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Sample records for potential therapy agent

  1. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Extract as a Potential Complementary Agent in Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Vallinas, Margarita; Reglero, Guillermo; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains an important cause of mortality nowadays and, therefore, new therapeutic approaches are still needed. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been reported to possess antitumor activities both in vitro and in animal studies. Some of these activities were attributed to its major components, such as carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Initially, the antitumor effects of rosemary were attributed to its antioxidant activity. However, in recent years, a lack of correlation between antioxidant and antitumor effects exerted by rosemary was reported, and different molecular mechanisms were related to its tumor inhibitory properties. Moreover, supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Food and Safety Authority, specific compositions of rosemary extract were demonstrated to be safe for human health and used as antioxidant additive in foods, suggesting the potential easy application of this agent as a complementary approach in cancer therapy. In this review, we aim to summarize the reported anticancer effects of rosemary, the demonstrated molecular mechanisms related to these effects and the interactions between rosemary and currently used anticancer agents. The possibility of using rosemary extract as a complementary agent in cancer therapy in comparison with its isolated components is discussed.

  2. Chemical warfare agent and biological toxin-induced pulmonary toxicity: could stem cells provide potential therapies?

    PubMed

    Angelini, Daniel J; Dorsey, Russell M; Willis, Kristen L; Hong, Charles; Moyer, Robert A; Oyler, Jonathan; Jensen, Neil S; Salem, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWAs) as well as biological toxins present a significant inhalation injury risk to both deployed warfighters and civilian targets of terrorist attacks. Inhalation of many CWAs and biological toxins can induce severe pulmonary toxicity leading to the development of acute lung injury (ALI) as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The therapeutic options currently used to treat these conditions are very limited and mortality rates remain high. Recent evidence suggests that human stem cells may provide significant therapeutic options for ALI and ARDS in the near future. The threat posed by CWAs and biological toxins for both civilian populations and military personnel is growing, thus understanding the mechanisms of toxicity and potential therapies is critical. This review will outline the pulmonary toxic effects of some of the most common CWAs and biological toxins as well as the potential role of stem cells in treating these types of toxic lung injuries.

  3. Synthesis of Sugar-Boronic Acid Derivatives: A Class of Potential Agents for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Daniela; Del Grosso, Erika; Fallarini, Silvia; Lombardi, Grazia; Panza, Luigi

    2017-04-07

    To date, sugar analogues that contain boronic acids as substitutes for hydroxyl groups are a class of compounds nearly unknown in the literature. The challenging synthesis of two sugar-boronic acid analogues is described, and data are retrieved on their solution behavior, stability, and toxicity. As these compounds were expected to mimic the behavior of carbohydrates, they were tested in regards to their future development as potential boron neutron capture therapy agents.

  4. Biological activity of N(4)-boronated derivatives of 2'-deoxycytidine, potential agents for boron-neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nizioł, Joanna; Uram, Łukasz; Szuster, Magdalena; Sekuła, Justyna; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary anticancer therapy that requires boron compound for nuclear reaction during which high energy alpha particles and lithium nuclei are formed. Unnatural, boron-containing nucleoside with hydrophobic pinacol moiety was investigated as a potential BNCT boron delivery agent. Biological properties of this compound are presented for the first time and prove that boron nucleoside has low cytotoxicity and that observed apoptotic effects suggest alteration of important functions of cancer cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of DNA from cancer cells proved that boron nucleoside is inserted into nucleic acids as a functional nucleotide derivative. NMR studies present very high degree of similarity of natural dG-dC base pair with dG-boron nucleoside system.

  5. Phthalocyanine derivatives possessing 2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethoxy groups as potential agents for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kucinska, Malgorzata; Skupin-Mrugalska, Paulina; Szczolko, Wojciech; Sobotta, Lukasz; Sciepura, Mateusz; Tykarska, Ewa; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Teubert, Anna; Fedoruk-Wyszomirska, Agnieszka; Wyszko, Eliza; Gdaniec, Maria; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Goslinski, Tomasz; Mielcarek, Jadwiga; Murias, Marek

    2015-03-12

    Three 2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethoxy substituted phthalocyanines were synthesized and characterized. Phthalocyanine derivatives revealed moderate to high quantum yields of singlet oxygen production depending on the solvent applied (e.g., in DMF ranging from 0.25 to 0.53). Their photosensitizing potential for photodynamic therapy was investigated in an in vitro model using cancer cell lines. Biological test results were found particularly encouraging for the zinc(II) phthalocyanine derivative possessing two 2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethoxy substituents in nonperipheral positions. Cells irradiated for 20 min at 2 mW/cm(2) revealed the lowest IC50 value at 0.25 μM for prostate cell line (PC3), whereas 1.47 μM was observed for human malignant melanoma (A375) cells. The cytotoxic activity in nonirradiated cells of novel phthalocyanine was found to be very low. Moreover, the cellular uptake, localization, cell cycle, apoptosis through an ELISA assay, and immunochemistry method were investigated in LNCaP cells. Our results showed that the tested photosensitizer possesses very interesting biological activity, depending on experimental conditions.

  6. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor SAHA as Potential Targeted Therapy Agent for Larynx Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grabarska, Aneta; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J.; Nowosadzka, Ewa; Gumbarewicz, Ewelina; Jeleniewicz, Witold; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Kowalczuk, Krystyna; Kupisz, Krzysztof; Polberg, Krzysztof; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors in the head and neck region. Due to the poor response to chemotherapeutics in patients and low survival rate, successful treatment of larynx cancer still remains a challenge. Therefore, the identification of novel treatment options is needed. We investigated the anticancer effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on two different laryngeal cancer cell lines RK33 and RK45. We also studied the antiproliferative action of SAHA in combination with cisplatin and defined the type of pharmacological interaction between these drugs. Materials and Methods: Viability and proliferation of larynx cancer cell lines were studied by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide method and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation assay, respectively. The type of interaction between SAHA and cisplatin was determined by an isobolographic analysis. Western blotting, flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction method were used to determine acetylation of histone H3, cell cycle progression and genes expression, respectively. Apoptosis was assessed by means of nucleosomes released to cytosol. Results: SAHA alone or in combination with cisplatin inhibited larynx cancer cells proliferation, whereas displayed relatively low toxicity against normal cells - primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts. The mixture of SAHA with cisplatin exerted additive and synergistic interaction in RK33 and RK45 cells, respectively. We showed that SAHA induced hyperacetylation of histone H3 K9, K14 and K23 and triggered apoptosis. SAHA also caused cell cycle arrest by upregulation of CDKN1A and downregulation of CCND1 encoding p21WAF1/CIP1 and cyclin D1 proteins, respectively. Conclusion: Our studies demonstrated that SAHA may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against larynx tumors. PMID:28123594

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor SAHA as Potential Targeted Therapy Agent for Larynx Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Grabarska, Aneta; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Nowosadzka, Ewa; Gumbarewicz, Ewelina; Jeleniewicz, Witold; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Kowalczuk, Krystyna; Kupisz, Krzysztof; Polberg, Krzysztof; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common malignant tumors in the head and neck region. Due to the poor response to chemotherapeutics in patients and low survival rate, successful treatment of larynx cancer still remains a challenge. Therefore, the identification of novel treatment options is needed. We investigated the anticancer effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on two different laryngeal cancer cell lines RK33 and RK45. We also studied the antiproliferative action of SAHA in combination with cisplatin and defined the type of pharmacological interaction between these drugs. Materials and Methods: Viability and proliferation of larynx cancer cell lines were studied by methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide method and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation assay, respectively. The type of interaction between SAHA and cisplatin was determined by an isobolographic analysis. Western blotting, flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction method were used to determine acetylation of histone H3, cell cycle progression and genes expression, respectively. Apoptosis was assessed by means of nucleosomes released to cytosol. Results: SAHA alone or in combination with cisplatin inhibited larynx cancer cells proliferation, whereas displayed relatively low toxicity against normal cells - primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts. The mixture of SAHA with cisplatin exerted additive and synergistic interaction in RK33 and RK45 cells, respectively. We showed that SAHA induced hyperacetylation of histone H3 K9, K14 and K23 and triggered apoptosis. SAHA also caused cell cycle arrest by upregulation of CDKN1A and downregulation of CCND1 encoding p21WAF1/CIP1 and cyclin D1 proteins, respectively. Conclusion: Our studies demonstrated that SAHA may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against larynx tumors.

  8. Superparamagnetic Bifunctional Bisphosphonates Nanoparticles: A Potential MRI Contrast Agent for Osteoporosis Therapy and Diagnostic

    PubMed Central

    Lalatonne, Y.; Monteil, M.; Jouni, H.; Serfaty, J. M.; Sainte-Catherine, O.; Lièvre, N.; Kusmia, S.; Weinmann, P.; Lecouvey, M.; Motte, L.

    2010-01-01

    A bone targeting nanosystem is reported here which combined magnetic contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and a therapeutic agent (bisphosphonates) into one drug delivery system. This new targeting nanoplatform consists of superparamagnetic γFe2O3 nanoparticles conjugated to 1,5-dihydroxy-1,5,5-tris-phosphono-pentyl-phosphonic acid (di-HMBPs) molecules with a bisphosphonate function at the outer of the nanoparticle surface for bone targeting. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated as a specific MRI contrast agent by adsorption study onto hydroxyapatite and MRI measurment. The strong adsorption of the bisphosphonates nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite and their use as MRI T2∗ contrast agent were demonstrated. Cellular tests performed on human osteosarcoma cells (MG63) show that γFe2O3@di-HMBP hybrid nanomaterial has no citoxity effect in cell viability and may act as a diagnostic and therapeutic system. PMID:20981332

  9. Bacteriophage: Time to Re-Evaluate the Potential of Phage Therapy as a Promising Agent to Control Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sabouri Ghannad, Masoud; Mohammadi, Avid

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays the most difficult problem in treatment of bacterial infections is the appearance of resistant bacteria to the antimicrobial agents so that the attention is being drawn to other potential targets. In view of the positive findings of phage therapy, many advantages have been mentioned which utilizes phage therapy over chemotherapy and it seems to be a promising agent to replace the antibiotics. This review focuses on an understanding of phages for the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases as a new alternative treatment of infections caused by multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria. Therefore, utilizing bacteriophage may be accounted as an alternative therapy. It is appropriate time to re-evaluate the potential of phage therapy as an effective bactericidal and a promising agent to control multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:23494063

  10. Non-carrier-added 186, 188Re labeled 17a-ethynylestradiol : a potential breast cancer imaging and therapy agent

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, M. E.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Peterson, E. J.; Ott, K. C.; Arterburn, J. B.

    2001-01-01

    Receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals constitute potential agents for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Breast cancer is the most prevalent form of diagnosed cancer in women in the United States, and it accounts for the second highest number of cases of cancer fatalities (1). In Approximately two-thirds of the breast tumors, estrogen and progesterone steroid hormone receptors can be found. Such tumors can often be treated successfully with anti-estrogen hormone therapy (2). Hence, the ability to determine the estrogen receptor (ER) contend of the breast tumor is essential for making the most appropriate choice of treatment for the patient. Along with this diagnostic aspect, steroid-based radiopharmaceuticals with high specific activity offer an encouraging prospect for therapeutic applications: {sup 186,188}Re labeled steroids binding to receptors expressed by cancer cells appear to be potential agents for the irradiation of small to medium-sized tumors. {sup 186}Re has been regarded as an ideal radionuclide for radiotherapy due to its appropriate half-live of 90 h and {beta}-energy of 1.07 MeV. Moreover, the {gamma}-emission of 137 keV that allows in vivo imaging while in therapy is an additional bonus. {sup 188}Re is obtained from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re radionuclide generator system, representing an advantage for availability at radiopharmacy laboratory by daily elution. In addition, {sup 188}Re emits high energy beta particles with an average energy of 769 keV, and the emission of the 155 keV allows simultaneous imaging for biodistribution evaluation in vivo. In order to avoid competitive saturation of the binding sites of the ligand receptor, Re labeled steroids with high specific activity are required, and the removal of all excess unlabeled ligands is mandatory. {sup 188}Re is eluted from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator produced and provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (3). This paper outlines the solid phase-supported preparation of an n

  11. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  12. Gadolinia nanofibers as a multimodal bioimaging and potential radiation therapy agent

    SciTech Connect

    Grishin, A. M. E-mail: grishin@inmatech.com; Jalalian, A.; Tsindlekht, M. I.

    2015-05-15

    Continuous bead-free C-type cubic gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanofibers 20-30 μm long and 40-100 nm in diameter were sintered by sol-gel calcination assisted electrospinning technique. Dipole-dipole interaction of neighboring Gd{sup 3+} ions in nanofibers with large length-to-diameter aspect ratio results in some kind of superparamagnetic behavior: fibers are magnetized twice stronger than Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. Being compared with commercial Gd-DTPA/Magnevist{sup ®}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} diethyleneglycol-coated (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-DEG) fibers show high 1/T{sub 1} and 1/T{sub 2} proton relaxivities. Intense room temperature photoluminescence, high NMR relaxivity and high neutron scattering cross-section of {sup 157}Gd nucleus promise to integrate Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers for multimodal bioimaging and neutron capture therapy.

  13. Design of multivalent galactosyl carborane as a targeting specific agent for potential application to boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chian-Hui; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chou, Fong-In; Liang, Chien-Fu; Lin, En-Wei; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2012-01-14

    A multivalent galactosyl carborane derivative 10 (dendritic glyco-borane, DGB) was synthesized and demonstrated as a potential cell-targeting agent in BNCT with HepG2 cells. DGB 10 improved the delivery of boron to HepG2 cells and neutron irradiation data show DGB 10 with ten-fold improvement at killing the HepG2 cells over BSH.

  14. Chlorophyll-a analogues conjugated with aminobenzyl-DTPA as potential bifunctional agents for magnetic resonance imaging and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Slansky, Adam; Dobhal, Mahabeer P; Goswami, Lalit N; Graham, Andrew; Chen, Yihui; Kanter, Peter; Alberico, Ronald A; Spernyak, Joseph; Morgan, Janet; Mazurchuk, Richard; Oseroff, Allan; Grossman, Zachary; Pandey, Ravindra K

    2005-01-01

    milestone toward improving cancer diagnosis and tumor characterization. More importantly, this paper describes a new family of bifunctional agents that combine two modalities into a single cost-effective "see and treat" approach, namely, a single agent that can be used for contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging followed by targeted photodynamic therapy.

  15. HS-133, a novel fluorescent phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor as a potential imaging and anticancer agent for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Son, Mi Kwon; Yun, Sun-Mi; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Donghee; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    As PI3K/Akt signaling is frequently deregulated in a wide variety of human tumors, PI3K inhibitors are an emerging class of drugs for cancer treatment. The monitoring of the drug behavior and distribution in the biological system can play an important role for targeted therapy and provide information regarding the response or resistance to available therapies. In this study, therefore, we have developed a family of xanthine derivatives, serving as a dual function exhibiting fluorescence, as well as inhibiting PI3K. Among them, HS-133 showed anti-proliferative effects and was monitored for its subcellular localization by a fluorescence microscopy. HS-133 suppressed the PI3K/Akt pathway and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis by HS-133 was confirmed by the increases of the cleaved PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-8. Furthermore, HS-133 decreased the protein expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, as well inhibited the tube formation and migration of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In vivo imaging also showed that tumors were visualized fluorescent with HS-133, and its oral administration significantly inhibited the growth of tumor in SkBr3 mouse xenograft models. Thus, we suggest that HS-133 may be used as a fluorescent anticancer agent against human breast cancer. PMID:25338206

  16. Metal-based phthalocyanines as a potential photosensitizing agent in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of melanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduray, Kaminee; Odhav, B.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging medical treatment that uses photosensitizers (drug) which are activated by laser light for the generation of cytotoxic free radicals and singlet oxygen molecules that cause tumor cell death. In the recent years, there has been a focus on using and improving an industrial colorant termed phthalocyanines as a prospective photosensitizer because of its unique properties. This in vitro study investigated the photodynamic effect of indium (InPcCl) and iron (FePcCl) phthalocyanine chlorides on human skin cancer cells (melanoma). Experimentally, 2 x 104 cells/ml were seeded in 24-well tissue culture plates and allowed to attach overnight, after which cells were treated with different concentrations (2 μg/ml - 100 μg/ml) of InPcCl and FePcCl. After 2 h, cells were irradiated with constant light doses of 2.5 J/cm2, 4.5 J/cm2 and 8.5 J/cm2 delivered from a diode laser. Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24 h before cell viability was measured using the MTT Assay. At 24 h after PDT, irradiation with a light dose of 2.5 J/cm2 for each photosensitizing concentration of InPcCl and FePcCl produced a significant decrease in cell viability, but when the treatment light dose was further increased to 4.5 J/cm2 and 8.5 J/cm2 the cell survival was less than 55% for photosensitizing concentrations of InPcCl and FePcCl from 4 μg/ml to 100 μg/ml. This PDT study concludes that low concentrations on InPcCl and FePcCl activated with low level light doses can be used for the effective in vitro killing of melanoma cancer cells.

  17. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Agents for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rayburn, Elizabeth R.; Ezell, Scharri J.; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is closely linked to cancer, and many anti-cancer agents are also used to treat inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, chronic inflammation increases the risk for various cancers, indicating that eliminating inflammation may represent a valid strategy for cancer prevention and therapy. This article explores the relationship between inflammation and cancer with an emphasis on epidemiological evidence, summarizes the current use of anti-inflammatory agents for cancer prevention and therapy, and describes the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of anti-inflammatory agents. Since monotherapy is generally insufficient for treating cancer, the combined use of anti-inflammatory agents and conventional cancer therapy is also a focal point in discussion. In addition, we also briefly describe future directions that should be explored for anti-cancer anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:20333321

  19. Brucella as a potential agent of bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Gizem D; Doganay, Mehmet

    2013-04-01

    Perception on bioterrorism has changed after the deliberate release of anthrax by the postal system in the United States of America in 2001. Potential bioterrorism agents have been reclassified based on their dissemination, expected rate of mortality, availability, stability, and ability to lead a public panic. Brucella species can be easily cultured from infected animals and human materials. Also, it can be transferred, stored and disseminated easily. An intentional contamination of food with Brucella species could pose a threat with low mortality rate. Brucella spp. is highly infectious through aerosol route, making it an attractive pathogen to be used as a potential agent for biological warfare purposes. Recently, many studies have been concentrated on appropriate sampling of Brucella spp. from environment including finding ways for its early detection and development of new decontamination procedures such as new drugs and vaccines. There are many ongoing vaccine development studies; some of which recently received patents for detection and therapy of Brucella spp. However, there is still no available vaccine for humans. In this paper, recent developments and recent patents on brucellosis are reviewed and discussed.

  20. TRPV1 antagonists as potential antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Correll, Craig C; Jia, Yanlin; Anthes, John C

    2008-01-01

    Cough is an important defensive pulmonary reflex that removes irritants, fluids, or foreign materials from the airways. However, when cough is exceptionally intense or when it is chronic and/or nonproductive it may require pharmacologic suppression. For many patients, antitussive therapies consist of OTC products with inconsequential efficacies. On the other hand, the prescription antitussive market is dominated by older opioid drugs such as codeine. Unfortunately, "codeine-like" drugs suppress cough at equivalent doses that also often produce significant ancillary liabilities such as GI constipation, sedation, and respiratory depression. Thus, the discovery of a novel and effective antitussive drug with an improved side effect profile relative to codeine would fulfill an unmet clinical need in the treatment of cough. Afferent pulmonary nerves are endowed with a multitude of potential receptor targets, including TRPV1, that could act to attenuate cough. The evidence linking TRPV1 to cough is convincing. TRPV1 receptors are found on sensory respiratory nerves that are important in the generation of the cough reflex. Isolated pulmonary vagal afferent nerves are responsive to TRPV1 stimulation. In vivo, TRPV1 agonists such as capsaicin elicit cough when aerosolized and delivered to the lungs. Pertinent to the debate on the potential use of TRPV1 antagonist as antitussive agents are the observations that airway afferent nerves become hypersensitive in diseased and inflamed lungs. For example, the sensitivity of capsaicin-induced cough responses following upper respiratory tract infection and in airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD is increased relative to that of control responses. Indeed, we have demonstrated that TRPV1 antagonism can attenuate antigen-induced cough in the allergic guinea pig. However, it remains to be determined if the emerging pharmacologic profile of TRPV1 antagonists will translate into a novel human antitussive drug. Current

  1. Polypodium leucotomos: a potential new photoprotective agent.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Neal

    2015-04-01

    As the understanding of the immune system pathways, cytokine balances, and cellular interactions continues to expand, so must the potential applications of therapies that can impact the process of diseases instead of just controlling their symptoms. In the case of Polypodium leucotomos extract, which is derived from a tropical fern of the Polypodiaceae family, the future potential of applications in dermatology and beyond will be better understood as its incorporation into daily routines gives rise to the development of new regimens. Clinicians may position this agent as an option for daily maintenance, accept its use in combinations, or use it as a template for further development of oral supplementation that may evolve into a true immunomodulator. The antioxidant activity of P. leucotomos extract is primarily driven by caffeic acid and ferulic acid, resulting in the control of cutaneous responses to ultraviolet-induced erythema, in the interception of inflammatory mechanisms, and the promotion of other cytotoxic responses. Histologically, the impact of P. leucotomos extract induces an effect on the overall reduction of angiogenesis, photocarcinogenesis, and solar elastosis, while on the cellular level there are improvements in cell membrane integrity and elastin expression. Future applications for P. leucotomos extract could include the potential for photoprotective effects, and subsequent research efforts should focus on determining the optimal dosage regimen, duration of action, and utility of combinations with sunscreens, among other outcomes. Recently published data have also demonstrated how the antioxidant effects of oral P. leucotomos extract can delay tumor development in mice models, suggesting there might be a protective role that could be described with further clinical research. In addition, it is important to recognize the distinction between photoprotection and chemoprevention, in that there has yet to be any in vivo or controlled clinical trial

  2. Quorum Quenching Agents: Resources for Antivirulence Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kaihao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens is a concern to human health and highlights the urgent need for the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. Quorum sensing (QS) regulates virulence in many bacterial pathogens, and thus, is a promising target for antivirulence therapy which may inhibit virulence instead of cell growth and division. This means that there is little selective pressure for the evolution of resistance. Many natural quorum quenching (QQ) agents have been identified. Moreover, it has been shown that many microorganisms are capable of producing small molecular QS inhibitors and/or macromolecular QQ enzymes, which could be regarded as a strategy for bacteria to gain benefits in competitive environments. More than 30 species of marine QQ bacteria have been identified thus far, but only a few of them have been intensively studied. Recent studies indicate that an enormous number of QQ microorganisms are undiscovered in the highly diverse marine environments, and these marine microorganism-derived QQ agents may be valuable resources for antivirulence therapy. PMID:24886865

  3. Inelastic processes of electron interactions with halouracils - cancer therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbachiya, Chetan; Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Swadia, Mohit

    2014-10-01

    We report electron impact total inelastic cross sections for important cancer treatment agents, 5-fluorouracil (5FU), 5-chlorouracil (5ClU) and 5-bromouracil (5BrU) from ionization threshold through 5000 eV. We have employed Spherical Complex Optical Potential [1,2] method to compute total inelastic cross sections Qinel and Complex Scattering Potential - ionization contribution (CSP-ic) formalism, to calculate total ionization cross sections Qion. Electron driven ionization cross sections for these important compounds of therapeutic interest are reported for the first time in this work. In absence of any ionization study for these cancer therapy agents, we have compared the data with their parent molecule Uracil. Present cross sections may serve as a reference estimates for experimental work.

  4. Newer agents in antiplatelet therapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jennifer; Holinstat, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy remains the mainstay in preventing aberrant platelet activation in pathophysiological conditions such as myocardial infarction, ischemia, and stroke. Although there has been significant advancement in antiplatelet therapeutic approaches, aspirin still remains the gold standard treatment in the clinical setting. Limitations in safety, efficacy, and tolerability have precluded many of the antiplatelet inhibitors from use in patients. Unforeseen incidences of increased bleeding risk and recurrent arterial thrombosis observed in patients have hampered the development of superior next generation antiplatelet therapies. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles have also limited the effectiveness of a number of antiplatelet inhibitors currently in use due to variability in metabolism, time to onset, and reversibility. A focused effort in the development of newer antiplatelet therapies to address some of these shortcomings has resulted in a significant number of potential antiplatelet drugs which target enzymes (phosphodiesterase, cyclooxygenase), receptors (purinergic, prostaglandins, protease-activated receptors, thromboxane), and glycoproteins (αIIbβ3, GPVI, vWF, GPIb) in the platelet. The validation and search for newer antiplatelet therapeutic approaches proven to be superior to aspirin is still ongoing and should yield a better pharmacodynamic profile with fewer untoward side-effects to what is currently in use today. PMID:22792011

  5. Turning on the Radio: Epigenetic Inhibitors as Potential Radiopriming Agents

    PubMed Central

    Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Kim, Michelle M.; Cabrales, Pedro; Salacz, Michael E.; Carter, Corey A.; Oronsky, Neil; Lybeck, Harry; Lybeck, Michelle; Larson, Christopher; Reid, Tony R.; Oronsky, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    First introduced during the late 1800s, radiation therapy is fundamental to the treatment of cancer. In developed countries, approximately 60% of all patients receive radiation therapy (also known as the sixty percenters), which makes radioresistance in cancer an important and, to date, unsolved, clinical problem. Unfortunately, the therapeutic refractoriness of solid tumors is the rule not the exception, and the ubiquity of resistance also extends to standard chemotherapy, molecularly targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Based on extrapolation from recent clinical inroads with epigenetic agents to prime refractory tumors for maximum sensitivity to concurrent or subsequent therapies, the radioresistant phenotype is potentially reversible, since aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are critical contributors to the evolution of resistant subpopulations of malignant cells. Within the framework of a syllogism, this review explores the emerging link between epigenetics and the development of radioresistance and makes the case that a strategy of pre- or co-treatment with epigenetic agents has the potential to, not only derepress inappropriately silenced genes, but also increase reactive oxygen species production, resulting in the restoration of radiosensitivity. PMID:27384589

  6. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  7. A minireview on the in vitro and in vivo experiments with anti-Escherichia coli O157:H7 phages as potential biocontrol and phage therapy agents.

    PubMed

    Sabouri, Salehe; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Amirpour-Rostami, Sahar; Skurnik, Mikael

    2017-02-21

    Phage therapy is an old method of combating bacterial pathogens that has recently been taken into consideration due to the alarming spread of antibiotic resistance. Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a foodborne pathogen that causes hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). There are several studies on isolation of specific phages against E. coli O157:H7 and more than 60 specific phages have been published so far. Although in vitro experiments have been successful in elimination or reduction of E. coli O157:H7numbers, in vivo experiments have not been as promising. This may be due to escape of bacteria to locations where phages have difficulties to enter or due to the adverse conditions in the gastrointestinal tract that affect phage viability and proliferation. To get around the latter obstacle, an alternative phage delivery method such as polymer microencapsulation should be tried. While the present time results are not very encouraging the work should be continued as more efficient phage treatment regimens might be found in future.

  8. Use of biologic agents in combination with other therapies for the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Cather, Jennifer C; Crowley, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder, which is associated with a significant negative impact on a patient's quality of life. Traditional therapies for psoriasis are often not able to meet desired treatment goals, and high-dose and/or long-term use is associated with toxicities that can result in end-organ damage. An improved understanding of the involvement of cytokines in the etiology of psoriasis has led to the development of biologic agents targeting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukins (ILs)-12/23. While biologic agents have improved treatment outcomes, they are not effective in all individuals with psoriasis. The combination of biologic agents with traditional therapies may provide improved therapeutic options for patients who inadequately respond to a single drug or when efficacy may be increased with supplementation of another treatment. In addition, combination therapy may reduce safety concerns and cumulative toxicity, as lower doses of individual agents may be efficacious when used together. This article reviews the current evidence available on the efficacy and safety of combining biologic agents with systemic therapies (methotrexate, cyclosporine, or retinoids) or with phototherapy, and the combination of biologic agents themselves. Guidance is provided to help physicians identify situations and the characteristics of patients who would benefit from combination therapy with a biologic agent. Finally, the potential clinical impact of biologic therapies in development (e.g., those targeting IL-17A, IL-17RA, or IL-23 alone) is analyzed.

  9. Can nanotechnology potentiate photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Dai, Tianhong; Chung, Hoon; Yaroslavsky, Anastasia; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Chiang, Long Y.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that can kill cancer cells and infectious microorganisms. Due to the tendency of most photosensitizers (PS) to be poorly soluble and to form nonphotoactive aggregates, drug-delivery vehicles have become of high importance. The nanotechnology revolution has provided many examples of nanoscale drug-delivery platforms that have been applied to PDT. These include liposomes, lipoplexes, nanoemulsions, micelles, polymer nanoparticles (degradable and nondegradable), and silica nanoparticles. In some cases (fullerenes and quantum dots), the actual nanoparticle itself is the PS. Targeting ligands such as antibodies and peptides can be used to increase specificity. Gold and silver nanoparticles can provide plasmonic enhancement of PDT. Two-photon excitation or optical upconversion can be used instead of one-photon excitation to increase tissue penetration at longer wavelengths. Finally, after sections on in vivo studies and nanotoxicology, we attempt to answer the title question, “can nano-technology potentiate PDT?” PMID:26361572

  10. Can nanotechnology potentiate photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K; Dai, Tianhong; Chung, Hoon; Yaroslavsky, Anastasia; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Chiang, Long Y; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that can kill cancer cells and infectious microorganisms. Due to the tendency of most photosensitizers (PS) to be poorly soluble and to form nonphotoactive aggregates, drug-delivery vehicles have become of high importance. The nanotechnology revolution has provided many examples of nanoscale drug-delivery platforms that have been applied to PDT. These include liposomes, lipoplexes, nanoemulsions, micelles, polymer nanoparticles (degradable and nondegradable), and silica nanoparticles. In some cases (fullerenes and quantum dots), the actual nanoparticle itself is the PS. Targeting ligands such as antibodies and peptides can be used to increase specificity. Gold and silver nanoparticles can provide plasmonic enhancement of PDT. Two-photon excitation or optical upconversion can be used instead of one-photon excitation to increase tissue penetration at longer wavelengths. Finally, after sections on in vivo studies and nanotoxicology, we attempt to answer the title question, "can nano-technology potentiate PDT?"

  11. Simultaneous two-photon excitation of photodynamic therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, Eric A.; Partridge, W. P., Jr.; Fisher, Walter G.; Dees, Craig; Petersen, Mark G.

    1998-07-01

    The spectroscopic and photochemical properties of several photosensitive compounds are compared using conventional single-photon excitation (SPE) and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). TPE is achieved using a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which allows direct promotion of non-resonant TPE. Excitation spectra and excited state properties of both type I and type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are examined. In general, while SPE and TPE selection rules may be somewhat different, the excited state photochemical properties are equivalent for both modes of excitation. In vitro promotion of a two-photon photodynamic effect is demonstrated using bacterial and human breast cancer models. These results suggest that use of TPE may be beneficial for PDT, since the technique allows replacement of visible or ultraviolet excitation with non- damaging near infrared light. Further, a comparison of possible excitation sources for TPE indicates that the titanium:sapphire laser is exceptionally well suited for non- linear excitation of PDT agents in biological systems due to its extremely short pulse width and high repetition rate; these features combine to effect efficient PDT activation with minimal potential for non-specific biological damage.

  12. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Esquivel, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease is a major leading cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries. Currently, the management of these patients is challenging due to the availability of new drugs with proven efficacy and security compared to traditional oral vitamin K antagonists. These compounds are characterized by a predictable pharmacokinetic profile for which blood monitoring is not routinely needed. Nevertheless, some data have suggested inter-patient variability in the anticoagulant effect of these drugs, raising concerns about their effectiveness and safety. Although mass-spectrometry is the gold standard to determine drug plasma concentrations, this method is not widely available in every-day practice and some coagulation assays are commonly used to determine the anticoagulant effect of these drugs. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the clinical question of how and when to monitor patients with new anticoagulant oral agents. PMID:26713281

  13. Molecular targeting agents in cancer therapy: science and society.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Asim Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The inception of targeted agents has revolutionized the cancer therapy paradigm, both for physicians and patients. A large number of molecular targeted agents for cancer therapy are currently available for clinical use today. Many more are in making, but there are issues that remain to be resolved for the scientific as well as social community before the recommendation of their widespread use in may clinical scenarios can be done, one such issue being cost and cost effectiveness, others being resistance and lack of sustained efficacy. With the current knowledge about available targeted agents, the growing knowledge of intricate molecular pathways and unfolding of wider spectrum of molecular targets that can really matter in the disease control, calls for only the just use of the agents available now, drug companies need to make a serious attempt to reduce the cost of the agents. Research should focus on agents that show sustained responses in preclinical data. More needs to be done in laboratories and by the pharmaceutical industries, before we can truly claim to have entered a new era of targeted therapy in cancer care.

  14. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  15. Combining molecular targeted agents with radiation therapy for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Scaringi, Claudia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Minniti, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The expansion in understanding the molecular biology that characterizes cancer cells has led to the rapid development of new agents to target important molecular pathways associated with aberrant activation or suppression of cellular signal transduction pathways involved in gliomagenesis, including epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and integrins signaling pathways. The use of antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib and erlotinib, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors temsirolimus and everolimus, and integrin inhibitor cilengitide, in combination with radiation therapy, has been supported by encouraging preclinical data, resulting in a rapid translation into clinical trials. Currently, the majority of published clinical studies on the use of these agents in combination with radiation and cytotoxic therapies have shown only modest survival benefits at best. Tumor heterogeneity and genetic instability may, at least in part, explain the poor results observed with a single-target approach. Much remains to be learned regarding the optimal combination of targeted agents with conventional chemoradiation, including the use of multipathways-targeted therapies, the selection of patients who may benefit from combined treatments based on molecular biomarkers, and the verification of effective blockade of signaling pathways. PMID:23966794

  16. Status epilepticus: Using antioxidant agents as alternative therapies.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; González-Trujano, María Eva; Sampieri, Aristides Iii; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Granados-Rojas, Leticia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Coballase-Urrutía, Elvia; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí

    2016-10-01

    The epileptic state, or status epilepticus (SE), is the most serious situation manifested by individuals with epilepsy, and SE events can lead to neuronal damage. An understanding of the molecular, biochemical and physiopathological mechanisms involved in this type of neurological disease will enable the identification of specific central targets, through which novel agents may act and be useful as SE therapies. Currently, studies have focused on the association between oxidative stress and SE, the most severe epileptic condition. A number of these studies have suggested the use of antioxidant compounds as alternative therapies or adjuvant treatments for the epileptic state.

  17. Status epilepticus: Using antioxidant agents as alternative therapies

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; González-Trujano, María Eva; Sampieri, Aristides Iii; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Granados-Rojas, Leticia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Coballase-Urrutía, Elvia; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí

    2016-01-01

    The epileptic state, or status epilepticus (SE), is the most serious situation manifested by individuals with epilepsy, and SE events can lead to neuronal damage. An understanding of the molecular, biochemical and physiopathological mechanisms involved in this type of neurological disease will enable the identification of specific central targets, through which novel agents may act and be useful as SE therapies. Currently, studies have focused on the association between oxidative stress and SE, the most severe epileptic condition. A number of these studies have suggested the use of antioxidant compounds as alternative therapies or adjuvant treatments for the epileptic state. PMID:27698680

  18. Simultaneous two-photon excitation of photodynamic therapy agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G. |; Partridge, W.P.; Dees, H.C.; Petersen, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    The spectroscopic and photochemical properties of several photosensitive compounds are compared using conventional single-photon excitation (SPE) and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). TPE is achieved using a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which allows direct promotion of non-resonant TPE. Excitation spectra and excited state properties of both type 1 and type 2 photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are examined.

  19. Maintenance therapy in NSCLC: why? To whom? Which agent?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance therapy is emerging as a treatment strategy in the management of advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Initial trials addressing the question of duration of combination chemotherapy failed to show any overall survival benefit for the prolonged administration over a fixed number of cycles with an increased risk for cumulative toxicity. Nowadays several agents with different ways of administration and a different pattern of toxicity have been formally investigated in the maintenance setting. Maintenance strategies include continuing with an agent already present in the induction regimen or switching to a different one. Taking into consideration that no comparative trials of maintenance with different chemotherapy drugs or targeted agents have been conducted, the choice and the duration of maintenance agents is largely empirical. Furthermore, it is still unknown and it remains an open question if this approach needs to be proposed to every patient in the case of partial/complete response or stable disease after the induction therapy. Here, we critically review available data on maintenance treatment, discussing the possibility to tailor the right treatment to the right patient, in an attempt to optimize costs and benefits of an ever-growing panel of different treatment options. PMID:21548925

  20. Beta-blocking agents during electroconvulsive therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Boere, E; Birkenhäger, T K; Groenland, T H N; van den Broek, W W

    2014-07-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with at least transient episodes of hypertension and tachycardia. Beta-blocking agents may be indicated to prevent cardiovascular complications and may shorten seizure duration. This review evaluates studies that used beta-blocking agents during ECT to determine which agent has the most favourable outcomes on cardiovascular variables and seizure duration. A Medline database search was made using the combined keywords 'adrenergic beta-antagonists' and 'electroconvulsive therapy'. The search was restricted to double-blind randomized controlled trials and yielded 29 original studies. With the use of esmolol, significant attenuating effects were found on cardiovascular parameters in the first 5 min after stimulation; its shortening effects on seizure duration may be dose-related. With the use of labetalol, findings on cardiovascular effects were inconsistent during the first minutes after stimulation but were significant after 5 min and thereafter; seizure duration was scarcely studied. Landiolol attenuates heart rate but with inconsistent findings regarding arterial pressure (AP); seizure duration was mostly unaffected. Esmolol appears to be effective in reducing the cardiovascular response, although seizure duration may be affected with higher dosages. Landiolol can be considered a suitable alternative, but effects on AP need further investigation. Labetalol has been studied to a lesser extent and may have prolonged cardiovascular effects. The included studies varied in design, methodology, and the amount of exact data provided in the publications. Further study of beta-blocking agents in ECT is clearly necessary.

  1. Potential role of nonstatin cholesterol lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Laura; Segatto, Marco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Pallottini, Valentina

    2011-11-01

    Although statins, 3β-hydroxy-3β-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, have revolutionized the management of cardiovascular diseases by lowering serum low density lipoproteins, many patients suffer from their side effects. Whether the statin side effects are related to their intrinsic toxicity or to the decrease of HMGR main isoprenoid end products, which are essential compounds for cell viability, is still debated. In addition to HMGR, the key and rate limiting step of cholesterol synthesis, many enzymes are involved in this multi-step pathway whose inhibition could be taken into account for a "nonstatin approach" in the management of hypercholesterolemia. In particular, due to their unique position downstream from HMGR, the inhibition of squalene synthase, farnesyl diphosphate farnesyltransferase (FDFT1), squalene epoxidase (SQLE), and oxidosqualene cyclase:lanosterol synthase (OSC) should decrease plasma levels of cholesterol without affecting ubiquinone, dolichol, and isoprenoid metabolism. Thus, although FDFT1, SQLE and OSC are little studied, they should be considered as perspective targets for the development of novel drugs against hypercholesterolemia. Here, structure-function relationships of FDFT1, SQLE, and OSC are reviewed highlighting the advantages that the downstream inhibition of HMGR could provide when compared to the statin-based therapy.

  2. The Clinical Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Combination With Radiation Therapy: A Pharmaceutical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ataman, Ozlem U.; Sambrook, Sally J.; Wilks, Chris; Lloyd, Andrew; Taylor, Amanda E.; Wedge, Stephen R.

    2012-11-15

    Summary: This paper explores historical and current roles of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical trials testing radiation therapy combinations with molecularly targeted agents and attempts to identify potential solutions to expediting further combination studies. An analysis of clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and novel cancer therapies was performed. Ongoing and completed trials were identified by searching the (clinicaltrials.gov) Web site, in the first instance, with published trials of drugs of interest identified through American Society of Clinical Oncology, European CanCer Organisation/European Society for Medical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and PubMed databases and then cross-correlated with (clinicaltrials.gov) protocols. We examined combination trials involving radiation therapy with novel agents and determined their distribution by tumor type, predominant molecular mechanisms examined in combination to date, timing of initiation of trials relative to a novel agent's primary development, and source of sponsorship of such trials. A total of 564 studies of targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy were identified with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Most studies were in phase I/II development, with only 36 trials in phase III. The tumor site most frequently studied was head and neck (26%), followed by non-small cell lung cancer. Pharmaceutical companies were the sponsors of 33% of studies overall and provided support for only 16% of phase III studies. In terms of pharmaceutical sponsorship, Genentech was the most active sponsor of radiation therapy combinations (22%), followed by AstraZeneca (14%). Most radiation therapy combination trials do not appear to be initiated until after drug approval. In phase III studies, the most common (58%) primary endpoint was overall survival. Collectively, this analysis suggests that such

  3. Efficient synthesis of benzamide riboside, a potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Bonnac, Laurent F; Gao, Guang-Yao; Chen, Liqiang; Patterson, Steven E; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2007-01-01

    An efficient five step synthesis of benzamide riboside (BR) amenable for a large scale synthesis has been developed. It allows for extensive pre-clinical studies of BR as a potential anticancer agent.

  4. Rapid Screening of Novel Agents for Combination Therapy in Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Cubitt, Christopher L.; Menth, Jiliana; Martinez, Gary V.; Foroutan, Parastou; Morse, David L.; Bui, Marilyn M.; Letson, G. Douglas; Sullivan, Daniel M.; Reed, Damon R.

    2013-01-01

    For patients with sarcoma, metastatic disease remains very difficult to cure, and outcomes remain less than optimal. Treatment options have not largely changed, although some promising gains have been made with single agents in specific subtypes with the use of targeted agents. Here, we developed a system to investigate synergy of combinations of targeted and cytotoxic agents in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. Agents were investigated alone and in combination with varying dose ratios. Dose-response curves were analyzed for synergy using methods derived from Chou and Talalay (1984). A promising combination, dasatinib and triciribine, was explored in a murine model using the A673 cell line, and tumors were evaluated by MRI and histology for therapy effect. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors were synergistic with etoposide, dasatinib, and Akt inhibitors across cell lines. Sorafenib and topotecan demonstrated a mixed response. Our systematic drug screening method allowed us to screen a large number of combinations of sarcoma agents. This method can be easily modified to accommodate other cell line models, and confirmatory assays, such as animal experiments, can provide excellent preclinical data to inform clinical trials for these rare malignancies. PMID:24282374

  5. Rhizoma Coptidis: A Potential Cardiovascular Protective Agent

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Li; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Saokaew, Surasak; Mehmood Khan, Tahir; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both the developed and developing world. Rhizoma coptidis (RC), known as Huang Lian in China, is the dried rhizome of medicinal plants from the family Ranunculaceae, such as Coptis chinensis Franch, C. deltoidea C.Y. Cheng et Hsiao, and C. teeta Wall which has been used by Chinese medicinal physicians for more than 2000 years. In China, RC is a common component in traditional medicines used to treat CVD associated problems including obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and disorders of lipid metabolism. In recent years, numerous scientific studies have sought to investigate the biological properties of RC to provide scientific evidence for its traditional medical uses. RC has been found to exert significant beneficial effects on major risk factors for CVDs including anti-atherosclerotic effect, lipid-lowering effect, anti-obesity effect and anti-hepatic steatosis effect. It also has myocardioprotective effect as it provides protection from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. These properties have been attributed to the presence of bioactive compounds contained in RC such as berberine, coptisine, palmatine, epiberberine, jatrorrhizine, and magnoflorine; all of which have been demonstrated to have cardioprotective effects on the various parameters contributing to the occurrence of CVD through a variety of pathways. The evidence available in the published literature indicates that RC is a herb with tremendous potential to reduce the risks of CVDs, and this review aims to summarize the cardioprotective properties of RC with reference to the published literature which overall indicates that RC is a herb with remarkable potential to reduce the risks and damage caused by CVDs. PMID:27774066

  6. Honey: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Managing Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic wounds are unlike typical wounds in that they are slower to heal, making treatment with conventional topical medications an uphill process. Among several different alternative therapies, honey is an effective choice because it provides comparatively rapid wound healing. Although honey has been used as an alternative medicine for wound healing since ancient times, the application of honey to diabetic wounds has only recently been revived. Because honey has some unique natural features as a wound healer, it works even more effectively on diabetic wounds than on normal wounds. In addition, honey is known as an “all in one” remedy for diabetic wound healing because it can combat many microorganisms that are involved in the wound process and because it possesses antioxidant activity and controls inflammation. In this review, the potential role of honey's antibacterial activity on diabetic wound-related microorganisms and honey's clinical effectiveness in treating diabetic wounds based on the most recent studies is described. Additionally, ways in which honey can be used as a safer, faster, and effective healing agent for diabetic wounds in comparison with other synthetic medications in terms of microbial resistance and treatment costs are also described to support its traditional claims. PMID:25386217

  7. Unsafe and potentially safe herbal therapies.

    PubMed

    Klepser, T B; Klepser, M E

    1999-01-15

    Unsafe and potentially safe herbal therapies are discussed. The use of herbal therapies is on the rise in the United States, but most pharmacists are not adequately prepared educationally to meet patients' requests for information on herbal products. Pharmacists must also cope with an environment in which there is relatively little regulation of herbal therapies by FDA. Many herbs have been identified as unsafe, including borage, calamus, coltsfoot, comfrey, life root, sassafras, chaparral, germander, licorice, and ma huang. Potentially safe herbs include feverfew, garlic, ginkgo, Asian ginseng, saw palmetto, St. John's wort, and valerian. Clinical trials have been used to evaluate feverfew for migraine prevention and rheumatoid arthritis; garlic for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and infections; ginkgo for circulatory disturbances and dementia; ginseng for fatigue and cancer prevention; and saw palmetto for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Also studied in formal trials have been St. John's wort for depression and valerian for insomnia. The clinical trial results are suggestive of efficacy of some herbal therapies for some conditions. German Commission E, a regulatory body that evaluates the safety and efficacy of herbs on the basis of clinical trials, cases, and other scientific literature, has established indications and dosage recommendations for many herbal therapies. Pharmacists have a responsibility to educate themselves about herbal therapies in order to help patients discern the facts from the fiction, avoid harm, and gain what benefits may be available.

  8. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients on anticoagulant therapy and antiplatelet agents

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Radaelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Periprocedural management of antithrombotics for gastrointestinal endoscopy is a common clinical issue, given the widespread use of these drugs for primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention. For diagnostic procedures, with or without biopsy, no adjustments in antithrombotics are usually needed. For operative procedures, balancing the risk of periprocedural hemorrhage with the continuation of antithrombotics against the chance of recurrent thromboembolic events with their discontinuation may be challenging. Oral anticoagulants need to be temporarily withheld, and consideration must be given to whether a periendoscopic “bridge” therapy, typically a low-molecular-weight heparin, should be used in order to minimize the risk of thromboembolic events. Although some emerging evidence has shown that patients receiving heparin bridging appear to be at increased risk of overall and major bleeding and at similar risk of thromboembolic events compared to controls, bridging therapy is still recommended for patients on vitamin K antagonists who are at high thrombotic risk. Conversely, bridging therapy is usually not needed for patients taking new oral agents, which are characterized by shorter half-lives, and a rapid offset and onset of action. Management of antiplatelet therapy requires special care in patients on secondary prevention, especially those with coronary stents. This review is intended to summarize the recommendations of updated International Guidelines designed to help the decision-making process in such an intricate field. PMID:28042233

  9. Novel 2-Aminobenzamides as Potential Orally Active Antithrombotic Agents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to develop potent antithrombotic agents, a series of novel 2-aminobenzamide derivatives were synthesized and screened for their in vivo antithrombotic activity. Among the 23 compounds tested, compound (8g) showed the most promising antithrombotic activity, which was comparable with clinically used aspirin or warfarin, but at variance with these standard drugs, 8g did not exhibit the increased bleeding time, suggesting its potential as a novel antithrombotic agent. PMID:24900559

  10. Potential Military Chemical/Biological Agents and Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    toxins, bioregulators, or prions. (1) Pathogens. Pathogens are disease-producing microorganisms,6 such as bacteria , rickettsiae , or viruses...disability. Potential biological antipersonnel agents include toxins, bacteria , rickettsiae , viruses, and toxins. (2) Antianimal. Biological...microorganisms such as pathogens (which include disease-causing bacteria , rickettsiae , and viruses) and toxins. NOTES: 1. See Table IV-1 (page IV-2) for the

  11. Monoclonal antibodies: new agents for cancer detection and targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies directed against markers on cancer cells are gaining in importance for the purpose of targeting diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In the past, this approach has had very limited success principally because the classical methods for producing antibodies from blood serum of animals immunized with cancer cells or extracts were unsatisfactory. The situation has changed dramatically since 1975 following the design of procedures for 'immortalizing' antibody-producing cells (lymphocytes) by fusing them with cultured myeloma cells to form hybridomas which continuously secrete antibodies. Since these hybridomas produce antibodies coded for by a single antibody-producing cell, the antibodies are called monoclonal. Building on these advances in biomedical research, it is now possible to reproducibly manufacture monoclonal antibodies on a scale suitable for use in cancer detection and therapy.

  12. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  13. 13- and 14-membered macrocyclic ligands containing methylcarboxylate or methylphosphonate pendant arms: chemical and biological evaluation of their (153)Sm and (166)Ho complexes as potential agents for therapy or bone pain palliation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Fernanda; Gano, Lurdes; Paula Campello, M; Lacerda, Sara; Santos, Isabel; Lima, Luís M P; Costa, Judite; Antunes, Patrícia; Delgado, Rita

    2006-02-01

    The stability constants of La(3+), Sm(3+) and Ho(3+) complexes with 13- and 14-membered macrocycles having methylcarboxylate (trita and teta) or methylphosphonate (tritp and tetp) arms were determined. All the ligands were labelled with (153)Sm and (166)Ho in order to evaluate the effect of the macrocyclic cavity size and type of appended arms on their in vitro and in vivo behaviour. The radiolabelling efficiency was found to be higher than 98% for all the complexes, except for those of tetp. All radiocomplexes studied are hydrophilic with an overall negative charge and low plasmatic protein binding. Good in vitro stability in physiological media and human serum was found for all complexes, except the (153)Sm/(166)Ho-teta, which are unstable in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). In vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) adsorption studies indicated that (153)Sm/(166)Ho-tritp complexes bind to HA having the (166)Ho complex the highest degree of adsorption (>80%, 10 mg). Biodistribution studies in mice demonstrated that (153)Sm/(166)Ho-trita complexes have a fast tissue clearance with more than 95% of the injected activity excreted after 2 h, value that is comparable to the corresponding dota complexes. In contrast, the (153)Sm-teta complex has a significantly lower total excretion. (153)Sm/(166)Ho-tritp complexes are retained by the bone, particularly (166)Ho-tritp that has 5-6% (% I.D./g) bone uptake and also a high rate of total excretion. Thus, these studies support the potential interest of (153)Sm/(166)Ho-trita complexes for therapy when conjugated to a biomolecule and the potential usefulness of the (166)Ho-tritp complex in bone pain palliation.

  14. Insights into a microwave susceptible agent for minimally invasive microwave tumor thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitang; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Li, Linlin; Tan, Longfei; Wang, Jingzhuo; Ren, Xiangling; Ren, Jun; Wang, Jianxin; Meng, Xianwei

    2015-03-01

    This work develops a kind of sodium alginate (SA) microcapsules as microwave susceptible agents for in vivo tumor microwave thermal therapy for the first time. Due to the excellent microwave susceptible properties and low bio-toxicity, excellent therapy efficiency can be achieved with the tumor inhibiting ratio of 97.85% after one-time microwave thermal therapy with ultralow power (1.8 W, 450 MHz). Meanwhile, the mechanism of high microwave heating efficiency was confirmed via computer-simulated model in theory, demonstrating that the spatial confinement efficiency of microcapsule walls endows the inside ions with high microwave susceptible properties. This strategy offers tremendous potential applications in clinical tumor treatment with the benefits of safety, reliability, effectiveness and minimally invasiveness.

  15. Primary screen for potential sheep scab control agents.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J A; Prickett, J C; Collins, D A; Weaver, R J

    2016-07-15

    The efficacy of potential acaricidal agents were assessed against the sheep scab mite Psoroptes ovis using a series of in vitro assays in modified test arenas designed initially to maintain P. ovis off-host. The mortality effects of 45 control agents, including essential oils, detergents, desiccants, growth regulators, lipid synthesis inhibitors, nerve action/energy metabolism disruptors and ecdysteroids were assessed against adults and nymphs. The most effective candidates were the desiccants (diatomaceous earth, nanoclay and sorex), the growth regulators (buprofezin, hexythiazox and teflubenzuron), the lipid synthesis inhibitors (spirodiclofen, spirotetramat and spiromesifen) and the nerve action and energy metabolism inhibitors (fenpyroximate, spinosad, tolfenpyrad, and chlorantraniliprole).

  16. Mustard: a potential agent of chemical warfare and terrorism.

    PubMed

    Saladi, R N; Smith, E; Persaud, A N

    2006-01-01

    As one of the most important vesicant agents, the destructive properties of mustards on the skin, eyes and respiratory system, combined with a lack of antidote, makes them effective weapons. Such weapons are inexpensive, easily obtainable and frequently stockpiled. Sulphur mustard (mustard gas) has been used as a chemical warfare agent in at least 10 conflicts. In this article, the use of mustard as a potential agent of chemical warfare and terrorism is outlined. The dose-dependent effects of acute sulphur mustard exposure on the skin, eyes, and respiratory system are described, as well as the possible extents of injuries, the mechanisms of action and the long-term complications. Prevention and management of mustard exposure are briefly discussed. The need for awareness and preparedness in the dermatological community regarding mustard exposure is emphasized.

  17. Use of Antifungal Combination Therapy: Agents, Order, and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Perfect, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the substantial morbidity and mortality related to invasive fungal infections, treatment with a combination of antifungal agents is often considered. A growing body of literature from in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical experience provides data evaluating this approach. This review describes combination antifungal strategies for the management of cryptococcal meningitis, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, and rare mold infections. The potential effects that sequencing and timing have on the efficacy of such approaches are discussed, with a focus on recent clinical data in this arena. PMID:20574543

  18. Pathophysiology of hemophilic arthropathy and potential targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Pulles, Astrid E; Mastbergen, Simon C; Schutgens, Roger E G; Lafeber, Floris P J G; van Vulpen, Lize F D

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia is a congenital clotting factor deficiency characterized by spontaneous and trauma-related bleeding. Spontaneous bleeding shows a predilection for joints, and repeated hemarthroses lead to a disabling condition called hemophilic arthropathy. Treatment of this condition consists of preventing joint bleeding on the one hand and orthopedic surgery as a last resort on the other. Up till now, there is no disease modifying therapy available to fill the gap between these extremes. This review provides an overview of the pathogenesis of hemophilic arthropathy in order to identify potential targets for therapy. Joint bleeding induces synovial inflammation, cartilage degeneration and bone damage. These processes interact with each other and result in a vicious circle. Hemarthrosis promotes synovial hypertrophy and neoangiogenesis, increasing the susceptibility to mechanical damage and subsequent bleeding. The inflamed synovium affects the cartilage, while cartilage is also directly affected by blood via the release of cytokines and metalloproteinases, and via hydroxyl radical formation inducing chondrocyte apoptosis. Apart from the inflammatory pathways, iron plays a pivotal role in this process, as does the fibrinolytic system. Considering its pathogenesis, potential targets for disease modifying therapy in hemophilic arthropathy are iron, inflammation, vascular remodeling, hyperfibrinolysis, bone remodeling and cartilage regeneration. So far, iron chelators, anti-inflammatory therapy, anti-fibrinolytics and bone remodeling agents have demonstrated beneficial effects, predominantly in a preclinical setting. There is still a long way to go before these interventions will translate into clinical practice. The most important challenges are: establishing a universal outcome measure to predict efficacy in humans, and determination of the optimal route and timing to administer disease modifying therapy.

