvements include new hardware, incorporating designs with digital photomultipliers, and fast electronics, allowing implementation of time-of-flight reconstruction. Manufacturers also improved PET sensitivity with a larger axial field of view and 3D imaging. On the CT side, faster scanners and multislice detectors allow implementation of advanced acquisition protocols such as 4D CT and coronary CT angiography. Significant advances have been also made in the reconstruction software, now integrating resolution recovery with advanced iterative techniques. New PET acquisition protocols have been enabled to include continuous bed motion. Efforts have been undertaken to compensate PET scans for respiratory and also for cardiac patient motion (for cardiac imaging) during PET imaging, which significantly improves overall image quality and resolution. Finally, simultaneous PET/MR systems have been recently deployed clinically and now offer even greater potential of image quality and enhanced clinical utility. PET/MR imaging allows for perfectly registered attenuation maps, clinically important complementary MR information, and potentially superior motion correction. These recent multifaceted advances allow PET to remain as one of the most exciting and relevant imaging technologies. PMID:26687853

  3. Recent Advances and Future Progress in PET Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Piotr J; Pan, Tinsu; Germano, Guido

    2016-01-01

    PET is an important and growing imaging modality. PET instrumentation has undergone a steady evolution improving various aspects of imaging. In this review, we discuss recent and future software and hardware technologies for PET/CT. The improvements include new hardware, incorporating designs with digital photomultipliers, and fast electronics, allowing implementation of time-of-flight reconstruction. Manufacturers also improved PET sensitivity with a larger axial field of view and 3D imaging. On the CT side, faster scanners and multislice detectors allow implementation of advanced acquisition protocols such as 4D CT and coronary CT angiography. Significant advances have been also made in the reconstruction software, now integrating resolution recovery with advanced iterative techniques. New PET acquisition protocols have been enabled to include continuous bed motion. Efforts have been undertaken to compensate PET scans for respiratory and also for cardiac patient motion (for cardiac imaging) during PET imaging, which significantly improves overall image quality and resolution. Finally, simultaneous PET/MR systems have been recently deployed clinically and now offer even greater potential of image quality and enhanced clinical utility. PET/MR imaging allows for perfectly registered attenuation maps, clinically important complementary MR information, and potentially superior motion correction. These recent multifaceted advances allow PET to remain as one of the most exciting and relevant imaging technologies.

  4. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE. PMID:26354876

  5. Cell-specific targeting in the mouse inner ear using nanoparticles conjugated with a neurotrophin-derived peptide ligand: potential tool for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumen; Johnston, Alex H; Newman, Tracey A; Glueckert, Rudolf; Dudas, Jozsef; Bitsche, Mario; Corbacella, Elisa; Rieger, Gunde; Martini, Alessandro; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2010-05-10

    Cell specific targeting is an emerging field in nanomedicine. Homing of the multifunctional nanoparticles (MFNPs) is achieved by the conjugation of targeting moieties on the nanoparticle surface. The inner ear is an attractive target for new drug delivery strategies as it is hard to access and hearing loss is a significant worldwide problem. In this work we investigated the utility of a Nerve Growth Factor-derived peptide (hNgf_EE) functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) to target cells of the inner ear. These functionalized NPs were introduced to organotypic explant cultures of the mouse inner ear and to PC-12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. The NPs did not show any signs of toxicity. Specific targeting and higher binding affinity to spiral ganglion neurons, Schwann cells and nerve fibers of the explant cultures were achieved through ligand mediated multivalent binding to tyrosine kinase receptors and to p75 neurotrophin receptors. Unspecific uptake of NPs was investigated using NPs conjugated with scrambled hNgf_EE peptide. Our results indicate a selective cochlear cell targeting by MFNPs, which may be a potential tool for cell specific drug and gene delivery to the inner ear.

  6. Two-ligand priming mechanism for potentiated phosphoinositide synthesis is an evolutionarily conserved feature of Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine exchange proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Ghosh, Ratna; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Lönnfors, Max; Somerharju, Pentti; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid signaling, particularly phosphoinositide signaling, plays a key role in regulating the extreme polarized membrane growth that drives root hair development in plants. The Arabidopsis AtSFH1 gene encodes a two-domain protein with an amino-terminal Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP) domain linked to a carboxy-terminal nodulin domain. AtSfh1 is critical for promoting the spatially highly organized phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate signaling program required for establishment and maintenance of polarized root hair growth. Here we demonstrate that, like the yeast Sec14, the AtSfh1 PITP domain requires both its phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)- and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho)-binding properties to stimulate PtdIns-4-phosphate [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis. Moreover, we show that both phospholipid-binding activities are essential for AtSfh1 activity in supporting polarized root hair growth. Finally, we report genetic and biochemical evidence that the two-ligand mechanism for potentiation of PtdIns 4-OH kinase activity is a broadly conserved feature of plant Sec14-nodulin proteins, and that this strategy appeared only late in plant evolution. Taken together, the data indicate that the PtdIns/PtdCho-exchange mechanism for stimulated PtdIns(4)P synthesis either arose independently during evolution in yeast and in higher plants, or a suitable genetic module was introduced to higher plants from a fungal source and subsequently exploited by them. PMID:27193303

  7. Water-soluble and photo-stable silver(I) dicarboxylate complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline ligands: Antimicrobial and anticancer chemotherapeutic potential, DNA interactions and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Laura; Dixit, Vidya; Assad, Letícia O N; Ribeiro, Thales P; Queiroz, Daniela D; Kellett, Andrew; Casey, Alan; Colleran, John; Pereira, Marcos D; Rochford, Garret; McCann, Malachy; O'Shea, Denis; Dempsey, Rita; McClean, Siobhán; Kia, Agnieszka Foltyn-Arfa; Walsh, Maureen; Creaven, Bernadette; Howe, Orla; Devereux, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The complexes [Ag2(OOC-(CH2)n-COO)] (n=1-10) (1-10) were synthesised and reacted with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) to yield derivatives formulating as [Ag2(phen)x(OOC-(CH2)y-COO)]·zH2O (x=2 or 3; y=1-10; z=1-4) (11-20) which are highly water-soluble and photo-stable in aqueous solution. The phen derivatives 11-20 exhibit chemotherapeutic potential against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and against cisplatin-sensitive breast (MCF-7) and resistant ovarian (SKOV-3) cancer cell lines. Cyclic voltammetric analysis and DNA binding and intercalation studies indicate that the mechanism of action of 11-20 is significantly different to that of their silver(I) dicarboxylate precursors and they do not induce DNA damage or ROS generation in mammalian cells. The representative complexes 9 and 19 (containing the undecanedioate ligand) were both found to significantly reduce superoxide and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in the yeast S. cerevisiae. PMID:26986979

  8. Ultraviolet light converts propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker and potential lupus-inducing drug, into a proinflammatory AhR ligand.

    PubMed

    Dorgham, Karim; Amoura, Zahir; Parizot, Christophe; Arnaud, Laurent; Frances, Camille; Pionneau, Cédric; Devilliers, Hervé; Pinto, Sandra; Zoorob, Rima; Miyara, Makoto; Larsen, Martin; Yssel, Hans; Gorochov, Guy; Mathian, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    UV light and some medications are known to trigger lupus erythematosus (LE). A common mechanism underlying the immunopathologic effect, resulting from exposure to these two seemingly unrelated factors, remains unknown. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a key role in the regulation of IL-22 production in humans and can be activated by both xenobiotics and naturally occurring photoproducts. A significant expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was observed in the peripheral blood of active systemic LE (SLE) patients, compared to inactive patients and controls. We also show that propranolol, a potential lupus-inducing drug, induced stronger AhR activation in PBMCs of SLE patients than in those of controls. AhR agonist activity of propranolol was enhanced by UV light exposure. MS analysis of irradiated propranolol revealed the generation of a proinflammatory photoproduct. This compound behaves like the prototypic AhR ligand 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole, a cutaneous UV light-induced tryptophan metabolite, both promoting IL-22, IL-8, and CCL2 secretion by T-cells and macrophages. Finally, LE patients exhibit signs of cutaneous AhR activation that correlate with lesional expression of the same proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting a role for photometabolites in the induction of skin inflammation. The AhR might therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention in LE.

  9. Synthesis, 68Ga-Radiolabeling, and Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of a Depsipeptide-Derived Compound as a Potential PET/CT Infection Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B.; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Hazari, Puja P.; Mishra, Anil K.; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R.; Sathekge, Mike M.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as 67/68Ga-citrate or 18F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with 68Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by 68Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3–2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  10. Synthesis, 68Ga-radiolabeling, and preliminary in vivo assessment of a depsipeptide-derived compound as a potential PET/CT infection imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Parboosing, Raveen; Hazari, Puja P; Mishra, Anil K; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R; Sathekge, Mike M

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as (67/68)Ga-citrate or (18)F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with (68)Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by (68)Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3-2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector.

  11. An open-label, randomized positron emission tomography (PET) study in healthy male volunteers consisiting of Part A and Part B. Part A: Clinical validation of norepinephrine transporter (NET) PET ligand, (S,S)-[11C]O-methylreboxetine ([11C]MRB) using different doses of oral atomoxetine as NET reuptake inhibitor. Part B: Evaluation of NET occupancy, as measured by [11C]MRB, with multiple dosing regimens of orally administered GSK372475.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna

    2007-08-31

    Results from human studies with the PET radiotracer (S,S)-[(11)C]O-methyl reboxetine ([(11)C](S,S)-MRB), a ligand targeting the norepinephrine transporter (NET), are reported. Quantification methods were determined from test/retest studies, and sensitivity to pharmacological blockade was tested with different doses of atomoxetine (ATX), a drug that binds to the NET with high affinity (K(i)=2-5 nM). METHODS: Twenty-four male subjects were divided into different groups for serial 90-min PET studies with [(11)C](S,S)-MRB to assess reproducibility and the effect of blocking with different doses of ATX (25, 50 and 100 mg, po). Region-of-interest uptake data and arterial plasma input were analyzed for the distribution volume (DV). Images were normalized to a template, and average parametric images for each group were formed. RESULTS: [(11)C](S,S)-MRB uptake was highest in the thalamus (THL) and the midbrain (MBR) [containing the locus coeruleus (LC)] and lowest for the caudate nucleus (CDT). The CDT, a region with low NET, showed the smallest change on ATX treatment and was used as a reference region for the DV ratio (DVR). The baseline average DVR was 1.48 for both the THL and MBR with lower values for other regions [cerebellum (CB), 1.09; cingulate gyrus (CNG) 1.07]. However, more accurate information about relative densities came from the blocking studies. MBR exhibited greater blocking than THL, indicating a transporter density approximately 40% greater than THL. No relationship was found between DVR change and plasma ATX level. Although the higher dose tended to induce a greater decrease than the lower dose for MBR (average decrease for 25 mg=24+/-7%; 100 mg=31+/-11%), these differences were not significant. The different blocking between MBR (average decrease=28+/- 10%) and THL (average decrease=17+/-10%) given the same baseline DVR indicates that the CDT is not a good measure for non-NET binding in both regions. Threshold analysis of the difference between the

  12. Potential of PEGylated Toll-Like Receptor 7 Ligands for Controlling Inflammation and Functional Changes in Mouse Models of Asthma and Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Mariano, Lívia Lacerda; Ghilosso-Bortolini, Roberta; de Arantes, Ana Carolina Santos; Fernandes, Andrey Junior; Berni, Michelle; Cecchinato, Valentina; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Maj, Roberto; Barberis, Alcide; Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues e; Martins, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations show that signaling activation through pattern recognition receptors can directly impact a number of inflammatory lung diseases. While toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists have raised interest for their ability to inhibit allergen-induced pathological changes in experimental asthma conditions, the putative benefit of this treatment is limited by adverse effects. Our aim was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of two PEGylated purine-like compounds, TMX-302 and TMX-306, characterized by TLR7 partial agonistic activity; therefore, the compounds are expected to induce lower local and systemic adverse reactions. In vitro approaches and translation to murine models of obstructive and restrictive lung diseases were explored. In vitro studies with human PBMCs showed that both TMX-302 and TMX-306 marginally affects cytokine production as compared with equivalent concentrations of the TLR7 full agonist, TMX-202. The PEGylated compounds did not induce monocyte-derived DC maturation or B cell proliferation, differently from what observed after stimulation with TMX-202. Impact of PEGylated ligands on lung function and inflammatory changes was studied in animal models of acute lung injury, asthma, and silicosis following Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), allergen (ovalbumin), and silica inhalation, respectively. Subcutaneous injection of TMX-302 prevented LPS- and allergen-induced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), leukocyte infiltration, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. However, intranasal instillation of TMX-302 led to neutrophil infiltration and failed to prevent allergen-induced AHR, despite inhibiting leukocyte counts in the BAL. Aerosolized TMX-306 given prophylactically, but not therapeutically, inhibited pivotal asthma features. Interventional treatment with intranasal instillation of TMX-306 significantly reduced the pulmonary fibrogranulomatous response and the number of silica particles in lung interstitial space in silicotic mice

  13. Potential of PEGylated Toll-Like Receptor 7 Ligands for Controlling Inflammation and Functional Changes in Mouse Models of Asthma and Silicosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Mariano, Lívia Lacerda; Ghilosso-Bortolini, Roberta; de Arantes, Ana Carolina Santos; Fernandes, Andrey Junior; Berni, Michelle; Cecchinato, Valentina; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Maj, Roberto; Barberis, Alcide; Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues E; Martins, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    Prior investigations show that signaling activation through pattern recognition receptors can directly impact a number of inflammatory lung diseases. While toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists have raised interest for their ability to inhibit allergen-induced pathological changes in experimental asthma conditions, the putative benefit of this treatment is limited by adverse effects. Our aim was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of two PEGylated purine-like compounds, TMX-302 and TMX-306, characterized by TLR7 partial agonistic activity; therefore, the compounds are expected to induce lower local and systemic adverse reactions. In vitro approaches and translation to murine models of obstructive and restrictive lung diseases were explored. In vitro studies with human PBMCs showed that both TMX-302 and TMX-306 marginally affects cytokine production as compared with equivalent concentrations of the TLR7 full agonist, TMX-202. The PEGylated compounds did not induce monocyte-derived DC maturation or B cell proliferation, differently from what observed after stimulation with TMX-202. Impact of PEGylated ligands on lung function and inflammatory changes was studied in animal models of acute lung injury, asthma, and silicosis following Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), allergen (ovalbumin), and silica inhalation, respectively. Subcutaneous injection of TMX-302 prevented LPS- and allergen-induced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), leukocyte infiltration, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung. However, intranasal instillation of TMX-302 led to neutrophil infiltration and failed to prevent allergen-induced AHR, despite inhibiting leukocyte counts in the BAL. Aerosolized TMX-306 given prophylactically, but not therapeutically, inhibited pivotal asthma features. Interventional treatment with intranasal instillation of TMX-306 significantly reduced the pulmonary fibrogranulomatous response and the number of silica particles in lung interstitial space in silicotic mice

  14. Adjuvant effects of invariant NKT cell ligand potentiates the innate and adaptive immunity to an inactivated H1N1 swine influenza virus vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Varun; Manickam, Cordelia; Dhakal, Santosh; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Ouyang, Kang; Hiremath, Jagadish; Khatri, Mahesh; Hague, Jacquelyn Gervay; Lee, Chang Won; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2016-04-15

    Pigs are considered as the source of some of the emerging human flu viruses. Inactivated swine influenza virus (SwIV) vaccine has been in use in the US swine herds, but it failed to control the flu outbreaks. The main reason has been attributed to lack of induction of strong local mucosal immunity in the respiratory tract. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell is a unique T cell subset, and activation of iNKT cell using its ligand α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been shown to potentiate the cross-protective immunity to inactivated influenza virus vaccine candidates in mice. Recently, we discovered iNKT cell in pig and demonstrated its activation using α-GalCer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated H1N1 SwIV coadministered with α-GalCer intranasally against a homologous viral challenge. Our results demonstrated the potent adjuvant effects of α-GalCer in potentiating both innate and adaptive immune responses to SwIV Ags in the lungs of pigs, which resulted in reduction in the lung viral load by 3 logs compared to without adjuvant. Immunologically, in the lungs of pigs vaccinated with α-GalCer an increased virus specific IgA response, IFN-α secretion and NK cell-cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, iNKT cell-stimulation enhanced the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-12) and reduced the production of immunosuppressive cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the lungs of pigs⋅ In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time iNKT cell adjuvant effects in pigs to SwIV Ags through augmenting the innate and adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract.

  15. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    de Galiza Barbosa, F; Delso, G; Ter Voert, E E G W; Huellner, M W; Herrmann, K; Veit-Haibach, P

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies.

  16. Laboratory and cyclotron requirements for PET research

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes four types of PET facilities: Clinical PET with no radionuclide production; clinical PET with a small accelerator; clinical PET with research support; and research PET facilities. General facility considerations are also discussed.

  17. Preparation and First Preclinical Evaluation of [18F]FE@SNAP: A Potential PET Tracer for the Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Receptor-1 (MCHR1)

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Cécile; Nics, Lukas; Zeilinger, Markus; Schirmer, Eva; Spreitzer, Helmut; Karanikas, Georgios; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Viernstein, Helmut; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system is a new target for the treatment of human disorders. Since the knowledge of the MCH system’s involvement in a variety of pathologies (obesity, diabetes, and deregulation of metabolic feedback mechanism) is based on in vitro or preclinical studies, a suitable positron emission tomography (PET) tracer needs to be developed. We herein present the preparation and first preclinical evaluation of [18F]FE@SNAP – a new PET tracer for MCH receptor-1 (MCHR1). The synthesis was performed using a microfluidic device. Preclinical evaluation included binding affinity, plasma stability, plasma free fraction, stability against the cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) system using liver microsomes, stability against carboxyl-esterase, and methods to assess the penetration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) such as logD analysis and immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography. Levels at 374 ± 202 MBq [18F]FE@SNAP were obtained after purification. The obtained Kd value of [18F]FE@SNAP was 2.9 nM. [18F]FE@SNAP evinced high stability against carboxylesterase, CYP450 enzymes, and in human plasma. LogD (3.83) and IAM chromatography results (Pm=0.51) were in the same range as for known BBB-penetrating compounds. The synthesis of [18F]FE@SNAP was reliable and successful. Due to high binding affinity and stability, [18F]FE@SNAP is a promising tracer for MCHR1. PMID:24106662

  18. Novel fluorine-18 labeled 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin derivatives as potential PET tracers for in vivo imaging of activated caspases in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Christopher M; Hermann, Sven; Faust, Andreas; Riemann, Burkhard; Schober, Otmar; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter; Kopka, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    The programmed type I cell death, defined as apoptosis, is induced by complex regulated signaling pathways that trigger the intracellular activation of executioner caspases-3, -6 and -7. Once activated, these enzymes initiate cellular death through cleavage of proteins which are responsible for DNA repair, signaling and cell maintenance. Several radiofluorinated inhibitors of caspases-3 and -7, comprising a moderate lipophilic 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)isatin lead structure, are currently being investigated for imaging apoptosis in vivo by us and others. The purpose of this study was to increase the intrinsic hydrophilicity of the aforementioned lead structure to alter the pharmacokinetic behavior of the resulting caspase-3 and -7 targeted radiotracer. Therefore, fluorinated and non-fluorinated derivatives of 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin were synthesized and tested for their inhibitory properties against recombinant caspases-3 and -7. Fluorine-18 has been introduced by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of an alkyne precursor with 2-[(18)F]fluoroethylazide. Using dynamic micro-PET biodistribution studies in vivo the kinetic behavior of one promising PET-compatible 5-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl 7-azaisatin derivative has been compared to a previously described isatin based radiotracer.

  19. Preparation and First Preclinical Evaluation of [(18)F]FE@SNAP: A Potential PET Tracer for the Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Receptor-1 (MCHR1).

    PubMed

    Philippe, Cécile; Nics, Lukas; Zeilinger, Markus; Schirmer, Eva; Spreitzer, Helmut; Karanikas, Georgios; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Viernstein, Helmut; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system is a new target for the treatment of human disorders. Since the knowledge of the MCH system's involvement in a variety of pathologies (obesity, diabetes, and deregulation of metabolic feedback mechanism) is based on in vitro or preclinical studies, a suitable positron emission tomography (PET) tracer needs to be developed. We herein present the preparation and first preclinical evaluation of [(18)F]FE@SNAP - a new PET tracer for MCH receptor-1 (MCHR1). The synthesis was performed using a microfluidic device. Preclinical evaluation included binding affinity, plasma stability, plasma free fraction, stability against the cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) system using liver microsomes, stability against carboxyl-esterase, and methods to assess the penetration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) such as logD analysis and immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography. Levels at 374 ± 202 MBq [(18)F]FE@SNAP were obtained after purification. The obtained K d value of [(18)F]FE@SNAP was 2.9 nM. [(18)F]FE@SNAP evinced high stability against carboxylesterase, CYP450 enzymes, and in human plasma. LogD (3.83) and IAM chromatography results (Pm=0.51) were in the same range as for known BBB-penetrating compounds. The synthesis of [(18)F]FE@SNAP was reliable and successful. Due to high binding affinity and stability, [(18)F]FE@SNAP is a promising tracer for MCHR1.

  20. Synthesis, Radiolabeling, and Biological Evaluation of 5-Hydroxy-2-[(18)F]fluoroalkyl-tryptophan Analogues as Potential PET Radiotracers for Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chiotellis, Aristeidis; Müller Herde, Adrienne; Rössler, Simon L; Brekalo, Ante; Gedeonova, Erika; Mu, Linjing; Keller, Claudia; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2016-06-01

    Aiming at developing mechanism-based amino acid (18)F-PET tracers for tumor imaging, we synthesized two (18)F-labeled analogues of 5-hydroxy-l-[β-(11)C]tryptophan ([(11)C]5HTP) whose excellent in vivo performance in neuroendocrine tumors is mainly attributed to its decarboxylation by aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), an enzyme overexpressed in these malignancies. Reference compounds and precursors were synthesized following multistep synthetic approaches. Radiosynthesis of tracers was accomplished in good radiochemical yields (15-39%), high specific activities (45-95 GBq/μmol), and excellent radiochemical purities. In vitro cell uptake was sodium-independent and was inhibited ≥95% by 2-amino-2-norbornanecarboxylic acid (BCH) and ∼30% by arginine. PET imaging in mice revealed distinctly high tumor/background ratios for both tracers, outperforming the well-established O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)tyrosine ([(18)F]FET) tracer in a head-to-head comparison. Biological evaluation revealed that the in vivo performance is most probably independent of any interaction with AADC. Nevertheless, the excellent tumor visualization qualifies the new tracers as interesting probes for tumor imaging worthy for further investigation. PMID:27191773

  1. (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucamines: Reductive amination of hydrophilic (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose with lipophilic amines for the development of potential PET imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Aparna; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2015-08-01

    Maillard reaction of (18)F-FDG with biological amines results in the formation of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglycosylamines ((18)F-FDGly) as pseudo-Amadori products. To increase in vivo stability, we report the reductive amination of FDGly to provide reduced fluorodeoxyglucamines (FDGlu). (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucamines ((18)F-FDGlu), resulting from linking (18)F-FDG (hydrophilic) to lipophilic molecules containing amine group may be useful as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents. Two amine derivatives, 7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-l-(3'-aminophenyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-lH-3-benzazepine (SCH 38548 for dopamine D1 receptors) and BTA-0 (for Aβ amyloid) were reacted with FDG under reductive amination conditions to yield stable products, FDGluSCH and FDGluBTA. FDGluSCH had high binding affinity to rat brain dopamine D1 receptors with a Ki of 19.5 nM while FDGluBTA had micromolar affinity for human frontal cortex Aβ plaques. (18)F-FDGluSCH was prepared in low to modest radiochemical yields and preliminary results showed binding to the rat striatum in brain slices. In vivo stability of(18)F-FDGluSCH needs to be determined. Our results suggest that (18)F-FDG is a useful 'radioactive synthon' for PET radiotracer development. Its usefulness will have to be determined on the basis of the structure-activity relationship of the target molecule.

  2. PET and PET/CT imaging of skeletal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone scintigraphy augmented with radiographs or cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has remained the commonest method to diagnose and follow up skeletal metastases. However, bone scintigraphy is associated with relatively poor spatial resolution, limited diagnostic specificity and reduced sensitivity for bone marrow disease. It also shows limited diagnostic accuracy in assessing response to therapy in a clinically useful time period. With the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners there has been an increasing interest in using various PET tracers to evaluate skeletal disease including [18F]fluoride (NaF) as a bone-specific tracer and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [18F]choline as tumour-specific tracers. There is also early work exploring the receptor status of skeletal metastases with somatostatin receptor analogues. This review describes the potential utility of these tracers in the assessment of skeletal metastases. PMID:20663736

  3. A survey of attitudes toward responsible pet ownership.

    PubMed

    Selby, L A; Rhoades, J D; Hewett, J E; Irvin, J A

    1979-01-01

    The concerns of medical and community officials about responsible pet ownership have increased. Before a practical solution can be found for irresponsible ownership and community health problems associated with pet populations, the public's attitudes on issues related to responsible pet ownership must be determined. Such issues include attitudes on dog and cat overpopulation, potential public health problems associated with pet populations, and methods of controlling pet populations and stray animals. Responses to a questionnaire were used to evaluate the attitudes of 910 pet owners and nonowners toward factors comprising responsible pet ownership. The median age of the respondents was 33 years; 414 (45 percent) were men, and 496 (55 percent) were women. At the time of the study, 18 percent owned a cat and a dog, 35 percent owned only a dog, 11 percent showed only a cat, and 36 percent were nonowners. Not only the sex of the respondent but also the category of pet ownership affected opinions on overpopulation of dogs and cats, nuisance and pollution problems associated with these animals, and methods of controlling pet populations in the community. For example, owners agreed strongly on family planning for pets, but a majority of male owners stated that they would not have their dogs neutered.

  4. A survey of attitudes toward responsible pet ownership.

    PubMed Central

    Selby, L A; Rhoades, J D; Hewett, J E; Irvin, J A

    1979-01-01

    The concerns of medical and community officials about responsible pet ownership have increased. Before a practical solution can be found for irresponsible ownership and community health problems associated with pet populations, the public's attitudes on issues related to responsible pet ownership must be determined. Such issues include attitudes on dog and cat overpopulation, potential public health problems associated with pet populations, and methods of controlling pet populations and stray animals. Responses to a questionnaire were used to evaluate the attitudes of 910 pet owners and nonowners toward factors comprising responsible pet ownership. The median age of the respondents was 33 years; 414 (45 percent) were men, and 496 (55 percent) were women. At the time of the study, 18 percent owned a cat and a dog, 35 percent owned only a dog, 11 percent showed only a cat, and 36 percent were nonowners. Not only the sex of the respondent but also the category of pet ownership affected opinions on overpopulation of dogs and cats, nuisance and pollution problems associated with these animals, and methods of controlling pet populations in the community. For example, owners agreed strongly on family planning for pets, but a majority of male owners stated that they would not have their dogs neutered. PMID:572978

  5. Preclinical Evaluation of a Potential GSH Ester Based PET/SPECT Imaging Probe DT(GSHMe)2 to Detect Gamma Glutamyl Transferase Over Expressing Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Harleen; Meena, Virendra Kumar; Prakash, Surbhi; Chuttani, Krishna; Chadha, Nidhi; Jaswal, Ambika; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Hazari, Puja Panwar

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is an important biomarker in malignant cancers. The redox processes ensuing from GGT-mediated metabolism of extracellular GSH are implicated in critical aspects of tumor cell biology. Reportedly, Glutathione monoethyl ester (GSHMe) is a substrate of GGT, which has been used for its rapid transport over glutathione. Exploring GGT to be an important target, a homobivalent peptide system, DT(GSHMe)2 was designed to target GGT-over expressing tumors for diagnostic purposes. DT(GSHMe)2 was synthesized, characterized and preclinically evaluated in vitro using toxicity, cell binding assays and time dependent experiments. Stable and defined radiochemistry with 99mTc and 68Ga was optimized for high radiochemical yield. In vivo biodistribution studies were conducted for different time points along with scintigraphic studies of radiolabeled DT(GSHMe)2 on xenografted tumor models. For further validation, in silico docking studies were performed on GGT (hGGT1, P19440). Preclinical in vitro evaluations on cell lines suggested minimal toxicity of DT(GSHMe)2 at 100 μM concentration. Kinetic analysis revealed transport of 99mTc-DT(GSHMe)2 occurs via a saturable high-affinity carrier with Michaelis constant (Km) of 2.25 μM and maximal transport rate velocity (Vmax) of 0.478 μM/min. Quantitative estimation of GGT expression from western blot experiments showed substantial expression with 41.6 ± 7.07 % IDV for tumor. Small animal micro PET (Positron Emission Tomography)/CT(Computed Tomography) coregistered images depicted significantly high uptake of DT(GSHMe)2 at the BMG-1 tumor site. ROI analysis showed high tumor to contra lateral muscle ratio of 9.33 in PET imaging studies. Avid accumulation of radiotracer was observed at tumor versus inflammation site at 2 h post i.v. injection in an Ehrlich Ascites tumor (EAT) mice model, showing evident specificity for tumor. We propose DT(GSHMe)2 to be an excellent candidate for prognostication and tumor

  6. Complexes of trivalent metal ions with potentially heptadentate N{sub 4}O{sub 3} Schiff base and amine phenol ligands of varying rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.W.; Liu, S.; Wong, E.; Rettig, S.J.; Orvig, C.

    1995-04-12

    The synthesis and characterization of several potentially heptadentate N{sub 4}O{sub 3} Schiff bases and amine phenols, as well as a series of their mononuclear and dinuclear complexes with indium and the lanthanides are reported. Schiff bases containing imidazolidine rings were the products of the known condensation reaction of triethylenetetramine with 3 equiv of 5-substituted salicylaldehydes to form H{sub 3}api (5-H-substituent), H{sub 3}Clapi (5-Cl-substituent), or H{sub 3}Brapi (5-Br-substituent); KBH{sub 4} reduction of these Schiff bases gave the appropriate isomeric N{sub 4}O{sub 3} amine phenols H{sub 3}(1,2,4-btt) and H{sub 3}(1,1,4-btt), as well as an acetone adduct, H{sub 3}(1,2,4-ahi). The Schiff bases reacted with 1 equiv of a lanthanide (Ln{sup 3+}) nitrate to produce mononuclear nine-coordinated [Ln(H{sub 3}Xapi)-(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}] complex wherein the ligand adopts a tridentate capping coordination mode, whereas the amine phenols formed mononuclear seven-coordinate complexes with the lanthanides and indium; homodinuclear complexes [LnL]{sub 2} were also obtained with the Schiff bases. The X-ray structures of the Schiff bases H{sub 3}api and H{sub 3}Clapi, the mononuclear amine phenol complexes Yb(1,2,4-btt){center_dot}0.5CH{sub 3}OH and In(1,1,4-btt), and the homodinuclear Schiff base complex [La(Brapi)]{sub 2}{center_dot}2CHCl{sub 3} have been determined.

  7. Solution Structure of the PAS Domain of a Thermophilic YybT Protein Homolog Reveals a Potential Ligand-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Edward; Rao, Feng; Pasunooti, Swathi; Pham, Thi Huong; Soehano, Ishin; Turner, Mark S.; Liew, Chong Wai; Lescar, Julien; Pervushin, Konstantin; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis protein YybT (or GdpP) and its homologs were recently established as stress signaling proteins that exert their biological effect by degrading the bacterial messenger cyclic di-AMP. YybT homologs contain a small Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domain (∼80 amino acids) that can bind b-type heme with 1:1 stoichiometry despite the small size of the domain and the lack of a conserved heme iron-coordinating residue. We determined the solution structure of the PAS domain of GtYybT from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans by NMR spectroscopy to further probe its function. The solution structure confirms that PASGtYybT adopts the characteristic PAS fold composed of a five-stranded antiparallel β sheet and a few short α-helices. One α-helix and three central β-strands of PASGtYybT are noticeably shorter than those of the typical PAS domains. Despite the small size of the protein domain, a hydrophobic pocket is formed by the side chains of nonpolar residues stemming from the β-strands and α-helices. A set of residues in the vicinity of the pocket and in the C-terminal region at the dimeric interface exhibits perturbed NMR parameters in the presence of heme or zinc protoporphyrin. Together, the results unveil a compact PAS domain with a potential ligand-binding pocket and reinforce the view that the PASYybT domains function as regulatory domains in the modulation of cellular cyclic di-AMP concentration. PMID:23504327

  8. Profits from precious pets.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, E

    2000-06-01

    In 1998, an anonymous millionaire, hoping to clone his pet dog Missy, awarded a Texas A&M University animal scientist $2.3 million to develop the necessary techniques. Now several companies are cashing in on the boom in frozen-tissue storage of pets for future cloning.

  9. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  10. Microfluidics for synthesis of peptide-based PET tracers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful noninvasive tool for acquisition of the physiological parameters in human and animals with the help of PET tracers. Among all the PET tracers, radiolabeled peptides have been widely explored for cancer-related receptor imaging due to their high affinity and specificity to receptors. But radiochemistry procedures for production of peptide-based PET tracers are usually complex, which makes large-scale clinical studies relatively challenging. New radiolabeling technologies which could simplify synthesis and purification procedures, are extremely needed. Over the last decade, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology have boomed as powerful tools in the field of organic chemistry, which potentially provide significant help to the PET chemistry. In this minireview, microfluidic radiolabeling technology is described and its application for synthesis of peptide-based PET tracers is summarized and discussed.

  11. Probing Ternary Complex Equilibria of Crown Ether Ligands by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ternary complex formation with solvent molecules and other adventitious ligands may compromise the performance of metal-ion-selective fluorescent probes. As Ca(II) can accommodate more than 6 donors in the first coordination sphere, commonly used crown ether ligands are prone to ternary complex formation with this cation. The steric strain imposed by auxiliary ligands, however, may result in an ensemble of rapidly equilibrating coordination species with varying degrees of interaction between the cation and the specific donor atoms mediating the fluorescence response, thus diminishing the change in fluorescence properties upon Ca(II) binding. To explore the influence of ligand architecture on these equilibria, we tethered two structurally distinct aza-15-crown-5 ligands to pyrazoline fluorophores as reporters. Due to ultrafast photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) quenching of the fluorophore by the ligand moiety, the fluorescence decay profile directly reflects the species composition in the ground state. By adjusting the PET driving force through electronic tuning of the pyrazoline fluorophores, we were able to differentiate between species with only subtle variations in PET donor abilities. Concluding from a global analysis of the corresponding fluorescence decay profiles, the coordination species composition was indeed strongly dependent on the ligand architecture. Altogether, the combination of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with selective tuning of the PET driving force represents an effective analytical tool to study dynamic coordination equilibria and thus to optimize ligand architectures for the design of high-contrast cation-responsive fluorescence switches. PMID:25313708

  12. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  13. Protonation of ferrous dinitrogen complexes containing a diphosphine ligand with a pendent amine.

    PubMed

    Heiden, Zachariah M; Chen, Shentan; Mock, Michael T; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; Rousseau, Roger; Bullock, R Morris

    2013-04-01

    The addition of acids to ferrous dinitrogen complexes [FeX(N2)(P(Et)N(Me)P(Et))(dmpm)](+) (X = H, Cl, or Br; P(Et)N(Me)P(Et) = Et2PCH2N(Me)CH2PEt2; and dmpm = Me2PCH2PMe2) gives protonation at the pendent amine of the diphosphine ligand rather than at the dinitrogen ligand. This protonation increased the νN2 band of the complex by 25 cm(-1) and shifted the Fe(II/I) couple by 0.33 V to a more positive potential. A similar IR shift and a slightly smaller shift of the Fe(II/I) couple (0.23 V) was observed for the related carbonyl complex [FeH(CO)(P(Et)N(Me)P(Et))(dmpm)](+). [FeH(P(Et)N(Me)P(Et))(dmpm)](+) was found to bind N2 about three times more strongly than NH3. Computational analysis showed that coordination of N2 to Fe(II) centers increases the basicity of N2 (vs free N2) by 13 and 20 pKa units for the trans halides and hydrides, respectively. Although the iron center increases the basicity of the bound N2 ligand, the coordinated N2 is not sufficiently basic to be protonated. In the case of ferrous dinitrogen complexes containing a pendent methylamine, the amine site was determined to be the most basic site by 30 pKa units compared to the N2 ligand. The chemical reduction of these ferrous dinitrogen complexes was performed in an attempt to increase the basicity of the N2 ligand enough to promote proton transfer from the pendent amine to the N2 ligand. Instead of isolating a reduced Fe(0)-N2 complex, the reduction resulted in isolation and characterization of HFe(Et2PC(H)N(Me)CH2PEt2)(P(Et)N(Me)P(Et)), the product of oxidative addition of the methylene C-H bond of the P(Et)N(Me)P(Et) ligand to Fe.

  14. A new method for assessing PET-MRI coregistration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Klein, Arno; Mikhno, Arthur; Gray, Neil; Zanderigo, Francesca; Mann, J. John; Parsey, Ramin V.

    2009-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are acquired for many purposes, from diagnostic assessment to aiding in the development of novel therapies. Whatever the intended use, it is often necessary to distinguish between different anatomical regions within these images. Because of this, magnetic resonance images (MRIs) are generally acquired to provide an anatomical reference. This reference will only be accurate if the PET image is properly coregistered to the MRI; yet currently, a method to evaluate PET-MRI coregistration accuracy does not exist. This problem is compounded by the fact that two visually indistinguishable coregistration results can produce estimates of ligand binding that vary significantly. Therefore, the focus of this work was to develop a method that can evaluate coregistration performance based on measured ligand binding within certain regions of the coregistered PET image. The evaluation method is based on the premise that a more accurate coregistration will result in higher ligand binding in certain anatomical regions defined by the MRI. This fully automated method was able to assess coregistration results within the variance of an expert manual rater and shows promise as a possible coregistration cost function.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of New Binuclear Co(0) Complexes with Diphosphinoamine Ligands. A Potential Approach for Asymmetric Pauson-Khand Reactions.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Yves; Robert, Frédéric; Durif, André; Averbuch, Marie-Thérèse; Kann, Nina; Greene, Andrew E.

    1999-05-14

    The synthesis of P-N-P bidentate ligands and the evaluation, based on IR and X-ray data, of their pi-acceptor properties in the complexes derived from phenylacetylene-dicobalt hexacarbonyl have been carried out. In addition, the reactivity of these complexes in the Pauson-Khand reaction has been examined.

  16. Synthesis, F-18 Radiolabeling, and MicroPET Evaluation of 3-(2,4-Dichlorophenyl)-N-alkyl-N-fluoroalkyl-2,5-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-amines as Ligands of the Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type-1 (CRF1) Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Stehouwer, Jeffrey S.; Birnbaum, Matthew S.; Voll, Ronald J.; Owens, Michael J.; Plott, Susan J.; Bourke, Chase H.; Wassef, Michael A.; Kilts, Clinton D.; Goodman, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    A series of 3-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-alkyl-N-fluoroalkyl-2,5-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-amines were synthesized and evaluated as potential positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the corticotropin-releasing factor type-1 (CRF1) receptor. Compounds 27,28,29, and 30 all displayed high binding affinity (≤ 1.2 nM) to the CRF1 receptor when assessed by in vitro competition binding assays at 23 °C, whereas a decrease in affinity (≥ 10-fold) was observed with compound 26. The logP7.4 values of [18F]26 – [18F]29 were in the range of ~2.2 – 2.8 and microPET evaluation of [18F]26 – [18F]29 in an anesthetized male cynomolgus monkey demonstrated brain penetrance, but specific binding was not sufficient enough to differentiate regions of high CRF1 receptor density from regions of low CRF1 receptor density. Radioactivity uptake in the skull, and sphenoid bone and/or sphenoid sinus during studies with [18F]28, [18F]28-d8, and [18F]29 was attributed to a combination of [18F]fluoride generated by metabolic defluorination of the radiotracer and binding of intact radiotracer to CRF1 receptors expressed on mast cells in the bone marrow. Uptake of [18F]26 and [18F]27 in the skull and sphenoid region was rapid but then steadily washed out which suggests that this behavior was the result of binding to CRF1 receptors expressed on mast cells in the bone marrow with no contribution from [18F]fluoride. PMID:26145817

  17. Synthesis, F-18 radiolabeling, and microPET evaluation of 3-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-alkyl-N-fluoroalkyl-2,5-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-amines as ligands of the corticotropin-releasing factor type-1 (CRF1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Stehouwer, Jeffrey S; Birnbaum, Matthew S; Voll, Ronald J; Owens, Michael J; Plott, Susan J; Bourke, Chase H; Wassef, Michael A; Kilts, Clinton D; Goodman, Mark M

    2015-08-01

    A series of 3-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-alkyl-N-fluoroalkyl-2,5-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-amines were synthesized and evaluated as potential positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the corticotropin-releasing factor type-1 (CRF1) receptor. Compounds 27, 28, 29, and 30 all displayed high binding affinity (⩽1.2 nM) to the CRF1 receptor when assessed by in vitro competition binding assays at 23 °C, whereas a decrease in affinity (⩾10-fold) was observed with compound 26. The logP7.4 values of [(18)F]26-[(18)F]29 were in the range of ∼2.2-2.8 and microPET evaluation of [(18)F]26-[(18)F]29 in an anesthetized male cynomolgus monkey demonstrated brain penetrance, but specific binding was not sufficient enough to differentiate regions of high CRF1 receptor density from regions of low CRF1 receptor density. Radioactivity uptake in the skull, and sphenoid bone and/or sphenoid sinus during studies with [(18)F]28, [(18)F]28-d8, and [(18)F]29 was attributed to a combination of [(18)F]fluoride generated by metabolic defluorination of the radiotracer and binding of intact radiotracer to CRF1 receptors expressed on mast cells in the bone marrow. Uptake of [(18)F]26 and [(18)F]27 in the skull and sphenoid region was rapid but then steadily washed out which suggests that this behavior was the result of binding to CRF1 receptors expressed on mast cells in the bone marrow with no contribution from [(18)F]fluoride.

  18. Chemokine (C-C motif) Ligand 2 is a potential biomarker of inflammation & physical fitness in obese children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is a global epidemic that is impacting children around the world. Obesity is a chronic inflammatory state with enhanced production of multiple cytokines and chemokines. Chemokine (C-C motif) Ligand 2 (CCL2) is produced by immune and metabolic cells and attracts immune cells into liver, muscle and adipose tissue, resulting in initiation and propagation of the inflammatory response in obesity. How obesity and fitness affect the production of this chemokine in children is unknown. This study tested the hypotheses that CCL2 levels are higher in obese children when compared to lean controls, and that fitness modulates CCL2 levels allowing its use as a biomarker of fitness. Methods This was a cross sectional case–control study conducted in a Pediatric Tertiary care center in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Controls were recruited from the community. This study recruited overweight/obese children (BMI ≥ 85th percentile, n = 18, 9 female, mean age 14.0 ± 2.6 years) and lean controls (BMI < 85th percentile, n = 18, 8 female, mean age 14.0 ± 2.6 years) matched for age, sex and biological maturation. Aerobic fitness test was done using a cycle ergometer performing the McMaster All-Out Progressive Continuous Cycling test to exhaustion to determine peak oxygen uptake. Fasting CCL2 samples were taken prior to test. Categorical variables including subject categorization into different aerobic fitness levels in overweight/obese and lean children was reported based on the median split in each group. Results Obese participants had significantly higher CCL2 levels when compared to lean group (150.4 ± 61.85 pg/ml versus 112.7 ± 38 pg/ml, p-value 0.034). To establish if CCL2 is a biomarker of fitness, we divided the groups based on their fitness levels. There was a main effect for group (F (3,32) = 3.2, p = 0.036). Obese high fitness group were similar to lean unfit and fit participants. Post-hoc analysis revealed that

  19. Does Pet Arrival Trigger Prosocial Behaviors in Individuals with Autism?

    PubMed Central

    Grandgeorge, Marine; Tordjman, Sylvie; Lazartigues, Alain; Lemonnier, Eric; Deleau, Michel; Hausberger, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of social interactions especially prosocial behaviors – an important aspect of development – is one of the characteristics of autistic disorders. Numerous strategies or therapies are used to improve communication skills or at least to reduce social impairments. Animal-assisted therapies are used widely but their relevant benefits have never been scientifically evaluated. In the present study, we evaluated the association between the presence or the arrival of pets in families with an individual with autism and the changes in his or her prosocial behaviors. Of 260 individuals with autism - on the basis of presence or absence of pets - two groups of 12 individuals and two groups of 8 individuals were assigned to: study 1 (pet arrival after age of 5 versus no pet) and study 2 (pet versus no pet), respectively. Evaluation of social impairment was assessed at two time periods using the 36-items ADI-R algorithm and a parental questionnaire about their child-pet relationships. The results showed that 2 of the 36 items changed positively between the age of 4 to 5 (t0) and time of assessment (t1) in the pet arrival group (study 1): “offering to share” and “offering comfort”. Interestingly, these two items reflect prosocial behaviors. There seemed to be no significant changes in any item for the three other groups. The interactions between individuals with autism and their pets were more – qualitatively and quantitatively - reported in the situation of pet arrival than pet presence since birth. These findings open further lines of research on the impact of pet’s presence or arrival in families with an individual with autism. Given the potential ability of individuals with autism to develop prosocial behaviors, related studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms involved in the development of such child-pet relationship. PMID:22870246

  20. Radiobromination of humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate, a potential label for immunoPET.

    PubMed

    Mume, Eskender; Orlova, Anna; Malmström, Per-Uno; Lundqvist, Hans; Sjöberg, Stefan; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2005-08-01

    Combining the specificity of radioimmunoscintigraphy and the high sensitivity of PET in an in vivo detection technique could improve the quality of nuclear diagnostics. Positron-emitting nuclide (76)Br (T(1/2)=16.2 h) might be a possible candidate for labeling monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and their fragments, provided that the appropriate labeling chemistry has been established. For internalizing antibodies, such as the humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, radiobromine label should be residualizing, i.e., ensuring that radiocatabolites are trapped intracellularly after the proteolytic degradation of antibody. This study evaluated the chemistry of indirect radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-(tributylstannyl)-3-pyridinecarboxylate. Literature data indicated that the use of this method provided residualizing properties for iodine and astatine labels on some antibodies. An optimized "one-pot" procedure produced an overall labeling efficiency of 45.5+/-1.2% over 15 min. The bromine label was stable under physiological and denaturing conditions. The labeled trastuzumab retained its capacity to bind specifically to HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro (immunoreactivity more than 75%). However, in vitro cell test did not demonstrate that the radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate improves cellular retention of radioactivity in comparison with the use of N-succinimidyl 4-bromobenzoate. PMID:16026708

  1. Fluroine-18 labeled 28-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-[-3-fluoropropyl] nortropane(FPT): Synthesis and tissue distribution of a potential, radioligand for mapping cocaine receptor sites by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, R.; Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1995-05-01

    Highly potent and selective radioligands for the dopamine transporter labeled with fluorine-18 (t {1/2}=110 min) are attractive probes for longitudinal in vivo mapping of cocaine receptor sites in the caudate by PET. Recently, we reported an iodine-123 labeled 3{beta}-aryl analog of cocaine, 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-((E)-3-iodopropen-1-yl)nortropane, which was 125 times more potent than cocaine in inhibiting [I-125] RTI-55 binding to rat striatal homogenates and which showed high striatal (S) uptake (0.61% dose/g) and high S to cerebellum (C) ratio S/C=16.5 at 120 min in rats. These results demonstrated bulk tolerance at the 8-position of this I-123 analog. These findings prompted us to synthesize a new radioligand fluorine-18 labeled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-3-fluoropropylnortropane (FPT) as a potential cocaine receptor PET imaging agent. Treatment of 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(chlorophenyl) nortropane (1) with 1-bromo-3-fluoropropane (2) in CH3CN at 80{degrees}C afforded FPT (3). In Vitro binding studies in rat striatal homogenates using [I-125] RTI-55 resulted in a Ki (nM) of 8.2 for FPT. [F-18]FPT (3) was prepared by treating 1,3-diiodopropane (4) with NCA K[F-18]/K222 for 5 min in CH3CN at 85{degrees}C to give [F-18] 1-fluoro-3-iodopropane (5) in 50% E.O.B. yield. Coupling of [F-18] 5 with 1 in CH3CN at 60{degrees}C afforded [F-18]FPT in 5% yield (not optimized) E.O.B. following HPLC purification in a total synthesis time of 100 min.. [F-18]5 was >99% radiochemically pure with a specific activity of 8 Ci/{mu}mole. Following intravenous administration to rats [F-18]FPT showed high uptake in the striatum (S) with rapid washout from the cerebellum to afford a high S/C ratios=6.2 at 120 min. Primate imaging will also be presented. These results suggest that FPT is an excellent candidate for mapping cocaine receptor sites by PET.

  2. Healthy Pets and People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnant women should avoid adopting or handling stray cats, especially kittens. They particularly should not clean litter ... may be sick. Many pets, such as dogs, cats, reptiles, rodents, and birds, carry germs that can ...

  3. Pets and Parasites

    MedlinePlus

    ... make me sick? Household pets such as dogs, cats, birds and reptiles can carry diseases or parasites ... might be used as litter boxes by neighborhood cats. Keep your children out of the dirt in ...

  4. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... large tunnel-shaped scanner. Electrodes for an electrocardiogram ( ECG ) will be placed on your chest. The PET ... often used when other tests, such as echocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac stress tests do not provide enough ...

  5. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) and computed tomography ( CT ) scans only reveal the structure of the ... a PET/CT. Alternative Names ... PT, Rijntjes M, Weiller C. Neuroimaging: Functional neuroimaging. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic ...

  6. PET studies in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  7. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of an 18F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for brain histamine subtype-3 receptors based on a nonimidazole 2-aminoethylbenzofuran chemotype

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Lu, Shuiyu; Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Jenko, Kimberly J.; Clark, David T.; Gladding, Robert L.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2012-01-01

    A known chemotype of H3 receptor ligand was explored for development of a radioligand for imaging brain histamine subtype 3 (H3) receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), namely non-imidazole 2-aminoethylbenzofurans, represented by the compound (R)-(2-(2-(2-methylpyrrolidin-1-yl)ethyl)benzofuran-5-yl)(4-fluorophenyl)methanone (9). Compound 9 was labeled with fluorine-18 (t1/2= 109.7 min) in high specific activity by treating the prepared nitro analog (12) with cyclotron-produced [18F]fluoride ion. [18F]9 was studied with PET in mouse and in monkey after intravenous injection. [18F]9 showed favorable properties as a candidate PET radioligand, including moderately high brain uptake with a high proportion of H3 receptor-specific signal in the absence of radiodefluorination. The nitro compound 12 was found to have even higher H3 receptor affinity, indicating the potential of this chemotype for the development of further promising PET radioligands. PMID:22313227

  8. PET/CT artifacts.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Todd M; Mehta, Ajeet S; Mehta, Amar S; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in positron emission tomography/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for AC. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  9. Ligand exclusion on acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Berman, H A; Leonard, K

    1990-11-27

    This paper examines covalent reactivity of AchE with respect to cationic and uncharged methylphosphonates and substrates in the absence and presence of cationic ligands selective for the active center and the peripheral anionic site. The organophosphorus inhibitors are enantiomeric alkyl methylphosphonothioates (1-5) containing cycloheptyl and isopropyl phosphono ester groups and S-methyl, S-n-pentyl, and S-[beta-(trimethylammonio)ethyl] leaving groups; these agents differ in their configuration about phosphorus and their steric, hydrophobic, and electrostatic characteristics. The synthetic substrates examined are acetylthiocholine, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7AMC). Antagonism of the methylphosphonothioate reaction by cationic ligands is strongly dependent on the nature of both the cation and the methylphosphonate but independent of the configuration about phosphorus. While all cations cause linear mixed inhibition of acetylthiocholine hydrolysis, there are observed a variety of inhibition patterns of 7AMC and p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis that are distinctly nonlinear, as well as patterns in which the reciprocal plots intersect in the upper right quadrant. Strong antagonism of cationic (methylphosphonyl)thiocholines correlates very well with linear inhibition of acetylthiocholine. Ligands that cause only negligible antagonism of the uncharged methylphosphonates display nonlinear inhibition of uncharged substrates. These relationships, since they are most pronounced for peripheral site ligands and are strongly dependent on the charge carried by the reactant, suggest that the peripheral anionic site alters enzyme reactivity through an electrostatic interaction with the net negative active center. Such behavior indicates a potential role for the peripheral anionic site in conserving AchE catalytic efficiency within a narrow range of values. PMID:2271673

  10. Behavior of the potential antitumor V(IV)O complexes formed by flavonoid ligands. 3. Antioxidant properties and radical production capability.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Ugone, Valeria; Fadda, Angela; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2016-08-01

    The radical production capability and the antioxidant properties of some V(IV)O complexes formed by flavonoid ligands were examined. In particular, the bis-chelated species of quercetin (que), [VO(que)2](2-), and morin (mor), [VO(mor)2], were evaluated for their capability to reduce the stable radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and produce the hydroxyl radical (•)OH by Fenton-like reactions, where the reducing agent is V(IV)O(2+). The results were compared with those displayed by other V(IV)O complexes, such as [VO(H2O)5](2+), [VO(acac)2] (acac=acetylacetonate) and [VO(cat)2](2-) (cat=catecholate). The capability of the V(IV)O flavonoids complexes to reduce DPPH is much larger than that of the V(IV)O species formed by non-antioxidant ligands and it is due mainly to the flavonoid molecule. Through the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) spin trapping assay of the hydroxyl radical it was possible to demonstrate that in acidic solution V(IV)O(2+) has an effectiveness in producing (•)OH radicals comparable to that of Fe(2+). When V(IV)O complexes of flavonoids were taken into account, the amount of hydroxyl radicals produced in Fenton-like reactions depends on the specific structure of the ligand and on their capability to reduce H2O2 to give (•)OH. Both the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under physiological conditions by V(IV)O complexes of flavonoid ligands and their radical scavenging capability can be put in relationship with their antitumor effectiveness and it could be possible to modulate these actions by changing the features of the flavonoid coordinated to the V(IV)O(2+) ion, such as the entity, nature and position of the substituents and the number of phenolic groups.

  11. Characterization of a potentially axially symmetric europium(III) complex of a tetraacetate,tetraaza, macrocyclic ligand by luminescence excitation, emission and lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Michael; de, William; Horrocks, W., Jr.; Liotta, Frank J.

    1982-01-01

    The Eu(III) complex of the octadentate macrocyclic ligand, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N''' -tetraacetate, DOTA, has been examined by luminescence excitation, emission, and lifetime spectroscopy using pulsed dye laser techniques. The results confirm the expected axially symmetric nature of the major component in solution and reveal that 1.2 ± 0.4 water molecules arc coordinatcd to the Eu(III) ion in the complex.

  12. Behavior of the potential antitumor V(IV)O complexes formed by flavonoid ligands. 1. Coordination modes and geometry in solution and at the physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Ugone, Valeria; Lubinu, Giuseppe; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2014-11-01

    The coordination modes and geometry assumed in solution by the potent antitumor oxidovanadium(IV) complexes formed by different flavonoids were studied by spectroscopic (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, EPR) and computational (Density Functional Theory, DFT) methods. A series of bidentate flavonoid ligands (L) with increasing structural complexity was examined, which can involve (CO, O(-)) donors and formation of five- and six-membered chelate rings, or (O(-), O(-)) donors and five-membered chelate rings. The geometry corresponding to these coordination modes can be penta-coordinated, [VOL2], or cis-octahedral, cis-[VOL2(H2O)]. The results show that, at physiological pH, ligands provided with (CO, O(-)) donor set yield cis-octahedral species with "maltol-like" coordination when five-membered chelate rings are formed (as with 3-hydroxyflavone), while penta-coordinated structures with "acetylacetone-like" coordination are preferred when the chelate rings are six-membered (as with chrysin). When both the binding modes are possible, as with morin, the "acetylacetone-like" coordination is observed. For the ligands containing a catecholic donor set, such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein, fisetin, quercetin and rutin, the formation of square pyramidal complexes with (O(-), O(-)) "catechol-like" coordination and five-membered chelate rings is preferred at physiological pH. The determination of the different coordination modes and geometry is important to define the biotransformation in the blood and the interaction of these complexes with the biological membranes.

  13. Detection of Mycobacterium avium in pet birds

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Silvia Neri; Sakamoto, Sidnei Miyoshi; de Paula, Cátia Dejuste; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Matushima, Eliana Reiko

    2009-01-01

    The present study is a report on the presence of Mycobacterium avium in four birds of the psittaciform order kept as pets. Anatomopathological diagnosis showed lesions suggestive of the agent and presence of alcohol-acid resistant bacilli (AARB) shown by the Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The identification of Mycobacterium avium was performed by means of PRA (PCR Restriction Analysis). DNA was directly extracted from tissue of the lesions and blocked in paraffin. The role of this agent in pet bird infection is discussed, as well as its zoonotic potential. PMID:24031356

  14. Fundamental Limits of Spatial Resolution in PET

    PubMed Central

    Moses, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental limits of spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET) have been understood for many years. The physical size of the detector element usually plays the dominant role in determining resolution, but the combined contributions from acollinearity, positron range, penetration into the detector ring, and decoding errors in the detector modules often combine to be of similar size. In addition, the sampling geometry and statistical noise further degrade the effective resolution. This paper describes quantitatively describes these effects, discusses potential methods for reducing the magnitude of these effects, and computes the ultimately achievable spatial resolution for clinical and pre-clinical PET cameras. PMID:21804677

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Quantification of GABAA Receptors in the Brain of Fragile X Patients

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aa, Nathalie; Goffin, Karolien; Koole, Michel; Porke, Kathleen; Van De Velde, Marc; Rooms, Liesbeth; Van Paesschen, Wim; Van Esch, Hilde; Van Laere, Koen; Kooy, R. Frank

    2015-01-01

    Over the last several years, evidence has accumulated that the GABAA receptor is compromised in animal models for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common hereditary form of intellectual disability. In mouse and fly models, agonists of the GABAA receptor were able to rescue specific consequences of the fragile X mutation. Here, we imaged and quantified GABAA receptors in vivo in brain of fragile X patients using Positron Emission Topography (PET) and [11C]flumazenil, a known high-affinity and specific ligand for the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors. We measured regional GABAA receptor availability in 10 fragile X patients and 10 control subjects. We found a significant reduction of on average 10% in GABAA receptor binding potential throughout the brain in fragile X patients. In the thalamus, the brain region showing the largest difference, the GABAA receptor availability was even reduced with 17%. This is one of the first reports of a PET study of human fragile X brain and directly demonstrates that the GABAA receptor availability is reduced in fragile X patients. The study reinforces previous hypotheses that the GABAA receptor is a potential target for rational pharmacological treatment of fragile X syndrome. PMID:26222316

  16. In vivo biodistribution of two ( sup 18 F)-labelled muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands: 2-( sup 18 F)- and 4-( sup 18 F)-fluorodexetimide

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.A.; Scheffel, U.A.; Dannals, R.F.; Stathis, M.; Ravert, H.T.; Wagner, H.N. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Two ({sup 18}F)-labelled analogues of the potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m-AChR) antagonist, dexetimide, were evaluated as potential ligands for imaging m-AChR by positron emission tomography (PET). Intravenous administration of both 2-({sup 18}F)- or 4-({sup 18}F)-fluorodexetimide resulted in high brain uptake of radioactivity in mice. High binding levels were observed in m-AChR rich areas, such as cortex and striatum, with low levels in the receptor-poor cerebellum. Uptake of radioactivity was saturable and could be blocked by pre-administration of dexetimide or atropine. Drugs with different sites of action were ineffective at blocking receptor binding. The results indicate that both radiotracers are promising candidates for use in PET studies.

  17. In vivo biodistribution of two [18F]-labelled muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands: 2-[18F]- and 4-[18F]-fluorodexetimide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A A; Scheffel, U A; Dannals, R F; Stathis, M; Ravert, H T; Wagner, H N

    1991-01-01

    Two [18F]-labelled analogues of the potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m-AChR) antagonist, dexetimide, were evaluated as potential ligands for imaging m-AChR by positron emission tomography (PET). Intravenous administration of both 2-[18F]- or 4-[18F]-fluorodexetimide resulted in high brain uptake of radioactivity in mice. High binding levels were observed in m-AChR rich areas, such as cortex and striatum, with low levels in the receptor-poor cerebellum. Uptake of radioactivity was saturable and could be blocked by pre-administration of dexetimide or atropine. Drugs with different sites of action were ineffective at blocking receptor binding. The results indicate that both radiotracers are promising candidates for use in PET studies. PMID:2008155

  18. PET tracer development—a tale of mice and men

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Rodney J; Dorow, Donna; Roselt, Peter

    2006-01-01

    PET scanning is an emerging technology for the clinical evaluation of many disease processes in man. The vast majority of clinical positron emission tomography (PET) studies are performed using a single tracer, fluorodeoxyglucose. Despite the excellent diagnostic performance of this tracer, it has recognised limitations. New tracers offer the potential to both address these limitations, and to establish new applications for PET. Small animal PET is a logical technique for validating new tracers relevant to human diseases. However, interspecies differences in the handling of chemicals may significantly influence the handling of novel tracers. This requires caution in extrapolating findings in animals to expectations of performance in man. Already there are several examples where biodistribution studies in mice would not have predicted the clinical utility of existing PET tracers. Nevertheless, application of a systematic approach to tracer development is likely to speed transition of new tracers from animals into man. PMID:17114061

  19. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  20. Forensic entomology of decomposing humans and their decomposing pets.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Michelle R

    2015-02-01

    Domestic pets are commonly found in the homes of decedents whose deaths are investigated by a medical examiner or coroner. When these pets become trapped with a decomposing decedent they may resort to feeding on the body or succumb to starvation and/or dehydration and begin to decompose as well. In this case report photographic documentation of cases involving pets and decedents were examined from 2009 through the beginning of 2014. This photo review indicated that in many cases the pets were cats and dogs that were trapped with the decedent, died and were discovered in a moderate (bloat to active decay) state of decomposition. In addition three cases involving decomposing humans and their decomposing pets are described as they were processed for time of insect colonization by forensic entomological approach. Differences in timing and species colonizing the human and animal bodies were noted as was the potential for the human or animal derived specimens to contaminate one another at the scene.

  1. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  2. Initial experience in primal-dual optimization reconstruction from sparse-PET patient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    There exists interest in designing a PET system with reduced detectors due to cost concerns, while not significantly compromising the PET utility. Recently developed optimization-based algorithms, which have demonstrated the potential clinical utility in image reconstruction from sparse CT data, may be used for enabling such design of innovative PET systems. In this work, we investigate a PET configuration with reduced number of detectors, and carry out preliminary studies from patient data collected by use of such sparse-PET configuration. We consider an optimization problem combining Kullback-Leibler (KL) data fidelity with an image TV constraint, and solve it by using a primal-dual optimization algorithm developed by Chambolle and Pock. Results show that advanced algorithms may enable the design of innovative PET configurations with reduced number of detectors, while yielding potential practical PET utilities.