  19. Targeted therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: novel agents on the horizon

    PubMed Central

    Cervello, Melchiorre; McCubrey, James A.; Cusimano, Antonella; Lampiasi, Nadia; Azzolina, Antonina; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common liver cancer, accounting for 90% of primary liver cancers. In the last decade it has become one of the most frequently occurring tumors worldwide and is also considered to be the most lethal of the cancer systems, accounting for approximately one third of all malignancies. Although the clinical diagnosis and management of early-stage HCC has improved significantly, HCC prognosis is still extremely poor. Furthermore, advanced HCC is a highly aggressive tumor with a poor or no response to common therapies. Therefore, new effective and well-tolerated therapy strategies are urgently needed. Targeted therapies have entered the field of anti-neoplastic treatment and are being used on their own or in combination with conventional chemotherapy drugs. Molecular-targeted therapy holds great promise in the treatment of HCC. A new therapeutic opportunity for advanced HCC is the use of sorafenib (Nexavar). On the basis of the recent large randomized phase III study, the Sorafenib HCC Assessment Randomized Protocol (SHARP), sorafenib has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of advanced HCC. Sorafenib showed to be able to significantly increase survival in patients with advanced HCC, establishing a new standard of care. Despite this promising breakthrough, patients with HCC still have a dismal prognosis, as it is currently the major cause of death in cirrhotic patients. Nevertheless, the successful results of the SHARP trial underscore the need for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this devastating disease. In this review we summarize the most important studies on the signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of HCC, as well as the newest emerging drugs and their potential use in HCC management. PMID:22470194

  20. A PSMA-targeted theranostic agent for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Chatterjee, Samit; Lisok, Ala; Minn, Il; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Wharram, Bryan; Wang, Yuchuan; Jin, Jiefu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C; Pomper, Martin G

    2017-02-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in the epithelium of prostate cancer and in the neovasculature of many non-prostate solid tumors. PSMA has been increasingly used as a target for cancer imaging and therapy. Here we describe a low-molecular-weight theranostic photosensitizer, YC-9, for PSMA-targeted optical imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT). YC-9 was synthesized by conjugating IRDye700DX N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester with a PSMA targeting Lys-Glu urea through a lysine-suberate linker in suitable yield. Optical imaging in vivo demonstrated PSMA-specific tumor uptake of YC-9 with rapid clearance from non-target tissues. PSMA-specific cell kill was demonstrated with YC-9in vitro through PDT in PSMA(+) PC3-PIP and PSMA(-) PC3-flu cells. In vivo PDT in mice bearing PSMA(+) PC3-PIP tumors at 4h post-injection of YC-9 (A total of four PDT sessions were performed, 48h apart) resulted in significant tumor growth delay, while tumors in control groups continued to grow. PDT with YC-9 significantly increased the median survival of the PSMA(+) PC3-PIP tumor mice (56.5days) compared to control groups [23.5-30.0days, including untreated, light alone, YC-9 alone (without light) and non-targeted IRDye700DX PDT treatment groups], without noticeable toxicity at the doses used. This study proves in principle that YC-9 is a promising therapeutic agent for targeted PDT of PSMA-expressing tissues, such as prostate tumors, and may also be useful against non-prostate tumors by virtue of neovascular PSMA expression.

  1. Semimetal Nanomaterials of Antimony as Highly Efficient Agent for Photoacoustic Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Rong, Pengfei; Yang, Kai; Huang, Peng; Sun, Kang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    In this study we report semimetal naonmaterials of antimony (Sb) as highly efficient agent for photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and photothermal therapy (PTT). The Sb nanorod bundles have been synthesized through a facile route by mixing 1-octadecane (ODE) and oleyl amine (OAm) as the solvent. The aqueous dispersion of PEGylated Sb NPs, due to its broad and strong photoabsorption ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths, is applicable as a photothermal agent driven by 808 nm laser with photothermal conversion efficiency up to 41%, noticeably higher than most of the PTT agents reported before. Our in vitro experiments also showed that cancer cell ablation effect of PEGylated Sb NPs was dependent on laser power. By intratumoral administration of PEGylated Sb NPs, 100% tumor ablation can be realized by using NIR laser irradiation with a lower power of 1 W/cm2 for 5 min (or 0.5 W/cm2 for 10 min) and no obvious toxic side effect is identified after photothermal treatment. Moreover, intense PA signal was also observed after intratumoral injection of PEGylated Sb NPs and NIR laser irradiation due to their strong NIR photoabsorption, suggesting PEGylated Sb NPs as a potential NIR PA agent. Based on the findings of this work, futher development of using other smimetal nanocrystals as highly efficient NIR agents can be achieved for vivo tumor imaging and PTT. PMID:25662491

  2. Crocetin: an agent derived from saffron for prevention and therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutheil, William G; Reed, Gregory; Ray, Amitabha; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and accounts for approximately 8 million deaths per year worldwide. Although there is an increasing number of therapeutic options available for patients with cancer, their efficacy is time-limited and non-curative. Approximately 50-60% cancer patients in the United States utilize agents derived from different parts of plants or nutrients (complementary and alternative medicine), exclusively or concurrently with traditional therapeutic regime such as chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The need for new drugs has prompted studies evaluating possible anti-cancer agents in fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices. Saffron, a spice and a food colorant present in the dry stigmas of the plant Crocus sativus L., has been used as an herbal remedy for various ailments including cancer by the ancient Arabian, Indian and Chinese cultures. Crocetin, an important carotenoid constituent of saffron, has shown significant potential as an anti-tumor agent in animal models and cell culture systems. Crocetin affects the growth of cancer cells by inhibiting nucleic acid synthesis, enhancing anti-oxidative system, inducing apoptosis and hindering growth factor signaling pathways. This review discusses the studies on cancer preventive potential of crocetin and its future use as an anticancer agent.

  3. Crocetin: an agent derived from saffron for prevention and therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gutheil, William G.; Reed, Gregory; Ray, Amitabha; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and accounts for approximately 8 million deaths per year worldwide. Although there is an increasing number of therapeutic options available for patients with cancer, their efficacy is time-limited and non-curative. Approximately 50-60% of cancer patients in the United States utilize agents derived from different parts of plants or nutrients (complementary and alternative medicine), exclusively or concurrently with traditional therapeutic regime such as chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The need for new drugs has prompted studies evaluating possible anti-cancer agents in fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices. Saffron, a spice and a food colorant present in the dry stigmas of the plant Crocus sativus L., has been used as an herbal remedy for various ailments including cancer by the ancient Arabian, Indian and Chinese cultures. Crocetin, an important carotenoid constituent of saffron, has shown significant potential as an anti-tumor agent in animal models and cell culture systems. Crocetin affects the growth of cancer cells by inhibiting nucleic acid synthesis, enhancing anti-oxidative system, inducing apoptosis and hindering growth factor signaling pathways. This review discusses the studies on cancer preventive potential of crocetin and its future use as an anticancer agent. PMID:21466430

  4. Microtubule-stabilizing agents: New drug discovery and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Mu, Xin; Du, Guanhua

    2016-06-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSAs) have been highly successful in the treatment of cancer in the past 20years. To date, three classes of MSAs have entered the clinical trial stage or have been approved for clinical anticancer chemotherapy, and more than 10 classes of novel structural MSAs have been derived from natural resources. The microtubule typically contains two MSA-binding sites: the taxoid site and the laulimalide/peloruside site. All defined MSAs are known to bind at either of these sites, with subtle but significant differences. MSAs with different binding sites may produce a synergistic effect. Although having been extensively applied in the clinical setting, paclitaxel and other approved MSAs still pose many challenges such as multidrug resistance, low bioavailability, poor solubility, high toxicity, and low passage through the blood-brain barrier. A variety of studies focus on the structure-activity relationship in order to improve the pharmaceutical properties of these agents. Here, the mechanisms of action, advancements in pharmacological research, and clinical developments of defined MSAs during the past decade are discussed. The latest discovered MSAs are also briefly introduced in this review. The increasing number of natural MSAs indicates the potential discovery of more novel, natural MSAs with different structural bases, which will further promote the development of anticancer chemotherapy.

  5. Magnetic nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H; Hickling, William J; Japp, Emily A; Rodriguez, Olga C; Ghosh, Anup; Albanese, Chris; Nishida, Maki; Van Keuren, Edward; Fricke, Stanley; Dollahon, Norman; Stoll, Sarah L

    2013-10-22

    Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible copolymer based on a water stable, nontoxic, mixed-metal-oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(L)16(H2O)4, where L is acetate or vinyl benzoic acid, and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity and was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 = 29.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. The metal-oxo cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid) can be copolymerized with styrene under miniemulsion conditions. Miniemulsion allows for the formation of nanometer-sized paramagnetic beads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.

  6. Pyrazoles as potential anti-angiogenesis agents: a contemporary overview

    PubMed Central

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos M.; Tzanetou, Evangelia N.; Haroutounian, Serkos A.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a mulit-step process by which new blood vessels are formed from preexisting vasculature. It is a key rate limiting factor in tumor growth since new blood vessels are necessary to increase tumor size. In this context it has been shown that anti-angiogenic factors can be used in cancer therapy. Among the plethora of heterocyclic compounds administered as anti-angiogenesis agents, pyrazoles constitute one of the bottlenecks of this category. Currently, several pyrazole based compounds are administered or are in Phase II and III trials and new targets emerge. It is highly possible that the advent of the next two decades will lead to the discovery and use of additional pyrazoles whose anti-angiogenic profile will position them in the forefront of the battle of various malignancies. The present review is an attempt to focus on those pyrazoles that arise as anti-angiogenesis agents commenting both on the chemistry and bioactivity that these exhibit aiming to contribute to the perspectives that they hold for future research. PMID:25250310

  7. Pyrazoles as potential anti-angiogenesis agents: A contemporary overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasiotis, Konstantinos; Tzanetou, Evangelia; Haroutounian, Serkos

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a mulit-step process by which new blood vessels are formed from preexisting vasculature. It is a key rate limiting factor in tumor growth since new blood vessels are necessary to increase tumor size. In this context it has been shown that anti-angiogenic factors can be used in cancer therapy. Among the plethora of heterocyclic compounds administered as anti-angiogenesis agents, pyrazoles constitute one of the bottlenecks of this category. Currently several pyrazole based compounds are administered or are in Phase II and III trials and new targets emerge. It is highly possible that the advent of the next two decades will lead to the discovery and use of additional pyrazoles whose anti-angiogenic profile will position them in the forefront of the battle of various malignancies. The present review is an attempt to focus on those pyrazoles that arise as anti-angiogenesis agents commenting both on the chemistry and bioactivity that these exhibit aiming to contribute to the perspectives that they hold for future research.

  8. Bacteriophage therapy: a potential solution for the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Zhabiz; Bagasra, Omar; Pace, Donald Gene

    2014-02-13

    The emergence of multiple drug-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. One of the possible replacement options for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. Phage therapy is an important alternative to antibiotics in the current era of drug-resistant pathogens. Bacteriophages have played an important role in the expansion of molecular biology and have been used as antibacterial agents since 1966. In this review, we describe a brief history of bacteriophages and clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents in this regard.

  9. Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy Against Viral Biothreat Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-12

    economy. Vaccine development is an important strategy to thwart the threat of these viral biothreat agents. There is an urgent need to improve...Alberta, Tl A 8K6. Canada E-mail: josh. wu@drdc-rddc.gc.ca .• 78 JoshQ.H. Wu existing vaccines against these agents and to develop new ones. Gene...of vaccines against viral biothreat agents. Genes encoding protective antigens of viral biothreat agents can be carried by these viral vectors and

  10. Development of peptides as potential drugs for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi Jie; Cho, Chi Hin

    2010-01-01

    The development of more selective agents focused on targeted delivery of imaging probes and drugs to different tumor sites is the current trend in cancer diagnosis and therapies. Peptides are small amino acid sequences that can be isolated to bind to a predetermined target and are potentially capable of interfering with its function. These specific peptides isolated can inhibit individual signaling components, which are essential in cancer development and progression. Phage display is a powerful technology for selecting and cloning peptides displayed on the surface of bacteriophage. Billionclone-peptide libraries can be rapidly and simultaneously selected by phage biopanning, leading to large numbers of hits. Although peptides account for only a small part of current therapeutic agents, their potential is being improved by new technologies affecting their modification, delivery, stability and their application in preclinical settings. This review will highlight how to isolate peptides that target pivotal molecules in cancer development and progression through phage library biopanning and how to modify these peptides to enhance their anticancer efficacy.

  11. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  12. Regulation of MicroRNAs by Natural Agents: New Strategies in Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNA which regulate gene expression by messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation or translation repression. The plethora of published reports in recent years demonstrated that they play fundamental roles in many biological processes, such as carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, programmed cell death, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, and differentiation by acting as tumour suppressor or oncogene, and aberrations in their expressions have been linked to onset and progression of various cancers. Furthermore, each miRNA is capable of regulating the expression of many genes, allowing them to simultaneously regulate multiple cellular signalling pathways. Hence, miRNAs have the potential to be used as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. Recent studies have shown that natural agents such as curcumin, resveratrol, genistein, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, indole-3-carbinol, and 3,3′-diindolylmethane exert their antiproliferative and/or proapoptotic effects through the regulation of one or more miRNAs. Therefore, this review will look at the regulation of miRNAs by natural agents as a means to potentially enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy through combinatorial therapies. It is hoped that this would provide new strategies in cancer therapies to improve overall response and survival outcome in cancer patients. PMID:25254214

  13. Enkephalinase inhibitors: potential agents for the management of pain.

    PubMed

    Thanawala, V; Kadam, V J; Ghosh, R

    2008-10-01

    Management of acute and chronic pain has always been a key area of clinical research. Enkephalinase inhibitors (EIs) seem to be promising as therapeutic agents having antinociceptive action. They additionally possess anticraving, antidiarrhoeal and antidepressant actions. The antinociceptive action of EIs has been reported for over a decade however, their therapeutic potential is yet to be effectively explored. EIs may be broadly classified as endogenous and those that are obtained synthetically. Endogenous EIs include peptides like spinorphin and opiorphin. And compounds like RB 101, RB 120, RB 3007 constitute the synthetically obtained EIs. Endogenous and synthetic inhibitors enkephalin degrading enzymes have been studied in vivo using standard animal models. The potential EI targets appear to be APN (Aminopeptidase N), NEP (Neutral endopeptidase), DPP-III (Dipeptidyl peptidase). EIs possess the advantage that they lack the opioid side effects. This article reviews the mechanisms by which EIs act and elucidates the pathways involved.

  14. 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives as potential biological agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Juan; Makawana, Jigar A; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of novel compound libraries along with screening is a rapid and effective approach for the discovery of potential chemical agents, and it becomes an important method in pharmaceutical chemistry research. 1,3,4- oxadiazole derivatives as the typical heterocyclic compounds, exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities and vital leading compounds for the development of chemical drugs. Herein, we focus on the synthesis and screening of novel 1,3,4-oxadiazoles derivatives with antimicrobial, antitumor or antiviral activities during the past decade. In this review, we discussed the synthetic development of 1,3,4-oxadiazoles derivatives, and also the relevant bioactivity and their prospects as the potential chemical drugs.

  15. Artocarpus plants as a potential source of skin whitening agents.

    PubMed

    Arung, Enos Tangke; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2011-09-01

    Artocarpus plants have been a focus of constant attention due to the potential for skin whitening agents. In the in vitro experiment, compounds from the Artocarpus plants, such as artocarpanone, norartocarpetin, artocarpesin, artogomezianol, andalasin, artocarbene, and chlorophorin showed tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Structure-activity investigations revealed that the 4-substituted resorcinol moiety in these compounds was responsible for their potent inhibitory activities on tyrosinase. In the in vitro assay, using B16 melanoma cells, the prenylated polyphenols isolated from Artocarpus plants, such as artocarpin, cudraflavone C, 6-prenylapigenin, kuwanon C, norartocarpin, albanin A, cudraflavone B, and brosimone I showed potent inhibitory activity on melanin formation. Structure-activity investigations revealed that the introduction of an isoprenoid moiety to a non-isoprenoid-substituted polyphenol enhanced the inhibitory activity of melanin production in B16 melanoma cells. In the in vivo investigation, the extract of the wood of Artocarpus incisus and a representative isolated compound from it, artocarpin had a lightening effect on the skin of guinea pigs' backs. Other in vivo experiments using human volunteers have shown that water extract of Artocarpus lakoocha reduced the melanin formation in the skin of volunteers. These results indicate that the extracts of Artocarpus plants are potential sources for skin whitening agents.

  16. Potential new photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yau-Kwan; Pandey, Ravindra K.; Sumlin, Adam B.; Missert, Joseph R.; Bellnier, David A.; Dougherty, Thomas J.

    1990-07-01

    In continuation of the effort to search for an ideal photosensitizer, two groups of potential new photosensitizers were synthesized and investigated for their photodynamic actions against tumors in mice. These were derivatives of methyl pheophorbide-a and of silicon naphthalocyanine. Of the former group, the 2 (1-0--hexyl) ethyl-desvinyl--methyl pheophorbide-a, or }IEDP, was the most active sensitizer. HEDP could be readily produced in large quantities and showed an optimum photodynamic action at 665 mu where it absorbs strongly. Also HEDP was cleared from the mouse skin within 4 days after administration, thus possibly alleviating the long-term phototoxic side-effects observed in Photofrin-based therapy. Of the second group of photosensitizers, the bis (dimethyl hydroxypropylsiloxy) silicon naphthalocyanine (HPSiNc) , and the corresponding acetoxy derivative (APSiNc) were of particular interest. At a drug-light dose of 1.0 mg/kg-135 J/cm2 (delivered by a laser at 772 nm), they showed antitumor activities comparable to that of PhotofrinTM. Further studies on these photosensitizers are warranted.

  17. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia.

  18. 3-Amidocoumarins as Potential Multifunctional Agents against Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Matos, Maria João; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Fernanda; Borges, Fernanda; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Estrada, Martín; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel; Laguna, Reyes; Viña, Dolores

    2015-12-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), which cause neuronal cell death, causing neurodegeneration. Agents that are able to concurrently inhibit MAO and scavenge free radicals represent promising multifunctional neuroprotective agents that could be used to delay or slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, variously substituted 3-amidocoumarins are described that exert neuroprotection in vitro against hydrogen peroxide in rat cortical neurons, as well as antioxidant activity in a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH⋅) radical scavenging assay. Selective and reversible inhibitors of the MAO-B isoform were identified. Interestingly, in the case of the 3-benzamidocoumarins, substitution at position 4 with a hydroxy group abolishes MAO-B activity, but the compounds remain active in the neuroprotection model. Further evaluation of 3-heteroarylamide derivatives indicates that it is the nature of the heterocycle that determines the neuroprotective effects. Evaluation in a parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) highlighted the need to further improve the blood-brain barrier permeability of this compound class. However, the compounds described herein adhere to Lipinski's rule of five, suggesting that this novel scaffold has desirable properties for the development of potential drug candidates.

  19. Potential Use of Phenolic Acids as Anti-Candida Agents: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, Guilherme R.; Ellepola, Kassapa; Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Y.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a sharp rise in the occurrence of Candida infections and associated mortality over the last few years, due to the growing body of immunocompromised population. Limited number of currently available antifungal agents, undesirable side effects and toxicity, as well as emergence of resistant strains pose a considerable clinical challenge for the treatment of candidiasis. Therefore, molecules that derived from natural sources exhibiting considerable antifungal properties are a promising source for the development of novel anti-candidal therapy. Phenolic compounds isolated from natural sources possess antifungal properties of interest. Particularly, phenolic acids have shown promising in vitro and in vivo activity against Candida species. However, studies on their mechanism of action alone or in synergism with known antifungals are still scarce. This review attempts to discuss the potential use, proposed mechanisms of action and limitations of the phenolic acids in anti-candidal therapy. PMID:26733965

  20. Synthesis, biological evaluation of chrysin derivatives as potential immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peng-Cheng; Cai, Tian-Tian; Qian, Yong; Sun, Juan; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2011-01-01

    A series of novel chrysin derivatives was firstly synthesized and evaluated on their immunosuppressive activity in the search for potential immunosuppressive agents. Among them, compounds 5c displayed the most potent immunosuppressive inhibitory activity with IC(50) of 0.78 μM, which was comparable to that of cyclosporin A (IC(50) = 0.06 μM). The preliminary mechanism of compound 5c inhibition effects was also detected by flow cytometry (FCM), and the compound exerted immunosuppressive activity via inducing the apoptosis of activated lymph node cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the estimated LD(50) (in mg/kg) in vivo of compound 5c is 738.2, which indicated that compound 5c was low toxic.

  1. Therapeutic potential of HMGB1-targeting agents in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haichao; Zhu, Shu; Zhou, Rongrong; Li, Wei; Sama, Andrew E.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis refers to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome resulting from a microbial infection. The inflammatory response is partly mediated by innate immune cells (such as macrophages, monocytes and neutrophils), which not only ingest and eliminate invading pathogens but also initiate an inflammatory response upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The prevailing theories of sepsis as a dysregulated inflammatory response, as manifested by excessive release of inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor and high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), are supported by extensive studies employing animal models of sepsis. Here we review emerging evidence that support extracellular HMGB1 as a late mediator of experimental sepsis, and discuss the therapeutic potential of several HMGB1-targeting agents (including neutralising antibodies and steroid-like tanshinones) in experimental sepsis. PMID:18980707

  2. Combination therapy of biologics with traditional agents in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Lyn C

    2011-06-01

    Although biologics are very efficacious as monotherapy in patients with psoriasis, combination treatment with traditional systemic and topical therapies may increase the speed of onset and enhance efficacy without significant additional toxicity. In contrast, in psoriatic arthritis, the addition of methotrexate to anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha therapy does not enhance efficacy in either the skin or joints.

  3. The Effects of Glucose Therapy Agents-Apple Juice, Orange Juice, and Cola-on Enteral Tube Flow and Patency.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Daphna J; Montreuil, Jasmine; Santoro, Andrea L; Zettas, Antonia; Lowe, Julia

    2016-06-01

    To develop evidence-based hypoglycemia treatment protocols in patients receiving total enteral nutrition, this study determined the effect on enteral tube flow of glucose therapy agents: apple juice, orange juice, and cola, and it also examined the effects of tube type and feed type with these glucose therapy agents. For this study, 12 gastrostomy tubes (6 polyethylene and 6 silicone) were set at 50 mL/h. Each feeding set was filled with Isosource HN with fibre or Novasource Renal. Each tube was irrigated with 1 glucose therapy agent, providing approximately 20 g of carbohydrate every 4 h. Flow-rate measurements were collected at 2 h intervals. The results showed that the glucose therapy agent choice affected flow rates: apple juice and cola had higher average flow rates than orange juice (P = 0.01). A significant difference was found between tube type and enteral formula: polyethylene tubes had higher average flow rates than silicone tubes (P < 0.0001), and Isosource HN with fibre had higher flow rates than Novasource Renal (P = 0.01). We concluded that apple juice and cola have less tube clogging potential than orange juice, and thus may be considered as primary treatment options for hypoglycemia in enterally fed patients. Polyethylene tubes and Isosource HN with fibre were less likely to clog than silicone tubes and Novasource Renal.

  4. Curcumin: a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mythri, R B; Bharath, M M Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized as a movement disorder. The motor symptoms in PD arise due to selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the ventral midbrain thereby depleting the dopamine levels in the striatum. Most of the current pharmacotherapeutic approaches in PD are aimed at replenishing the striatal dopamine. Although these drugs provide symptomatic relief during early PD, many patients develop motor complications with long-term treatment. Further, PD medications do not effectively tackle tremor, postural instability and cognitive deficits. Most importantly, most of these drugs do not exhibit neuroprotective effects in patients. Consequently, novel therapies involving natural antioxidants and plant products/molecules with neuroprotective properties are being exploited for adjunctive therapy. Curcumin is a polyphenol and an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a dietary spice used in Indian cuisine and medicine. Curcumin exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, crosses the blood-brain barrier and is neuroprotective in neurological disorders. Several studies in different experimental models of PD strongly support the clinical application of curcumin in PD. The current review explores the therapeutic potential of curcumin in PD.

  5. Potential New Agents for the Management of Hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Packham, David K; Kosiborod, Mikhail

    2016-02-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common electrolyte disturbance with multiple potential etiologies. It is usually observed in the setting of reduced renal function. Mild to moderate hyperkalemia is usually asymptomatic, but is associated with poor prognosis. When severe, hyperkalemia may cause serious acute cardiac arrhythmias and conduction abnormalities, and may result in sudden death. The rising prevalence of conditions associated with hyperkalemia (heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes) and broad use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs), which improve patient outcomes but increase the risk of hyperkalemia, have led to a significant rise in hyperkalemia-related hospitalizations and deaths. Current non-invasive therapies for hyperkalemia either do not remove excess potassium or have poor efficacy and tolerability. There is a clear need for safer, more effective potassium-lowering therapies suitable for both acute and chronic settings. Patiromer sorbitex calcium and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate (ZS-9) are two new potassium-lowering compounds currently in development. Although they have not yet been approved by the US FDA, both have demonstrated efficacy and safety in recent trials. Patiromer sorbitex calcium is a polymer resin and sorbitol complex that binds potassium in exchange for calcium; ZS-9, a non-absorbed, highly selective inorganic cation exchanger, traps potassium in exchange for sodium and hydrogen. This review discusses the merits of both novel drugs and how they may help optimize the future management of patients with hyperkalemia.

  6. A graphene quantum dot photodynamic therapy agent with high singlet oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jiechao; Lan, Minhuan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Liu, Weimin; Guo, Liang; Wang, Hui; Jia, Qingyan; Niu, Guangle; Huang, Xing; Zhou, Hangyue; Meng, Xiangmin; Wang, Pengfei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-08-01

    Clinical applications of current photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are often limited by their low singlet oxygen (1O2) quantum yields, as well as by photobleaching and poor biocompatibility. Here we present a new PDT agent based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) that can produce 1O2 via a multistate sensitization process, resulting in a quantum yield of ~1.3, the highest reported for PDT agents. The GQDs also exhibit a broad absorption band spanning the UV region and the entire visible region and a strong deep-red emission. Through in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that GQDs can be used as PDT agents, simultaneously allowing imaging and providing a highly efficient cancer therapy. The present work may lead to a new generation of carbon-based nanomaterial PDT agents with overall performance superior to conventional agents in terms of 1O2 quantum yield, water dispersibility, photo- and pH-stability, and biocompatibility.

  7. A graphene quantum dot photodynamic therapy agent with high singlet oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jiechao; Lan, Minhuan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Liu, Weimin; Guo, Liang; Wang, Hui; Jia, Qingyan; Niu, Guangle; Huang, Xing; Zhou, Hangyue; Meng, Xiangmin; Wang, Pengfei; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhang, Wenjun; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-08-08

    Clinical applications of current photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are often limited by their low singlet oxygen ((1)O2) quantum yields, as well as by photobleaching and poor biocompatibility. Here we present a new PDT agent based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) that can produce (1)O2 via a multistate sensitization process, resulting in a quantum yield of ~1.3, the highest reported for PDT agents. The GQDs also exhibit a broad absorption band spanning the UV region and the entire visible region and a strong deep-red emission. Through in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that GQDs can be used as PDT agents, simultaneously allowing imaging and providing a highly efficient cancer therapy. The present work may lead to a new generation of carbon-based nanomaterial PDT agents with overall performance superior to conventional agents in terms of (1)O2 quantum yield, water dispersibility, photo- and pH-stability, and biocompatibility.

  8. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-06-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  9. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  10. Cows' milk fat components as potential anticarcinogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Parodi, P W

    1997-06-01

    The optimum approach to conquering cancer is prevention. Although the human diet contains components which promote cancer, it also contains components with the potential to prevent it. Recent research shows that milk fat contains a number of potential anticarcinogenic components including conjugated linoleic acid, sphingomyelin, butyric acid and ether lipids. Conjugated linoleic acid inhibited proliferation of human malignant melanoma, colorectal, breast and lung cancer cell lines. In animals, it reduced the incidence of chemically induced mouse epidermal tumors, mouse forestomach neoplasia and aberrant crypt foci in the rat colon. In a number of studies, conjugated linoleic acid, at near-physiological concentrations, inhibited mammary tumorigenesis independently of the amount and type of fat in the diet. In vitro studies showed that the milk phospholipid, sphingomyelin, through its biologically active metabolites ceramide and sphingosine, participates in three major antiproliferative pathways influencing oncogenesis, namely, inhibition of cell growth, and induction of differentiation and apoptosis. Mice fed sphingomyelin had fewer colon tumors and aberrant crypt foci than control animals. About one third of all milk triacylglycerols contain one molecule of butyric acid, a potent inhibitor of proliferation and inducer of differentiation and apoptosis in a wide range of neoplastic cell lines. Although butyrate produced by colonic fermentation is considered important for colon cancer protection, an animal study suggests dietary butyrate may inhibit mammary tumorigenesis. The dairy cow also has the ability to extract other potential anticarcinogenic agents such as beta-carotene, beta-ionone and gossypol from its feed and transfer them to milk. Animal studies comparing the tumorigenic potential of milk fat or butter with linoleic acid-rich vegetable oils or margarines are reviewed. They clearly show less tumor development with dairy products.

  11. Evaluation of boronated EGF as a potential delivery agent for BNCT of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Weilian; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene is often amplified in human glioblastomas, but, reflecting the cellular heterogeneity of these tumors, the frequency of amplification is variable. Since the number of EGFR has been considered as a potential target for the specific delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to brain tumors. Initially, the focus was on using anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies or their fragments, but within the past few years there has been increasing interest in using EGF based bioconjugates as targeting agents. Recently, we have described a method for the boronation of EGF and have characterized the resulting bioconjugates in vitro. In the present study, we have investigated the potential usefulness of boronated EGF as a delivery agent for neutron capture therapy in rats bearing intracerebral implants of the C6 glioma, which has been transfected with the gene encoding EGFR. Our results indicate that following intratumoral injection, boronated EGF selectivity targeted the transfected EGFR positive C6 glioma, and that the amount of delivered to the tumor exceeded by 3-4 orders of magnitude that which could be delivered by intravenous injection.

  12. Redox therapy in neonatal sepsis: reasons, targets, strategy, and agents.

    PubMed

    Bajčetić, Milica; Spasić, Snežana; Spasojević, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the most fulminating conditions in neonatal intensive care units. Antipathogen and supportive care are administered routinely, but do not deliver satisfactory results. In addition, the efforts to treat neonatal sepsis with anti-inflammatory agents have generally shown to be futile. The accumulating data imply that intracellular redox changes intertwined into neonatal sepsis redox cycle represent the main cause of dysfunction of mitochondria and cells in neonatal sepsis. Our aim here is to support the new philosophy in neonatal sepsis treatment, which involves the integration of mechanisms that are responsible for cellular dysfunction and organ failure, the recognition of the most important targets, and the selection of safe agents that can stop the neonatal sepsis redox cycle by hitting the hot spots. Redox-active agents that could be beneficial for neonatal sepsis treatment according to these criteria include lactoferrin, interleukin 10, zinc and selenium supplements, ibuprofen, edaravone, and pentoxifylline.

  13. Development of immune-specific interaction potentials and their application in the multi-agent-system VaccImm.

    PubMed

    Woelke, Anna Lena; von Eichborn, Joachim; Murgueitio, Manuela S; Worth, Catherine L; Castiglione, Filippo; Preissner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Peptide vaccination in cancer therapy is a promising alternative to conventional methods. However, the parameters for this personalized treatment are difficult to access experimentally. In this respect, in silico models can help to narrow down the parameter space or to explain certain phenomena at a systems level. Herein, we develop two empirical interaction potentials specific to B-cell and T-cell receptor complexes and validate their applicability in comparison to a more general potential. The interaction potentials are applied to the model VaccImm which simulates the immune response against solid tumors under peptide vaccination therapy. This multi-agent system is derived from another immune system simulator (C-ImmSim) and now includes a module that enables the amino acid sequence of immune receptors and their ligands to be taken into account. The multi-agent approach is combined with approved methods for prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding peptides and the newly developed interaction potentials. In the analysis, we critically assess the impact of the different modules on the simulation with VaccImm and how they influence each other. In addition, we explore the reasons for failures in inducing an immune response by examining the activation states of the immune cell populations in detail.In summary, the present work introduces immune-specific interaction potentials and their application to the agent-based model VaccImm which simulates peptide vaccination in cancer therapy.

  14. Development of Immune-Specific Interaction Potentials and Their Application in the Multi-Agent-System VaccImm

    PubMed Central

    Woelke, Anna Lena; von Eichborn, Joachim; Murgueitio, Manuela S.; Worth, Catherine L.; Castiglione, Filippo; Preissner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Peptide vaccination in cancer therapy is a promising alternative to conventional methods. However, the parameters for this personalized treatment are difficult to access experimentally. In this respect, in silico models can help to narrow down the parameter space or to explain certain phenomena at a systems level. Herein, we develop two empirical interaction potentials specific to B-cell and T-cell receptor complexes and validate their applicability in comparison to a more general potential. The interaction potentials are applied to the model VaccImm which simulates the immune response against solid tumors under peptide vaccination therapy. This multi-agent system is derived from another immune system simulator (C-ImmSim) and now includes a module that enables the amino acid sequence of immune receptors and their ligands to be taken into account. The multi-agent approach is combined with approved methods for prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding peptides and the newly developed interaction potentials. In the analysis, we critically assess the impact of the different modules on the simulation with VaccImm and how they influence each other. In addition, we explore the reasons for failures in inducing an immune response by examining the activation states of the immune cell populations in detail. In summary, the present work introduces immune-specific interaction potentials and their application to the agent-based model VaccImm which simulates peptide vaccination in cancer therapy. PMID:21858048

  15. Molecular targets of dietary agents for prevention and therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Shishodia, Shishir

    2006-05-14

    While fruits and vegetables are recommended for prevention of cancer and other diseases, their active ingredients (at the molecular level) and their mechanisms of action less well understood. Extensive research during the last half century has identified various molecular targets that can potentially be used not only for the prevention of cancer but also for treatment. However, lack of success with targeted monotherapy resulting from bypass mechanisms has forced researchers to employ either combination therapy or agents that interfere with multiple cell-signaling pathways. In this review, we present evidence that numerous agents identified from fruits and vegetables can interfere with several cell-signaling pathways. The agents include curcumin (turmeric), resveratrol (red grapes, peanuts and berries), genistein (soybean), diallyl sulfide (allium), S-allyl cysteine (allium), allicin (garlic), lycopene (tomato), capsaicin (red chilli), diosgenin (fenugreek), 6-gingerol (ginger), ellagic acid (pomegranate), ursolic acid (apple, pears, prunes), silymarin (milk thistle), anethol (anise, camphor, and fennel), catechins (green tea), eugenol (cloves), indole-3-carbinol (cruciferous vegetables), limonene (citrus fruits), beta carotene (carrots), and dietary fiber. For instance, the cell-signaling pathways inhibited by curcumin alone include NF-kappaB, AP-1, STAT3, Akt, Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), caspases, PARP, IKK, EGFR, HER2, JNK, MAPK, COX2, and 5-LOX. The active principle identified in fruit and vegetables and the molecular targets modulated may be the basis for how these dietary agents not only prevent but also treat cancer and other diseases. This work reaffirms what Hippocrates said 25 centuries ago, let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

  16. Expression of potentially lethal damage in Chinese hamster cells exposed to hematoporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gomer, C J; Rucker, N; Ferrario, A; Murphree, A L

    1986-07-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether the expression and/or repair of potentially lethal damage could be observed in mammalian cells exposed to hemataporphyrin derivative (HPD) photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was combined with posttreatment protocols known to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage in cells treated with X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, or alkylating agents. Potentiation of lethal damage from photodynamic therapy was induced by hypothermia (4 degrees C) following short (1 h) or extended (16 h) HPD incubation conditions. Caffeine potentiated the lethal effects of PDT only when cells were incubated with HPD for extended time periods. However, 3-aminobenzamide had no effect on the cytotoxic actions of PDT following either short or extended HPD incubations. Recovery from potentially lethal damage expressed by posttreatment hypothermia was complete within 1 h, while recovery from potentially lethal damage expressed by posttreatment caffeine required time periods of up to 24 h. The lack of effect of 3-aminobenzamide on expression of potentially lethal damage following photodynamic therapy may be related to direct inhibition of adenosine diphosphoribose transferase by photodynamic therapy. These results indicate that the expression and repair of potentially lethal damage can be observed in cells treated with PDT and will vary as a function of porphyrin incubation conditions.

  17. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E.; Fernandez, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  18. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E; Fernandez, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules.

  19. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Muhammad Kashif; Ashiq, Mehrban; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation.

  20. Wasp Venom Toxins as a Potential Therapeutic Agent.

    PubMed

    Dongol, Yashad; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapara L; Shrestha, Rakesh K; Aryal, Gopi

    2016-01-01

    It is high time now to discover novel drugs due to the increasing rate of drug resistance by the pathogen organisms and target cells as well as the dependence or tolerance of the body towards the drug. As it is obvious that significant numbers of the modern day pharmaceuticals are derived from natural products, it is equally astonishing to accept that venoms of various origins have therapeutic potentials. Wasp venoms are also a rich source of therapeutically important toxins which includes short cationic peptides, kinins, polyamines and polyDNA viruses, to name a few indentified. Wasp venom cationic peptides, namely mastoparan and its analogs, show a very important potency as an antimicrobial and anticancer agents of the future. They have proven to be the better candidates due to their lesser toxic effects and higher selectivity upon chemical modification and charge optimization. They also have superiority over the conventional chemical drugs as the target cells very rarely develop resistance against them because these peptides primarily imparts its effect through biophysical interaction with the target cell membrane which is dependent upon the net charge of the peptide, its hydrophobicity and anionicity and fluidity of the target cell membranes. Besides, the other components of wasp venom such as kinins, polyamines and polyDNA viruses show various pharmacological promise in the treatment of pain, inflammatory disease, and neurodegenerative diseases such as epilepsy and aversion.

  1. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium.

  2. Astaxanthin: a potential therapeutic agent in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S

    2011-03-21

    Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid present in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail. It is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties and as such has potential as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Synthetic forms of astaxanthin have been manufactured. The safety, bioavailability and effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation that have relevance to the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, have been assessed in a small number of clinical studies. No adverse events have been reported and there is evidence of a reduction in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation with astaxanthin administration. Experimental studies in several species using an ischaemia-reperfusion myocardial model demonstrated that astaxanthin protects the myocardium when administered both orally or intravenously prior to the induction of the ischaemic event. At this stage we do not know whether astaxanthin is of benefit when administered after a cardiovascular event and no clinical cardiovascular studies in humans have been completed and/or reported. Cardiovascular clinical trials are warranted based on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties, the safety profile and preliminary experimental cardiovascular studies of astaxanthin.

  3. Potential of Biological Agents in Decontamination of Agricultural Soil

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Muhammad Kashif; Ashiq, Mehrban; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used for the control of weeds, diseases, and pests of cultivated plants all over the world, mainly since the period after the Second World War. The use of pesticides is very extensive to control harm of pests all over the globe. Persistent nature of most of the synthetic pesticides causes serious environmental concerns. Decontamination of these hazardous chemicals is very essential. This review paper elaborates the potential of various biological agents in decontamination of agricultural soils. The agricultural crop fields are contaminated by the periodic applications of pesticides. Biodegradation is an ecofriendly, cost-effective, highly efficient approach compared to the physical and chemical methods which are expensive as well as unfriendly towards environment. Biodegradation is sensitive to the concentration levels of hydrogen peroxide and nitrogen along with microbial community, temperature, and pH changes. Experimental work for optimum conditions at lab scale can provide very fruitful results about specific bacterial, fungal strains. This study revealed an upper hand of bioremediation over physicochemical approaches. Further studies should be carried out to understand mechanisms of biotransformation. PMID:27293964

  4. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage.

  5. Mustard vesicating agent-induced toxicity in the skin tissue and silibinin as a potential countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to the vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) causes severe skin injury with delayed blistering. Depending upon the dose and time of their exposure, edema and erythema develop into blisters, ulceration, necrosis, desquamation, and pigmentation changes, which persist weeks and even years after exposure. Research advances have generated data that have started to explain the probable mechanism of action of vesicant-induced skin toxicity; however, despite these advances, effective and targeted therapies are still deficient. This review highlights studies on two SM analogs, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and NM, and CEES- and NM-induced skin injury mouse models that have substantially added to the knowledge on the complex pathways involved in mustard vesicating agent-induced skin injury. Furthermore, employing these mouse models, studies under the National Institutes of Health Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats program have identified the flavanone silibinin as a novel therapeutic intervention with the potential to be developed as an effective countermeasure against skin injury following exposure to mustard vesicating agents.

  6. Comparing the effects of manual therapy versus electrophysical agents in the management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Shahzad; Ahmed, Syed Imran; Khan, Muhammad; Soomro, Rabail Rani

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Manual Therapy in comparison to Electrophysical agents in Knee Osteoarthritis. Total 50 patients with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from OPD of orthopedics civil hospital and Institute Of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Dow University of Health Sciences Karachi. All those patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria were selected on voluntary basis. Selected patients were equally divided and randomly assigned into two groups with age and gender matching. The Manual therapy group received program of Maitland joint mobilization whereas Electrophysical Agent group received a program of TENS and cold pack. Both group received a program of exercise therapy as well. Patients received 3 treatment sessions per week for 4 successive weeks. Clinical assessment was performed using WOMAC index at baseline and on 12th treatment session. Both study groups showed clinically and statistically considerable improvements in WOMAC index. However, Related 2 sample t-test showed better clinical results in Manual Therapy group (p = 0.000) than Electrophysical Agents group (p = 0.008). The mean improvement in total WOMAC index was relatively higher in Manual Therapy group (22.36 ± 13.91) than Electrophysical Agent group (9.72 ± 6.10). This study concluded that manual therapy is clinically more effective in decreasing pain, stiffness and improving physical function in knee osteoarthritis.

  7. Vascular targeting agents enhance chemotherapeutic agent activities in solid tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Siemann, Dietmar W; Mercer, Emma; Lepler, Sharon; Rojiani, Amyn M

    2002-05-01

    The utility of combining the vascular targeting agents 5,6-dimethyl-xanthenone-4 acetic acid (DMXAA) and combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP) with the anticancer drugs cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (CP) was evaluated in experimental rodent (KHT sarcoma), human breast (SKBR3) and ovarian (OW-1) tumor models. Doses of the vascular targeting agents that led to rapid vascular shutdown and subsequent extensive central tumor necrosis were identified. Histologic evaluation showed morphologic damage of tumor cells within a few hours after treatment, followed by extensive hemorrhagic necrosis and dose-dependent neoplastic cell death as a result of prolonged ischemia. Whereas these effects were induced by a range of CA4DP doses (10-150 mg/kg), the dose response to DMXAA was extremely steep; doses < or = 15 mg/kg were ineffective and doses > or = 20 mg/kg were toxic. DMXAA also enhanced the tumor cell killing of cisplatin, but doses > 15 mg/kg were required. In contrast, CA4DP increased cisplatin-induced tumor cell killing at all doses studied. This enhancement of cisplatin efficacy was dependent on the sequence and interval between the agents. The greatest effects were achieved when the vascular targeting agents were administered 1-3 hr after cisplatin. When CA4DP (100 mg/kg) or DMXAA (17.5 mg/kg) were administered 1 hr after a range of doses of cisplatin or CP, the tumor cell kill was 10-500-fold greater than that seen with chemotherapy alone. In addition, the inclusion of the antivascular agents did not increase bone marrow stem cell toxicity associated with these anticancer drugs, thus giving rise to a therapeutic gain.

  8. Recent Development of Multifunctional Agents as Potential Drug Candidates for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guzior, Natalia; ckowska,, Anna Wię; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a complex and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The available therapy is limited to the symptomatic treatment and its efficacy remains unsatisfactory. In view of the prevalence and expected increase in the incidence of AD, the development of an effective therapy is crucial for public health. Due to the multifactorial aetiology of this disease, the multi-target-directed ligand (MTDL) approach is a promising method in search for new drugs for AD. This review updates information on the development of multifunctional potential anti-AD agents published within the last three years. The majority of the recently reported structures are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, often endowed with some additional properties. These properties enrich the pharmacological profile of the compounds giving hope for not only symptomatic but also causal treatment of the disease. Among these advantageous properties, the most often reported are an amyloid-β anti-aggregation activity, inhibition of β-secretase and monoamine oxidase, an antioxidant and metal chelating activity, NO-releasing ability and interaction with cannabinoid, NMDA or histamine H3 receptors. The majority of novel molecules possess heterodimeric structures, able to interact with multiple targets by combining different pharmacophores, original or derived from natural products or existing therapeutics (tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, memantine). Among the described compounds, several seem to be promising drug candidates, while others may serve as a valuable inspiration in the search for new effective therapies for AD. PMID:25386820

  9. Recent development of multifunctional agents as potential drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Guzior, Natalia; Wieckowska, Anna; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The available therapy is limited to the symptomatic treatment and its efficacy remains unsatisfactory. In view of the prevalence and expected increase in the incidence of AD, the development of an effective therapy is crucial for public health. Due to the multifactorial aetiology of this disease, the multi-target-directed ligand (MTDL) approach is a promising method in search for new drugs for AD. This review updates information on the development of multifunctional potential anti-AD agents published within the last three years. The majority of the recently reported structures are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, often endowed with some additional properties. These properties enrich the pharmacological profile of the compounds giving hope for not only symptomatic but also causal treatment of the disease. Among these advantageous properties, the most often reported are an amyloid-β antiaggregation activity, inhibition of β-secretase and monoamine oxidase, an antioxidant and metal chelating activity, NOreleasing ability and interaction with cannabinoid, NMDA or histamine H3 receptors. The majority of novel molecules possess heterodimeric structures, able to interact with multiple targets by combining different pharmacophores, original or derived from natural products or existing therapeutics (tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, memantine). Among the described compounds, several seem to be promising drug candidates, while others may serve as a valuable inspiration in the search for new effective therapies for AD.

  10. POTENTIAL OF HERBAL MEDICINES IN MODERN MEDICAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hakim Mohammed

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses in this paper the potentialities of Herbal medicine in modern therapy. Also he throws some light on the importance of natural drugs which bring about cure without generation side-effects. PMID:22557447

  11. Simultaneous two-photon activation of type-I photodynamic therapy agents.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W G; Partridge, W P; Dees, C; Wachter, E A

    1997-08-01

    The excitation and emission properties of several psoralen derivatives are compared using conventional single-photon excitation and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). Two-photon excitation is effected using the output of a mode-locked titanium: sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which is used to promote nonresonant TPE directly. Specifically, the excitation spectra and excited-state properties of 8-methoxypsoralen and 4'-aminomethyl-4,5,8-trimethylpsoralen are shown to be equivalent using both modes of excitation. Further, in vitro feasibility of two-photon photodynamic therapy (PDT) is demonstrated using Salmonella typhimurium. Two-photon excitation may be beneficial in the practice of PDT because it would allow replacement of visible or UV excitation light with highly penetrating, nondamaging near infrared light and could provide a means for improving localization of therapy. Comparison of possible laser excitation sources for PDT reveals the titanium: sapphire laser to be exceptionally well suited for nonlinear excitation of PDT agents in biological systems due to its extremely short pulse width and high repetition rate that together provide efficient PDT activation and greatly reduced potential for biological damage.

  12. Water-soluble platinum phthalocyanines as potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Giuseppina; Lanuti, Paola; D'Ambrosio, Primiano; Tonucci, Lucia; Pierdomenico, Laura; D'Emilio, Carlo; Celli, Nicola; Marchisio, Marco; d'Alessandro, Nicola; Santavenere, Eugenio; Bressan, Mario; Miscia, Sebastiano

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer represents the second cause of death in the European female population. The lack of specific therapies together with its high invasive potential are the major problems associated to such a tumor. In the last three decades platinum-based drugs have been considered essential constituents of many therapeutic strategies, even though with side effects and frequent generation of drug resistance. These drugs have been the guide for the research, in last years, of novel platinum and ruthenium based compounds, able to overcome these limitations. In this work, ruthenium and platinum based phthalocyanines were synthesized through conventional techniques and their antiproliferative and/or cytotoxic actions were tested. Normal mammary gland (MCF10A) and several models of mammarian carcinoma at different degrees of invasiveness (BT474, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) were used. Cells were treated with different concentrations (5-100 μM) of the above reported compounds, to evaluate toxic concentration and to underline possible dose-response effects. The study included growth curves made by trypan blue exclusion test and scratch assay to study cellular motility and its possible negative modulation by phthalocyanine. Moreover, we investigated cell cycle and apoptosis through flow cytometry and AMNIS Image Stream cytometer. Among all the tested drugs, tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine of platinum resulted to be the molecule with the best cytostatic action on neoplastic cell lines at the concentration of 30 μM. Interestingly, platinum tetrasulfophtalocyanine, at low doses, had no antiproliferative effects on normal cells. Therefore, such platinum complex, appears to be a promising drug for mammarian carcinoma treatment.

  13. Enterovirus infection in Korean children and anti-enteroviral potential candidate agents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwi Sung; Choi, Young Jin

    2012-01-01

    Although most enterovirus infections are not serious enough to be life threatening, several enteroviruses such as enterovirus 71 are responsible for severe, potentially life-threatening disease. The epidemic patterns of enteroviruses occur regularly during the year, but they may change due to environmental shifts induced by climate change due to global warming. Therefore, enterovirus epidemiological studies should be performed continuously as a basis for anti-viral studies. A great number of synthesized antiviral compounds that work against enteroviruses have been developed but only a few have demonstrated effectiveness in vivo. No proven effective antiviral agents are available for enterovirus disease therapy. The development of a new antiviral drug is a difficult task due to poor selective toxicity and cost. To overcome these limitations, one approach is to accelerate the availability of other existing antiviral drugs approved for antiviral effect against enteroviruses, and the other way is to screen traditional medicinal plants. PMID:23133481

  14. Mechanistic study of IR-780 dye as a potential tumor targeting and drug delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Erlong; Luo, Shenglin; Tan, Xu; Shi, Chunmeng

    2014-01-01

    IR-780 iodide, a near-infrared fluorescent heptamethine dye, has been recently characterized to exhibit preferential accumulation property in the mitochondria of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanisms for its tumor selective activity and its potential as a drug delivery carrier. Results showed that the energy-dependent uptake of IR-780 iodide into the mitochondria of tumor cells was affected by glycolysis and plasma membrane potential. Moreover, OATP1B3 subtype of organic anion transporter peptides (OATPs) may play a dominant role in the transportation of IR-780 iodide into tumor cells, while cellular endocytosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and the ATP-binding cassette transporters did not show significant influence to its accumulation. We further evaluated the potential of IR-780 iodide as a drug delivery carrier by covalent conjugation of IR-780 with nitrogen mustard (IR-780NM). In vivo imaging showed that IR-780NM remained the tumor targeting property, indicating that IR-780 iodide could be potentially applied as a drug delivery agent for cancer targeted imaging and therapy.

  15. Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents for Enhancing Tissue Engineering Characterization and Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Santiesteban, Daniela Y.; Kubelick, Kelsey; Dhada, Kabir S.; Dumani, Diego; Suggs, Laura; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    The past three decades have seen numerous advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) therapies. However, despite the successes there is still much to be done before TERM therapies become commonplace in clinic. One of the main obstacles is the lack of knowledge regarding complex tissue engineering processes. Imaging strategies, in conjunction with exogenous contrast agents, can aid in this endeavor by assessing in vivo therapeutic progress. The ability to uncover real-time treatment progress will help shed light on the complex tissue engineering processes and lead to development of improved, adaptive treatments. More importantly, the utilized exogenous contrast agents can double as therapeutic agents. Proper use of these Monitoring/Imaging and Regenerative Agents (MIRAs) can help increase TERM therapy successes and allow for clinical translation. While other fields have exploited similar particles for combining diagnostics and therapy, MIRA research is still in its beginning stages with much of the current research being focused on imaging or therapeutic applications, separately. Advancing MIRA research will have numerous impacts on achieving clinical translations of TERM therapies. Therefore, it is our goal to highlight current MIRA progress and suggest future research that can lead to effective TERM treatments. PMID:26692081

  16. Biocompatible astaxanthin as a novel marine-oriented agent for dual chemo-photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanna; Kim, Hyejin; Seok, Kwang Hyuk; Jung, Min Jung; Ahn, Yeh-chan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-01-01

    The photothermal effect of a marine-oriented xanthophyll carotenoid, astaxanthin (AXT), was characterized based on its potential absorption of visible laser light and conversion of optical light energy into heat for thermal treatment. As an antioxidant and anticancer agent, AXT extracted from marine material can be utilized for photothermal therapy due to its strong light absorption. The current study investigated the feasibility of the marine-based material AXT to increase the therapeutic efficacy of chemo-photothermal therapy (PTT) by assessing photothermal sessions in both cells and tumor tissues. A quasi-cw Q-switched 80 W 532 nm laser system was utilized to induce thermal necrosis in in vitro and in vivo models. An in vitro cytotoxicity study of AXT was implemented using squamous cell carcinoma (VX2) and macrophage (246.7) cell lines. In vivo PTT experiments were performed on 17 rabbits bearing VX2 tumors on their eyes that were treated with or without intratumoral injection of AXT at a dose of 100 μl (300 μg/ml) followed by laser irradiation at a low irradiance of 0.11 W/cm2. Fluorescence microscopy images revealed cellular death via apoptosis and necrosis owing to the dual chemo-photothermal effects induced by AXT. In vivo experimental results demonstrated that the AXT-assisted irradiation entailed a temperature increase by 30.4°C after tumor treatment for 4 min. The relative variations in tumor volume confirmed that the tumors treated with both AXT and laser irradiation completely disappeared 14 days after treatment, but the tumors treated under other conditions gradually grew. Due to selective light absorption, AXT-assisted laser treatment could be an effective thermal therapy for various drug-resistant cancers. PMID:28369126

  17. Silibinin, Dexamethasone, and Doxycycline as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Treating Vesicant-Inflicted Ocular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B; Enzenauer, Robert W; Petrash, J Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 µg), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. PMID:22841772

  18. Quantum dots and their potential biomedical applications in photosensitization for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Yaghini, Elnaz; Seifalian, Alexander M; MacRobert, Alexander J

    2009-04-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have received considerable interest in recent years as a result of their unique optical properties, leading to many applications in biology. This review examines their potential for photosensitization in photodynamic therapy compared with, and in combination with, conventional photosensitizing organic dyes. Photodynamic therapy is used for treating a range of malignant tumors and certain non-malignant pathologies, and conventional photosensitizers are based on organic dyes that are efficient generators of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. By exploiting the unique optical properties of quantum dots, the conjugation of quantum dots with photosensitizers and targeting agents could provide a new class of versatile multifunctional nanoparticles for both diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  19. The role of targeted agents in adjuvant therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen

    2005-07-01

    The recent survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage non-small cell lung cancer provides optimism for the future success of targeted therapy in this setting. It is important that we begin to explore molecularly targeted agents in the adjuvant arena, but how best to accomplish this in the face of these new findings presents a challenge. Criteria for selecting promising targeted therapies and optimal trial designs to evaluate them expeditiously in the adjuvant setting are clearly needed.

  20. Imidacloprid as a Potential Agent for the Systemic Control of Sand Flies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Imidacloprid as a potential agent for the systemic control of sand flies Gideon Wasserberg1,4*, Richard... imidacloprid as a systemic control agent. First, to evaluate the blood-feeding effect, we fed adult female Phlebotomus papatasi with imidacloprid ...mortality was obtained with a dose of only 250 ppm. Overall, results support the feasibility of imidacloprid as a systemic control agent that

  1. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein as a potential target for cancer therapy: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Jagani, Hitesh; Kasinathan, Narayanan; Meka, Sreenivasa Reddy; Josyula, Venkata Rao

    2016-08-01

    Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein, is considered as a potential target in cancer treatment since its oncogenic potential has been proven and is well documented. Antisense technology and RNA interference (RNAi) have been used to reduce the expression of the Bcl-2 gene in many types of cancer cells and are effective as adjuvant therapy along with the chemotherapeutic agents. The lack of appropriate delivery systems is considered to be the main hurdle associated with the RNAi. In this review, we discuss the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein, its oncogenic potential, and various approaches utilized to target Bcl-2 including suitable delivery systems employed for successful delivery of siRNA.

  2. Optimizing immunomodulators and anti-TNF agents in the therapy of Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Dassopoulos, Themistocles; Sninsky, Charles A

    2012-06-01

    Randomized trials support the use of the thiopurines and anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies in treating Crohn disease. New therapeutic approaches and laboratory assays have helped optimize the use of these agents. Thiopurine methyltransferase activity should always be determined to avoid thiopurines in individuals with absent enzyme activity. The role of metabolite-adjusted dosing when initiating thiopurines is not settled. Measuring metabolites helps guide management in patients failing therapy. Loss of response to anti-TNF therapy is mitigated by maintenance therapy and concomitant immunomodulators. When loss of response to infliximab occurs, management is guided by the serum concentrations of infliximab and antibodies to infliximab.