  3. Quantitation of rare circulating tumor cells by folate receptor α ligand-targeted PCR in bladder transitional cell carcinoma and its potential diagnostic significance.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fuming; Liu, Yuchen; Zhao, Rongchang; Zou, Xiangjun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jiaqiang; Wang, Yongqiang; Li, Feiyang; Zou, Xiaowen; Xia, Ye; Wang, Xuliang; Xing, Li; Li, Cailing; Lu, Jingxiao; Tang, Junlong; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Gui, Yaoting; Cai, Zhiming; Sun, Xiaojuan

    2014-07-01

    Numerous attempts for detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been made to develop reliable assays for early diagnosis of cancers. In this study, we validated the application of folate receptor α (FRα) as the tumor marker to detect CTC through tumor-specific ligand PCR (LT-PCR) and assessed its utility for diagnosis of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Immunohistochemistry for FRα was performed on ten bladder TCC tissues. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for FRα was performed on both urine and serum specimens from bladder TCC patients (n = 64 and n = 20, respectively) and healthy volunteers (n = 20 and n = 23, respectively). Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR were performed to confirm the expression of FRα in bladder TCC cells. CTC values in 3-mL peripheral blood were measured in 57 bladder TCC patients, 48 healthy volunteers, and 15 subjects with benign urologic pathologies by the folate receptor α ligand-targeted PCR. We found that FRα protein was overexpressed in both bladder TCC cells and tissues. The levels of FRα mRNA were also much higher in bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and SW780 than those of leukocyte. Values of FRα were higher in both serum and urine specimens of bladder TCC patients than those of control. CTC values were also higher in 3-mL peripheral blood of bladder TCC patients than those of control (median 26.5 Cu/3 mL vs 14.0 Cu/3 mL). Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for bladder TCC detection was 0.819, 95 % CI (0.738-0.883). At the cutoff value of 15.43 Cu/3 mL, the sensitivity and the specificity for detecting bladder cancer are 82.14 and 61.9 %, respectively. We concluded that quantitation of CTCs through FRα ligand-PCR could be a promising method for noninvasive diagnosis of bladder TCC.

  4. Estimation from PET data of transient changes in dopamine concentration induced by alcohol: support for a non-parametric signal estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, C. C.; Yoder, K. K.; Kareken, D. A.; Bouman, C. A.; O'Connor, S. J.; Normandin, M. D.; Morris, E. D.

    2008-03-01

    We previously developed a model-independent technique (non-parametric ntPET) for extracting the transient changes in neurotransmitter concentration from paired (rest & activation) PET studies with a receptor ligand. To provide support for our method, we introduced three hypotheses of validation based on work by Endres and Carson (1998 J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 18 1196-210) and Yoder et al (2004 J. Nucl. Med. 45 903-11), and tested them on experimental data. All three hypotheses describe relationships between the estimated free (synaptic) dopamine curves (FDA(t)) and the change in binding potential (ΔBP). The veracity of the FDA(t) curves recovered by nonparametric ntPET is supported when the data adhere to the following hypothesized behaviors: (1) ΔBP should decline with increasing DA peak time, (2) ΔBP should increase as the strength of the temporal correlation between FDA(t) and the free raclopride (FRAC(t)) curve increases, (3) ΔBP should decline linearly with the effective weighted availability of the receptor sites. We analyzed regional brain data from 8 healthy subjects who received two [11C]raclopride scans: one at rest, and one during which unanticipated IV alcohol was administered to stimulate dopamine release. For several striatal regions, nonparametric ntPET was applied to recover FDA(t), and binding potential values were determined. Kendall rank-correlation analysis confirmed that the FDA(t) data followed the expected trends for all three validation hypotheses. Our findings lend credence to our model-independent estimates of FDA(t). Application of nonparametric ntPET may yield important insights into how alterations in timing of dopaminergic neurotransmission are involved in the pathologies of addiction and other psychiatric disorders.

  5. Pet Loss: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkin, Bruce S.; Bahrick, Audrey S.

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to increase awareness of counselors about topic of pet loss. Discusses how counselors can be actively involved through practice, consultation, and research to help people deal with emotional impact of pet loss. (Author/NB)

  6. The ADNI PET Core: 2015

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Landau, Susan M.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Foster, Norman L.; Wang, Angela Y.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This paper reviews the work done in the ADNI PET core over the past 5 years, largely concerning techniques, methods, and results related to amyloid imaging in ADNI. METHODS The PET Core has utilized [18F]florbetapir routinely on ADNI participants, with over 1600 scans available for download. Four different laboratories are involved in data analysis, and have examined factors such as longitudinal florbetapir analysis, use of FDG-PET in clinical trials, and relationships between different biomarkers and cognition. RESULTS Converging evidence from the PET Core has indicated that cross-sectional and longitudinal florbetapir analyses require different reference regions. Studies have also examined the relationship between florbetapir data obtained immediately after injection, which reflects perfusion, and FDG-PET results. Finally, standardization has included the translation of florbetapir PET data to a centiloid scale. CONCLUSION The PET Core has demonstrated a variety of methods for standardization of biomarkers such as florbetapir PET in a multicenter setting. PMID:26194311

  7. Different Type 1 Fimbrial Genes and Tropisms of Commensal and Potentially Pathogenic Actinomyces spp. with Different Salivary Acidic Proline-Rich Protein and Statherin Ligand Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khah, Massoud Kheir; Slavnic, Snjezana; Johansson, Ingegerd; Strömberg, Nicklas

    2001-01-01

    Actinomyces spp. exhibit type 1 fimbria-mediated adhesion to salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (PRPs) and statherin ligands. Actinomyces spp. with different animal and tissue origins belong to three major adhesion types as relates to ligand specificity and type 1 fimbria genes. (i) In preferential acidic-PRP binding, strains of Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 from human and monkey mouths displayed at least three ligand specificities characterized by preferential acidic-PRP binding. Slot blot DNA hybridization showed seven highly conserved type 1 fimbria genes (orf1- to -6 and fimP) in genospecies 1 and 2 strains, except that orf5 and orf3 were divergent in genospecies 1. (ii) In preferential statherin binding, oral Actinomyces viscosus strains of rat and hamster origin (and strain 19246 from a human case of actinomycosis) bound statherin preferentially. DNA hybridization and characterization of the type 1 fimbria genes from strain 19246 revealed a homologous gene cluster of four open reading frames (orfA to -C and fimP). Bioinformatics suggested sortase (orfB, orf4, and part of orf5), prepilin peptidase (orfC and orf6), fimbria subunit (fimP), and usher- and autotransporter-like (orfA and orf1 to -3) functions. Those gene regions corresponding to orf3 and orf5 were divergent, those corresponding to orf2, orf1, and fimP were moderately conserved, and those corresponding to orf4 and orf6 were highly conserved. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses using a fimP probe separated human and monkey and rat and hamster strains into phylogenetically different groups. (iii) In statherin-specific binding, strains of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 from septic and other human infections displayed a low-avidity binding to statherin. Only the orf4 and orf6 gene regions were highly conserved. Finally, rat saliva devoid of statherin bound bacterial strains avidly irrespective of ligand specificity, and specific antisera detected either type 1, type 2, or both

  8. Behavior of the potential antitumor V(IV)O complexes formed by flavonoid ligands. 3. Antioxidant properties and radical production capability.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Ugone, Valeria; Fadda, Angela; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2016-08-01

    The radical production capability and the antioxidant properties of some V(IV)O complexes formed by flavonoid ligands were examined. In particular, the bis-chelated species of quercetin (que), [VO(que)2](2-), and morin (mor), [VO(mor)2], were evaluated for their capability to reduce the stable radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and produce the hydroxyl radical (•)OH by Fenton-like reactions, where the reducing agent is V(IV)O(2+). The results were compared with those displayed by other V(IV)O complexes, such as [VO(H2O)5](2+), [VO(acac)2] (acac=acetylacetonate) and [VO(cat)2](2-) (cat=catecholate). The capability of the V(IV)O flavonoids complexes to reduce DPPH is much larger than that of the V(IV)O species formed by non-antioxidant ligands and it is due mainly to the flavonoid molecule. Through the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) spin trapping assay of the hydroxyl radical it was possible to demonstrate that in acidic solution V(IV)O(2+) has an effectiveness in producing (•)OH radicals comparable to that of Fe(2+). When V(IV)O complexes of flavonoids were taken into account, the amount of hydroxyl radicals produced in Fenton-like reactions depends on the specific structure of the ligand and on their capability to reduce H2O2 to give (•)OH. Both the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under physiological conditions by V(IV)O complexes of flavonoid ligands and their radical scavenging capability can be put in relationship with their antitumor effectiveness and it could be possible to modulate these actions by changing the features of the flavonoid coordinated to the V(IV)O(2+) ion, such as the entity, nature and position of the substituents and the number of phenolic groups. PMID:27184413

  9. Mixed ligand complex via zinc(II)-mediated in situ oxidative heterocyclization of hydrochloride salt of 2-chlorobenzaldehyde hydralazine hydrazone as potential of antihypertensive agent.

    PubMed

    Bakale, Raghavendra P; Naik, Ganesh N; Mangannavar, Chandrashekhar V; Muchchandi, Iranna S; Shcherbakov, I N; Frampton, Chris; Gudasi, Kalagouda B

    2014-02-12

    An unusual tetrahedral mixed ligand Zn(II) complex ZnT(L)Cl, where L = 2-chlorobenzaldehyde hydralazine hydrazone and T = in situ generated 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-a]phthalazine is reported. Structure of the fused triazole has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Structure of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes has been confirmed by spectral and analytical methods. Metal complexes have exhibited better activity in the fructose induced hypertension studies in animal model and are comparable with the standard.

  10. Conformational readout of RNA by small ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kligun, Efrat; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules have highly versatile structures that can fold into myriad conformations, providing many potential pockets for binding small molecules. The increasing number of available RNA structures, in complex with proteins, small ligands and in free form, enables the design of new therapeutically useful RNA-binding ligands. Here we studied RNA ligand complexes from 10 RNA groups extracted from the protein data bank (PDB), including adaptive and non-adaptive complexes. We analyzed the chemical, physical, structural and conformational properties of binding pockets around the ligand. Comparing the properties of ligand-binding pockets to the properties of computed pockets extracted from all available RNA structures and RNA-protein interfaces, revealed that ligand-binding pockets, mainly the adaptive pockets, are characterized by unique properties, specifically enriched in rare conformations of the nucleobase and the sugar pucker. Further, we demonstrate that nucleotides possessing the rare conformations are preferentially involved in direct interactions with the ligand. Overall, based on our comprehensive analysis of RNA-ligand complexes, we suggest that the unique conformations adopted by RNA nucleotides play an important role in RNA recognition by small ligands. We term the recognition of a binding site by a ligand via the unique RNA conformations “RNA conformational readout.” We propose that “conformational readout” is a general way by which RNA binding pockets are recognized and selected from an ensemble of different RNA states. PMID:23618839

  11. Quantitative evaluation of PET image using event information bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hankyeol; Kwak, Shin Hye; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Woo, Sang-Keun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the effect in the PET image quality according to event bootstrap of small animal PET data. In order to investigate the time difference condition, realigned sinograms were generated from randomly sampled data set using bootstrap. List-mode data was obtained from small animal PET scanner for Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 20 min and Y-90 60 min. PET image was reconstructed by Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization(OSEM) 2D with the list-mode format. Image analysis was investigated by Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) of Ge-68 and Y-90 image. Non-parametric resampled PET image SNR percent change for the Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 60 min, and Y-90 20 min was 1.69 %, 7.03 %, and 4.78 %, respectively. SNR percent change of non-parametric resampled PET image with time difference condition was 1.08 % for the Ge-68 30 sec, 6.74 % for the Y-90 60 min and 10.94 % for the Y-90 29 min. The result indicated that the bootstrap with time difference condition had a potential to improve a noisy Y-90 PET image quality. This method should be expected to reduce Y-90 PET measurement time and to enhance its accuracy.

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI Perform Equally Well in Cancer: Evidence from Studies on More Than 2,300 Patients.

    PubMed

    Spick, Claudio; Herrmann, Ken; Czernin, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT has become the reference standard in oncologic imaging against which the performance of other imaging modalities is measured. The promise of PET/MRI includes multiparametric imaging to further improve diagnosis and phenotyping of cancer. Rather than focusing on these capabilities, many investigators have examined whether (18)F-FDG PET combined with mostly anatomic MRI improves cancer staging and restaging. After a description of PET/MRI scanner designs and a discussion of technical and operational issues, we review the available literature to determine whether cancer assessments are improved with PET/MRI. The available data show that PET/MRI is feasible and performs as well as PET/CT in most types of cancer. Diagnostic advantages may be achievable in prostate cancer and in bone metastases, whereas disadvantages exist in lung nodule assessments. We conclude that (18)F-FDG PET/MRI and PET/CT provide comparable diagnostic information when MRI is used simply to provide the anatomic framework. Thus, PET/MRI could be used in lieu of PET/CT if this approach becomes economically viable and if reasonable workflows can be established. Future studies should explore the multiparametric potential of MRI. PMID:26742709

  13. Towards optimal imaging with PET: an in silico feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, A. L.; Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; Wu, K.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging relies fundamentally on the ability of the system to accurately identify true coincidence events. With existing systems, this is currently accomplished with an energy acceptance criterion followed by correction techniques to remove suspected false coincidence events. These corrections generally result in signal and contrast loss and thus limit the PET system’s ability to achieve optimum image quality. A key property of annihilation radiation is that the photons are polarised with respect to each other. This polarisation correlation offers a potentially powerful discriminator, independent of energy, to accurately identify true events. In this proof of concept study, we investigate how photon polarisation information can be exploited in PET imaging by developing a method to discriminate true coincidences using the polarisation correlation of annihilation pairs. We implement this method using a Geant4 PET simulation of a GE Advance/Discovery LS system and demonstrate the potential advantages of the polarisation coincidence selection method over a standard energy criterion method. Current PET ring detectors are not capable of exploiting the polarisation correlation of the photon pairs. Compton PET systems, however are promising candidates for this application. We demonstrate the feasibility of a two-component Compton camera system in identifying true coincidences with Monte Carlo simulations. Our study demonstrates the potential of improving signal gain using polarisation, particularly for high photon emission rates. We also demonstrate the ability of the Compton camera at exploiting this polarisation correlation in PET.

  14. Some food toxic for pets

    PubMed Central

    Kovalkovičová, Natália; Šutiaková, Irena; Pistl, Juraj; Šutiak, Václav

    2009-01-01

    According to world statistics, dogs and cats are the species that owners most frequently seek assistance with potential poisonings, accounting 95–98% of all reported animal cases. Exposures occur more commonly in the summer and in December that is associated with the holiday season. The majority (>90%) of animal poisonings are accidental and acute in nature and occur near or at the animal owner's home. Feeding human foodstuff to pets may also prove dangerous for their health. The aim of this review was to present common food items that should not be fed (intentionally or unintentionally) to dogs, i.e. chocolate, caffeine, and other methylxanthines, grapes, raisins, onion, garlic, avocado, alcohol, nuts, xylitol contained in chewing gum and candies, etc. Onion and avocado are toxic for cats, too. The clinical effects of individual toxicants and possible therapy are also mentioned. Knowing what human food has the potential to be involved in serious toxicoses should allow veterinarians to better educate their clients on means of preventing pet poisonings. It can be concluded that the best advice must surely be to give animal fodder or treats specifically developed for their diets. PMID:21217849

  15. An Educational PET Camera Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Tegner, P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) cameras are now in widespread use in hospitals. A model of a PET camera has been installed in Stockholm House of Science and is used to explain the principles of PET to school pupils as described here.

  16. Limiting the Number of Potential Binding Modes by Introducing Symmetry into Ligands: Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors for Trypsin-Like Serine Proteases.

    PubMed

    Furtmann, Norbert; Häußler, Daniela; Scheidt, Tamara; Stirnberg, Marit; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Bajorath, Jürgen; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-01-11

    In the absence of X-ray data, the exploration of compound binding modes continues to be a challenging task. For structure-based design, specific features of active sites in different targets play a major role in rationalizing ligand binding characteristics. For example, dibasic compounds have been reported as potent inhibitors of various trypsin-like serine proteases, the active sites of which contain several binding pockets that can be targeted by cationic moieties. This results in several possible orientations within the active site, complicating the binding mode prediction of such compounds by docking tools. Therefore, we introduced symmetry in bi- and tribasic compounds to reduce conformational space in docking calculations and to simplify binding mode selection by limiting the number of possible pocket occupations. Asymmetric bisbenzamidines were used as starting points for a multistage and structure-guided optimization. A series of 24 final compounds with either two or three benzamidine substructures was ultimately synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of five serine proteases, leading to potent symmetric inhibitors for the pharmaceutical drug targets matriptase, matriptase-2, thrombin and factor Xa. This study underlines the relevance of ligand symmetry for chemical biology.

  17. Development of a Novel PET Tracer [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 Targeting MMP2 for Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chao; Zhang, Dazhi; Zhang, Anyu; Wang, Lizhen; Jiang, Hongdie; Wang, Tao; Liu, Hongrui; Xu, Yuping; Yang, Runlin; Chen, Fei; Yang, Min; Zuo, Changjing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The overexpression of gelatinases, that is, matrix metalloproteinase MMP2 and MMP9, has been associated with tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. To image MMP2 in tumors, we developed a novel ligand termed [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6, with consideration that: c(KAHWGFTLD)NH2 (herein, C6) is a selective gelatinase inhibitor; Cy5.5-C6 has been visualized in many in vivo tumor models; positron emission tomography (PET) has a higher detection sensitivity and a wider field of view than optical imaging; fluorine-18 (18F) is the optimal PET radioisotope, and the creation of a [18F]AlF-peptide complex is a simple procedure. Methods C6 was conjugated to the bifunctional chelator NOTA (1, 4, 7-triazacyclononanetriacetic acid) for radiolabeling [18F]AlF conjugation. The MMP2-binding characteristics and tumor-targeting efficacy of [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 were tested in vitro and in vivo. Results The non-decay corrected yield of [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 was 46.2–64.2%, and the radiochemical purity exceeded 95%. [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 was favorably retained in SKOV3 and PC3 cells, determined by cell uptake. Using NOTA-C6 as a competitive ligand, the uptake of [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 in SKOV3 cells decreased in a dose-dependent manner. In biodistribution and PET imaging studies, higher radioactivity concentrations were observed in tumors. Pre-injection of C6 caused a marked reduction in tumor tissue uptake. Immunohistochemistry showed MMP2 in tumor tissues. Conclusions [18F]AlF-NOTA-C6 was easy to synthesize and has substantial potential as an imaging agent that targets MMP2 in tumors. PMID:26540114

  18. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with 18F-DOPA PET and PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Grasso, Cristina; Schillaci, Orazio

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to give an overview of the potential clinical utility of [18F]-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET and PET/CT for imaging of brain tumors. Review articles and reference lists were used to supplement the search findings. 18F-DOPA has been investigated as a PET tracer for primary brain tumors, metastases of somatic cancer, and evaluation of relapse of pathology in patients with brain tumor after surgery and/or radiotherapy on the basis of enhanced cell proliferation. Available studies have provided encouraging preliminary results for diagnosis of brain tumors and relapse after surgery/radiotherapy. In the brain, excellent discrimination between tumor and normal tissue can be achieved because of the low physiological uptake of 18F-DOPA and the high ratio between tumor and normal hemispheric tissue. Information on evaluation of brain metastases is limited but encouraging. PET and PET/CT with 18F-DOPA are useful in diagnosing primary brain tumors and should be recommended in the diagnosis of relapse of disease after surgical treatment and/or radiotherapy. Semiquantitative analysis could improve diagnosis while correlative imaging with MRI is essential. Limits are due to low knowledge of potential pitfalls.

  19. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex biology of prostate cancer have provided an increasing number of potential targets for imaging and treatment. The imaging evaluation of prostate cancer needs to be tailored to the various phases of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. CONCLUSION In this article, I review the current state of affairs on a range of PET radiotracers for potential use in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer. PMID:22826388

  20. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  1. Designing ligands to bind proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, George M; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M

    2005-11-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called 'rational drug design') has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem - how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) - would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is 'Why is it so difficult?' and the answer is 'We still don't entirely know'. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues - potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others - that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein-ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging.

  2. In vitro and in vivo testing of the dopamine D1 ligand [123I]SCH 23982 with respect to its potential application in SPET investigations.

    PubMed

    Beer, H F; Lin, S; Bläuenstein, P; Hasler, P; Schubiger, P A; Maier, A; Lichtensteiger, W; Oettli, R; Bekier, A; Weder, B

    1993-07-01

    [123I]SCH 23982, a dopamine D1 ligand, was labelled in a large scale process and then tested in vitro for binding to rat brain sections and membranes. Because of the promising values of KD = 1.5 x 10(-10) M and Bmax = 0.7 x 10(-11) mol/g, in vivo evaluation was performed on rats and normal volunteers to test its possible usefulness for SPET imaging. In competition experiments, a higher binding in the presence of sulpiride was found while ketanserin displaced [123I]SCH 23982 only at a 10,000-fold excess. Differences between rats and men were seen with respect to their metabolism. SPET investigations failed because the washout of [123I]SCH 23982 was too rapid.

  3. Replication Capacity of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Virus in Pet Birds and Mammals, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Lenny, Brian J; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Alam, S M Rabiul; Hasan, M Kamrul; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G; Jones, Jeremy C

    2015-12-01

    Avian influenza A(H9N2) is an agricultural and public health threat. We characterized an H9N2 virus from a pet market in Bangladesh and demonstrated replication in samples from pet birds, swine tissues, human airway and ocular cells, and ferrets. Results implicated pet birds in the potential dissemination and zoonotic transmission of this virus.

  4. Replication Capacity of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Virus in Pet Birds and Mammals, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Lenny, Brian J.; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Alam, S.M. Rabiul; Hasan, M. Kamrul; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza A(H9N2) is an agricultural and public health threat. We characterized an H9N2 virus from a pet market in Bangladesh and demonstrated replication in samples from pet birds, swine tissues, human airway and ocular cells, and ferrets. Results implicated pet birds in the potential dissemination and zoonotic transmission of this virus. PMID:26583371

  5. Replication Capacity of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Virus in Pet Birds and Mammals, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Lenny, Brian J; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Alam, S M Rabiul; Hasan, M Kamrul; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G; Jones, Jeremy C

    2015-12-01

    Avian influenza A(H9N2) is an agricultural and public health threat. We characterized an H9N2 virus from a pet market in Bangladesh and demonstrated replication in samples from pet birds, swine tissues, human airway and ocular cells, and ferrets. Results implicated pet birds in the potential dissemination and zoonotic transmission of this virus. PMID:26583371

  6. Pets and the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on pets and the elderly. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, adult children, dementia and…

  7. Precision Medicine in Multiple Sclerosis: Future of PET Imaging of Inflammation and Reactive Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Poutiainen, Pekka; Jaronen, Merja; Quintana, Francisco J.; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging techniques can enhance diagnosis to achieve successful treatment, as well as reveal underlying pathogenic mechanisms in disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The cooperation of advanced multimodal imaging techniques and increased knowledge of the MS disease mechanism allows both monitoring of neuronal network and therapeutic outcome as well as the tools to discover novel therapeutic targets. Diverse imaging modalities provide reliable diagnostic and prognostic platforms to better achieve precision medicine. Traditionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered the golden standard in MS research and diagnosis. However, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can provide functional information of molecular biology in detail even prior to anatomic changes, allowing close follow up of disease progression and treatment response. The recent findings support three major neuroinflammation components in MS: astrogliosis, cytokine elevation, and significant changes in specific proteins, which offer a great variety of specific targets for imaging purposes. Regardless of the fact that imaging of astrocyte function is still a young field and in need for development of suitable imaging ligands, recent studies have shown that inflammation and astrocyte activation are related to progression of MS. MS is a complex disease, which requires understanding of disease mechanisms for successful treatment. PET is a precise non-invasive imaging method for biochemical functions and has potential to enhance early and accurate diagnosis for precision therapy of MS. In this review we focus on modulation of different receptor systems and inflammatory aspect of MS, especially on activation of glial cells, and summarize the recent findings of PET imaging in MS and present the most potent targets for new biomarkers with the main focus on experimental MS research.

  8. Precision Medicine in Multiple Sclerosis: Future of PET Imaging of Inflammation and Reactive Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Poutiainen, Pekka; Jaronen, Merja; Quintana, Francisco J.; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging techniques can enhance diagnosis to achieve successful treatment, as well as reveal underlying pathogenic mechanisms in disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The cooperation of advanced multimodal imaging techniques and increased knowledge of the MS disease mechanism allows both monitoring of neuronal network and therapeutic outcome as well as the tools to discover novel therapeutic targets. Diverse imaging modalities provide reliable diagnostic and prognostic platforms to better achieve precision medicine. Traditionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered the golden standard in MS research and diagnosis. However, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can provide functional information of molecular biology in detail even prior to anatomic changes, allowing close follow up of disease progression and treatment response. The recent findings support three major neuroinflammation components in MS: astrogliosis, cytokine elevation, and significant changes in specific proteins, which offer a great variety of specific targets for imaging purposes. Regardless of the fact that imaging of astrocyte function is still a young field and in need for development of suitable imaging ligands, recent studies have shown that inflammation and astrocyte activation are related to progression of MS. MS is a complex disease, which requires understanding of disease mechanisms for successful treatment. PET is a precise non-invasive imaging method for biochemical functions and has potential to enhance early and accurate diagnosis for precision therapy of MS. In this review we focus on modulation of different receptor systems and inflammatory aspect of MS, especially on activation of glial cells, and summarize the recent findings of PET imaging in MS and present the most potent targets for new biomarkers with the main focus on experimental MS research. PMID:27695400

  9. MR/PET or PET/MRI: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Beyer, Thomas; Moser, Ewald

    2013-02-01

    After the very successful clinical introduction of combined PET/CT imaging a decade ago, a hardware combination of PET and MR is following suit. Today, three different approaches towards integrated PET/MR have been proposed: (1) a triple-modality system with a 3T MRI and a time-of-flight PET/CT installed in adjacent rooms, (2) a tandem system with a 3T MRI and a time-of-flight PET/CT in a co-planar installation with a joint patient handling system, and (3) a fully-integrated system with a whole-body PET system mounted inside a 3T MRI system. This special issue of MAGMA brings together contributions from key experts in the field of PET/MR, PET/CT and CT. The various papers share the author's perspectives on the state-of-the-art PET/MR imaging with any of the three approaches mentioned above. In addition to several reviews discussing advantages and challenges of combining PET and MRI for clinical diagnostics, first clinical data are also presented. We expect this special issue to nurture future improvements in hardware, clinical protocols, and efficient post-processing strategies to further assess the diagnostic value of combined PET/MR imaging. It remains to be seen whether a so-called "killer application" for PET/MRI will surface. In that case PET/MR is likely to excel in pre-clinical and selected research applications for now. This special issue helps the readers to stay on track of this exciting development. PMID:23385880

  10. The role of PET/CT scanning in radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Jarritt, P H; Carson, K J; Hounsell, A R; Visvikis, D

    2006-09-01

    The introduction of functional data into the radiotherapy treatment planning process is currently the focus of significant commercial, technical, scientific and clinical development. The potential of such data from positron emission tomography (PET) was recognized at an early stage and was integrated into the radiotherapy treatment planning process through the use of image fusion software. The combination of PET and CT in a single system (PET/CT) to form an inherently fused anatomical and functional dataset has provided an imaging modality which could be used as the prime tool in the delineation of tumour volumes and the preparation of patient treatment plans, especially when integrated with virtual simulation. PET imaging typically using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) can provide data on metabolically active tumour volumes. These functional data have the potential to modify treatment volumes and to guide treatment delivery to cells with particular metabolic characteristics. This paper reviews the current status of the integration of PET and PET/CT data into the radiotherapy treatment process. Consideration is given to the requirements of PET/CT data acquisition with reference to patient positioning aids and the limitations imposed by the PET/CT system. It also reviews the approaches being taken to the definition of functional/tumour volumes and the mechanisms available to measure and include physiological motion into the imaging process. The use of PET data must be based upon a clear understanding of the interpretation and limitations of the functional signal. Protocols for the implementation of this development remain to be defined, and outcomes data based upon clinical trials are still awaited. PMID:16980683

  11. SmartPET: Applying HPGe and pulse shape analysis to small-animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Grint, A. N.; Mather, A. R.; Nolan, P. J.; Scraggs, D. P.; Turk, G.; Hall, C. J.; Lazarus, I.; Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R. A.

    2007-08-01

    The SmartPET project is the development of a prototype small-animal imaging system based on the use of Hyperpure Germanium (HPGe) detectors. The use of digital electronics and application of Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques provide fine spatial resolution, while the excellent intrinsic energy resolution of HPGe detectors makes the system ideal for multi-nuclide imaging. As a result, the SmartPET system has the potential to function as a dual modality imager, operating as a dual-head Positron Emission Tomography (PET) camera or in a Compton Camera configuration for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. In this paper, we discuss how the use of simple PSA techniques greatly improves the position sensitivity of the detector yielding improved spatial resolution in reconstructed images. The PSA methods presented have been validated by comparison to data from high-precision scanning of the detectors. Results from this analysis are presented along with initial images from the SmartPET system, which demonstrates the impact of these techniques on PET images.

  12. Probing neurodegeneration and aging: A PET approach

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, H.F.

    1995-12-31

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging has received wide application to the study of the aging brain and its diseases, most notably Parkinson`s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer`s Disease (AD). Basic neurological processes such as blood flow and glucose metabolism have been most often measured. Radioligands developed for specific neurochemical systems have amplified the flow and metabolism studies by more precisely defining the changes associated with degenerative processes. Our present research focuses on two additional applications of radiopharmaceutical development and PET imaging - (1) investigating the fundamental mechanisms of neurodegeneration and aging, and (2) assessing novel therapeutic intervention for PD with PET imaging. We have synthesized fluorine-18 labeled analogs of rotenone, a natural product that possesses high affinity to Complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and evaluated their potential to study changes in neuronal mitochondrial density and function. A large body evidence points to mitochondrial dysfunction as a key factor in aging and neurodegeneration. We are also currently evaluating the use of genetically transfected cells to treat PD. Primates are being imaged with [{sup 18}F]flouro-m-L-tyrosine before and after MPTP Parkinsonian type lesioning and following implantation of genetically altered cells capable of secreting tyrosine hydroxylase into the lesioned area. The ability to develop and apply PET probes has significantly enhanced the understanding of normal, aging, and degenerative processes of the brain.

  13. 24 CFR 960.707 - Pet ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pet ownership. 960.707 Section 960... ADMISSION TO, AND OCCUPANCY OF, PUBLIC HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.707 Pet ownership. (a..., may own one or more common household pets or have one or more common household pets present in...

  14. 24 CFR 960.707 - Pet ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pet ownership. 960.707 Section 960... ADMISSION TO, AND OCCUPANCY OF, PUBLIC HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.707 Pet ownership. (a..., may own one or more common household pets or have one or more common household pets present in...

  15. Talking with Children about Furry Classroom Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Notes that rodents and rabbits share many characteristics that make them suitable classroom pets and gives background information on rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils. Offers advice on buying a classroom pet, the pet's home, feeding, helping the children handle the pet, and pet health and family planning. (TJQ)

  16. [The PET, Past and Future].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique nuclear medicine test using positron emitters such as 18F and 11C. In PET tests, various kinds of functional aspects of human bodies can be evaluated by using compounds labeled by these positron emitters. Recently, combined scanners of PET and anatomical imaging modalities such as CT and MRI have been developed and functional information with anatomical location can be easily obtained, increasing the usefulness of PET tests. PET tests are now essential imaging tools to diagnose various kinds of disease with functional abnormalities. In the field of oncology, 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose PET tests are routinely used in clinical practice under health insurance. In the field of neurology, PET tests are actively used to investigate cerebral function by labeled neurotransmitters and so on. Currently, brain PET tests to detect beta-amyloid are applied to the diagnosis of dementia. In the field of cardiology, cardiac perfusion and myocardial metabolism are quantitatively measured by using PET and obtained results have successfully revealed the pathogenesis of intractable cardiac diseases. Future technical advances will enhance the usefulness of PET tests more and more. PMID:26753390

  17. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  18. PET/CT AND RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY OF PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek; Oehr, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Traditional morphologically based imaging modalities are now being complemented by positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography (CT) in prostate cancer. Metastatic prostate cancer is an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) since no effective therapies are available. This review highlights the most important achievements within the last year in PET/CT and RIT of prostate cancer. Recent findings Conflicting results exist on the use of choline for detection of malignant disease in the prostate gland. The role of PET/CT in N-staging remains to be elucidated further. However, 18F-choline and 11C-choline PET/CT have been demonstrated to be useful for detection of recurrence. 18F-choline and 18F-fluoride PET/CT are useful for detection of bone metastases. Prostate tumor antigens may be used as targets for RIT. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is currently under focus of a number of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. J591, a monoclonal antibody, that targets the extracellular domain of PSMA, shows promising results. HER2 receptors may also have a potential as target for PET/CT imaging and RIT of advanced prostate cancer. Summary PET/CT in prostate cancer has proven to play a significant role, in particular for detection of prostate cancer recurrence and bone metastases. Radioimmunotherapy of metastatic prostate cancer warrant further investigations. PMID:19535981

  19. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings.

    PubMed

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  20. Overexpression of BAD potentiates sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand treatment in the prostatic carcinoma cell line LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Taghiyev, Agshin F; Guseva, Natalya V; Harada, Hisashi; Knudson, C Michael; Rokhlin, Oskar W; Cohen, Michael B

    2003-05-01

    Here we show that LNCaP, which is resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis, becomes sensitive to TRAIL after overexpression of full-length, wild-type BAD (BAD WT). TRAIL induces caspase-dependent cleavage of BAD WT that results in generation of a M(r) 15,000 protein. LNCaP stably expressing truncated BAD (tBAD) and cells expressing mutated BAD at the caspase cleavage site were less sensitive to TRAIL treatment when compared to LNCaP expressing BAD WT. Cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO release from mitochondria into cytosol was found after TRAIL treatment only in cells overexpressing BAD WT. Furthermore, differences in phosphorylation of serine residues for BAD WT and tBAD were identified. BAD WT was phosphorylated at positions S136 and S155, whereas tBAD was phosphorylated at positions S112, S136, and S155. LNCaP stably expressing BAD mutated at serine 112 to alanine was less sensitive to TRAIL treatment when compared to LNCaP expressing BAD WT. Lastly, recombinant BAD cleaved by caspase-3 is a more potent inducer of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO release than BAD WT. In summary, BAD-mediated sensitivity of LNCaP to TRAIL depends on the phosphorylation status of BAD WT and tBAD.

  1. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-01

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  2. Foreign Body Reaction Associated with PET and PET/Chitosan Electrospun Nanofibrous Abdominal Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Veleirinho, Beatriz; Coelho, Daniela S.; Dias, Paulo F.; Maraschin, Marcelo; Pinto, Rúbia; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Peixoto, Ana; Souza, José A.; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa M.; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospun materials have been widely explored for biomedical applications because of their advantageous characteristics, i.e., tridimensional nanofibrous structure with high surface-to-volume ratio, high porosity, and pore interconnectivity. Furthermore, considering the similarities between the nanofiber networks and the extracellular matrix (ECM), as well as the accepted role of changes in ECM for hernia repair, electrospun polymer fiber assemblies have emerged as potential materials for incisional hernia repair. In this work, we describe the application of electrospun non-absorbable mats based on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) in the repair of abdominal defects, comparing the performance of these meshes with that of a commercial polypropylene mesh and a multifilament PET mesh. PET and PET/chitosan electrospun meshes revealed good performance during incisional hernia surgery, post-operative period, and no evidence of intestinal adhesion was found. The electrospun meshes were flexible with high suture retention, showing tensile strengths of 3 MPa and breaking strains of 8–33%. Nevertheless, a significant foreign body reaction (FBR) was observed in animals treated with the nanofibrous materials. Animals implanted with PET and PET/chitosan electrospun meshes (fiber diameter of 0.71±0.28 µm and 3.01±0.72 µm, respectively) showed, respectively, foreign body granuloma formation, averaging 4.2-fold and 7.4-fold greater than the control commercial mesh group (Marlex). Many foreign body giant cells (FBGC) involving nanofiber pieces were also found in the PET and PET/chitosan groups (11.9 and 19.3 times more FBGC than control, respectively). In contrast, no important FBR was observed for PET microfibers (fiber diameter = 18.9±0.21 µm). Therefore, we suggest that the reduced dimension and the high surface-to-volume ratio of the electrospun fibers caused the FBR reaction, pointing out the need for further studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying

  3. Imaging quality of (44)Sc in comparison with five other PET radionuclides using Derenzo phantoms and preclinical PET.

    PubMed

    Bunka, Maruta; Müller, Cristina; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Haller, Stephanie; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; van der Meulen, Nicholas P

    2016-04-01

    PET is the favored nuclear imaging technique because of the high sensitivity and resolution it provides, as well as the possibility for quantification of accumulated radioactivity. (44)Sc (T1/2=3.97h, Eβ(+)=632keV) was recently proposed as a potentially interesting radionuclide for PET. The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality, which can be obtained with (44)Sc, and compare it with five other, frequently employed PET nuclides using Derenzo phantoms and a small-animal PET scanner. The radionuclides were produced at the medical cyclotron at CRS, ETH Zurich ((11)C, (18)F), at the Injector II research cyclotron at CRS, PSI ((64)Cu, (89)Zr, (44)Sc), as well as via a generator system ((68)Ga). Derenzo phantoms, containing solutions of each of these radionuclides, were scanned using a GE Healthcare eXplore VISTA small-animal PET scanner. The image resolution was determined for each nuclide by analysis of the intensity signal using the reconstructed PET data of a hole diameter of 1.3mm. The image quality of (44)Sc was compared to five frequently-used PET radionuclides. In agreement with the positron range, an increasing relative resolution was determined in the sequence of (68)Ga<(44)Sc<(89)Zr<(11)C<(64)Cu<(18)F. The performance of (44)Sc was in agreement with the theoretical expectations based on the energy of the emitted positrons. PMID:26774390

  4. Honey-based PET or PET/chitosan fibrous wound dressings: effect of honey on electrospinning process.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aysu; Simşek, Murat; Aldemir, Sevcan Dalkıranoğlu; Kazaroğlu, Nur Merve; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2014-07-01

    In this study, fibrous mats were fabricated via electrospinning from solutions of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), PET/chitosan, and PET/honey at different concentrations. The effect of honey and chitosan on electrospinning process was investigated and compared. Fibers containing chitosan had a beaded or ribbon-like/branched morphology, but this morphology improved in the presence of honey. The diameter of electrospun fibers decreased with an increased ratio of honey in PET solution. In addition, fiber deposition area in the collector increased by increasing the honey content. PET/chitosan and PET/honey fibrous mats reached an equilibrium water content in 15 min and their water uptake capacities, which are important for exudating wounds, were found in the range of 280-430% on dry basis. Cytotoxicity evaluation demonstrated that fibers exhibited no cytotoxic activity. This study discloses that PET fibrous mats especially electrospun in the presence of honey could be proposed as potential wound dressing materials owing to their improved processing abilities besides their suitable structural properties.

  5. Progress reported in PET recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The Goodyear Polyester Division has demonstrated its ability to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET) from recycled plastic soft drink bottles and remanufacture the material into PET suitable for containers. Most people are familiar with PET in the form of lightweight, shatter resistant beverage bottles. About 20 percent of these beverage containers currently are being recycled. The recycled PET is currently used in many applications such as carpeting, pillow stuffing, sleeping bag filling, insulation for water heaters and non-food containers. This is the first step of Goodyear's increased efforts to recycle PET from containers into a material suitable for food packing. The project is extremely complex, involving sophisticated understanding of the chemical reactions involved, PET production and the technology testing protocols necessary to design a process that addresses all the technical, safety, and regulatory concerns. The research conducted so far indicated that additional processing beyond simply cleaning the shredded material, called flake, will be required to assure a quality polymer.

  6. Ingredients: where pet food starts.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Angele

    2008-08-01

    Every clinician is asked "What should I feed my pet?" Understanding the ingredients in pet food is an important part of making the best recommendation. Pet food can be as simple as one ingredient or as complicated as containing more than 60 ingredients. Pet food and its ingredients are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and state feed officials. Part of that regulation is the review and definition of ingredients. Existing ingredients change and new ingredients become available so the need for ingredient definitions grows. Ingredients for product formulations are chosen based on their nutrient content, digestibility, palatability, functionality, availability, and cost. As an example, a typical, nutritionally complete dry dog food with 42 ingredients is examined and the ingredients are discussed here. Safe, healthy pet food starts with safe ingredients sourced from well-monitored suppliers. The ultimate goal of both veterinarians and pet food manufacturers is the same--long healthy lives for dogs and cats.

  7. Predictive and prognostic value of FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Oyen, Wim J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The predictive and prognostic value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) in non-small-cell lung carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and lymphoma is discussed. The degree of FDG uptake is of prognostic value at initial presentation, after induction treatment prior to resection and in the case of relapse of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In locally advanced and advanced stages of NSCLC, FDG-PET has been shown to be predictive for clinical outcome at an early stage of treatment. In colorectal carcinoma, limited studies are available on the prognostic value of FDG-PET, however, the technique appears to have great potential in monitoring the success of local ablative therapies soon after intervention and in the prediction and evaluation of response to radiotherapy, systemic therapy, and combinations thereof. The prognostic value of end-of treatment FDG-PET for FDG-avid lymphomas has been established, and the next step is to define how to use this information to optimize patient outcome. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, FDG-PET has a high negative predictive value, however, histological confirmation of positive findings should be sought where possible. For non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the opposite applies. The newly published standardized guidelines for interpretation formulates specific criteria for visual interpretation and for defining PET positivity in the liver, spleen, lung, bone marrow and small residual lesions. The introduction of these guidelines should reduce variability among studies. Interim PET offers a reliable method for early prediction of long-term remission, however it should only be performed in prospective randomized controlled trials. Many of the diagnostic and management questions considered in this review are relevant to other tumour types. Further research in this field is of great importance, since it may lead to a change in the therapeutic concept of cancer. The preliminary findings call for systematic inclusion of FDG-PET

  8. Using Technology to Better Characterize the Apollo Sample Suite: A Retroactive PET Analysis and Potential Model for Future Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    From 1969-1972 the Apollo missions collected 382 kg of lunar samples from six distinct locations on the Moon. Studies of the Apollo sample suite have shaped our understanding of the formation and early evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and have had important implications for studies of the other terrestrial planets (e.g., through the calibration of the crater counting record) and even the outer planets (e.g., the Nice model of the dynamical evolution of the Solar System). Despite nearly 50 years of detailed research on Apollo samples, scientists are still developing new theories about the origin and evolution of the Moon. Three areas of active research are: (1) the abundance of water (and other volatiles) in the lunar mantle, (2) the timing of the formation of the Moon and the duration of lunar magma ocean crystallization, (3) the formation of evolved lunar lithologies (e.g., granites) and implications for tertiary crustal processes on the Moon. In order to fully understand these (and many other) theories about the Moon, scientists need access to "new" lunar samples, particularly new plutonic samples. Over 100 lunar meteorites have been identified over the past 30 years, and the study of these samples has greatly aided in our understanding of the Moon. However, terrestrial alteration and the lack of geologic context limit what can be learned from the lunar meteorites. Although no "new" large plutonic samples (i.e., hand-samples) remain to be discovered in the Apollo sample collection, there are many large polymict breccias in the Apollo collection containing relatively large (approximately 1 cm or larger) previously identified plutonic clasts, as well as a large number of unclassified lithic clasts. In addition, new, previously unidentified plutonic clasts are potentially discoverable within these breccias. The question becomes how to non-destructively locate and identify new lithic clasts of interest while minimizing the contamination and physical degradation of

  9. Target Definition by C11-Methionine-PET for the Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Masayuki Miwa, Kazuhiro; Shinoda, Jun; Kako, Nobuo; Nishibori, Hironori; Sakurai, Kouta; Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) to delineate target volumes for brain metastases and to investigate to what extent tumor growth is presented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MET-PET. Materials and Methods: Three observers undertook target definition in 19 patients with 95 brain metastases by MRI and MET-PET images. MRI gross target volume (GTV) (GTV-MRI) was defined as the contrast-enhanced area on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. MET-PET GTV (GTV-PET) was defined as the area of an accumulation of MET-PET apparently higher than that of normal tissue on MET-PET images. The size of occupation ratio was determined using the following equation: SOR (%) of MET are within x mm margin outside GTV-MRI = the volume of the GTV-PET within x mm outside the GTV-MRI/the volume of the GTV-PET. Results: For GTV-MRI volumes of {<=}0.5 mL, the sensitivity of tumor detection by MET-PET was 43%. For GTV-MRI volume of >0.5 mL, GTV-PET volumes were larger than GTV-MRI volumes and a significant correlation was found between these variables by linear regression. For all tumor sizes and tumor characteristics, a 2-mm margin outside the GTV-MRI significantly improved the coverage of the GTV-PET. Conclusions: Although there were some limitations in our study associated with spatial resolution, blurring effect, and image registrations with PET images, MET-PET was supposed to have a potential as a promising tool for the precise delineation of target volumes in radiotherapy planning for brain metastases.

  10. Client services for geriatric pets.

    PubMed

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals. PMID:2646816

  11. Client services for geriatric pets.

    PubMed

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals.

  12. First-in-human uPAR PET: Imaging of Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Morten; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Christensen, Camilla; Madsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Carsten H.; Thurison, Tine; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Holm, Søren; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Ploug, Michael; Pappot, Helle; Brasso, Klaus; Kroman, Niels; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A first-in-human clinical trial with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in patients with breast, prostate and bladder cancer, is described. uPAR is expressed in many types of human cancers and the expression is predictive of invasion, metastasis and indicates poor prognosis. uPAR PET imaging therefore holds promise to be a new and innovative method for improved cancer diagnosis, staging and individual risk stratification. The uPAR specific peptide AE105 was conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with 64Cu for targeted molecular imaging with PET. The safety, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution profile and radiation dosimetry after a single intravenous dose of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 were assessed by serial PET and computed tomography (CT) in 4 prostate, 3 breast and 3 bladder cancer patients. Safety assessment with laboratory blood screening tests was performed before and after PET ligand injection. In a subgroup of the patients, the in vivo stability of our targeted PET ligand was determined in collected blood and urine. No adverse or clinically detectable side effects in any of the 10 patients were found. The ligand exhibited good in vivo stability and fast clearance from plasma and tissue compartments by renal excretion. In addition, high uptake in both primary tumor lesions and lymph node metastases was seen and paralleled high uPAR expression in excised tumor tissue. Overall, this first-in-human study therefore provides promising evidence for safe use of 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 for uPAR PET imaging in cancer patients. PMID:26516369

  13. First-in-human uPAR PET: Imaging of Cancer Aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Persson, Morten; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Christensen, Camilla; Madsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Carsten H; Thurison, Tine; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Holm, Søren; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Ploug, Michael; Pappot, Helle; Brasso, Klaus; Kroman, Niels; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A first-in-human clinical trial with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in patients with breast, prostate and bladder cancer, is described. uPAR is expressed in many types of human cancers and the expression is predictive of invasion, metastasis and indicates poor prognosis. uPAR PET imaging therefore holds promise to be a new and innovative method for improved cancer diagnosis, staging and individual risk stratification. The uPAR specific peptide AE105 was conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with (64)Cu for targeted molecular imaging with PET. The safety, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution profile and radiation dosimetry after a single intravenous dose of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 were assessed by serial PET and computed tomography (CT) in 4 prostate, 3 breast and 3 bladder cancer patients. Safety assessment with laboratory blood screening tests was performed before and after PET ligand injection. In a subgroup of the patients, the in vivo stability of our targeted PET ligand was determined in collected blood and urine. No adverse or clinically detectable side effects in any of the 10 patients were found. The ligand exhibited good in vivo stability and fast clearance from plasma and tissue compartments by renal excretion. In addition, high uptake in both primary tumor lesions and lymph node metastases was seen and paralleled high uPAR expression in excised tumor tissue. Overall, this first-in-human study therefore provides promising evidence for safe use of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 for uPAR PET imaging in cancer patients.

  14. First-in-human uPAR PET: Imaging of Cancer Aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Persson, Morten; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Christensen, Camilla; Madsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Carsten H; Thurison, Tine; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Holm, Søren; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Ploug, Michael; Pappot, Helle; Brasso, Klaus; Kroman, Niels; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A first-in-human clinical trial with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in patients with breast, prostate and bladder cancer, is described. uPAR is expressed in many types of human cancers and the expression is predictive of invasion, metastasis and indicates poor prognosis. uPAR PET imaging therefore holds promise to be a new and innovative method for improved cancer diagnosis, staging and individual risk stratification. The uPAR specific peptide AE105 was conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with (64)Cu for targeted molecular imaging with PET. The safety, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution profile and radiation dosimetry after a single intravenous dose of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 were assessed by serial PET and computed tomography (CT) in 4 prostate, 3 breast and 3 bladder cancer patients. Safety assessment with laboratory blood screening tests was performed before and after PET ligand injection. In a subgroup of the patients, the in vivo stability of our targeted PET ligand was determined in collected blood and urine. No adverse or clinically detectable side effects in any of the 10 patients were found. The ligand exhibited good in vivo stability and fast clearance from plasma and tissue compartments by renal excretion. In addition, high uptake in both primary tumor lesions and lymph node metastases was seen and paralleled high uPAR expression in excised tumor tissue. Overall, this first-in-human study therefore provides promising evidence for safe use of (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 for uPAR PET imaging in cancer patients. PMID:26516369

  15. Extended suicide with a pet.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases. PMID:24051598

  16. Handling ligands with Coot

    PubMed Central

    Debreczeni, Judit É.; Emsley, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Coot is a molecular-graphics application primarily aimed to assist in model building and validation of biological macromolecules. Recently, tools have been added to work with small molecules. The newly incorporated tools for the manipulation and validation of ligands include interaction with PRODRG, subgraph isomorphism-based tools, representation of ligand chemistry, ligand fitting and analysis, and are described here. PMID:22505262

  17. PET Studies in Nonhuman Primate Models of Cocaine Abuse: Translational Research Related to Vulnerability and Neuroadaptations

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Robert W.; Duke, Angela N.; Nader, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The current review highlights the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to study the neurobiological substrates underlying vulnerability to cocaine addiction and subsequent adaptations following chronic cocaine self-administration in nonhuman primate models of cocaine abuse. Environmental (e.g., social rank) and sex-specific influences on dopaminergic function and sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine are discussed. Cocaine-related cognitive deficits have been hypothesized to contribute to high rates of relapse and are described in nonhuman primate models. Lastly, the long-term consequences of cocaine on neurobiology are discussed. PET imaging and longitudinal, within-subject behavioral studies in nonhuman primates have provided a strong framework for designing pharmacological and behavioral treatment strategies to aid drug-dependent treatment seekers. Non-invasive PET imaging will allow for individualized treatment strategies. Recent advances in radiochemistry of novel PET ligands and other imaging modalities can further advance our understanding of stimulant use on the brain. PMID:23458573

  18. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. in pet turtles and their environment

    PubMed Central

    Back, Du-San; Shin, Gee-Wook; Wendt, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Pet turtles are known as a source of Salmonella infection to humans when handled in captivity. Thirty four turtles purchased from pet shops and online markets in Korea were examined to determine whether the turtles and their environment were contaminated with Salmonella spp. Salmonella spp. were isolated from fecal samples of 17 turtles. These isolates were identified as S. enterica through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolation rate of Salmonella spp. from the soil and water samples increased over time. We concluded that a high percentage of turtles being sold in pet shops were infected with Salmonella spp., and their environments tend to become contaminated over time unless they are maintained properly. These results indicate that pet turtles could be a potential risk of salmonellosis in Korea. PMID:27729933

  19. PET detector modules based on novel detector technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1994-05-01

    A successful PET detector module must identify 511 keV photons with: high efficiency (>85%), high spatial resolution (<5 mm fwhm), low cost (<$600 / in{sup 2}), low dead time (<4 {mu}s in{sup 2}), good timing resolution (<5 ns fwhm for conventional PET, <200 ps fwhm for time of flight), and good energy resolution (<100 keV fwhm), where these requirements are listed in decreasing order of importance. The ``high efficiency`` requirement also implies that the detector modules must pack together without inactive gaps. Several novel and emerging radiation detector technologies could improve the performance of PET detectors. Avalanche photodiodes, PIN photodiodes, metal channel dynode photomultiplier tubes, and new scintillators all have the potential to improve PET detectors significantly.

  20. Beyond whole-body imaging: advanced imaging techniques of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Barnwell, James; Raptis, Constantine A; McConathy, Jonathan E; Laforest, Richard; Siegel, Barry A; Woodard, Pamela K; Fowler, Kathryn

    2015-02-01

    PET/MRI is a hybrid imaging modality that is gaining clinical interest with the first Food and Drug Administration-approved simultaneous imaging system recently added to the clinical armamentarium. Several advanced PET/MRI applications, such as high-resolution anatomic imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, motion correction, and cardiac imaging, show great potential for clinical use. The purpose of this article is to highlight several advanced PET/MRI applications through case examples and review of the current literature.

  1. Molecular imaging using PET for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Chikako; Miyakita, Yasuji; Yoshida, Masayuki; Hamada, Akinobu; Kanayama, Yousuke; Yonemori, Kan; Hashimoto, Jun; Tani, Hitomi; Kodaira, Makoto; Yunokawa, Mayu; Yamamoto, Harukaze; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging can visualize the biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in vivo using certain tracers for specific molecular targets. Molecular imaging of breast cancer can be performed with various imaging modalities, however, positron emission tomography (PET) is a sensitive and non-invasive molecular imaging technology and this review will focus on PET molecular imaging of breast cancer, such as FDG-PET, FLT-PET, hormone receptor PET, and anti-HER2 PET.

  2. Tricyclic pyrazoles. Part 8. Synthesis, biological evaluation and modelling of tricyclic pyrazole carboxamides as potential CB2 receptor ligands with antagonist/inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Deiana, Valeria; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M Ruth; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Asproni, Battistina; Cichero, Elena; Fossa, Paola; Muñoz, Eduardo; Deligia, Francesco; Murineddu, Gabriele; García-Arencibia, Moisés; Pinna, Gerard A

    2016-04-13

    Previous studies have investigated the relevance and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of pyrazole derivatives in relation with cannabinoid receptors, and the series of tricyclic 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazoles emerged as potent CB2 receptor ligands. In the present study, novel 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole and 1H-benzo[g]indazole carboxamides containing a cyclopropyl or a cyclohexyl substituent were designed and synthesized to evaluate the influence of these structural modifications towards CB1 and CB2 receptor affinities. Among these derivatives, compound 15 (6-cyclopropyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide) showed the highest CB2 receptor affinity (Ki = 4 nM) and remarkable selectivity (KiCB1/KiCB2 = 2232), whereas a similar affinity, within the nM range, was seen for the fenchyl derivative (compound 10: Ki = 6 nM), for the bornyl analogue (compound 14: Ki = 38 nM) and, to a lesser extent, for the aminopiperidine derivative (compound 6: Ki = 69 nM). Compounds 10 and 14 were also highly selective for the CB2 receptor (KiCB1/KiCB2 > 1000), whereas compound 6 was relatively selective (KiCB1/KiCB2 = 27). The four compounds were also subjected to GTPγS binding analysis showing antagonist/inverse agonist properties (IC50 for compound 14 = 27 nM, for 15 = 51 nM, for 10 = 80 nM and for 6 = 294 nM), and this activity was confirmed for the three more active compounds in a CB2 receptor-specific in vitro bioassay consisting in the quantification of prostaglandin E2 release by LPS-stimulated BV2 cells, in the presence and absence of WIN55,212-2 and/or the investigated compounds. Modelling studies were also conducted with the four compounds, which conformed with the structural requirements stated for the binding of antagonist compounds to the human CB2 receptor.

  3. Tricyclic pyrazoles. Part 8. Synthesis, biological evaluation and modelling of tricyclic pyrazole carboxamides as potential CB2 receptor ligands with antagonist/inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Deiana, Valeria; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M Ruth; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Asproni, Battistina; Cichero, Elena; Fossa, Paola; Muñoz, Eduardo; Deligia, Francesco; Murineddu, Gabriele; García-Arencibia, Moisés; Pinna, Gerard A

    2016-04-13

    Previous studies have investigated the relevance and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of pyrazole derivatives in relation with cannabinoid receptors, and the series of tricyclic 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazoles emerged as potent CB2 receptor ligands. In the present study, novel 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole and 1H-benzo[g]indazole carboxamides containing a cyclopropyl or a cyclohexyl substituent were designed and synthesized to evaluate the influence of these structural modifications towards CB1 and CB2 receptor affinities. Among these derivatives, compound 15 (6-cyclopropyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-(adamantan-1-yl)-1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide) showed the highest CB2 receptor affinity (Ki = 4 nM) and remarkable selectivity (KiCB1/KiCB2 = 2232), whereas a similar affinity, within the nM range, was seen for the fenchyl derivative (compound 10: Ki = 6 nM), for the bornyl analogue (compound 14: Ki = 38 nM) and, to a lesser extent, for the aminopiperidine derivative (compound 6: Ki = 69 nM). Compounds 10 and 14 were also highly selective for the CB2 receptor (KiCB1/KiCB2 > 1000), whereas compound 6 was relatively selective (KiCB1/KiCB2 = 27). The four compounds were also subjected to GTPγS binding analysis showing antagonist/inverse agonist properties (IC50 for compound 14 = 27 nM, for 15 = 51 nM, for 10 = 80 nM and for 6 = 294 nM), and this activity was confirmed for the three more active compounds in a CB2 receptor-specific in vitro bioassay consisting in the quantification of prostaglandin E2 release by LPS-stimulated BV2 cells, in the presence and absence of WIN55,212-2 and/or the investigated compounds. Modelling studies were also conducted with the four compounds, which conformed with the structural requirements stated for the binding of antagonist compounds to the human CB2 receptor. PMID:26890113

  4. Use of PET/CT for staging and radiation therapy planning in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mac Manus, M P

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and more recently PET/computed tomography (CT) scanning represent major advances in the imaging of lung cancer and have an especially high impact on the management of patients who are candidates for potentially curative or "radical" radiotherapy (RT). This article reviews the current status of PET and PET/CT for staging patients before RT and considers the use of PET and PET/CT images for target volume definition. The relevant literature on the use of PET for staging lung cancer is reviewed and placed in the context of patients who are candidates for RT. Research that specifically considers the use of PET for RT planning is considered critically and some promising areas for future research are discussed. The available literature is almost exclusively devoted to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with few relevant studies of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The primary PET radiopharmaceutical shown to have value for staging and RT planning is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). In prospective studies where PET imaging was used to stage radical RT candidates, 25-30% of patients were excluded from radical therapy because of PET detected advanced disease. In all studies where "PET-assisted" and conventional target or treatment volumes were compared, there were major differences between PET and conventional volumes. Because PET-assisted staging is proven to be significantly more accurate than conventional staging and because all studies show major differences between PET-assisted and conventional treatment volumes in NSCLC, routine use of PET/CT for RT planning is recommended.

  5. Potentially Dangerous Items for Your Pet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News Releases Consumer Updates About FDA Contact FDA Browse by Product Area ...

  6. Get Set for a Pet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRosa, Bill

    1987-01-01

    Describes a game in which students deal with some of the factors involved in being a responsible pet owner. Includes a list of the materials needed for the game and provides the game board and the game pieces, along with a fold-out poster about neutering and spaying pets. (TW)

  7. Meet the Alpha-Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zitlaw, Jo Ann Bruce; Frank, Cheryl Standish

    1985-01-01

    "Alpha-Pets" are the focal point of an integrated, multidisciplinary curriculum. Each pet is featured for a week in a vocabulary-rich story and introduces related activities beginning with the featured letter, such as the four food groups during Freddie Fish's week or universe during Ulysses Unicorn's week. (MT)

  8. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  9. A Promising PET Tracer for Imaging of α₇ Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Brain: Design, Synthesis, and in Vivo Evaluation of a Dibenzothiophene-Based Radioligand.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Rodrigo; Scheunemann, Matthias; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Wenzel, Barbara; Fasoli, Francesca Maria; Gotti, Cecilia; Kranz, Mathias; Donat, Cornelius K; Patt, Marianne; Hillmer, Ansel; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Peters, Dan; Steinbach, Jörg; Sabri, Osama; Huang, Yiyun; Brust, Peter

    2015-10-09

    Changes in the expression of α₇ nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α₇ nAChRs) in the human brain are widely assumed to be associated with neurological and neurooncological processes. Investigation of these receptors in vivo depends on the availability of imaging agents such as radioactively labelled ligands applicable in positron emission tomography (PET). We report on a series of new ligands for α₇ nAChRs designed by the combination of dibenzothiophene dioxide as a novel hydrogen bond acceptor functionality with diazabicyclononane as an established cationic center. To assess the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of this new basic structure, we further modified the cationic center systematically by introduction of three different piperazine-based scaffolds. Based on in vitro binding affinity and selectivity, assessed by radioligand displacement studies at different rat and human nAChR subtypes and at the structurally related human 5-HT₃ receptor, we selected the compound 7-(1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonan-4-yl)-2-fluorodibenzo-[b,d]thiophene 5,5-dioxide (10a) for radiolabeling and further evaluation in vivo. Radiosynthesis of [18F]10a was optimized and transferred to an automated module. Dynamic PET imaging studies with [18F]10a in piglets and a monkey demonstrated high uptake of radioactivity in the brain, followed by washout and target-region specific accumulation under baseline conditions. Kinetic analysis of [18F]10a in pig was performed using a two-tissue compartment model with arterial-derived input function. Our initial evaluation revealed that the dibenzothiophene-based PET radioligand [18F]10a ([18F]DBT-10) has high potential to provide clinically relevant information about the expression and availability of α₇ nAChR in the brain.

  10. The potential of iron chelators of the pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone class as effective antiproliferative agents II: the mechanism of action of ligands derived from salicylaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D R; Milnes, K

    1997-04-15

    We have recently screened 36 analogues of the lipophilic iron (Fe) chelator, pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH), for their antiproliferative effect (Richardson et al, Blood 86:4295, 1995). Of these compounds, 1 chelator derived from salicylaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone (206) and 4 ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone (308, 309, 311, and 315) showed pronounced antiproliferative activity, being far more effective than desferrioxamine (DFO). The present study was designed to investigate in detail the mechanism of action of these PIH analogues in a variety of neoplastic cell lines. This investigation showed that the analogues were far more active than DFO at inhibiting cellular proliferation and 3H-thymidine, 3H-leucine, and 3H-uridine incorporation. Additional experiments showed that, in contrast to DFO, the 5 analogues were potent at preventing 59Fe uptake from transferrin (Tf) and increasing 59Fe release from cells at concentrations as low as 10 micromol/L. Examination of the distribution of 59Fe in neoplastic cells using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE)/59Fe-autoradiography showed that most of the 59Fe taken up from Tf was incorporated into ferritin, although 3 other previously unrecognized components (bands A, B, and C) were also identified. Band C comigrated with 59Fe-citrate and was chelated on incubation of neuroblastoma cells with DFO, PIH, or the PIH analogues, with this compartment being the main intracellular target of these ligands. Further work showed that the effects of the chelators at inducing characteristics consistent with apoptosis or necrosis were cell line-specific, and while DFO increased the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phases in all cell types, the effect of analogue 311 on the cell cycle was variable depending on the cell line. This study provides further evidence for the potential use of these Fe chelators as anticancer agents.