  3. Sarcopenia--consequences, mechanisms, and potential therapies.

    PubMed

    Greenlund, L J S; Nair, K S

    2003-03-01

    Increasingly, the worldwide population is growing older. Sarcopenia occurs with age and is characterized by loss of muscle mass, strength and endurance. Mechanisms that underlie this process are beginning to be understood. These include age-related loss and atrophy of individual muscle fibers, decreased synthesis of muscle proteins, and reduced mitochondrial function. The role of decreased anabolic hormone production in causing these changes remains to be clearly defined. Anabolic hormone replacement is a potential strategy currently being investigated for treatment of sarcopenia. Combinations of aerobic, resistance, and stretching exercise programs have well established beneficial effects. Further understanding of the molecular processes involved in the aging of muscle both at the level of gene expression and protein modification will be important for discovering novel treatment strategies.

  4. Targeted Aucore-Agshell nanorods as a dual-functional contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yiwen; Peng, Dong; Wang, Kun; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiushi; Tian, Jie; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing contrast enhancement is essential for producing specific signals in biomedical imaging and therapy. The potential of using Aucore-Agshell nanorods (Au@Ag NRs) as a dual-functional theranostic contrast agent is demonstrated for effective cancer imaging and treatments. Due to its strong NIR absorption and high efficiency of photothermal conversion, effects of both photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) are enhanced significantly. The PAT signal grows by 45.3% and 82% in the phantom and in vivo experiments, respectively, when compared to those using Au NRs. In PTT, The maximum increase of tissue temperature treated with Au@Ag NRs is 22.8 °C, twice that with Au NRs. Results of the current study show the feasibility of using Au@Ag NRs for synergetic PAT with PTT. And it will enhance the potential application on real-time PAT guided PTT, which will greatly benefit the customized PTT treatment of cancer. PMID:27231624

  5. Specific Inhibitors of Histone Demethylases: Novel Chemical Agents for Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0442 TITLE: Specific Inhibitors of Histone...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Specific Inhibitors of Histone Demethylases: Novel Chemical Agents for Breast Cancer Therapy 5b...specific inhibitors for these enzymes using an enzyme-templated approach that takes advantage of the enzyme’s substrate specificity. The identified

  6. Measuring the effects of topically applied skin optical clearing agents and modeling the effects and consequences for laser therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Khan, Misbah; Choi, Bernard; Svaasand, Lars O.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2005-04-01

    Human skin prepared with an optical clearing agent manifests reduced scattering as a result of de-hydration and refractive index matching. This has potentially large effects for laser therapies of several skin lesions such as port wine stain, hair removal and tattoo removal. With most topically applied clearing agents the clearing effect is limited because they penetrate poorly through the intact superficial skin layer (stratum corneum). Agent application modi other than topical are impractical and have limited the success of optical clearing in laser dermatology. In recent reports, however, a mixture of lipofylic and hydrofylic agents was shown to successfully penetrate through the intact stratum corneum layer which has raised new interest in this field. Immediately after application, the optical clearing effect is superficial and, as the agent diffuses through the skin, reduced scattering is manifested in deeper skin layers. For practical purposes as well as to maximize therapeutic success, it is important to quantify the reduced scattering as well as the trans-cutaneous transport dynamics of the agent. We determined the time and tissue depth resolved effects of optically cleared skin by inserting a microscopic reflector array in the skin. Depth dependent light intensity was measured by quantifying the signal of the reflector array with optical coherence tomography. A 1-dimensional mass diffusion model was used to estimate a trans-cutaneous transport diffusion constant for the clearing agent mixture. The results are used in Monte Carlo modeling to determine the optimal time of laser treatment after topical application of the optical clearing agent.

  7. Potential Benefits of Non-Pharmacological Therapies in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Sueiro Blanco, F.; Estévez Schwarz, I.; Ayán, C.; Cancela, JM.; Martín, V.

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is an incurable common syndrome of non-articular origin, and with no effective treatment by now. A great deal of research has sought to assess the efficacy of different therapies, especially non-pharmacological and low-cost ones, in the reduction of the intensity of symptoms. Despite the availability of a wide range of alternative therapies nowadays, there is little scientific evidence of the potential benefits of most of them, with results being contradictories. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the less well known alternative therapies in FM treatment, to describe the more relevant clinical studies published in this matter, and to analyze the potential effects of the main alternative therapies, in order to verify their efficacy. PMID:19088863

  8. Nanobodies as novel agents for disease diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Siontorou, Christina G

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of naturally occurring, heavy-chain only antibodies in Camelidae, and their further development into small recombinant nanobodies, presents attractive alternatives in drug delivery and imaging. Easily expressed in microorganisms and amenable to engineering, nanobody derivatives are soluble, stable, versatile, and have unique refolding capacities, reduced aggregation tendencies, and high-target binding capabilities. This review outlines the current state of the art in nanobodies, focusing on their structural features and properties, production, technology, and the potential for modulating immune functions and for targeting tumors, toxins, and microbes. PMID:24204148

  9. Analogues of [(triethylsilyl)ethynyl]estradiol as potential antifertility agents.

    PubMed

    Peters, R H; Crowe, D F; Avery, M A; Chong, W K; Tanabe, M

    1988-03-01

    Various 17 alpha-ethynylsteroids were prepared and derivatized as the corresponding triethylsilyl compounds 2-35, which were examined for a ratio of antifertility to estrogenic activity that would be more beneficial than that of the presently used agent. Among the triethylsilyl compounds evaluated, only 23 displayed this desired ratio, although two other compounds without the triethylsilyl moiety, 18 and 26, shared similar characteristics.

  10. Synthesis of Potential Prophylactic Agents against Cyanide Intoxication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-12

    compiles th« synthetic procedures described in reports submitted for quarters 9-12 of this contract. We have also colligated structures of all...tingle example of ihn compound class was submitted for biological evaluation this report period, and the physical properties of this agent (1) are...condensation of propiophenone »ith diethyl oxalate (Eq. II) The physical properties of these compounds are summarized in Table 2. a cr, 3 F 4 OCH3 5 CH3

  11. [Emetogenic potential of antineoplastic agents based on clinical trials in Japan].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoki; Handa, Satoko; Kato, Yasuhisa

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of chemotherapy that decreases patients' quality of life and motivation for treatment. Therefore, prevention and treatment of CINV are essential for motivating patients to continue chemotherapy. International societies such as American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC)/European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) have published guidelines for using antiemetics, and these guidelines were published in Japan in May 2010. However, both the Japananese and international guidelines do not provide sufficient clinical trial-based evidence for antiemetic use in the Japanese population. In this study, we attempted to evaluate and clarify the frequency of CINV in clinical trials in Japan. We found that thet guidelines specify different emetogenic potentials of some antineoplastic agents such as gemcitabine. Therefore, we believe that it is necessary to reevaluate the emetogenic risk of such antineoplastic agents and to develop a practical and standard antiemetic therapy so that in the future, patients do not hesitate to undergo chemotherapy because of side effects.

  12. The Role of Topical Antifungal Therapy for Onychomycosis and the Emergence of Newer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common infection of the nail unit that is usually caused by a dermatophyte (tinea unguium) and most frequently affects toenails in adults. In most cases, onychomycosis is associated with limited treatment options that are effective in achieving complete clearance in many cases. In addition, recurrence rates are high in the subset of treated patients who have been effectively cleared, usually with an oral antifungal agent. There has been a conspicuous absence of medical therapies approved in the United States since the introduction of topical ciclopirox (8% nail lacquer), with no new effective agents introduced for more than 10 years. Fortunately, newer agents and formulations have been under formal development. While patients might prefer a topical therapy, efficacy with ciclopirox 8% nail lacquer, the only available agent until the very recent approval of efinaconazole 10% solution, has been disappointing. The poor therapeutic outcomes achieved with ciclopirox 8% nail lacquer were not unexpected as the cure rates achieved in the clinical trials were unimpressive, despite concomitant nail debridement, which was an integral part of the pivotal trials with ciclopirox 8% nail lacquer. Efinaconazole 10% solution and tavaborole 5% solution are new topical antifungals specifically developed for the treatment of dermatophyte onychomycosis. In Phase 3 clinical trials, both newer agents were applied once daily for 48 weeks without concomitant nail debridement. Mycologic cure rates with efinaconazole 10% solution are markedly superior to what was achieved with ciclopirox 8% nail lacquer. To add, they appear to be nearly comparable to those achieved with oral itraconazole in pivotal clinical trials. However, it is important to remember that direct comparisons between different studies are not conclusive, are not generally considered to be scientifically sound, and may not be entirely accurate due to differences in study design and other factors. Well

  13. Maintenance therapy for multiple myeloma in the era of novel agents.

    PubMed

    Facon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Despite many recent advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma, the course of the disease is characterized by a repeating pattern of periods of remission and relapse as patients cycle through the available treatment options. Evidence is mounting that long-term maintenance therapy may help suppress residual disease after definitive therapy, prolonging remission and delaying relapse. For patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), lenalidomide maintenance therapy has been shown to improve progression-free survival (PFS); however, it is still unclear whether this translates into extended overall survival (OS). For patients ineligible for ASCT, continuous therapy with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone was shown to improve PFS and OS (interim analysis) compared with a standard, fixed-duration regimen of melphalan, prednisone, and thalidomide in a large phase 3 trial. Other trials have also investigated thalidomide and bortezomib maintenance for ASCT patients, and both agents have been evaluated as continuous therapy for those who are ASCT ineligible. However, some important questions regarding the optimal regimen and duration of therapy must be answered by prospective clinical trials before maintenance therapy, and continuous therapy should be considered routine practice. This article reviews the available data on the use of maintenance or continuous therapy strategies and highlights ongoing trials that will help to further define the role of these strategies in the management of patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

  14. Advance of Molecular Imaging Technology and Targeted Imaging Agent in Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that integrates advanced imaging technology with cellular and molecular biology. It can realize noninvasive and real time visualization, measurement of physiological or pathological process in the living organism at the cellular and molecular level, providing an effective method of information acquiring for diagnosis, therapy, and drug development and evaluating treatment of efficacy. Molecular imaging requires high resolution and high sensitive instruments and specific imaging agents that link the imaging signal with molecular event. Recently, the application of new emerging chemical technology and nanotechnology has stimulated the development of imaging agents. Nanoparticles modified with small molecule, peptide, antibody, and aptamer have been extensively applied for preclinical studies. Therapeutic drug or gene is incorporated into nanoparticles to construct multifunctional imaging agents which allow for theranostic applications. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of molecular imaging, the novel imaging agent including targeted imaging agent and multifunctional imaging agent, as well as cite some examples of their application in molecular imaging and therapy. PMID:24689058

  15. A dual function theranostic agent for near-infrared photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Huang, Shuo; Wang, Mingfeng; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Theranostic, defined as combining diagnostic and therapeutic agents, has attracted more attention in biomedical application. It is essential to monitor diseased tissue before treatment. Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising treatment of cancer tissue due to minimal invasion, unharmful to normal tissue and high efficiency. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid nonionizing biomedical imaging modality that combines rich optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality. The near infra-red (NIR) wavelengths, usually used in PAT, can provide deep penetration at the expense of reduced contrast, as the blood absorption drops in the NIR range. Exogenous contrast agents with strong absorption in the NIR wavelength range can enhance the photoacoustic imaging contrast as well as imaging depth. Most theranostic agents incorporating PAT and PTT are inorganic nanomaterials that suffer from poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we present an benzo[1,2-c;4,5-c'] bis[1,2,5] thiadiazole (BBT), based theranostic agent which not only acts as photoacoustic contrast agent but also a photothermal therapy agent. Experiments were performed on animal blood and organic nanoparticles embedded in a chicken breast tissue using PAT imaging system at ~803 nm wavelengths. Almost ten time contrast enhancement was observed from the nanoparticle in suspension. More than 6.5 time PA signal enhancement was observed in tissue at 3 cm depth. HeLa cell lines was used to test photothermal effect showing 90% cells were killed after 10 min laser irradiation. Our results indicate that the BBT - based naoparticles are promising theranostic agents for PAT imaging and cancer treatment by photothermal therapy.

  16. Non-peptidyl insulin mimetics as a potential antidiabetic agent.

    PubMed

    Nankar, Rakesh P; Doble, Mukesh

    2013-08-01

    Insulin has an important role in the maintenance of blood sugar. It is the only available therapeutic agent for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and there is a dire need for an oral substitute. Different categories of compounds including mono and di substituted benzoquinones, vanadium based compounds and natural products have been reported to cause insulin-like effects either by increasing phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR) or inhibiting the protein tyrosine phosphatases. This review summarizes the development of various insulin mimetics with special emphasis on their structure-activity relationships and various biological actions they produce.

  17. Investigation of Vietnamese plants for potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Lynette Bueno; Still, Patrick C.; Naman, C. Benjamin; Ren, Yulin; Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Van Thanh, Bui; Swanson, Steven M.; Soejarto, Djaja D.

    2014-01-01

    Higher plants continue to afford humankind with many new drugs, for a variety of disease types. In this review, recent phytochemical and biological progress is presented for part of a collaborative multi-institutional project directed towards the discovery of new antitumor agents. The specific focus is on bioactive natural products isolated and characterized structurally from tropical plants collected in Vietnam. The plant collection, identification, and processing steps are described, and the natural products isolated from these species are summarized with their biological activities. PMID:25395897

  18. Silibinin, dexamethasone, and doxycycline as potential therapeutic agents for treating vesicant-inflicted ocular injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A.; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B.; Enzenauer, Robert W.; Petrash, J. Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 μg), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. -- Highlights: ► Established injury biomarkers in rabbit corneal culture with nitrogen mustard (NM) ► This NM model is a cost effective

  19. Melatonin and Nitrones As Potential Therapeutic Agents for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Alejandro; Ramos, Eva; Patiño, Paloma; Oset-Gasque, Maria J.; López-Muñoz, Francisco; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a disease of aging affecting millions of people worldwide, and recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) is the only treatment approved. However, r-tPA has a low therapeutic window and secondary effects which limit its beneficial outcome, urging thus the search for new more efficient therapies. Among them, neuroprotection based on melatonin or nitrones, as free radical traps, have arisen as drug candidates due to their strong antioxidant power. In this Perspective article, an update on the specific results of the melatonin and several new nitrones are presented. PMID:27932976

  20. Systemic therapy with immunosuppressive agents and retinoids in hidradenitis suppurativa: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blok, J L; van Hattem, S; Jonkman, M F; Horváth, B

    2013-02-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a difficult disease to treat. Although the pathogenesis of this inflammatory skin disease is largely unknown, the important role of the immune system has been demonstrated in both experimental and clinical studies. Clinicians are therefore increasingly prescribing systemic treatments with immunosuppressive agents, but the more traditionally used systemic retinoids, especially isotretinoin, also remain relatively common therapies. In order to provide an overview of all currently available systemic immunosuppressive agents and retinoids for the treatment of HS, a systematic search was performed using the Medline and Embase databases. All published papers concerning systemic retinoids or immunosuppressive treatments for HS in adults were included. The primary endpoints were the percentages of significant responders, moderate responders and nonresponders. Other endpoints were the relapse rate and adverse events. In total 87 papers were included, comprising 518 patients with HS who were treated with systemic retinoids, biological agents or another immunosuppressive agents, including colchicine, ciclosporin, dapsone or methotrexate. The highest response rates were observed with infliximab, adalimumab and acitretin. Overall, the quality of evidence was low and differed between the agents, making direct comparisons difficult. However, based on the amount of evidence, infliximab and adalimumab were the most effective agents. Acitretin was also effective in HS, although the quality of the evidence was low. The therapeutic effect of isotretinoin is questionable. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the effectiveness of acitretin, and to identify the most effective immunosuppressive agents in HS.

  1. Harnessing the potential of epigenetic therapy to target solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Nita; Easwaran, Hariharan; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic therapies may play a prominent role in the future management of solid tumors. This possibility is based on the clinical efficacy of existing drugs in treating defined hematopoietic neoplasms, paired with promising new data from preclinical and clinical studies that examined these agents in solid tumors. We suggest that current drugs may represent a targeted therapeutic approach for reprogramming solid tumor cells, a strategy that must be pursued in concert with the explosion in knowledge about the molecular underpinnings of normal and cancer epigenomes. We hypothesize that understanding targeted proteins in the context of their enzymatic and scaffolding functions and in terms of their interactions in complexes with proteins that are targets of new drugs under development defines the future of epigenetic therapies for cancer. PMID:24382390

  2. Current antiplatelet agents: place in therapy and role of genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eugene

    2015-04-01

    Antiplatelet therapies play a central role in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. While aspirin, a cyclo-oxygenase-1 inhibitor has been the cornerstone of antithrombotic treatment for several decades, P2Y12 receptor inhibitors cangrelor, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor and protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist vorapaxar, have emerged as additional therapies to reduce the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. Recent clinical trials evaluating the role of these agents and major society guideline updates for use of antiplatelet therapies for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events will be examined. The latest studies regarding the appropriate duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention will be presented. The current state of genetic and platelet function testing will be reviewed.

  3. Recent advances in inhibitors of bacterial fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) system enzymes as potential antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Shutao

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial infections are a constant and serious threat to human health. With the increase of multidrug resistance of clinically pathogenic bacteria, common antibiotic therapies have been less effective. Fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) system enzymes are essential for bacterial membrane lipid biosynthesis and represent increasingly promising targets for the discovery of antibacterial agents with new mechanisms of action. This review highlights recent advances in inhibitors of bacterial FASII as potential antibacterial agents, paying special attention to the activities, mechanisms, and structure-activity relationships of those inhibitors that mainly target β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase, β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase, and enoyl-ACP reductase. Although inhibitors with low nanomolar and selective activity against various bacterial FASII have entered clinical trials, further research is needed to expand upon both available and yet unknown scaffolds to identify new FASII inhibitors that may have antibacterial potential, particularly against resistant bacterial strains.

  4. Therapeutic Potential of Hydrazones as Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Suman; Sharma, Neha; Saini, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazones are a special class of organic compounds in the Schiff base family. Hydrazones constitute a versatile compound of organic class having basic structure (R1R2C=NNR3R4). The active centers of hydrazone, that is, carbon and nitrogen, are mainly responsible for the physical and chemical properties of the hydrazones and, due to the reactivity toward electrophiles and nucleophiles, hydrazones are used for the synthesis of organic compound such as heterocyclic compounds with a variety of biological activities. Hydrazones and their derivatives are known to exhibit a wide range of interesting biological activities like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, analgesic, antimicrobial, anticancer, antiprotozoal, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiplatelet, cardioprotective, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antitubercular, trypanocidal, anti-HIV, and so forth. The present review summarizes the efficiency of hydrazones as potent anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25383223

  5. Potential radiosensitizing agents. 5. 2-Substituted benzimidazole derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.P.; Larroquette, C.A.; Agrawal, K.C.

    1982-11-01

    A series of 2-substituted benzimidazoles and their derivatives have been synthesized and tested for their ability to selectively sensitize hypoxic Chinese hamster cells (V-79) toward the lethal effect of ionizing radiation. These compounds were prepared by reacting the 2-substituted benzimidazoles with 1,2-epoxy-3-methoxypropane in the presence of potassium carbonate. Reaction of the 2-nitro and 2-methylfonyl analogue with the epoxide also yielded a cyclized material, which was confirmed to be a benzimidazo(2,1-b)oxazole. In an attempt to increase the electron affinity, 5- or 6-nitro-2-substituted-benzimidazoles were also synthesized and then reacted with the epoxide to yield the corresponding 1-substituted derivatives. The results of the biological tests for the radiosensitizing activity of these agents against Chinese hamster cells (V-79) in culture indicated that the 2-nitro-substituted analogues were the most effective sensitizers in this series.

  6. Hyperglycaemia Induced by Novel Anticancer Agents: An Undesirable Complication or a Potential Therapeutic Opportunity?

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2017-03-01

    Signalling pathways involving protein kinase, insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin receptors and the phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) system are critical in promoting oncogenesis. The use of anticancer agents that inhibit these pathways frequently results in hyperglycaemia, an on-target effect of these drugs. Hyperglycaemia induced by these agents denotes optimal inhibition of the desired pharmacological target. As hyperglycaemia can be treated successfully and effectively with metformin, managing this complication by reducing the dose of or discontinuing the anticancer drug may be counterproductive, especially if it is otherwise effective and clinically tolerated. The use of metformin to treat hyperglycaemia induced by anticancer drugs provides a valuable therapeutic opportunity of potentiating their clinical anticancer effects. Although evidence from randomised controlled trials is awaited, extensive preclinical evidence and clinical observational studies suggest that metformin has anticancer properties that improve overall survival in patients with diabetes and a variety of cancers. Metformin has also been reported to reverse resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-inhibiting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarises briefly the role of the above signalling pathways in oncogenesis, the causal association between inhibition of these pathways and hyperglycaemia, and the effect of metformin on clinical outcomes resulting from its anticancer properties. The evidence reviewed herein, albeit almost exclusively from observational studies, provides support for a greater use of metformin not only in patients with cancer and diabetes or drug-induced hyperglycaemia but also potentially as an anticancer drug. However, prospective randomised controlled studies are needed in all these settings to better assess the effect on clinical outcomes of adding metformin to ongoing anticancer therapy.

  7. Antimicrobial potential of bacteriocins: in therapy, agriculture and food preservation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Varish; Khan, Mohd Sajid; Jamal, Qazi Mohammad Sajid; Alzohairy, Mohammad A; Al Karaawi, Mohammad A; Siddiqui, Mughees Uddin

    2017-01-01

    Due to the appearance of antibiotic resistance and the toxicity associated with currently used antibiotics, peptide antibiotics are the need of the hour. Thus, demand for new antimicrobial agents has brought great interest in new technologies to enhance safety. One such antimicrobial molecule is bacteriocin, synthesised by various micro-organisms. Bacteriocins are widely used in agriculture, veterinary medicine as a therapeutic, and as a food preservative agent to control various infectious and food-borne pathogens. In this review, we highlight the potential therapeutic and food preservative applications of bacteriocin.

  8. Enteric MRI contrast agents: comparative study of five potential agents in humans.

    PubMed

    Tart, R P; Li, K C; Storm, B L; Rolfes, R J; Ang, P G

    1991-01-01

    We compared the effectiveness of 1 mM Geritol, 12% corn oil emulsion, Kaolin-pectin, single contrast oral barium sulfate, and effervescent granules as enteric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Five volunteers were recruited. Each volunteer ingested for examinations, separated by at least one week, either 500 ml of each of the liquid preparations or two packets of the CO2 granules (producing 400 ml of CO2 per packet). Abdominal MR images were then obtained using a 1.5 T Magnetom imager and SE 550/22, SE 2000/45/90 and FISP 40/18/40 degrees pulse sequences. The oil emulsions were best tolerated. Barium sulfate caused the greatest amount of nausea, followed by Geritol and Kaolin-pectin. With FISP 40/18/40 degrees, 60%-80% of the small bowel was well delineated using oil emulsion, Kaolin-pectin, or barium sulfate. We conclude that oil emulsion was by far the best enteric MR contrast agent in our study. Good delineation of the small bowel and pancreas can be achieved using oil emulsion and gradient echo pulse sequences. The lack of side-effects and the excellent taste make it highly acceptable to human subjects.

  9. [Developing FGFR inhibitors as potential anti-cancer agents].

    PubMed

    Zsákai, Lilian; Németh, Gábor; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Greff, Zoltán; Horváth, Zoltán; Szokol, Bálint; Baska, Ferenc; Boon, Tin Chuad; Orfi, Lászlo; Kéri, Györgya

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) family is a sequentially highly related subgroup of membrane proteins consisting of four tyrosine kinase type enzyme: FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. These are kinases of great interest in a wide spectrum of physiological processes such as tissue repair via controlling cell proliferation. As initiatiors of cell proliferation, in some cases they have leading roles in several types of cancer, eg. breast cancer, pancreas cancer, gastric tumors and multiple myeloma via overexpression and/or mutation. This phenomenon makes them promising targets for drug development in order to develop signal transduction therapies based on small molecule FGFR inhibitors. We have developed two main groups of lead molecules: compounds with benzotiophene and oxindole cores utilizing numerous methods from in silico modelling via in vitro biochemichal assays and testing on relevant cell lines to cytotoxicity assays.

  10. Metastatic Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis: Favorable Response to Steroid Pulse Therapy Plus Immunosuppressive Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Dong, Huimin; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Xue, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Background Our study retrospectively reviewed the therapeutic effect of steroid pulse therapy in combination with an immunosuppressive agent in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with metastatic thymoma. Material/Methods MG patients with metastatic thymoma that underwent methylprednisolone pulse therapy plus cyclophosphamide were retrospectively analyzed. Patients initially received methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral methylprednisolone. Cyclophosphamide was prescribed simultaneously at the beginning of treatment. Clinical outcomes, including therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of MG and thymoma, were assessed. Results Twelve patients were recruited. According to histological classification, 4 cases were type B2 thymoma, 3 were type B3, 2 were type B1, and 1 was type AB. After combined treatment for 15 days, both the thymoma and MG responded dramatically to high-dose methylprednisolone plus cyclophosphamide. The symptoms of MG were improved in all patients, with marked improvement in 6 patients and basic remission in 4. Interestingly, complete remission of thymoma was achieved in 5 patients and partial remission in 7 patients. Myasthenic crisis was observed in 1 patient and was relieved after intubation and ventilation. Adverse reactions were observed in 7 patients (58.3%), most commonly infections, and all were resolved without discontinuation of therapy. During the follow-up, all patients were stabilized except for 1 with pleural metastasis who received further treatment and another 1 who died from myasthenic crisis. Conclusions The present study in a series of MG patients with metastatic thymoma indicated that steroid pulse therapy in combination with immunosuppressive agents was an effective and well-tolerated for treatment of both metastatic thymoma and MG. Glucocorticoid pulse therapy plus immunosuppressive agents should therefore be considered in MG patients with metastatic thymoma. PMID:28278141

  11. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a potential targeting agent for delivery of boron to malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Bailey, M.Q.; Soloway, A.H.; Carlsson, J.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of high grade gliomas express an amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and this often is associated with an increase in cell surface receptor expression. The rapid internalization and degradation of EGF-EGFR complexes, as well as their high affinity make EGF a potential targeting agent for delivery of {sup 10}B to tumor cells with an amplified number of EGFR. Human glioma cells can expresses as many as 10{sup 5} {minus}10{sup 6} EGF receptors per cell, and if these could be saturated with boronated EGF, then > 10{sup 8} boron atoms would be delivered per cell. Since EGF has a comparatively low molecular weight ({approximately} 6 kD), this has allowed us to construct relatively small bioconjugates containing {approximately} 900 boron atoms per EGF molecule{sup 3}, which also had high affinity for EGFR on tumor cells. In the present study, the feasibility of using EGF receptors as a potential target for therapy of gliomas was investigated by in vivo scintigraphic studies using {sup 131}I{minus} or {sup 99m}{Tc}-labeled EGF in a rat brain tumor model. Our results indicate that intratumorally delivered boron- EGF conjugates might be useful for targeting EGFR on glioma cells if the boron containing moiety of the conjugates persisted intracellularly. Further studies are required, however, to determine if this approach can be used for BNCT of the rat glioma.

  12. Genomic identification of potential targets unique to Candida albicans for the discovery of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Himanshu; Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Khan, Feroz

    2014-01-01

    Despite of modern antifungal therapy, the mortality rates of invasive infection with human fungal pathogen Candida albicans are up to 40%. Studies suggest that drug resistance in the three most common species of human fungal pathogens viz., C. albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus (causing mortality rate up to 90%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (causing mortality rate up to 70%) is due to mutations in the target enzymes or high expression of drug transporter genes. Drug resistance in human fungal pathogens has led to an imperative need for the identification of new targets unique to fungal pathogens. In the present study, we have used a comparative genomics approach to find out potential target proteins unique to C. albicans, an opportunistic fungus responsible for severe infection in immune-compromised human. Interestingly, many target proteins of existing antifungal agents showed orthologs in human cells. To identify unique proteins, we have compared proteome of C. albicans [SC5314] i.e., 14,633 total proteins retrieved from the RefSeq database of NCBI, USA with proteome of human and non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that 4,568 proteins were identified unique to C. albicans as compared to those of human and later when these unique proteins were compared with S. cerevisiae proteome, finally 2,161 proteins were identified as unique proteins and after removing repeats total 1,618 unique proteins (42 functionally known, 1,566 hypothetical and 10 unknown) were selected as potential antifungal drug targets unique to C. albicans.

  13. [Cycloferon as an agent for the anti-relapse therapy in patients with chronic hyperplastic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, I P; Romantsov, M G; Kriukov, A I; Grigorian, S S; Kovalenko, A L

    2013-01-01

    The data on the efficacy of cycloferon as an agents of antirelapsing therapy in management of 123 patients with chronic hyperplastic sinusitis are presented. The drug induction of endogenous interferons was validated by the properties of the local mucosal immunity, virus invasion and virus persistence in the nasal an d accessory nasal sinuses mucosa, as well as by different levels ofthe interferon production deficiency. The clinical efficacy was stated in 53% of the cases. The relapses were recorded in 13.1% of the patients treated with cycloferon vs. 33.3% of the patients under the local corticosteroid therapy.

  14. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Wendel Mombaque; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00). The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:27878224

  15. Biological agents with potential for misuse: a historical perspective and defensive measures.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Deepak K; Warheit, David B

    2004-08-15

    Biological and chemical agents capable of producing serious illness or mortality have been used in biowarfare from ancient times. Use of these agents has progressed from crude forms in early and middle ages, when snakes and infected cadavers were used as weapons in battles, to sophisticated preparations for use during and after the second World War. Cults and terrorist organizations have attempted the use of biological agents with an aim to immobilize populations or cause serious harm. The reasons for interest in these agents by individuals and organizations include relative ease of acquisition, potential for causing mass casualty or panic, modest financing requirement, availability of technology, and relative ease of delivery. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified Critical Biological Agents into three major categories. This classification was based on several criteria, which include severity of impact on human health, potential for delivery in a weapon, capacity to cause panic and special needs for development, and stockpiling of medication. Agents that could cause the greatest harm following deliberate use were placed in category A. Category B included agents capable of producing serious harm and significant mortality but of lower magnitude than category A agents. Category C included emerging pathogens that could be developed for mass dispersion in future and their potential as a major health threat. A brief description of the category A bioagents is included and the pathophysiology of two particularly prominent agents, namely anthrax and smallpox, is discussed in detail. The potential danger from biological agents and their ever increasing threat to human populations have created a need for developing technologies for their early detection, for developing treatment strategies, and for refinement of procedures to ensure survival of affected individuals so as to attain the ultimate goal of eliminating the threat from intentional use of

  16. Thymol and eugenol derivatives as potential antileishmanial agents.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Selene Maia; Vila-Nova, Nadja Soares; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal; Rondon, Fernanda Cristina; Lobo, Carlos Henrique; de Alencar Araripe Noronha Moura, Arlindo; Sales, Antônia Débora; Rodrigues, Ana Paula Ribeiro; de Figuereido, José Ricardo; Campello, Claudio Cabral; Wilson, Mary E; de Andrade, Heitor Franco

    2014-11-01

    In Northeastern Brazil visceral leishmaniasis is endemic with lethal cases among humans and dogs. Treatment is toxic and 5-10% of humans die despite treatment. The aim of this work was to survey natural active compounds to find new molecules with high activity and low toxicity against Leishmania infantum chagasi. The compounds thymol and eugenol were chosen to be starting compounds to synthesize acetyl and benzoyl derivatives and to test their antileishmanial activity in vitro and in vivo against L. i. chagasi. A screening assay using luciferase-expressing promastigotes was used to measure the growth inhibition of promastigotes, and an ELISA in situ was performed to evaluate the growth inhibition of amastigote. For the in vivo assay, thymol and eugenol derivatives were given IP to BALB/c mice at 100mg/kg/day for 30 days. The thymol derivatives demonstrated the greater activity than the eugenol derivatives, and benzoyl-thymol was the best inhibitor (8.67 ± 0.28 μg/mL). All compounds demonstrated similar activity against amastigotes, and acetyl-thymol was more active than thymol and the positive control drug amphotericin B. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of Leishmania amastigote only in the spleen but not the liver of mice treated with acetyl-thymol. Thus, these synthesized derivatives demonstrated anti-leishmanial activity both in vitro and in vivo. These may constitute useful compounds to generate new agents for treatment of leishmaniasis.

  17. Cotinine: a potential new therapeutic agent against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Valentina; Zeitlin, Ross

    2012-07-01

    Tobacco smoking has been correlated with a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This negative correlation has been attributed to nicotine's properties. However, the undesired side-effects of nicotine and the absence of clear evidence of positive effects of this drug on the cognitive abilities of AD patients have decreased the enthusiasm for its therapeutic use. In this review, we discuss evidence showing that cotinine, the main metabolite of nicotine, has many of the beneficial effects but none of the negative side-effects of its precursor. Cotinine has been shown to be neuroprotective, to improve memory in primates as well as to prevent memory loss, and to lower amyloid-beta (Aβ)) burden in AD mice. In AD, cotinine's positive effect on memory is associated with the inhibition of Aβ aggregation, the stimulation of pro-survival factors such as Akt, and the inhibition of pro-apoptotic factors such as glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β). Because stimulation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) positively modulates these factors and memory, the involvement of these receptors in cotinine's effects are discussed. Because of its beneficial effects on brain function, good safety profile, and nonaddictive properties, cotinine may represent a new therapeutic agent against AD.

  18. Neem components as potential agents for cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Kumar, Sandeep; Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2014-08-01

    Azadirachta indica, also known as neem, is commonly found in many semi-tropical and tropical countries including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The components extracted from neem plant have been used in traditional medicine for the cure of multiple diseases including cancer for centuries. The extracts of seeds, leaves, flowers, and fruits of neem have consistently shown chemopreventive and antitumor effects in different types of cancer. Azadirachtin and nimbolide are among the few bioactive components in neem that have been studied extensively, but research on a great number of additional bioactive components is warranted. The key anticancer effects of neem components on malignant cells include inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, suppression of cancer angiogenesis, restoration of cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) balance, and enhancement of the host immune responses against tumor cells. While the underlying mechanisms of these effects are mostly unclear, the suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway is, at least partially, involved in the anticancer functions of neem components. Importantly, the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of neem components are tumor selective as the effects on normal cells are significantly weaker. In addition, neem extracts sensitize cancer cells to immunotherapy and radiotherapy, and enhance the efficacy of certain cancer chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the current updates on the anticancer effects of neem components and their possible impact on managing cancer incidence and treatment.

  19. Influence of potentially remineralizing agents on bleached enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Samezima, Leticia Yumi; Fonseca, Léila Pereira; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the addition of calcium and fluoride into a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on enamel surface and subsurface microhardness. Twenty extracted human third molars were sectioned to obtain enamel fragments and they were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the bleaching treatment. Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control). Group 2 was treated with a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Total Bleach), Groups 3 and 4 were bleached with Total Bleach modified by the addition of sodium fluoride and calcium chloride, respectively. The microhardness of the enamel surface was assessed using a Vickers microdurometer immediately after the bleaching treatment. The specimens were sectioned in the central portion, polished and evaluated to determine the microhardness of the enamel subsurface to a depth of 125 microm, with an interval of 25 microm between measures. There were significant differences among the groups. In terms of surface microhardness, the bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group exhibited the highest means. Regarding subsurface microhardness, there were no significant differences among the groups for the depth and interaction factors. The bleached group exhibited the lowest means, and the calcium-modified bleached group presented the highest means. It was concluded that the bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the surface and subsurface microhardness of the enamel, and the addition of fluoride and calcium in the bleaching agent increased the microhardness means of the bleached enamel.

  20. Novel Oxadiazole Thioglycosides as Potential Anti-Acinetobacter Agents

    PubMed Central

    Akbari Dilmaghani, Karim; Nasuhi Pur, Fazel; Mahammad pour, Majid; Mahammad nejad, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    The glycosylation of 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiones has been performed with peracetylated β-pyranosyl bromide in the presence of potassium carbonate. Deprotection of acetylated thioglycosides was necessary for increasing their antibacterial effects. The structures of nucleosides were confirmed by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and HRMS. The anomeric protons of nucleosides c1–4 were assigned to the doublet, confirming the β-configuration. The synthesized compounds were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (Gram-negetive) strain in-vitro in comparison with Ampicillin as a reference drug which is normally used for treating such infections. The synthetic compounds showed different inhibition zones against tested bacterial strain. Thioglycoside derivatives of 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiones (c set) were more active against Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ATCC 23055 than “parent” 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiones (a set), confirming the relation between glyco-conjugation and increasing of antiproliferative activity of antibiotic agents. The best result belonged to nucleoside bearing 2-furyl moiety in its heterocyclic nucleus (c4). The existence of m-PhNO2 group as Ar in structures of a set and their corresponding sugar derivatives decreased the antibacterial activity of them in comparison with the rest of synthetic compounds. PMID:28243273

  1. Neem components as potential agents for cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Fang; Kumar, Sandeep; Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    Azadirachta indica, also known as neem, is commonly found in many semi-tropical and tropical countries including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The components extracted from neem plant have been used in traditional medicine for the cure of multiple diseases including cancer for centuries. The extracts of seeds, leaves, flowers, and fruits of neem have consistently shown chemopreventive and antitumor effects in different types of cancer. Azadirachtin and nimbolide are among the few bioactive components in neem that have been studied extensively, but research on a great number of additional bioactive components is warranted. The key anticancer effects of neem components on malignant cells include inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, suppression of cancer angiogenesis, restoration of cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) balance, and enhancement of the host immune responses against tumor cells. While the underlying mechanisms of these effects are mostly unclear, the suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway is, at least partially, involved in the anticancer functions of neem components. Importantly, the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of neem components are tumor selective as the effects on normal cells are significantly weaker. In addition, neem extracts sensitize cancer cells to immunotherapy and radiotherapy, and enhance the efficacy of certain cancer chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the current updates on the anticancer effects of neem components and their possible impact on managing cancer incidence and treatment. PMID:25016141

  2. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies.

  3. THE SYNTHESIS OF POTENTIAL ANTI-RADIATION AGENTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    potentially capable of carrying it into nu leic acids, was completed. Since replacement of the sulfur of cysteamine with selenium does not destroy...products (2-aminoselenazolines and 2-selenoethylguanidines) were prepared. The bis Bunte salt of bis(2-mercaptoethyl)amine the doublearmed analog of cysteamine was synthesized. (Author)

  4. Development of RNAi technology for targeted therapy--a track of siRNA based agents to RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yinjian; Zhang, Chunling; Liang, Wei

    2014-11-10

    RNA interference (RNAi) was intensively studied in the past decades due to its potential in therapy of diseases. The target specificity and universal treatment spectrum endowed siRNA advantages over traditional small molecules and protein drugs. However, barriers exist in the blood circulation system and the diseased tissues blocked the actualization of RNAi effect, which raised function versatility requirements to siRNA therapeutic agents. Appropriate functionalization of siRNAs is necessary to break through these barriers and target diseased tissues in local or systemic targeted application. In this review, we summarized that barriers exist in the delivery process and popular functionalized technologies for siRNA such as chemical modification and physical encapsulation. Preclinical targeted siRNA delivery and the current status of siRNA based RNAi therapeutic agents in clinical trial were reviewed and finally the future of siRNA delivery was proposed. The valuable experience from the siRNA agent delivery study and the RNAi therapeutic agents in clinical trial paved ways for practical RNAi therapeutics to emerge early.

  5. Laminin-111: a potential therapeutic agent for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goudenege, Sébastien; Lamarre, Yann; Dumont, Nicolas; Rousseau, Joël; Frenette, Jérôme; Skuk, Daniel; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2010-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) still needs effective treatments, and myoblast transplantation (MT) is considered as an approach to repair damaged skeletal muscles. DMD is due to the complete loss of dystrophin from muscles. The lack of link between the contracting apparatus and the extracellular matrix leads to frequent damage to the sarcolemma triggering muscle fiber necrosis. Laminins are major proteins in the extracellular matrix. Laminin-111 is normally present in skeletal and cardiac muscles in mice and humans but only during embryonic development. In this study, we showed that intramuscular injection of laminin-111 increased muscle strength and resistance in mdx mice. We also used laminin-111 as a coadjuvant in MT, and we showed this protein decreased considerably the repetitive cycles of degeneration, inflammatory reaction, and regeneration. Moreover, MT is significantly improved. To explain the improvement, we confirmed with the same myoblast cell batch that laminin-111 improves proliferation and drastically increases migration in vitro. These results are extremely important because DMD could be treated only by the injection of a recombinant protein, a simple and safe therapy to prevent loss of muscle function. Moreover, the improvement in MT would be significant to treat the muscles of DMD patients who are already weak.

  6. New potential chemotherapy for ovarian cancer - Combined therapy with WP 631 and epothilone B.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Barbara; Rogalska, Aneta; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2016-04-15

    Despite more modern therapeutics approaches and the use of new drugs for chemotherapy, patients with ovarian cancer still have poor prognosis and therefore, new strategies for its cure are highly needed. One of the promising ways is combined therapy, which has many advantages as minimizing drug resistance, enhancing efficacy of treatment, and reducing toxicity. Combined therapy has rich and successful history in the field of ovarian cancer treatment. Currently use therapy is usually based on platinum-containing agent (carboplatin or cisplatin) and a member of taxanes (paclitaxel or docetaxel). In the mid-2000s this standard regimen has been expanded with bevacizumab, monoclonal antibody directed to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Another drug combination with promising perspectives is WP 631 given together with epothilone B (Epo B). WP 631 is a bisanthracycline composed of two molecules of daunorubicin linked with a p-xylenyl linker. Epo B is a 16-membered macrolide manifesting similar mechanism of action to taxanes. Their effectiveness against ovarian cancer as single agents is well established. However, the combination of WP 631 and Epo B appeared to act synergistically, meaning that it is much more potent than the single drugs. The mechanism lying under its efficacy includes disturbing essential cell cycle-regulating proteins leading to mitotic slippage and following apoptosis, as well as affecting EpCAM and HMGB1 expression. In this article, we summarized the current state of knowledge regarding combined therapy based on WP 631 and Epo B as a potential way of ovarian cancer treatment.

  7. Repositioning of chlorambucil as a potential anti-schistosomal agent.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Maha M; Mossallam, Shereen F; Amer, Eglal I; Younis, Layla K; Rashed, Hoda A

    2017-02-01

    As parasites and cancer cells share many lifestyle and behavioral resemblances, repositioning of anti-cancerous agents as anti-parasitic is quite trendy, especially those sharing the same therapeutic targets. Therefore, the current study investigated the in vitro efficacy of ascending concentrations of chlorambucil (0.5-20μg/ml) against adult Schistosoma mansoni worms, over 72h. Additionally, its in vivo effects against the different developmental stages of the worm were assessed, after an oral dose of 2.5mg/kg/day for five successive days, through evaluating the worm load reduction and worms' morphological alterations and oogram changes. In addition to tissue egg count, a histopathological study of the liver was conducted. In vitro, chlorambucil demonstrated noticeable anti-schistosomal effects in the form of progressive reductions of the worms' viability in a dose dependent manner. Complete worm death was achieved at 72h incubation with 5μg/ml drug concentration. In vivo, chlorambucil induced a significant reduction in the total worm load against all developmental stages. Its highest impact was evident against the juvenile stage, where it induced 75.8% total worm load reduction, and 89.2% and 86.7% intestinal and hepatic egg counts reduction, respectively, along with ogram alterations. Besides, it induced significant shortening of both male and female worms and promoted an amelioration of hepatic histopathology. Results show that chlorambucil possesses favorable in vitro and in vivo anti-schistosomal activity. The highest in vivo efficacy was against the juvenile stage of S. mansoni, significantly superior to praziquantel, with extended potency to the adult stage. Further studies are recommended for chlorambucil target verification and to enhance its therapeutic efficacy.

  8. The toxicology of bioregulators as potential agents of bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Bokan, Slavko

    2005-06-01

    Bioregulators or modulators are biochemical compounds such as peptides, that occur naturally in organisms. Advances in biotechnology create the potential for the misuse of peptide bioregulators in offensive biological weapons programmes. Bioregulators are a new class of weapons that can damage the nervous system, alter mood, trigger psychological changes and kill. Over the last twenty years, neuroscience has produced an explosion of knowledge about receptor systems in the nerve cells that are of critical importance in receiving chemical transmitter substances released by other nerve cells. Bioregulators are closely related to substances normally found in the body that regulates normal biological processes. The potential military or terrorist use of bioregulators is similar to that of toxins. Together with increased research into toxins, the bioregulators have also been studied and synthesized. This paper presents a review of bioregulators that could be used in terrorist or other hostile activities.

  9. Au@Pt nanostructures: a novel photothermal conversion agent for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinglong; Jiang, Xiumei; Wang, Liming; Zhang, Hui; Hu, Zhijian; Liu, Ying; Wu, Xiaochun; Chen, Chunying

    2014-04-07

    Due to aspect ratio dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR), gold nanorods (Au NRs) can be tuned to have a strong absorption in the near infrared region (NIR) and convert light to heat energy, which shows promises in cancer photothermal therapy. In this study, we introduced another more efficient NIR photothermal agent, Au nanorods coated with a shell of Pt nanodots (Au@Pt nanostructures). After surface modification with Pt dots, the Au@Pt nanostructure became a more efficient photothermal therapy agent as verified both in vitro and in vivo. To clarify the mechanism, we assessed the interaction between the MDA-MB-231 cells with Au@Pt or Au NRs. Results showed that the slightly higher uptake and the reduced sensitivity of the longitudinal SPR band on the intracellular aggregate state may contribute to the better photothermal efficiency for Au@Pt NRs. The theoretical studies further confirmed that the Au@Pt nanostructure itself exhibited better photothermal efficiency compared to Au NRs. These advantages make the Au@Pt nanostructure a more attractive and effective agent for cancer photothermal therapy than general Au NRs.

  10. Novel Targeted Agents in Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Natalie S.; Park, Steven I.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent emergence of novel targeted agents for treatment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In particular, antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates directed against surface antigens, agents that block immune checkpoint pathways, and small molecule inhibitors directed against cell signaling pathways have shown significant promise in patients with relapsed and refractory disease and in the frontline setting. With the development of these new therapies, cytotoxic chemotherapy may be avoided entirely in some clinical settings. This review will present the latest information on these novel treatments in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and will discuss both recently approved agents as well as drugs currently being studied in clinical trials. PMID:26393619

  11. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  12. Synthesis of genistein 2,3-anhydroglycoconjugates -- potential antiproliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Goj, Katarzyna; Rusin, Aleksandra; Szeja, Wiesław; Kitel, Radosław; Komor, Roman; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    The title compounds, variously protected 2.3-anhydrosugars linked with genistein through an alkyl chain, were synthesized in a sequence of reactions. First step involved Ferrier rearragement of 3,4-di-O-acetyl-L-rhamnal with 3-bromopropanol to obtain 2,3-unsaturated bromoalkylglycosides. The next step was epoxidation with m-CPBA and finally these compounds were connected with genistein in reaction of 7-O-genistein tetra-butylamonium salt with 2,3-anhydro bromoalkylglycosides. Obtained glycoconjugates differ in orientation of an oxirane ring and the protecting group in a sugar moiety. All compounds were tested in vitro for antiproliferative potential in cancer cells.

  13. Breakthrough therapies: Cystic fibrosis (CF) potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Marshall, Susan G; Ramsey, Bonnie W; Rowe, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in abnormal protein function. Recent advances of targeted molecular therapies and high throughput screening have resulted in multiple drug therapies that target many important mutations in the CFTR protein. In this review, we provide the latest results and current progress of CFTR modulators for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, focusing on potentiators of CFTR channel gating and Phe508del processing correctors for the Phe508del CFTR mutation. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular basis underlying these new therapies and emerging results from the latest clinical trials. The future directions for augmenting the rescue of Phe508del with CFTR modulators are also emphasized.

  14. Nanotechnology and stem cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases: potential applications.

    PubMed

    La Francesca, Saverio

    2012-01-01

    The use of stem cell therapy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases has generated significant interest in recent years. Limitations to the clinical application of this therapy center on issues of stem cell delivery, engraftment, and fate. Nanotechnology-based cell labeling and imaging techniques facilitate stem cell tracking and engraftment studies. Nanotechnology also brings exciting new opportunities to translational stem cell research as it enables the controlled engineering of nanoparticles and nanomaterials that can properly relate to the physical scale of cell-cell and cell-niche interactions. This review summarizes the most relevant potential applications of nanoscale technologies to the field of stem cell therapy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Pyrimidine derivatives as potential agents acting on central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Deep, Aakash; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2015-01-01

    Pyrimidine and its derivatives are present in many of the bioactive aromatic compounds that are of wide interest because of their diverse biological and clinical applications. The utility of pyrimidines as synthon for various biologically active compounds has given impetus to these studies. The review article aims to review the work reported on pharmacological activities of central nervous system (CNS) such as anticonvulsant and antidepressant, which created interest among researchers to synthesize variety of pyrimidine and their derivatives. The present study shows, objective of the work can be summarized as pyrimidine derivative constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development. These observations have been given novel idea for the development of new pyrimidine derivative that possess varied biological activities. This article aims to review the recent works on pyrimidine moiety together with the biological potential during the past year.

  16. Melatonin as a Potential Agent in the Treatment of Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Coto-Montes, Ana; Boga, Jose A.; Tan, Dun X.; Reiter, Russel J.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the increased speed at which the world population is aging, sarcopenia could become an epidemic in this century. This condition currently has no means of prevention or treatment. Melatonin is a highly effective and ubiquitously acting antioxidant and free radical scavenger that is normally produced in all organisms. This molecule has been implicated in a huge number of biological processes, from anticonvulsant properties in children to protective effects on the lung in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the data which suggest that melatonin may be beneficial in attenuating, reducing or preventing each of the symptoms that characterize sarcopenia. The findings are not limited to sarcopenia, but also apply to osteoporosis-related sarcopenia and to age-related neuromuscular junction dysfunction. Since melatonin has a high safety profile and is drastically reduced in advanced age, its potential utility in the treatment of sarcopenic patients and related dysfunctions should be considered. PMID:27783055

  17. Morphine as a Potential Oxidative Stress-Causing Agent.

    PubMed

    Skrabalova, Jitka; Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2013-11-01

    Morphine exhibits important pharmacological effects for which it has been used in medical practice for quite a long time. However, it has a high addictive potential and can be abused. Long-term use of this drug can be connected with some pathological consequences including neurotoxicity and neuronal dysfunction, hepatotoxicity, kidney dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, most studies examining the impact of morphine have been aimed at determining the effects induced by chronic morphine exposure in the brain, liver, cardiovascular system and macrophages. It appears that different tissues may respond to morphine diversely and are distinctly susceptible to oxidative stress and subsequent oxidative damage of biomolecules. Importantly, production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species induced by morphine, which have been observed under different experimental conditions, can contribute to some pathological processes, degenerative diseases and organ dysfunctions occurring in morphine abusers or morphine-treated patients. This review attempts to provide insights into the possible relationship between morphine actions and oxidative stress.

  18. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-22

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity.

  19. Potential Antiosteoporotic Agents from Plants: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Min; Nie, Yan; Cao, Da-Peng; Xue, Yun-Yun; Wang, Jie-Si; Zhao, Lu; Rahman, Khalid; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health hazard and is a disease of old age; it is a silent epidemic affecting more than 200 million people worldwide in recent years. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research many plants and their compounds have been shown to possess antiosteoporosis activity. This paper reviews the medicinal plants displaying antiosteoporosis properties including their origin, active constituents, and pharmacological data. The plants reported here are the ones which are commonly used in traditional medical systems and have demonstrated clinical effectiveness against osteoporosis. Although many plants have the potential to prevent and treat osteoporosis, so far, only a fraction of these plants have been thoroughly investigated for their physiological and pharmacological properties including their mechanism of action. An attempt should be made to highlight plant species with possible antiosteoporosis properties and they should be investigated further to help with future drug development for treating this disease. PMID:23365596

  20. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Nikzad, Sonia; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  1. Gene therapy in Alzheimer's disease - potential for disease modification.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Per; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Tjernberg, Lars O; Winblad, Bengt; Saido, Takaomi C

    2010-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in the elderly, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline. The mechanism underlying onset of the disease has not been fully elucidated. However, characteristic pathological manifestations include extracellular accumulation and aggregation of the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) into plaques and intracellular accumulation and aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau, forming neurofibrillary tangles. Despite extensive research worldwide, no disease modifying treatment is yet available. In this review, we focus on gene therapy as a potential treatment for AD, and summarize recent work in the field, ranging from proof-of-concept studies in animal models to clinical trials. The multifactorial causes of AD offer a variety of possible targets for gene therapy, including two neurotrophic growth factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, Abeta-degrading enzymes, such as neprilysin, endothelin-converting enzyme and cathepsin B, and AD associated apolipoprotein E. This review also discusses advantages and drawbacks of various rapidly developing virus-mediated gene delivery techniques for gene therapy. Finally, approaches aiming at down-regulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 levels by means of siRNA-mediated knockdown are briefly summarized. Overall, the prospects appear hopeful that gene therapy has the potential to be a disease modifying treatment for AD.

  2. Natural products as a source of potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Cassady, J M; Baird, W M; Chang, C J

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of novel bioactive natural products are reported. This research is directed to the exploration of plants with confirmed activity in bioassays designed to detect potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents. Structural work and chemical studies are reported for several cytotoxic agents from the plants Annona densicoma, Annona reticulata, Claopodium crispifolium, Polytrichum obioense, and Psorospermum febrifugum. Studies are also reported based on development of a mammalian cell culture benzo[a]pyrene metabolism assay for the detection of potential anticarcinogenic agents from natural products. In this study a number of isoflavonoids and flavonoids with antimutagenic activity have been discovered.

  3. The preclinical pharmacokinetic disposition of a series of perforin-inhibitors as potential immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    Bull, M R; Spicer, J A; Huttunen, K M; Denny, W A; Ciccone, A; Browne, K A; Trapani, J A; Helsby, N A

    2015-12-01

    The cytolytic protein perforin is a key component of the immune response and is implicated in a number of human pathologies and therapy-induced conditions. A novel series of small molecule inhibitors of perforin function have been developed as potential immunosuppressive agents. The pharmacokinetics and metabolic stability of a series of 16 inhibitors of perforin was evaluated in male CD1 mice following intravenous administration. The compounds were well tolerated 6 h after dosing. After intravenous administration at 5 mg/kg, maximum plasma concentrations ranged from 532 ± 200 to 10,061 ± 12 ng/mL across the series. Plasma concentrations were greater than the concentrations required for in vitro inhibitory activity for 11 of the compounds. Following an initial rapid distribution phase, the elimination half-life values for the series ranged from 0.82 ± 0.25 to 4.38 ± 4.48 h. All compounds in the series were susceptible to oxidative biotransformation. Following incubations with microsomal preparations, a tenfold range in in vitro half-life was observed across the series. The data suggests that oxidative biotransformation was not singularly responsible for clearance of the compounds and no direct relationship between microsomal clearance and plasma clearance was observed. Structural modifications however, do provide some information as to the relative microsomal stability of the compounds, which may be useful for further drug development.