  11. Glial inhibitors influence the mRNA and protein levels of mGlu2/3, 5 and 7 receptors and potentiate the analgesic effects of their ligands in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Osikowicz, Maria; Skup, Malgorzata; Mika, Joanna; Makuch, Wioletta; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2009-12-15

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, which are present on neurons and glial cells, have been shown to play a role in neuropathic pain. The present study sought to investigate how the glial inhibitors minocycline and pentoxifylline alter the effect that chronic constriction injury (CCI) has on the expression of mGlu receptors and on their associated ligands. RT-PCR analysis revealed that seven days after CCI, the mRNA levels of glial markers C1q and GFAP, as well as those of mGlu5 and mGlu3, but not mGlu7, were elevated in the lumbar spinal cord - ipsilateral to the injury. The protein levels of the microglial marker OX42, the astroglial marker GFAP, and mGlu5 receptor protein were increased, whereas the levels of mGlu2/3 and mGlu7 receptor proteins were reduced. Preemptive and repeated intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration (16 and 1h before nerve injury and then twice daily for seven days) of minocycline (30mg/kg) and pentoxifylline (20mg/kg) prevented the injury-induced changes in the levels of mGlu3 and mGlu5 receptor mRNAs and the injury-induced changes in the protein levels of all the receptors. Repeated administration of minocycline and pentoxifylline significantly attenuated CCI-induced allodynia (von Frey test) and hyperalgesia (cold plate test) measured on day seven after injury and potentiated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of single i.p. and intrathecal (i.t.) injections of mGlu receptor ligands: MPEP, LY379268 or AMN082. We conclude that attenuation of injury-induced glial activation can reduce glutamatergic activity, thereby contributing to regulation of pain sensation. PMID:19782473

  12. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging.

  13. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging. PMID:27494441

  14. Investigation of optimization-based reconstruction with an image-total-variation constraint in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-08-01

    Interest remains in reconstruction-algorithm research and development for possible improvement of image quality in current PET imaging and for enabling innovative PET systems to enhance existing, and facilitate new, preclinical and clinical applications. Optimization-based image reconstruction has been demonstrated in recent years of potential utility for CT imaging applications. In this work, we investigate tailoring the optimization-based techniques to image reconstruction for PET systems with standard and non-standard scan configurations. Specifically, given an image-total-variation (TV) constraint, we investigated how the selection of different data divergences and associated parameters impacts the optimization-based reconstruction of PET images. The reconstruction robustness was explored also with respect to different data conditions and activity up-takes of practical relevance. A study was conducted particularly for image reconstruction from data collected by use of a PET configuration with sparsely populated detectors. Overall, the study demonstrates the robustness of the TV-constrained, optimization-based reconstruction for considerably different data conditions in PET imaging, as well as its potential to enable PET configurations with reduced numbers of detectors. Insights gained in the study may be exploited for developing algorithms for PET-image reconstruction and for enabling PET-configuration design of practical usefulness in preclinical and clinical applications.

  15. Re-exploring the N-phenylpicolinamide derivatives to develop mGlu4 ligands with improved affinity and in vitro microsomal stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoda; Kil, Kun-Eek; Poutiainen, Pekka; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Kang, Hye-Jin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2015-09-15

    In recent years, mGlu4 has received great attention and research effort because of the potential benefits of mGlu4 activation in treating numerous brain disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Many positive allosteric modulators of mGlu4 have been developed. To better understand the role of mGlu4 in healthy and disease conditions, we are interested in developing an mGlu4 selective radioligand for in vivo studies. Thus, we had synthesized and studied [(11)C]2 as a PET tracer for mGlu4, which demonstrated some promising features as a PET radioligand as well as the limitation need to be improved. In order to develop an mGlu4 ligand with enhanced affinity and improved metabolic stability, we have modified, synthesized and evaluated a series of new N-phenylpicolinamide derivatives. The SAR study has discovered a number of compounds with low nM affinity to mGlu4. The dideuteriumfluoromethoxy modified compound 24 is identified as a very promising mGlu4 ligand, which has demonstrated enhanced affinity, improved in vitro microsomal stability, good selectivity and good permeability. PMID:26231155

  16. Synthesis, structure-affinity relationships, and radiolabeling of selective high-affinity 5-HT4 receptor ligands as prospective imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L; Pike, Victor W

    2010-10-14

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT(4) receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT(4) antagonist (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron emitter, either carbon-11 (t(1/2) = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t(1/2) = 109.7 min), and included (i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl, or fluoro, (ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, (iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and (iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT(4) receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-(11)C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [(11)C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT(4) receptors. PMID:20812727

  17. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  18. Interacting with a Computer-Simulated Pet: Factors Influencing Children's Humane Attitudes and Empathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Yueh-Feng; Kaufman, David

    2014-01-01

    Previous research by Tsai and Kaufman (2010a, 2010b) has suggested that computer-simulated virtual pet dogs can be used as a potential medium to enhance children's development of empathy and humane attitudes toward animals. To gain a deeper understanding of how and why interacting with a virtual pet dog might influence children's social and…

  19. 36 CFR 1002.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pets. 1002.15 Section 1002.15....15 Pets. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Possessing a pet in a public building, public... possession of pets by the Board. This paragraph shall not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually...

  20. 36 CFR 1002.15 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 1002.15 Section 1002.15....15 Pets. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Possessing a pet in a public building, public... possession of pets by the Board. This paragraph shall not apply to guide dogs accompanying visually...

  1. 7 CFR 502.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 502.11 Section 502.11 Agriculture Regulations of... CONDUCT ON BELTSVILLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.11 Pets. Pets... vaccinations. Pets that are the property of employees residing on BARC must be up to date on their...

  2. Post-PET ultrasound improves specificity of 18F-FDG-PET for recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer while maintaining sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kråkenes, Jostein; Brauckhoff, Katrin; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Heinecke, Achim; Akslen, Lars A; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Brauckhoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography (PET) using fluor-18-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) with or without computed tomography (CT) is generally accepted as the most sensitive imaging modality for diagnosing recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in patients with negative whole body scintigraphy with iodine-131 (I-131). Purpose To assess the potential incremental value of ultrasound (US) over 18F-FDG-PET-CT. Material and Methods Fifty-one consecutive patients with suspected recurrent DTC were prospectively evaluated using the following multimodal imaging protocol: (i) US before PET (pre-US) with or without fine needle biopsy (FNB) of suspicious lesions; (ii) single photon emission computed tomography (≥3 GBq I-131) with co-registered CT (SPECT-CT); (iii) 18F-FDG-PET with co-registered contrast-enhanced CT of the neck; (iv) US in correlation with the other imaging modalities (post-US). Postoperative histology, FNB, and long-term follow-up (median, 2.8 years) were taken as composite gold standard. Results Fifty-eight malignant lesions were identified in 34 patients. Forty lesions were located in the neck or upper mediastinum. On receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, 18F-FDG-PET had a limited lesion-based specificity of 59% at a set sensitivity of 90%. Pre-US had poor sensitivity and specificity of 52% and 53%, respectively, increasing to 85% and 94% on post-US, with knowledge of the PET/CT findings (P < 0.05 vs. PET and pre-US). Multimodal imaging changed therapy in 15 out of 51 patients (30%). Conclusion In patients with suspected recurrent DTC, supplemental targeted US in addition to 18F-FDG-PET-CT increases specificity while maintainin sensitivity, as non-malignant FDG uptake in cervical lesions can be confirmed. PMID:25770086

  3. Synthesis and characterizations of novel quinoline derivatives having mixed ligand activities at the kappa and mu receptors: Potential therapeutic efficacy against morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Deb, Ishani; Paira, Priyankar; Hazra, Abhijit; Banerjee, Sukdeb; Dutta, Pradip Kumar; Mondal, Nirup Bikash; Das, Sumantra

    2009-08-15

    Based on an established 3D pharmacophore, a series of quinoline derivatives were synthesized. The opioidergic properties of these compounds were determined by a competitive binding assay using (125)I-Dynorphine, (3)H-DAMGO and (125)I-DADLE for kappa, mu, and delta receptors, respectively. Results showed varying degree of activities of the compounds to kappa and mu opioid receptors with negligible interactions at the delta receptor. The compound, S4 was the most successful in inhibiting the two most prominent quantitative features of naloxone precipitated withdrawal symptoms - stereotyped jumping and body weight loss. Determination of IC(50) of S4 revealed a greater affinity towards mu compared to kappa receptor. In conclusion, quinoline derivatives of S4 like structure offer potential tool for treatment of narcotic addictions.

  4. High-Resolution PET Imaging with Therapeutic Antibody-based PD-1/PD-L1 Checkpoint Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Hettich, Michael; Braun, Friederike; Bartholomä, Mark D.; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Checkpoint-blocking antibodies like those targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway have revolutionized oncology. We developed radiotracers based on therapeutic checkpoint-blocking antibodies permitting sensitive and high-resolution PET imaging of both PD-1 and PD-L1 in immunocompetent mice. ImmunoPET of naive mice revealed similar overall expression patterns for PD-1 and PD-L1 in secondary lymphoid organs (spleen and lymph nodes). Interestingly, PD-L1 was also detected in brown adipose tissue (BAT), confirming the notion that BAT is immunologically relevant. Under pathophysiological conditions, strong expression of the receptor/ligand pair was also found in non-lymphoid tissues. Both were specifically detected in malignant tumors. PD-1 was readily detected after combined immunoradiotherapy causing massive tumor infiltration by PD-1+ lymphocytes. PD-L1 tracer uptake was reduced in PD-L1 knockout tumors. Moreover, monitoring the expression changes of PD-L1 in response to its main inducer, the effector T cell cytokine IFN-γ, revealed robust upregulation in the lung. This suggests that T cell responses in the lung, a vital organ continuously exposed to a variety of antigens, are strongly restrained by the PD-1 checkpoint. In turn, this could explain the association of PD-1 checkpoint inhibition with potentially fatal immune-mediated pneumonitis and partially also its efficacy in lung cancer. PMID:27446497

  5. Synthesis and Preliminary Evaluation of a 2-Oxoquinoline Carboxylic Acid Derivative for PET Imaging the Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Linjing; Slavik, Roger; Müller, Adrienne; Popaj, Kasim; Čermak, Stjepko; Weber, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D.; Ametamey, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2) has been shown to be up-regulated in activated microglia and therefore plays an important role in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease. The CB2 receptor is therefore considered as a very promising target for therapeutic approaches as well as for imaging. A promising 2-oxoquinoline derivative designated KP23 was synthesized and radiolabeled and its potential as a ligand for PET imaging the CB2 receptor was evaluated. [11C]KP23 was obtained in 10%–25% radiochemical yield (decay corrected) and 99% radiochemical purity. It showed high stability in phosphate buffer, rat and mouse plasma. In vitro autoradiography of rat and mouse spleen slices, as spleen expresses a high physiological expression of CB2 receptors, demonstrated that [11C]KP23 exhibits specific binding towards CB2. High spleen uptake of [11C]KP23 was observed in dynamic in vivo PET studies with Wistar rats. In conclusion, [11C]KP23 showed promising in vitro and in vivo characteristics. Further evaluation with diseased animal model which has higher CB2 expression levels in the brain is warranted. PMID:24662272

  6. HIGHER IN VIVO SEROTONIN-1A BINDING IN POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER: A PET STUDY WITH [11C]WAY-100635

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Gregory M.; Ogden, R. Todd; Huang, Yung-yu; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John; Parsey, Ramin V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain serotonin-1A receptors (5-HT1A) are implicated in anxiety. We compared regional brain 5-HT1A binding in medication-free participants with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and healthy volunteers using fully quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) methods. Methods Twenty patients with DSM-IV PTSD (13 with comorbid major depressive disorder, [MDD]) and 49 healthy volunteers underwent PET imaging with 5-HT1A antagonist radioligand [C-11]WAY100635. Arterial blood sampling provided a metabolite-corrected input function and the concentration of free ligand in plasma (fP) for estimation of regional binding potential, BPF ( = Bavailable /KD). Linear mixed modeling compared BPF between groups across regions of interest (ROIs). Results The PTSD group had higher 5-HT1A BPF across brain ROIs (P = .0006). Post hoc comparisons showed higher 5-HT1A BPF in PTSD in all cortical ROIs (26–33%), amygdala (34%), and brainstem raphe nuclei (43%), but not hippocampus. The subgroup of seven PTSD patients without comorbid MDD had higher 5-HT1A BPF compared with healthy volunteers (P = .03). Conclusions This is the first report of higher brainstem and forebrain 5-HT1A binding in vivo in PTSD. The finding is independent of MDD. PTSD and MDD have in common an upregulation of 5-HT1A binding including midbrain autoreceptors that would favor less firing and serotonin release. This abnormality may represent a common biomarker of these stress-associated brain disorders. PMID:23408467

  7. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  8. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  9. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  10. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  11. Carbon-11 radiolabeling of iron-oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Xu, Youwen; Kim, Sung Won; Schueller, Michael J.; Alexoff, David; Smith, S. David; Wang, Wei; Schlyer, David

    2013-07-01

    Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled SPIO NPs was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled

  12. Improved synthesis of DOTA tetraamide lanthanide(III) ligands: tool for increasing the repertoire of potential PARACEST contrast agents for MRI and/or fluorescent sensors

    PubMed Central

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M.; Viswanathan, Subha; Sherry, A. Dean

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of new DOTA tetra-amide (DOTAMR4) compounds is of great interest given their application in the formation of Ln(III) complexes which are potential PARACEST contrast agents in MRI or fluorescent molecular probes. In this context amino acid and peptide DOTAMR4 derivatives are particularly attractive since the amino-acid and/or peptide moiety can show responsive properties dependent on a given stimuli which might translate to changes in water exchange rates of the corresponding Ln(III) complex. Current synthesis of DOTAMR4 derivatives is typically carried out by reacting haloacetamide intermediates with cyclen. However, this method fails to generate the tetra-substituted products when bulky substituents are present in the haloacetamide and in some cases this intermediate cannot be prepared by conventional acylation procedures limiting the number of DOTAMR4 compounds available for study. As a solution to these limitations, an improved methodology for the synthesis of DOTAMR4 by coupling DOTA to an appropriate amine containing reagent (i.e. protected amino-acids with the α-amino group free) is presented in this work. Several DOTAMR4 derivatives which are difficult or impossible to prepare with the traditional methodologies were easily obtained starting with DOTA. A new protocol was derived using this methodology for the solution phase synthesis of DOTA peptide derivatives. With this methodology, many other DOTAMR4 peptide and non-peptide derivatives have been prepared in our laboratories with several of these new compounds showing interesting properties for molecular imaging. PMID:20586036

  13. Bromine-80m-labeled estrogens: Auger-electron emitting, estrogen receptor-directed ligands with potential for therapy of estrogen receptor positive cancers

    SciTech Connect

    DeSombre, E.R.; Mease, R.C.; Hughes, A.; Harper, P.V.; DeJesus, O.T.; Friedman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    A triphenylbromoethylene, 1,1-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-bromo-2-phenylethylene, Br-BHPE, and a bromosteroidal estrogen, 17..cap alpha..- bromovinylestradiol, BrVE/sub 2/, were labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide bromine-80m, prepared by the (p,n) reaction with /sup 80/Se. To assess their potential as estrogen receptor (ER) directed therapeutic substrates the bromine-80m labeled estrogens were injected into immature female rats and the tissue distribution studied at 0.5 and 2 hours. Both radiobromoestrogens showed substantial diethylstilbesterol (DES)-inhibitable localization in the ER rich tissues, uterus, pituitary, ovary and vagina at both time points. While the percent dose per gram tissue was higher for the Br-BHPE, the BrVE/sub 2/ showed higher tissue to blood ratios, especially at 2 hr, reflecting the lower blood concentrations of radiobromine following administration of the steroidal bromoestrogen. Comparing intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration for the radiobromine labeled Br-BHPE, the intraperitoneal route was particularly advantageous to provide maximum, DES-inhibitable concentrations in the peritoneal, ER-rich target organs, the uterus, ovary and vagina. While uterine concentrations after BrBHPE were from 10--48% dose/g and after BrVE/sub 2/ were 15--25% dose/g, similar treatment with /sup 80m/Br as sodium bromide showed uniform low concentrations in all tissues at about the levels seen in blood. The effective specific activity of (/sup 80m/Br)BrBHPE, assayed by specific binding to ER in rat uterine cytosol, was 8700 Ci/mmole. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used tin applications for the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams.

  15. The Dynamics of Ligand Barrier Crossing Inside the Acetylcholinesterase Gorge

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2003-10-01

    The dynamics of ligand movement through the constricted region of the acetylcholinesterase gorge is important in understanding how the ligand gains access to and is released from the active site of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the simple ligand, tetramethylammonium, crossing this bottleneck region are conducted using umbrella potential sampling and activated .ux techniques. The low potential of mean force obtained is consistent with the fast reaction rate of acetylcholinesterase observed experimentally. From the results of the activated dynamics simulations, local conformational .uctuations of the gorge residues and larger scale collective motions of the protein are found to correlate highly with the ligand crossing.

  16. Advantages of improved timing accuracy in PET cameras using LSOscintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2002-12-02

    PET scanners based on LSO have the potential forsignificantly better coincidence timing resolution than the 6 ns fwhmtypically achieved with BGO. This study analyzes the performanceenhancements made possible by improved timing as a function of thecoincidence time resolution. If 500 ps fwhm coincidence timing resolutioncan be achieved in a complete PET camera, the following four benefits canbe realized for whole-body FDG imaging: 1) The random event rate can bereduced by using a narrower coincidence timing window, increasing thepeak NECR by~;50 percent. 2) Using time-of-flight in the reconstructionalgorithm will reduce the noise variance by a factor of 5. 3) Emissionand transmission data can be acquired simultaneously, reducing the totalscan time. 4) Axial blurring can be reduced by using time-of-flight todetermine the correct axial plane that each event originated from. Whiletime-of-flight was extensively studied in the 1980's, practical factorslimited its effectiveness at that time and little attention has been paidto timing in PET since then. As these potential improvements aresubstantial and the advent of LSO PET cameras gives us the means toobtain them without other sacrifices, efforts to improve PET timingshould resume after their long dormancy.

  17. Clinical PET-MR Imaging in Breast Cancer and Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rice, Samuel L; Friedman, Kent P

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid imaging systems have dramatically improved thoracic oncology patient care over the past 2 decades. PET-MR imaging systems have the potential to further improve imaging of thoracic neoplasms, resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic advantages compared with current MR imaging and PET-computed tomography systems. Increasing soft tissue contrast and lesion sensitivity, improved image registration, reduced radiation exposure, and improved patient convenience are immediate clinical advantages. Multiparametric quantitative imaging capabilities of PET-MR imaging have the potential to improve understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer and treatment effects, potentially guiding improvements in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27593245

  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of [11C]LY2795050 as a Novel Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonist Radiotracer for PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Kim, Su Jin; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Lin, Shu-fei; Mitch, Charles; Quimby, Steven; Barth, Vanessa; Rash, Karen; Masters, John; Navarro, Antonio; Seest, Eric; Morris, Evan E.; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KOR) are believed to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression, anxiety disorders, drug abuse and alcoholism. To date, only one tracer, the kappa opioid receptor agonist [11C]GR103545, has been reported to be able to image KOR in primates. The goal of the present study was to synthesize the selective KOR antagonist [11C]LY2795050 and evaluate its potential as a PET tracer to image KOR in vivo. METHODS In vitro binding affinity of LY2795050 was measured in radioligand competition binding assays. Ex vivo experiments were conducted using microdosing of the unlabelled ligand in Sprague-Dawley rats, as well as wild-type and KOR knock-out mice, to assess the ligand’s potential as a tracer candidate. Imaging experiments with [11C]LY2795050 in monkeys were carried out on the Focus-220 PET scanner with arterial blood input function measurement. Binding parameters were determined with kinetic modeling analysis. RESULTS LY2795050 displays full antagonist activity and high binding affinity and selectivity for KOR. Microdosing studies in rodents and ex vivo analysis of tissue concentrations with LC/MS/MS identified LY2795050 as an appropriate tracer candidate able to provide specific binding signals in vivo. [11C]LY2795050 was prepared in an average yield of 12% and >99% radiochemical purity. In rhesus monkeys, [11C]LY2795050 displayed a moderate rate of peripheral metabolism, with ∼40% of parent compound remaining at 30 min postinjection. In the brain, [11C]LY2795050 displayed fast uptake kinetics (regional activity peak times < 20 min) and an uptake pattern consistent with the distribution of KOR in primates. Pretreatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg, iv) resulted in a uniform distribution of radioactivity. Further, specific binding of [11C]LY2795050 was reduced by the selective KOR antagonist LY2456302 in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION [11C]LY2795050 displayed favorable pharmacokinetic properties and binding profiles in vivo, and therefore

  19. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    MedlinePlus

    ... their pets to avoid getting diseases from the animals. Persons in this category include those who take ... risk of diseases that can be passed from animals to humans. Here are some tips: Ask your ...

  20. 10 "Poison Pills" for Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... left on the bedside table. Zolpidem may make cats wobbly and sleepy, but most pets become very ... very common pain killer found in most households. Cats are extremely sensitive to acetaminophen, but dogs can ...

  1. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    MedlinePlus

    ... pets in households with young children. [775 KB] Animals and Health Check out two CDC websites with helpful resources. Gastrointestinal (Enteric) Diseases from Animals : Information about zoonotic outbreaks, prevention messages, and helpful ...

  2. Strong non-linear effects in the chiroptical properties of the ligand-exchanged Au38 and Au40 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoppe, Stefan; Dass, Amala; Bürgi, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Ligand exchange reactions on size-selected Au38(2-PET)24 and Au40(2-PET)24 clusters (2-PET: 2-phenylethylthiol) with mono- and bi-dentate chiral thiols were performed. The reactions were monitored with MALDI mass spectrometry and the arising chiroptical properties were compared to the number of incorporated chiral ligands. Only a small fraction of chiral ligands is needed to induce significant optical activity to the clusters. The use of bidentate 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-dithiol (BINAS) leads to slow exchange, but the optical activity measured is strong. Moreover, a non-linear behaviour between optical activity and the number of chiral ligands is found in the BINAS case for both Au38 and Au40, which may indicate different exchange rates of enantiopure BINAS with the enantiomers of inherently chiral (but racemic) clusters. This is ascribed to effects arising from the bidentate nature of BINAS. In contrast, the use of monodentate camphor-10-thiol (CamSH) leads to comparably fast exchange on both clusters. The arising optical activity is weak. This is the first study where chiroptical effects are directly correlated with the composition of the ligand shell.Ligand exchange reactions on size-selected Au38(2-PET)24 and Au40(2-PET)24 clusters (2-PET: 2-phenylethylthiol) with mono- and bi-dentate chiral thiols were performed. The reactions were monitored with MALDI mass spectrometry and the arising chiroptical properties were compared to the number of incorporated chiral ligands. Only a small fraction of chiral ligands is needed to induce significant optical activity to the clusters. The use of bidentate 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-dithiol (BINAS) leads to slow exchange, but the optical activity measured is strong. Moreover, a non-linear behaviour between optical activity and the number of chiral ligands is found in the BINAS case for both Au38 and Au40, which may indicate different exchange rates of enantiopure BINAS with the enantiomers of inherently chiral (but racemic) clusters

  3. Nutritional sustainability of pet foods.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kelly S; Carter, Rebecca A; Yount, Tracy P; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system. PMID:23493530

  4. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  5. Flexible ligand docking using conformational ensembles.

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, D. M.; Shoichet, B. K.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular docking algorithms suggest possible structures for molecular complexes. They are used to model biological function and to discover potential ligands. A present challenge for docking algorithms is the treatment of molecular flexibility. Here, the rigid body program, DOCK, is modified to allow it to rapidly fit multiple conformations of ligands. Conformations of a given molecule are pre-calculated in the same frame of reference, so that each conformer shares a common rigid fragment with all other conformations. The ligand conformers are then docked together, as an ensemble, into a receptor binding site. This takes advantage of the redundancy present in differing conformers of the same molecule. The algorithm was tested using three organic ligand protein systems and two protein-protein systems. Both the bound and unbound conformations of the receptors were used. The ligand ensemble method found conformations that resembled those determined in X-ray crystal structures (RMS values typically less than 1.5 A). To test the method's usefulness for inhibitor discovery, multi-compound and multi-conformer databases were screened for compounds known to bind to dihydrofolate reductase and compounds known to bind to thymidylate synthase. In both cases, known inhibitors and substrates were identified in conformations resembling those observed experimentally. The ligand ensemble method was 100-fold faster than docking a single conformation at a time and was able to screen a database of over 34 million conformations from 117,000 molecules in one to four CPU days on a workstation. PMID:9568900

  6. The role of PET quantification in cardiovascular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Slomka, Piotr; Berman, Daniel S.; Alexanderson, Erick; Germano, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has several clinical and research applications in cardiovascular imaging. Myocardial perfusion imaging with PET allows accurate global and regional measurements of myocardial perfusion, myocardial blood flow and function at stress and rest in one exam. Simultaneous assessment of function and perfusion by PET with quantitative software is currently the routine practice. Combination of ejection fraction reserve with perfusion information may improve the identification of severe disease. The myocardial viability can be estimated by quantitative comparison of fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) and rest perfusion imaging. The myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve measurements are becoming routinely included in the clinical assessment due to enhanced dynamic imaging capabilities of the latest PET/CT scanners. Absolute flow measurements allow evaluation of the coronary microvascular dysfunction and provide additional prognostic and diagnostic information for coronary disease. Standard quantitative approaches to compute myocardial blood flow from kinetic PET data in automated and rapid fashion have been developed for 13N-ammonia, 15O-water and 82Rb radiotracers. The agreement between software methods available for such analysis is excellent. Relative quantification of 82Rb PET myocardial perfusion, based on comparisons to normal databases, demonstrates high performance for the detection of obstructive coronary disease. New tracers, such as 18F-flurpiridaz may allow further improvements in the disease detection. Computerized analysis of perfusion at stress and rest reduces the variability of the assessment as compared to visual analysis. PET quantification can be enhanced by precise coregistration with CT angiography. In emerging clinical applications, the potential to identify vulnerable plaques by quantification of atherosclerotic plaque uptake of 18FDG and 18F-sodium fluoride tracers in carotids, aorta and coronary arteries has been

  7. Canine Comfort: Pet Affinity Buffers the Negative Impact of Ambivalence over Emotional Expression on Perceived Social Support

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Jennifer L.; Quist, Michelle C.; Young, Chelsie M.; Steers, Mai-Ly N.; Foster, Dawn W.; Lu, Qian

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated pet affinity as a buffer between ambivalence over emotional expression (AEE) and social support. AEE occurs when one desires to express emotions but is reluctant to do so and is related to negative psychological outcomes. Individuals high in AEE may have difficulty receiving social support and thus may not gain accompanying benefits. Social support has been associated with positive health outcomes, and pet support is positively associated with human social support. The present study explores the potential protective effect of pet affinity. One hundred ninety-eight undergraduate dog owners completed measures assessing perceived social support, pet affinity, and AEE. AEE was expected to be negatively associated with social support, and pet affinity was expected to buffer the negative effects of AEE on social support. We found that AEE was negatively associated with perceived social support. An interaction between pet affinity and AEE emerged such that the negative association between AEE and social support was weaker among those higher in pet affinity. Thus, at high levels of AEE, those who felt a close connection with their pets reported more perceived social support than those less connected with their pets. Overall, these findings emphasize the potential benefits of pet affinity. PMID:25960586

  8. PET/MRI insert using digital SiPMs: Investigation of MR-compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Jakob; Weissler, Bjoern; Dueppenbecker, Peter; Gebhardt, Pierre; Schug, David; Ruetten, Walter; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present an initial MR-compatibility study performed with the world's first preclinical PET/MR insert based on fully digital silicon photo multipliers (dSiPM). The PET insert allows simultaneous data acquisition of both imaging modalities and thus enables the true potential of hybrid PET/MRI. Since the PET insert has the potential to interfere with all of the MRI's subsystems (strong magnet, gradients system, radio frequency (RF) system) and vice versa, interference studies on both imaging systems are of great importance to ensure an undisturbed operation. As a starting point to understand the interference, we performed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements as well as dedicated noise scans on the MRI side to characterize the influence of the PET electronics on the MR receive chain. Furthermore, improvements of sub-components' shielding of the PET system are implemented and tested inside the MRI. To study the influence of the MRI on the PET performance, we conducted highly demanding stress tests with gradient and RF dominated MR sequences. These stress tests unveil a sensitivity of the PET's electronics to gradient switching.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of [76Br]-Labeled High Affinity A3 Adenosine Receptor Ligands for Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Melman, Artem; de Castro, Sonia; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Bromine-76 radiolabeled analogues of previously reported high affinity A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) nucleoside ligands have been prepared as potential radiotracers for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Methods The radiosyntheses were accomplished by oxidative radiobromination on the N6-benzyl moiety of trimethyltin precursors. Biodistribution studies of the kinetics of uptake were conducted in awake rats. Results We prepared an agonist ligand {[76Br](1′R,2′R,3′S,4′R,5′S)-4-{2-chloro-6-[(3-bromophenylmethyl)amino]purin-9-yl}-1-(methylaminocarbonyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol (MRS3581)} in 59% radiochemical yield (RCY) with a specific activity of 19.5 GBq/μmol and an antagonist ligand {[76Br](1R,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(6-(3-bromobenzylamino)-2-chloro-9H-purin-9-yl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol. (MRS5147)} in 65% RCY with a specific activity of 22 GBq/μmol). The resultant products exhibited the expected high affinity (Ki ~ 0.6 nM) and specific binding at the human A3AR in vitro. Biodistribution studies in the rat showed uptake in the organs of excretion and metabolism. The antagonist MRS5147 exhibited increasing uptake in testes, an organ that contains significant quantities of A3AR, over a 2 h time course, which suggests the presence of a specific A3AR retention mechanism. Conclusion We were able to compare uptake of the [76Br]labeled antagonist MRS5147 to [76Br]agonist MRS3581. The antagonist MRS5147 shows increasing uptake in the testes, an A3AR rich tissue, suggesting that this ligand may have promise as a molecular imaging agent. PMID:19181263

  10. Prospective Study of FLT PET for Early Interim Response Assessment in Advanced Stage B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schöder, Heiko; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Hamlin, Paul; Gavane, Somali; Horwitz, Steven; Matasar, Matthew; Moskowitz, Alison; Noy, Ariela; Palomba, Lia; Portlock, Carol; Straus, David; Grewal, Ravinder; Migliacci, Jocelyn C.; Larson, Steven M.; Moskowitz, Craig H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current clinical and imaging tools remain suboptimal for early assessment of prognosis and treatment response in aggressive lymphomas. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) can be used to measure tumor cell proliferation and treatment response. In a prospective study in patients with advanced stage B-cell lymphoma we investigated the prognostic and predictive value of FLT PET in comparison to standard imaging with FDG PET and clinical outcome. Patients and Methods 65 patients were treated with an induction/consolidation regimen consisting of four cycles of R-CHOP-14 followed by 3 cycles of ICE. FLT PET was performed at baseline and at interim (iPET) after 1–2 cycles of therapy. FDG PET was performed at baseline, after cycle 4, and at the end of therapy. The relationship between PET findings, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was investigated. Results With a median follow-up of 51 months, PFS and OS were 71% and 86% respectively. FLT iPET, analyzed visually, using a 5-point score, or semi-quantitatively, using SUV and ΔSUV, predicted both PFS and OS (p<0.01 for all parameters). Residual FLT SUVmax on iPET was associated with an inferior PFS (HR: 1.26, p=0.001) and OS (HR: 1.27, p=0.002). Using FDG PET, findings in the end of treatment scan were better predictors of PFS and OS than findings on interim scan. Baseline PET imaging parameters, including SUV, proliferative or metabolic tumor volume, did not correlate with outcome. Conclusion FLT PET after 1–2 cycles of chemotherapy predicts PFS and OS, and a negative FLT iPET may potentially help design risk-adapted therapies in patients with aggressive lymphomas. In contrast, the positive predictive value of FLT iPET remains too low to justify changes in patient management. PMID:26719374

  11. The Basic Principles of FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Hess, Søren; Nielsen Braad, Poul-Erik; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Inglev, Signe; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) forms the basis of molecular imaging. FDG-PET imaging is a multidisciplinary undertaking that requires close interdisciplinary collaboration in a broad team comprising physicians, technologists, secretaries, radio-chemists, hospital physicists, molecular biologists, engineers, and cyclotron technicians. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of important basic issues and considerations pivotal to successful patient examinations, including basic physics, instrumentation, radiochemistry, molecular and cell biology, patient preparation, normal distribution of tracer, and potential interpretive pitfalls. PMID:26050942

  12. Recent Developments in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Instrumentation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors.