  4. Aminosugar derivatives as potential anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents.

    PubMed Central

    Karpas, A; Fleet, G W; Dwek, R A; Petursson, S; Namgoong, S K; Ramsden, N G; Jacob, G S; Rademacher, T W

    1988-01-01

    Recent data suggest that aminosugar derivatives which inhibit glycoprotein processing have potential anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. These inhibitory effects may be due to disruption of cell fusion and subsequent cell-cell transmission of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus. Free virus particles able to bind CD4-positive cells are still produced in the presence of these compounds with only partial reduction of infectivity. We now report a method to score in parallel both the degree of antiviral activity and the effect on cell division of aminosugar derivatives. We find that (i) the compounds 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-L-arabinitol and N-(5-carboxymethyl-1-pentyl)-1,5-imino-L-fucitol partially inhibit the cytopathic effect (giant cell formation, etc.) of HIV and yield of infectious virus; (ii) the compounds N-methyldeoxynojirimycin and N-ethyldeoxynojirimycin reduce the yield of infectious HIV by an order of four and three logarithms, respectively; and (iii) one compound, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin, of the 47 compounds previously screened reduces infectious viral particles by a logarithmic order greater than five at noncytotoxic concentrations. In addition, long-term growth of infected cells in the presence of N-butyldeoxynojirimycin gradually decreases the proportion of infected cells, leading to eventual elimination of HIV from culture. This result suggests that replication is associated with cytolysis. The ability to break the cycle of replication and reinfection has important implications in the chemotherapy of AIDS. PMID:3264071

  5. Potential dermal wound healing agent in Blechnum orientale Linn

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Blechnum orientale Linn. (Blechnaceae) is used ethnomedicinally to treat wounds, boils, blisters or abscesses and sores, stomach pain and urinary bladder complaints. The aim of the study was to validate the ethnotherapeutic claim and to evaluate the effects of B. orientale water extract on wound healing activity. Methods Water extract of B. orientale was used. Excision wound healing activity was examined on Sprague-Dawley rats, dressed with 1% and 2% of the water extract. Control groups were dressed with the base cream (vehicle group, negative control) and 10% povidone-iodine (positive control) respectively. Healing was assessed based on contraction of wound size, mean epithelisation time, hydroxyproline content and histopathological examinations. Statistical analyses were performed using one way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test. Results Wound healing study revealed significant reduction in wound size and mean epithelisation time, and higher collagen synthesis in the 2% extract-treated group compared to the vehicle group. These findings were supported by histolopathological examinations of healed wound sections which showed greater tissue regeneration, more fibroblasts and angiogenesis in the 2% extract-treated group. Conclusions The ethnotherapeutic use of this fern is validated. The water extract of B. orientale is a potential candidate for the treatment of dermal wounds. Synergistic effects of both strong antioxidant and antibacterial activities in the extract are deduced to have accelerated the wound repair at the proliferative phase of the healing process. PMID:21835039

  6. Morphine as a Potential Oxidative Stress-Causing Agent

    PubMed Central

    Skrabalova, Jitka; Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Morphine exhibits important pharmacological effects for which it has been used in medical practice for quite a long time. However, it has a high addictive potential and can be abused. Long-term use of this drug can be connected with some pathological consequences including neurotoxicity and neuronal dysfunction, hepatotoxicity, kidney dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, most studies examining the impact of morphine have been aimed at determining the effects induced by chronic morphine exposure in the brain, liver, cardiovascular system and macrophages. It appears that different tissues may respond to morphine diversely and are distinctly susceptible to oxidative stress and subsequent oxidative damage of biomolecules. Importantly, production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species induced by morphine, which have been observed under different experimental conditions, can contribute to some pathological processes, degenerative diseases and organ dysfunctions occurring in morphine abusers or morphine-treated patients. This review attempts to provide insights into the possible relationship between morphine actions and oxidative stress. PMID:24376392

  7. Investigation of Stilbenoids as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Rotavirus Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Ball, Judith M; Medina-Bolivar, Fabricio; Defrates, Katelyn; Hambleton, Emily; Hurlburt, Megan E; Fang, Lingling; Yang, Tianhong; Nopo-Olazabal, Luis; Atwill, Richard L; Ghai, Pooja; Parr, Rebecca D

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) infections cause severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Vaccines are available but cost prohibitive for many countries and only reduce severe symptoms. Vaccinated infants continue to shed infectious particles, and studies show decreased efficacy of the RV vaccines in tropical and subtropical countries where they are needed most. Continuing surveillance for new RV strains, assessment of vaccine efficacy, and development of cost effective antiviral drugs remain an important aspect of RV studies. This study was to determine the efficacy of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory stilbenoids to inhibit RV replication. Peanut (A. hypogaea) hairy root cultures were induced to produce stilbenoids, which were purified by high performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC) and analyzed by HPLC. HT29.f8 cells were infected with RV in the presence stilbenoids. Cell viability counts showed no cytotoxic effects on HT29.f8 cells. Viral infectivity titers were calculated and comparatively assessed to determine the effects of stilbenoid treatments. Two stilbenoids, trans-arachidin-1 and trans-arachidin-3, show a significant decrease in RV infectivity titers. Western blot analyses performed on the infected cell lysates complemented the infectivity titrations and indicated a significant decrease in viral replication. These studies show the therapeutic potential of the stilbenoids against RV replication.

  8. An in situ forming biodegradable hydrogel-based embolic agent for interventional therapies.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lihui; Rostambeigi, Nassir; Zantek, Nicole D; Rostamzadeh, Parinaz; Bravo, Mike; Carey, John; Golzarian, Jafar

    2013-09-01

    We present here the characteristics of an in situ forming hydrogel prepared from carboxymethyl chitosan and oxidized carboxymethyl cellulose for interventional therapies. Gelation, owing to the formation of Schiff bases, occurred both with and without the presence of a radiographic contrast agent. The hydrogel exhibited a highly porous internal structure (pore diameter 17±4 μm), no cytotoxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, hemocompatibility with human blood, and degradability in lysozyme solutions. Drug release from hydrogels loaded with a sclerosant, tetracycline, was measured at pH 7.4, 6 and 2 at 37°C. The results showed that tetracycline was more stable under acidic conditions, with a lower release rate observed at pH 6. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was loaded into the hydrogel and a cumulative release of 30% was observed over 78 h in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C. Injection of the hydrogel precursor through a 5-F catheter into a fusiform aneurysm model was feasible, leading to complete filling of the aneurysmal sac, which was visualized by fluoroscopy. The levels of occlusion by hydrogel precursors (1.8% and 2.1%) and calibrated microspheres (100-300 μm) in a rabbit renal model were compared. Embolization with hydrogel precursors was performed without clogging and the hydrogel achieved effective occlusion in more distal arteries than calibrated microspheres. In conclusion, this hydrogel possesses promising characteristics potentially beneficial for a wide range of vascular intervention procedures that involve embolization and drug delivery.

  9. Potentially Harmful Therapy and Multicultural Counseling: Bridging Two Disciplinary Discourses

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Dennis C.; Gone, Joseph P.; Nagata, Donna K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years psychologists have been increasingly concerned about potentially harmful therapy, yet this recent discourse has not addressed issues that have long been voiced by the multicultural counseling and psychotherapy movement. We aim to begin to bring these seemingly disparate discourses of harm into greater conversation with one another, in the service of placing the discipline on a firmer foothold in its considerations of potentially harmful therapy. After reviewing the two discourses and exploring reasons for their divergence, we argue that they operate according to differing assumptions pertaining to the sources, objects, and scope of harm. We then argue that these differences reveal the discipline’s need to better appreciate that harm is a social construct, that psychotherapy may be inherently ethnocentric, and that strategies for collecting evidence of harm should be integrated with a social justice agenda. PMID:26339075

  10. Potentially Harmful Therapy and Multicultural Counseling: Bridging Two Disciplinary Discourses.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Dennis C; Gone, Joseph P; Nagata, Donna K

    2015-04-01

    In recent years psychologists have been increasingly concerned about potentially harmful therapy, yet this recent discourse has not addressed issues that have long been voiced by the multicultural counseling and psychotherapy movement. We aim to begin to bring these seemingly disparate discourses of harm into greater conversation with one another, in the service of placing the discipline on a firmer foothold in its considerations of potentially harmful therapy. After reviewing the two discourses and exploring reasons for their divergence, we argue that they operate according to differing assumptions pertaining to the sources, objects, and scope of harm. We then argue that these differences reveal the discipline's need to better appreciate that harm is a social construct, that psychotherapy may be inherently ethnocentric, and that strategies for collecting evidence of harm should be integrated with a social justice agenda.

  11. 5-Fluorouracil as an enhancer of aminolevulinate-based photodynamic therapy for skin cancer: New use for a venerable agent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Wilson, Clara; Iyer, Karthik

    2011-02-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was developed in the 1950s as an anticancer drug and is now widely used to treat many cancers, including colon and breast carcinoma. 5-FU causes fluoronucleotide misincorporation into RNA and DNA, inhibits thymidylate synthase, and leads to growth arrest and apoptosis. For skin precancers (actinic keratoses; AK), 5-FU is prescribed as a topical agent and was essentially the only option for treating widespread AK of the skin prior to FDA approval of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 1999. PDT is now gradually replacing 5-FU as a preferred treatment for AK, but neither PDT nor 5-FU are effective for true skin cancers (basal or squamous cell), particularly for tumors >1 mm in depth. In our ongoing work to improve the efficacy of PDT for skin cancer, we previously showed that PDT efficacy can be significantly enhanced by preconditioning tumors with methotrexate (MTX), which leads to increased production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in target cells. However, because MTX must be given orally or intravenously, it is considered unacceptable for widespread human use due to potential toxicity. MTX and 5-FU exert similar effects on the thymidylate synthesis pathway, so we reasoned that topical 5-FU could be a potential alternative to MTX. In this paper, exploratory studies that test 5-FU as a preconditioning agent for PDT are presented. In a cutaneous model of squamous cell carcinoma (chemically-induced papillomatous tumors in mice), 5-FU significantly enhances PpIX accumulation and therefore emerges as a new candidate agent for combination therapy with PDT.

  12. β-Nitrostyrenes as Potential Anti-leishmanial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Syed; Afrin, Farhat; Islamuddin, Mohammad; Chouhan, Garima; Ali, Intzar; Naaz, Faatima; Sharma, Kalicharan; Zaman, Mohammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of new therapeutic approach to treat leishmaniasis has become a priority. In the present study, the antileishmanial effect of β-nitrostyrenes was investigated against in vitro promastigotes and amastigotes. A series of β-nitrostyrenes have been synthesized by using Henry reaction and were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by broth microdilution assay and in vitro antileishmanial activities against Leishmania donovani promastigotes by following standard guidelines. The most active compounds were futher evaluated for their in vitro antileishmanial activities against intracellular amastigotes. Among the tested β-nitrostyrenes, compounds 7, 8, 9, 12, and 17 exhibited potential activities (MICs range, 0.25–8 μg/mL) against clinically significant human pathogenic fungi. However, the microbactericidal concentrations (MBCs) and the microfungicidal concentrations (MFCs) were found to be either similar or only two-fold greater than the MICs. Anti-leishmanial results demonstrated that compounds 9, 12, 14, and 18 were found to be most active among the tested samples and exhibited 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) by 23.40 ± 0.71, 37.83 ± 3.74, 40.50 ± 1.47, 55.66 ± 2.84 nM against L. donovani promastigotes and 30.5 ± 3.42, 21.46 ± 0.96, 26.43 ± 2.71, and 61.63 ± 8.02 nM respectively against intracellular L. donovani promastigotes amastigotes respectively which are comparable with standard AmB (19.60 ± 1.71 nM against promastigotes and 27.83 ± 3.26 nM against amastigotes). Compounds 9, 12, 14, and 18 were found to have potent in vitro leishmanicidal activity against L. donovani and found to be non-toxic against mammalian macrophages even at a concentration of 25 μM. Nitric oxide (NO) estimation studies reveals that these compounds are moderately inducing NO levels. PMID:27635124

  13. Role of sodium tungstate as a potential antiplatelet agent

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Rebeca; Pino, Marc; Hurtado, Begoña; García de Frutos, Pablo; Caballo, Carolina; Escolar, Ginés; Gomis, Ramón; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Platelet inhibition is a key strategy in the management of atherothrombosis. However, the large variability in response to current strategies leads to the search for alternative inhibitors. The antiplatelet effect of the inorganic salt sodium tungstate (Na2O4W), a protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitor, has been investigated in this study. Methods Wild-type (WT) and PTP1B knockout (PTP1B−/−) mice were treated for 1 week with Na2O4W to study platelet function with the platelet function analyzer PFA-100, a cone-and-plate analyzer, a flat perfusion chamber, and thrombus formation in vivo. Human blood aliquots were incubated with Na2O4W for 1 hour to measure platelet function using the PFA-100 and the annular perfusion chamber. Aggregometry and thromboelastometry were also performed. Results In WT mice, Na2O4W treatment prolonged closure times in the PFA-100 and decreased the surface covered (%SC) by platelets on collagen. Thrombi formed in a thrombosis mice model were smaller in animals treated with Na2O4W (4.6±0.7 mg vs 8.9±0.7 mg; P<0.001). Results with Na2O4W were similar to those in untreated PTP1B−/− mice (5.0±0.3 mg). Treatment of the PTP1B−/− mice with Na2O4W modified only slightly this response. In human blood, a dose-dependent effect was observed. At 200 μM, closure times in the PFA-100 were prolonged. On denuded vessels, %SC and thrombi formation (%T) decreased with Na2O4W. Neither the aggregating response nor the viscoelastic clot properties were affected. Conclusion Na2O4W decreases consistently the hemostatic capacity of platelets, inhibiting their adhesive and cohesive properties under flow conditions in mice and in human blood, resulting in smaller thrombi. Although Na2O4W may be acting on platelet PTP1B, other potential targets should not be disregarded. PMID:26060394

  14. NAAG peptidase inhibitors and their potential for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Neale, Joseph H; Pomper, Martin G; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2005-12-01

    Modulation of N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate peptidase activity with small-molecule inhibitors holds promise for a wide variety of diseases that involve glutamatergic transmission, and has implications for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. This new class of compounds, of which at least one has entered clinical trials and proven to be well tolerated, has demonstrated efficacy in experimental models of pain, schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and, when appropriately functionalized, can image prostate cancer. Further investigation of these promising drug candidates will be needed to bring them to the marketplace. The recent publication of the X-ray crystal structure for the enzymatic target of these compounds should facilitate the development of other new agents with enhanced activity that could improve both the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders.

  15. Cationic porphycenes as potential photosensitizers for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ragàs, Xavier; Sánchez-García, David; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Dai, Tianhong; Agut, Montserrat; Hamblin, Michael R.; Nonell, Santi

    2010-01-01

    Structures of typical photosensitizers used in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy are based on porphyrins, phthalocyanines and phenothiazinium salts, with cationic charges at physiological pH values. However derivatives of the porphycene macrocycle (a structural isomer of porphyrin) have barely been investigated as antimicrobial agents. Therefore, we report the synthesis of the first tricationic water-soluble porphycene and its basic photochemical properties. We successfully tested it for in vitro photoinactivation of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as a fungal species (Candida) in a drug-dose and light-dose dependent manner. We also used the cationic porphycene in vivo to treat an infection model comprising mouse 3rd degree burns infected with a bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. There was a 2.6-log10 reduction (p < 0.001) of the bacterial bioluminescence for the PDT-treated group after irradiation with 180 J·cm-2 of red light. PMID:20936792

  16. [Evidences of physical agents action on bone metabolism and their potential clinical use].

    PubMed

    Lirani, Ana Paula R; Lazaretti-Castro, Marise

    2005-12-01

    The action of physical agents such as low level laser therapy, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and electrical and electromagnetic fields on bone have been often studied, showing that they are able to promote osteogenesis, accelerate fracture consolidation and augment bone mass. The use of these therapeutic modalities was first based on the finding that bone is a piezoelectric material, that means it can generate polarization when deformed, transforming mechanical energy into electric energy, and this has widen therapeutic possibilities to bony tissue. The present work aims to present evidences of physiologic effects and mechanisms of action of these physical agents on bone metabolism, based on articles published in international scientific literature.

  17. Clinical trial success rates of anti-obesity agents: the importance of combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Hussain, H T; Parker, J L; Sharma, A M

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a clinical trial profile assessing the risk of drug failure among anti-obesity agents. Research was conducted by looking at anti-obesity therapies currently on the market or in clinical trials (phases I to III) conducted from 1998 to September 2014, with the exclusion of any drugs whose phase I trial was conducted prior to January 1998. This was completed primarily through a search on http://clinicaltrials.gov where a total of 51 drugs met the search criteria. The transition probabilities were then calculated based on various classifications and compared against industry standards. The transition probability of anti-obesity agents was 8.50% whereas the transition probability of industry standards was 10.40%. Combination therapies had four times the transition probability than monotherapies, 40% and 4.75%, respectively. Therefore, it was determined that 92% of drugs fail during clinical trial testing for this indication and combination therapy appears to improve clinical trial success rates to 10-fold.

  18. Photo-activated Cancer Therapy: Potential for Treatment of Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry

    The diffuse and infiltrative nature of high grade gliomas, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), makes complete surgical resection virtually impossible. The propensity of glioma cells to migrate along white matter tracts suggests that a cure is possible only if these migratory cells can be eradicated. Approximately 80% of GBMs recur within 2 cm of the resection margin, suggesting that a reasonable approach for improving the prognosis of GBM patients would be the development of improved local therapies capable of eradicating glioma cells in the brain-adjacent-to-tumor (BAT). An additional complicating factor for the development of successful therapies is the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which is highly variable throughout the BAT—it is intact in some regions, while leaky in others. This variance in BBB patency has significant implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents. The results of a number of studies have shown that experimental light-based therapeutic modalities such as photochemical internalization (PCI) and photothermal therapy (PTT) may be useful in the treatment of gliomas. This chapter summarizes recent findings illustrating the potential of: (1) PCI for the delivery of therapeutic macromolecules such as chemotherapeutic agents and tumor suppressor genes, and (2) nanoshell-mediated PTT, including nanoparticle delivery approaches via macrophages.

  19. Potential Use of Biological Proteins for Liver Failure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Yamasaki, Keishi; Seo, Hakaru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Biological proteins have unlimited potential for use as pharmaceutical products due to their various biological activities, which include non-toxicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Recent scientific advances allow for the development of novel innovative protein-based products that draw on the quality of their innate biological activities. Some of them hold promising potential for novel therapeutic agents/devices for addressing hepatic diseases such as hepatitis, fibrosis, and hepatocarcinomas. This review attempts to provide an overview of the development of protein-based products that take advantage of their biological activity for medication, and discusses possibilities for the therapeutic potential of protein-based products produced through different approaches to specifically target the liver (or hepatic cells: hepatocytes, hepatic stellate cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and Kupffer cells) in the treatment of hepatic diseases. PMID:26404356

  20. Synthetic Ni3S2/Ni hybrid architectures as potential contrast agents in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Chen, K.

    2016-04-01

    Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents mainly include superparamagnetic (SPM) iron oxide nanoparticle as T 2 contrast agent for liver and paramagnetic Gd (III)-chelate as T 1 contrast agent for all organs. In this work, weak ferromagnetic kale-like and SPM cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni hybrid architectures were synthesized and evaluated as potential T 1 MRI contrast agents. Their relatively small r 2/r 1 ratios of 2.59 and 2.38, and high r 1 values of 11.27 and 4.89 mmol-1 L s-1 (for the kale-like and cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni, respectively) will shed some light on the development of new-type MRI contrast agents.

  1. Novel Cs-Based Upconversion Nanoparticles as Dual-Modal CT and UCL Imaging Agents for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuxin; Li, Luoyuan; Guo, Quanwei; Wang, Lu; Liu, Dongdong; Wei, Ziwei; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide-based contrast agents have attracted increasing attention for their unique properties and potential applications in cancer theranostics. To date, many of these agents have been studied extensively in cells and small animal models. However, performance of these theranostic nanoparticles requires further improvement. In this study, a novel CsLu2F7:Yb,Er,Tm-based visual therapeutic platform was developed for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy. Due to the presence of the heavy alkali metal Cesium (Cs) in host lattice, the nanoplatform can provide a higher resolution X-ray CT imaging than many other reported lanthanide-based CT contrast agents. Furthermore, by using the targeted RGD motif, chemotherapy drug alpha-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS), and photothermal coupling agent ICG, this nanoplatform simultaneously provides multifunctional imaging and targeted synergistic therapy. To demonstrate the theranostic performance of this novel nanoplatform in vivo, visual diagnosis in the small animal model was realized by UCL/CT imaging which was further integrated with targeted chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy. These results provided evidence for the successful construction of a novel lanthanide-based nanoplatform coupled with multimodal imaging diagnosis and potential application in synergistic cancer theranostics. PMID:27446485

  2. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential. PMID:24533741

  3. [Therapy strategies for acute coronary syndrome and after coronary interventions. Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Divchev, D; Nienaber, C; Ince, H

    2011-11-01

    There is ongoing development of new therapeutic regimens in the use of antithrombotic agents and anticoagulants focussing on acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with an increasing impact on current guidelines over the last years. This was especially accompanied by an increase in innovative percutaneous coronary interventional (PCI) methods in patients with ACS, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with a need for therapeutics with more sufficient and effective antiplatelet action. On the other hand, newer direct and indirect thrombin inhibitors with primary use in prevention and therapy of thromboembolic events have been shown to have beneficial and even superior effects in ACS with or without PCI. The current review aims to report on the evidence-based use of approved antithrombotic agents and anticoagulants in ACS with special focus on PCI according to the actualized European guidelines.

  4. Alzheimer's associated inflammation, potential drug targets and future therapies.

    PubMed

    Stuchbury, G; Münch, G

    2005-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly population. The most widely used treatment for Alzheimer's disease at present is acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, which aim to prolong cognitive function through increased synaptic activity, without providing neuroprotection. This treatment is only symptomatic and provides modest outcomes for patients. The recent elucidation of the inflammatory pathways involved in Alzheimer's disease however, has opened doors for better treatment and prevention by identification of areas of therapeutic intervention that target the cause of the disease rather than the symptoms. This review describes the inflammatory pathways that are thought to be present in Alzheimer's disease and some of the new therapies that have shown promise, via alteration or inhibition of these pathways. Some of the therapies included in this review, which have already demonstrated beneficial effects in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, or have the potential to do so, are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, statins, RAGE antagonists and antioxidants.

  5. Potential of epigenetic therapies in non-cancerous conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Theresa; Yung, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    There has been an explosion of knowledge in the epigenetics field in the past 20 years. The first epigenetic therapies have arrived in the clinic for cancer treatments. In contrast, much of the promise of epigenetic therapies for non-cancerous conditions remains in the laboratories. The current review will focus on the recent progress that has been made in understanding the pathogenic role of epigenetics in immune and inflammatory conditions, and how the knowledge may provide much needed new therapeutic targets for many autoimmune diseases. Dietary factors are increasingly recognized as potential modifiers of epigenetic marks that can influence health and diseases across generations. The current epigenomics revolution will almost certainly complement the explosion of personal genetics medicine to help guide treatment decisions and disease risk stratification. PMID:25566322

  6. Plitidepsin: design, development, and potential place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Álvarez, Sara; Pardal, Emilia; Sánchez-Nieto, Diego; Navarro, Miguel; Caballero, Maria Dolores; Mateos, Maria Victoria; Martín, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Plitidepsin is a cyclic depsipeptide that was first isolated from a Mediterranean marine tunicate (Aplidium albicans) and, at present, is manufactured by total synthesis and commercialized as Aplidin®. Its antitumor activity, observed in preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies has prompted numerous clinical trials to be conducted over the last 17 years, alone or in combination with other anticancer agents. Single-agent plitidepsin has shown limited antitumor activity and a tolerable safety profile in several malignancies, such as noncutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma, melanoma, and multiple myeloma. In patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, plitidepsin activity seems to be enhanced after addition of dexamethasone while remaining well tolerated, and a Phase III trial comparing plitidepsin plus dexamethasone vs dexamethasone alone is underway. Additional studies are required to better define the role of plitidepsin in combination with other active agents in these indications. Results of plitidepsin activity in other hematological malignancies or solid tumors have been disappointing so far. Further studies analyzing its mechanisms of action and potential biomarkers will help select patients who may benefit most from this drug. In this review, we critically analyze the published studies on plitidepsin in hematological malignancies and solid tumors and discuss its current role and future perspectives in treating these malignancies. We also review its design, pharmaceutical data, and mechanism of action. PMID:28176904

  7. Plitidepsin: design, development, and potential place in therapy.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Álvarez, Sara; Pardal, Emilia; Sánchez-Nieto, Diego; Navarro, Miguel; Caballero, Maria Dolores; Mateos, Maria Victoria; Martín, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Plitidepsin is a cyclic depsipeptide that was first isolated from a Mediterranean marine tunicate (Aplidium albicans) and, at present, is manufactured by total synthesis and commercialized as Aplidin(®). Its antitumor activity, observed in preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies has prompted numerous clinical trials to be conducted over the last 17 years, alone or in combination with other anticancer agents. Single-agent plitidepsin has shown limited antitumor activity and a tolerable safety profile in several malignancies, such as noncutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma, melanoma, and multiple myeloma. In patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, plitidepsin activity seems to be enhanced after addition of dexamethasone while remaining well tolerated, and a Phase III trial comparing plitidepsin plus dexamethasone vs dexamethasone alone is underway. Additional studies are required to better define the role of plitidepsin in combination with other active agents in these indications. Results of plitidepsin activity in other hematological malignancies or solid tumors have been disappointing so far. Further studies analyzing its mechanisms of action and potential biomarkers will help select patients who may benefit most from this drug. In this review, we critically analyze the published studies on plitidepsin in hematological malignancies and solid tumors and discuss its current role and future perspectives in treating these malignancies. We also review its design, pharmaceutical data, and mechanism of action.

  8. PD-1 as a potential target in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    McDermott, David F; Atkins, Michael B

    2013-10-01

    Recently, an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the host response to tumors has led to the identification of checkpoint signaling pathways involved in limiting the anticancer immune response. One of the most critical checkpoint pathways responsible for mediating tumor-induced immune suppression is the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway, normally involved in promoting tolerance and preventing tissue damage in settings of chronic inflammation. Many human solid tumors express PD ligand 1 (PD-L1), and this is often associated with a worse prognosis. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with cancer typically express PD-1 and have impaired antitumor functionality. Proof-of-concept has come from several preclinical studies in which blockade of PD-1 or PD-L1 enhanced T-cell function and tumor cell lysis. Three monoclonal antibodies against PD-1, and one against PD-L1, have reported phase 1 data. All four agents have shown encouraging preliminary activity, and those that have been evaluated in larger patient populations appear to have encouraging safety profiles. Additional data are eagerly awaited. This review summarizes emerging clinical data and potential of PD-1 pathway-targeted antibodies in development. If subsequent investigations confirm the initial results, it is conceivable that agents blocking the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway will prove valuable additions to the growing armamentarium of targeted immunotherapeutic agents.

  9. Synthesis of amino Derivatives of Dithio Acids as Potential Radiation Protective Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    ation Management S SI ____ K> AD Synthesis of Amino Derivatives of Dithio Acids as Potential Radiation Protective Agents * 0 Annual Report "TIi: o DTIC...Sftcuntiy Clatuftcatio") Synthesis of Amino Derivatives of Dithio Acids as PotentitI- Radiation Protective Agents 12l PERISONAL. Ak.TI4OR(S) * William...methyl- picoline derivatives was accomplished. Use of N-mthyl-2,6-dimethylpyridine also allowed the synthesis of a bis(dithioacetic acid) function not

  10. Vitamin D: considerations in the continued development as an agent for cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald L; Deeb, Kristin K; Johnson, Candace S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable preclinical and epidemiologic data suggest that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis, progression, and therapy for cancer. Numerous epidemiologic studies support the hypothesis that individuals with lower serum vitamin D levels have a higher risk of a number of cancers. Measures of vitamin D level in such studies include both surrogate estimates of vitamin D level (residence in more northern latitudes, history of activity, and sun exposure) as well as measured serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol levels. Perhaps, the most robust of these epidemiologic studies is that of Giovannucci et al, who developed and validated an estimate of serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol level and reported that among >40,000 individuals in the Health Professionals Study, an increase in 25(OH) cholecalciferol level of 62.5 ng/mL was associated with a reduction in the risk of head/neck, esophagus, pancreas cancers, and acute leukemia by >50%. Unfortunately, very limited data are available to indicate whether or not giving vitamin D supplements reduces the risk of cancer. Many preclinical studies indicate that exposing cancer cells, as well as vascular endothelial cells derived from tumors, to high concentrations of active metabolites of vitamin D halts progression through cell cycle, induces apoptosis and will slow or stop the growth of tumors in vivo. There are no data that one type of cancer is more or less susceptible to the effects of vitamin D. Vitamin D also potentiates the antitumor activity of a number of types of cytotoxic anticancer agents in in vivo preclinical models. Vitamin D analogues initiate signaling through a number of important pathways, but the pathway(s) essential to the antitumor activities of vitamin D are unclear. Clinical studies of vitamin D as an antitumor agent have been hampered by the lack of a suitable pharmaceutical preparation for clinical study. All commercially available formulations are inadequate because of the necessity to administer large

  11. Vitamin D: Considerations in the Continued Development as an Agent for Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Donald L.; Deeb, Kristen; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable preclinical and epidemiologic data suggest that vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis, progression and therapy of cancer. Numerous epidemiologic studies support the hypothesis that individuals with lower serum vitamin D levels have a higher risk of a number of cancers. Measures of vitamin D level in such studies include both surrogate estimates of vitamin D level (residence in more northern latitudes, history of activity and sun exposure) as well as measured serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol levels. Perhaps the most robust of these epidemiologic studies is that of Giovannucci and colleagues who developed and validated an estimate of serum 25(OH) cholecalciferol level and reported that among more than 40,000 individuals in the Health professionals Study an increase in 25(OH) cholecalciferol level of 62.5ng/mL was associated with a reduction in the risk of head/neck, esophagus, pancreas cancers and acute leukemia by >50%. Unfortunately very limited data are available to indicate whether or not giving vitamin D supplements reduces the risk of cancer. Many preclinical studies indicate that exposing cancer cells – as well as vascular endothelial cells derived from tumors - to high concentrations of active metabolites of vitamin D halts progression through cell cycle, induces apoptosis and will slow or stop the growth of tumors in vivo. There are no data that one type of cancer is more or less susceptible to the effects of vitamin D. Vitamin D also potentiates the antitumor activity of a number of types of cytotoxic anticancer agents in in vivo preclinical models. Vitamin D analogues initiate signaling through a number of important pathways, but the pathway(s) essential to the antitumor activities of vitamin D are unclear. Clinical studies of vitamin D as an antitumor agent have been hampered by the lack of a suitable pharmaceutical preparation for clinical study. All commercially available formulations are inadequate because of the necessity to

  12. Chemical genetics and its potential in cardiac stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Joaquim M; Riley, Paul R

    2013-05-01

    Over the last decade or so, intensive research in cardiac stem cell biology has led to significant discoveries towards a potential therapy for cardiovascular disease; the main cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. The major goal within the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine is to replace lost or damaged cardiac muscle and coronaries following ischaemic disease. At present, de novo cardiomyocytes can be generated either in vitro, for cell transplantation or disease modelling using directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells, or in vivo via direct reprogramming of resident adult cardiac fibroblast or ectopic stimulation of resident cardiac stem or progenitor cells. A major bottleneck with all of these approaches is the low efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation alongside their relative functional immaturity. Chemical genetics, and the application of phenotypic screening with small molecule libraries, represent a means to enhance understanding of the molecular pathways controlling cardiovascular cell differentiation and, moreover, offer the potential for discovery of new drugs to invoke heart repair and regeneration. Here, we review the potential of chemical genetics in cardiac stem cell therapy, highlighting not only the major contributions to the field so far, but also the future challenges.

  13. Review on near-infrared heptamethine cyanine dyes as theranostic agents for tumor imaging, targeting, and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wu, Jason Boyang; Pan, Dongfeng

    2016-05-01

    A class of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine cyanine dyes that are taken up and accumulated specifically in cancer cells without chemical conjugation have recently emerged as promising tools for tumor imaging and targeting. In addition to their fluorescence and nuclear imaging-based tumor-imaging properties, these dyes can be developed as drug carriers to safely deliver chemotherapy drugs to tumors. They can also be used as effective agents for photodynamic therapy with remarkable tumoricidal activity via photodependent cytotoxic activity. The preferential uptake of dyes into cancer but not normal cells is co-operatively mediated by the prevailing activation of a group of organic anion-transporting polypeptides on cancer cell membranes, as well as tumor hypoxia and increased mitochondrial membrane potential in cancer cells. Such mechanistic explorations have greatly advanced the current application and future development of NIRF dyes and their derivatives as anticancer theranostic agents. This review summarizes current knowledge and emerging advances in NIRF dyes, including molecular characterization, photophysical properties, multimodal development and uptake mechanisms, and their growing potential for preclinical and clinical use.

  14. Current Development of ROS-Modulating Agents as Novel Antitumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Wu, Yue; Bian, Jinlei; Qian, Xue; Lin, Hongzhi; Sun, Haopeng; You, Qidong; Zhang, Xiaojin

    2017-01-01

    Compared to normal cells, usually cancer cells are under higher oxidative stress. Elevating intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by introducing excessive ROS or inhibiting antioxidant system may enhance selectively of cancer cell killing by ROS-modulating agents through stress sensitization or stress overload. Meanwhile due to the adaptive response, normal cells may be capable of maintaining redox homeostasis under exogenous ROS. Here we review ROS-modulating agents in different mechanisms and classify them into groups by various targets for illustrating more clearly. At last, we discuss their side effects and the potential troubles of developing these agents and argue that might be an effective strategy for further exploring to modulate the unique redox regulatory mechanisms of cancer cells.

  15. Informed Consent in Opioid Therapy: A Potential Obligation and Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, Martin D.; Savage, Seddon R.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of patients receiving opioids for the spectrum of pain disorders experiences negligible or short-term adverse effects (AEs), and rarely develops addiction. However, a subset of this population encounters significant difficulties with opioid therapy. These problems include protracted AEs, as well as misuse, abuse and addiction, which can result in significant morbidity and mortality and makes informed consent an important consideration. Opioid treatment agreements (OTAs), which may include documentation of informed consent, have been employed to promote the safe use of opioids for pain. There is debate regarding the effectiveness of OTAs in reducing the risk of opioid misuse; however, most practitioners recognize that OTAs provide an opportunity to discuss the potential risks and benefits of opioid therapy and to establish mutually agreed upon treatment goals, a clear plan of treatment, and circumstances for continuation and discontinuation of opioids. Informed consent is an important component of an OTA but is not often the focus of consideration in discussions of OTAs. This article examines the principles, process, and content of informed consent for opioid therapy of pain in the context of OTAs. PMID:22445273

  16. Monascus Pigment Rubropunctatin: A Potential Dual Agent for Cancer Chemotherapy and Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunquan; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Deshan; Chen, Haijun; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Chengzhuo; Guo, Yanghao

    2016-03-30

    The Monascus pigment, rubropunctatin, was extracted and purified from red mold rice (RMR), and its cytotoxic activities against human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells were studied under the conditions with or without light irradiation. The IC50 value of rubropunctatin against HeLa cells in the dark was 93.71 ± 1.96 μM (24 h), while the cytotoxic activity was enhanced more than 3 times (IC50 = 24.02 ± 2.17 μM) under light irradiation (halogen lamp, 500 W; wavelength, 597-622 nm; and fluence rate, 15 mW cm(-2), for 30 min). However, the IC50 value of rubropunctatin against the immortalized human cervical epithelial H8 cells was more than 300 μM, even under light irradiation, indicating that rubropunctatin has a favorable selectivity index (SI). Treatment of HeLa cells with rubropunctatin in the dark or under light irradiation resulted in a dose-dependent apoptosis, as validated by the increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and phosphatidylserine externalization, and the inductive effect on HeLa cell apoptosis was boosted by the light irradiation. In addition, treatment with rubropunctatin alone or under light irradiation was found to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via the mitochondrial pathway, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9, and increase of the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). It was suggested that rubropunctatin could be a promising natural dual anticancer agent for photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy.

  17. Pharmacological characterization of a novel gastrodin derivative as a potential anti-migraine agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Han; Zhao, Li-Xue; Wan, Jing-Yu; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Xiao-Na; Long, Fang-Yi; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Chu; Du, Jun-Rong

    2016-03-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent neurovascular disorder in the brain. An optimal therapy for migraine has not yet been developed. Gastrodin (Gas), the main effective constitute from Gastrodiae Rhizoma (Tianma in Chinese), has been indicated for migraine treatment and prophylaxis more than 30 years, with demonstrated safety. However, Gas is a phenolic glycoside, with relatively low concentrations and weak efficacy in the central nervous system. To develop more effective anti-migraine agents, we synthesized a novel Gas derivative (Gas-D). In the present study, comparative pharmacodynamic evaluations of Gas and Gas-D were performed in a model of nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced migraine in rats and the hot-plate test in mice. Following behavioral testing in this migraine model, external jugular vein blood and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) were collected to analyze plasma nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations and c-Fos expression in the TNC. The acute oral toxicity of Gas and Gas-D was also examined. We found that Gas-D had potent anti-migraine effects, likely attributable to inhibition of both trigeminal nerve activation at central sites and the peripheral release of CGRP following NO scavenging. Additionally, Gas-D exerted significant anti-nociceptive effect in response to thermal pain compared with Gas. Furthermore, a single dose of 2.048 g/kg Gas or Gas-D presented no acute oral toxicity in mice. Altogether, the potent anti-migraine and anti-hyperalgesic effects of Gas-D suggest that it might be a potentially novel drug candidate for migraine treatment or prophylaxis.

  18. Local drug delivery agents as adjuncts to endodontic and periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Puri, K; Puri, N

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained/controlled drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. The conventional method for the elimination of subgingival microbial infection includes mechanical debridement, irrigation with antimicrobial agents or surgical access. But, the effectiveness of conventional nonsurgical treatment is limited by lack of accessibility to bacteria in deeper periodontal pockets, and/or does not completely eliminate intracanal microorganisms. Surgical intervention may be beneficial but cannot be done in all cases, medically compromised cases and also in patients not willing to be subjected to surgical therapy. Development of local drug delivery systems provides an answer to all such difficulties. This comprehensive review tries to cover the detailed information about the latest advances in the various local drug delivery systems, their indications, contraindications and their advantages over systemic drug therapy. PMID:24868252

  19. Neoadjuvant therapy for potentially resectable pancreatic cancer: an emerging paradigm?

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas B

    2013-04-01

    Although neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been tested for more than two decades and can be safely delivered to patients with non-metastatic pancreatic cancer, no randomised trials have been reported until now. Here we provide an overview of the first randomised trial in patients with potentially resectable cancer and of the latest developments in neoadjuvant therapy for this group of patients. It is necessary to continue to perform clinical trials in this field to accurately identify the effect on survival and quality of life in patients with potentially resectable, borderline resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer. Aspects of imaging for restaging and clinical prognostic factors are also discussed given they will be useful instruments for future trials.

  20. Diabetes mellitus and atrial remodeling: mechanisms and potential upstream therapies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qitong; Liu, Tong; Ng, Chee Y; Li, Guangping

    2014-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, and its prevalence has increasing substantially over the last decades. Recent data suggest that there is an increased risk of AF among the patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the potential molecular mechanisms regarding DM-related AF and diabetic atrial remodeling are not fully understood. In this comprehensive review, we would like to summarize the potential relationship between diabetes and atrial remodeling, including structural, electrical, and autonomic remodeling. Also, some upstream therapies, such as thiazolidinediones, probucol, ACEI/ARBs, may play an important role in the prevention and treatment of AF. Therefore, large prospective randomized, controlled trials and further experimental studies should be challengingly continued.

  1. Physicochemical properties of potential porphyrin photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Marta; Kozub, Patrycja; Kimball, Joseph; Rojkiewicz, Marcin; Kuś, Piotr; Gryczyński, Zugmunt; Ratuszna, Alicja

    2015-07-01

    This research evaluated the suitability of synthetic photosensitizers for their use as potential photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy using steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. Four tetraphenylporphyrin derivatives were studied in ethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide. The spectroscopic properties namely electronic absorption and emission spectra, ability to generate singlet oxygen, lifetimes of the triplet state, as well as their fluorescence quantum yield were determined. Also time-correlated single photon counting method was used to precisely determine fluorescence lifetimes for all four compounds. Tested compounds exhibit high generation of singlet oxygen, low generation of fluorescence and they are chemical stable during irradiation. The studies show that the tested porphyrins satisfy the conditions of a potential drug in terms of physicochemical properties.

  2. Melatonin as a promising agent of regulating stem cell biology and its application in disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Chen, Simon; Li, Yuan; Liu, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Stem cells have emerged as an important approach to repair and regenerate damaged tissues or organs and show great therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases. However, the low survival of engrafted stem cells still remains a major challenge for stem cell therapy. As a major hormone from the pineal gland, melatonin has been shown to play an important role in regulating the physiological and pathological functions of stem cells, such as promoting proliferation, migration and differentiation. Thus, melatonin combined with stem cell transplantation displayed promising application potential in neurodegenerative diseases, liver cirrhosis, wound healing, myocardial infarction, kidney ischemia injury, osteoporosis, etc. It exerts its physiological and pathological functions through its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptosis and anti-ageing properties. Here, we summarize recent advances on exploring the biological role of melatonin in stem cells, and discuss its potential applications in stem cell-based therapy.

  3. Vimentin as a potential molecular target in cancer therapy Or Vimentin, an overview and its potential as a molecular target for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Li, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Vimentin, a major constituent of the intermediate filament (IF) family of proteins, is ubiquitously expressed in normal mesenchymal cells and is known to maintain cellular integrity and provide resistance against stress. Increased vimentin expression has been reported in various epithelial cancers including prostate cancer, gastrointestinal tumors, CNS tumors, breast cancer, malignant melanoma, lung cancer and other types of cancers. Vimentin's over-expression in cancer correlates well with increased tumor growth, invasion and poor prognosis; however, the role of vimentin in cancer progression remains obscure. In the recent years, vimentin has gained much importance as a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Although EMT is associated with a number of tumorigenic events, the role of vimentin in the underlying events mediating these processes remains unknown. Though majority of the literature findings indicate a future significance of vimentin as a biomarker for different cancers with clinical relevance, more research in to the molecular aspects will be crucial to particularly evaluate the function of vimentin in the process of tumorigenesis. By virtue of its over-expression in a large number of cancers and its role in mediating various tumorigenic events, vimentin serves as an attractive target for cancer therapy. Further, research directed toward elucidating the role of vimentin in various signaling pathways would open up new approaches for the development of promising therapeutic agents. This review summarizes the expression and functions of vimentin in cancers and also suggests some directions toward future cancer therapy utilizing vimentin as a potential target. PMID:21637948

  4. Acute drug prescribing to children on chronic antiepilepsy therapy and the potential for adverse drug interactions in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Philipp H; Ekins-Daukes, Suzie; Simpson, Colin R; Milne, Robert M; Helms, Peter; McLay, James S

    2005-01-01

    Aims To investigate the extent of acute coprescribing in primary care to children on chronic antiepileptic therapy, which could give rise to potentially harmful drug–drug interactions. Design Acute coprescribing to children on chronic antiepileptic drug therapy in primary care was assessed in 178 324 children aged 0–17 years for the year 1 November 1999 to 31 October 2000. Computerized prescribing data were retrieved from 161 representative general practices in Scotland. Setting One hundred and sixty-one general practices throughout Scotland. Results During the study year 723 (0.41%) children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy were identified. Fourteen antiepileptic agents were prescribed, with carbamazepine, sodium valproate and lamotrigine accounting for 80% of the total. During the year children on chronic antiepileptic therapy were prescribed 4895 acute coprescriptions for 269 different medicines. The average number of acute coprescriptions for non-epileptic drug therapy were eight, 11, six, and six for the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-olds, respectively. Of these acute coprescriptions 72 (1.5%) prescribed to 22 (3.0%) children were identified as a potential source of clinically serious interactions. The age-adjusted prevalence rates for potentially serious coprescribing were 86, 26, 22, and 33/1000 children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy in the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-old age groups, respectively. The drugs most commonly coprescribed which could give rise to such interactions were antacids, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, theophylline and the low-dose oral contraceptive. For 10 (45.5%0 of the 20 children identified at risk of a potentially clinically serious adverse drug interaction, the acute coprescription was prescribed off label because of age or specific contraindication/warning. Conclusions In primary care, 3.0% of children on chronic antiepileptic therapy are coprescribed therapeutic agents, which could

  5. Anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF agents: important targeted therapies of colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qing-Yang; Wei, Ye; Chen, Jing-Wen; Chang, Wen-Ju; Ye, Le-Chi; Zhu, De-Xiang; Xu, Jian-Min

    2014-04-21

    question because of the inferior prognosis in the COIN trial and the NORDIC-VII trial. Also, bevacizumab plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was questioned because of the NO16966 trial. By the update and further analysis of the COIN trial and the NORDIC-VII trial, cetuximab plus FOLFOX was reported to be reliable again. But bevacizumab plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy was still controversial. In addition, some trials have reported that bevacizumab is not suitable for conversion therapy. The results of the FIRE-III trial showed that cetuximab led to a significant advantage over bevacizumab in response rate (72% vs 63%, P = 0.017) for evaluable population. With the balanced allocation of second-line treatment, the FIRE-III trial was expected to provide evidence for selecting following regimens after first-line progression. There is still no strong evidence for the efficacy of targeted therapy as a preoperative treatment for resectable CLM or postoperative treatment for resected CLM, although the combined regimen is often administered based on experience. Combination therapy with more than one targeted agent has been proven to provide no benefit, and even was reported to be harmful as first-line treatment by four large clinical trials. However, recent studies reported positive results of erlotinib plus bevacizumab for maintenance treatment. The mechanism of antagonism between different targeted agents deserves further study, and may also provide greater understanding of the development of resistance to targeted agents.

  6. Natural and genetically engineered viral agents for oncolysis and gene therapy of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G; Horvath, Joseph C

    2008-12-01

    Based on personal acquaintances and experience dating back to the early 1950s, the senior author reviews the history of viral therapy of cancer. He points out the difficulties encountered in the treatment of human cancers, as opposed by the highly successful viral therapy of experimentally maintained tumors in laboratory animals, especially that of ascites carcinomas in mice. A detailed account of viral therapy of human tumors with naturally oncolytic viruses follows, emphasizing the first clinical trials with viral oncolysates. The discrepancy between the high success rates, culminating in cures, in the treatment of tumors of laboratory animals, and the moderate results, such as stabilizations of disease, partial responses, very rare complete remissions, and frequent relapses with virally treated human tumors is recognized. The preclinical laboratory testing against established human tumor cell lines that were maintained in tissue cultures for decades, and against human tumors extricated from their natural habitat and grown in xenografts, may not yield valid results predictive of the viral therapy applied against human tumors growing in their natural environment, the human host. Since the recent discovery of the oncosuppressive efficacy of bacteriophages, the colon could be regarded as the battlefield, where incipient tumor cells and bacteriophages vie for dominance. The inner environment of the colon will be the teaching ground providing new knowledge on the value of the anti-tumor efficacy of phage-induced innate anti-tumor immune reactions. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses are reviewed next. The molecular biology of viral oncolysis is explained in details. Elaborate efforts are presented to elucidate how gene product proteins of oncolytic viruses switch off the oncogenic cascades of cancer cells. The facts strongly support the conclusion that viral therapy of human cancers will remain in the front lines of modern cancer therapeutics. It may be a

  7. Newer immunosuppressive drugs: their potential role in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Drosos, Alexandros A

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic immune-mediated disease characterised by chronic synovitis, which leads to cartilage damage and joint destruction. It is generally a progressive disease with radiographic evidence of joint damage, functional status decline and premature mortality. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor alpha, play an important role in maintaining the chronicity of RA and mediating tissue damage. New approaches in the therapy of RA with anticytokine biological agents, which neutralise or block cytokines or their receptors, are now the first generation antirheumatic drugs in clinical practice. A better understanding of the signal transduction systems and gene regulation by transcription factors involved in cytokine production has opened the way for the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds useful in treating patients with RA. Overactivation of selective kinases or aberrant function of downstream transcription factors could help convert a normal immune response to a chronic disease state. This provides a unique opportunity for novel therapeutic interventions, since specific signal transduction or transcription factor targets might interrupt the perpetuation mechanisms in RA. The availability of potent and selective p38 mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors provide a means in further dissecting the pathways implicated in cytokine production, which in turn maintain the chronicity of RA. Many studies conclude that these compounds are very useful in the treatment of chronic synovitis and therefore are very promising for RA treatment.

  8. Gastrointestinal parasites: potential therapy for refractory inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Moreels, Tom G; Pelckmans, Paul A

    2005-02-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Different pharmacological agents are currently used in several combinations to control the inflammatory process. Recently, antibodies against the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha appeared to be very effective in treating patients with Crohn's disease. However, due to the fact that the pathogen causing IBD is still unknown, no causative treatment is currently available that is able to make the disease disappear. Recently, the hygiene hypothesis of the development of immunological diseases was proposed, stating that raising children in extremely hygienic environments with less exposure to parasite infections may negatively affect the development of the immune system, predisposing them to immunologic diseases such as IBD. This hypothesis is supported by experimental data showing that helminthic parasites protect against T helper (TH) type 1 cell-mediated gastrointestinal inflammations like Crohn's disease. Both TH-2 cells and regulatory T cells may be involved in this immunomodulatory mechanism. Here, we review the experimental and clinical studies in favor of the hygiene hypothesis, opening perspectives on new therapies for IBD.

  9. [Antiplatelet therapy: resistance to traditional antiaggregation drugs and role of new antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    del Castillo-Carnevali, Hugo; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Zamorano Gómez, José Luis

    2014-09-09

    Platelet aggregation plays a key role in the development of major cardiovascular events (MACE) related to atherothrombosis. Since the appearance of coronary stenting, the importance of measuring and modulating platelet activity has considerably increased in the scientific literature during the last decade. Double antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel administrated to stent carriers has widely demonstrated its efficacy in the prevention of MACE compared with aspirin alone. These benefits are also present when a conservatory approach is chosen for acute coronary syndrome management. However, there are an important number of patients who develop MACE despite optimal dual antiplatelet therapy, most likely related to an incomplete platelet activity inhibition. Many studies suggest an important inter-individual variability in the response to the drugs, maybe related, at least in part, to the use of different assessment techniques of platelet aggregation. Other authors suggest an incomplete platelet inhibition as a possible explanation for the presence of MACE in patients under optimal antiplatelet therapy. Resistance to usual drugs has become a clinically relevant issue that requires an individual approach where new antiplatelet agents, such as prasugrel or ticagrelor, could play an important role as stated in current consensus documents.

  10. Imaging of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: a potential bioterrorism agent of military significance.

    PubMed

    Bui-Mansfield, Liem T; Cressler, Dana K

    2011-11-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a potentially fatal infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Its etiologic agents are viruses of the genus Hantavirus of the virus family Bunyaviridae. Hypothetical ease of production and distribution of these agents, with their propensity to incapacitate victims and overwhelm health care resources, lend themselves as significant potential biological agents of terrorism. HFRS has protean clinical manifestations, which may mimic upper respiratory tract infection, nephrolithiasis, and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and may delay proper treatment. Sequelae of HFRS, such as hemorrhage, acute renal failure, retroperitoneal edema, pancreatitis, pulmonary edema, and neurologic symptoms, can be detected by different imaging modalities. Medical providers caring for HFRS patients must be aware of its radiologic features, which may help to confirm its clinical diagnosis. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and complications of HFRS.

  11. Is riluzole a potential therapy for Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with autistic features and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) in the majority of cases. Besides symptomatic treatment, no therapeutic trials have shown effectiveness for RTT. Some perspectives in the treatment of RTT have been provided by recent works showing a phenotypic reversal by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a RTT mouse model. Glutamate may also play an important role in the primary pathogenesis in Rett syndrome through the excitotoxic neuronal injury in experimental models. Riluzole, an agent currently approved for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a glutamatergic modulator and BDNF enhancer with neuroprotective properties. For these reasons, riluzole could potentially play an important role in the treatment of RTT symptoms. Several points regarding the use of riluzole in RTT are discussed. Further evaluation of the therapeutic effects of this agent in RTT animal models is needed before clinical trials can begin.

  12. Gene therapy for HIV/AIDS: the potential for a new therapeutic regimen.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Greg; Amado, Rafael; Symonds, Geoff

    2003-08-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the etiologic agent of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). HIV/AIDS is a disease that, compared with the not so distant past, is now better held in check by current antiretroviral drugs. However, it remains a disease not solved. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) generally uses two non-nucleoside and one nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor or two non-nucleoside RT and one protease inhibitor. HAART is far more effective than the mono- or duo-therapy of the past, which used compounds like the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor AZT or two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. However, even with the relatively potent drug cocktails that comprise HAART, there are the issues of (i). HIV escape mutants, (ii). an apparent need to take the drugs in an ongoing manner, and (iii). the drugs' side effects that are often severe. This review speaks to the potential addition to these potent regimens of another regimen, namely the genetic modification of target hematopoietic cells. Such a new treatment paradigm is conceptually attractive as it may yield the constant intracellular expression of an anti-HIV gene that acts to inhibit HIV replication and pathogenicity. A body of preclinical work exists showing the inhibition of HIV replication and decreased HIV pathogenicity by anti-HIV genetic agents. This preclinical work used hematopoietic cell lines and primary cells as the target tissue. More recently, several clinical trials have sought to test this concept in vivo.

  13. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Ralstonia solanacearum FJAT-1458, a Potential Biocontrol Agent for Tomato Wilt

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deju; Zhu, Yujing; Wang, Jieping; Chen, Zheng; Che, Jiamei; Zheng, Xuefang; Chen, Xiaoqiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An avirulent strain of Ralstonia solanacearum FJAT-1458 was isolated from a living tomato. Here, we report the complete R. solanacearum FJAT-1458 genome sequence of 6,059,899 bp and 5,241 genes. This bacterial strain is a potential candidate as a biocontrol agent in the form of a plant vaccine for bacterial wilt. PMID:28385834

  15. In vitro and In vivo Studies on Stilbene Analogs as Potential Treatment Agents for Colon Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based upon the potential of resveratrol as a cancer chemopreventive agent, 27 stilbenes analogs were synthesized and tested against colon cancer cell line HT-29. Among these compounds, amino derivative (Z)-4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) aniline (4), (Z)-methyl 4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) benzoate (6) and (Z)-1...

  16. Intracellular signaling as a potential target for antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Andre, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Three classes of inhibitors of platelet aggregation have demonstrated substantial clinical benfits. Aspirin acts by irreversibly inhibiting COX-1 and therefore blocking the synthesis of proaggregatory thromboxane A (2) (TxA(2)). The indirect acting (ticlopidine, clopidogrel, prasugrel) and the direct acting (ticagrelor) antagonists of P2Y(12) block the thrombus stabilizing activity of ADP. Parenteral GP IIb-IIIa inhibitors directly block platelet-platelet interactions. Despite well-established benefits, all antiplatelet agents have important limitations: increased bleeding and gastrointestinal toxicities (aspirin), high incidence of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (ticlopidine), potentially nonresponders (clopidogrel), severe bleeding (prasugrel, GP IIb-IIIa antagonists) and "complicated" relationships with aspirin ticagrelor). In this chapter, we present the genetic and pharmacological evidence that supports the development and expectations associated with novel antiplatelet strategies directed at intrasignaling pathways.