  13. Novel Strategy for Preparing Dual-Modality Optical/PET Imaging Probes via Photo-Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingyi; Ding, Jiule; Xing, Wei; Gai, Yongkang; Sheng, Jing; Zeng, Dexing

    2016-05-18

    Preparation of small molecule based dual-modality probes remains a challenging task due to the complicated synthetic procedure. In this study, a novel concise and generic strategy for preparing dual-modality optical/PET imaging probes via photo-click chemistry was developed, in which the diazole photo-click linker functioned not only as a bridge between the targeting-ligand and the PET imaging moiety, but also as the fluorophore for optical imaging. A dual-modality AE105 peptidic probe was successfully generated via this strategy and subsequently applied in the fluorescent staining of U87MG cells and the (68)Ga based PET imaging of mice bearing U87MG xenograft. In addition, dual-modality monoclonal antibody cetuximab has also been generated via this strategy and labeled with (64)Cu for PET imaging studies, broadening the application of this strategy to include the preparation of macromolecule based imaging probes.

  14. [Clinical evaluation of female pelvic tumors : Application fields of integrated PET/MRI].

    PubMed

    Grueneisen, J; Umutlu, L

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning has recently become established in clinical imaging. Various studies have demonstrated the great potential of this new hybrid imaging procedure for applications in the field of oncology and the diagnostics of inflammatory processes. With initial studies demonstrating the feasibility and high diagnostic potential of PET/MRI comparable to PET-computed tomography (CT), the focus of future studies should be on the identification of application fields with a potential diagnostic benefit of PET/MRI over other established diagnostic tools. Both MRI and PET/CT are widely used in the diagnostic algorithms for malignancies of the female pelvis. A simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI data within a single examination provides complementary information which can be used for a more comprehensive evaluation of the primary tumor as well as for whole body staging. Therefore, the aim of this article is to outline potential clinical applications of integrated PET/MRI for the diagnostic work-up of primary or recurrent gynecological neoplasms of the female pelvis. PMID:27315240

  15. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  16. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  17. PET-Based Personalized Management of Infectious and Inflammatory Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass; Basu, Sandip

    2016-07-01

    It is challenging to diagnose and manage infectious and inflammatory diseases; symptoms are relatively nonspecific, the disease patterns are often systemic. Imaging is pivotal and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/computed tomography (CT) is increasingly used due to its high sensitivity whole-body approach. At present, the literature is still relatively sparse, but evidence for FDG-PET/CT is mounting in several domains, for example, detecting culprit lesions in systemic infections and inflammations, evaluation of disease extent and therapy monitoring, and many other domains have shown considerable potential, for example, atherosclerosis in systemic inflammation. We believe FDG-PET/CT is becoming a first-line modality for infections and inflammation. PMID:27321037

  18. [Current trends in using PET radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostics in oncology].

    PubMed

    Adam, J; Kadeřávek, J; Kužel, F; Vašina, J; Rehák, Z

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important field of modern medicine, particularly thanks to its role in in vivo imaging of important processes in human organism. This is possible thanks to the use of radiopharmaceuticals, specific substances labeled by radioactive nuclide, its distribution in the body can be visualized by specialized scanners and, based on the knowledge of physiological patterns, dia-gnosis can be determined. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a modern and in many ways indispensable method of nuclear medicine. The spectrum of radiopharmaceuticals available in recent years is broadening thanks to a coordinated effort of manufacturers of synthesis equipment, chemists and potential users -  physicians. This review focuses on the development in the PET radiopharmaceutical field in the last five years, with an emphasis on oncological applications of PET. PMID:24945550

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of Candidate PET Radioligands for Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type-1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, Nicholas J.; Li, Yu-Wen; Chin, Frederick T.; Dischino, Douglas D.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Deskus, Jeffrey A.; Mattson, Ronald J.; Imaizumo, Masao; Pieschl, Rick; Molski, Thaddeus F.; Fujita, Masahiro; Dulac, Heidi; Zaczek, Robert; Bronson, Joanne J.; Macor, John E.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A radioligand for measuring the density of corticotrophin-releasing factor subtype-1 receptors (CRF1 receptors) in living animal and human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) would be a useful tool for neuropsychiatric investigations and the development of drugs intended to interact with this target. This study was aimed at discovery of such a radioligand from a group of CRF1 receptor ligands based on a core 3-(phenylamino)pyrazin-2(1H)-one scaffold. Methods CRF1 receptor ligands were selected for development as possible PET radioligands based on their binding potency at CRF receptors (displacement of [125I]CRF from rat cortical membranes), measured lipophilicity, autoradiographic binding profile in rat and rhesus monkey brain sections, rat biodistribution, and suitability for radiolabeling with carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Two identified candidates (BMS-721313 and BMS-732098) were labeled with fluorine-18. A third candidate (BMS-709460) was labeled with carbon-11 and all three radioligands were evaluated in PET experiments in rhesus monkey. CRF1 receptor density (Bmax) was assessed in rhesus brain cortical and cerebellum membranes with the CRF receptor ligand, [3H]BMS-728300. Results The three ligands selected for development showed high binding affinity (IC50 values, 0.3–8 nM) at CRF1 receptors and moderate lipophilicity (LogD, 2.8–4.4). [3H]BMS-728300 and the two 18F-labeled ligands showed region-specific binding in rat and rhesus monkey brain autoradiography, namely higher binding density in the frontal and limbic cortex, and cerebellum than in thalamus and brainstem. CRF1 receptor Bmax in rhesus brain was found to be 50–120 fmol/mg protein across cortical regions and cerebellum. PET experiments in rhesus monkey showed that the radioligands [18F]BMS-721313, [18F]BMS-732098 and [11C]BMS-709460 gave acceptably high brain radioactivity uptake but no indication of the specific binding as seen in vitro. Conclusions Candidate CRF1 receptor

  20. An investigation on the use of shredded waste PET bottles as aggregate in lightweight concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Akcaoezoglu, Semiha; Atis, Cengiz Duran; Akcaoezoglu, Kubilay

    2010-02-15

    In this work, the utilization of shredded waste Poly-ethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottle granules as a lightweight aggregate in mortar was investigated. Investigation was carried out on two groups of mortar samples, one made with only PET aggregates and, second made with PET and sand aggregates together. Additionally, blast-furnace slag was also used as the replacement of cement on mass basis at the replacement ratio of 50% to reduce the amount of cement used and provide savings. The water-binder (w/b) ratio and PET-binder (PET/b) ratio used in the mixtures were 0.45 and 0.50, respectively. The size of shredded PET granules used in the preparation of mortar mixtures were between 0 and 4 mm. The results of the laboratory study and testing carried out showed that mortar containing only PET aggregate, mortar containing PET and sand aggregate, and mortars modified with slag as cement replacement can be drop into structural lightweight concrete category in terms of unit weight and strength properties. Therefore, it was concluded that there is a potential for the use of shredded waste PET granules as aggregate in the production of structural lightweight concrete. The use of shredded waste PET granules due to its low unit weight reduces the unit weight of concrete which results in a reduction in the death weight of a structural concrete member of a building. Reduction in the death weight of a building will help to reduce the seismic risk of the building since the earthquake forces linearly dependant on the dead-weight. Furthermore, it was also concluded that the use of industrial wastes such as PET granules and blast-furnace slag in concrete provides some advantages, i.e., reduction in the use of natural resources, disposal of wastes, prevention of environmental pollution, and energy saving.

  1. An investigation on the use of shredded waste PET bottles as aggregate in lightweight concrete.

    PubMed

    Akçaözoğlu, Semiha; Atiş, Cengiz Duran; Akçaözoğlu, Kubilay

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the utilization of shredded waste Poly-ethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottle granules as a lightweight aggregate in mortar was investigated. Investigation was carried out on two groups of mortar samples, one made with only PET aggregates and, second made with PET and sand aggregates together. Additionally, blast-furnace slag was also used as the replacement of cement on mass basis at the replacement ratio of 50% to reduce the amount of cement used and provide savings. The water-binder (w/b) ratio and PET-binder (PET/b) ratio used in the mixtures were 0.45 and 0.50, respectively. The size of shredded PET granules used in the preparation of mortar mixtures were between 0 and 4 mm. The results of the laboratory study and testing carried out showed that mortar containing only PET aggregate, mortar containing PET and sand aggregate, and mortars modified with slag as cement replacement can be drop into structural lightweight concrete category in terms of unit weight and strength properties. Therefore, it was concluded that there is a potential for the use of shredded waste PET granules as aggregate in the production of structural lightweight concrete. The use of shredded waste PET granules due to its low unit weight reduces the unit weight of concrete which results in a reduction in the death weight of a structural concrete member of a building. Reduction in the death weight of a building will help to reduce the seismic risk of the building since the earthquake forces linearly dependent on the dead-weight. Furthermore, it was also concluded that the use of industrial wastes such as PET granules and blast-furnace slag in concrete provides some advantages, i.e., reduction in the use of natural resources, disposal of wastes, prevention of environmental pollution, and energy saving. PMID:19853433

  2. Feasibility of Using Distal Endpoints for In-room PET Range Verification of Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, Kira; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Winey, Brian; Bortfeld, Thomas; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to verify the dose delivery in proton therapy, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans have been employed to measure the distribution of β+ radioactivity produced from nuclear reactions of the protons with native nuclei. Because the dose and PET distributions are difficult to compare directly, the range verification is currently carried out by comparing measured and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation predicted PET distributions. In order to reduce the reliance on MC, simulated PET (simPET) and dose distal endpoints were compared to explore the feasibility of using distal endpoints for in-room PET range verification. MC simulations were generated for six head and neck patients with corrections for radiological decay, biological washout, and PET resolution. One-dimensional profiles of the dose and simPET were examined along the direction of the beam and covering the cross section of the beam. The chosen endpoints of the simPET (x-intercept of the linear fit to the distal falloff) and planned dose (20–50% of maximum dose) correspond to where most of the protons are below the threshold energy for the nuclear reactions. The difference in endpoint range between the distal surfaces of the dose and MC-PET were compared and the spread of range differences were assessed. Among the six patients, the mean difference between MC-PET and dose depth was found to be −1.6 mm to +0.5 mm between patients, with a standard deviation of 1.1 to 4.0 mm across the individual beams. In clinical practice, regions with deviations beyond the safety margin need to be examined more closely and can potentially lead to adjustments to the treatment plan. PMID:24464031

  3. Parasites in pet reptiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles), belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (4)) of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3%) of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (6)) of endoparasites in 252 (76.1%) of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1) and Protozoa (2)) of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5%) animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners. PMID:21624124

  4. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands.

  5. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands. PMID:24834870

  6. Sodium 18F-Fluoride PET/CT of Bone, Joint and Other Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein; Desai, Bhushan; Conti, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) with positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasing. This resurgence of an old tracer has been fueled by several factors including superior diagnostic performance over standard 99mTc-based bone scintigraphy, growth in the availability of PET/CT imaging systems, increase in the number of regional commercial distribution centers for PET radiotracers, the recent concerns about potential chronic shortages with 99mTc based radiotracers, and the recent decision by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reimburse for 18F-NaF PET/CT for evaluation of patients with known or suspected bone metastases through the National Oncologic PET Registry. The major goal of this article is to review the current evidence on the diagnostic utility of 18F-NaF in the imaging assessment of bone and joint in a variety of clinical conditions. PMID:25475379

  7. Architectural repertoire of ligand-binding pockets on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of ligand binding sites in proteins provides valuable information for computer-assisted drug design. We present a method for the automated extraction and classification of ligand binding site topologies, in which protein surface cavities are represented as branched frameworks. The procedure employs a growing neural gas approach for pocket topology assignment and pocket framework generation. We assessed the structural diversity of 623 known ligand binding site topologies based on framework cluster analysis. At a resolution of 5 A only 23 structurally distinct topology groups were formed; this suggests an overall limited structural diversity of ligand-accommodating protein cavities. Higher resolution allowed for identification of protein-family specific pocket features. Pocket frameworks highlight potentially preferred modes of ligand-receptor interactions and will help facilitate the identification of druggable subpockets suitable for ligand affinity and selectivity optimization. PMID:20069621

  8. Nanosized (mu12-Pt)Pd164-xPtx(CO)72(PPh3)20 (x approximately 7) containing Pt-centered four-shell 165-atom Pd-Pt core with unprecedented intershell bridging carbonyl ligands: comparative analysis of icosahedral shell-growth patterns with geometrically related Pd145(CO)x(PEt3)30 (x approximately 60) containing capped three-shell Pd145 core.

    PubMed

    Mednikov, Evgueni G; Jewell, Matthew C; Dahl, Lawrence F

    2007-09-19

    Presented herein are the preparation and crystallographic/microanalytical/magnetic/spectroscopic characterization of the Pt-centered four-shell 165-atom Pd-Pt cluster, (mu(12)-Pt)Pd(164-x)Pt(x)(CO)(72)(PPh(3))(20) (x approximately 7), 1, that replaces the geometrically related capped three-shell icosahedral Pd(145) cluster, Pd(145)(CO)(x)(PEt(3))(30) (x approximately 60), 2, as the largest crystallographically determined discrete transition metal cluster with direct metal-metal bonding. A detailed comparison of their shell-growth patterns gives rise to important stereochemical implications concerning completely unexpected structural dissimilarities as well as similarities and provides new insight concerning possible synthetic approaches for generation of multi-shell metal clusters. 1 was reproducibly prepared in small yields (<10%) from the reaction of Pd(10)(CO)(12)(PPh(3))(6) with Pt(CO)(2)(PPh(3))(2). Its 165-atom metal-core geometry and 20 PPh(3) and 72 CO ligands were established from a low-temperature (100 K) CCD X-ray diffraction study. The well-determined crystal structure is attributed largely to 1 possessing cubic T(h) (2/m3) site symmetry, which is the highest crystallographic subgroup of the noncrystallographic pseudo-icosahedral I(h) (2/m35) symmetry. The "full" four-shell Pd-Pt anatomy of 1 consists of: (a) shell 1 with the centered (mu(12)-Pt) atom encapsulated by the 12-atom icosahedral Pt(x)Pd(12-x) cage, x = 1.2(3); (b) shell 2 with the 42-atom nu(2) icosahedral Pt(x)Pd(42-x) cage, x = 3.5(5); (c) shell 3 with the anti-Mackay 60-atom semi-regular rhombicosidodecahedral Pt(x)Pd(60-x) cage, x = 2.2(6); (d) shell 4 with the 50-atom nu(2) pentagonal dodecahedral Pd(50) cage. The total number of crystallographically estimated Pt atoms, 8 +/- 3, which was obtained from least-squares (Pt(x)/Pd(1-x))-occupancy analysis of the X-ray data that conclusively revealed the central atom to be pure Pt (occupancy factor, x = 1.00(3)), is fortuitously in agreement

  9. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  10. Recent Understandings of Pet Allergies

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Dennis; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2016-01-01

    Allergic reactions to pets have been recognized for at least a hundred years. Yet our understanding of the effects of all of the interactions between pet exposures and human immune responses continues to grow. Allergists, epidemiologists, and immunologists have spent years trying to better understand how exposures to pet allergens lead to allergic sensitization (the production of allergen-specific immunoglobulin class E [IgE] antibodies) and subsequent allergic disease. A major new development in this understanding is the recognition that pet exposures consist of not only allergen exposures but also changes in microbial exposures. Exposures to certain pet-associated microbes, especially in the neonatal period, appear to be able to dramatically alter how a child’s immune system develops and this in turn reduces the risk of allergic sensitization and disease. An exciting challenge in the next few years will be to see whether these changes can be developed into a realistic preventative strategy with the expectation of significantly reducing allergic disease, especially asthma. PMID:26918180

  11. Children's drawings and attachment to pets.

    PubMed

    Kidd, A H; Kidd, R M

    1995-08-01

    To help confirm the concept that distances placed between the self and other figures in children's drawings represent emotional distances, 242 pet-owning and 35 nonpet-owning kindergartners through eighth graders drew pictures of themselves, a pet, and/or a family member. Owners drew pets significantly closer than family-figures although the younger the child, the greater the distance between self and pet. Older children drew themselves holding pets significantly more often, but younger children placed the family-figure between the self and the pet significantly more often. There were no significant gender differences in self-figure/pet-figure distances, but cats, dogs, caged animals, and farm animals were placed significantly closer to self-figures than were fish. Over-all, owners were clearly emotionally closer to pets than to family members, but nonowners were as close emotionally to family members as were owners. PMID:7501763

  12. [Simultaneous whole-body PET-MRI in pediatric oncology : More than just reducing radiation?].

    PubMed

    Gatidis, S; Gückel, B; la Fougère, C; Schmitt, J; Schäfer, J F

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an essential role in pediatric oncology with regard to diagnosis, therapy-planning, and the follow-up of solid tumors. The current imaging standard in pediatric oncology includes a variety of radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities depending on the specific tumor entity. The introduction of combined simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has opened up new diagnostic options in pediatric oncology. This novel modality combines the excellent anatomical accuracy of MRI with the metabolic information of PET. In initial clinical studies, the technical feasibility and possible diagnostic advantages of combined PET-MRI have been in comparison with alternative imaging techniques. It was shown that a reduction in radiation exposure of up to 70 % is achievable compared with PET-CT. Furthermore, it has been shown that the number of imaging studies necessary can be markedly reduced using combined PET-MRI. Owing to its limited availability, combined PET-MRI is currently not used as a routine procedure. However, this new modality has the potential to become the imaging reference standard in pediatric oncology in the future. This review article summarizes the central aspects of pediatric oncological PET-MRI based on existing literature. Typical pediatric oncological PET-MRI cases are also presented.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI for Lung Cancer Staging.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-07-01

    Tumor, lymph node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer is typically performed with the TNM staging system, as recommended by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Radiologic examinations for TNM staging of lung cancer patients include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), and FDG-PET combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) and are used for pretherapeutic assessments. Recent technical advances in MR systems, application of fast and parallel imaging and/or introduction of new MR techniques, and utilization of contrast media have markedly improved the diagnostic utility of MRI in this setting. In addition, FDG-PET can be combined or fused with MRI (PET/MRI) for clinical practice. This review article will focus on these recent advances in MRI as well as on PET/MRI for lung cancer staging, in addition to a discussion of their potential and limitations for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, FDG-PET, and PET/CT.

  14. Retrospective data-driven respiratory gating for PET using TOF information.

    PubMed

    Mengdie Wang; Ning Guo; Hui Zhang; Elfhakri, Georges; Guangshu Hu; Quanzheng Li

    2015-08-01

    Traditional data-driven respiratory gating method is capable of detecting breathing cycles directly from positron emission tomography (PET) data, but usually fails at low SNR, particularly at low dose PET/CT study. Time-of-flight (TOF) PET has the potential to improve the SNR. In order for TOF information to reduce the statistical noise and boost the performance of respiratory gating, we present a robust data-driven respiratory gating method using TOF information, which retrospectively derived the respiratory signal from the acquired TOF-PET data. The PET data was acquired in list mode format and analyzed in sinogram space. The method was demonstrated with patient datasets acquired on a TOF PET/CT system. Data-driven gating methods by center of mass (COM) and principle component analysis (PCA) algorithm were successfully performed on nonTOF PET and TOF PET dataset. To assess the accuracy of the data-driven respiratory signal, a hardware-based signal was acquired for comparison. The study showed that retrospectively respiratory gating using TOF sinograms has improved the SNR, and outperforms the non-TOF gating under both COM and PCA algorithms. PMID:26737299

  15. Ebselen Is a Potential Anti-Osteoporosis Agent by Suppressing Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation In vitro and Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Bone Destruction In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Min; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Oh, Jaemin; Lee, Myeung Su

    2016-01-01

    Ebselen is a non-toxic seleno-organic drug with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that is currently being examined in clinical trials to prevent and treat various diseases, including atherosclerosis, stroke, and cancer. However, no reports are available for verifying the pharmacological effects of ebselen on major metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we observed that ebselen suppressed the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture by regulating the ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin secreted by osteoblasts. In addition, ebselen treatment in the early stage of osteoclast differentiation inhibited RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis by decreasing the phosphorylation of IκB, PI3K, and Akt in early signaling pathways and by subsequently inducing c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1. Further, ebselen induced apoptosis of osteoclasts in the late stage of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, ebselen treatment suppressed filamentous actin ring formation and bone resorption activity of mature osteoclasts. Reflecting these in vitro effects, administration of ebselen recovered bone loss and its µ-CT parameters in lipopolysaccharide-mediated mouse model. Histological analysis confirmed that ebselen prevented trabecular bone matrix degradation and osteoclast formation in the bone tissues. Finally, it was proved that the anti-osteoclastogenic action of ebselen is achieved through targeting N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. These results indicate that ebselen is a potentially safe drug for treating metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27019631

  16. Preparation of α1- and α2-isomers of mono-Ru-substituted Dawson-type phosphotungstates with an aqua ligand and comparison of their redox potentials, catalytic activities, and thermal stabilities with Keggin-type derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nishiki, Kensuke; Umehara, Naoya; Kadota, Yusuke; López, Xavier; Poblet, Josep M; Mezui, Charyle Ayingone; Teillout, Anne-Lucie; Mbomekalle, Israël M; de Oliveira, Pedro; Miyamoto, Mayumi; Sano, Tsuneji; Sadakane, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Both the α1- and the α2-isomers of mono-ruthenium (Ru)-substituted Dawson-type phosphotungstates with terminal aqua ligands, [α1-P2W17O61Ru(III)(H2O)](7-) (α1-RuH2O) and [α2-P2W17O61Ru(III)(H2O)](7-) (α2-RuH2O), were prepared in pure form by cleavage of the Ru-S bond of the corresponding DMSO derivatives, [α1-P2W17O61Ru(DMSO)](8-) (α1-RuDMSO) and [α2-P2W17O61Ru(DMSO)](8-) (α2-RuDMSO), respectively. Redox studies indicated that α1-RuH2O and α2-RuH2O show proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), and the Ru(III)(H2O) species was reversibly reduced to Ru(II)(H2O) species and oxidized to Ru(IV)([double bond, length as m-dash]O) species and further to Ru(V)([double bond, length as m-dash]O) species in aqueous solution depending on the pH. Their redox potentials and thermal stabilities were compared with those of the corresponding α-Keggin-type derivatives ([α-XW11O39Ru(H2O)](n-); X = Si(4+) (n = 5), Ge(4+) (n = 5), or P(5+) (n = 4)). The basic electronic and redox features of Ru(L)-substituted Keggin- and Dawson-type heteropolytungstates (with L = H2O or O(2-)) were analyzed by means of density functional calculations. Similar to the corresponding α-Keggin-type derivatives, both α1-RuH2O and α2-RuH2O show catalytic activity for water oxidation. PMID:26672976

  17. A novel thermally stable hydroperoxo-copper(II) complex in a Cu(N2O2) chromophore of a potential N4O2 donor Schiff base ligand: synthesis, structure and catalytic studies.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Surajit; Dutta, Arpan; Debnath, Mainak; Dolai, Malay; Das, Kalyan K; Ali, Mahammad

    2013-09-28

    The generation and study of metal-hydroperoxo/metal-peroxo (LCu(II)-OOH or LCu(II)-OO˙) complexes is a fascinating area of research of many chemical and biochemical researchers, because of their involvement as active intermediates in many biological and industrial catalytic oxidation processes. For this purpose we have designed a bulky hexa-coordinating ligand with potential N4O2 donor atoms which could provide an opportunity to synthesize a mononuclear Cu(II) complex with an aim to utilize it in the catalytic oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons by an environmentally benign oxidant, H2O2. The Cu(II) complex (1) was structurally characterized and found to have square-planar geometry with the two pyrazolyl groups remaining in dangling mode. A novel mononuclear complex [Et3NH][LCu(II)-OOH] (2) was found to form in the reaction between 1 and H2O2 in the presence of Et3N. The presence of this dangling groups favours the stability of hydroperoxo species, [LCu-OOH](-) (2) through H-bonding with the coordinated phenoxo oxygen atom, which was confirmed by ESI-MS(+) and MS(-) (m/z) mass analysis and DFT calculations. This complex was found to be thermally stable at room temperature [k(d) = (5.67 ± 0.03) × 10(-5) s(-1) at 25 °C] and may be due to the formation of O-O-H···O(phenoxo) H-bonding as delineated by the DFT calculations. Complex 1 was found to be an efficient catalyst for the oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons to the corresponding aldehyde and alcohol in 2:1 mole ratio with TON ~300. PMID:23884097

  18. Clinical applications of PET/MRI: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nensa, Felix; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Heusch, Philipp; Wetter, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Fully integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners have been available for a few years. Since then, the number of scanner installations and published studies have been growing. While feasibility of integrated PET/MRI has been demonstrated for many clinical and preclinical imaging applications, now those applications where PET/MRI provides a clear benefit in comparison to the established reference standards need to be identified. The current data show that those particular applications demanding multiparametric imaging capabilities, high soft tissue contrast and/or lower radiation dose seem to benefit from this novel hybrid modality. Promising results have been obtained in whole-body cancer staging in non-small cell lung cancer and multiparametric tumor imaging. Furthermore, integrated PET/MRI appears to have added value in oncologic applications requiring high soft tissue contrast such as assessment of liver metastases of neuroendocrine tumors or prostate cancer imaging. Potential benefit of integrated PET/MRI has also been demonstrated for cardiac (i.e., myocardial viability, cardiac sarcoidosis) and brain (i.e., glioma grading, Alzheimer's disease) imaging, where MRI is the predominant modality. The lower radiation dose compared to PET/computed tomography will be particularly valuable in the imaging of young patients with potentially curable diseases.However, further clinical studies and technical innovation on scanner hard- and software are needed. Also, agreements on adequate refunding of PET/MRI examinations need to be reached. Finally, the translation of new PET tracers from preclinical evaluation into clinical applications is expected to foster the entire field of hybrid PET imaging, including PET/MRI. PMID:25010371

  19. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The body's main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication-all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects. PMID:27679534

  20. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The body’s main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication—all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects. PMID:27679534

  1. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Richard, Marie Anne; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Bénard, François; deKemp, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The body’s main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose), proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using the glucose analog 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication—all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects.

  2. Latest achievements in PET techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Belcari, Nicola; Motta, Alfonso; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Sabba, Nicola; Zavattini, Guido

    2003-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has moved from a distinguished research tool in physiology, cardiology and neurology to become a major tool for clinical investigation in oncology, in cardiac applications and in neurological disorders. Much of the PET accomplishments is due to the remarkable improvements in the last 10 years both in hardware and software aspects. Nowadays a similar effort is made by many research groups towards the construction of dedicated PET apparatus in new emerging fields such as molecular medicine, gene therapy, breast cancer imaging and combined modalities. This paper reports on some recent results we have obtained in small animal imaging and positron emission mammography, based on the use of advanced technology in the field of scintillators and photodetectors, such as Position-Sensitive Detectors coupled to crystal matrices, combined use of scintillating fibers and Hybrid-Photo-Diodes readout, and Hamamatsu flat panels. New ideas and future developments are discussed.

  3. Understanding advertising in pet nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R G

    1994-01-01

    Advertising is part of the effort to attract attention of consumers to products, in this case, pet foods. It is generally benign in its effect, but it can be misleading, although rarely deliberately so. It uses a specialized vocabulary, which must be mastered if one is to understand what is intended. For all of the expense and effort, advertising figures directly in relatively few decisions to purchase. Its main intention is to call our attention to a particular pet food and to give that product an image. If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive. On the other hand, if a product performs well, the word-of-mouth will be positive and that mode of advertising is one of the most effective. PMID:8076285

  4. 36 CFR 13.1234 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pets. 13.1234 Section 13.1234 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK... § 13.1234 Pets. Possessing a pet in the BCDA is prohibited....

  5. Pet therapy: dogs de-stress students.

    PubMed

    Young, Judith S

    2012-01-01

    Research supports the efficacy of the human-animal bond and pet therapy in a variety of settings. At nursing students' request at one school, the author began offering pet therapy prior to examinations. Anecdotal evidence of a study with the author's Golden Retriever, Goldilocks, demonstrates that pet therapy can reduce test anxiety and improve nursing student performance. PMID:23082615

  6. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  7. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  8. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  9. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  10. 7 CFR 503.11 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pets. 503.11 Section 503.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.11 Pets. No pets or animals of any kind may be...

  11. A Guide to Managing Your Classroom Pets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caras, Robert

    1980-01-01

    The author suggests eight ideal classroom pets: hamsters; turtles; snakes; spiders; frogs and toads; fish; and birds. For each he gives suggestions on selecting the pet and housing and feeding it in the classroom. Desert terrariums and home pet care training are also discussed. (SJL)

  12. 7 CFR 500.10 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 500.10 Section 500.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ARBORETUM Conduct on U.S. National Arboreturm Property § 500.10 Pets. Pets brought upon...

  13. Saying Goodbye: Pet Loss and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Thelma

    2005-01-01

    Pets can be loyal, loving, and entertaining members of a family. Their deaths are generally experienced as painful losses by the people who love them, even though the grief experience is often culturally disenfranchised. In this manuscript, we discuss the role that pets can play in a person's life; the effects that pet loss can have on the people…

  14. 36 CFR 13.1234 - Pets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pets. 13.1234 Section 13.1234 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK... § 13.1234 Pets. Possessing a pet in the BCDA is prohibited....

  15. Nondestructive Analysis of Apollo Samples by Micro-CT and Micro-XRF Analysis: A PET Style Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    An integral part of any sample return mission is the initial description and classification of returned samples by the preliminary examination team (PET). The goal of a PET is to characterize and classify the returned samples, making this information available to the general research community who can then conduct more in-depth studies on the samples. A PET strives to minimize the impact their work has on the sample suite, which often limits the PET work to largely visual measurements and observations like optical microscopy. More modern techniques can also be utilized by future PET to nondestructively characterize astromaterials in a more rigorous way. Here we present our recent analyses of Apollo samples 14321 and 14305 by micro-CT and micro-XRF (respectively), assess the potential for discovery of "new" Apollo samples for scientific study, and evaluate the usefulness of these techniques in future PET efforts.

  16. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Negami, Tatsuki; Shimizu, Kentaro; Terada, Tohru

    2014-09-30

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations with the MARTINI force field were performed to reproduce the protein-ligand binding processes. We chose two protein-ligand systems, the levansucrase-sugar (glucose or sucrose), and LinB-1,2-dichloroethane systems, as target systems that differ in terms of the size and shape of the ligand-binding pocket and the physicochemical properties of the pocket and the ligand. Spatial distributions of the Coarse-grained (CG) ligand molecules revealed potential ligand-binding sites on the protein surfaces other than the real ligand-binding sites. The ligands bound most strongly to the real ligand-binding sites. The binding and unbinding rate constants obtained from the CGMD simulation of the levansucrase-sucrose system were approximately 10 times greater than the experimental values; this is mainly due to faster diffusion of the CG ligand in the CG water model. We could obtain dissociation constants close to the experimental values for both systems. Analysis of the ligand fluxes demonstrated that the CG ligand molecules entered the ligand-binding pockets through specific pathways. The ligands tended to move through grooves on the protein surface. Thus, the CGMD simulations produced reasonable results for the two different systems overall and are useful for studying the protein-ligand binding processes.