  17. Progress in Nanotechnology Based Approaches to Enhance the Potential of Chemopreventive Agents

    PubMed Central

    Muqbil, Irfana; Masood, Ashiq; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Azmi, Asfar S.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural agents to suppress, reverse or prevent the carcinogenic process from turning into aggressive cancer. Over the last two decades, multiple natural dietary compounds with diverse chemical structures such flavonoids, tannins, curcumins and polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive agents. These agents have proven excellent anticancer potential in the laboratory setting, however, the observed effects in vitro do not translate in clinic where they fail to live up to their expectations. Among the various reasons for this discrepancy include inefficient systemic delivery and robust bioavailability. To overcome this barrier, researchers have focused towards coupling these agents with nano based encapsulation technology that in principle will enhance bioavailability and ultimately benefit clinical outcome. The last decade has witnessed rapid advancement in the development of nanochemopreventive technology with emergence of many nano encapsulated formulations of different dietary anticancer agents. This review summarizes the most up-to-date knowledge on the studies performed in nanochemoprevention, their proposed use in the clinic and future directions in which this field is heading. As the knowledge of the dynamics of nano encapsulation evolves, it is expected that researchers will bring forward newer and far more superior nanochemopreventive agents that may become standard drugs for different cancers. PMID:24212623

  18. Potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Valdespino, Victor; Valdespino, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease with both genetic and epigenetic origins. The growing field of epigenetics has contributed to our understanding of oncogenesis and tumor progression, and has allowed the development of novel therapeutic drugs. First-generation epigenetic inhibitor drugs have obtained modest clinical results in two types of hematological malignancy. Second-generation epigenetic inhibitors are in development, and have intrinsically greater selectivity for their molecular targets. Solid tumors are more genetic and epigenetically complex than hematological malignancies, but the transcriptome and epigenome biomarkers have been identified for many of these malignancies. This solid tumor molecular aberration profile may be modified using specific or quasi-specific epidrugs together with conventional and innovative anticancer treatments. In this critical review, we briefly analyze the strategies to select the targeted epigenetic changes, enumerate the second-generation epigenetic inhibitors, and describe the main signs indicating the potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors. We also highlight the work of consortia or academic organizations that support the undertaking of human epigenetic therapeutic projects as well as some examples of transcriptome/epigenome profile determination in clinical assessment of cancer patients treated with epidrugs. There is a good chance that epigenetic therapies will be able to be used in patients with solid tumors in the future. This may happen soon through collaboration of diverse scientific groups, making the selection of targeted epigenetic aberration(s) more rapid, the design and probe of drug candidates, accelerating in vitro and in vivo assays, and undertaking new cancer epigenetic-therapy clinical trails. PMID:26346546

  19. Molecular effective coverage surface area of optical clearing agents for predicting optical clearing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    The improvement of methods for optical clearing agent prediction exerts an important impact on tissue optical clearing technique. The molecular dynamic simulation is one of the most convincing and simplest approaches to predict the optical clearing potential of agents by analyzing the hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bridges and hydrogen bridges type forming between agents and collagen. However, the above analysis methods still suffer from some problem such as analysis of cyclic molecule by reason of molecular conformation. In this study, a molecular effective coverage surface area based on the molecular dynamic simulation was proposed to predict the potential of optical clearing agents. Several typical cyclic molecules, fructose, glucose and chain molecules, sorbitol, xylitol were analyzed by calculating their molecular effective coverage surface area, hydrogen bonds, hydrogen bridges and hydrogen bridges type, respectively. In order to verify this analysis methods, in vitro skin samples optical clearing efficacy were measured after 25 min immersing in the solutions, fructose, glucose, sorbitol and xylitol at concentration of 3.5 M using 1951 USAF resolution test target. The experimental results show accordance with prediction of molecular effective coverage surface area. Further to compare molecular effective coverage surface area with other parameters, it can show that molecular effective coverage surface area has a better performance in predicting OCP of agents.

  20. Intelligent Agents and Their Potential for Future Design and Synthesis Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Intelligent Agents and Their Potential for Future Design and Synthesis Environment, held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, September 16-17, 1998. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of intelligent agents technology and to identify the potential of software agents for use in future design and synthesis environment. The presentations covered the current status of agent technology and several applications of intelligent software agents. Certain materials and products are identified in this publication in order to specify adequately the materials and products that were investigated in the research effort. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement of products by NASA, nor does it imply that the materials and products are the only ones or the best ones available for this purpose. In many cases equivalent materials and products are available and would probably produce equivalent results.

  1. Potential New Pharmacological Agents Derived From Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Haniye; Khakshur, Ali Asghar; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we reviewed plants and phytochemical compounds demonstrating beneficial effects in pancreatic cancer to find new sources of pharmaceutical agents. For this purpose, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched for plants or herbal components with beneficial effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Data were collected up to January 2013. The search terms were "plant," "herb," "herbal therapy," or "phytotherapy" and "pancreatic cancer" or "pancreas." All of the human in vivo and in vitro studies were included. According to studies, among diverse plants and phytochemicals, 12 compounds including apigenin, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, curcumin, thymoquinone, dihydroartemisinin, cucurbitacin B, and perillyl alcohol have beneficial action against pancreatic cancer cells through 4 or more mechanisms. Applying their plausible synergistic effects can be an imperative approach for finding new efficient pharmacological agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Characterization of biomodified dentin matrices for potential preventive and reparative therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina B.; Castellan, Carina. S.; Shinohara, Mirela S.; Hassan, Lina; Antunes, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Biomodification of existing hard tissue structures, specifically tooth dentin, is an innovative approach proposed to improve the biomechanical and biochemical properties of tissue for potential preventive or reparative/regenerative therapies. The objectives of the study were to systematically characterize dentin matrices biomodified by proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract (GSE) and glutaraldehyde (GD). Changes to the biochemistry and biomechanical properties were assessed by several assays to investigate the degree of interactions, biodegradation rates, proteoglycans interaction, and effect of collagen fibril orientation and environmental conditions on the tensile properties. The highest degree of agent-dentin interaction was observed with GSE which exhibited the highest denaturation temperature, regardless of the agent concentration. Biodegradation rates remarkably decreased following biomodification of dentin matrices after 24hs collagenase digestion. A significant decreased in the proteoglycans content of GSE treated samples was observed using a micro-assay for glycosaminoglycans and histological electron microscopy, while no changes were observed for GD and control. Tensile strength properties of GD biomodified dentin matrices were affected by dentin tubule orientation, most likely due to the orientation of the collagen fibrils. Higher and/or increased stability of the tensile properties of GD and GSE-treated samples were observed following exposure to collagenase and 8 month water storage. Biomodification of dentin matrices using chemical agents not only affects the collagen biochemistry; it also involves interaction with proteoglycans. Tissue biomodifiers interact differently with dentin matrices and may provide the tissue with enhanced preventive and restorative/reparative abilities. PMID:21167964

  3. The Potential of Streptomyces as Biocontrol Agents against the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae (Pyricularia oryzae).

    PubMed

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ser, Hooi-Leng; Khan, Tahir M; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Pusparajah, Priyia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2017-01-01

    Rice is a staple food source for more than three billion people worldwide. However, rice is vulnerable to diseases, the most destructive among them being rice blast, which is caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph Pyricularia oryzae). This fungus attacks rice plants at all stages of development, causing annual losses of approximately 10-30% in various rice producing regions. Synthetic fungicides are often able to effectively control plant diseases, but some fungicides result in serious environmental and health problems. Therefore, there is growing interest in discovering and developing new, improved fungicides based on natural products as well as introducing alternative measures such as biocontrol agents to manage plant diseases. Streptomyces bacteria appear to be promising biocontrol agents against a wide range of phytopathogenic fungi, which is not surprising given their ability to produce various bioactive compounds. This review provides insight into the biocontrol potential of Streptomyces against the rice blast fungus, M. oryzae. The ability of various Streptomyces spp. to act as biocontrol agents of rice blast disease has been studied by researchers under both laboratory and greenhouse/growth chamber conditions. Laboratory studies have shown that Streptomyces exhibit inhibitory activity against M. oryzae. In greenhouse studies, infected rice seedlings treated with Streptomyces resulted in up to 88.3% disease reduction of rice blast. Studies clearly show that Streptomyces spp. have the potential to be used as highly effective biocontrol agents against rice blast disease; however, the efficacy of any biocontrol agent may be affected by several factors including environmental conditions and methods of application. In order to fully exploit their potential, further studies on the isolation, formulation and application methods of Streptomyces along with field experiments are required to establish them as effective biocontrol agents.

  4. The Potential of Streptomyces as Biocontrol Agents against the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae (Pyricularia oryzae)

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ser, Hooi-Leng; Khan, Tahir M.; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Pusparajah, Priyia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2017-01-01

    Rice is a staple food source for more than three billion people worldwide. However, rice is vulnerable to diseases, the most destructive among them being rice blast, which is caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph Pyricularia oryzae). This fungus attacks rice plants at all stages of development, causing annual losses of approximately 10–30% in various rice producing regions. Synthetic fungicides are often able to effectively control plant diseases, but some fungicides result in serious environmental and health problems. Therefore, there is growing interest in discovering and developing new, improved fungicides based on natural products as well as introducing alternative measures such as biocontrol agents to manage plant diseases. Streptomyces bacteria appear to be promising biocontrol agents against a wide range of phytopathogenic fungi, which is not surprising given their ability to produce various bioactive compounds. This review provides insight into the biocontrol potential of Streptomyces against the rice blast fungus, M. oryzae. The ability of various Streptomyces spp. to act as biocontrol agents of rice blast disease has been studied by researchers under both laboratory and greenhouse/growth chamber conditions. Laboratory studies have shown that Streptomyces exhibit inhibitory activity against M. oryzae. In greenhouse studies, infected rice seedlings treated with Streptomyces resulted in up to 88.3% disease reduction of rice blast. Studies clearly show that Streptomyces spp. have the potential to be used as highly effective biocontrol agents against rice blast disease; however, the efficacy of any biocontrol agent may be affected by several factors including environmental conditions and methods of application. In order to fully exploit their potential, further studies on the isolation, formulation and application methods of Streptomyces along with field experiments are required to establish them as effective biocontrol agents. PMID:28144236

  5. The Potential Use of Pharmacological Agents to Modulate Orthodontic Tooth Movement (OTM)

    PubMed Central

    Kouskoura, Thaleia; Katsaros, Christos; von Gunten, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    The biological processes that come into play during orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) have been shown to be influenced by a variety of pharmacological agents. The effects of such agents are of particular relevance to the clinician as the rate of tooth movement can be accelerated or reduced as a result. This review aims to provide an overview of recent insights into drug-mediated effects and the potential use of drugs to influence the rate of tooth movement during orthodontic treatment. The limitations of current experimental models and the need for well-designed clinical and pre-clinical studies are also discussed. PMID:28228735

  6. General guidelines for medically screening mixed population groups potentially exposed to nerve or vesicant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B. ); Sidell, F.R. ); Leffingwell, S.S. . Center for Environmental Health and Injury Control)

    1992-01-01

    A number of state and local planners have requested guidance on screening protocols and have expressed interest in sampling body fluids from exposed or potentially exposed individuals as a means of estimating agent dose. These guidelines have been developed to provide a clear statement that could be used by state and local emergency response personnel in the event of a nerve or vesicant agent incident resulting in off-post contamination; maximum protection from harm is the goal. The assumption is that any population group so exposed would be heterogeneous for age, gender, reproductive status, and state of health.

  7. Photodynamic therapy potentiates the paracrine endothelial stimulation by colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, María Julia; Florencia Pansa, María; Emanuel Vera, Renzo; Belén Rumie Vittar, Natalia; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Recurrence is a major problem and is often the ultimate cause of death. In this context, the tumor microenvironment influences tumor progression and is considered as a new essential feature that clearly impacts on treatment outcome, and must therefore be taken into consideration. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), oxygen, light and drug-dependent, is a novel treatment modality when CRC patients are inoperable. Tumor vasculature and parenchyma cells are both potential targets of PDT damage modulating tumor-stroma interactions. In biological activity assessment in photodynamic research, three-dimensional (3D) cultures are essential to integrate biomechanical, biochemical, and biophysical properties that better predict the outcome of oxygen- and drug-dependent medical therapies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of methyl 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT using a light emitting diode for the treatment of CRC cells in a scenario that mimics targeted tissue complexity, providing a potential bridge for the gap between 2D cultures and animal models. Since photodynamic intervention of the tumor microenvironment can effectively modulate the tumor-stroma interaction, it was proposed to characterize the endothelial response to CRC paracrine communication, if one of these two populations is photosensitized. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the dialogue between endothelial and tumor populations when subjected to lethal PDT conditions induces an increase in angiogenic phenotype, and we think that it should be carefully considered for the development of PDT therapeutic protocols.

  8. Antiandrogens and androgen depleting therapies in prostate cancer: novel agents for an established target

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Clegg, Nicola J.; Scher, Howard I

    2010-01-01

    Summary Activation of the androgen receptor is critical for prostate cancer growth at all points in the illness. Currently therapies targeting the androgen receptor, including androgen depletion approaches and antiandrogens, do not completely inhibit androgen receptor activity. Prostate cancer cells develop resistance to castration by acquiring changes such as AR overexpression that result in reactivation of the receptor. Based on understanding of these resistance mechanisms and androgen synthesis pathways, novel antiandrogens and androgen depleting agents have been tested. Notably, MDV3100, a novel antiandrogen designed for activity in prostate cancer model systems with overexpressed AR and, abiraterone acetate, a 17-α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase inhibitor that blocks steroid biosynthesis in the adrenal gland and in the tumor, have demonstrated significant activity in early phase trials and are being tested in the phase III setting. PMID:19796750

  9. Advances in drug delivery system for platinum agents based combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiang; Xiao, Hai-Hua; Song, Hai-Qin; Jing, Xia-Bin; Yan, Le-San; Qi, Ruo-Gu

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based anticancer agents are widely used as first-line drugs in cancer chemotherapy for various solid tumors. However, great side effects and occurrence of resistance remain as the major drawbacks for almost all the platinum drugs developed. To conquer these problems, new strategies should be adopted for platinum drug based chemotherapy. Modern nanotechnology has been widely employed in the delivery of various therapeutics and diagnostic. It provides the possibility of targeted delivery of a certain anticancer drug to the tumor site, which could minimize toxicity and optimize the drug efficacy. Here, in this review, we focused on the recent progress in polymer based drug delivery systems for platinum-based combination therapy. PMID:26779373

  10. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mfouo-Tynga, Ivan; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed) or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS), to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs) are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events. PMID:25955645

  11. Optimization and Evaluation of 5-Styryl-Oxathiazol-2-one Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasome Inhibitors as Potential Antitubercular Agents

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Francesco; Gising, Johan; Åkerbladh, Linda; Roos, Annette K; Naworyta, Agata; Mowbray, Sherry L; Sokolowski, Anders; Henderson, Ian; Alling, Torey; Bailey, Mai A; Files, Megan; Parish, Tanya; Karlén, Anders; Larhed, Mats

    2015-01-01

    This is the first report of 5-styryl-oxathiazol-2-ones as inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteasome. As part of the study, the structure–activity relationship of oxathiazolones as Mtb proteasome inhibitors has been investigated. Furthermore, the prepared compounds displayed a good selectivity profile for Mtb compared to the human proteasome. The 5-styryl-oxathiazol-2-one inhibitors identified showed little activity against replicating Mtb, but were rapidly bactericidal against nonreplicating bacteria. (E)-5-(4-Chlorostyryl)-1,3,4-oxathiazol-2-one) was most effective, reducing the colony-forming units (CFU)/mL below the detection limit in only seven days at all concentrations tested. The results suggest that this new class of Mtb proteasome inhibitors has the potential to be further developed into novel antitubercular agents for synergistic combination therapies with existing drugs. PMID:26246997

  12. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for atherothrombotic disease: the role of current and emerging agents.

    PubMed

    Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ferreiro, José Luis

    2013-08-01

    Coronary atherothrombotic disease, including chronic stable angina and acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is associated with significant global burden. The acute clinical manifestations of atherothrombotic disease are mediated by occlusive arterial thrombi that impair tissue perfusion and are composed of a core of aggregated platelets, generated by platelet activation, and a superimposed fibrin mesh produced by the coagulation cascade. Long-term antithrombotic therapies, namely oral antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, have demonstrated variable clinical effects. Aspirin and P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists have been shown to reduce the risk for thrombosis and ischaemic events by blocking the thromboxane (Tx) A2 and platelet P2Y12 activation pathways, respectively, whereas the benefits of oral anticoagulants have not been consistently documented. However, even in the presence of aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor antagonist, the risk for ischaemic events remains substantial because platelet activation continues via pathways independent of TxA2 and ADP, most notably the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 platelet activation pathway stimulated by thrombin. Emerging antithrombotic therapies include those targeting the platelet, such as the new P2Y12 antagonists and a novel class of oral PAR-1 antagonists, and those inhibiting the coagulation cascade, such as the new direct factor Xa antagonists, the direct thrombin inhibitors, and a novel class of factor IX inhibitors. The role of emerging antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants in the long-term management of patients with atherothrombotic disease will be determined by the balance of efficacy and safety in large ongoing clinical trials.

  13. 3-bromopyruvate: a new targeted antiglycolytic agent and a promise for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, S; Vali, M; Kunjithapatham, R; Buijs, M; Syed, L H; Rao, P P; Ota, S; Kwak, B K; Loffroy, R; Geschwind, J F

    2010-08-01

    The pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate, is an alkylating agent and a potent inhibitor of glycolysis. This antiglycolytic property of 3-bromopyruvate has recently been exploited to target cancer cells, as most tumors depend on glycolysis for their energy requirements. The anticancer effect of 3-bromopyruvate is achieved by depleting intracellular energy (ATP) resulting in tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss the principal mechanism of action and primary targets of 3-bromopyruvate, and report the impressive antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate in multiple animal tumor models. We describe that the primary mechanism of 3-bromopyruvate is via preferential alkylation of GAPDH and that 3-bromopyruvate mediated cell death is linked to generation of free radicals. Research in our laboratory also revealed that 3-bromopyruvate induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, inhibits global protein synthesis further contributing to cancer cell death. Therefore, these and other studies reveal the tremendous potential of 3-bromopyruvate as an anticancer agent.

  14. External Qi therapy to treat symptoms of Agent Orange Sequelae in Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Woo, Won-Hong; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Hong, Sung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung; Moon, Sun-Rock

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Qi therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment for various symptoms presented by Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War with Agent Orange Sequelae. Nine subjects volunteered to receive 30 minutes of Qi therapy, twice per day for 7 days. There was marked improvement in 89% of the patients with impaired physical activity, 86% of those with psychological disorder, 78% of those with heavy drug use, and 67% of those with fatigue, indigestion and high blood glucose levels. This data suggests that Qi therapy combined with conventional treatment has positive effects in reducing and managing the pain, psychosomatic disorders, and substance abuse in patients with Agent Orange Sequelae. We cannot completely discount the possible influence of the placebo effect, and more objective, clinical measures are needed to study the long-term effects of Qi therapy.

  15. Novel Hydrogel Material as a Potential Embolic Agent in Embolization Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Liming; An, Qingzhu; Chen, Liang; Wen, Ying; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Wei; Yi, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel graphene-oxide (GO) enhanced polymer hydrogel (GPH) as a promising embolic agent capable of treating cerebrovascular diseases and malignant tumors, using the trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) technique. Simply composed of GO and generation five poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-5), our rheology experiments reveal that GPH exhibits satisfactory mechanical strength, which resist the high pressures of blood flow. Subcutaneous experiments on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats demonstrate the qualified biocompatibility of GPH. Finally, our in vivo experiments on New Zealand rabbits, which mix GPH with the X-ray absorbing contrast agent, Iohexol, reveal complete embolization of the artery. We also note that GPH shortens embolization time and exhibits low toxicity in follow-up experiments. Altogether, our study demonstrates that GPH has many advantages over the currently used embolic agents and has potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:27561915

  16. Novel Hydrogel Material as a Potential Embolic Agent in Embolization Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Liming; An, Qingzhu; Chen, Liang; Wen, Ying; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Wei; Yi, Tao

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel graphene-oxide (GO) enhanced polymer hydrogel (GPH) as a promising embolic agent capable of treating cerebrovascular diseases and malignant tumors, using the trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) technique. Simply composed of GO and generation five poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-5), our rheology experiments reveal that GPH exhibits satisfactory mechanical strength, which resist the high pressures of blood flow. Subcutaneous experiments on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats demonstrate the qualified biocompatibility of GPH. Finally, our in vivo experiments on New Zealand rabbits, which mix GPH with the X-ray absorbing contrast agent, Iohexol, reveal complete embolization of the artery. We also note that GPH shortens embolization time and exhibits low toxicity in follow-up experiments. Altogether, our study demonstrates that GPH has many advantages over the currently used embolic agents and has potential applications in clinical practice.

  17. The poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae): a potential vector of pathogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Valiente Moro, Claire; De Luna, Carlos J; Tod, Alexander; Guy, Jonathan H; Sparagano, Olivier A E; Zenner, Lionel

    2009-06-01

    The poultry red mite, D. gallinae has been involved in the transmission of many pathogenic agents, responsible for serious diseases both in animals and humans. Nowadays, few effective methods are available to control the ectoparasite in poultry farms. Consequently, this is an emerging problem which must be taken into account to maintain good health in commercial egg production. This paper addresses the vector capacity of the ectoparasite with special emphasis on salmonellae, pathogenic agents responsible for many of the most important outbreaks of food-borne diseases worlwide. It has been experimentally shown that D. gallinae could act as a biological vector of S. enteritidis and natural carriage of these bacteria by the mite on poultry premises has also been reported. It was also found that D. gallinae carried other pathogens such as E. coli, Shigella sp., and Staphylococcus, thus increasing the list of pathogenic agents potentially transmitted by the mite.

  18. Insulin versus an oral antidiabetic agent as add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes after failure of an oral antidiabetic regimen: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, JM; Brown, Lauren C; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Background Although evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus provide clear recommendations for initial therapy, evidence on an optimal treatment strategy after secondary failure is unclear. Purpose To compare the efficacy of add-on therapy using basal insulin versus an additional oral antidiabetic agent in patients with type 2 diabetes and secondary failure. Data sources We searched the following electronic databases from inception until June 2007: MEDLINE; EMBASE; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Web of Science; Scopus; CINAHL; International Pharmaceutical Abstracts; Academic OneFile; PASCAL; Global Health Database; LILACS; HealthSTAR; PubMed. Reference lists of potentially relevant articles and clinical trial databases were searched, pharmaceutical manufacturers were contacted, and grey literature sources were sought. Study selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving subjects with type 2 diabetes with secondary failure who were randomly assigned to receive additional basal insulin therapy (insulin glargine, detemir, or NPH [neutral protamine Hagedorn]) versus another oral antidiabetic agent from any class. Data extraction Two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Our primary outcome was glycemic control measured by change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and the proportion of subjects achieving a HbA1C value of ≤ 7%. Data synthesis To compare overall efficacy between the 2 treatment strategies, change in HbA1C was pooled across studies using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD). Eleven RCTs, involving 757 participants with a median age of 56 and a median known duration of diabetes of 11 years, were included in our analysis. Insulin treatment demonstrated a small but statistically significant improvement in HbA1C compared with the use of an additional oral agent as add-on therapy (WMD -0.17; 95% CI [confidence interval] -0

  19. Hexaphyrin as a Potential Theranostic Dye for Photothermal Therapy and 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Nakatsuji, Hirotaka; Fukuda, Ryosuke; Okamoto, Haruki; Imai, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tkachenko, Nikolai; Hashida, Mitsuru; Murakami, Tatsuya; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2017-02-15

    meso-Aryl substituted expanded porphyrins have two potential key features suitable for theranostic agents, excellent absorption in near infrared (NIR) region and possible introduction of multiple fluorine atoms at structurally nearly equivalent positions. Herein, hexaphyrin (hexa) was synthesized using 2,6-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4-formyl benzoate and pyrrole and evaluated as a novel theranostic expanded porphyrin possessing the above key features. Under NIR light illumination hexa showed intense photothermal and weak photodynamic effects, which were most likely due to its low-lying excited states close to a singlet oxygen. This sustained photothermal effect caused the ablation of cancer cells more effectively than the photodynamic effect of indocyanine green, a clinically used dye. In addition, hexa@cpHDL revealed potential for use in visualization of tumors by 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to the presence of the multiple fluorine atoms. These results shed light on a latent utility of expanded porphyrins as theranostic agents in both photothermal therapy and 19F MRI.

  20. Preparation and characterization of an iron oxide-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for potential bone cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sneha, Murugesan; Sundaram, Nachiappan Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multifunctional magnetic nanostructures have been found to have potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering. Iron oxide nanoparticles are biocompatible and have distinctive magnetic properties that allow their use in vivo for drug delivery and hyperthermia, and as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Hydroxyapatite is used frequently due to its well-known biocompatibility, bioactivity, and lack of toxicity, so a combination of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite materials could be useful because hydroxyapatite has better bone-bonding ability. In this study, we prepared nanocomposites of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite and analyzed their physicochemical properties. The results suggest that these composites have superparamagnetic as well as biocompatible properties. This type of material architecture would be well suited for bone cancer therapy and other biomedical applications.

  1. Pharmacogenetics, enzyme probes and therapeutic drug monitoring as potential tools for individualizing taxane therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krens, Stefanie D; McLeod, Howard L; Hertz, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    The taxanes are a class of chemotherapeutic agents that are widely used in the treatment of various solid tumors. Although taxanes are highly effective in cancer treatment, their use is associated with serious complications attributable to large interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and a narrow therapeutic window. Unpredictable toxicity occurrence necessitates close patient monitoring while on therapy and adverse effects frequently require decreasing, delaying or even discontinuing taxane treatment. Currently, taxane dosing is based primarily on body surface area, ignoring other factors that are known to dictate variability in pharmacokinetics or outcome. This article discusses three potential strategies for individualizing taxane treatment based on patient information that can be collected before or during care. The clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics, enzyme probes or therapeutic drug monitoring could enable clinicians to personalize taxane treatment to enhance efficacy and/or limit toxicity. PMID:23556452

  2. Development and evaluation of 99mTc-tricarbonyl-caspofungin as potential diagnostic agent of fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Ana L; Fernández, Leticia; Rey, Ana; Terán, Mariclla

    2014-01-01

    Infections by Candida spp and Aspergillus spp are the most common causes of invasive fungal infections. The main diagnostic methods are blood culture, and antigen-based techniques, but they are still suboptimal, leading to delays in the initiation of therapies and resulting in high mortality rates despite the availability of several new antifungal agents. The aim of this work was the development, synthesis and evaluation of a potential radiopharmaceutical enable the rapid and accurate diagnosis by scintigraphic images of fungal infection using caspofungin, a lipopeptide, radiolabelled with (99m)Tc. Caspofungin was radiolabeled with (99m)Tc-tricarbonyl precursor. The complex was assessed for in vitro stability, lipophilicity, plasma protein binding and plasma stability. Biological evaluation was conducted in four groups of CD1 female mice. G1 healthy animals, G2 was induced sterile inflammation with turpentine oil. G3 and G4 were infected with Candida albicans and Aspergillus Niger. Scintigraphicimages were acquired before sacrifice. The Caspofungin - tricarbonyl complex was obtained with RCP higher than 95%, it was stable in labeling milieu for at least 20 hours, and in plasma for 4 hours. Challenge with competitive agents showed no ligand exchange during 200 min. The product was well tolerated by mice and showed mainly hepatobiliar excretion. Lesion uptake was markedly higher in infected tissues than in sterile inflammation. Scintigraphic images clearly distinguished inflammation from infection. The high RCP yields and in vitro stability, the targeted biodistribution profile and good T/NT ratios, outlines this complex as a potential agent for rapid and specific diagnosis of infections caused by pathogenic yeasts.

  3. The potential role of natural agents in treatment of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Velamuri, Suryakanta; Badmaev, Vladimir; Lan, Charlie; Hanania, Nicola

    2007-12-01

    Obstructive airway diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis present with dyspnea and variety of other symptoms. Physiologically, they are characterized by maximal expiratory flow limitation and pathologically, by inflammation of the airways and the lung parenchyma. Inflammation plays a major role in the gradual worsening of the lung function resulting in worsening symptoms. For many years, scientists focused their efforts in identifying various pathways involved in the chronic inflammation present in these diseases. Further, studies are underway to identify various molecular targets in these pathways for the purpose of developing novel therapeutic agents. Natural agents have been used for thousands of years in various cultures for the treatment of several medical conditions and have mostly proven to be safe. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies show potential anti-inflammatory role for some of the existing natural agents. This review provides an overview of the literature related to the anti-inflammatory effects of some of the natural agents which have potential value in the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  4. Chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Kuca, Kamil; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents are compounds of different chemical structures. Simple molecules such as chlorine as well as complex structures such as ricin belong to this group. Nerve agents, vesicants, incapacitating agents, blood agents, lung-damaging agents, riot-control agents and several toxins are among chemical warfare agents. Although the use of these compounds is strictly prohibited, the possible misuse by terrorist groups is a reality nowadays. Owing to this fact, knowledge of the basic properties of these substances is of a high importance. This chapter briefly introduces the separate groups of chemical warfare agents together with their members and the potential therapy that should be applied in case someone is intoxicated by these agents.

  5. Agent based modeling of the effects of potential treatments over the blood-brain barrier in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Marzio; Russo, Giulia; Motta, Santo; Pappalardo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system that involves the destruction of the insulating sheath of axons, causing severe disabilities. Since the etiology of the disease is not yet fully understood, the use of novel techniques that may help to understand the disease, to suggest potential therapies and to test the effects of candidate treatments is highly advisable. To this end we developed an agent based model that demonstrated its ability to reproduce the typical oscillatory behavior observed in the most common form of multiple sclerosis, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The model has then been used to test the potential beneficial effects of vitamin D over the disease. Many scientific studies underlined the importance of the blood-brain barrier and of the mechanisms that influence its permeability on the development of the disease. In the present paper we further extend our previously developed model with a mechanism that mimics the blood-brain barrier behavior. The goal of our work is to suggest the best strategies to follow for developing new potential treatments that intervene in the blood-brain barrier. Results suggest that the best treatments should potentially prevent the opening of the blood-brain barrier, as treatments that help in recovering the blood-brain barrier functionality could be less effective.

  6. Novel Approaches for Potential Therapy of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sawczak, Victoria; Getsy, Paulina; Zaidi, Aliya; Sun, Fei; Zaman, Khalequz; Gaston, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal autosomal recessive disease that causes severe damage to the respiratory and digestive systems. It results from a dysfunctional CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein, which is a cAMP- regulated epithelial chloride channel. CFTR is also a subtype of the ABC-transporter superfamily, and is expressed primarily in the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the airways, pancreas, and intestines. A single amino acid deletion of phenylalanine (Phe) is the most common mutation in CF patients known as F508del-CFTR. Normally, wild-type CFTR is largely degraded before reaching the cell membrane and F508del-CFTR virtually never reaches the cell surface. Ultimately, our goal is to correct dysfunctional CFTR proteins in CF patients. Via high-throughput screening techniques, several novel compounds for potential drugs effective in reversing the molecular CF defect and prohibiting further progression of CF have recently been discovered. S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are small, naturally occurring endogenous cell signaling compounds, which have potential relevance to human lung diseases, including CF. Remarkably, researchers have found that the level of SNOs are reduced in the CF airway. It was previously reported that different types of SNOs, such as GSNO and S-nitrosoglutathione diethyl ester will increase CFTR maturation and function at the plasma membrane in human airway epithelial cells. The mechanisms by which SNOs improve CFTR maturation remain elusive. Currently, clinical trials are still investigating the effectiveness and safety of novel corrector and potentiator drugs for F508del- CFTR. This review article offers a summary of our knowledge on the most up-to-date CF therapies.

  7. The stimulation of bioluminescence in Photobacterium leiognathi as a potential prescreen for antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, D A; Peterson, G A; White, R J; Maiese, W M

    1985-10-01

    The stimulation of bioluminescence in Photobacterium leiognathi has previously been described as a test for genotoxic compounds. An adaptation of this procedure has been developed which uses a dim variant of P. leiognathi and permits the prescreening of microbial fermentation broths for potential antitumor agents. Bioluminescence in this organism was stimulated by compounds which bind to DNA or affect DNA synthesis. Antibiotics with target sites such as protein, cell wall or RNA synthesis, did not alter bioluminescence. Fermentation broths from over 5,000 soil isolates were prescreened in this assay and 95 (1.6%) were defined as active. Further analysis of selected cultures suggested that about half produced compound(s) with DNA-binding activity. These results suggest that the photobacterium induction assay (PIA) may be useful as a prescreen for potential antitumor agents. The assay is rapid, simple and requires only microgram quantities of material for testing.

  8. Potential for Terahertz/Optical, Two Color Non-linear Sensing of Liquid Biochemical Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-18

    solutions1,2 in the infrared frequency band. To explore the lowest frequency macromo- lecular modes of biomolecules, which occur at terahertz fre- quencies, in...resonant with elec- tronic excitations and macromolecular vibrations . A configuration that optimizes SDFG in the face of strong terahertz absorption by...REPORT Potential for terahertz /optical, two color non-linear sensing of liquid biochemical agents 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: A high

  9. Synthesis, antifungal activities and qualitative structure activity relationship of carabrone hydrazone derivatives as potential antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Ren, Shuang-Xi; He, Ze-Yu; Wang, De-Long; Yan, Xiao-Nan; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2014-03-11

    Aimed at developing novel fungicides for relieving the ever-increasing pressure of agricultural production caused by phytopathogenic fungi, 28 new hydrazone derivatives of carabrone, a natural bioactive sesquisterpene, in three types were designed, synthesized and their antifungal activities against Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lagenarium were evaluated. The result revealed that all the derivatives synthesized exhibited considerable antifungal activities in vitro and in vivo, which led to the improved activities for carabrone and its analogues and further confirmed their potential as antifungal agents.

  10. Engineered nanoparticles induce cell apoptosis: potential for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan-Dan; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have been widely applied in industry, commodities, biology and medicine recently. The potential for many related threats to human health has been highlighted. ENPs with their sizes no larger than 100 nm are able to enter the human body and accumulate in organs such as brain, liver, lung, testes, etc, and cause toxic effects. Many references have studied ENP effects on the cells of different organs with related cell apoptosis noted. Understanding such pathways towards ENP induced apoptosis may aid in the design of effective cancer targeting ENP drugs. Such ENPs can either have a direct effect towards cancer cell apoptosis or can be used as drug delivery agents. Characteristics of ENPs, such as sizes, shape, forms, charges and surface modifications are all seen to play a role in determining their toxicity in target cells. Specific modifications of such characteristics can be applied to reduce ENP bioactivity and thus alleviate unwanted cytotoxicity, without affecting the intended function. This provides an opportunity to design ENPs with minimum toxicity to non-targeted cells. PMID:27056889

  11. Secukinumab for rheumatology: development and its potential place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koenders, Marije I; van den Berg, Wim B

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic disease is not a single disorder, but a group of more than 100 diseases that affect joints, connective tissues, and/or internal organs. Although rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) differ in their pathogenesis and clinical presentation, the treatment of these inflammatory disorders overlaps. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are used to reduce pain and inflammation. Additional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs are prescribed to slowdown disease progression, and is in RA more frequently and effectively applied than in AS. Biologicals are a relatively new class of treatments that specifically target cytokines or cells of the immune system, like tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors or B-cell blockers. A new kid on the block is the interleukin-17 (IL-17) inhibitor secukinumab, which has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and AS. IL-17 is a proinflammatory cytokine that has an important role in host defense, but its proinflammatory and destructive effects have also been linked to pathogenic processes in autoimmune diseases like RA and psoriasis. Animal models have greatly contributed to further insights in the potential of IL-17 blockade in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, and have resulted in the development of various potential drugs targeting the IL-17 pathway. Secukinumab (AIN457) is a fully human monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to IL-17A and recently entered the market under the brand name Cosentyx®. By binding to IL-17A, secukinumab prevents it from binding to its receptor and inhibits its ability to trigger inflammatory responses that play a role in the development of various autoimmune diseases. With secukinumab being the first in class to receive Food and Drug Administration approval, this article will further focus on this new biologic agent and review the milestones

  12. [The efficacy of complex therapy of ventricular arrhythmias with emoxipin and preductal in combination with antiarrhythmic agents].

    PubMed

    Kotliarov, A A; Mosina, L M; Kairakina, T N; Chibisov, S M; Kulikov, S I

    2007-01-01

    Forty-five patients with coronary heart disease and various forms of ventricular arrhythmias (25 men and 20 women aged 42 to 73) were examined. The use of complex therapy with emoxipin and preductal in a combination with antiarrhythmic agents potentated the action of these preparations. The application of emoxipin resulted in a longer positive effect.

  13. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir’s effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties. PMID:23469959

  14. The use of marine-derived bioactive compounds as potential hepatoprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Dileep G; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Al-Musharafi, Salma K

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment may be explored as a rich source for novel drugs. A number of marine-derived compounds have been isolated and identified, and their therapeutic effects and pharmacological profiles are characterized. In the present review, we highlight the recent studies using marine compounds as potential hepatoprotective agents for the treatment of liver fibrotic diseases and discuss the proposed mechanisms of their activities. In addition, we discuss the significance of similar studies in Oman, where the rich marine life provides a potential for the isolation of novel natural, bioactive products that display therapeutic effects on liver diseases. PMID:25500871

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of pseudolaric acid B derivatives as potential immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shou-Qiang; Wang, Jie; Zhao, Chuan; Sun, Qiang-Wen; Wang, Yi-Teng; Ai, Ting; Li, Tan; Gao, Ying; Wang, Huo; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PB) derivatives with immunosuppressive activity were found by our group. In order to find potential immunosuppressive agents with high efficacy and low toxicity, a series of novel PB derivatives were synthesized and evaluated on their immunosuppressive activities. Most of the synthesized compounds were tested in vitro on murine T and B proliferation. In particular, compound 11 exhibited excellent inhibitory activity toward murine T cells (up to 19-fold enhancement compared to that of mycophenolatemofetil) and little cytotoxicity toward normal murine spleen cells. These experimental data demonstrated that some of these PB derivatives have great potential for future immunosuppressive studies.

  16. Potentiated antitumor effects of a combination therapy with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Maciej; Strusinska, Katarzyna; Legat, Magdalena; Makowski, Marcin; Jakobisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub

    2004-05-01

    Farnesyltransferase inhibitors, butyrate and butyric acid derivatives have previously been reported to exert anti-tumor activity in experimental models in vitro and in vivo and have recently gained acceptance as potential anticancer agents. In our study, we examined antitumor effects of a combination of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate in vitro against MDA-MB-231 and MIA PaCa-2 human cancer cells. This combination therapy showed synergistic antitumor activity against MDA-MB-231 cells, which was at least in part due to induction of p27KIP1 expression. Both drugs increased intracellular levels of p53 as well but there was no significant difference between the groups treated with single drugs and the group treated with their combination. In MIA PaCa-2 cells, the combination therapy exerted additive antitumor activity. Our results illustrate possible application of the farnesyltransferase inhibitor L-744,832 and butyrate as a combination therapy of cancer.

  17. Informed consent in opioid therapy: a potential obligation and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Cheatle, Martin D; Savage, Seddon R

    2012-07-01

    Most patients receiving opioids for the spectrum of pain disorders tolerate opioids well without major complications. However, a subset of this population encounters significant difficulties with opioid therapy (OT). These problems include protracted adverse effects, as well as misuse, abuse, and addiction, which can result in significant morbidity and mortality and make informed consent an important consideration. Opioid treatment agreements (OTAs), which may include documentation of informed consent, have been used to promote the safe use of opioids for pain. There is a debate regarding the effectiveness of OTAs in reducing the risk of opioid misuse; however, most practitioners recognize that OTAs provide an opportunity to discuss the potential risks and benefits of OT and establish mutually agreed-on treatment goals, a clear plan of treatment, and circumstances for continuation and discontinuation of opioids. Informed consent is an important component of an OTA but not often the focus of consideration in discussions of OTAs. This article examines the principles, process, and content of informed consent for OT of pain in the context of OTAs.

  18. [Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: A potential therapy for cognitive disorders?

    PubMed

    Nouhaud, C; Sherrard, R M; Belmin, J

    2017-03-01

    Considering the limited effectiveness of drugs treatments in cognitive disorders, the emergence of noninvasive techniques to modify brain function is very interesting. Among these techniques, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate cortical excitability and have potential therapeutic effects on cognition and behaviour. These effects are due to physiological modifications in the stimulated cortical tissue and their associated circuits, which depend on the parameters of stimulation. The objective of this article is to specify current knowledge and efficacy of rTMS in cognitive disorders. Previous studies found very encouraging results with significant improvement of higher brain functions. Nevertheless, these few studies have limits: a few patients were enrolled, the lack of control of the mechanisms of action by brain imaging, insufficiently formalized technique and variability of cognitive tests. It is therefore necessary to perform more studies, which identify statistical significant improvement and to specify underlying mechanisms of action and the parameters of use of the rTMS to offer rTMS as a routine therapy for cognitive dysfunction.

  19. Short bowel syndrome in children: current and potential therapies.

    PubMed

    Uko, Victor; Radhakrishnan, Kadakkal; Alkhouri, Naim

    2012-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) reflects a state of malabsorption that occurs due to loss of a significant portion of the small bowel. The pathophysiology of SBS is determined largely by the process of adaptation, which is the innate attempt by the remnant portions of the intestine to increase fluid and nutrient reabsorption. In recent years, emphasis has been placed on intestinal rehabilitation with multidisciplinary teams as a comprehensive approach to the management of patients with SBS. In our institution, the multidisciplinary team members include pediatric gastroenterologists, pediatric surgeons, pediatric dieticians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, neonatologists (especially for patients still under their care), transplant surgeons, transplant coordinators and social workers. Parenteral nutrition plays a significant role in the management of SBS, but its use is associated with many potential complications, including cholestatic liver disease. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions have shown promise in their ability to reverse and also prevent the development of cholestasis in these patients. Clinical trials have shown that growth factors and other trophic hormones facilitate the process of adaptation. The most significant impact has been shown with the use of glucagon-like peptide-2 and its analog (teduglutide). Surgical interventions remain an important part of the management of SBS to facilitate adaptation and treat complications. Intestinal transplantation is a last resort option when the process of adaptation is unsuccessful. This review article is intended to provide an overview of the conventional and emerging therapies for pediatric SBS.

  20. First In Vivo Evaluation of Liposome-encapsulated 223Ra as a Potential Alpha-particle-emitting Cancer Therapeutic Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasdottir, Thora J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2006-09-13

    Liposomes carrying chemotherapeutics have had some success in cancer treatment and may be suitable carriers for therapeutic radionuclides. This study was designed to evaluate the biodistribution of and to estimate the radiation doses from the alpha emitter 223Ra loaded into pegylated liposomes in selected tissues. 223Ra was encapsulated in pegylated liposomal doxorubicin by ionophore-mediated loading. The biodistribution of liposomal 223Ra was compared to free cationic 223Ra in Balb/C mice. We showed that liposomal 223 Ra circulated in the blood with an initial half-time in excess of 24 hours, which agreed well with that reported for liposomal doxorubicin in rodents, while the blood half-time of cationic 223Ra was considerably less than one hour. When liposomal 223 Ra was catabolized, the released 223Ra was either excreted or taken up in the skeleton. This skeletal uptake increased up to 14 days after treatment, but did not reach the level seen with free 223Ra. Pre-treatment with non-radioactive liposomal doxorubicin 4 days in advance lessened the liver uptake of liposomal 223 Ra. Dose estimates showed that the spleen, followed by bone surfaces, received the highest absorbed doses. Liposomal 223 Ra was relatively stable in vivo and may have potential for radionuclide therapy and combination therapy with chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Quantum dots and potential therapy for Krabbe's disease.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Glyn

    2016-11-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy have proved useful in reversing many pathological consequences of many nonneural lysosomal storage diseases but have not yet reversed pathology or influenced disease outcome in Krabbe's disease (KD). This Review discusses the relative merits of stem cell therapy, molecular chaperone therapy, gene therapy, substrate reduction therapy, enzyme replacement therapy, and combination therapy. Given the limitations of these approaches, this Review introduces the idea of using tiny, 6-nm, intensely fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) to deliver a cell-penetrating peptide and 6 histidine residue-tagged β-D-galactocerebrosidase across the blood-brain barrier. We can therefore follow the fate of injected material and ensure that all targets are reached and that accumulated material is degraded. Uptake of lysosomal hydrolases is a complex process, and the cell-penetrating peptide JB577 is uniquely able to promote endosomal egress of the QD cargo. This Review further shows that uptake may depend on the charge of the coating of the QD, specifically, that negative charge directs the cargo to neurons. Because KD involves primarily glia, specifically oligodendroglia, we experiment with many coatings and discover a coating (polyethylene glycol 600 amino) that has a positive charge and targets oligodendrocytes. A similar effect is achieved by treating with chondroitinase ABC to degrade the extracellular matrix, indicating that enzyme replacement has several hurdles to overcome before it can become a routine CNS therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cobalt Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles as a Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Zeinab; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Manouchehri, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNP) have been used for contrast enhancement in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In recent years, research on the use of ferrite nanoparticles in T2 contrast agents has shown a great potential application in MR imaging. In this work, Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 and Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4-DMSA magnetic nanoparticles, CZF-MNPs and CZF-MNPs-DMSA, were investigated as MR imaging contrast agents. Methods: Cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles and their suitable coating, DMSA, were investigated under in vitro condition. Human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC3) with bare (uncoated) and coated magnetic nanoparticles were investigated as nano-contrast MR imaging agents. Results: Using T2-weighted MR images identified that signal intensity of bare and coated MNPs was enhanced with increasing concentration of MNPs in water. The values of 1/T2 relaxivity (r2) for bare and coated MNPs were found to be 88.46 and 28.80 (mM−1 s−1), respectively. Conclusion: The results show that bare and coated MNPs are suitable as T2-weighted MR imaging contrast agents. Also, the obtained r2/r1 values (59.3 and 50) for bare and coated MNPs were in agreement with the results of other previous relevant works. PMID:26140183

  3. Medicinal plants from Peru: a review of plants as potential agents against cancer.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Valerio, Luis G

    2006-09-01

    Natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery and development especially for agents against cancer and infectious disease. An analysis of new and approved drugs for cancer by the United States Food and Drug Administration over the period of 1981-2002 showed that 62% of these cancer drugs were of natural origin. Natural compounds possess highly diverse and complex molecular structures compared to small molecule synthetic drugs and often provide highly specific biological activities likely derived from the rigidity and high number of chiral centers. Ethnotraditional use of plant-derived natural products has been a major source for discovery of potential medicinal agents. A number of native Andean and Amazonian medicines of plant origin are used as traditional medicine in Peru to treat different diseases. Of particular interest in this mini-review are three plant materials endemic to Peru with the common names of Cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa), Maca (Lepidium meyenii), and Dragon's blood (Croton lechleri) each having been scientifically investigated for a wide range of therapeutic uses including as specific anti-cancer agents as originally discovered from the long history of traditional usage and anecdotal information by local population groups in South America. Against this background, we present an evidence-based analysis of the chemistry, biological properties, and anti-tumor activities for these three plant materials. In addition, this review will discuss areas requiring future study and the inherent limitations in their experimental use as anti-cancer agents.

  4. Efficacy of gallium phthalocyanine as a photosensitizing agent in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduray, Kaminee; Odhav, Bharti

    2012-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a revolutionary treatment aimed at treating cancers without surgery or chemotherapy. It is based on the discovery that certain chemicals known as photosensitizing agents (e.g. porphyrins, phthalocyanines, etc.) can kill cancerous cells when exposed to low level laser light at a specific wavelength. The present study investigates the cellular uptake and photodynamic effect of gallium (III) phthalocyanine chloride (GaPcCl) on Caco-2 cancer cells. Caco-2 cells were treated with different concentrations of GaPcCl for 2 h before treatment with a diode laser (λ = 661 nm, laser power = 90 mW) delivering a light dose of 2.5 J/cm2, 4.5 J/cm2 or 8.5 J/cm2. After 24 h, the cell viability of post-irradiated cells was measured using the MTT assay. Cellular uptake studies were performed by photosensitizing cells with GaPcCl for 30 min, 2 h, 10 h, 12 h, 18 h and 24 h before lysing the treated cells into solution to measure the GaPcCl fluorescence emission at an excitation wavelength of 600 nm. Results showed an increase in fluorescence intensity of emission peaks at longer incubation times, indicating a greater cellular uptake of GaPcCl by Caco-2 cells at 24 h in comparison to 30 min. GaPcCl at a concentration of 100 μg/ml activated with a laser light dose of 8.5 J/cm2 reduced the cell viability of Caco-2 cells to 27%. This concludes that GaPcCl activated with low level laser light can be used as a photosensitizing agent for the in vitro PDT treatment of colon cancer.

  5. Natural Product-Derived Treatments for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Safety, Efficacy, and Therapeutic Potential of Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, James; Ahn, Hyung Seok; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Dela Peña, Ike

    2016-01-01

    Typical treatment plans for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) utilize nonpharmacological (behavioral/psychosocial) and/or pharmacological interventions. Limited accessibility to behavioral therapies and concerns over adverse effects of pharmacological treatments prompted research for alternative ADHD therapies such as natural product-derived treatments and nutritional supplements. In this study, we reviewed the herbal preparations and nutritional supplements evaluated in clinical studies as potential ADHD treatments and discussed their performance with regard to safety and efficacy in clinical trials. We also discussed some evidence suggesting that adjunct treatment of these agents (with another botanical agent or pharmacological ADHD treatments) may be a promising approach to treat ADHD. The analysis indicated mixed findings with regard to efficacy of natural product-derived ADHD interventions. Nevertheless, these treatments were considered as a "safer" approach than conventional ADHD medications. More comprehensive and appropriately controlled clinical studies are required to fully ascertain efficacy and safety of natural product-derived ADHD treatments. Studies that replicate encouraging findings on the efficacy of combining botanical agents and nutritional supplements with other natural product-derived therapies and widely used ADHD medications are also warranted. In conclusion, the risk-benefit balance of natural product-derived ADHD treatments should be carefully monitored when used as standalone treatment or when combined with other conventional ADHD treatments.

  6. Natural Product-Derived Treatments for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Safety, Efficacy, and Therapeutic Potential of Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, James; Ahn, Hyung Seok; Cheong, Jae Hoon; dela Peña, Ike

    2016-01-01

    Typical treatment plans for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) utilize nonpharmacological (behavioral/psychosocial) and/or pharmacological interventions. Limited accessibility to behavioral therapies and concerns over adverse effects of pharmacological treatments prompted research for alternative ADHD therapies such as natural product-derived treatments and nutritional supplements. In this study, we reviewed the herbal preparations and nutritional supplements evaluated in clinical studies as potential ADHD treatments and discussed their performance with regard to safety and efficacy in clinical trials. We also discussed some evidence suggesting that adjunct treatment of these agents (with another botanical agent or pharmacological ADHD treatments) may be a promising approach to treat ADHD. The analysis indicated mixed findings with regard to efficacy of natural product-derived ADHD interventions. Nevertheless, these treatments were considered as a “safer” approach than conventional ADHD medications. More comprehensive and appropriately controlled clinical studies are required to fully ascertain efficacy and safety of natural product-derived ADHD treatments. Studies that replicate encouraging findings on the efficacy of combining botanical agents and nutritional supplements with other natural product-derived therapies and widely used ADHD medications are also warranted. In conclusion, the risk-benefit balance of natural product-derived ADHD treatments should be carefully monitored when used as standalone treatment or when combined with other conventional ADHD treatments. PMID:26966583

  7. Single Agent Nanoparticle for Radiotherapy and Radio-Photothermal Therapy in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Yunyun; Adachi, Makoto; Wen, Xiaoxia; Erwin, Bill; Mawlawi, Osama; Lai, Stephen Y.; Li, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. The aggressive behavior of ATC and its resistance to traditional treatment limit the efficacy of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The purpose of this study is aimed at enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with photothermal therapy (PTT) in murine orthotopic model of ATC, based on our developed single radioactive copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticle platform. We prepare a new dual-modality therapy for ATC consisting of a single-compartment nanoplatform, polyethylene glycol-coated [64Cu]CuS NPs, in which the radiotherapeutic property of 64Cu is combined with the plasmonic properties of CuS NPs. Mice with Hth83 ATC were treated with PEG[64Cu]CuS NPs and/or near infrared laser. Antitumor effects were assessed by tumor growth and animal survival. We found that in mice bearing orthotopic human Hth83 ATC tumors, micro-PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies showed that about 50% of the injected dose of PEG-[64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in tumor 48 h after intratumoral injection. Human absorbed doses were calculated from biodistribution data. In antitumor experiments, tumor growth was delayed by PEG-[64Cu]CuS NP-mediated RT, PTT, and combined RT/PTT, with combined RT/PTT being most effective. In addition, combined RT/PTT significantly prolonged the survival of Hth83 tumor-bearing mice compared to no treatment, laser treatment alone, or NP treatment alone without producing acute toxic effects. These findings indicate that this single-compartment multifunctional NPs platform merits further development as a novel therapeutic agent for ATC. PMID:25913249

  8. Single agent nanoparticle for radiotherapy and radio-photothermal therapy in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Chen, Yunyun; Adachi, Makoto; Wen, Xiaoxia; Erwin, Bill; Mawlawi, Osama; Lai, Stephen Y; Li, Chun

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. The aggressive behavior of ATC and its resistance to traditional treatment limit the efficacy of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The purpose of this study is aimed at enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with photothermal therapy (PTT) in murine orthotopic model of ATC, based on our developed single radioactive copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticle platform. We prepare a new dual-modality therapy for ATC consisting of a single-compartment nanoplatform, polyethylene glycol-coated [(64)Cu]CuS NPs, in which the radiotherapeutic property of (64)Cu is combined with the plasmonic properties of CuS NPs. Mice with Hth83 ATC were treated with PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs and/or near infrared laser. Antitumor effects were assessed by tumor growth and animal survival. We found that in mice bearing orthotopic human Hth83 ATC tumors, micro-PET/CT imaging and biodistribution studies showed that about 50% of the injected dose of PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NPs was retained in tumor 48 h after intratumoral injection. Human absorbed doses were calculated from biodistribution data. In antitumor experiments, tumor growth was delayed by PEG-[(64)Cu]CuS NP-mediated RT, PTT, and combined RT/PTT, with combined RT/PTT being most effective. In addition, combined RT/PTT significantly prolonged the survival of Hth83 tumor-bearing mice compared to no treatment, laser treatment alone, or NP treatment alone without producing acute toxic effects. These findings indicate that this single-compartment multifunctional NPs platform merits further development as a novel therapeutic agent for ATC.

  9. THIOCYANATE: A potentially useful therapeutic agent with host defense and antioxidant properties✩

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Joshua D.; Day, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Thiocyanate (SCN) functions in host defense as part of the secreted lactoperoxidase (LPO) microbicidal pathway. SCN is the preferred substrate for LPO-driven catalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) forming hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN). HOSCN is selectively generated by many peroxidase enzymes that can utilize SCN including: eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), gastric peroxidase (GPO), myeloperoxidase (MPO), salivary peroxidase (SPO), and thyroid peroxidase (TPO). These enzymes generate HOSCN through a two-electron halogenation reaction. HOSCN is a potent microbicidal agent that kills or nullifies invading pathogens but is better tolerated by host tissue. Some controversy exists as to whether physiologic levels of HOSCN are non-toxic to host tissue, but the disagreement appears to be based on results of enzymatic generation (yielding moderate steady-state exposure) versus direct high level acute exposure in mammalian cell lines. This apparent duality is also true of other endogenous oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and relates to the difference between physiologically relevant oxidant production versus supra-physiologic bolus dosing approaches. SCN has antioxidant properties that include the ability to protect cells against oxidizing agents such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and repair protein chloramines. SCN is an important endogenous molecule that has the potential to interact in complex and elegant ways with its host environment and foreign organisms. SCN’s diverse properties as both host defense and antioxidant agent make it a potentially useful therapeutic. PMID:22968041

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel diphenylthiazole-based cyclooxygenase inhibitors as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; Gouda, Ahmed M; Omar, Hany A; Tolba, Mai F

    2014-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used medications as analgesics and antipyretics. Currently, there is a growing interest in their antitumor activity and their ability to reduce the risk and mortality of several cancers. While several studies revealed the ability of NSAIDs to induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis in cancer cells, their exact anticancer mechanism is not fully understood. However, both cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and -independent pathways were reported to have a role. In an attempt to develop new anticancer agents, a series of diphenylthiazole substituted thiazolidinone derivatives was synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activity against a panel of cancer cell lines. Additionally, the inhibitory activity of the synthesized derivatives against COX enzymes was investigated as a potential mechanism for the anticancer activity. Cytotoxicity assay results showed that compounds 15b and 16b were the most potent anticancer agents with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) between 8.88 and 19.25μM against five different human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, COX inhibition assay results were in agreement with that of the cytotoxicity assays where the most potent anticancer compounds showed good COX-2 inhibition comparable to that of celecoxib. Further support to our results were gained by the docking studies which suggested the ability of compound 15b to bind into COX-2 enzyme with low energy scores. Collectively, these results demonstrated the promising activity of the newly designed compounds as leads for subsequent development into potential anticancer agents.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of iodobenzamide analogues: Potential D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.A.; Kung, H.F.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J. )

    1990-01-01

    (S)-N-((1-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6- methoxybenzamide (({sup 123}I)IBZM) is a central nervous system (CNS) D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agent. In order to investigate the versatility of this parent structure in specific dopamine receptor localization and the potential for developing new dopamine receptor imaging agents, a series of new iodinated benzamides with fused ring systems, naphthalene (INAP) and benzofuran (IBF), was synthesized and radiolabeled, and the in vivo and in vitro biological properties were characterized. The best analogue of IBZM is IBF (21). The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) with rat striatal tissue preparation was found to be saturable and displayed a Kd of 0.106 {plus minus} 0.015 nM. Competition data of various receptor ligands for ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) binding show the following rank order of potency: spiperone greater than IBF (21) greater than IBZM greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than ({plus minus})-ADTN,6,7 greater than ketanserin greater than SCH-23390 much greater than propranolol. The in vivo biodistribution results confirm that ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) concentrated in the striatal area after iv injection into rats. The study demonstrates that ({sup 123}I)IBF (21) is a potential agent for imaging CNS D-2 dopamine receptors.