  17. Controlling Gold Nanoclusters by Diphospine Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qianfan; Bonaccorso, Timary A.; Williard, Paul G.; Wang, Lai S.

    2014-01-08

    We report the synthesis and structure determination of a new Au22 nanocluster coordinated by six bidentate diphosphine ligands: 1,8-bis(diphenylphosphino) octane (L8 for short). Single crystal x-ray crystallography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry show that the cluster assembly is neutral and can be formulated as Au22(L8)6. The Au22 core consists of two Au11 units clipped together by four L8 ligands, while the additional two ligands coordinate to each Au11 unit in a bidentate fashion. Eight gold atoms at the interface of the two Au11 units are not coordinated by any ligands. Four short gold-gold distances (2.64?2.65 Å) are observed at the interface of the two Au11 clusters as a result of the clamping force of the four clipping ligands and strong electronic interactions. The eight uncoordinated surface gold atoms in the Au22(L8)6 nanocluster are unprecedented in atom-precise gold nanoparticles and can be considered as potential in-situ active sites for catalysis.

  18. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Campylobacter spp. Prevalence and Concentration in Household Pets and Petting Zoo Animals for Use in Exposure Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Pintar, Katarina D. M.; Christidis, Tanya; Thomas, M. Kate; Anderson, Maureen; Nesbitt, Andrea; Keithlin, Jessica; Marshall, Barbara; Pollari, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Animal contact is a potential transmission route for campylobacteriosis, and both domestic household pet and petting zoo exposures have been identified as potential sources of exposure. Research has typically focussed on the prevalence, concentration, and transmission of zoonoses from farm animals to humans, yet there are gaps in our understanding of these factors among animals in contact with the public who don’t live on or visit farms. This study aims to quantify, through a systematic review and meta-analysis, the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter carriage in household pets and petting zoo animals. Four databases were accessed for the systematic review (PubMed, CAB direct, ProQuest, and Web of Science) for papers published in English from 1992–2012, and studies were included if they examined the animal population of interest, assessed prevalence or concentration with fecal, hair coat, oral, or urine exposure routes (although only articles that examined fecal routes were found), and if the research was based in Canada, USA, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Studies were reviewed for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis by two reviewers, compiled into a database, and relevant studies were used to create a weighted mean prevalence value. There were insufficient data to run a meta-analysis of concentration values, a noted study limitation. The mean prevalence of Campylobacter in petting zoo animals is 6.5% based on 7 studies, and in household pets the mean is 24.7% based on 34 studies. Our estimated concentration values were: 7.65x103cfu/g for petting zoo animals, and 2.9x105cfu/g for household pets. These results indicate that Campylobacter prevalence and concentration are lower in petting zoo animals compared with household pets and that both of these animal sources have a lower prevalence compared with farm animals that do not come into contact with the public. There is a lack of studies on Campylobacter in petting zoos and/or fair animals in

  19. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Campylobacter spp. Prevalence and Concentration in Household Pets and Petting Zoo Animals for Use in Exposure Assessments.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Katarina D M; Christidis, Tanya; Thomas, M Kate; Anderson, Maureen; Nesbitt, Andrea; Keithlin, Jessica; Marshall, Barbara; Pollari, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Animal contact is a potential transmission route for campylobacteriosis, and both domestic household pet and petting zoo exposures have been identified as potential sources of exposure. Research has typically focussed on the prevalence, concentration, and transmission of zoonoses from farm animals to humans, yet there are gaps in our understanding of these factors among animals in contact with the public who don't live on or visit farms. This study aims to quantify, through a systematic review and meta-analysis, the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter carriage in household pets and petting zoo animals. Four databases were accessed for the systematic review (PubMed, CAB direct, ProQuest, and Web of Science) for papers published in English from 1992-2012, and studies were included if they examined the animal population of interest, assessed prevalence or concentration with fecal, hair coat, oral, or urine exposure routes (although only articles that examined fecal routes were found), and if the research was based in Canada, USA, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Studies were reviewed for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis by two reviewers, compiled into a database, and relevant studies were used to create a weighted mean prevalence value. There were insufficient data to run a meta-analysis of concentration values, a noted study limitation. The mean prevalence of Campylobacter in petting zoo animals is 6.5% based on 7 studies, and in household pets the mean is 24.7% based on 34 studies. Our estimated concentration values were: 7.65x103cfu/g for petting zoo animals, and 2.9x105cfu/g for household pets. These results indicate that Campylobacter prevalence and concentration are lower in petting zoo animals compared with household pets and that both of these animal sources have a lower prevalence compared with farm animals that do not come into contact with the public. There is a lack of studies on Campylobacter in petting zoos and/or fair animals in

  20. Impact of MR based attenuation correction on neurological PET studies

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Rubin, Brian B.; McConathy, Jonathan; Laforest, Richard; Qi, Jing; Sharma, Akash; Priatna, Agus; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) scanners have become a reality in recent years with the benefits of reduced radiation exposure, reduction of imaging time, and potential advantages in quantification. Appropriate attenuation correction remains a challenge. Biases in PET activity measurements were demonstrated using the current MR based attenuation correction technique. We aim to investigate the impact of using standard MRAC technique on the clinical and research utility of PET/MR hybrid scanner for amyloid imaging. Methods Florbetapir scans were obtained on 40 participants on a Biograph mMR hybrid scanner with simultaneous MR acquisition. PET images were reconstructed using both MR and CT derived attenuation map. Quantitative analysis was performed for both datasets to assess the impact of MR based attenuation correction to absolute PET activity measurements as well as target to reference ratio (SUVR). Clinical assessment was also performed by a nuclear medicine physician to determine amyloid status based on the criteria in the FDA prescribing information for florbetapir. Results MR based attenuation correction led to underestimation of PET activity for most part of the brain with a small overestimation for deep brain regions. There is also an overestimation of SUVR values with cerebellar reference. SUVR measurements obtained from the two attenuation correction methods were strongly correlated. Clinical assessment of amyloid status resulted in identical classification as positive or negative regardless of the attenuation correction methods. Conclusions MR based attenuation correction cause biases in quantitative measurements. The biases may be accounted for by a linear model, although the spatial variation cannot be easily modelled. The quantitative differences however did not affect clinical assessment as positive or negative. PMID:26823562

  1. Development of PhytoPET: A plant imaging PET system

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H; Lee, S J; McKisson, J; Xi, W; Zorn, C; Howell, C R; Crowell, A S; Cumberbatch, L; Reid, C D; Smith, M F; Stolin, A

    2012-02-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) system to image the biodistribution of positron emitting tracers in live plants is underway. The positron emitting {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer is used in plant biology research investigating carbon sequestration in biomass, optimization of plant productivity and biofuel development. This PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single 5 cm x 5 cm Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. Each H8500 is coupled to a LYSO:Ce scintillator array composed of 48 x 48 elements that are 10 mm thick arranged with a 1.0 mm pitch. An Ethernet based 12-bit flash analog to digital data acquisition system with onboard coincident matrix definition is under development to digitize the signals. The detector modules of the PhytoPET system can be arranged and stacked to accommodate various sized plants and plant structures.

  2. A New Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Imaging Sigma-1 Receptors in Living Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zavaleta, Cristina L.; Nielsen, Carsten H.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Vuppala, Pradeep K.; Chan, Carmel; Avery, Bonnie A.; Fishback, James A.; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Chin, Frederick T.

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) radioligands have the potential to detect and monitor various neurological diseases. Herein we report the synthesis, radiofluorination and evaluation of a new S1R ligand 6-(3-fluoropropyl)-3-(2-(azepan-1-yl)ethyl)benzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-one ([18F]FTC-146, [18F]13). [18F]13 was synthesized by nucleophilic fluorination, affording a product with >99% radiochemical purity (RCP) and specific activity (SA) of 2.6 ± 1.2 Ci/Amol (n = 13) at end of synthesis (EOS). Positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiography studies of [18F]13 in mice showed high uptake of the radioligand in S1R rich regions of the brain. Pre treatment with 1 mg/kg haloperidol (2), non radioactive 13, or BD1047 (18) reduced the binding of [18F]13 in the brain at 60 min by 80%, 82% and 81% respectively, suggesting that [18F]13 accumulation in mouse brain represents specific binding to S1Rs. These results indicate that [18F]13 is a promising candidate radiotracer for further evaluation as a tool for studying S1Rs in living subjects. PMID:22853801

  3. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  4. Patient-adaptive lesion metabolism analysis by dynamic PET images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic PET imaging provides important spatial-temporal information for metabolism analysis of organs and tissues, and generates a great reference for clinical diagnosis and pharmacokinetic analysis. Due to poor statistical properties of the measurement data in low count dynamic PET acquisition and disturbances from surrounding tissues, identifying small lesions inside the human body is still a challenging issue. The uncertainties in estimating the arterial input function will also limit the accuracy and reliability of the metabolism analysis of lesions. Furthermore, the sizes of the patients and the motions during PET acquisition will yield mismatch against general purpose reconstruction system matrix, this will also affect the quantitative accuracy of metabolism analyses of lesions. In this paper, we present a dynamic PET metabolism analysis framework by defining a patient adaptive system matrix to improve the lesion metabolism analysis. Both patient size information and potential small lesions are incorporated by simulations of phantoms of different sizes and individual point source responses. The new framework improves the quantitative accuracy of lesion metabolism analysis, and makes the lesion identification more precisely. The requirement of accurate input functions is also reduced. Experiments are conducted on Monte Carlo simulated data set for quantitative analysis and validation, and on real patient scans for assessment of clinical potential. PMID:23286175

  5. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-21

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John's equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions--the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations are

  6. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D

    2016-01-21

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John's equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions--the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations are

  7. A unified Fourier theory for time-of-flight PET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Metzler, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Fully 3D time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners offer the potential of previously unachievable image quality in clinical PET imaging. TOF measurements add another degree of redundancy for cylindrical PET scanners and make photon-limited TOF-PET imaging more robust than non-TOF PET imaging. The data space for 3D TOF-PET data is five-dimensional with two degrees of redundancy. Previously, consistency equations were used to characterize the redundancy of TOF-PET data. In this paper, we first derive two Fourier consistency equations and Fourier-John equation for 3D TOF PET based on the generalized projection-slice theorem; the three partial differential equations (PDEs) are the dual of the sinogram consistency equations and John’s equation. We then solve the three PDEs using the method of characteristics. The two degrees of entangled redundancy of the TOF-PET data can be explicitly elicited and exploited by the solutions of the PDEs along the characteristic curves, which gives a complete understanding of the rich structure of the 3D x-ray transform with TOF measurement. Fourier rebinning equations and other mapping equations among different types of PET data are special cases of the general solutions. We also obtain new Fourier rebinning and consistency equations (FORCEs) from other special cases of the general solutions, and thus we obtain a complete scheme to convert among different types of PET data: 3D TOF, 3D non-TOF, 2D TOF and 2D non-TOF data. The new FORCEs can be used as new Fourier-based rebinning algorithms for TOF-PET data reduction, inverse rebinnings for designing fast projectors, or consistency conditions for estimating missing data. Further, we give a geometric interpretation of the general solutions—the two families of characteristic curves can be obtained by respectively changing the azimuthal and co-polar angles of the biorthogonal coordinates in Fourier space. We conclude the unified Fourier theory by showing that the Fourier consistency equations

  8. Pets' Impact on Your Patients' Health: Leveraging Benefits and Mitigating Risk.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Kate; Barton, Luisa; Darling, Marcia; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence A; Monavvari, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Over two thirds of Americans live with pets and consider them important members of the family. Pets benefit human health (zooeyia) in 4 ways: as builders of social capital, as agents of harm reduction, as motivators for healthy behavior change, and as potential participants in treatment plans. Conversely, pets can present risks to their owners. They are potential sources of zoonotic disease and injury. Pets can also challenge a family's prioritization of financial and social resources. To activate the benefits of zooeyia and appropriately calibrate and mitigate zoonotic risk, physicians first need to know about the pets in their patients' families. Asking about pets is a simple and feasible approach to assess patients' environmental history and social capital. Asking about pets is a nonthreatening way to build rapport and demonstrates an interest in the whole family, which can improve the physician-patient therapeutic alliance. Physicians can use an interprofessional, collaborative approach with veterinarians to address zoonotic health risks and leverage zooeyia. PMID:26152446

  9. PET-Based Percutaneous Needle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Ghassan

    2016-07-01

    PET can be used to guide percutaneous needle biopsy to the most metabolic lesion, improving diagnostic yield. PET biopsy guidance can be performed using visual or software coregistration, electromagnetic needle tracking, cone-beam computed tomography (CT), and intraprocedural PET/CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsies allow the sampling of lesions that may not be clearly visible on anatomic imaging, or of lesions that are morphologically normal. PET can identify suspicious locations within complex tumors that are most likely to contain important diagnostic and prognostic information. PMID:27321036

  10. The MiniPET: a didactic PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, R.; Silva, J.; Gurriana, L.; Silva, J. M.; Maio, A.; Soares Augusto, J.

    2013-03-01

    The MiniPET project aims to design and build a small PET system. It consists of two 4 × 4 matrices of 16 LYSO scintillator crystals and two PMTs with 16 channels resulting in a low cost system with the essential functionality of a clinical PET instrument. It is designed to illustrate the physics of the PET technique and to provide a didactic platform for the training of students and nuclear imaging professionals as well as for scientific outreach. The PET modules can be configured to test for the coincidence of 511 keV gamma rays. The model has a flexible mechanical setup [1] and can simulate 14 diferent ring geometries, from a configuration with as few as 18 detectors per ring (ring radius phi=51 mm), up to a geometry with 70 detectors per ring (phi=200 mm). A second version of the electronic system [2] allowed measurement and recording of the energy deposited in 4 detector channels by photons from a 137Cs radioactive source and by photons resulting of the annihilation of positrons from a 22Na radioactive source. These energy spectra are used for detector performance studies, as well as angular dependency studies. In this paper, the mechanical setup, the front-end high-speed analog electronics, the digital acquisition and control electronics implemented in a FPGA, as well as the data-transfer interface between the FPGA board and a host PC are described. Recent preliminary results obtained with the 4 active channels in the prototype are also presented.

  11. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  12. Segmentation of brain PET-CT images based on adaptive use of complementary information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-02-01

    Dual modality PET-CT imaging provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scanning session, which can potentially be used to improve image segmentation of PET-CT data. The ability to distinguish structures for segmentation is a function of structure and modality and varies across voxels. Thus optimal contribution of a particular modality to segmentation is spatially variant. Existing segmentation algorithms, however, seldom account for this characteristic of PET-CT data and the results using these algorithms are not optimal. In this study, we propose a relative discrimination index (RDI) to characterize the relative abilities of PET and CT to correctly classify each voxel into the correct structure for segmentation. The definition of RDI is based on the information entropy of the probability distribution of the voxel's class label. If the class label derived from CT data for a particular voxel has more certainty than that derived from PET data, the corresponding RDI will have a higher value. We applied the RDI matrix to balance adaptively the contributions of PET and CT data to segmentation of brain PET-CT images on a voxel-by-voxel basis, with the aim to give the modality with higher discriminatory power a larger weight. The resultant segmentation approach is distinguished from traditional approaches by its innovative and adaptive use of the dual-modality information. We compared our approach to the non-RDI version and two commonly used PET-only based segmentation algorithms for simulation and clinical data. Our results show that the RDI matrix markedly improved PET-CT image segmentation.

  13. Carbodiphosphoranes and Related Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petz, Wolfgang; Frenking, Gernot

    The theoretical and experimental research on carbodiphosphoranes C(PR3)2 and related compounds CL2, both as free molecules and as ligands in transition metal complexes, is reviewed. Carbodiphosphoranes are examples of divalent carbon(0) compounds CL2 which have peculiar donor properties that are due to the fact that the central carbon atom has two lone electron pairs. The bonding situation is best described in terms of L→C←L donor acceptor interactions which distinguishes CL2 compounds (carbones) from divalent carbon(II) compounds (carbenes) through the number of lone electron pairs. The structures and stabilities of transition metal complexes with ligands CL2 can be understood and predictions can be made considering the double donor ability of the carbone compounds.

  14. Strong non-linear effects in the chiroptical properties of the ligand-exchanged Au38 and Au40 clusters.

    PubMed

    Knoppe, Stefan; Dass, Amala; Bürgi, Thomas

    2012-07-21

    Ligand exchange reactions on size-selected Au(38)(2-PET)(24) and Au(40)(2-PET)(24) clusters (2-PET: 2-phenylethylthiol) with mono- and bi-dentate chiral thiols were performed. The reactions were monitored with MALDI mass spectrometry and the arising chiroptical properties were compared to the number of incorporated chiral ligands. Only a small fraction of chiral ligands is needed to induce significant optical activity to the clusters. The use of bidentate 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-dithiol (BINAS) leads to slow exchange, but the optical activity measured is strong. Moreover, a non-linear behaviour between optical activity and the number of chiral ligands is found in the BINAS case for both Au(38) and Au(40), which may indicate different exchange rates of enantiopure BINAS with the enantiomers of inherently chiral (but racemic) clusters. This is ascribed to effects arising from the bidentate nature of BINAS. In contrast, the use of monodentate camphor-10-thiol (CamSH) leads to comparably fast exchange on both clusters. The arising optical activity is weak. This is the first study where chiroptical effects are directly correlated with the composition of the ligand shell. PMID:22653001

  15. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR.

  16. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  17. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  18. Principles of PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Disselhorst, Jonathan A; Bezrukov, Ilja; Kolb, Armin; Parl, Christoph; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-05-12

    Hybrid PET/MR systems have rapidly progressed from the prototype stage to systems that are increasingly being used in the clinics. This review provides an overview of developments in hybrid PET/MR systems and summarizes the current state of the art in PET/MR instrumentation, correction techniques, and data analysis. The strong magnetic field requires considerable changes in the manner by which PET images are acquired and has led, among others, to the development of new PET detectors, such as silicon photomultipliers. During more than a decade of active PET/MR development, several system designs have been described. The technical background of combined PET/MR systems is explained and related challenges are discussed. The necessity for PET attenuation correction required new methods based on MR data. Therefore, an overview of recent developments in this field is provided. Furthermore, MR-based motion correction techniques for PET are discussed, as integrated PET/MR systems provide a platform for measuring motion with high temporal resolution without additional instrumentation. The MR component in PET/MR systems can provide functional information about disease processes or brain function alongside anatomic images. Against this background, we point out new opportunities for data analysis in this new field of multimodal molecular imaging. PMID:24819419

  19. Rescoring ligand docking poses.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shijun; Zhang, Youping; Xiu, Zhilong

    2010-05-01

    The ranking of ligand docking poses according to certain scoring systems to identify the best fit is the most important step in virtual database screening for drug discovery. By focusing on method development strategy, this review provides possibilities for constructing rescoring approaches based on an overview of recent developments in the field. These developments can be classified into three categories. The first category involves a scaling approach that employs a factor to scale the primary scoring function. These scaling factors are defined with respect to the geometrical match between the location of a ligand and the target binding site, or defined according to a molecular weight distribution consistent with the empirical range of molecular weights of drug-like compounds. The second category involves consensus scoring approaches that use multiple scoring functions to rank the ligand poses retained in a docking procedure, based on the preliminary ranking according to a primary scoring function. The final category involves the addition of selected accuracy-oriented energy terms, such as the solvent effect and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics treatments. PMID:20443166

  20. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  1. Diseases Transmitted by Less Common House Pets.

    PubMed

    Chomel, Bruno B

    2015-12-01

    Beside dogs and cats, the most common pets worldwide, an increasing number of pocket pets and exotic pets are making their way to more and more households, especially in North America and Europe. Although many of these animals make appropriate pets, they also can be a source of many zoonotic diseases, especially in young children and immunocompromised individuals. Some of these diseases can be life threatening, such as rabies, rat bite fever, and plague. Some others are quite common, because of the frequency of the pathogens harbored by these species, such as salmonellosis in reptiles and amphibians. Appropriate knowledge of the zoonotic agents carried by these "new" pet species is strongly recommended prior to acquiring pocket or exotic pets. Furthermore, adopting wildlife as pets is strongly discouraged, because it is always a risky action that can lead to major health issues. PMID:27337276

  2. PET: a revolution in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Abass; Lakhani, Paras; Mavi, Ayse; Kung, Justin W; Zhuang, Hongming

    2004-11-01

    FDG-PET has had remarkable influence on the assessment of physiologic and pathologic states. The authors predict that FDG-PET imaging could soon become the most common procedure used by nuclear medicine laboratories and could remain so for an extended period of time. The power of molecular imaging lies in the vast potential for using biochemical and pharmacologic probes to extend applications arising from an understanding of cell biology to a large number of well-characterized pathologic states. Molecular imaging based upon tracer kinetics with positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals could become the main source of information for the management of cancer patients. In that case, nuclear medicine procedures might become the most common imaging studies performed in the practice of medicine. This speculation is not farfetched when one realizes the enormous change that a single biologically important compound, FDG, has brought to the medical arena. The major challenge today is to attract the highly qualified individuals and to secure the resources needed to harness the opportunities in the specialty of molecular imaging. PMID:15488553

  3. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  4. Zoonoses in pet birds: review and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pet birds are a not-so-well known veterinarian’s clientship fraction. Bought individually or in couples, as families often do (which is a lucrative business for pet shops or local breeders) or traded (sometimes illegally) for their very high genetic or exotic value, these birds, commonly canaries, parakeets or parrots, are regularly sold at high prices. These animals, however, are potential carriers and/or transmitters of zoonotic diseases. Some of them could have an important impact on human health, like chlamydophilosis, salmonellosis or even highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1. This review paper, although non exhaustive, aims at enlightening, by the description of several cases of bird-human transmission, the risks encountered by bird owners, including children. Public health consequences will be discussed and emphasis will be made on some vector-borne diseases, known to be emergent or which are underestimated, like those transmitted by the red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. Finally, biosecurity and hygiene, as well as prevention guidelines will be developed and perspectives proposed. PMID:23687940

  5. Schwannoma Showing Avid Uptake on 68Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Izard, Michael A; Emmett, Louise; Hsiao, Edward; Schembri, Geoffrey Paul

    2016-09-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT is a relatively new and highly sensitive imaging modality used in staging metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma who had a PSMA PET/CT scan for staging of his disease. A PSMA-avid right pelvic mass was identified anterior to the sacrum. Surgical removal and histopathological examination of this lesion revealed the diagnosis of schwannoma. It is important to be aware that schwannoma may also show avid uptake on PSMA PET/CT scan and may potentially lead to an incorrect diagnosis of metastatic prostate carcinoma. PMID:27405039

  6. Development of a dipodal Schiff base ligand with N-imine and O-naphtholate donors: A potential chelator towards Cu(II) metal ion established through potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baral, Minati; Gupta, Amit; Kanungo, B. K.

    2015-08-01

    A novel hydroxynaphthaldehyde derived Schiff base ligand N,N'-bis-[2-[(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)methyleneamino]ethyl]propanediamide (DOTA2HNAP) containing nitrogen and oxygen donor atoms has been developed. The lowest energy molecular structure of DOTA2HNAP and its complexes with Cu (II) metal ion were examined by molecular mechanics using MM+ force which later was re-optimized by semi-empirical method. The theoretical IR and UV spectra of the ligand were obtained using semi empirical/ZINDO/PM3 and were compared with the experimental ones. The coordinating ability of DOTA2HNAP with H+ and Cu(II) ions was investigated in 1:99 (DMSO: water) binary solvent mixture at 25±1°C by potentiometric and spectrophotometric method. The electronic spectra of the ligand show three distinct peaks (253nm, 320nm and 360nm) implicating existence of the Schiff base in quinone form that was well supported by theoretical spectral studies. Out of various complex species forming in solution, all the metal ions show higher stability of complexes when in 1:1 metal-ligand stoichiometry, binding through two N-imine and two O-naphtholate groups.

  7. Development of a dipodal Schiff base ligand with N-imine and O-naphtholate donors: A potential chelator towards Cu(II) metal ion established through potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baral, Minati Gupta, Amit; Kanungo, B. K.

    2015-08-28

    A novel hydroxynaphthaldehyde derived Schiff base ligand N,N’-bis-[2-[(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)methyleneamino]ethyl]propanediamide (DOTA2HNAP) containing nitrogen and oxygen donor atoms has been developed. The lowest energy molecular structure of DOTA2HNAP and its complexes with Cu (II) metal ion were examined by molecular mechanics using MM+ force which later was re-optimized by semi-empirical method. The theoretical IR and UV spectra of the ligand were obtained using semi empirical/ZINDO/PM3 and were compared with the experimental ones. The coordinating ability of DOTA2HNAP with H{sup +} and Cu(II) ions was investigated in 1:99 (DMSO: water) binary solvent mixture at 25±1°C by potentiometric and spectrophotometric method. The electronic spectra of the ligand show three distinct peaks (253nm, 320nm and 360nm) implicating existence of the Schiff base in quinone form that was well supported by theoretical spectral studies. Out of various complex species forming in solution, all the metal ions show higher stability of complexes when in 1:1 metal-ligand stoichiometry, binding through two N-imine and two O-naphtholate groups.

  8. A novel polynuclear Cu(I)-sulfur cluster with 1,2-dithiolate-o-carborane ligands as a potential in vitro antitumour agent and its DNA binding properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhong; Jiang, Jin; Lu, Jing; Li, Dacheng; Cheng, Shuang; Dou, Jianmin

    2013-04-14

    A novel polynuclear Cu(I)-sulfur cluster, (C54H62B30Cu6N8S6), bearing 1,2-dithiolate-o-carborane and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands was synthesized. The complex displayed rapid, low micromolar in vitro cytotoxicity against a range of epithelial tumour cells and efficient CT-DNA binding. PMID:23426331

  9. Improved ligand geometries in crystallographic refinement using AFITT in PHENIX.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Moriarty, Nigel W; Kelley, Brian P; Case, David A; York, Darrin M; Adams, Paul D; Warren, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Modern crystal structure refinement programs rely on geometry restraints to overcome the challenge of a low data-to-parameter ratio. While the classical Engh and Huber restraints work well for standard amino-acid residues, the chemical complexity of small-molecule ligands presents a particular challenge. Most current approaches either limit ligand restraints to those that can be readily described in the Crystallographic Information File (CIF) format, thus sacrificing chemical flexibility and energetic accuracy, or they employ protocols that substantially lengthen the refinement time, potentially hindering rapid automated refinement workflows. PHENIX-AFITT refinement uses a full molecular-mechanics force field for user-selected small-molecule ligands during refinement, eliminating the potentially difficult problem of finding or generating high-quality geometry restraints. It is fully integrated with a standard refinement protocol and requires practically no additional steps from the user, making it ideal for high-throughput workflows. PHENIX-AFITT refinements also handle multiple ligands in a single model, alternate conformations and covalently bound ligands. Here, the results of combining AFITT and the PHENIX software suite on a data set of 189 protein-ligand PDB structures are presented. Refinements using PHENIX-AFITT significantly reduce ligand conformational energy and lead to improved geometries without detriment to the fit to the experimental data. For the data presented, PHENIX-AFITT refinements result in more chemically accurate models for small-molecule ligands. PMID:27599738

  10. Improved ligand geometries in crystallographic refinement using AFITT in PHENIX

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Pawel A.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Kelley, Brian P.; Case, David A.; York, Darrin M.; Adams, Paul D.; Warren, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    Modern crystal structure refinement programs rely on geometry restraints to overcome the challenge of a low data-to-parameter ratio. While the classical Engh and Huber restraints work well for standard amino-acid residues, the chemical complexity of small-molecule ligands presents a particular challenge. Most current approaches either limit ligand restraints to those that can be readily described in the Crystallographic Information File (CIF) format, thus sacrificing chemical flexibility and energetic accuracy, or they employ protocols that substantially lengthen the refinement time, potentially hindering rapid automated refinement workflows. PHENIX–AFITT refinement uses a full molecular-mechanics force field for user-selected small-molecule ligands during refinement, eliminating the potentially difficult problem of finding or generating high-quality geometry restraints. It is fully integrated with a standard refinement protocol and requires practically no additional steps from the user, making it ideal for high-throughput workflows. PHENIX–AFITT refinements also handle multiple ligands in a single model, alternate conformations and covalently bound ligands. Here, the results of combining AFITT and the PHENIX software suite on a data set of 189 protein–ligand PDB structures are presented. Refinements using PHENIX–AFITT significantly reduce ligand conformational energy and lead to improved geometries without detriment to the fit to the experimental data. For the data presented, PHENIX–AFITT refinements result in more chemically accurate models for small-molecule ligands. PMID:27599738

  11. 89Zr-DFO-J591 for immunoPET imaging of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Jason P.; Divilov, Vadim; Bander, Neil H.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Larson, Steven M.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium-89 (t1/2 = 3.27 days) is a positron emitting radionuclide which displays excellent potential for use in the design and synthesis of radioimmunoconjugates for immunoPET. In these studies we report the preparation of 89Zr-DFO-J591, a novel 89Zr -labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) construct for targeted immunoPET imaging and quantification of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression in vivo. Methods The in vivo behavior of [89Zr]Zr-chloride, [89Zr]Zr-oxalate and [89Zr]Zr-DFO was investigated by using PET imaging. High level computational studies using density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to investigate the electronic structure of [89Zr]Zr-DFO and probe the nature of the complex in aqueous conditions. J591 was functionalized with the hexadentate, tris-hydroxamate ligand desferrioxamine B (DFO) and radiolabeled with [89Zr]Zr-oxalate at room temperature. ImmunoPET imaging experiments in male, athymic nu/nu mice bearing sub-cutaneous LNCaP (PSMA positive) or PC-3 (PSMA negative) tumors were conducted. The change in 89Zr-DFO-J591 tissue uptake in response to high- and low-specific-activity formulations in the two tumor models was measured by using acute biodistribution studies and immunoPET. Results Basic characterization of three important reagents, [89Zr]Zr-chloride and [89Zr]Zr-oxalate, as well as the complex, [89Zr]Zr-DFO, demonstrated that the nature of the 89Zr species has a dramatic effect on the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics. DFT calculations provide a rationale for the observed high in vivo stability of 89Zr-DFO-labeled mAbs and suggest that in aqueous conditions, [89Zr]Zr-DFO forms a thermodynamically stable, 8-coordinate complex by coordination of two water molecules. 89Zr-DFO-J591 was produced in high radiochemical yield (>77%) with radiochemical purity >99% and a specific-activity of 181.7±1.1 MBq/mg (4.91±0.03 mCi/mg). In vitro assays demonstrated that 89Zr-DFO-J591 had an initial immunoreactive fraction of

  12. Recent developments in time-of-flight PET.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, S; Mikhaylova, E; D'Hoe, E; Mollet, P; Karp, J S

    2016-12-01

    While the first time-of-flight (TOF)-positron emission tomography (PET) systems were already built in the early 1980s, limited clinical studies were acquired on these scanners. PET was still a research tool, and the available TOF-PET systems were experimental. Due to a combination of low stopping power and limited spatial resolution (caused by limited light output of the scintillators), these systems could not compete with bismuth germanate (BGO)-based PET scanners. Developments on TOF system were limited for about a decade but started again around 2000. The combination of fast photomultipliers, scintillators with high density, modern electronics, and faster computing power for image reconstruction have made it possible to introduce this principle in clinical TOF-PET systems. This paper reviews recent developments in system design, image reconstruction, corrections, and the potential in new applications for TOF-PET. After explaining the basic principles of time-of-flight, the difficulties in detector technology and electronics to obtain a good and stable timing resolution are shortly explained. The available clinical systems and prototypes under development are described in detail. The development of this type of PET scanner also requires modified image reconstruction with accurate modeling and correction methods. The additional dimension introduced by the time difference motivates a shift from sinogram- to listmode-based reconstruction. This reconstruction is however rather slow and therefore rebinning techniques specific for TOF data have been proposed. The main motivation for TOF-PET remains the large potential for image quality improvement and more accurate quantification for a given number of counts. The gain is related to the ratio of object size and spatial extent of the TOF kernel and is therefore particularly relevant for heavy patients, where image quality degrades significantly due to increased attenuation (low counts) and high scatter fractions. The

  13. Pet insurance--essential option?

    PubMed

    Stowe, J D

    2000-08-01

    As Hawn (2) says, "insurance is about risk and peace of mind." She reports that the American Humane Society supports pet insurance because companion animals are able to be treated for disease or accidents that are life-threatening where, otherwise, they would have been euthanized. For veterinarians, she suggests that pet insurance allows them to practice veterinary medicine "as if it were free." It is inevitable that pet insurance will grow as a recourse for veterinary fees. This may be a savior to some families whose budget is stretched to the limit at a critical moment in the health care of their cherished pet. We in the veterinary profession have an advantage over other professions. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of insurance, as it applies to human health and dental care. If we work hand-in-hand with our own industries, collectively we may be able to develop a system that wins for everyone, with fees that allow practice to thrive and growth strategies that accommodate new treatment and diagnostic modalities, as well as consistent and exemplary customer service. The path ahead is always fraught with bumps and potholes. We can be a passive passenger and become a victim of the times or an active driver to steer the profession to a clearer route. Pet insurance is but one of the solutions for the profession; the others are a careful assessment of our fees--charging what we are worth, not what we think the client will pay; business management; customer service; leadership of our health care team; lifelong learning; and more efficient delivery systems. Let us stop being a victim, stop shooting ourselves in the professional foot, and seize the day! PMID:10945132

  14. Pet insurance--essential option?

    PubMed Central

    Stowe, J D

    2000-01-01

    As Hawn (2) says, "insurance is about risk and peace of mind." She reports that the American Humane Society supports pet insurance because companion animals are able to be treated for disease or accidents that are life-threatening where, otherwise, they would have been euthanized. For veterinarians, she suggests that pet insurance allows them to practice veterinary medicine "as if it were free." It is inevitable that pet insurance will grow as a recourse for veterinary fees. This may be a savior to some families whose budget is stretched to the limit at a critical moment in the health care of their cherished pet. We in the veterinary profession have an advantage over other professions. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of insurance, as it applies to human health and dental care. If we work hand-in-hand with our own industries, collectively we may be able to develop a system that wins for everyone, with fees that allow practice to thrive and growth strategies that accommodate new treatment and diagnostic modalities, as well as consistent and exemplary customer service. The path ahead is always fraught with bumps and potholes. We can be a passive passenger and become a victim of the times or an active driver to steer the profession to a clearer route. Pet insurance is but one of the solutions for the profession; the others are a careful assessment of our fees--charging what we are worth, not what we think the client will pay; business management; customer service; leadership of our health care team; lifelong learning; and more efficient delivery systems. Let us stop being a victim, stop shooting ourselves in the professional foot, and seize the day! Images p639-a PMID:10945132

  15. A Novel PET Imaging Probe for the Detection and Monitoring of Translocator Protein 18 kDa Expression in Pathological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Mara; Moon, Byung Seok; Park, Hyun Soo; Laquintana, Valentino; Jung, Jae Ho; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Lopedota, Angela; Franco, Massimo; Kim, Sang Eun; Lee, Byung Chul; Denora, Nunzio

    2016-01-01

    A new fluorine-substituted ligand, compound 1 (CB251), with a very high affinity (Ki = 0.27 ± 0.09 nM) and selectivity for the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), is presented as an attractive biomarker for the diagnosis of neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and tumour progression. To test compound 1 as a TSPO PET imaging agent in vivo, 2-(2-(4-(2-[18F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-6,8-dichloroimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl)-N,N-dipropylacetamide ([18F]1; [18F]CB251) was synthesized by nucleophilic aliphatic substitution in a single-step radiolabelling procedure with a 11.1 ± 3.5% (n = 14, decay corrected) radiochemical yield and over 99% radiochemical purity. In animal PET imaging studies, [18F]CB251 provided a clearly visible image of the inflammatory lesion with the binding potential of the specifically bound radioligand relative to the non-displaceable radioligand in tissue (BPND 1.83 ± 0.18), in a neuroinflammation rat model based on the unilateral stereotaxic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), comparable to that of [11C]PBR28 (BPND 1.55 ± 0.41). [18F]CB251 showed moderate tumour uptake (1.96 ± 0.11%ID/g at 1 h post injection) in human glioblastoma U87-MG xenografts. These results suggest that [18F]CB251 is a promising TSPO PET imaging agent for neuroinflammation and TSPO-rich cancers. PMID:26853260

  16. Receptor-binding, biodistribution, and metabolism studies of 64Cu-DOTA-cetuximab, a PET-imaging agent for epidermal growth-factor receptor-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Ping Li, Wen; Meyer, Laura A; Capretto, David A; Sherman, Christopher D; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2008-04-01

    The epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligands have been recognized as critical factors in the pathophysiology of tumorigenesis. Overexpression of the EGFR plays a significant role in the tumor progression of a wide variety of solid human cancers. Therefore, the EGFR represents an attractive target for the design of novel diagnostic and therapeutic agents for cancer. Cetuximab (C225, Erbitux) was the first monoclonal antibody targeted against the ligand-binding site of EGFR approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with EGFR-expressing, metastatic colorectal carcinoma, although clinical trials showed variability in the response to this treatment. The aim of this study involved using cetuximab to design a positron emission tomography (PET) agent to image the overexpression of EGFR in tumors. Cetuximab was conjugated with the chelator, DOTA, for radiolabeling with the positron-emitter, 64Cu (T(1/2) = 12.7 hours). 64Cu-DOTA-cetuximab showed high binding affinity to EGFR-positive A431 cells (K(D) of 0.28 nM). Both biodistribution and microPET imaging studies with 64Cu-DOTA-cetuximab demonstrated greater uptake at 24 hours postinjection in EGFR-positive A431 tumors (18.49% +/- 6.50% injected dose per gram [ID/g]), compared to EGFR-negative MDA-MB-435 tumors (2.60% +/- 0.35% ID/g). A431 tumor uptake at 24 hours was blocked with unlabeled cetuximab (10.69% +/- 2.72% ID/g), suggesting that the tumor uptake was receptor mediated. Metabolism experiments in vivo showed that 64Cu-DOTA-cetuximab was relatively stable in the blood of tumor-bearing mice; however, there was significant metabolism in the liver and tumors. 64Cu-DOTA-cetuximab is a potential agent for imaging EGFR-positive tumors in humans.

  17. Evaluation of a novel PDE10A PET radioligand, [(11) C]T-773, in nonhuman primates: brain and whole body PET and brain autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Takano, Akihiro; Stepanov, Vladimir; Gulyás, Balázs; Nakao, Ryuji; Amini, Nahid; Miura, Shotaro; Kimura, Haruhide; Taniguchi, Takahiko; Halldin, Christer

    2015-07-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is considered to be a key target for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric diseases. The characteristics of [(11) C]T-773, a novel positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand with high binding affinity and selectivity for PDE10A, were evaluated in autoradiography and in nonhuman primate (NHP) PET. Brain PET measurements were performed under baseline conditions and after administration of a selective PDE10A inhibitor, MP-10. Total distribution volume (VT ) and binding potential (BPND ) were calculated using various kinetic models. Whole body PET measurements were performed to calculate the effective dose of [(11) C]T-773. Autoradiography studies in postmortem human and monkey brain sections showed high accumulation of [(11) C]T-773 in the striatum and substantia nigra which was blocked by MP-10. Brain PET showed high accumulation of [(11) C]T-773 in the striatum, and the data could be fitted using a two tissue compartment model. BPND was approximately 1.8 in the putamen when the cerebellum was used as the reference region. Approximately 70% of PDE10A binding was occupied by 1.8 mg/kg of MP-10. Whole body PET showed high accumulation of [(11) C]T-773 in the liver, kidney, heart, and brain in the initial phase. The radioligand was partly excreted via bile and the gastrointestinal tract, and partly excreted through the urinary tract. The calculated effective dose was 0.007 mSv/MBq. In conclusion, [(11) C]T-773 was demonstrated to be a promising PET radioligand for PDE10A with favorable brain kinetics. Dosimetry results support multiple PET measurements per person in human studies. Further research is required with [(11) C]T-773 in order to test the radioligand's potential clinical applications.

  18. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis.

  19. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis. PMID

  20. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Individual Differences in Frequency of Play with Pets among Middle-Aged Men: A Behavioral Genetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kristen C.; Hoffman, Christy L.; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Kremen, William S.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Grant, Michael D.; Lyons, Michael J.; Xian, Hong; Franz, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that pet ownership and human–animal interaction (HAI) have benefits for human physical and psychological well-being. However, there may be pre-existing characteristics related to patterns of pet ownership and interactions with pets that could potentially bias results of research on HAI. The present study uses a behavioral genetic design to estimate the degree to which genetic and environmental factors contribute to individual differences in frequency of play with pets among adult men. Participants were from the ongoing longitudinal Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging (VETSA), a population-based sample of 1,237 monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins aged 51–60 years. Results demonstrate that MZ twins have higher correlations than DZ twins on frequency of pet play, suggesting that genetic factors play a role in individual differences in interactions with pets. Structural equation modeling revealed that, according to the best model, genetic factors accounted for as much as 37% of the variance in pet play, although the majority of variance (63–71%) was due to environmental factors that are unique to each twin. Shared environmental factors, which would include childhood exposure to pets, overall accounted for <10% of the variance in adult frequency of pet play, and were not statistically significant. These results suggest that the effects of childhood exposure to pets on pet ownership and interaction patterns in adulthood may be mediated primarily by genetically-influenced characteristics. PMID:25580056

  1. Robust experiment design for estimating myocardial {beta} adrenergic receptor concentration using PET

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, Cristian; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr.; Ernsberger, Paul; Saidel, Gerald M.

    2007-01-15

    Myocardial {beta} adrenergic receptor ({beta}-AR) concentration can substantially decrease in congestive heart failure and significantly increase in chronic volume overload, such as in severe aortic valve regurgitation. Positron emission tomography (PET) with an appropriate ligand-receptor model can be used for noninvasive estimation of myocardial {beta}-AR concentration in vivo. An optimal design of the experiment protocol, however, is needed for sufficiently precise estimates of {beta}-AR concentration in a heterogeneous population. Standard methods of optimal design do not account for a heterogeneous population with a wide range of {beta}-AR concentrations and other physiological parameters and consequently are inadequate. To address this, we have developed a methodology to design a robust two-injection protocol that provides reliable estimates of myocardial {beta}-AR concentration in normal and pathologic states. A two-injection protocol of the high affinity {beta}-AR antagonist [{sup 18}F]-(S)-fluorocarazolol was designed based on a computer-generated (or synthetic) population incorporating a wide range of {beta}-AR concentrations. Timing and dosage of the ligand injections were optimally designed with minimax criterion to provide the least bad {beta}-AR estimates for the worst case in the synthetic population. This robust experiment design for PET was applied to experiments with pigs before and after {beta}-AR upregulation by chemical sympathectomy. Estimates of {beta}-AR concentration were found by minimizing the difference between the model-predicted and experimental PET data. With this robust protocol, estimates of {beta}-AR concentration showed high precision in both normal and pathologic states. The increase in {beta}-AR concentration after sympathectomy predicted noninvasively with PET is consistent with the increase shown by in vitro assays in pig myocardium. A robust experiment protocol was designed for PET that yields reliable estimates of {beta

  2. FDG-PET evaluation of indeterminate pancreatic masses

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chi-Lai; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Griffeth, L.K.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the-ability of PET with 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) to differentiate benign from malignant pancreatic masses in patients with indeterminate findings on CT. We performed FDG-PET on 12 patients with indeterminate mass lesions and 2 patients with CT findings typical for malignancy. Eight were found to have pancreatic carcinoma and six had benign lesions. The final diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed in all patients but two with a presumed diagnosis of focal pancreatitis based on stable clinical follow-up for at least 12 months. Lesion uptake of FDG was evaluated qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by determination of the standardized uptake value (SUV). With use of a 2.5 cutoff value for SUV, all eight malignant and four of six benign lesions were correctly categorized. Qualitative evaluation gave the same results. The two false-positive lesions had elevated SUV values of 3.4 and 3.8, respectively. Our results indicate that FDG-PET has potential value for assessing patients with CT findings that are indeterminate for pancreatic carcinoma. FDG-PET may obviate invasive diagnostic procedures in many patients with benign disease. 36 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Mixed reality virtual pets to reduce childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Kyle; Ahn, Sun Joo; Moore, James; Brown, Scott; Robertson, Thomas P; Marable, Amanda; Basu, Aryabrata

    2014-04-01

    Novel approaches are needed to reduce the high rates of childhood obesity in the developed world. While multifactorial in cause, a major factor is an increasingly sedentary lifestyle of children. Our research shows that a mixed reality system that is of interest to children can be a powerful motivator of healthy activity. We designed and constructed a mixed reality system that allowed children to exercise, play with, and train a virtual pet using their own physical activity as input. The health, happiness, and intelligence of each virtual pet grew as its associated child owner exercised more, reached goals, and interacted with their pet. We report results of a research study involving 61 children from a local summer camp that shows a large increase in recorded and observed activity, alongside observational evidence that the virtual pet was responsible for that change. These results, and the ease at which the system integrated into the camp environment, demonstrate the practical potential to impact the exercise behaviors of children with mixed reality. PMID:24650979

  4. Mixed reality virtual pets to reduce childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Kyle; Ahn, Sun Joo; Moore, James; Brown, Scott; Robertson, Thomas P; Marable, Amanda; Basu, Aryabrata

    2014-04-01

    Novel approaches are needed to reduce the high rates of childhood obesity in the developed world. While multifactorial in cause, a major factor is an increasingly sedentary lifestyle of children. Our research shows that a mixed reality system that is of interest to children can be a powerful motivator of healthy activity. We designed and constructed a mixed reality system that allowed children to exercise, play with, and train a virtual pet using their own physical activity as input. The health, happiness, and intelligence of each virtual pet grew as its associated child owner exercised more, reached goals, and interacted with their pet. We report results of a research study involving 61 children from a local summer camp that shows a large increase in recorded and observed activity, alongside observational evidence that the virtual pet was responsible for that change. These results, and the ease at which the system integrated into the camp environment, demonstrate the practical potential to impact the exercise behaviors of children with mixed reality.

  5. Caution: Reptile pets shuttle grasshopper allergy and asthma into homes.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Jensen, Sebastian A F; Robibaro, Bruno; Kinaciyan, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The numbers of reptiles in homes has at least doubled in the last decade in Europe and the USA. Reptile purchases are increasingly triggered by the attempt to avoid potentially allergenic fur pets like dogs and cats. Consequently, reptiles are today regarded as surrogate pets initiating a closer relationship with the owner than ever previously observed. Reptile pets are mostly fed with insects, especially grasshoppers and/or locusts, which are sources for aggressive airborne allergens, best known from occupational insect breeder allergies. Exposure in homes thus introduces a new form of domestic allergy to grasshoppers and related insects. Accordingly, an 8-year old boy developed severe bronchial hypersensitivity and asthma within 4 months after purchase of a bearded dragon. The reptile was held in the living room and regularly fed with living grasshoppers. In the absence of a serological allergy diagnosis test, an IgE immunoblot on grasshopper extract and prick-to-prick test confirmed specific sensitization to grasshoppers. After 4 years of allergen avoidance, a single respiratory exposure was sufficient to trigger a severe asthma attack again in the patient. Based on literature review and the clinical example we conclude that reptile keeping is associated with introducing potent insect allergens into home environments. Patient interviews during diagnostic procedure should therefore by default include the question about reptile pets in homes. PMID:26322151

  6. [Interest of FDG-PET for lung cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Mezzani-Saillard, S; Modzelewski, R; Edet-Sanson, A; Dubray, B; Vera, P

    2011-10-01

    The recent advances in medical imaging have profoundly altered the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). A meta-analysis has confirmed the superiority of FDG PET-CT over CT for initial staging. FDG PET-CT improves the reproducibility of target volume delineation, especially close to the mediastinum or in the presence of atelectasia. Although not formally validated by a randomized trial, the reduction of the mediastinal target volume, by restricting the irradiation to FDG-avid nodes, is widely accepted. The optimal method of delineation still remains to be defined. The role of FDG PET-CT in monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy is under investigation, potentially opening the way to adapting the treatment modalities to tumor radiation sensitivity. Other tracers, such as F-miso (hypoxia), are also under clinical investigation. To avoid excessive delays, the integration of PET-CT in routine practice requires quick access to the imaging equipment, technical support (fusion and image processing) and multidisciplinary delineation of target volumes. PMID:21880535

  7. Caution: Reptile pets shuttle grasshopper allergy and asthma into homes.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Jensen, Sebastian A F; Robibaro, Bruno; Kinaciyan, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The numbers of reptiles in homes has at least doubled in the last decade in Europe and the USA. Reptile purchases are increasingly triggered by the attempt to avoid potentially allergenic fur pets like dogs and cats. Consequently, reptiles are today regarded as surrogate pets initiating a closer relationship with the owner than ever previously observed. Reptile pets are mostly fed with insects, especially grasshoppers and/or locusts, which are sources for aggressive airborne allergens, best known from occupational insect breeder allergies. Exposure in homes thus introduces a new form of domestic allergy to grasshoppers and related insects. Accordingly, an 8-year old boy developed severe bronchial hypersensitivity and asthma within 4 months after purchase of a bearded dragon. The reptile was held in the living room and regularly fed with living grasshoppers. In the absence of a serological allergy diagnosis test, an IgE immunoblot on grasshopper extract and prick-to-prick test confirmed specific sensitization to grasshoppers. After 4 years of allergen avoidance, a single respiratory exposure was sufficient to trigger a severe asthma attack again in the patient. Based on literature review and the clinical example we conclude that reptile keeping is associated with introducing potent insect allergens into home environments. Patient interviews during diagnostic procedure should therefore by default include the question about reptile pets in homes.

  8. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders E; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend A; Law, Ian; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2011-01-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is becoming increasingly available as an imaging modality in veterinary medicine. The purpose of this study was to report semiquantitative standard uptake values (SUV) of malignant and nonmalignant tissues and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27.0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number of these were also observed in this study.

  9. PET radiopharmaceuticals for probing enzymes in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Jason P; Cumming, Paul; Vasdev, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Biologically important processes in normal brain function and brain disease involve the action of various protein-based receptors, ion channels, transporters and enzymes. The ability to interrogate the location, abundance and activity of these entities in vivo using non-invasive molecular imaging can provide unprecedented information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of brain function. Indeed, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is transforming our understanding of the central nervous system and brain disease. Great emphasis has historically been placed on developing radioligands for the non-invasive detection of neuroreceptors. In contrast, relatively few enzymes have been amenable to examination by PET imaging procedures based upon trapping or accumulation of enzymatic products, because only a subset of enzymes have sufficient catalytic rate to produce measureable accumulation within the practical time-limit of PET recordings. However, high affinity inhibitors are now serving as tracers for enzymes, particularly for measuring the abundance of enzymes mediating intracellular signal transduction in the brain, which offer a rich diversity of potential targets for drug discovery. The purpose of this review is to summarize well-known radiotracers for brain enzymes, and draw attention to recent developments in PET radiotracers for imaging signal transduction pathways in the brain. The review is organized by target class and focuses on structural chemistry of the best-established radiotracers identified in each class. PMID:23638333

  10. Detection and Identification of Ligands for Mammalian RPTP Extracellular Domains.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Andrew William

    2016-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) form a group of over 20 enzymes in vertebrates, each with unique ectodomains subject to potential extracellular interactions with ligands. It has recently become clear that a remarkably diverse range of ligands exist, including homophilic binders, adhesion molecules, neurotrophin receptors, and proteoglycans. Individual RPTPs can bind several ligands, and vice versa, suggesting that complex cell signaling networks exist. The identification of RPTP ligands and where they are located in tissues remains a challenge for a large number of these enzymes. Here we describe some powerful methods that have proved successful for several research groups, leading to our improved understanding of RPTP-ligand interactions and functional regulation. PMID:27514811

  11. Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hurst, R E

    2000-12-01

    Bexarotene (LGD-1069), from Ligand, was the first retinoid X receptor (RXR)-selective, antitumor retinoid to enter clinical trials. The company launched the drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), as Targretin capsules, in the US in January 2000 [359023]. The company filed an NDA for Targretin capsules in June 1999, and for topical gel in December 1999 [329011], [349982] specifically for once-daily oral administration for the treatment of patients with early-stage CTCL who have not tolerated other therapies, patients with refractory or persistent early stage CTCL and patients with refractory advanced stage CTCL. The FDA approved Targretin capsules at the end of December 1999 for once-daily oral treatment of all stages of CTCL in patients refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy, at an initial dose of 300 mg/m2/day. After an NDA was submitted in December 1999 for Targretin gel, the drug received Priority Review status for use as a treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with stage IA, IB or IIA CTCL [354836]. The FDA issued an approvable letter in June 2000, and granted marketing clearance for CTCL in the same month [370687], [372768], [372769], [373279]. Ligand had received Orphan Drug designation for this indication [329011]. At the request of the FDA, Ligand agreed to carry out certain post-approval phase IV and pharmacokinetic studies [351604]. The company filed an MAA with the EMEA for Targretin Capsules to treat lymphoma in November 1999 [348944]. The NDA for Targretin gel is based on a multicenter phase III trial that was conducted in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia involving 50 patients and a multicenter phase I/II clinical program involving 67 patients. Targretin gel was evaluated for the treatment of patients with early stage CTCL (IA-IIA) who were refractory to, intolerant to, or reached a response plateau for at least 6 months on at least two prior therapies. Efficacy results exceeded the protocol-defined response

  12. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using (11)C-ITMM.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wagatsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2016-03-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4-(11)C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ((11)C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  13. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in scanned ion beam therapy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Stützer, Kristin; Bert, Christoph; Parodi, Katia

    2015-08-01

    At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, patient irradiation with scanned proton and carbon ion beams is verified by offline positron emission tomography (PET) imaging: the {β+} -activity measured within the patient is compared to a prediction calculated on the basis of the treatment planning data in order to identify potential delivery errors. Currently, this monitoring technique is limited to the treatment of static target structures. However, intra-fractional organ motion imposes considerable additional challenges to scanned ion beam radiotherapy. In this work, the feasibility and potential of time-resolved (4D) offline PET-based treatment verification with a commercial full-ring PET/CT (x-ray computed tomography) device are investigated for the first time, based on an experimental campaign with moving phantoms. Motion was monitored during the gated beam delivery as well as the subsequent PET acquisition and was taken into account in the corresponding 4D Monte-Carlo simulations and data evaluation. Under the given experimental conditions, millimeter agreement between the prediction and measurement was found. Dosimetric consequences due to the phantom motion could be reliably identified. The agreement between PET measurement and prediction in the presence of motion was found to be similar as in static reference measurements, thus demonstrating the potential of 4D PET-based treatment verification for future clinical applications.

  14. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in scanned ion beam therapy: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Stützer, Kristin; Bert, Christoph; Parodi, Katia

    2015-08-21

    At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, patient irradiation with scanned proton and carbon ion beams is verified by offline positron emission tomography (PET) imaging: the β+-activity measured within the patient is compared to a prediction calculated on the basis of the treatment planning data in order to identify potential delivery errors. Currently, this monitoring technique is limited to the treatment of static target structures. However, intra-fractional organ motion imposes considerable additional challenges to scanned ion beam radiotherapy. In this work, the feasibility and potential of time-resolved (4D) offline PET-based treatment verification with a commercial full-ring PET/CT (x-ray computed tomography) device are investigated for the first time, based on an experimental campaign with moving phantoms. Motion was monitored during the gated beam delivery as well as the subsequent PET acquisition and was taken into account in the corresponding 4D Monte-Carlo simulations and data evaluation. Under the given experimental conditions, millimeter agreement between the prediction and measurement was found. Dosimetric consequences due to the phantom motion could be reliably identified. The agreement between PET measurement and prediction in the presence of motion was found to be similar as in static reference measurements, thus demonstrating the potential of 4D PET-based treatment verification for future clinical applications. PMID:26237315

  15. Fluorescent ligands to investigate GPCR binding properties and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Martin; Faklaris, Orestis; Falco, Amadine; Trinquet, Eric; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Mouillac, Bernard; Durroux, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescent ligands for GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) have been synthesized for a long time but their use was usually restricted to receptor localization in the cell by fluorescent imaging microscopy. During the last two decades, the emergence of new fluorescence-based strategies and the concomitant development of fluorescent measurement apparatus have dramatically widened the use of fluorescent ligands. Among the various strategies, TR (time-resolved)-FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) approaches exhibit an interesting potential to study GPCR interactions with various partners. We have derived various sets of ligands that target different GPCRs with fluorophores, which are compatible with TR-FRET strategies. Fluorescent ligands labelled either with a fluorescent donor (such as europium or terbium cryptate) or with a fluorescent acceptor (such as fluorescein, dy647 or Alexa Fluor® 647), for example, kept high affinities for their cognate receptors. These ligands turn out to be interesting tools to develop FRET-based binding assays. We also used these fluorescent ligands to analyse GPCR oligomerization by measuring FRET between ligands bound to receptor dimers. In contrast with FRET strategies, on the basis of receptor labelling, the ligand-based approach we developed is fully compatible with the study of wild-type receptors and therefore with receptors expressed in native tissues. Therefore, by using fluorescent analogues of oxytocin, we demonstrated the existence of oxytocin receptor dimers in the mammary gland of lactating rats.

  16. Resolution modeling in PET imaging: Theory, practice, benefits, and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Rahmim, Arman; Qi, Jinyi; Sossi, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review the field of resolution modeling in positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction, also referred to as point-spread-function modeling. The review includes theoretical analysis of the resolution modeling framework as well as an overview of various approaches in the literature. It also discusses potential advantages gained via this approach, as discussed with reference to various metrics and tasks, including lesion detection observer studies. Furthermore, attention is paid to issues arising from this approach including the pervasive problem of edge artifacts, as well as explanation and potential remedies for this phenomenon. Furthermore, the authors emphasize limitations encountered in the context of quantitative PET imaging, wherein increased intervoxel correlations due to resolution modeling can lead to significant loss of precision (reproducibility) for small regions of interest, which can be a considerable pitfall depending on the task of interest. PMID:23718620

  17. Diffusion-weighted and PET/MR Imaging after Radiation Therapy for Malignant Head and Neck Tumors.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Rager, Olivier; Dulguerov, Pavel; Burkhardt, Karim; Ailianou, Angeliki; Becker, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of the irradiated neck constitutes a challenge because of radiation therapy-induced tissue alterations, the variable appearances of recurrent tumors, and functional and metabolic phenomena that mimic disease. Therefore, morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT), and software fusion of PET and MR imaging data sets are increasingly used to facilitate diagnosis in clinical practice. Because MR imaging and PET often yield complementary information, PET/MR imaging holds promise to facilitate differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation therapy-induced changes and complications. This review focuses on clinical applications of DW and PET/MR imaging in the irradiated neck and discusses the added value of multiparametric imaging to solve diagnostic dilemmas. Radiologists should understand key features of radiation therapy-induced tissue alterations and potential complications seen at DW and PET/MR imaging, including edema, fibrosis, scar tissue, soft-tissue necrosis, bone and cartilage necrosis, cranial nerve palsy, and radiation therapy-induced arteriosclerosis, brain necrosis, and thyroid disorders. DW and PET/MR imaging also play a complementary role in detection of residual and recurrent disease. Interpretation pitfalls due to technical, functional, and metabolic phenomena should be recognized and avoided. Familiarity with DW and PET/MR imaging features of expected findings, potential complications, and treatment failure after radiation therapy increases diagnostic confidence when interpreting images of the irradiated neck. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26252192

  18. Diffusion-weighted and PET/MR Imaging after Radiation Therapy for Malignant Head and Neck Tumors.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Rager, Olivier; Dulguerov, Pavel; Burkhardt, Karim; Ailianou, Angeliki; Becker, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of the irradiated neck constitutes a challenge because of radiation therapy-induced tissue alterations, the variable appearances of recurrent tumors, and functional and metabolic phenomena that mimic disease. Therefore, morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT), and software fusion of PET and MR imaging data sets are increasingly used to facilitate diagnosis in clinical practice. Because MR imaging and PET often yield complementary information, PET/MR imaging holds promise to facilitate differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation therapy-induced changes and complications. This review focuses on clinical applications of DW and PET/MR imaging in the irradiated neck and discusses the added value of multiparametric imaging to solve diagnostic dilemmas. Radiologists should understand key features of radiation therapy-induced tissue alterations and potential complications seen at DW and PET/MR imaging, including edema, fibrosis, scar tissue, soft-tissue necrosis, bone and cartilage necrosis, cranial nerve palsy, and radiation therapy-induced arteriosclerosis, brain necrosis, and thyroid disorders. DW and PET/MR imaging also play a complementary role in detection of residual and recurrent disease. Interpretation pitfalls due to technical, functional, and metabolic phenomena should be recognized and avoided. Familiarity with DW and PET/MR imaging features of expected findings, potential complications, and treatment failure after radiation therapy increases diagnostic confidence when interpreting images of the irradiated neck. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  19. Survey of zoonotic dermatoses in client-owned exotic pet mammals in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    d'Ovidio, D; Santoro, D

    2015-03-01

    Several 'exotic' mammalian species (e.g. rabbits, rodents, ferrets and hedgehogs) live in close proximity to humans as companion pets. Skin diseases (SD) are frequent causes of morbidity in exotic pet mammals, and most of those SDs have a zoonotic potential. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequencies and types of zoonotic dermatosis (ZD) in client-owned, exotic pet mammals in Southern Italy. Six-hundred and fifty-five medical records of exotic pet mammals examined between 2011 and 2012, across twenty private practice veterinary clinics around the Naples area (Italy), were retrospectively evaluated and screened for animals diagnosed with SDs (rabbits n = 455, guinea pigs n = 93, ferrets n = 64, hedgehogs n = 19, chinchillas n = 13 and rats n = 11). The records of animals diagnosed with SD, whose causative agents had a zoonotic potential, were selected for analysis. The Mann-Whitney independent test was used for statistical analysis. A P value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Eighty-two records (12.5%) of animals with ZD were identified. Of those, 56.1% (46/82) were affected by fungal infections and 42.7% (35/82) by parasitic infections. No zoonotic bacterial or viral infections were diagnosed. Dermatophytosis was significantly diagnosed more frequently in younger animals. The results of this survey indicate that exotic pet mammals may serve as active carriers for many highly contagious pathogens with zoonotic potential. Awareness and vigilance by the veterinary practitioner is crucial in the prevention of occurrences of ZDs. Children frequently come in close contact with exotic pets. To prevent the unplanned transmission of pathogen from pet to human, an active routine screening examination and preventative treatments are strongly recommended for every newly purchased pet mammal.

  20. Influence of the normalization template on the outcome of statistical parametric mapping of PET scans.

    PubMed

    Gispert, J D; Pascau, J; Reig, S; Martínez-Lázaro, R; Molina, V; García-Barreno, P; Desco, M

    2003-07-01

    Spatial normalization is an essential preprocessing step in statistical parametric mapping (SPM)-based analysis of PET scans. The standard template provided with the SPM99 software package was originally constructed using (15)O-H(2)O PET scans and is commonly applied regardless of the tracer actually used in the scans being analyzed. This work studies the effect of using three different normalization templates in the outcome of the statistical analysis of PET scans: (1) the standard SPM99 PET template; (2) an (18)F-FDG PET template, constructed by averaging PET scans previously normalized to the standard template; and (3) an MRI-aided (18)F-FDG PET template, constructed by averaging PET scans normalized according to the deformation parameters obtained from MRI scans. A strictly anatomical MRI normalization of each PET was used as a reference, under the rationale that a normalization based only upon MRI should provide higher spatial accuracy. The potential bias involv