  12. Biodegradable polymer based theranostic agents for photoacoustic imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, multifunctional theranostic agents for photoacoustic (PA), ultrasound (US), fluorescent imaging, and for therapeutic drug delivery were developed and tested. These agents consisted of a shell made from a biodegradable Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, loaded with perfluorohexane (PFH) liquid and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the core, and lipophilic carbocyanines fluorescent dye DiD and therapeutic drug Paclitaxel (PAC) in the shell. Their multifunctional capacity was investigated in an in vitro study. The PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs particles were synthesized by a double emulsion technique. The average PLGA particle diameter was 560 nm, with 50 nm diameter silica-coated gold nano-spheres in the shell. MCF7 human breast cancer cells were incubated with PLGA/PFH/DiDGNPs for 24 hours. Fluorescent and PA images were recorded using a fluorescent/PA microscope using a 1000 MHz transducer and a 532 nm pulsed laser. For the particle vaporization and drug delivery test, MCF7 cells were incubated with the PLGA/PFH-GNPs-PAC or PLGA/PFH-GNPs particles for 6, 12 and 24 hours. The effects of particle vaporization and drug delivery inside the cells were examined by irradiating the cells with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm2, and cell viability quantified using the MTT assay. The PA images of MCF7 cells containing PLGA/PFH/DiD-GNPs were spatially coincident with the fluorescent images, and confirmed particle uptake. After exposure to the PLGA/PFHGNP- PAC for 6, 12 and 24 hours, the cell survival rate was 43%, 38%, and 36% respectively compared with the control group, confirming drug delivery and release inside the cells. Upon vaporization, cell viability decreased to 20%. The particles show potential as imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles.

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel acylhydrazone derivatives as potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina

    2013-11-01

    We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential antitumor agents a series of 2-hydroxybenzylidene derivatives of the N-(2-trifluoromethylpiridyn-4-yl)anthranilic acid hydrazide, and some analogues bearing a (2-trifluoromethyl)piridyn-4-ylamino group in 3- or 4-position of benzohydrazide or 4-position of phenylacetohydrazide. Compounds 12e, 13e, 15e, and 16e, bearing a 4-(diethylamino)salicylidene group exhibited potent cytotoxicity, with averaged GI50 values in sub-micromolar range, and a variety of cell selectivity at nanomolar concentrations. The determination of acute toxicity in athymic nudes mice proved some compounds to be non-toxic, making them good candidates for further study as antitumor agents.

  14. Design, synthesis and evaluation of 4-dimethylamine flavonoid derivatives as potential multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Wang, Ting; Hong, Chen; Yang, Ya-Chen; Chen, Ying; Cen, Juan; Xie, Song-Qiang; Wang, Chao-Jie

    2016-10-21

    A new series of 4-dimethylamine flavonoid derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents. The inhibition of cholinesterase activity, self-induced β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation, and antioxidant activity by these derivatives was investigated. Most of the compounds exhibited potent acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activity. A Lineweaver-Burk plot and molecular modeling study showed that these compounds targeted both the catalytic active site (CAS) and peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE. The derivatives showed potent self-induced Aβ aggregation inhibition and peroxyl radical absorbance activity. Moreover, compound 6d significantly protected PC12 neurons against H2O2-induced cell death at low concentrations. Thus, these compounds could become multifunctional agents for further development for the treatment of AD.

  15. In vitro efficiency and mechanistic role of indocyanine green as photodynamic therapy agent for human melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mamoon, A.M.; Miller, L.; Gamal-Eldeen, A. M.; Ruppel, M. E.; Smith, R. J.; Tsang, T.; Miller, L. M.

    2009-05-02

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for superficial cancer. However, poor therapeutic results have been reported for melanoma, due to the high melanin content. Indocyanine green (ICG) has near infrared absorption (700-800 nm) and melanins do not absorb strongly in this area. This study explores the efficiency of ICG as a PDT agent for human melanoma, and its mechanistic role in the cell death pathway. Human skin melanoma cells (Sk-Mel-28) were incubated with ICG and exposed to a low power Ti:Sapphire laser. Synchrotron-assisted Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to assess the cell damage and changes in lipid, protein, and nucleic acids. The cell death pathway was determined by analysis of cell viability and apoptosis and necrosis markers. In the cell death pathway, {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation evoked rapid multiple consequences that trigger apoptosis after laser exposure for only 15min including the release of cytochrome c, the activation of total caspases, caspase-3, and caspase-9, the inhibition of NF-{Kappa}B P65, and the enhancement of DNA fragmentation, and histone acetylation. ICG/PDT can efficiently and rapidly induce apoptosis in human melanoma cells and it can be considered as a new therapeutic approach for topical treatment of melanoma.

  16. Developing Agentic Learners for 21st Century Practice: A Pedagogic Approach in Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoe C-Y; Flavell, Helen; Parsons, Dave; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to teaching occupational therapy students how to create orthoses, whilst at the same time developing higher-order critical thinking, reflective, and clinical reasoning skills is described. The scaffolded nature of the learning activities, incorporating Kolb's reflective learning cycle, was used to support students' capacity for clinical reasoning and better prepare them for clinical placement. The peer-assessment element was also designed to support the experiential learning by allowing students to test their evaluation of hand orthoses, compare their assessment with an expert's, and identify areas for improvement. Students who demonstrated higher grades for the written reflection assessment showed better agreement with the experts (smaller bias, p<0.01). This study concluded there was a correlation between students' capacity for reflective thinking and the development of clinical reasoning. Furthermore, the reflective writing exercise encouraged students to generalise their skills beyond the classroom. The approach and findings of this study are relevant to a range of allied health professions through providing a process to support the development of higher-order critical thinking, reflection, and reasoning skills. Furthermore, the study provides an evidence base to demonstrate that higher reflective skill capacity and critical thinking are crucial to creating agentic learners.

  17. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. Objective We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. Methods We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Results Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. Conclusions We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning. PMID:27036325

  18. Novel C6-substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazinones as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yujin; Yun, Hye Jeong; Min, Hye-Young; Lee, Ho Jin; Pham, Phuong Chi; Moon, Jayoung; Kwon, Dah In; Lim, Bumhee; Suh, Young-Ger; Lee, Jeeyeon; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a membrane receptor tyrosine kinase over-expressed in a number of tumors. However, combating resistance is one of the main challenges in the currently available IGF-1R inhibitor-based cancer therapies. Increased Src activation has been reported to confer resistance to anti-IGF-1R therapeutics in various tumor cells. An urgent unmet need for IGF-1R inhibitors is to suppress Src rephosphorylation induced by current anti-IGF-1R regimens. In efforts to develop effective anticancer agents targeting the IGF-1R signaling pathway, we explored 2-aryl-1,3,4-oxadiazin-5-ones as a novel scaffold that is structurally unrelated to current tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The compound, LL-2003, exhibited promising antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo; it effectively suppressed IGF-1R and Src and induced apoptosis in various non-small cell lung cancer cells. Further optimizations for enhanced potency in cellular assays need to be followed, but our strategy to identify novel IGF-1R/Src inhibitors may open a new avenue to develop more efficient anticancer agents. PMID:26515601

  19. Statin Therapy: Review of Safety and Potential Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Satish; Raghunath, Ajay; Raghunath, Sudhakshini

    2016-01-01

    Background Hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly called statins, are some of the most commonly prescribed medications worldwide. Evidence suggests that statin therapy has significant mortality and morbidity benefit for both primary and secondary prevention from cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, concern has been expressed regarding the adverse effects of long term statin use. The purpose of this article was to review the current medical literature regarding the safety of statins. Methods Major trials and review articles on the safety of statins were identified in a search of the MEDLINE database from 1980 to 2016, which was limited to English articles. Results Myalgia is the most common side effect of statin use, with documented rates from 1-10%. Rhabdomyolysis is the most serious adverse effect from statin use, though it occurs quite rarely (less than 0.1%). The most common risk factors for statin-related myopathy include hypothyroidism, polypharmacy and alcohol abuse. Derangement in liver function tests is common, affecting up to 1% of patients; however, the clinical significance of this is unknown. Some statin drugs are potentially diabetogenic and the risk appears to increase in those patients on higher doses. Pitavastatin has not been associated with increased risk of diabetes. Statins have not been proven to increase the risk of malignancy, dementia, mood disorders or acute interstitial nephritis. However, statins do have multiple drug interactions, primarily those which interact with the cytochrome p450 enzyme group. Conclusions Overall, statin drugs appear to be safe for use in the vast majority of patients. However, patients with multiple medical co-morbidities are at increased risk of adverse effects from long-term statin use. PMID:27899849

  20. Autophagy therapeutic potential of garlic in human cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yung-Lin; Raghu, Rajasekaran; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Liu, Chun-Ting; Lin, Shu-Hsi; Lai, Yi-Syuan; Cheng, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Shih-Hang; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is one of the deadliest diseases against humans. To tackle this menace, humans have developed several high-technology therapies, such as chemotherapy, tomotherapy, targeted therapy, and antibody therapy. However, all these therapies have their own adverse side effects. Therefore, recent years have seen increased attention being given to the natural food for complementary therapy, which have less side effects. Garlic (Dà Suàn; Allium sativum), is one of most powerful food used in many of the civilizations for both culinary and medicinal purpose. In general, these foods induce cancer cell death by apoptosis, autophagy, or necrosis. Studies have discussed how natural food factors regulate cell survival or death by autophagy in cancer cells. From many literature reviews, garlic could not only induce apoptosis but also autophagy in cancer cells. Autophagy, which is called type-II programmed cell death, provides new strategy in cancer therapy. In conclusion, we wish that garlic could be the pioneer food of complementary therapy in clinical cancer treatment and increase the life quality of cancer patients.

  1. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  2. Efficacy of the hypomethylating agents as frontline, salvage, or consolidation therapy in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Bernard; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Lyerly, Susan; Klepin, Heidi D; Lawrence, Julia; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The hypomethylating agents (HAs), azacitidine and decitabine, have emerged as an alternative to initial and salvage therapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Little is known about how AML responds to hypomethylating agents after standard therapy, and the activity of these agents in a real-world setting is not well studied. We retrospectively examined data for 75 consecutive AML patients at Wake Forest from 2002 to 2011 treated with HAs either as first-line (n = 34), salvage (n = 28), or consolidation (n = 13) therapy. We collected data on age, gender, race, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), cytogenetics, type of treatment, complete remission (CR), complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and survival. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards models. Frontline response rate (CR + CRi) was 26.5 %, and median overall survival (OS) was 3.4 months (95 % CI 1.3-7.4), with 18 % alive at 1 year. In the salvage cohort, the response rate was significantly lower compared to frontline (3.6 versus 26.5 %, p = 0.017). Despite the reduced response, OS from time of HA treatment was longer than frontline at 8.2 months (CI 4.8-10.3). In the consolidation cohort, OS was 13.8 months (CI 8.0-21.6) with one patient in remission more than 30 months from diagnosis. These data suggest that prior cytotoxic therapy decreases marrow response rates to HAs but not survival. Furthermore, use of hypomethylating agents for consolidation resulted in a median overall survival over 1 year in a cohort of older patients. This suggests that hypomethylating agents have activity in all phases of AML treatment.

  3. Potential application of gene therapy to X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thomas; Calmels, Boris; Barlogis, Vincent; Michel, Gérard; Tonnelle, Cécile; Chabannon, Christian

    2007-08-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), or Bruton's disease, is the most common human primary humoral immunodeficiency. XLA is caused by mutations of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key regulator of B-cell physiology. Since the mid 80's, substitutive therapy by intravenous gammaglobulin infusions has significantly improved XLA patient survival and quality of life. Nevertheless, some frequent affections persist despite treatment, and lead to handicapping and further to morbid clinical complications for XLA individuals. Development of gene therapy by transfer of the BTK gene into hematopoietic progenitors could represent an alternative strategy for the treatment of Bruton's disease, with the advantage of a definitive cure for XLA patients. Gene therapy of XLA could be considered as a paradigm for future expansion of gene therapy approaches for many other diseases, since future utilization may be strictly dependent on a marked improvement of risk-benefit ratio compared to pre-existing treatments.

  4. Insights into the antimicrobial properties of hepcidins: advantages and drawbacks as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Lisa; Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Batoni, Giovanna; Tavanti, Arianna

    2015-04-10

    The increasing frequency of multi-drug resistant microorganisms has driven research into alternative therapeutic strategies. In this respect, natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hold much promise as candidates for the development of novel antibiotics. However, AMPs have some intrinsic drawbacks, such as partial degradation by host proteases or inhibition by host body fluid composition, potential toxicity, and high production costs. This review focuses on the hepcidins, which are peptides produced by the human liver with a known role in iron homeostasis, as well by numerous other organisms (including fish, reptiles, other mammals), and their potential as antibacterial and antifungal agents. Interestingly, the antimicrobial properties of human hepcidins are enhanced at acidic pH, rendering these peptides appealing for the design of new drugs targeting infections that occur in body areas with acidic physiological pH. This review not only considers current research on the direct killing activity of these peptides, but evaluates the potential application of these molecules as coating agents preventing biofilm formation and critically assesses technical obstacles preventing their therapeutic application.

  5. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  6. Effects of Potential Therapeutic Agents on Copper Accumulations in Gill of Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Luxama, Juan D.; Carroll, Margaret A.; Catapane, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for organisms, but when in excess, copper’s redox potential enhances oxyradical formation and increases cellular oxidative stress. Copper is a major pollutant in Jamaica Bay and other aquatic areas. Bivalves are filter feeders that accumulate heavy metals and other pollutants from their environment. Previously it was determined that seed from the bivalve Crassostrea virginica, transplanted from an oyster farm to Jamaica Bay readily accumulated copper and other pollutants into their tissues. In the present study we utilized Atomic Absorption Spectrometry to measure the uptake of copper into C. virginica gill in the presence and absence of three potential copper -blocking agents: diltiazem, lanthanum, and p-aminosalicyclic acid. Diltiazem and lanthanum are known calcium-channel blockers and p-aminosalicylic acid is an anti-infammarory agent with possible metal chelating properties. We also used the DMAB-Rhodanine histochemistry staining technique to confirm that copper was entering gill cells. Our result showed that diltiazem and p-aminosalicyclic acid reduced copper accumulations in the gill, while lanthanum did not. DMAB-Rhodanine histochemistry showed enhanced cellular copper staining in copper-treated samples and further demonstrated that diltiazem was able to reduce copper uptake. The accumulation of copper into oyster gill and its potential toxic effects could be of physiological significance to the growth and long term health of oysters and other marine animals living in a copper polluted environment. Identifying agents that block cellular copper uptake will further the understanding of metal transport mechanisms and may be beneficial in the therapeutic treatment of copper toxicity in humans. PMID:21841975

  7. Quercetin and rutin as potential sunscreen agents: determination of efficacy by an in vitro method.

    PubMed

    Choquenet, Benjamin; Couteau, Céline; Paparis, Eva; Coiffard, Laurence J M

    2008-06-01

    Given that flavonoids are known for their ultraviolet (UV)B photoprotective properties in plants that contain them, we chose to study quercetin (1) and rutin (2) as agents that could potentially be used in sunscreen products. These two substances proved to behave in similar ways. When incorporated in oil-in-water emulsions, at a concentration of 10% (w/w), 1 and 2 give sun protection factor (SPF) values similar to that of homosalate, a standard substance. These two flavonoids also provided a non-negligible level of photoprotection in the UVA range. When used in association with titanium dioxide, the SPF obtained was around 30.

  8. Molecules that Mimic Apolipoprotein A-I: Potential Agents for Treating Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Luke J.; Maryanoff, Bruce E.; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    2013-01-01

    Certain amphipathic α-helical peptides can functionally mimic many of the properties of full-length apolipoproteins, thereby offering an approach to modulate high-density lipoprotein (HDL) for combating atherosclerosis. In this Perspective, we summarize the key findings and advances over the past 25 years in the development of peptides that mimic apolipoproteins, especially apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). This assemblage of information provides a reasonably clear picture of the state of the art in the apolipoprotein mimetic field, an appreciation of the potential for such agents in pharmacotherapy, and a sense of the opportunities for optimizing the functional properties of HDL. PMID:24168751

  9. Vitamin D compounds: clinical development as cancer therapy and prevention agents.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald L; Muindi, Josephia; Fakih, Marwan; Yu, Wei-Dong; Johnson, Candace S

    2006-01-01

    While 1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol) is best recognized for its effects on bone and mineral metabolism, epidemiological data indicate that low vitamin D levels may play a role in the genesis and progression of breast, lung, colorectal and prostate cancer, as well as malignant lymphoma and melanoma. Calcitriol has strong antiproliferative effects in prostate, breast, colorectal, head/neck and lung cancer, as well as lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma model systems. Antiproliferative effects are seen in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms of these effects are associated with G0/G1 arrest, induction of apoptosis, differentiation and modulation of growth factor-mediated signaling in tumor cells. In addition to the direct effects on tumor cells, recent data strongly support the hypothesis that the stromal effects of vitamin D analogs (e.g., direct effects on tumor vasculature) are also important in the antiproliferative effects. Antitumor effects are seen in a wide variety of tumor types and there are few data to suggest that vitamin D-based approaches are more effective in any one tumor type. Glucocorticoids potentiate the antitumor effect of calcitriol and decrease calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia. In addition, calcitriol potentiates the antitumor effects of many cytotoxic agents. Preclinical data indicate that maximal antitumor effects are seen with pharmacological doses of calcitriol and that such exposure can be safely achieved in animals using a high dose, intermittent schedule of administration. AUC and C(max) calcitriol concentrations of 32 ng.h/ml and 9.2 ng/ml are associated with striking antitumor effects in a murine squamous cell carcinoma model and there is increasing evidence from clinical trials that such exposures can be safely attained in patients. Another approach to maximizing intra-tumoral exposure to vitamin D analogs is to inhibit their catabolism. The data clearly indicate that agents which inhibit the major vitamin D catabolizing enzyme

  10. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-09

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  11. Therapeutic potential of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 antagonists as multifunctional agents.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ohashi, Nami; Masuno, Hiroyuki; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Hiramatsu, Kenichi; Araki, Takanobu; Ueda, Satoshi; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2007-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 possesses multiple critical functions in normal and pathologic physiology. CXCR4 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that transduces signals of its endogenous ligand, the chemokine CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1). The interaction between CXCL12 and CXCR4 plays an important role in the migration of progenitors during embryologic development of the cardiovascular, hemopoietic, central nervous systems, and so on. This interaction is also known to be involved in several intractable disease processes, including HIV infection, cancer cell metastasis, leukemia cell progression, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and pulmonary fibrosis. It is conjectured that this interaction may be a critical therapeutic target in all of these diseases, and several CXCR4 antagonists have been proposed as potential drugs. Fourteen-mer peptides, T140 and its analogues, were previously developed in our laboratory as specific CXCR4 antagonists that were identified as HIV-entry inhibitors, anti-cancer-metastatic agents, anti-chronic lymphocytic/acute lymphoblastic leukemia agents, and anti-RA agents. Cyclic pentapeptides, such as FC131 [cyclo(D-Tyr-Arg-Arg-L-3-(2-naphthyl)alanine-Gly)], were also previously found as CXCR4 antagonist leads based on pharmacophores of T140. This review article describes the elucidation of multiple functions of CXCR4 antagonists and the development of a number of low-molecular weight CXCR4 antagonists involving FC131 analogues and other compounds with different scaffolds including linear-type structures.

  12. Discovery of piperlongumine as a potential novel lead for the development of senolytic agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Chang, Jianhui; Liu, Xingui; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Suping; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Daohong; Zheng, Guangrong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that senescent cells play an important role in many age-associated diseases. The pharmacological depletion of senescent cells (SCs) with a “senolytic agent”, a small molecule that selectively kills SCs, is a potential novel therapeutic approach for these diseases. Recently, we discovered ABT-263, a potent and highly selective senolytic agent, by screening a library of rationally-selected compounds. With this screening approach, we also identified a second senolytic agent called piperlongumine (PL). PL is a natural product that is reported to have many pharmacological effects, including anti-tumor activity. We show here that PL preferentially killed senescent human WI-38 fibroblasts when senescence was induced by ionizing radiation, replicative exhaustion, or ectopic expression of the oncogene Ras. PL killed SCs by inducing apoptosis, and this process did not require the induction of reactive oxygen species. In addition, we found that PL synergistically killed SCs in combination with ABT-263, and initial structural modifications to PL identified analogs with improved potency and/or selectivity in inducing SC death. Overall, our studies demonstrate that PL is a novel lead for developing senolytic agents. PMID:27913811

  13. Identification of Aspergillus flavus isolates as potential biocontrol agents of aflatoxin contamination in crops.

    PubMed

    Rosada, L J; Sant'anna, J R; Franco, C C S; Esquissato, G N M; Santos, P A S R; Yajima, J P R S; Ferreira, F D; Machinski, M; Corrêa, B; Castro-Prado, M A A

    2013-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus, a haploid organism found worldwide in a variety of crops, including maize, cottonseed, almond, pistachio, and peanut, causes substantial and recurrent worldwide economic liabilities. This filamentous fungus produces aflatoxins (AFLs) B1 and B2, which are among the most carcinogenic compounds from nature, acutely hepatotoxic and immunosuppressive. Recent efforts to reduce AFL contamination in crops have focused on the use of nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus strains as biological control agents. Such agents are applied to soil to competitively exclude native AFL strains from crops and thereby reduce AFL contamination. Because the possibility of genetic recombination in A. flavus could influence the stability of biocontrol strains with the production of novel AFL phenotypes, this article assesses the diversity of vegetative compatibility reactions in isolates of A. flavus to identify heterokaryon self-incompatible (HSI) strains among nonaflatoxigenic isolates, which would be used as biological controls of AFL contamination in crops. Nitrate nonutilizing (nit) mutants were recovered from 25 A. flavus isolates, and based on vegetative complementation between nit mutants and on the microscopic examination of the number of hyphal fusions, five nonaflatoxigenic (6, 7, 9 to 11) and two nontoxigenic (8 and 12) isolates of A. flavus were phenotypically characterized as HSI. Because the number of hyphal fusions is reduced in HSI strains, impairing both heterokaryon formation and the genetic exchanges with aflatoxigenic strains, the HSI isolates characterized here, especially isolates 8 and 12, are potential agents for reducing AFL contamination in crops.

  14. Marine Algae as a Potential Source for Anti-Obesity Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wan-Loy, Chu; Siew-Moi, Phang

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major epidemic that poses a worldwide threat to human health, as it is also associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Therapeutic intervention through weight loss drugs, accompanied by diet and exercise, is one of the options for the treatment and management of obesity. However, the only approved anti-obesity drug currently available in the market is orlistat, a synthetic inhibitor of pancreatic lipase. Other anti-obesity drugs are still being evaluated at different stages of clinical trials, while some have been withdrawn due to their severe adverse effects. Thus, there is a need to look for new anti-obesity agents, especially from biological sources. Marine algae, especially seaweeds are a promising source of anti-obesity agents. Four major bioactive compounds from seaweeds which have the potential as anti-obesity agents are fucoxanthin, alginates, fucoidans and phlorotannins. The anti-obesity effects of such compounds are due to several mechanisms, which include the inhibition of lipid absorption and metabolism (e.g., fucoxanthin and fucoidans), effect on satiety feeling (e.g., alginates), and inhibition of adipocyte differentiation (e.g., fucoxanthin). Further studies, especially testing bioactive compounds in long-term human trials are required before any new anti-obesity drugs based on algal products can be developed. PMID:27941599

  15. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  16. Antioxidants as potential medical countermeasures for chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Cameron S; Day, Brian J

    2016-01-15

    The continuing horrors of military conflicts and terrorism often involve the use of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Many CWA and TIC exposures are difficult to treat due to the danger they pose to first responders and their rapid onset that can produce death shortly after exposure. While the specific mechanism(s) of toxicity of these agents are diverse, many are associated either directly or indirectly with increased oxidative stress in affected tissues. This has led to the exploration of various antioxidants as potential medical countermeasures for CWA/TIC exposures. Studies have been performed across a wide array of agents, model organisms, exposure systems, and antioxidants, looking at an almost equally diverse set of endpoints. Attempts at treating CWAs/TICs with antioxidants have met with mixed results, ranging from no effect to nearly complete protection. The aim of this commentary is to summarize the literature in each category for evidence of oxidative stress and antioxidant efficacy against CWAs and TICs. While there is great disparity in the data concerning methods, models, and remedies, the outlook on antioxidants as medical countermeasures for CWA/TIC management appears promising.

  17. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters as Potential MRI/CT Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Le, Wenjun; Cui, Shaobin; Chen, Xin; Zhu, Huanhuan; Chen, Bingdi; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Multi-modal imaging plays a key role in the earlier detection of disease. In this work, a facile bioinspired method was developed to synthesize Gd-functionalized gold nanoclusters (Gd-Au NCs). The Gd-Au NCs exhibit a uniform size, with an average size of 5.6 nm in dynamic light scattering (DLS), which is a bit bigger than gold clusters (3.74 nm, DLS), while the fluorescent properties of Gd-Au NCs are almost the same as that of Au NCs. Moreover, the Gd-Au NCs exhibit a high longitudinal relaxivity value (r1) of 22.111 s−1 per mM of Gd in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), which is six times higher than that of commercial Magnevist (A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid, Gd-DTPA, r1 = 3.56 mM−1·s−1). Besides, as evaluated by nano single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) the Gd-Au NCs have a potential application as CT contrast agents because of the Au element. Finally, the Gd-Au NCs show little cytotoxicity, even when the Au concentration is up to 250 μM. Thus, the Gd-Au NCs can act as multi-modal imaging contrast agents.

  18. Antitumoral, antioxidant, and antimelanogenesis potencies of Hawthorn, a potential natural agent in the treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nadia; Mokdad-Bzéouich, Imèn; Maatouk, Mouna; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-06-01

    The lack of an efficient agent that does not have the disadvantage of low activity (kojic acid), high cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity (hydroquinone), poor skin penetration (arbutin), or low stability in formulation (glabridin) led us to continue our research on new antipigmentation/skin-lightening agents. Therefore, research of natural products that can modulate the metabolism of pigmentation is of great interest. Otherwise, malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer, with high metastatic potential, and currently, there is no effective chemotherapy against invasive melanoma. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new drugs with potent activity and weak side effects against melanoma. The in-vitro anticancer effect of hawthorn was analyzed against B16F10 melanoma cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The effect of isolated compounds from hawthorn on melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells was investigated by measuring the amounts of melanin and tyrosinase spectrophotometrically at 475 nm. Balb/c mice models inoculated with B16F10 mouse tumor cells were used to evaluate the in-vivo antitumoral potential of hawthorn by assessing its effect on the growth of transplanted tumors. The antioxidant potential of tested samples was evaluated in B16F10 and primary human keratinocyte cells using a cellular antioxidant activity assay. Hawthorn tested samples inhibited effectively the growth of melanoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, it appears that tested samples from hawthorn reduced melanogenesis by inhibiting the tyrosinase activity of B16F10 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In-vivo studies showed that hawthorn total oligomer flavonoids extract treatment at a dose of 150 mg/kg body weight for 21 days in implanted tumor mice resulted in significant inhibition of the tumor growth volume and weight. In addition, tested samples showed significant cellular antioxidant capacity against the reactive oxygen species

  19. Complex of C60 Fullerene with Doxorubicin as a Promising Agent in Antitumor Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prylutska, Svitlana V.; Skivka, Larysa M.; Didenko, Gennadiy V.; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I.; Evstigneev, Maxim P.; Potebnya, Grygoriy P.; Panchuk, Rostyslav R.; Stoika, Rostyslav S.; Ritter, Uwe; Scharff, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of doxorubicin in complex with C60 fullerene (C60 + Dox) on the growth and metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice and to perform a primary screening of the potential mechanisms of C60 + Dox complex action. We found that volume of tumor from mice treated with the C60 + Dox complex was 1.4 times less than that in control untreated animals. The number of metastatic foci in lungs of animals treated with C60 + Dox complex was two times less than that in control untreated animals. Western blot analysis of tumor lysates revealed a significant decrease in the level of heat-shock protein 70 in animals treated with C60 + Dox complex. Moreover, the treatment of tumor-bearing mice was accompanied by the increase of cytotoxic activity of immune cells. Thus, the potential mechanisms of antitumor effect of C60 + Dox complex include both its direct action on tumor cells by inducing cell death and increasing of stress sensitivity and an immunomodulating effect. The obtained results provide a scientific basis for further application of C60 + Dox nanocomplexes as treatment agents in cancer chemotherapy.

  20. Naturally occurring and synthetic agents as potential anti-inflammatory and immunomodulants.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Nighat; Saify, Zafar Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Terpenes in general and triterpenes in particular showed anti-inflammatory activity and act as immunomodulators in nutraceutical agents. Antiinflammation, a useful and attractive approach in experimental oncology, helps to investigate the inflammation preventive potential of natural products and synthetic entities. During the course of our research work in natural product chemistry and synthesis of novel structures in the field of heterocyclic chemistry, we found interesting results. In natural product betulinic acid, α-amyrin acetate, lupeol acetate, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid and their derivatives showed interesting potential analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. In this review specific reference has been made to novel classes and newly discovered compounds in the literature, which exhibited required activities. Indomethacine is a potent synthetic compound, which becomes the basis of novel anti-inflammatory agents. Shen postulated a receptor theory which indicates the physical parameters responsible for anti-inflammatory activity. Attempt has been made to cover almost all the anti-inflammatory agents which fall under the various chemical structural classes of compounds showing required activity. The objective of this review is to compile relevant data on the mechanism of action of terpenes isolated from active ethnomedicinal plants to examine the role terpenoids have in medicinal plants used against inflammatory diseases, especially those in which an immune response is implicated. In addition, a selection of several structurally related compounds has been compiled in order to analyze the possible structural characteristics and relationships between the different types of structures found in triterpenoids. The selection of active species was made on the basis of their immunomodulatory activity, and their role in the resolution of diseases in which the immune system is implicated to examine the mechanism by which they are useful as ethnopharmacological

  1. The validation of a new vascular damage assay for photodynamic therapy agents.

    PubMed

    Bellnier, D A; Potter, W R; Vaughan, L A; Sitnik, T M; Parsons, J C; Greco, W R; Whitaker, J; Johnson, P; Henderson, B W

    1995-11-01

    The therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT: photodynamic sensitizer + light) is partly due to vascular damage. This report describes a new vascular photodamage assay for PDT agents and a validation of the assay. The method described here quantitates changes in tissue blood perfusion based on the relative amount of injected fluorescein dye in treated and untreated tissues. A specially designed fluorometer uses chopped monochromatic light from an argon laser as a source for exciting fluorescein fluorescence. The fluorescent light emitted from the tissue is collected by a six element fiberoptic array, filtered and delivered to a photodiode detector coupled to a phase-locked amplifier for conversion to a voltage signal for recording. This arrangement permits a rather simple, inexpensive construction and allows for the simultaneous use of the argon laser by other investigators. The routine assay for characterizing a specific photosensitizer at a standard dose consists of the sequential allocation of eight mice to a set of different light doses designed to span the dose-response range of fluorescein fluorescence exclusion (measured 8-10 min after fluorescein injection). The assay validation experiment used an anionic photosensitizer, 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a at a dose of 0.4 mumol/kg. The parameter estimates (n = 34 mice) from fitting the standard Hill dose-response model to the data were: median fluorescence exclusion light dose FE50 = 275 +/- 8.3 J/cm2 and Hill sigmoidicity parameter m = -3.66 +/- 0.28. Subsets of the full data set randomly selected to simulate a standard eight mice experiment yielded similar parameter estimates. The new assay provides reliable estimates of PDT vascular damage with a frugal sequential experimental design.

  2. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with AML not achieving remission: potentially curative therapy.

    PubMed

    Gyurkocza, B; Lazarus, H M; Giralt, S

    2017-02-27

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who fail to achieve complete remission (CR) have a dismal prognosis. Although data suggest that durable remissions can be achieved in approximately 30% of patients with refractory or relapsed AML after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), only a small fraction of those patients are offered this therapeutic option. Importantly, patients with primary refractory AML have distinctly better outcomes following allogeneic HCT than those with refractory relapse. Access to suitable donors could be one of the main barriers in these situations. However, with recent developments in the field of allogeneic HCT, such as alternative donor sources, high-resolution HLA-typing, reduced intensity conditioning regimens and improvements in supportive care, this approach has the potential to offer long-term survival for patients with refractory and relapsed AML and should be considered as early after diagnosis as possible. Incorporating novel agents into the conditioning regimen or as post-transplant maintenance therapy could further improve outcomes and render older or medically infirm patients with refractory or relapsed AML eligible for allogeneic HCT. In this review, we summarize existing data on allogeneic HCT in patients with refractory or relapsed AML and explore novel approaches with the potential to improve outcomes in this patient population.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.8.

  3. Isolation and characterization of soil Streptomyces species as potential biological control agents against fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed

    2014-05-01

    The use of antagonist microorganisms against fungal plant pathogens is an attractive and ecologically alternative to the use of chemical pesticides. Streptomyces are beneficial soil bacteria and potential candidates for biocontrol agents. This study reports the isolation, characterization and antagonist activity of soil streptomycetes from the Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve, a Natural protected area in Campeche, Mexico. The results showed morphological, physiological and biochemical characterization of six actinomycetes and their inhibitory activity against Curvularia sp., Aspergillus niger, Helminthosporium sp. and Fusarium sp. One isolate, identified as Streptomyces sp. CACIS-1.16CA showed the potential to inhibit additional pathogens as Alternaria sp., Phytophthora capsici, Colletotrichum sp. and Rhizoctonia sp. with percentages ranging from 47 to 90 %. This study identified a streptomycete strain with a broad antagonist activity that could be used for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of new 3-phenylcoumarin derivatives as potential antidepressant agents.

    PubMed

    Sashidhara, Koneni V; Rao, K Bhaskara; Singh, Seema; Modukuri, Ram K; Aruna Teja, G; Chandasana, Hardik; Shukla, Shubha; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2014-10-15

    A series of amine substituted 3-phenyl coumarin derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential antidepressant agents. In preliminary screening, all compounds were evaluated in forced swimming test (FST), a model to screen antidepressant activity in rodents. Among the series, compounds 5c and 6a potentially decreased the immobility time by 73.4% and 79.7% at a low dose of 0.5 mg/kg as compared to standard drug fluoxetine (FXT) which reduced the immobility time by 74% at a dose of 20 mg/kg, ip. Additionally, these active compounds also exhibited significant efficacy in tail suspension test (TST) (another model to screen antidepressant compounds). Interestingly, rotarod and locomotor activity tests confirmed that these two compounds do not have any motor impairment effect and neurotoxicity in mice. Our studies demonstrate that the new 3-phenylcoumarin derivatives may serve as a promising antidepressant lead and hence pave the way for further investigation around this chemical space.

  5. Potential Anti-HPV and Related Cancer Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Shuang; Guan, Hua-Shi; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the prevention and treatment of human papillomavirus (HPV) which is closely related to the cervical cancer and other genital diseases are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and other bioactive compounds have been shown to possess a variety of anti-HPV and related cancer activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the potential anti-HPV and related cancer agents from marine resources. In particular, it will provide an update on the anti-HPV actions of heparinoid polysaccharides and bioactive compounds present in marine organisms, as well as the therapeutic vaccines relating to marine organisms. In addition, the possible mechanisms of anti-HPV actions of marine bioactive compounds and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:24705500

  6. Avena sativa (Oat), a potential neutraceutical and therapeutic agent: an overview.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajinder; De, Subrata; Belkheir, Asma

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present review article is to summarize the available information related to the availability, production, chemical composition, pharmacological activity, and traditional uses of Avena sativa to highlight its potential to contribute to human health. Oats are now cultivated worldwide and form an important dietary staple for the people in number of countries. Several varieties of oats are available. It is a rich source of protein, contains a number of important minerals, lipids, β-glucan, a mixed-linkage polysaccharide, which forms an important part of oat dietary fiber, and also contains various other phytoconstituents like avenanthramides, an indole alkaloid-gramine, flavonoids, flavonolignans, triterpenoid saponins, sterols, and tocols. Traditionally oats have been in use since long and are considered as stimulant, antispasmodic, antitumor, diuretic, and neurotonic. Oat possesses different pharmacological activities like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, anticholesterolaemic, etc. A wide spectrum of biological activities indicates that oat is a potential therapeutic agent.

  7. Adsorption of histones on natural polysaccharides: The potential as agent for multiple organ failure in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Takashi; Kofuji, Kyoko; Okada, Kenji; Fujimori, Junya; Murata, Mikio; Shigeyama, Masato; Hanioka, Nobumitsu; Murata, Yoshifumi

    2016-03-01

    Histones are intracellular proteins that are structural elements of nuclear chromatin and regulate gene transcription. However, the extracellular histones released in response to bacterial challenges have been identified as mediators contributing to endothelial dysfunction, organ failure, and death during sepsis. In the present study, the adsorption of histones as well as plasma proteins (α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), albumin, and γ-globulin) on alginic acid, pectin, dextran, and chitosan was examined in order to evaluate the potential of natural polysaccharides as therapeutic agents for multiple organ failure in sepsis. Alginic acid and pectin strongly adsorbed histones, whereas the adsorption abilities of dextran and chitosan toward histones were very low or negligible. Among the natural polysaccharides examined, only alginic acid did not adsorb any of the plasma proteins. These results demonstrated that alginic acid strongly adsorbed histones, but not plasma proteins; therefore, it has potential as a candidate drug for the treatment of multiple organ failure in sepsis.

  8. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease: the potential of VEGF.

    PubMed

    Tiong, Alice; Freedman, Saul Benedict

    2004-04-01

    The quest for new therapeutic options and the recent exponential explosion in our knowledge of genetics have led to active interest and research into gene therapy. One area of gene therapy that has generated much debate and controversy is the use of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for therapeutic angiogenesis for palliative intent, and for the prevention of restenosis following percutaneous revascularization in coronary and peripheral arterial disease. This review highlights the development in VEGF gene therapy in the last 12 to 18 months, particularly the results from randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase I and II studies that have evolved from encouraging results from animal models and early pilot studies in humans.

  9. Effect of Hypobaric Hypoxia on Cognitive Functions and Potential Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    MUTHURAJU, Sangu; PATI, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    High altitude (HA), defined as approximately 3000–5000 m, considerably alters physiological and psychological parameters within a few hours. Chronic HA-mediated hypoxia (5000 m) results in permanent neuronal damage to the human brain that persists for one year or longer, even after returning to sea level. At HA, there is a decrease in barometric pressure and a consequential reduction in the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), an extreme environmental condition to which humans are occasionally exposed. This condition is referred to as hypobaric hypoxia (HBH), which represents the most unfavourable characteristics of HA. HBH causes the disruption of oxygen availability to tissue. However, no review article has explored the impact of HBH on cognitive functions or the potential therapeutic agents for HBH. Therefore, the present review aimed to describe the impact of HBH on both physiological and cognitive functions, specifically learning and memory. Finally, the potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of HBH-induced cognitive impairment are discussed. PMID:25941462

  10. Potential Bio-Control Agent from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Odedina, Grace Fiyinfoluwa; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-09-07

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen implicated in many outbreaks of listeriosis. This study aimed at screening for the potential use of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract as a bio-control agent against L. monocytogenes. Twenty-two L. monocytogenes isolates were checked with 16 commercial antibiotics and isolates displayed resistance to 10 antibiotics. All the tested isolates were sensitive to the extract with inhibition zones ranging from 14 to 16 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values ranged from 16 to 32 µg/mL and 128 to 512 µg/mL, respectively. Time-kill assay showed that the extract had remarkable bactericidal effects on L. monocytogenes. The extract at a concentration of 16 µg/mL reduced tolerance to 10% NaCl in L. monocytogenes in 4 h. Stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were rapidly inactivated by greater than 3-log units within 30 min of contact time with R. tomentosa extract at 128 µg/mL. Electron microscopy revealed fragmentary bacteria with changes in the physical and morphological properties. Our study demonstrates the potential of the extract for further development into a bio-control agent in food to prevent the incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination.

  11. Potential Bio-Control Agent from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa against Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Odedina, Grace Fiyinfoluwa; Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen implicated in many outbreaks of listeriosis. This study aimed at screening for the potential use of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract as a bio-control agent against L. monocytogenes. Twenty-two L. monocytogenes isolates were checked with 16 commercial antibiotics and isolates displayed resistance to 10 antibiotics. All the tested isolates were sensitive to the extract with inhibition zones ranging from 14 to 16 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values ranged from 16 to 32 µg/mL and 128 to 512 µg/mL, respectively. Time-kill assay showed that the extract had remarkable bactericidal effects on L. monocytogenes. The extract at a concentration of 16 µg/mL reduced tolerance to 10% NaCl in L. monocytogenes in 4 h. Stationary phase L. monocytogenes cells were rapidly inactivated by greater than 3-log units within 30 min of contact time with R. tomentosa extract at 128 µg/mL. Electron microscopy revealed fragmentary bacteria with changes in the physical and morphological properties. Our study demonstrates the potential of the extract for further development into a bio-control agent in food to prevent the incidence of L. monocytogenes contamination. PMID:26371033

  12. Potential water-quality effects from iron cyanide anticaking agents in road salt

    SciTech Connect

    Paschka, M.G.; Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.

    1999-10-01

    Water-soluble iron cyanide compounds are widely used as anticaking agents in road salt, which creates potential contamination of surface and groundwater with these compounds when the salt dissolves and is washed off roads in runoff. This paper presents a summary of available information on iron cyanide use in road salt and its potential effects on water quality. Also, estimates of total cyanide concentrations in snow-melt runoff from roadways are presented as simple mass-balance calculations. Although available information does not indicate a widespread problem, it also is clear that the water-quality effects of cyanide in road salt have not been examined much. Considering the large, and increasing, volume of road salt used for deicing, studies are needed to determine levels of total and free cyanide in surface and groundwater adjacent to salt storage facilities and along roads with open drainage ditches. Results could be combined with current knowledge of the fate and transport of cyanide to assess water-quality effects of iron cyanide anticaking agents used in road salt.

  13. ER maleate is a novel anticancer agent in oral cancer: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Jessa, Fatima; Srivastava, Gunjan; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-01-01

    ER maleate [10-(3-Aminopropyl)-3, 4-dimethyl-9(10H)-acridinone maleate] identified in a kinome screen was investigated as a novel anticancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our aim was to demonstrate its anticancer effects, identify putative molecular targets and determine their clinical relevance and investigate its chemosensitization potential for platinum drugs to aid in OSCC management. Biologic effects of ER maleate were determined using oral cancer cell lines in vitro and oral tumor xenografts in vivo. mRNA profiling, real time PCR and western blot revealed ER maleate modulated the expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Their clinical significance was determined in oral SCC patients by immunohistochemistry and correlated with prognosis by Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses. ER maleate induced cell apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in oral cancer cells. Imagestream analysis revealed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased polyploidy, unravelling deregulation of cell division and cell death. Mechanistically, ER maleate decreased expression of PLK1 and Syk, induced cleavage of PARP, caspase9 and caspase3, and increased chemosensitivity to carboplatin; significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased antitumor activity of carboplatin in tumor xenografts. ER maleate treated tumor xenografts showed reduced PLK1 and Syk expression. Clinical investigations revealed overexpression of PLK1 and Syk in oral SCC patients that correlated with disease prognosis. Our in vitro and in vivo findings provide a strong rationale for pre-clinical efficacy of ER maleate as a novel anticancer agent and chemosensitizer of platinum drugs for OSCC. PMID:26934445

  14. Targeting CSC-Related miRNAs for Cancer Therapy by Natural Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Li, Yiwei; Ahmad, Aamir; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bao, Ginny; Ali, Shadan; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has provided evidence on fundamental clinical implications because of the involvement of CSCs in cell migration, invasion, metastasis, and treatment resistance, which leads to the poor clinical outcome of cancer patients. Therefore, targeting CSCs will provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment and/or prevention of tumors. However, the regulation of CSCs and its signaling pathways during tumorigenesis are not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been proved to act as key regulators of the post-transcriptional regulation of genes, which involve in a wide array of biological processes including tumorigenesis. The altered expressions of miRNAs are associated with poor clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with a variety of tumors. Therefore, emerging evidence strongly suggest that miRMAs play critical roles in tumor development and progression. Emerging evidence also suggest that miRNAs participate in the regulation of tumor cell growth, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis. Moreover, miRNAs such as let-7, miR-21, miR-22, miR-34, miR-101, miR-146a, and miR-200 have been found to be associated with CSC phenotype and function mediated through targeting oncogenic signaling pathways. In this article, we will discuss the role of miRNAs in the regulation of CSC phenotype and function during tumor development and progression. We will also discuss the potential role of naturally occurring agents (nutraceuticals) as potent anti-tumor agents that are believed to function by targeting CSC-related miRNAs. PMID:23140295

  15. Potential of Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Goya, R G.; Sarkar, D.K.; Brown, O.A.; Hereñú, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas constitute the most frequent neuroendocrine pathology, comprising up to 15% of primary intracranial tumors. Current therapies for pituitary tumors include surgery and radiotherapy, as well as pharmacological approaches for some types. Although all of these approaches have shown a significant degree of success, they are not devoid of unwanted side effects, and in most cases do not offer a permanent cure. Gene therapy—the transfer of genetic material for therapeutic purposes—has undergone an explosive development in the last few years. Within this context, the development of gene therapy approaches for the treatment of pituitary tumors emerges as a promising area of research. We begin by presenting a brief account of the genesis of prolactinomas, with particular emphasis on how estradiol induces prolactinomas in animals. In so doing, we discuss the role of each of the recently discovered growth inhibitory and growth stimulatory substances and their interactions in estrogen action. We also evaluate the cell-cell communication that may govern these growth factor interactions and subsequently promote the growth and survival of prolactinomas. Current research efforts to implement gene therapy in pituitary tumors include the treatment of experimental prolactinomas or somatomammotropic tumors with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the suicide gene for the herpes simplex type 1 (HSV1) thymidine kinase, which converts the prodrug ganciclovir into a toxic metabolite. In some cases, the suicide transgene has been placed under the control of pituitary cell-type specific promoters, like the human prolactin or human growth hormone promoters. Also, regulatable adenoviral vector systems are being assessed in gene therapy approaches for experimental pituitary tumors. In a different type of approach, an adenoviral vector, encoding the human retinoblastoma suppressor oncogene, has been successfully used to rescue the phenotype of spontaneous pituitary

  16. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: potential targets and therapies.

    PubMed

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Nanda, Sanjeev; Konety, Badrinath R; Saleem, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The treatment landscape for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is undergoing significant changes with the advent of new therapies and multidisciplinary efforts by scientists and clinicians. As activation of multiple molecular pathways in the neoplastic prostate makes it impossible for single-target drugs to be completely effective in treating CRPC, this has led to combination therapy strategy, where several molecules involved in tumor growth and disease progression are targeted by a therapeutic regimen. In the present review, we provide an update on the molecular pathways that play an important role in the pathogenesis of CRPC and discuss the current wave of new treatments to combat this lethal disease.

  17. Clinical potential of gene therapy: towards meeting the demand.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J L; Rasko, J E J

    2014-03-01

    Since the discovery that new genetic material could be transferred into human cells resulting in induced expression of genes and proteins, clinicians and scientists have been working to harness the technology for clinical outcomes. This article provides a summary of the current status of developments within the broad discipline of clinical gene therapy. In pursuing the treatment of diverse clinical conditions, a wide variety of therapeutics, each tailor-made, may be required. Gene therapy offers the possibility of accurately and specifically targeting particular genetic abnormalities through gene correction, addition or replacement. It represents a compelling idea that adds a new dimension to our portfolio of credible therapeutic choices.

  18. Potential mesenchymal stem cell therapy for skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoguang; Hamada, Takahiro; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-haematopoietic cells that reside in most tissues including adult bone marrow. MSCs have recently been extensively studied and used for clinical therapies, including skin wound healing. However, there are still many questions to be answered. In the viewpoint entitled 'Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in skin: why and what for?', Dr. Khosrotehrani provided a comprehensive overview for MSC properties and current progresses on clinical applications for various skin conditions. This viewpoint is therefore very helpful for both dermatologists and basic skin researchers to understand stem cells researches.

  19. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  20. In Vitro Efficacy and Mechanistic Role of Indocyanine Green as a Photodynamic Therapy Agent for Human Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mamoon, A.; Gamal-Eldeen, A; Ruppel, M; Smith, R; Tsang, T; Miller, L

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment for superficial cancer. However, poor therapeutic results have been reported for melanoma, due to the high melanin content. Indocyanine green (ICG) has near infrared absorption (700-800nm) and melanins do not absorb strongly in this area. This study explores the efficiency of ICG as a PDT agent for human melanoma, and its mechanistic role in the cell death pathway.

  1. Efficacy of the Hypomethylating Agents as Frontline, Salvage or Consolidation Therapy in Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Bernard; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Lyerly, Susan; Klepin, Heidi D.; Lawrence, Julia; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R.; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Background The hypomethylating agents (HA), azacitidine and decitabine, have emerged as an alternative to initial and salvage therapy in patients with AML. Little is known about how AML responds to hypomethylating agents after standard therapy and the activity of these agents in a real world setting is not well studied. Methods We retrospectively examined data for 75 consecutive AML patients at Wake Forest from 2002–2011 treated with HAs either as 1st line (n=34), salvage (n=28) or consolidation (n=13). We collected data on age, gender, race, Charlson Comorbidity index (CCI), cytogenetics, type of treatment, Complete Remission (CR), Complete Remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and survival. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and cox proportional hazards models. Results Frontline response rate (CR+CRi) was 26.5%, median overall survival (OS) was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3–7.4) months, with 18% alive at one year. In the salvage cohort, the response rate was significantly lower compared to frontline (3.6% versus 26.5%, p=0.017). Despite the reduced response, OS from time of HA treatment was longer than frontline at 8.2 (CI 4.8–10.3) months. In the consolidation cohort OS was 13.8 (CI 8.0 – 21.6) months with one patient in remission more than 30 months from diagnosis. Conclusion These data suggest prior cytotoxic therapy decrease marrow response rates to HAs but not survival. Furthermore, use of hypomethylating agents for consolidation resulted in a median overall survival over one year in a cohort of older patients. This suggests that hypomethylating agents have activity in all phases of AML treatment. PMID:24149914

  2. Marathon Group Therapy: Potential for University Counseling Centers and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger, Thomas; Harris, Rafael S., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A descriptive analysis of marathon group therapy was conducted, specifying issues of set-up, screening, preparation, start-up, introduction to group process, facilitating therapeutic moments throughout the weekend, termination, and follow-up. Factors and dynamics unique to this modality are outlined for marathon groups in university counseling…

  3. Potential gene therapy strategies for cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-10-01

    To be maximally effective, therapy of cancer must be directed against both the resting stem cells and the proliferating cells of the cancer. The cell populations of both normal and cancer tissues consist of resting stem cells, proliferating transit-amplifying cells, terminally differentiating cells and dying (apoptotic) cells. The difference between normal tissue renewal and growth of cancers is that some of the transit-amplifying cells in the cancer population do not mature into terminally differentiating cells, but instead continue to proliferate and do not die (maturation arrest). Because of this the number of cancer cells increase, whereas the cell population of normal tissues remains a relatively constant. Conventional radiation treatment and chemotherapy kill the actively proliferating transit- amplifying cells of the cancer. Differentiation therapy, using specific targeted inhibitors of activation, effectively induces differentiation of the proliferating transit-amplifying cancer cells. However, even if the proliferating cancer cells are completely inhibited or eliminated, the cancer stem cells may restore the transit-amplifying population, so that clinical remission is usually temporary. The hypothesis presented in this paper is that successful cancer therapy must be directed against both the resting stem cells and the proliferating cells of the cancer. This may be possible if specific stem cell signals are inhibited using gene therapy, while at the same time attacking proliferating cells by conventional radiation treatment or chemotherapy. With advances in approaches using specific inhibitory RNA, such combination therapy may now be possible, but critical problems in delivering the inhibitory effect specifically to the cancer stem cells have yet to be worked out.

  4. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Human RAD51 Potentiates Breast Cancer Cell Killing by Therapeutic Agents in Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    The homologous recombination pathway is responsible for the repair of DNA double strand breaks. RAD51, a key homologous recombination protein, promotes the search for homology and DNA strand exchange between homologous DNA molecules. RAD51 is overexpressed in a variety of cancer cells. Downregulation of RAD51 by siRNA increases radio- or chemo-sensitivity of cancer cells. We recently developed a specific RAD51 small molecule inhibitor, B02, which inhibits DNA strand exchange activity of RAD51 in vitro. In this study, we used human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 to investigate the ability of B02 to inhibit RAD51 and to potentiate an anti-cancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents including doxorubicin, etoposide, topotecan, and cisplatin. We found that the combination of B02 with cisplatin has the strongest killing effect on the cancer cells. We then tested the effect of B02 and cisplatin on the MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation in mouse xenografts. Our results showed that B02 significantly enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin on tumor cells in vivo. Our current data demonstrate that use of RAD51-specific small molecule inhibitor represents a feasible strategy of a combination anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24971740

  5. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: potential targets and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Nanda, Sanjeev; Konety, Badrinath R; Saleem, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The treatment landscape for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is undergoing significant changes with the advent of new therapies and multidisciplinary efforts by scientists and clinicians. As activation of multiple molecular pathways in the neoplastic prostate makes it impossible for single-target drugs to be completely effective in treating CRPC, this has led to combination therapy strategy, where several molecules involved in tumor growth and disease progression are targeted by a therapeutic regimen. In the present review, we provide an update on the molecular pathways that play an important role in the pathogenesis of CRPC and discuss the current wave of new treatments to combat this lethal disease. PMID:22956858

  6. Potential for Stem Cell-Based Periodontal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bassir, Seyed Hossein; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Raanan, Justin; Ghaffarigarakani, Sasan; Chung, Jamie; Freire, Marcelo; Andrada, Luciano C.; Intini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and are linked to several systemic diseases. The goal of periodontal treatment is to halt the progression of the disease and regenerate the damaged tissue. However, achieving complete and functional periodontal regeneration is challenging because the periodontium is a complex apparatus composed of different tissues, including bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament. Stem cell-based regenerative therapy may represent an effective therapeutic tool for periodontal regeneration due to their plasticity and ability to differentiate into different cell lineages. This review presents and critically analyzes the available information on stem cell-based therapy for the regeneration of periodontal tissues and suggests new avenues for the development of more effective therapeutic protocols. PMID:26058394

  7. Kinase inhibitors as potential agents in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Hanley N.

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of therapeutic options available for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) - from immunomodulating agents to proteasome inhibitors to histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and, most recently, monoclonal antibodies. Used in conjunction with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, these modalities have nearly doubled the disease's five-year survival rate over the last three decades to about 50%. In spite of these advances, MM still is considered incurable as resistance and relapse are common. While small molecule protein kinase inhibitors have made inroads in the therapy of a number of cancers, to date their application to MM has been less than successful. Focusing on MM, this review examines the roles played by a number of kinases in driving the malignant state and the rationale for target development in the design of a number of kinase inhibitors that have demonstrated anti-myeloma activity in both in vitro and in vivo xenograph models, as well as those that have entered clinical trials. Among the targets and their inhibitors examined are receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases, cell cycle control kinases, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway kinases, protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, casein kinase, integrin-linked kinase, sphingosine kinase, and kinases involved in the unfolded protein response. PMID:27655636

  8. Cromolyn sodium: a potential therapy for uremic pruritus?

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H

    2006-04-01

    Uremic pruritus occurs in up to 50% of patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. The pathogenesis of this disabling condition is unknown but likely involves multiple pathways involving the peripheral and central nervous system as well as local chemical and inflammatory mediators. Therapy has involved modification of the dialysis procedure, topical medications such as emollients, physical treatments such as ultraviolet light, and several oral medications such as antihistamines, activated charcoal, and gabapentin. Unfortunately, most of these therapies have not been subjected to rigorous clinical trials and clinical success has been variable. Two patients with disabling uremic pruritus refractory to multiple interventions are reported, who showed significant improvement in pruritus severity as assessed by a visual analog scale when they were treated with the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn sodium. Cessation of cromolyn resulted in return of pruritus, which improved with rechallenge with the medication. Cromolyn sodium may offer an alternative therapy for patients with refractory uremic pruritus, and should be subjected to a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  9. Potential of adult neural stem cells in stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Andres, Robert H; Choi, Raymond; Steinberg, Gary K; Guzman, Raphael

    2008-11-01

    Despite state-of-the-art therapy, clinical outcome after stroke remains poor, with many patients left permanently disabled and dependent on care. Stem cell therapy has evolved as a promising new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of stroke in experimental studies, and recent clinical trials have proven its feasibility and safety in patients. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of different cell types, such as embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells, human fetal tissue and genetically engineered cell lines. Adult neural stem cells offer the advantage of avoiding the ethical problems associated with embryonic or fetal stem cells and can be harvested as autologous grafts from the individual patients. Furthermore, stimulation of endogenous adult stem cell-mediated repair mechanisms in the brain might offer new avenues for stroke therapy without the necessity of transplantation. However, important scientific issues need to be addressed to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the critical steps in cell-based repair to allow the introduction of these experimental techniques into clinical practice. This review describes up-to-date experimental concepts using adult neural stem cells for the treatment of stroke.

  10. Clinical potential for vitamin D as a neoadjuvant for photodynamic therapy of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Rollakanti, Kishore

    2015-03-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), comprising basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is the most common form of human cancer worldwide. Effective therapies include surgical excision, cryotherapy, and ionizing radiation, but all of these cause scarring. ALA-based PDT is a non-scarring modality used routinely for NMSC in Europe but not in the USA, primarily due to lingering uncertainties about efficacy. We have identified three agents (methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, and vitamin D) that can be used as neoadjuvants, i.e., can be given as a pretreatment prior to ALA-PDT, to improve the efficacy of tumor killing in mouse models of NMSC. Vitamin D (VD3) is the most recent neoadjuvant on this list. In this presentation we make the case that VD3 may be superior to the other agents to improve results of ALA-PDT skin cancer treatment. The active form of VD3 (calcitriol) is available topically as a pharmaceutical grade cream or ointment (FDA-approved for psoriasis), and works well for boosting ALA-PDT tumor treatment in mouse models. For deep tumors not reachable by a topical route, calcitriol can be given systemically and is very effective, but carries a risk of causing hypercalcemia as a side effect. To circumvent this risk, we have conducted experiments with the natural dietary form of VD3 (cholecalciferol), and showed that this improves ALA-PDT efficacy almost to the same extent as calcitriol. Because cholecalciferol does not increase serum calcium levels, this represents a potentially extremely safe approach. Data in mouse models of BCC and SCC will be presented.

  11. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Hamed, Maha I; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-11-10

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin's ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections.

  12. Bismuth@US-tubes as a Potential Contrast Agent for X-ray Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Eladio J.; Tran, Lesa A.; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Yoon, Diana; Mikos, Antonios G.; Rusakova, Irene A.; Cheong, Benjamin Y.; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graça; Willerson, James T.; Perin, Emerson C.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2013-01-01

    The encapsulation of bismuth as BiOCl/Bi2O3 within ultra-short (ca. 50 nm) single-walled carbon nanocapsules (US-tubes) has been achieved. The Bi@US-tubes have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Bi@US-tubes have been used for intracellular labeling of pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to show high X-ray contrast in computed tomography (CT) cellular imaging for the first time. The relatively high contrast is achieved with low bismuth loading (2.66% by weight) within the US-tubes and without compromising cell viability. X-ray CT imaging of Bi@US-tubes-labeled MSCs showed a nearly two-fold increase in contrast enhancement when compared to unlabeled MSCs in a 100 kV CT clinical scanner. The CT signal enhancement from the Bi@US-tubes is 500 times greater than polymer-coated Bi2S3 nanoparticles and several-fold that of any clinical iodinated contrast agent (CA) at the same concentration. Our findings suggest that the Bi@US-tubes can be used as a potential new class of X-ray CT agent for stem cell labeling and possibly in vivo tracking. PMID:24288589

  13. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of chalcone oxime derivatives as potential immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yin; Song, Ran; Li, Yao; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Fu, Jie; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2012-05-01

    A series of deoxybenzoin oximes were recently reported as potent immunosuppressive agents by our group. In order to continue the original research for potential immunosuppressive agents with high efficacy and low toxicity, we synthesized a series of new chalcone oximes and evaluated them for their cytotoxicities and immunosuppressive activities. Among the synthesized compounds, chalcone oximes 25 and 27 exhibited lower cytotoxicities and higher inhibitory activities on anti-CD3/anti-CD28 co-stimulated lymph node cells than other compounds. Specially, compound 27 displayed 200-fold lower cytotoxicity (CC(50)=2174.39 μM) than cyclosporin A (CC(50)=10.10 μM) and showed SI value (SI=176.69) close to cyclosporin A (SI=154.13). Besides, the preliminary mechanism of inhibition effect of compounds 25 and 27 was also detected by flow cytometry, and the compounds exerted immunosuppressive activities via inducing the apoptosis of activated lymph node cells in a dose dependent manner. Also, the deep mechanism of apoptosis was detected by Western blot analysis.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of radioiodinated 1-(dialkyl-aminoalkyl)-4-phenylpiperazines as potential brain imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.N.; Shourbagy, T.E.

    1985-05-01

    The interest in radioiodinated diamines stems from their similarity to /sup 125/I-HIPDM and to the 1-dialkvlamino-acyl-4-phenylpiperazines that the authors have previously examined as potential brain imaging agents. In this study they converted the 1-(dialkylaminoacyl)-4-phenylpiperazines to their corresponding 1-(dialkylaminoacyl) analogs via reduction with diborane in THF. Radioiodination at the no-carrier-added level with Na/sup 125/I and chloramine-T gave the final compounds, after chromatographic separation, in 30-50% yields. The tissue distributions were determined in rats at 0.25, and 4 hrs after an i.v. injection of the radiochemical. The results indicated that all of the agents were readily extracted by the brain (1.5-2.5% ID) with brain to blood ratios >20. The structure-distribution relationships for this series were, however, decidedly different from the aminoacyl compounds in that morpholino-derivatives had better uptake and retention than the piperidine derivatives. Neither extension of the alkyl chain nor the presence of carrier significantly altered the brain uptake and retention of the radiochemical. Further studies are in progress. In conclusion, they have identified a class of radiotracers that can be readily prepared and show a pattern of brain uptake and retention than the structurally similar 1-dialkylaminoacyl-4-phenylpiperazines.

  15. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  16. Design of novel dispirooxindolopyrrolidine and dispirooxindolopyrrolothiazole derivatives as potential antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Mhiri, Chourouk; Boudriga, Sarra; Askri, Moheddine; Knorr, Michael; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Nana, Frédéric; Golz, Christopher; Strohmann, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    With the aim to develop new potent antitubercular agents, a series of novel dispirooxindolopyrrolidines and dispirooxindolopyrrolothiazoles have been synthesized via a three-component 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of (Z)-3-arylidenebenzofuran-2-ones, substituted isatin derivatives and α-aminoacids. The stereochemistry of the spiroadducts has been confirmed by an X-ray diffraction analysis. All the target heterocycles were evaluated for in vitro antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain and the most active compounds were subjected to cytotoxicity studies against (RAW 264.7) cell lines. Among them, twelve compounds showed potent anti-tubercular activity with MIC ranging from 1.56 to 6.25 μg/mL. In particular dispirooxindolopyrrolothiazole derivatives 5c and 5f were found to be the most active (MIC of 1.56 μg/mL) with a good safety profile (27.53% and 20.74% at 50 μM, respectively). This is the first report demonstrating the benzofuranone oxindole hybrids as potential antimycobacterial agents.

  17. Understanding Virulence in the Brucellae and Francisellae: Towards Efficacious Treatments for Two Potential Biothreat Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rasley, A; Parsons, D A; El-Etr, S; Roux, C; Tsolis, R

    2009-12-30

    Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Brucellae species are highly infectious pathogens classified as select agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the potential for use in bioterrorism attacks. These organisms are known to be facultative intracellular pathogens that preferentially infect human monocytes. As such, understanding how the host responds to infection with these organisms is paramount in detecting and combating human disease. We have compared the ability of fully virulent strains of each pathogen and their non-pathogenic near neighbors to enter and survive inside the human monocytic cell line THP-1 and have quantified the cellular response to infection with the goal of identifying both unique and common host response patterns. We expanded the scope of these studies to include experiments with pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague. Nonpathogenic strains of each organism were impaired in their ability to survive intracellularly compared with their pathogenic counterparts. Furthermore, infection of THP-1 cells with pathogenic strains of Y. pestis and F. tularensis resulted in marked increases in the secretion of the inflammatory chemokines IL-8, RANTES, and MIP-1{beta}. In contrast, B. melitensis infection failed to elicit any significant increases in a panel of cytokines tested. These differences may underscore distinct strategies in pathogenic mechanisms employed by these pathogens.

  18. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva’a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner–Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa’s expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space. PMID:27445461

  19. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner-Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa's expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space.

  20. Bismuth@US-tubes as a Potential Contrast Agent for X-ray Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Eladio J; Tran, Lesa A; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Yoon, Diana; Mikos, Antonios G; Rusakova, Irene A; Cheong, Benjamin Y; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graça; Willerson, James T; Perin, Emerson C; Wilson, Lon J

    2013-10-07

    The encapsulation of bismuth as BiOCl/Bi2O3 within ultra-short (ca. 50 nm) single-walled carbon nanocapsules (US-tubes) has been achieved. The Bi@US-tubes have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Bi@US-tubes have been used for intracellular labeling of pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to show high X-ray contrast in computed tomography (CT) cellular imaging for the first time. The relatively high contrast is achieved with low bismuth loading (2.66% by weight) within the US-tubes and without compromising cell viability. X-ray CT imaging of Bi@US-tubes-labeled MSCs showed a nearly two-fold increase in contrast enhancement when compared to unlabeled MSCs in a 100 kV CT clinical scanner. The CT signal enhancement from the Bi@US-tubes is 500 times greater than polymer-coated Bi2S3 nanoparticles and several-fold that of any clinical iodinated contrast agent (CA) at the same concentration. Our findings suggest that the Bi@US-tubes can be used as a potential new class of X-ray CT agent for stem cell labeling and possibly in vivo tracking.

  1. Glycans in magnetic resonance imaging: determinants of relaxivity to smart agents, and potential applications in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Laura; Gregori, Maria; So, Po-Wah

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate chemistry and glycobiology have become a "hot" subject. These extensive, complex structures serve essential roles in cell surface phenomena, but we are only beginning to understand what some of these functions are; any advances in the development of synthetic and/or analytical tools for glycobiology are extremely useful for our understanding of the roles of carbohydrates in biology, and as biomarkers of physiological/pathological states. This review provides an outlook of the potential of carbohydrate chemistry/biology in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a major important and prominent technique in diagnostic clinical medicine and biomedical research. During the last 30 years, MRI has developed from an intriguing research project to an essential diagnostic method in the clinic. Although MRI contrast in endogenous tissues provides excellent sensitivity for detecting subtle changes in anatomy and function, MRI still has poor specificity for attributing image contrast to specific biological processes. To overcome this limitation, MRI methods are being developed that induce changes in MR image contrast in response to molecular compositions and functions that serve as early biomarkers of pathologies. Carbohydrates with their intriguing chemistry, not only can provide structures for novel MRI probes for imaging specific biological processes, but can themselves provide novel targets/biomarkers. For example, the glycan structure can simply provide a molecular scaffold for modulating the physicochemical properties of the imaging contrast agent, or can be used for the design of novel MR agents with the ability to disclose relevant physiological or pathological cellular events.

  2. Novel benzothiazine-piperazine derivatives by peptide-coupling as potential anti-proliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Ramineni; Kasaboina, Suresh; Bidayat, Deepthi; Nikhil Kumar, U; Jain, Nishant; Tangeda, Saritha Jostna; Bantu, Rajashaker; Janardhan, Sridhara; Nagarapu, Lingaiah

    2017-01-15

    In an attempt to develop potential and selective anti-proliferative agents, a series of novel benzothiazine-piperazine derivatives 8a-i and 10a-g were synthesized by coupling of 2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3(4H)-one with various amines 7a-i and 9a-g in excellent yields and evaluated for their in vitro anti-proliferative activity against four cancer cell lines, HeLa (cervical), MIAPACA (pancreatic), MDA-MB-231 (breast) and IMR32 (neuroblastoma). In vitro inhibitory activity indicated that compounds 8a, 8d, 8g, 10a, 10b, 10e, 10f were found to be good anti-proliferative agents. Among them the derivatives 8g, 10e and 10f were found to be the most active members exhibiting remarkable growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking was undertaken to investigate the probable binding mode and key active site interactions in HDAC8 and EHMT2 proteins. The docking results are complementary to the experimental results.

  3. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Q-426 as a potential biocontrol agent against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengchao; Quan, Chunshan; Wang, Yingguo; Wang, Jianhua; Fan, Shengdi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, Bacillus species have received considerable attention for the biological control of many fungal diseases. In this study, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Q-426 was tested for its potential use against a variety of plant pathogens. Our screen for genes involved in the biosynthesis of antifungal agents revealed that the fen and bmy gene clusters are present in the Q-426 genome. Lipopeptides such as bacillomycin D, fengycin A, and fengycin B were purified from the bacterial culture broth and subsequently identified by ESI-mass spectrometry. The minimal inhibitory concentration of fengycin A against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae W.C. Snyder & H.N. Hansen O-27 was determined to be 31.25 μg ml(-1) . However, exposure of fungal cells to 50 μg ml(-1) of fengycin A did not allow permeation of fluorescein diacetate into the cytoplasm through the cell membrane. Moreover, leakage of intracellular inorganic cations, nucleic acid and protein were also not detected, indicating that the fungal cell membrane is not the primary target of action for fengycin A. Profound morphological changes were observed in the F. oxysporum strain and spore germination was completely inhibited, suggesting that 50 μg ml(-1) of fengycin A acts, at least, as a fungistatic agent.

  4. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Singh, Prahlad R.

    1997-01-01

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g. .sup.99m Tc or .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re) or late transition metals (e.g., .sup.105 Rh or .sup.109 Pd). The complexes with these metals .sup.186 Re/.sup.188 Re, .sup.99m Tc and .sup.109 Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g. Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  5. Animals living in polluted environments are potential source of antimicrobials against infectious agents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobials crisis is a ticking time bomb which could lead to millions of people dying from untreatable infections. With the worsening trends of antimicrobial resistance, we are heading towards a pre-antibiotic era. Thus, there is a need for newer and more powerful antibiotic agents. The search for new antibiotic compounds originating from natural resources is a promising research area. Animals living in germ-infested environments are a potent source of antimicrobials. Under polluted milieus, organisms such as cockroaches encounter different types of bacteria, including superbugs. Such creatures survive the onslaught of superbugs and are able to ward off disease by producing antimicrobial substances which show potent activity in the nervous system. We hope that the discovery of antimicrobial activity in the cockroach brain will stimulate research in finding antimicrobials from unusual sources, and has potential for the development of novel antibiotics. Nevertheless, intensive research in the next few years will be required to approach or realize these expectations.

  6. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease: different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents including curcumin.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly. Deposition of amyloid beta plaque and associated neuroinflammation are the major hallmarks of AD. Whereas reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated microglial cells contribute to neuronal loss, nuclear factor kappaB and apolipoprotein E participate in inflammatory process of AD. Current FDA approved drugs provide only symptomatic relief in AD. For broad spectrum of activity, some natural products are also being tested. Turmeric is used as an anti-inflammatory medicine in various regions of Asia. Curcumin, which is a yellow colored polyphenol compound present in turmeric, showed anti-inflammatory properties. Herein, we discuss the neurobiological and neuroinflammatory pathways of AD, evaluate different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents, including curcumin, for the treatment of AD.

  7. Sodium arsenite potentiates the clastogenicity and mutagenicity of DNA cross linking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Lee, K.C.; Tzeng, Y.J.; Huang, R.Y.; Jan, K.Y.

    1986-01-01

    To see if sodium arsenite enhances the clastogenicity and the mutagenicity of DNA crosslinking agents, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human skin fibroblasts were exposed to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-Pt(II)) or 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus long-wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and then to sodium arsenite. The results indicate that the clastogenicity of cis-Pt(II) and 8-MOP pllus UVA are enhanced by the post-treatment with sodium arsenite. Chromatid breaks and exchanges are predominantly increased in doubly treated cells. Furthermore, the mutagenicity of cis-Pt(II) at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus is also potentiated by sodium arsenite in CHO cells

  8. Structure-activity analysis of 2'-modified cinnamaldehyde analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fei Fei; Chua, Yee Shin; Scarmagnani, Silvia; Palaniappan, Puvithira; Franks, Mark; Poobalasingam, Thurka; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Westwell, Andrew D; Hagen, Thilo

    2009-10-02

    The natural product 2'-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (HCA) and its analogue, 2'-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA), have been previously shown to have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we use structure-activity analysis to define structural features that are important for the activity of cinnamaldehyde analogues. Our results emphasize an important role for both the propenal group as well as the modification at the 2'-position. Further studies were aimed to characterize the mechanism of action of BCA. Exposure to BCA induced cell death via caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. Cell death was not due to autophagy or necrosis as a result of energy depletion or induction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings have important implications for future drug design and highlight the importance of defining molecular drug targets for this promising class of potential anticancer agents.

  9. Oxidative stress and Alzheimer's disease: dietary polyphenols as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Darvesh, Altaf S; Carroll, Richard T; Bishayee, Anupam; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J

    2010-05-01

    Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In recent years, antioxidants - especially those of dietary origin - have been suggested as possible agents useful for the prevention and treatment of AD. This article reviews the role of oxidative stress and the contribution of free radicals in the development of AD, and also discusses the use of antioxidants as a therapeutic strategy in the amelioration of this illness. The antioxidant potential of polyphenolic compounds obtained from dietary sources, such as anthocyanins from berries, catechins and theaflavins from tea, curcumin from turmeric, resveratrol from grapes and peanuts, the dihydrochalcones aspalathin and nothofagin from rooibos and the xanthone mangiferin from honeybush, are discussed in this review. The neuroprotective effects of these phytochemicals in preclinical models of AD are highlighted. Finally, innovative concepts, novel hypotheses, current challenges and future directions in the use of dietary polyphenols for the treatment of AD are discussed.

  10. Novel enterobactin analogues as potential therapeutic chelating agents: Synthesis, thermodynamic and antioxidant studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingchun; Jin, Bo; Shi, Zhaotao; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Qiangqiang; Lei, Shan; Peng, Rufang

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel hexadentate enterobactin analogues, which contain three catechol chelating moieties attached to different molecular scaffolds with flexible alkyl chain lengths, were prepared. The solution thermodynamic stabilities of the complexes with uranyl, ferric(III), and zinc(II) ions were then investigated. The hexadentate ligands demonstrate effective binding ability to uranyl ion, and the average uranyl affinities are two orders of magnitude higher than 2,3-dihydroxy-N1,N4-bis[(1,2-hydroxypyridinone-6-carboxamide)ethyl]terephthalamide [TMA(2Li-1,2-HOPO)2] ligand with similar denticity. The high affinity of hexadentate ligands could be due to the presence of the flexible scaffold, which favors the geometric agreement between the ligand and the uranyl coordination preference. The hexadentate ligands also exhibit higher antiradical efficiency than butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). These results provide a basis for further studies on the potential applications of hexadentate ligands as therapeutic chelating agents. PMID:27671769

  11. Novel enterobactin analogues as potential therapeutic chelating agents: Synthesis, thermodynamic and antioxidant studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingchun; Jin, Bo; Shi, Zhaotao; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Qiangqiang; Lei, Shan; Peng, Rufang

    2016-09-01

    A series of novel hexadentate enterobactin analogues, which contain three catechol chelating moieties attached to different molecular scaffolds with flexible alkyl chain lengths, were prepared. The solution thermodynamic stabilities of the complexes with uranyl, ferric(III), and zinc(II) ions were then investigated. The hexadentate ligands demonstrate effective binding ability to uranyl ion, and the average uranyl affinities are two orders of magnitude higher than 2,3-dihydroxy-N1,N4-bis[(1,2-hydroxypyridinone-6-carboxamide)ethyl]terephthalamide [TMA(2Li-1,2-HOPO)2] ligand with similar denticity. The high affinity of hexadentate ligands could be due to the presence of the flexible scaffold, which favors the geometric agreement between the ligand and the uranyl coordination preference. The hexadentate ligands also exhibit higher antiradical efficiency than butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). These results provide a basis for further studies on the potential applications of hexadentate ligands as therapeutic chelating agents.

  12. Lignin model compound in alginate hydrogel: a strong antimicrobial agent with high potential in wound treatment.

    PubMed

    Spasojević, Dragica; Zmejkoski, Danica; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Nikolić, Miloš; Soković, Marina; Milošević, Verica; Jarić, Ivana; Stojanović, Marijana; Marinković, Emilija; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin; Prodanović, Radivoje; Jovanović, Miloš; Radotić, Ksenija

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays bacterial resistance to known antibiotics is a serious health problem. In order to achieve more efficient treatment, lately there is an effort to find new substances, such as certain biomaterials, that are non-toxic to humans with antibiotic potential. Lignins and lignin-derived compounds have been proposed to be good candidates for use in medicine and health maintenance. In this study, the antibacterial activity of the lignin model polymer dehydrogenate polymer (DHP) in alginate hydrogel (Alg) was studied. The obtained results show that DHP-Alg has strong antimicrobial activity against several bacterial strains and biofilms and does not have a toxic effect on human epithelial cells. These results strongly suggest its application as a wound healing agent or as an adjunct substance for wound treatments.

  13. Novel Penicillin Analogues as Potential Antimicrobial Agents; Design, Synthesis and Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Zaman; Bais, Abdul; Manir, Md. Maniruzzaman; Niazi, Umar

    2015-01-01

    A number of penicillin derivatives (4a-h) were synthesized by the condensation of 6-amino penicillinic acid (6-APA) with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as antimicrobial agents. In silico docking study of these analogues was performed against Penicillin Binding Protein (PDBID 1CEF) using AutoDock Tools 1.5.6 in order to investigate the antimicrobial data on structural basis. Penicillin binding proteins function as either transpeptidases or carboxypeptidases and in few cases demonstrate transglycosylase activity in bacteria. The excellent antibacterial potential was depicted by compounds 4c and 4e against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidus and Staphylococcus aureus compared to the standard amoxicillin. The most potent penicillin derivative 4e exhibited same activity as standard amoxicillin against S. aureus. In the enzyme inhibitory assay the compound 4e inhibited E. coli MurC with an IC50 value of 12.5 μM. The docking scores of these compounds 4c and 4e also verified their greater antibacterial potential. The results verified the importance of side chain functionalities along with the presence of central penam nucleus. The binding affinities calculated from docking results expressed in the form of binding energies ranges from -7.8 to -9.2kcal/mol. The carboxylic group of penam nucleus in all these compounds is responsible for strong binding with receptor protein with the bond length ranges from 3.4 to 4.4 Ǻ. The results of present work ratify that derivatives 4c and 4e may serve as a structural template for the design and development of potent antimicrobial agents. PMID:26267242

  14. Biocompatible nanotemplate-engineered nanoparticles containing gadolinium: stability and relaxivity of a potential MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua; White, R D; Hardy, Peter A; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida; Sutthanut, Khaetthareeya; Jay, Michael

    2006-04-01

    In this article, we use a nanotemplate engineering approach to prepare biodegradable nanoparticles composed of FDA-approved materials and possessing accessible gadolinium (Gd) atoms and demonstrate their potential as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Nanoparticles containing dimyristoyl phosphoethanolamine diethylene triamine penta acetate (PE-DTPA) were prepared using 3.5 mg of Brij 78, 2.0 mg of emulsifying wax and 0.5 mg of PE-DTPA/ml from a microemulsion precursor. After the addition of GdCl3, the presence of Gd on the surface of nanoparticles was characterized using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). The in vitro relaxivities of the PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles in different media were assessed at different field strengths. The conditional stability constant of Gd binding to the nanoparticles was determined using competitive spectrophotometric titration. Transmetallation kinetics of the gadolinium ion from PE-DTPA-Gd nanoparticles with zinc as the competing ionic was measured using the relaxivity evolution method. Nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 130 nm possessing surface chelating functions were made from GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) materials. STEM demonstrated the uniform distribution of Gd3+ on the surface of the nanoparticles. The thermodynamic binding constant for Gd3+ to the nanoparticles was approximately 10(18) M(-1) and transmetallation studies with Zn2+ yielded kinetic constants K1 and K(-1) of 0.033 and 0.022 1/h, respectively, with an equilibrium constant of 1.5. A payload of approximately 10(5) Gd/nanoparticle was achieved; enhanced relaxivities were observed, including a pH dependence of the transverse relaxivity (r2). Nanoparticles composed of materials that have been demonstrated to be hemocompatible and enzymatically metabolized and possessing accessible Gd ions on their surface induce relaxivities in the bulk water signal that make them

  15. Novel Penicillin Analogues as Potential Antimicrobial Agents; Design, Synthesis and Docking Studies.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Zaman; Bais, Abdul; Manir, Md Maniruzzaman; Niazi, Umar

    2015-01-01

    A number of penicillin derivatives (4a-h) were synthesized by the condensation of 6-amino penicillinic acid (6-APA) with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as antimicrobial agents. In silico docking study of these analogues was performed against Penicillin Binding Protein (PDBID 1CEF) using AutoDock Tools 1.5.6 in order to investigate the antimicrobial data on structural basis. Penicillin binding proteins function as either transpeptidases or carboxypeptidases and in few cases demonstrate transglycosylase activity in bacteria. The excellent antibacterial potential was depicted by compounds 4c and 4e against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidus and Staphylococcus aureus compared to the standard amoxicillin. The most potent penicillin derivative 4e exhibited same activity as standard amoxicillin against S. aureus. In the enzyme inhibitory assay the compound 4e inhibited E. coli MurC with an IC50 value of 12.5 μM. The docking scores of these compounds 4c and 4e also verified their greater antibacterial potential. The results verified the importance of side chain functionalities along with the presence of central penam nucleus. The binding affinities calculated from docking results expressed in the form of binding energies ranges from -7.8 to -9.2kcal/mol. The carboxylic group of penam nucleus in all these compounds is responsible for strong binding with receptor protein with the bond length ranges from 3.4 to 4.4 Ǻ. The results of present work ratify that derivatives 4c and 4e may serve as a structural template for the design and development of potent antimicrobial agents.

  16. Evaluation of Gd-DTPA-monophytanyl and phytantriol nanoassemblies as potential MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhishek; de Campo, Liliana; Rehmanjan, Beenish; Willis, Scott A; Waddington, Lynne J; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Kirby, Nigel; Price, William S; Moghaddam, Minoo J

    2015-02-03

    Supramolecular self-assembling amphiphiles have been widely used in drug delivery and diagnostic imaging. In this report, we present the self-assembly of Gd (III) chelated DTPA-monophytanyl (Gd-DTPA-MP) amphiphiles incorporated within phytantriol (PT), an inverse bicontinuous cubic phase forming matrix at various compositions. The dispersed colloidal nanoassemblies were evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents at various magnetic field strengths. The homogeneous incorporation of Gd-DTPA-MP in PT was confirmed by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of the bulk phases of the mixtures. The liquid crystalline nanostructures, morphology, and the size distribution of the nanoassemblies were studied by SAXS, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The dispersions with up to 2 mol % of Gd-DTPA-MP in PT retained inverse cubosomal nanoassemblies, whereas the rest of the dispersions transformed to liposomal nanoassemblies. In vitro relaxivity studies were performed on all the dispersions at 0.54, 9.40, and 11.74 T and compared to Magnevist, a commercially available contrast agent. All the dispersions showed much higher relaxivities compared to Magnevist at both low and high magnetic field strengths. Image contrast of the nanoassemblies was also found to be much better than Magnevist at the same Gd concentration at 11.74 T. Moreover, the Gd-DTPA-MP/PT dispersions showed improved relaxivities over the pure Gd-DTPA-MP dispersion at high magnetic fields. These stable colloidal nanoassemblies have high potential to be used as combined delivery matrices for diagnostics and therapeutics.

  17. ROS-responsive activatable photosensitizing agent for imaging and photodynamic therapy of activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Youngmi; Kim, In-Hoo; Kim, Kyungtae; Choi, Yongdoo

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of macrophage-targeted theranostic nanoparticles (MacTNP) prepared from a Chlorin e6 (Ce6)-hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugate can be activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophage cells. MacTNP are nonfluorescent and nonphototoxic in their native state. However, when treated with ROS, especially peroxynitrite, they become highly fluorescent and phototoxic. In vitro cell studies show that MacTNP emit near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence inside activated macrophages. The NIR fluorescence is quenched in the extracellular environment. MacTNP are nontoxic in macrophages up to a Ce6 concentration of 10 μM in the absence of light. However, MacTNP become phototoxic upon illumination in a light dose-dependent manner. In particular, significantly higher phototoxic effect is observed in the activated macrophage cells compared to human dermal fibroblasts and non-activated macrophages. The ROS-responsive MacTNP, with their high target-to-background ratio, may have a significant potential in selective NIR fluorescence imaging and in subsequent photodynamic therapy of atherosclerosis with minimum side effects.

  18. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2003-05-20

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron- capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  19. Use of novel metalloporphyrins as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated phorphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron-capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  20. Natural products as potential cancer therapy enhancers: A preclinical update.

    PubMed

    Agbarya, Abed; Ruimi, Nili; Epelbaum, Ron; Ben-Arye, Eran; Mahajna, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that arises as a consequence of alterations in many physiological processes. Recently, hallmarks of cancer were suggested that include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis, along with two emerging hallmarks including reprogramming energy metabolism and escaping immune destruction. Treating multifactorial diseases, such as cancer with agents targeting a single target, might provide partial treatment and, in many cases, disappointing cure rates. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that the regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Since ancient times, plants, herbs, and other natural products have been used as healing agents. Moreover, the majority of the medicinal substances available today have their origin in natural compounds. Traditionally, pharmaceuticals are used to cure diseases, and nutrition and herbs are used to prevent disease and to provide an optimal balance of macro- and micro-nutrients needed for good health. We explored the combination of natural products, dietary nutrition, and cancer chemotherapeutics for improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapeutics and negating side effects.

  1. Natural products as potential cancer therapy enhancers: A preclinical update

    PubMed Central

    Agbarya, Abed; Ruimi, Nili; Epelbaum, Ron; Ben-Arye, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that arises as a consequence of alterations in many physiological processes. Recently, hallmarks of cancer were suggested that include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis, along with two emerging hallmarks including reprogramming energy metabolism and escaping immune destruction. Treating multifactorial diseases, such as cancer with agents targeting a single target, might provide partial treatment and, in many cases, disappointing cure rates. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that the regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Since ancient times, plants, herbs, and other natural products have been used as healing agents. Moreover, the majority of the medicinal substances available today have their origin in natural compounds. Traditionally, pharmaceuticals are used to cure diseases, and nutrition and herbs are used to prevent disease and to provide an optimal balance of macro- and micro-nutrients needed for good health. We explored the combination of natural products, dietary nutrition, and cancer chemotherapeutics for improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapeutics and negating side effects. PMID:26770737

  2. The potential application of chlorin e6-polyvinylpyrrolidone formulation in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Chin, William Wei Lim; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Lau, Weber Kam On; Olivo, Malini

    2006-11-01

    Much research has been focused on developing effective drug delivery systems for the preparation of chlorins as potential photosensitizers for PDT. This report describes the evaluation of a new water-soluble formulation of chlorin e6 consisting of a complex of trisodium salt chlorin e6 and polyvinylpyrrolidone (Ce6-PVP) for application in photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 2 specific aims: (i) to investigate its fluorescence kinetics in skin, normal and tumor tissue after intravenous administration, and (ii) to investigate its PDT efficacy. Our results demonstrate that this new formulation possesses photosensitizing properties with rapid accumulation in tumor tissue observed within 1 h after intravenous administration. Although high selectivity in tumor tissue was found between the period of 3 and 6 h, the efficacy of Ce6-PVP mediated PDT was best at 1 h drug-light interval. It is suggested that, the extent of tumor necrosis post PDT is dependent on the plasma concentration of Ce6-PVP, implying a vascular mediated cell death mechanism. A faster clearance rate of Ce6-PVP from the skin of nude mice was observed compared to Ce6. The new formulation of Ce6-PVP seems to show promise as an effective therapeutic agent.

  3. The natural compound magnolol inhibits invasion and exhibits potential in human breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Yong-qiang; Wang, Zhong-yuan; Wu, Yan-ping; Yu, Xian-jun; Zhang, Xu-dong; Ming, Ping-hong; Zhou, Guang-biao; Huang, Laiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are the main causes of treatment failure and death in breast cancer. Thus, novel invasion-based therapies such as those involving natural agents are urgently required. In this study, we examined the effects of magnolol (Mag), a compound extracted from medicinal herbs, on breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Highly invasive cancer cells were found to be highly sensitive to treatment. Mag markedly inhibited the activity of highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, Mag significantly downregulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression, an enzyme critical to tumor invasion. Mag also inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity and the DNA binding of NF-κB to MMP-9 promoter. These results indicate that Mag suppresses tumor invasion by inhibiting MMP-9 through the NF-κB pathway. Moreover, Mag overcame the promoting effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our findings reveal the therapeutic potential and mechanism of Mag against cancer. PMID:24226295

  4. Quantum dot-folic acid conjugates as potential photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Morosini, Vincent; Bastogne, Thierry; Frochot, Céline; Schneider, Raphaël; François, Aurélie; Guillemin, François; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2011-05-01

    This study examined the in vitro potential of bioconjugated quantum dots (QDs) as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). According to our previous approaches using photosensitizers, folic acid appears to be an optimal targeting ligand for selective delivery of attached therapeutic agents to cancer tissues. We synthesized hydrophilic near infrared emitting CdTe(S)-type QDs conjugated with folic acid using different spacers. Photodynamic efficiency of QDs conjugated or not with folic acid was evaluated on KB cells, acting as a positive control due to their overexpression of FR-α, and HT-29 cells lacking FR-α, as negative control. A design of experiments was suggested as a rational solution to evaluate the impacts of each experimental factor (QD type and concentration, light fluence and excitation wavelength, time of contact before irradiation and cell phenotype). We demonstrated that, for concentrations lower than 10 nM, QDs displayed practically no cytotoxic effect without light exposure for both cell lines. Whereas QDs at 2.1 nM displayed a weak photodynamic activity, a concentration of 8 nM significantly enhanced the photodynamic efficiency characterized by a light dose-dependent response. A statistically significant difference in photodynamic efficiency between KB and HT-29 cells was evidenced in the case of folic acid-conjugated QDs. Optimal conditions led to an enhanced photocytotoxicity response, allowing us to validate the ability of QDs to generate a photodynamic effect and of folic acid-conjugated QDs for targeted PDT.

  5. BRAF inhibitors and radiotherapy for melanoma brain metastases: potential advantages and disadvantages of combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Patel, Kirtesh R; Danish, Hasan H; Lawson, David H; Khan, Mohammad K

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive malignancy that frequently spreads to the brain, resulting in rapid deterioration in both quality and quantity of life. Historically, treatment options for melanoma brain metastases (MBM) have predominantly consisted of surgery and radiotherapy. While these options can help provide local control, the majority of patients still develop intracranial progression. Indeed, novel therapeutic options, including molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapy, have improved outcomes and are now changing the role of radiotherapy. Up to 50% of melanomas contain an activating BRAF mutation, resulting in hyperactive cellular proliferation and survival. Drugs that target BRAF have been introduced for the treatment of metastatic melanoma and offer hope in improving disease outcomes; however, many of these trials either excluded or had a limited amount of patients with MBM. Recent studies have revealed that melanoma cell lines become more radiosensitive following BRAF inhibition, thus providing a potential synergistic mechanism when combining BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) and radiotherapy. However, neurotoxicity concerns also exist with this combination. This article reviews the efficacy and limitations of BRAFi therapy for MBM, describes current evidence for combining BRAFis with radiation, discusses the rationale and evidence for combination modalities, and highlights emerging clinical trials specifically investigating this combination in MBM. PMID:28003758

  6. Potential for Stem Cell-Based Periodontal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bassir, Seyed Hossein; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Raanan, Justin; Ghaffarigarakani, Sasan; Chung, Jamie; Freire, Marcelo; Andrada, Luciano C; Intini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and are linked to several systemic diseases. The goal of periodontal treatment is to halt the progression of the disease and regenerate the damaged tissue. However, achieving complete and functional periodontal regeneration is challenging because the periodontium is a complex apparatus composed of different tissues, including bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament. Stem cells may represent an effective therapeutic tool for periodontal regeneration due to their plasticity and their ability to regenerate different tissues. This review presents and critically analyzes the available information on stem cell-based therapy for the regeneration of periodontal tissues and suggests new avenues for the development of more effective therapeutic protocols.

  7. Purple sweet potato colour--a potential therapy for galactosemia?

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2014-06-01

    Galactosemia is an inherited metabolic disease in which galactose is not properly metabolised. There are various theories to explain the molecular pathology, and recent experimental evidence strongly suggests that oxidative stress plays a key role. High galactose diets are damaging to experimental animals and oxidative stress also plays a role in this toxicity which can be alleviated by purple sweet potato colour (PSPC). This plant extract is rich in acetylated anthocyanins which have been shown to quench free radical production. The objective of this Commentary is to advance the hypothesis that PSPC, or compounds therefrom, may be a viable basis for a novel therapy for galactosemia.

  8. Enhancing Potentially Plant-Available Lead Concentrations in Contaminated Residential Soils Using a Biodegradable Chelating Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andra, S.; Datta, R.; Sarkar, D.; Saminathan, S.

    2007-12-01

    Chelation of heavy metals is an important factor in enhancing metal solubility and, hence, metal availability to plants to promote phytoremediation. In the present study, we compared the effects of application of a biodegradable chelating agent, namely, ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) on enhancing plant available form of lead (Pb) in Pb-based paint contaminated residential soils compared to that of a more commonly used, but non-biodegradable chelate, i.e., ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Development of a successful phytoremediation model for metals such as Pb depends on a thorough understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the soil, along with the optimization of a chelate treatment to mobilize Pb from `unavailable' pools to potentially plant available fraction. In this context, we set out to perform batch incubation experiments to investigate the effectiveness of the two aforementioned chelates in enhancing plant available Pb at four different concentrations (0, 5, 10 and 15 mM/kg soil) and three treatment durations (0, 10 and 30 days). We selected 12 contaminated residential soils from two major metropolitan areas (San Antonio, TX and Baltimore, MD) with varying soil physico-chemical properties - the soils from San Antonio were primarily alkaline and those from Baltimore were typically acidic. Total soil Pb concentrations ranged between 256 mg/kg and 4,182 mg/kg. Our results show that both chelates increased the solubility of Pb, otherwise occluded in the complex soil matrix. For both EDTA and EDDS, the exchangeable concentrations of soil Pb also increased with increase in chelate concentration and incubation time. The most effective treatment was 15 mM chelate kg-1 soil incubated for 30 days, which caused many fold increase in potentially plant available Pb (a combination of the soluble and exchangeable fractions) relative to the unamended controls. Step wise multiple linear regression analysis using chelate-extractable Pb and soil

  9. Viruses of the Bunya- and Togaviridae families: potential as bioterrorism agents and means of control.

    PubMed

    Sidwell, Robert W; Smee, Donald F

    2003-01-01

    When considering viruses of potential importance as tools for bioterrorism, several viruses in the Bunya- and Togaviridae families have been cited. Among those in the Bunyaviridae family are Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, hanta, and sandfly fever viruses, listed in order of priority. Those particularly considered in the Togaviridae family are Venezuelan, eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses. Factors affecting the selection of these viruses are the ability for them to induce a fatal or seriously incapacitating illness, their ease of cultivation in order to prepare large volumes, their relative infectivity in human patients, their ability to be transmitted by aerosol, and the lack of measures available for their control. Each factor is fully considered in this review. Vaccines for the control of infections induced by these viruses are in varying stages of development, with none universally accepted to date. Viruses in the Bunyaviridae family are generally sensitive to ribavirin, which has been recommended as an emergency therapy for infections by viruses in this family although has not yet been FDA-approved. Interferon and interferon inducers also significantly inhibit these virus infections in animal models. Against infections induced by viruses in the Togaviridae family, interferon-alpha would appear to currently be the most useful for therapy.

  10. Clinical potential of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to improve radiation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Alice; Marignol, Laure; Foley, Ruth; Lynch, Thomas H; Lawler, Mark; Hollywood, Donal

    2011-12-01

    Despite the advances in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment, current therapies are not curative in a significant proportion of patients. Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT), when combined with radiation therapy, could improve the outcome of treatment for prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the western world. GDEPT involves the introduction of a therapeutic transgene, which can be targeted to the tumour cells. A prodrug is administered systemically and is converted to its toxic form only in those cells containing the transgene, resulting in cell kill. This review will discuss the clinical trials which have investigated the potential of GDEPT at various stages of prostate cancer progression. The advantages of using GDEPT in combination with radiotherapy will be examined, as well as some of the recent advances which enhance the potential utility of GDEPT.

  11. Achromatopsia as a potential candidate for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ji-Jing; Alexander, John; Lei, Bo; Deng, Wentao; Zhang, Keqing; Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W

    2010-01-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive retinal disease involving loss of cone function that afflicts approximately 1 in 30,000 individuals. Patients with achromatopsia usually have visual acuities lower than 20/200 because of the central vision loss, photophobia, complete color blindness and reduced cone-mediated electroretinographic (ERG) amplitudes. Mutations in three genes have been found to be the primary causes of achromatopsia, including CNGB3 (beta subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), CNGA3 (alpha subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), and GNAT2 (cone specific alpha subunit of transducin). Naturally occurring mouse models with mutations in Cnga3 (cpfl5 mice) and Gnat2 (cpfl3 mice) were discovered at The Jackson Laboratory. A natural occurring canine model with CNGB3 mutations has also been found. These animal models have many of the central phenotypic features of the corresponding human diseases. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, we and others show that cone function can be restored in all three models. These data suggest that human achromatopsia may be a good candidate for corrective gene therapy.

  12. Potential use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) as radioprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Gerhard; Henninger, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia. Apart from their lipid-lowering activity, they have pleiotropic effects that are attributed to the inhibition of regulatory proteins, including Ras-homologous (Rho) GTPases. Here, we discuss the potential usefulness of statins to prevent normal tissue damage provoked by radiotherapy. Statins reduce the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines stimulated by ionizing radiation in vitro and alleviate IR-induced inflammation and fibrosis in vivo. The currently available data indicate that statins accelerate the rapid repair of DNA double-strand breaks and, moreover, mitigate the DNA damage response induced by IR. Furthermore, statins increase the mRNA expression of DNA repair factors in vivo. Thus, although the molecular mechanisms involved are still ambiguous, preclinical data concordantly show a promising radioprotective capacity of statins.

  13. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in "personalized" therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy.

  14. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in “personalized” therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new boron-containing chlorin derivatives as agents for both photodynamic therapy and boron neutron capture therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Asano, Ryuji; Nagami, Amon; Fukumoto, Yuki; Miura, Kaori; Yazama, Futoshi; Ito, Hideyuki; Sakata, Isao; Tai, Akihiro

    2014-03-01

    New boron-containing chlorin derivatives 9 and 13 as agents for both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer were synthesized from photoprotoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (2) and L-4-boronophenylalanine-related compounds. The in vivo biodistribution and clearance of 9 and 13 were investigated in tumor-bearing mice. The time to maximum accumulation of compound 13 in tumor tissue was one-fourth of that of compound 9, and compound 13 showed rapid clearance from normal tissues within 24h after injection. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of PDT using 13 was evaluated by measuring tumor growth rates in tumor-bearing mice with 660 nm light-emitting diode irradiation at 3h after injection of 13. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by PDT using 13. These results suggested that 13 might be a good candidate for both PDT and BNCT of cancer.

  16. Rapid, Potentially Automatable, Method Extract Biomarkers for HPLC/ESI/MS/MS to Detect and Identify BW Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    status can sometimes be reflected in the infectious potential or drug resistance of those pathogens. For example, in Mycobacterium tuberculosis ... Mycobacterium tuberculosis , its antibiotic resistance and prediction of pathogenicity amongst Mycobacterium spp. based on signature lipid biomarkers ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Rapid, Potentially Automatable, Method Extract Biomarkers for HPLC/ESI/MS/MS to Detect and Identify BW Agents 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. Physical agent modalities in physical therapy and rehabilitation of small animals.

    PubMed

    Hanks, June; Levine, David; Bockstahler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Physical agent modalities can be effective components of the overall rehabilitation of small animals. This article reviews the effects, indications, contraindications, and precautions of cold, superficial heat, therapeutic ultrasound, and electrical stimulation.

  18. Enhancing the efficacy of cytotoxic agents for cancer therapy using photochemical internalisation.

    PubMed

    Martinez de Pinillos Bayona, Alejandra; Moore, Caroline M; Loizidou, Marilena; MacRobert, Alexander J; Woodhams, Josephine H

    2016-03-01

    Photochemical internalisation (PCI) is a technique for improving cellular delivery of certain bioactive agents which are prone to sequestration within endolysosomes. There is a wide range of agents suitable for PCI-based delivery including toxins, oligonucleotides, genes and immunoconjugates which demonstrates the versatility of this technique. The basic mechanism of PCI involves triggering release of the agent from endolysosomes within the target cells using a photosensitiser which is selectively retained with the endolysosomal membranes. Excitation of the photosensitiser by visible light leads to disruption of the membranes via photooxidative damage thereby releasing the agent into the cytosol. This treatment enables the drugs to reach their intended subcellular target more efficiently and improves their efficacy. In this review we summarise the applications of this technique with the main emphasis placed on cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Enhancing the efficacy of cytotoxic agents for cancer therapy using photochemical internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Caroline M.; Loizidou, Marilena; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Woodhams, Josephine H.

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical internalisation (PCI) is a technique for improving cellular delivery of certain bioactive agents which are prone to sequestration within endolysosomes. There is a wide range of agents suitable for PCI‐based delivery including toxins, oligonucleotides, genes and immunoconjugates which demonstrates the versatility of this technique. The basic mechanism of PCI involves triggering release of the agent from endolysosomes within the target cells using a photosensitiser which is selectively retained with the endolysosomal membranes. Excitation of the photosensitiser by visible light leads to disruption of the membranes via photooxidative damage thereby releasing the agent into the cytosol. This treatment enables the drugs to reach their intended subcellular target more efficiently and improves their efficacy. In this review we summarise the applications of this technique with the main emphasis placed on cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25758607

  20. Gancidin W, a potential low-toxicity antimalarial agent isolated from an endophytic Streptomyces SUK10.

    PubMed

    Zin, Noraziah Mohamad; Baba, Mohd Shukri; Zainal-Abidin, Abu Hassan; Latip, Jalifah; Mazlan, Noor Wini; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic Streptomyces strains are potential sources for novel bioactive molecules. In this study, the diketopiperazine gancidin W (GW) was isolated from the endophytic actinobacterial genus Streptomyces, SUK10, obtained from the bark of Shorea ovalis tree, and it was tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei PZZ1/100. GW exhibited an inhibition rate of nearly 80% at 6.25 and 3.125 μg kg(-1) body weight on day four using the 4-day suppression test method on male ICR strain mice. Comparing GW at both concentrations with quinine hydrochloride and normal saline as positive and negative controls, respectively, 50% of the mice treated with 3.125 μg kg(-1) body weight managed to survive for more than 11 months after infection, which almost reached the life span of normal mice. Biochemical tests of selected enzymes and proteins in blood samples of mice treated with GW were also within normal levels; in addition, no abnormalities or injuries were found on internal vital organs. These findings indicated that this isolated bioactive compound from Streptomyces SUK10 exhibits very low toxicity and is a good candidate for potential use as an antimalarial agent in an animal model.

  1. Discovery of a Phosphodiesterase 9A Inhibitor as a Potential Hypoglycemic Agent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 9 (PDE9) inhibitors have been studied as potential therapeutics for treatment of diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. Here we report a potent PDE9 inhibitor 3r that has an IC50 of 0.6 nM and >150-fold selectivity over other PDEs. The HepG2 cell-based assay shows that 3r inhibits the mRNA expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose 6-phosphatase. These activities of 3r, together with the reasonable pharmacokinetic properties and no acute toxicity at 1200 mg/kg dosage, suggest its potential as a hypoglycemic agent. The crystal structure of PDE9-3r reveals significantly different conformation and hydrogen bonding pattern of 3r from those of previously published 28s. Both 3r and 28s form a hydrogen bond with Tyr424, a unique PDE9 residue (except for PDE8), but 3r shows an additional hydrogen bond with Ala452. This structure information might be useful for design of PDE9 inhibitors. PMID:25432025

  2. Identification of Inhibitors of CD36-Amyloid Beta Binding as Potential Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Doens, Deborah; Valiente, Pedro A; Mfuh, Adelphe M; X T Vo, Anh; Tristan, Adilia; Carreño, Lizmar; Quijada, Mario; Nguyen, Vu T; Perry, George; Larionov, Oleg V; Lleonart, Ricardo; Fernández, Patricia L

    2017-02-15

    Neuroinflammation is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid β has a central role in microglia activation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory mediators that are associated with neuronal toxicity. The recognition of amyloid β by microglia depends on the expression of several receptors implicated in the clearance of amyloid and in cell activation. CD36 receptor expressed on microglia interacts with fibrils of amyloid inducing the release of proinflammatory cytokines and amyloid internalization. The interruption of the interaction CD36-amyloid β compromises the activation of microglia cells. We have developed and validated a new colorimetric assay to identify potential inhibitors of the binding of amyloid β to CD36. We have found seven molecules, structural analogues of the Trichodermamide family of natural products that interfere with the interaction CD36-amyloid β. By combining molecular docking and dynamics simulations, we suggested the second fatty acids binding site within the large luminal hydrophobic tunnel, present in the extracellular domain of CD36, as the binding pocket of these compounds. Free energy calculations predicted the nonpolar component as the driving force for the binding of these inhibitors. These molecules also inhibited the production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with fibrils of amyloid β. This work serves as a platform for the identification of new potential anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Gancidin W, a potential low-toxicity antimalarial agent isolated from an endophytic Streptomyces SUK10

    PubMed Central

    Zin, Noraziah Mohamad; Baba, Mohd Shukri; Zainal-Abidin, Abu Hassan; Latip, Jalifah; Mazlan, Noor Wini; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic Streptomyces strains are potential sources for novel bioactive molecules. In this study, the diketopiperazine gancidin W (GW) was isolated from the endophytic actinobacterial genus Streptomyces, SUK10, obtained from the bark of Shorea ovalis tree, and it was tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei PZZ1/100. GW exhibited an inhibition rate of nearly 80% at 6.25 and 3.125 μg kg−1 body weight on day four using the 4-day suppression test method on male ICR strain mice. Comparing GW at both concentrations with quinine hydrochloride and normal saline as positive and negative controls, respectively, 50% of the mice treated with 3.125 μg kg−1 body weight managed to survive for more than 11 months after infection, which almost reached the life span of normal mice. Biochemical tests of selected enzymes and proteins in blood samples of mice treated with GW were also within normal levels; in addition, no abnormalities or injuries were found on internal vital organs. These findings indicated that this isolated bioactive compound from Streptomyces SUK10 exhibits very low toxicity and is a good candidate for potential use as an antimalarial agent in an animal model. PMID:28223778

  4. Recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery and its potential as anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhinav; Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Kalam, Mohd Abul; Jain, Sudhir K; Singhal, Pradeep K

    2016-04-01

    L-Asparaginase (EC3.5.1.1) is an enzyme, which is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and other related blood cancers from a long time. This enzyme selectively hydrolyzes the extracellular amino acid L-asparagine into L-aspartate and ammonia, leading to nutritional deficiencies, protein synthesis inhibition, and ultimately death of lymphoblastic cells by apoptosis. Currently, bacterial asparaginases are used for treatment purpose but offers scepticism due to a number of toxicities, including thrombosis, pancreatitis, hyperglycemia, and hepatotoxicity. Resistance towards bacterial asparaginase is another major disadvantage during cancer management. This situation attracted attention of researchers towards alternative sources of L-asparaginase, including plants and fungi. Present article discusses about potential of L-asparaginase as an anticancer agent, its mechanism of action, and adverse effects related to current asparaginase formulations. This article also provides an outlook for recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery from alternative sources and their potential as a less toxic alternative to current formulations.

  5. Visceral Blood Flow Modulation: Potential Therapy for Morbid Obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Tyler J.; Murphy, Timothy P.; Jay, Bryan S.; Hampson, Christopher O.; Zafar, Abdul M.

    2013-06-15

    We present this preliminary investigation into the safety and feasibility of endovascular therapy for morbid obesity in a swine model. A flow-limiting, balloon-expandable covered stent was placed in the superior mesenteric artery of three Yorkshire swine after femoral arterial cutdown. The pigs were monitored for between 15 and 51 days after the procedure and then killed, with weights obtained at 2-week increments. In the two pigs in which the stent was flow limiting, a reduced rate of weight gain (0.42 and 0.53 kg/day) was observed relative to the third pig (0.69 kg/day), associated with temporary food aversion and signs of mesenteric ischemia in one pig.

  6. Monoclonal antibody-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG encapsulating doxorubicin as a potential theranostic agent.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Neus; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa S; Beziere, Nicolas S; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2015-03-30

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is an FDA-approved, strongly photo-absorbent/fluorescent probe that has been incorporated into a clinically-relevant PEGylated liposome as a flexible optoacoustic contrast agent platform. This study describes the engineering of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using the anti-MUC-1 "humanized" monoclonal antibody (MoAb) hCTM01 as a tumour-specific theranostic system. We aimed to visualise non-invasively the tumour accumulation of these MoAb-targeted liposomes over time in tumour-bearing mice using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT). Preferential accumulation of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG was studied after intravenous administration in comparison to non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using both fast growing (4T1) and slow growing (HT-29) MUC-1 positive tumour models. Monitoring liposomal ICG in the tumour showed that both targeted and non-targeted liposome-ICG formulations preferentially accumulated into the tumour models studied. Rapid accumulation was observed for targeted liposomes at early time points mainly in the periphery of the tumour volume suggesting binding to available MUC-1 receptors. In contrast, non-targeted PEGylated liposomes showed accumulation at the centre of the tumour at later time points. In an attempt to take this a step further, we successfully encapsulated the anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) into both targeted and non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG. The engineering of DOX-loaded targeted ICG liposome systems present a novel platform for combined tumour-specific therapy and diagnosis. This can open new possibilities in the design of advanced image-guided cancer therapeutics.

  7. N-Acetylcysteine as a Potential Antidote and Biomonitoring Agent of Methylmercury Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Madejczyk, Michael S.; Ballatori, Nazzareno

    2008-01-01

    Background Many people, by means of consumption of seafood or other anthropogenic sources, are exposed to levels of methylmercury (MeHg) that are generally considered to be quite low, but that may nevertheless produce irreversible brain damage, particularly in unborn babies. The only way to prevent or ameliorate MeHg toxicity is to enhance its elimination from the body. Objectives Using N-acetylcysteine (NAC), we aimed to devise a monitoring protocol for early detection of acute exposure or relatively low MeHg levels in a rodent model, and to test whether NAC reduces MeHg levels in the developing embryo. Results NAC produced a transient, dose-dependent acceleration of urinary MeHg excretion in rats of both sexes. Approximately 5% of various MeHg doses was excreted in urine 2 hr after injection of 1 mmol/kg NAC. In pregnant rats, NAC markedly reduced the body burden of MeHg, particularly in target tissues such as brain, placenta, and fetus. In contrast, NAC had no significant effect on urinary MeHg excretion in preweanling rats. Conclusions Because NAC causes a transient increase in urinary excretion of MeHg that is proportional to the body burden, it is promising as a biomonitoring agent for MeHg in adult animals. In view of this and because NAC is effective at enhancing MeHg excretion when given either orally or intravenously, can decrease brain and fetal levels of MeHg, has minimal side effects, and is widely available in clinical settings, NAC should be evaluated as a potential antidote and biomonitoring agent in humans. PMID:18197295

  8. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a potential contrast agent for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Goñi, T; Martín-Sitjar, J; Simões, R V; Acosta, M; Lope-Piedrafita, S; Arús, C

    2013-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is commonly used in preclinical studies of animal models of high-grade glioma as a solvent for chemotherapeutic agents. A strong DMSO signal was detected by single-voxel MRS in the brain of three C57BL/6 control mice during a pilot study of DMSO tolerance after intragastric administration. This led us to investigate the accumulation and wash-out kinetics of DMSO in both normal brain parenchyma (n=3 control mice) by single-voxel MRS, and in 12 GL261 glioblastomas (GBMs) by single-voxel MRS (n=3) and MRSI (n=9). DMSO accumulated differently in each tissue type, reaching its highest concentration in tumors: 6.18 ± 0.85 µmol/g water, 1.5-fold higher than in control mouse brain (p<0.05). A faster wash-out was detected in normal brain parenchyma with respect to GBM tissue: half-lives of 2.06 ± 0.58 and 4.57 ± 1.15 h, respectively. MRSI maps of time-course DMSO changes revealed clear hotspots of differential spatial accumulation in GL261 tumors. Additional MRSI studies with four mice bearing oligodendrogliomas (ODs) revealed similar results as in GBM tumors. The lack of T(1) contrast enhancement post-gadolinium (gadopentetate dimeglumine, Gd-DTPA) in control mouse brain and mice with ODs suggested that DMSO was fully able to cross the intact blood-brain barrier in both normal brain parenchyma and in low-grade tumors. Our results indicate a potential role for DMSO as a contrast agent for brain tumor detection, even in those tumors 'invisible' to standard gadolinium-enhanced MRI, and possibly for monitoring heterogeneities associated with progression or with therapeutic response.

  9. The future of therapy for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: emerging agents and novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (MM) continues to present a therapeutic challenge. The immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the proteasome inhibitor (PI) bortezomib, have dramatically improved clinical outcomes for patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory MM. However, nearly all patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to these drugs. Numerous agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM. Those farthest along in clinical development include new IMiDs (pomalidomide), new PIs (eg, carfilzomib, MLN9708, and marizomib), histone deacetylase inhibitors (eg, panobinostat and vorinostat), monoclonal antibodies (eg, elotuzumab, siltuximab, and BT062), and signal transduction modulators (eg, perifosine). These emerging agents with diverse mechanisms of action have demonstrated promising anti-tumor activity in patients with relapsed/refractory MM, and rationally designed combinations with established agents are being investigated in the clinic. These new agents are creating opportunities to target multiple pathways, overcome resistance, and improve clinical outcomes, particularly for those patients who are refractory to approved novel agents. This article describes emerging antimyeloma agents in mid-stage to late-stage clinical development, and highlights the novel treatment approaches and combination strategies being evaluated in the relapsed/refractory setting.

  10. In vitro studies of the efficiency of two-photon activation of photodynamic therapy agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Mamta; Karotki, Aliaksandr; Collins, Hazel; Anderson, Harry L.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2006-09-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of severe vision loss in the older population, due to ingrowth of new leaky blood vessels (neovasculature) from the choriocapillaris, which results in destruction of photoreceptors in the fovea and loss of central vision. "Standard" one-photon (1-γ) photodynamic therapy (PDT) using Visudyne (R) is an approved method of AMD treatment but has the potential to damage healthy tissues lying above and below the neovasculature due to photosensitizer accumulation and its wide-beam 1-γ excitation. Highly-targeted two-photon (2-γ) excitation may avoid this, since, due to its non-linear intensity dependence, the probability of 2-γ excitation is greatest in the focal plane, which intrinsically avoids out-of-focus damage to healthy tissues. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the 2-γ efficiency of Visudyne and to compare it to the archetypal photosensitizer Photofrin (R). Since neovascular endothelium is targeted in AMD, an endothelial cell line (YPEN-1) was selected as the in vitro model. 2-γ PDT was delivered using tightly focused ~300 fs laser pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser operating at 850 nm with 90 MHz pulse repetition rate. An assay was developed for quantification of the cellular damage using the permeability stain Hoechst 33258 and the viability stain SYTOX. Visudyne (LD 50= dose to kill 50% of cells: 500 J/cm2, 10 M, 7.2 μg/ml) was about an order of magnitude more effective than Photofrin (LD50 : 7500 J/cm2, ~42 μM, 25 μg/ml). We also demonstrate for the first time the quadratic dependence of the cellular response to 2-γ PDT. This in vitro work will lead to the design of optimized in vivo studies in animal models of AMD.

  11. Induction of Lambda-Bacteriophage in Escherichia coli as a Screening Test for Potential Antitumor Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Bernard; Howard, Alma J.

    1964-01-01

    A simple, rapid, quantitative test procedure to measure induction of phage production in lysogenic Escherichia coli K-12 (λ) was described. This test was used in a study of 209 substances, including antibiotics, pyrimirines, purines, alkylating agents, thiols, amino acids, vitamins, and miscellaneous compounds. Minimal inducing concentrations for the 26 (12.5% of total tested) substances found to be effective inducing agents, as well as a listing of the inactive compounds, are presented. Since 21 of the 26 active agents reportedly have antineoplastic activity in rodent tumor systems, it was concluded that the induction test may provide a useful screen for the detection of potentially useful antitumor compounds. PMID:14170962

  12. Consolidation and Maintenance Therapies for Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma in the Era of Novel Agents.

    PubMed

    Nathwani, Nitya; Larsen, Jeremy T; Kapoor, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    Advances in therapy in multiple myeloma have resulted in significant improvements in patient outcomes; however, relapse remains problematic. Strategies to improve outcomes following autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) include consolidation to intensify therapy and improve depth of response and maintenance therapy to achieve long-term disease control. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), including thalidomide and lenalidomide, are appealing as maintenance therapy given their oral administration; however, the cumulative toxicities of thalidomide have limited its efficacy in maintenance therapy. Maintenance lenalidomide is better tolerated, and multiple studies have demonstrated an improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but its impact on overall survival (OS) remains controversial. Additional concerns regarding the risk of second primary malignancies and significant cost of long-term lenalidomide therapy have also been raised. Proteasome inhibitors, particularly, bortezomib have also been incorporated in consolidation and maintenance regimens alone or in combination with an IMiD. Preliminary studies have suggested bortezomib maintenance may benefit patients with adverse cytogenetics, including t(4;14) and deletion 17p. Determination of the optimal consolidation and maintenance regimen and duration of therapy post-transplantation is a focus of several ongoing randomized studies.

  13. Meconium aspiration syndrome: possible pathophysiological mechanisms and future potential therapies.

    PubMed

    Lindenskov, Paal Helge Haakonsen; Castellheim, Albert; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Does meconium cause meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) or is meconium discharge only a marker of fetal hypoxia? This dispute has lasted for centuries, but since the 1960s, detrimental effects of meconium itself on the lungs have been demonstrated in animal experiments. In clinical MAS, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is the leading cause of death in MAS. Regarding the complex chemical composition of meconium, it is difficult to identify a single agent responsible for the pathophysiology. However, considering that meconium is stored in the intestines, partly unexposed to the immune system, aspirated meconium could be recognized as ‘danger', representing damaged self. The common denominator in the pathophysiology could therefore be activation of innate immunity. Thus, a bulk of evidence implies that meconium is a potent activator of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, complement, prostaglandins and reactive oxygen species. We hypothesize that the two main recognition systems of innate immunity, the Toll-like receptors and the complement system, recognize meconium as ‘danger', which leads not only to lung dysfunction but also to a systemic inflammatory response. This might have therapeutic implications in the future.

  14. Luteolin, a flavonoid with potentials for cancer prevention and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yong; Shi, Ranxin; Wang, Xia; Shen, Han-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Luteolin, 3′,4′,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone, is a common flavonoid that exists in many types of plants including fruits, vegetables, and medicinal herbs. Plants rich in luteolin have been used in Chinese traditional medicine for treating various diseases such as hypertension, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. Having multiple biological effects such as anti-inflammation, anti-allergy and anticancer, luteolin functions as either an antioxidant or a pro-oxidant biochemically. The biological effects of luteolin could be functionally related to each other. For instance, the anti-inflammatory activity may be linked to its anticancer property. Luteolin's anticancer property is associated with the induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis. Furthermore, luteolin sensitizes cancer cells to therapeutic-induced cytotoxicity through suppressing cell survival pathways such as phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and stimulating apoptosis pathways including those that induce the tumor suppressor p53. These observations suggest that luteolin could be an anticancer agent for various cancers. Furthermore, recent epidemiological studies have attributed a cancer prevention property to luteolin. In this review, we summarize the progress of recent research on luteolin, with a particular focus on its anticancer role and molecular mechanisms underlying this property of luteolin. PMID:18991571

  15. Combining chemotherapeutic agents and netrin-1 interference potentiates cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Paradisi, Andrea; Creveaux, Marion; Gibert, Benjamin; Devailly, Guillaume; Redoulez, Emeline; Neves, David; Cleyssac, Elsa; Treilleux, Isabelle; Klein, Christian; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Cassier, Philippe A; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The secreted factor netrin-1 is upregulated in a fraction of human cancers as a mechanism to block apoptosis induced by netrin-1 dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H. Targeted therapies aiming to trigger tumour cell death via netrin-1/receptors interaction interference are under preclinical evaluation. We show here that Doxorubicin, 5-Fluorouracil, Paclitaxel and Cisplatin treatments trigger, in various human cancer cell lines, an increase of netrin-1 expression which is accompanied by netrin-1 receptors increase. This netrin-1 upregulation which appears to be p53-dependent is a survival mechanism as netrin-1 silencing by siRNA is associated with a potentiation of cancer cell death upon Doxorubicin treatment. We show that candidate drugs interfering with netrin-1/netrin-1 receptors interactions potentiate Doxorubicin, Cisplatin or 5-Fluorouracil-induced cancer cell death in vitro. Moreover, in a model of xenografted nude mice, we show that systemic Doxorubicin treatment triggers netrin-1 upregulation in the tumour but not in normal organs, enhancing and prolonging tumour growth inhibiting effect of a netrin-1 interfering drug. Together these data suggest that combining conventional chemotherapies with netrin-1 interference could be a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:24293316

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: past history, current status, and future potential.

    PubMed

    Barth, R F; Soloway, A H; Brugger, R M

    1996-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron-10 is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. High-grade astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme, and metastatic brain tumors constitute a major group of neoplasms for which there is no effective treatment. There is growing interest in using BNCT in combination with surgery to treat patients with primary, and possibly metastatic brain tumors. For BNCT to be successful, a large number of 10B atoms must be localized on or preferably within neoplastic cells, and a sufficient number of thermal neutrons must reach and be absorbed by the 10B atoms to sustain a lethal 10B(n, alpha)7 Li reaction. Two major questions will be addressed in this review. First, how can a large number of 10B atoms be delivered selectively to cancer cells? Second, how can a high fluence of neutrons be delivered to the tumor? Two boron compounds currently are being used clinically, sodium borocaptate (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA), and a number of new delivery agents are under investigation, including boronated porphyrins, nucleosides, amino acids, polyamines, monoclonal and bispecific antibodies, liposomes, and epidermal growth factor. These will be discussed, and potential problems associated with their use as boron delivery agents will be considered. Nuclear reactors, currently, are the only source of neutrons for BNCT, and the fission process within the core produces a mixture of lower-energy thermal and epithermal neutrons, fast or high (> 10,000 eV) energy neutrons, and gamma rays. Although thermal neutron beams have been used clinically in Japan to treat patients with brain tumors and cutaneous melanomas, epithermal neutron beams should be more useful because of their superior tissue-penetrating properties. Beam sources and characteristics will be discussed in the context of current and future BNCT trials. Finally, the past and present

  17. Use of an Adult Rat Retinal Explant Model for Screening of Potential Retinal Ganglion Cell Neuroprotective Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Natalie D.; Johnson, Thomas V.; Welsapar, Guncha; DeKorver, Nicholas W.; Tomarev, Stanislav I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To validate an established adult organotypic retinal explant culture system for use as an efficient medium-throughput screening tool to investigate novel retinal ganglion cell (RGC) neuroprotective therapies. Methods. Optimal culture conditions for detecting RGC neuroprotection in rat retinal explants were identified. Retinal explants were treated with various recognized, or purported, neuroprotective agents and cultured for either 4 or 7 days ex vivo. The number of cells surviving in the RGC layer (RGCL) was quantified using histologic and immunohistochemical techniques, and statistical analyses were applied to detect neuroprotective effects. Results. The ability to replicate previously reported in vivo RGC neuroprotection in retinal explants was verified by demonstrating that caspase inhibition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment, and stem cell transplantation all reduced RGCL cell loss in this model. Further screening of potential neuroprotective pharmacologic agents demonstrated that betaxolol, losartan, tafluprost, and simvastatin all alleviated RGCL cell loss in retinal explants, supporting previous reports. However, treatment with brimonidine did not protect RGCL neurons from death in retinal explant cultures. Explants cultured for 4 days ex vivo proved most sensitive for detecting neuroprotection. Conclusions. The current adult rat retinal explant culture model offers advantages over other models for screening potential neuroprotective drugs, including maintenance of neurons in situ, control of environmental conditions, and dissociation from other factors such as intraocular pressure. Verification that neuroprotection by previously identified RGC-protective therapies could be replicated in adult retinal explant cultures suggests that this model could be used for efficient medium-throughput screening of novel neuroprotective therapies for retinal neurodegenerative disease. PMID:21345987

  18. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Sijing; Lu, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-08-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic.

  19. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sijing; LU, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic. PMID:27535093

  20. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G. W.

    2005-06-28

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

  1. Synergistic Combination Agent for Cancer Therapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory of the Frederick National Laboratory for Biomedical Research seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop a ceramide and vinca alkaloid combination therapy for treatment of cancer.

  2. Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachani, Roxanne; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin; Hervault, Aziliz; Mertz, Damien; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Thanh, Nguy&Ecirtil; N. Thi&Cmb. B. Dot; Kim

    2016-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high saturation magnetization value (84.5 emu g-1). The surface of the IONPs could be tailored post synthesis with two different ligands which provided functionality and stability in water and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Their potential as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was confirmed as they exhibited high r1 and r2 relaxivities of 7.95 mM-1 s-1 and 185.58 mM-1 s-1 respectively at 1.4 T. Biocompatibility and viability of IONPs in primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied and confirmed.Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  4. Potential of pluripotent stem cells for diabetes therapy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Insa S

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) are common diseases. To date, it is widely accepted that all forms of DM lead to the loss of beta cells. Therefore, to avoid the debilitating comorbidities when glycemic control cannot be fully achieved, some would argue that beta cell replacement is the only way to cure the disease. Due to organ donor shortage, other cell sources for beta cell replacement strategies have to be employed. Pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells offer a valuable alternative to provide the necessary cells to substitute organ transplants but also to serve as a model to study the onset and progression of the disease, resulting in better treatment regimens. This review will summarize recent progress in the establishment of pluripotent stem cells, their differentiation into the pancreatic lineage with a focus on two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) differentiation settings, the special role of iPS cells in the analysis of genetic predispositions to diabetes, and techniques that help to move current approaches to clinical applications. Particular attention, however, is also given to the long-term challenges that have to be addressed before ES or iPS cell-based therapies will become a broadly accepted treatment option.

  5. A Review on Novel Breast Cancer Therapies: Photodynamic Therapy and Plant Derived Agent Induced Cell Death Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This review article presents an extensive examination of risk factors for breast cancer, treatment strategies with special attention to photodynamic therapy and natural product based treatments. Breast cancer remains the most commonly occurring cancer in women worldwide and the detection, treatment, and prevention are prominent concerns in public health. Background information on current developments in treatment helps to update the approach towards risk assessment. Breast cancer risk is linked to many factors such as hereditary, reproductive and lifestyle factors. Minimally invasive Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be used in the management of various cancers; it uses a light sensitive drug (a photosensitizer, PS) and a light of visible wavelength, to destroy targeted cancer cells. State of the art analyses has been carried out to investigate advancement in the search for the cure and control of cancer progression using natural products. Traditional medicinal plants have been used as lead compounds for drug discovery in modern medicine. Both PDT and plant derived drugs induce cell death via different mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, cell cycle regulation and even the regulation of various cell signalling pathways.

  6. Neural crest stem cells: discovery, properties and potential for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are a migratory cell population synonymous with vertebrate evolution. They generate a wide variety of cell and tissue types during embryonic and adult development including cartilage and bone, connective tissue, pigment and endocrine cells as well as neurons and glia amongst many others. Such incredible lineage potential combined with a limited capacity for self-renewal, which persists even into adult life, demonstrates that NC cells bear the key hallmarks of stem and progenitor cells. In this review, we describe the identification, characterization and isolation of NC stem and progenitor cells from different tissues in both embryo and adult organisms. We discuss their specific properties and their potential application in cell-based tissue and disease-specific repair. PMID:22231630

  7. The acquisition of dangerous biological materials: Technical facts sheets to assist risk assessments of 46 potential BW agents

    SciTech Connect

    Aceto, Donato Gonzalo; Astuto-Gribble, Lisa M.; Gaudioso, Jennifer M.

    2007-11-01

    Numerous terrorist organizations have openly expressed interest in producing and deploying biological weapons. However, a limiting factor for many terrorists has been the acquisition of dangerous biological agents, as evidenced by the very few successful instances of biological weapons use compared to the number of documented hoaxes. Biological agents vary greatly in their ability to cause loss of life and economic damage. Some agents, if released properly, can kill many people and cause an extensive number of secondary infections; other agents will sicken only a small number of people for a short period of time. Consequently, several biological agents can potentially be used to perpetrate a bioterrorism attack but few are likely capable of causing a high consequence event. It is crucial, from a US national security perspective, to more deeply understand the likelihood that terrorist organizations can acquire the range of these agents. Few studies have attempted to comprehensively compile the technical information directly relevant to the acquisition of dangerous bacteria, viruses and toxins. In this report, technical fact sheets were assembled for 46 potentially dangerous biological agents. Much of the information was taken from various research sources which could ultimately and significantly expedite and improve bioterrorism threat assessments. By systematically examining a number of specific agent characteristics included in these fact sheets, it may be possible to detect, target, and implement measures to thwart future terrorist acquisition attempts. In addition, the information in these fact sheets may be used as a tool to help laboratories gain a rudimentary understanding of how attractive a method laboratory theft is relative to other potential acquisition modes.

  8. Photosensitive liposomes as potential drug delivery vehicles for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Christopher G.; Mitchell, A. C.; Chowdhary, R. K.

    1991-11-01

    Light-sensitive liposomes incorporating a photochromic phospholipid (Bis-Azo PC) have been developed which exhibit light-activated release of entrapped contents and intervesicular fusion. The trapping and light-induced release of inorganic ions, fluorescent market dyes, and the antitumor drug methotrexate have been demonstrated. These results are discussed together with some of the potential therapeutic applications of light-sensitive liposomes.

  9. Hendra and nipah infection: pathology, models and potential therapies.

    PubMed

    Vigant, Frederic; Lee, Benhur

    2011-06-01

    The Paramyxoviridae family comprises of several genera that contain emerging or re-emerging threats for human and animal health with no real specific effective treatment available. Hendra and Nipah virus are members of a newly identified genus of emerging paramyxoviruses, Henipavirus. Since their discovery in the 1990s, henipaviruses outbreaks have been associated with high economic and public health threat potential. When compared to other paramyxoviruses, henipaviruses appear to have unique characteristics. Henipaviruses are zoonotic paramyxoviruses with a broader tropism than most other paramyxoviruses, and can cause severe acute encephalitis with unique features among viral encephalitides. There are currently no approved effective prophylactic or therapeutic treatments for henipavirus infections. Although ribavirin was empirically used and seemed beneficial during the biggest outbreak caused by one of these viruses, the Nipah virus, its efficacy is disputed in light of its lack of efficacy in several animal models of henipavirus infection. Nevertheless, because of its highly pathogenic nature, much effort has been spent in developing anti-henipavirus therapeutics. In this review we describe the unique features of henipavirus infections and the different strategies and animal models that have been developed so far in order to identify and test potential drugs to prevent or treat henipavirus infections. Some of these components have the potential to be broad-spectrum antivirals as they target effectors of viral pathogenecity common to other viruses. We will focus on small molecules or biologics, rather than vaccine strategies, that have been developed as anti-henipaviral therapeutics.

  10. Expanding the potential of MRI contrast agents through multifunctional polymeric nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Ioana; Gunkel-Grabole, Gesine; Belluati, Andrea; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    MRI is a sought-after, noninvasive tool in medical diagnostics, yet the direct application of contrast agents to tissue suffers from several drawbacks. Hosting the contrast agents in polymeric nanocarriers can solve many of these issues while creating additional benefit through exploitation of the intrinsic characteristics of the polymeric carriers. In this report, the versatility is highlighted with recent examples of dendritic and hyperbranched polymers, polymer nanoparticles and micelles, and polymersomes as multifunctional bioresponsive nanocarriers for MRI contrast agents.

  11. [A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy--VII. Biological agents].

    PubMed

    Pasero, G; Marson, P; Gatto, B

    2011-11-09

    The introduction of biological agents has been a major turning-point in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, particularly in rheumatoid arthritis. This review describes the principle milestones that have led, through the knowledge of the structure and functions of nucleic acids, to the development of production techniques of the three major families of biological agents: proteins, monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. A brief history has also been traced of the cytokines most involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IL-1 and TNF) and the steps which have led to the use of the main biological drugs in rheumatology: anakinra, infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept and rituximab.

  12. Scaffold Hopping Toward Agomelatine: Novel 3, 4-Dihydroisoquinoline Compounds as Potential Antidepressant Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Ang, Wei; Long, Haiyue; Chang, Ying; Li, Zicheng; Zhou, Liangxue; Yang, Tao; Deng, Yong; Luo, Youfu

    2016-10-01

    A scaffold-hopping strategy toward Agomelatine based on in silico screening and knowledge analysis was employed to design novel antidepressant agents. A series of 3, 4-dihydroisoquinoline compounds were selected for chemical synthesis and biological assessment. Three compounds (6a-1, 6a-2, 6a-9) demonstrated protective effects on corticosterone-induced lesion of PC12 cells. Compound 6a-1 also displayed low inhibitory effects on the growth of HEK293 and L02 normal cells and it was further evaluated for its potential antidepressant effects in vivo. The forced swim test (FST) results revealed that compound 6a-1 remarkably reduced the immobility time of rats and the open field test (OFT) results indicated a better general locomotor activity of the rats treated with compound 6a-1 than those with Agomelatine or Fluoxetine. Mechanism studies implied that compound 6a-1 can significantly reduce PC12 cell apoptosis by up-regulation of GSH and down-regulation of ROS in corticosterone-induced lesion of PC12 cells. Meanwhile, the down-regulation of calcium ion concentration and up-regulation of BDNF level in PC12 cells may account for the neuroprotective effects. Furthermore, compound 6a-1 can increase cell survival and cell proliferation, promote cell maturation in the rat hippocampus after chronic treatment. The acute toxicity data in vivo indicated compound 6a-1 exhibited less hepatotoxicity than Agomelatine.

  13. Design of vanadium mixed-ligand complexes as potential anti-protozoa agents.

    PubMed

    Benítez, Julio; Guggeri, Lucía; Tomaz, Isabel; Arrambide, Gabriel; Navarro, Maribel; Pessoa, João Costa; Garat, Beatriz; Gambino, Dinorah

    2009-04-01

    In the search for new therapeutic tools against Chagas' disease (American Trypanosomiasis) four novel mixed-ligand vanadyl complexes, [V(IV)O(L(2)-2H)(L(1))], including a bidentate polypyridyl DNA intercalator (L(1)) and a tridentate salycylaldehyde semicarbazone derivative (L(2)) as ligands were synthesized, characterized by a combination of techniques, and in vitro evaluated. EPR suggest a distorted octahedral geometry with the tridentate semicarbazone occupying three equatorial positions and the polypyridyl ligand coordinated in an equatorial/axial mode. Both complexes including dipyrido[3,2-a: 2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz) as polypyridyl coligand showed IC(50) values in the muM range against Dm28c strain (epimastigotes) of Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of the disease, being as active as the anti-trypanosomal reference drug Nifurtimox. To get an insight into the trypanocidal mechanism of action of these compounds, DNA was evaluated as a potential parasite target and EPR, and (51)V NMR experiments were also carried out upon aging aerated solutions of the complexes. Data obtained by electrophoretic analysis suggest that the mechanism of action of these complexes could include DNA interactions.

  14. New multifunctional ligands for potential use in the design therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical imaging agents

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Singh, P.R.

    1997-02-11

    A class of diagnostic and therapeutic compounds are derived from phosphinimines that include ligands containing either a single phosphinimine functionality or both a phosphinimine group and a phosphine or arsine group, or an aminato group, or a second phosphinimine moiety. These phosphinimine ligands are complexed to early transition metal radionuclides (e.g., {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) or late transition metals (e.g., {sup 105}Rh or {sup 109}Pd). The complexes with these metals {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 109}Pd exhibit a high in vitro and high in vivo stability. The complexes are formed in high yields and can be neutral or charged. These ligands can also be used to form stable compounds with paramagnetic transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn) for potential use as MRI contrast agents. Applications for the use of ligands and making the ligands are also disclosed.

  15. Scaffold Hopping Toward Agomelatine: Novel 3, 4-Dihydroisoquinoline Compounds as Potential Antidepressant Agents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Ang, Wei; Long, Haiyue; Chang, Ying; Li, Zicheng; Zhou, Liangxue; Yang, Tao; Deng, Yong; Luo, Youfu

    2016-01-01

    A scaffold-hopping strategy toward Agomelatine based on in silico screening and knowledge analysis was employed to design novel antidepressant agents. A series of 3, 4-dihydroisoquinoline compounds were selected for chemical synthesis and biological assessment. Three compounds (6a-1, 6a-2, 6a-9) demonstrated protective effects on corticosterone-induced lesion of PC12 cells. Compound 6a-1 also displayed low inhibitory effects on the growth of HEK293 and L02 normal cells and it was further evaluated for its potential antidepressant effects in vivo. The forced swim test (FST) results revealed that compound 6a-1 remarkably reduced the immobility time of rats and the open field test (OFT) results indicated a better general locomotor activity of the rats treated with compound 6a-1 than those with Agomelatine or Fluoxetine. Mechanism studies implied that compound 6a-1 can significantly reduce PC12 cell apoptosis by up-regulation of GSH and down-regulation of ROS in corticosterone-induced lesion of PC12 cells. Meanwhile, the down-regulation of calcium ion concentration and up-regulation of BDNF level in PC12 cells may account for the neuroprotective effects. Furthermore, compound 6a-1 can increase cell survival and cell proliferation, promote cell maturation in the rat hippocampus after chronic treatment. The acute toxicity data in vivo indicated compound 6a-1 exhibited less hepatotoxicity than Agomelatine. PMID:27698414

  16. Sonorensin: A new bacteriocin with potential of an anti-biofilm agent and a food biopreservative

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Lipsy; Singh, Gurdeep; Kumar Jena, Kautilya; Sahoo, Debendra K.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to exploration of alternative therapeutic agents such as ribosomally synthesized bacterial peptides known as bacteriocins. Biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. Bacteria in biofilm can be upto thousand times more resistant to antibiotics than the same bacteria circulating in a planktonic state. In this study, sonorensin, predicted to belong to the heterocycloanthracin subfamily of bacteriocins, was found to be effectively killing active and non-multiplying cells of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Sonorensin showed marked inhibition activity against biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence and electron microscopy suggested that growth inhibition occurred because of increased membrane permeability. Low density polyethylene film coated with sonorensin was found to effectively control the growth of food spoilage bacteria like Listeria monocytogenes and S. aureus. The biopreservative effect of sonorensin coated film showing growth inhibition of spoilage bacteria in chicken meat and tomato samples demonstrated the potential of sonorensin as an alternative to current antibiotics/ preservatives. PMID:26292786

  17. Cyclooxygenase‐2 facilitates dengue virus replication and serves as a potential target for developing antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Kuang; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Lin, Chun-Yu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is one of the important mediators of inflammation in response to viral infection, and it contributes to viral replication, for example, cytomegalovirus or hepatitis C virus replication. The role of COX-2 in dengue virus (DENV) replication remains unclear. In the present study, we observed an increased level of COX-2 in patients with dengue fever compared with healthy donors. Consistent with the clinical data, an elevated level of COX-2 expression was also observed in DENV-infected ICR suckling mice. Using cell-based experiments, we revealed that DENV-2 infection significantly induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells. The exogenous expression of COX-2 or PGE2 treatment dose-dependently enhanced DENV-2 replication. In contrast, COX-2 gene silencing and catalytic inhibition sufficiently suppressed DENV-2 replication. In an ICR suckling mouse model, we identified that the COX-2 inhibitor NS398 protected mice from succumbing to life-threatening DENV-2 infection. By using COX-2 promoter-based analysis and specific inhibitors against signaling molecules, we identified that NF-κB and MAPK/JNK are critical factors for DENV-2-induced COX-2 expression and viral replication. Altogether, our results reveal that COX-2 is an important factor for DENV replication and can serve as a potential target for developing therapeutic agents against DENV infection. PMID:28317866

  18. Platinum(II) metal complexes as potential anti-Trypanosoma cruzi agents.

    PubMed

    Vieites, Marisol; Otero, Lucía; Santos, Diego; Toloza, Jeannette; Figueroa, Roberto; Norambuena, Ester; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Aguirre, Gabriela; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes; Morello, Antonio; Maya, Juan Diego; Garat, Beatriz; Gambino, Dinorah

    2008-01-01

    In the search for new therapeutic tools against Chagas' disease (American Trypanosomiasis) two series of new platinum(II) complexes with bioactive 5-nitrofuryl containing thiosemicarbazones as ligands were synthesized, characterized and in vitro evaluated. Most of the complexes showed IC50 values in the muM range against two different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of the disease, being as active as the anti-trypanosomal drug Nifurtimox. In particular, the coordination of L3 (4-ethyl-1-(5-nitrofurfurylidene)thiosemicarbazide) to Pt(II) forming [Pt(L3)2] lead to almost a five-fold activity increase in respect to the free ligand. Trying to get an insight into the trypanocidal mechanism of action of these compounds, DNA and redox metabolism (intra-parasite free radical production) were evaluated as potential parasite targets. Results suggest that the complexes could inhibit parasite growth through a dual mechanism of action involving production of toxic free radicals by bioreduction and DNA interaction.

  19. Indium-111-labeled LDL: A potential agent for imaging atherosclerotic disease and lipoprotein biodistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.M.; Butler, S.P.; Meinken, G.E.; Wang, T.S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Srivastava, S.C.; Alderson, P.O.; Ginsberg, H.N. )

    1990-03-01

    Radiolabeling of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and external imaging with a gamma camera would offer a means of taking advantage of the metabolic activity of developing atherosclerotic lesions in order to noninvasively detect and determine the extent of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled LDL was prepared and its purity demonstrated by agarose electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. In vitro studies with cultured human fibroblasts demonstrated significant inhibition of iodine-125-({sup 125}I) LDL binding to LDL receptors by {sup 111}In-LDL, although this was less than the inhibition produced by unlabeled LDL. Adrenal gland uptake of {sup 111}In-LDL by hypercholesterolemic rabbits was reduced by 86% compared to the level of uptake observed in normal rabbits. These results were compatible with downregulation of adrenal LDL receptors in the hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Uptake of {sup 111}In-LDL in the atherosclerotic proximal aorta of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was 2.5 times higher than in normal rabbits. These results suggest that {sup 111}In-LDL has the potential to be a useful agent for external imaging of atherosclerotic lesions and lipoprotein biodistribution.

  20. N-Substituted piperazinyl quinolones as potential cytotoxic agents: structure-activity relationships study.

    PubMed

    Foroumadi, Alireza; Emami, Saeed; Rajabalian, Saeed; Badinloo, Marziyeh; Mohammadhosseini, Negar; Shafiee, Abbas

    2009-03-01

    As part of a continuing search for new potential anticancer candidates in the piperazinyl quinolone series, the cytotoxicity evaluation of new N-substituted piperazinyl quinolones was of our interest. The growth inhibitory activities of 12 new compounds, namely N-[2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-2-oxoethyl] and N-[2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-2-oxyiminoethyl] piperazinyl quinolones 1-12 were determined against six cancer cell lines using MTT colorimetric assay. Preliminary screening showed that most of the new N-[2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethyl]piperazinyl quinolones 4-12 containing (un)substituted oxime moiety showed significant cytotoxic activity and the modification of functionality on ethyl spacer produced a relatively minor change of activity. Thus, in the piperazinyl quinolone series, cytotoxic activity can be positively modulated through the introduction of 2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethyl residue on the piperazine ring. The results revealed that the introduction of 2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethyl moiety on the piperazine ring of quinolone antibacterials (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and enoxacin) changes the biological profile of piperazinyl quinolones from antibacterials to cytotoxic agents.

  1. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel quinazolinyl-diaryl urea derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Nian; Wang, Xian-Fu; Li, Ting; Wu, De-Wen; Fu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Guang-Ji; Shen, Xing-Can; Wang, Heng-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Through a structure-based molecular hybridization approach, a series of novel quinazolinyl-diaryl urea derivatives were designed, synthesized, and screened for their in vitro antiproliferative activities against three cancer cell lines (HepG2, MGC-803, and A549). Six compounds (7 g, 7 m, 7 o, 8 e, 8 g, and 8 m) showed stronger activity against a certain cell line compared with the positive reference drugs sorafenib and gefitinib. Among the six compounds, 8 g exhibited the strongest activity. In particular, compound 8 g induced A549 apoptosis, arrested cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. This compound can also effectively regulate the expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle-related proteins, and influence the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Molecular docking and structure-activity relationship analyses revealed that it can bind well to the active site of the receptor c-Raf, which was consistent with the biological data. Therefore, compound 8 g may be a potent antitumor agent, representing a promising lead for further optimization.

  2. Novel Azasterols as Potential Agents for Treatment of Leishmaniasis and Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Silvia Orenes; Rodrigues, Juliany C. F.; Jiménez, Carmen Jiménez; Joyce-Menekse, Miranda; Rodrigues, Carlos; Croft, Simon L.; Yardley, Vanessa; de Luca-Fradley, Kate; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M.; Urbina, Julio; de Souza, Wanderley; Pacanowska, Dolores González; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of novel azasterols as potential compounds for the treatment of leishmaniasis and other diseases caused by trypanosomatid parasites. Azasterols are a known class of (S)-adenosyl-l-methionine: Δ24-sterol methyltransferase(24-SMT) inhibitors in fungi, plants, and some parasitic protozoa. The compounds prepared showed activity at micromolar and nanomolar concentrations when tested against Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma spp. The enzymatic and sterol composition studies indicated that the most active compounds acted by inhibiting 24-SMT. The role of the free hydroxyl group at position 3 of the sterol nucleus was also probed. When an acetate was attached to the 3β-OH, the compounds did not inhibit the enzyme but had an effect on parasite growth and the levels of sterols in the parasite, suggesting that the acetate group was removed in the organism. Thus, an acetate group on the 3β-OH may have application as a prodrug. However, there may be an additional mode(s) of action for these acetate derivatives. These compounds were shown to have ultrastructural effects on Leishmania amazonensis promastigote membranes, including the plasma membrane, the mitochondrial membrane, and the endoplasmic reticulum. The compounds were also found to be active against the bloodstream form (trypomastigotes) of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, a causative agent of African trypanosomiasis. PMID:15273104

  3. The pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF): an important potential therapeutic agent for infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Chen, Yanru; Guo, Zhihui; Xie, Yide; Zhou, Yakuan; Jiang, Chenghong; Chen, Xiaosong

    2017-04-01

    In previous studies, the expression and the role of proangiogenic factors in infantile hemangiomas have been well studied. However, the role of angiogenic inhibitors has been revealed rarely. The expression of PEDF, as the strongest and safe endogenous inhibitor, is still unrecognized until the current study. In order to investigate the expression and significance of the pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in the proliferating and regressing phases of infantile hemangiomas, the expression of PEDF, VEGF, Ki-67, and CD34 protein in hemangioma tissues was examined with immunohistochemical polymer HRP method in 42 cases during the proliferative phase, 40 cases during the regressing phase, and 11 cases of non-involuting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs). Meanwhile, the mRNA expression of these factors was detected with quantitative realtime RT-PCR. We found the protein and mRNA expression of PEDF in regressing phase was significantly higher than those in proliferative phase and NICHs (P < 0.001), while the protein and mRNA expression of VEGF were much lower (P < 0.001). The microvessel density (MVD), Ki-67 changes, and the expression of PEDF and VEGF were found significantly correlated. These results indicated that the reduction of VEGF and increase in PEDF are causative to the evolution of infantile hemangioma. PEDF may play a key role in the spontaneous regression of infantile hemangioma and may become an important potential therapeutic agent for infantile hemangioma.

  4. Studies on potential biological control agents of immature mosquitoes in sewage wastewater in southern California.

    PubMed

    Mian, L S; Mulla, M S; Wilson, B A

    1986-09-01

    Three biological control agents, a copepod, Mesocyclops leuckarti pilosa, and two fish, Cyprinodon macularius and Poecilia reticulata, were evaluated for their survival in secondary sewage effluent (SSE) and predation potential on mosquito larvae. Results showed that the survival of M. l. pilosa was not significantly affected in SSE or SSE diluted (50%) with water. In predation tests, the copepod consumed from 50 to 90% of the 1st-instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus in 24 to 72 hr and P. reticulata fed on almost all stages (egg to pupa) of the test mosquitoes. Survivorship of P. reticulata and C. macularius in SSE was not significantly affected by SSE under both greenhouse and sewage aquaculture conditions. Poecilia reticulata was distributed towards the influent end and C. macularius towards the effluent end of the aquaculture ponds, indicating the former species can tolerate higher levels of pollution which exists at the influent end of the pond. However, low water temperature and dissolved oxygen may be detrimental to these fish species in sewage aquacultural systems.

  5. In vitro characterization of an Fe(8) cluster as potential MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Elisenda; Roig, Anna; Molins, Elies; Arús, Carles; Quintero, María Rosa; Cabañas, Miquel E; Cerdán, Sebastián; Lopez-Larrubia, Pilar; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2005-08-01

    The complex [(tacn)(6)Fe(8)(micro(3)-O)(2)(micro(2)-OH)(12)]Br(8).9H(2)O (Fe(8)) was evaluated in vitro as a new kind of possible MRI contrast agent. Relaxivities were measured at 1.41 and 9.4 T for Fe(8) and commercial Gd-DTPA dissolved in PBS. There was significant difference for r(1) and r(2) values between Fe(8) and Gd-DTPA at high field (9.4 T) and for r(1) at low field (1.4 T) (p<0.05). Phantom studies with T(1)-weighted MRI at 9.4 T suggest T(1) contrast potential for Fe(8). That is, up to 5.2 times higher intensity enhancement with respect to that of equimolar Gd-DTPA was obtained with an Fe(8) concentration, referred to the whole molecule, of 0.2 mM, for which no toxicity on C6 cells could be detected. No toxic effects on cultured C6 cells were observed up to a concentration of 1 mM Fe(8).

  6. Evaluation of Se-75 BISTAES as a potential articular cartilage imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Se-75 bis (..beta..-N,N,N-trimethylamino)-ethyl) selenide diiodide (Se-75 BISTAES) as an articular cartilage imaging agent for the early diagnosis of osteoarthritis was evaluated. The compound was synthesized and the identity was established. The radiochemical purity and stability were determined initially and over a two-month period of storage at three temperatures. The biodistribution of Se-75 BISTAES in rabbits and guinea pigs was studied. A high concentration of radioactivity was found in the knee and shoulder cartilage. The radioactivity in the cartilage was the highest at 15 minutes to one hour post-injection. In rabbits, the highest ratio of radioactivity in the cartilage to the surrounding tissues was about 30. A minimal ratio of 10 is required for nuclear medicine imaging. Nuclear medicine imaging conducted on rabbits demonstrated increased radioactivity in the articular cartilage in the knee and shoulder. The impression from the nuclear medicine images and the findings of the biodistribution study indicated that the route of excretion of Se-75 BISTAES was the urine. The in vitro binding between Se-75 BISTAES and chondroitin sulfate was determined by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

  7. Biology and preliminary host range assessment of two potential kudzu biological control agents.

    PubMed

    Frye, Matthew J; Hough-Goldstein, Judith; Sun, Jiang-Hua

    2007-12-01

    Two insect species from China, Gonioctena tredecimmaculata (Jacoby) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Ornatalcides (Mesalcidodes) trifidus (Pascoe) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were studied in quarantine in the United States as potential biological control agents for kudzu, Pueraria montana variety lobata (Willd.) Maesen and S. Almeida. Adults of G. tredecimmaculata were ovoviviparous and reproduced throughout the summer, producing offspring that had an obligate adult diapause. In no-choice tests, adult and larval G. tredecimmaculata rejected most of the plant species tested, but consumed foliage and completed their life cycle on soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) and on a native woodland plant, hog-peanut (Amphicarpaea bracteata L. Fernald), which are in the same subtribe as kudzu (Glycininae). Insects showed similar responses to field- and greenhouse-grown soybean and kudzu foliage, despite measurable differences in leaf traits: field-grown foliage of both plants had greater leaf toughness, higher total carbon content, higher trichome density, and lower water content than greenhouse foliage. O. trifidus adults also rejected most of the plants tested but fed on and severely damaged potted soybean and hog-peanut plants in addition to kudzu. Further tests in China are needed to determine whether these species will accept nontarget host plants under open-field conditions.

  8. Salvianolic Acid B, a Potential Chemopreventive Agent, for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Guo, Yinhan; Gu, Xinbin

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is one of the top ten cancers in the United States. The survival rate of HNSCC has only marginally improved over the last two decades. In addition, African-American men bear a disproportionate burden of this preventable disease. Therefore, a critical challenge of preventive health approaches is warranted. Salvianolic acid B (Sal-B) isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge, which is a well-know Chinese medicines has been safely used to treat and prevent aging diseases for thousand of years. Recently, the anticancer properties of Sal-B have received more attention. Sal-B significantly inhibits or delays the growth of HNSCC in both cultured HNSCC cells and HNSCC xenograft animal models. The following anticancer mechanisms have been proposed: the inhibition of COX-2/PGE-2 pathway, the promotion of apoptosis, and the modulation of angiogenesis. In conclusion, Sal-B is a potential HNSCC chemopreventive agent working through antioxidation and anti-inflammation mechanisms. PMID:21209716

  9. N-( sup 18 F)fluoroacetyl-D-glucosamine: A potential agent for cancer diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, T.; Kubota, K.; Sato, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Tada, M.; Iwata, R.; Itoh, M.; Hatazawa, J.; Sato, K.; Fukuda, H. )

    1990-10-01

    Positron labeled substrates such as sugars, amino acids, and nucleosides have been investigated for the in-vivo evaluation of biochemical processes in cancerous tissue. Hexosamines are obligatory structural components of many biologically important macromolecules, including membrane glycoproteins and mucopolysaccharide. We evaluated a new synthesized pharmaceutical, N-({sup 18}F)fluoroacetyl-D-glucosamine ({sup 18}F-FAG), which is a structural analog of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. C3H/HeMsNRS mice bearing spontaneous hepatomas were used for the tissue distribution study. At 60 min after injection, high uptakes were found in tumor (5.16, mean value of %dose/g), liver (3.71), and kidney (3.27). The tumor uptake of 18F-FAG showed the highest value in all tissue. In the PET study, VX-2 carcinoma of the rabbit was clearly visualized. Our preliminary results suggest that {sup 18}F-FAG has potential as a new agent for tumor imaging.

  10. Natural flavonoids as potential multifunctional agents in prevention of diabetic cataract

    PubMed Central

    Stefek, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Cataract is one of the earliest secondary complications of diabetes mellitus. The lens is a closed system with limited capability to repair or regenerate itself. Current evidence supports the view that cataractogenesis is a multifactorial process. Mechanisms related to glucose toxicity, namely oxidative stress, processes of non-enzymatic glycation and enhanced polyol pathway significantly contribute to the development of eye lens opacity under conditions of diabetes. There is an urgent need for inexpensive, non-surgical approaches to the treatment of cataract. Recently, considerable attention has been devoted to the search for phytochemical therapeutics. Several pharmacological actions of natural flavonoids may operate in the prevention of cataract since flavonoids are capable of affecting multiple mechanisms or etiological factors responsible for the development of diabetic cataract. In the present paper, natural flavonoids are reviewed as potential agents that could reduce the risk of cataract formation via affecting multiple pathways pertinent to eye lens opacification. In addition, the bioavailability of flavonoids for the lens is considered. PMID:21753902

  11. Sonorensin: A new bacteriocin with potential of an anti-biofilm agent and a food biopreservative.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Lipsy; Singh, Gurdeep; Kumar Jena, Kautilya; Sahoo, Debendra K

    2015-08-21

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to exploration of alternative therapeutic agents such as ribosomally synthesized bacterial peptides known as bacteriocins. Biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. Bacteria in biofilm can be upto thousand times more resistant to antibiotics than the same bacteria circulating in a planktonic state. In this study, sonorensin, predicted to belong to the heterocycloanthracin subfamily of bacteriocins, was found to be effectively killing active and non-multiplying cells of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Sonorensin showed marked inhibition activity against biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence and electron microscopy suggested that growth inhibition occurred because of increased membrane permeability. Low density polyethylene film coated with sonorensin was found to effectively control the growth of food spoilage bacteria like Listeria monocytogenes and S. aureus. The biopreservative effect of sonorensin coated film showing growth inhibition of spoilage bacteria in chicken meat and tomato samples demonstrated the potential of sonorensin as an alternative to current antibiotics/ preservatives.

  12. Child as change agent. The potential of children to increase healthy food purchasing.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Katherine; Zachary, Drew A; Fox, Monica; Gittelsohn, Joel; Surkan, Pamela J

    2014-10-01

    Shoppers make many food choices while buying groceries. Children frequently accompany caregivers, giving them the potential to influence these choices. We aimed to understand low-income shoppers' perceptions of how children influence caregivers' purchasing decisions and how the supermarket environment could be manipulated to allow children to serve as change agents for healthy food purchasing in a primarily African-American community. We conducted thirty in-depth interviews, five follow-up interviews, one supermarket walk-through interview, and four focus groups with adult supermarket shoppers who were regular caregivers for children under age 16. We conducted one focus group with supermarket employees and one in-depth interview with a supermarket manager. Qualitative data were analyzed using iterative thematic coding and memo writing. Caregivers approached grocery shopping with efforts to save money, prevent waste and purchase healthy food for their families, but described children as promoting unplanned, unhealthy food purchases. This influence was exacerbated by the supermarket environment, which participants found to promote unhealthy options and provide limited opportunities for children to interact with healthier foods. Caregivers' suggestions for promoting healthy purchasing for shoppers with children included manipulating the placement of healthy and unhealthy foods and offering opportunities for children to taste and interact with healthy options.

  13. Phyllanthus wightianus Müll. Arg.: A Potential Source for Natural Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, D.; Srinivasan, R.; Shivakumar, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Phyllanthus wightianus belongs to Euphorbiaceae family having ethnobotanical importance. The present study deals with validating the antimicrobial potential of solvent leaf extracts of P. wightianus. 11 human bacterial pathogens (Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Proteus vulgaris, and Serratia marcescens) and 4 fungal pathogens (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mucor racemosus, and Aspergillus niger) were also challenged with solvent leaf extracts usingagar well and disc diffusion methods. Further, identification of the active component present in the bioactive extract was done using GC-MS analysis. Results show that all extracts exhibited broad spectrum (6–29 mm) of antibacterial activity on most of the tested organisms. The results highlight the fact that the well in agar method was more effective than disc diffusion method. Significant antimicrobial activity was detected in methanol extract against S. pneumoniae (29 mm) with MIC and MBC values of 15.62 μg/mL. GC-MS analysis revealed that 29 bioactive constituents were present in methanolic extract of P. wightianus, of which 9,12-octadecaenioic acid (peak area 22.82%; RT-23.97) and N-hexadecanoic acid (peak area 21.55% RT-21.796) are the major compounds. The findings of this study show that P. wightianus extracts may be used as an anti-infective agent in folklore medicine. PMID:24883301

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of Aminothiazole-Paeonol Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ying; Kapoor, Mohit; Huang, Ying-Pei; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Yu-Ling; Huang, Su-Chin; Liao, Wei-Neng; Chen, Jen-Kun; Huang, Jer-Shing; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-26

    In this study, novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives were synthesized and characterized using ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, IR, mass spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography. All the new synthesized compounds were evaluated according to their anticancer effect on seven cancer cell lines. The experimental results indicated that these compounds possess high anticancer potential regarding human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS cells) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29 cells). Among these compounds, N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (13c) had the most potent inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 4.0 µM to AGS, 4.4 µM to HT-29 cells and 5.8 µM to HeLa cells. The 4-fluoro-N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]benzenesulfonamide (13d) was the second potent compound, showing IC50 values of 7.2, 11.2 and 13.8 µM to AGS , HT-29 and HeLa cells, respectively. These compounds are superior to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for relatively higher potency against AGS and HT-29 human cancer cell lines along with lower cytotoxicity to fibroblasts. Novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives in this work might be a series of promising lead compounds to develop anticancer agents for treating gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  15. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  16. Volatile Organic Compounds from Native Potato-associated Pseudomonas as Potential Anti-oomycete Agents

    PubMed Central

    De Vrieze, Mout; Pandey, Piyush; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Varadarajan, Adithi R.; Ahrens, Christian H.; Weisskopf, Laure; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in (i) origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere), (ii) in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and (iii) protective effects against late blight on potato leaf disks. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture. PMID:26635763

  17. Curcumin derivatives as metal-chelating agents with potential multifunctional activity for pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Erika; Benassi, Rois; Sacchi, Stefania; Pignedoli, Francesca; Asti, Mattia; Saladini, Monica

    2014-10-01

    Curcuminoids represent new perspectives for the development of novel therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (AD), one probable mechanism of action is related to their metal complexing ability. In this work we examined the metal complexing ability of substituted curcuminoids to propose new chelating molecules with biological properties comparable with curcumin but with improved stability as new potential AD therapeutic agents. The K2T derivatives originate from the insertion of a -CH2COOC(CH3)3 group on the central atom of the diketonic moiety of curcumin. They retain the diketo-ketoenol tautomerism which is solvent dependent. In aqueous solution the prevalent form is the diketo one but the addition of metal ion (Ga(3+), Cu(2+)) causes the dissociation of the enolic proton creating chelate complexes and shifting the tautomeric equilibrium towards the keto-enol form. The formation of metal complexes is followed by both NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations on K2T21 complexes with Ga(3+) and Cu(2+) are performed and compared with those on curcumin complexes. [Ga(K2T21)2(H2O)2](+) was found more stable than curcumin one. Good agreement is detected between calculated and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR data. The calculated OH bond dissociation energy (BDE) and the OH proton dissociation enthalpy (PDE), allowed to predict the radical scavenging ability of the metal ion complexed with K2T21, while the calculated electronic affinity (EA) and ionization potential (IP) represent yardsticks of antioxidant properties. Eventually theoretical calculations suggest that the proton-transfer-associated superoxide-scavenging activity is enhanced after binding metal ions, and that Ga(3+) complexes display possible superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity.

  18. Potential applications for antiviral therapy and prophylaxis in bovine medicine.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Viral disease is one of the major causes of financial loss and animal suffering in today's cattle industry. Increases in global commerce and average herd size, urbanization, vertical integration within the industry and alterations in global climate patterns have allowed the spread of pathogenic viruses, or the introduction of new viral species, into regions previously free of such pathogens, creating the potential for widespread morbidity and mortality in naïve cattle populations. Despite this, no antiviral products are currently commercially licensed for use in bovine medicine, although significant progress has been made in the development of antivirals for use against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and bovine herpesvirus (BHV). BVDV is extensively studied as a model virus for human antiviral studies. Consequently, many compounds with efficacy have been identified and a few have been successfully used to prevent infection in vivo although commercial development is still lacking. FMDV is also the subject of extensive antiviral testing due to the importance of outbreak containment for maintenance of export markets. Thirdly, BHV presents an attractive target for antiviral development due to its worldwide presence. Antiviral studies for other bovine viral pathogens are largely limited to preliminary studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of antiviral compounds against several key bovine pathogens and the potential for commercial antiviral applications in the prevention and control of several selected bovine diseases.

  19. Targeted agents in non-small cell lung cancer therapy: What is there on the horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Villaflor, Victoria M.; Salgia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases. There has been much research in lung cancer over the past decade which has advanced our ability to treat these patients with a more personalized approach. The scope of this paper is to review the literature and give a broad understanding of the current molecular targets for which we currently have therapies as well as other targets for which we may soon have therapies. Additionally, we will cover some of the issues of resistance with these targeted therapies. The molecular targets we intend to discuss are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma kinase (ALK), KRAS, C-MET/RON, PIK3CA. ROS-1, RET Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Ephrins and their receptors, BRAF, and immunotherapies/vaccines. This manuscript only summarizes the work which has been done to date and in no way is meant to be comprehensive. PMID:23599689

  20. Characterization and Functionalization of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Use as Potential Agents for Cancer Thermotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Nora

    This thesis presents experimental studies of iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis, functionalization, and intracellular hyperthermal effects on murine macrophages as a model in vitro system. Colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of particular interest in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH). Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have garnered great interest as economical, biocompatible hyperthermia agents due to their superparamagnetic activity. Here we seek to optimize the synthetic reproducibility and in vitro utilization of IONPs for application in MFH. We compared aqueous synthetic protocols and various protective coating techniques using various analytical techniques and in vitro assays to assess the biocompatibility and feasibility of the various preparations of nanoparticles. Using a co-precipitation of iron salts methodology, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with an average diameter of 6-8nm were synthesized and stabilized with carboxylates. By performing calorimetry measurements in an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) with a frequency of 500 kHz and field strength of 0.008Tesla the superparamagnetic behavior of these particles was confirmed. To further investigate these IONPs in a biological application, citric acid-stabilized particles, in conjunction with heat generated by these IONPs when exposed to an OMF, were assessed to determine their effects on cell viability in a RAW 267.4 murine macrophage model system. Our results show that 91.5-97% of cells that have ingested IONPs die follow exposure to an OMF. Importantly, neither the IONPs (at applicable concentrations) nor the OMF show cytotoxic effects. These particular particles have promising preliminary results as hyperthermic agents in both the current literature and simple, proof-of-concept experiments in our laboratory setting. We present experimental results for the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of iron oxide nanoparticles in MFH. Our results show that while IONPs have

  1. Entomopathogenic marine actinomycetes as potential and low-cost biocontrol agents against bloodsucking arthropods.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Karthik; Kumar, Gaurav; Kirthi, Arivarasan Vishnu; Rao, Kokati Venkata Bhaskara; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul

    2013-11-01

    A novel approach to control strategies for integrated blood-feeding parasite management is in high demand, including the use of biological control agents. The present study aims to determine the efficacy of optimized crude extract of actinomycetes strain LK1 as biological control agent against the fourth-instar larvae of Anopheles stephensi and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae) and adults of Haemaphysalis bispinosa, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae), and Hippobosca maculata (Diptera: Hippoboscidae). Antiparasitic activity was optimized using the Plackett-Burman method, and the design was developed using the software Design-Expert version 8.0.7.1. The production of the optimized crude actinomycetes LK1 strain extract was performed using response surface methodology to optimize the process parameters of protease inhibitor activity of marine actinobacteria for the independent variables like pH, temperature, glucose, casein, and NaCl at two levels (-1 and +1). The potential actinomycetes strain was identified as Saccharomonas spp., and the metamodeling surface simulation procedure was followed. It was studied using a computer-generated experimental design, automatic control of simulation experiments, and sequential optimization of the metamodels fitted to a simulation response surface function. The central composite design (CCD) used for the analysis of treatment showed that a second-order polynomial regression model was in good agreement with the experimental results at R (2) = 0.9829 (p < 0.05). The optimized values of the variables for antioxidant production were pH 6.00, glucose 1.3%, casein 0.09%, temperature 31.23 °C, and NaCl 0.10%. The LK1 strain-optimized crude extract was purified using reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, and the isolated protease inhibitor showed antiparasitic activity. The antiparasitic activity of optimized crude extract of LK1 was tested against larvae of A. stephensi (LC₅₀ = 31.82 ppm

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Novel Agent-Based Therapies for Multiple Myeloma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Li, Yan; Yan, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing bortezomib, thalidomide, and lenalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) for safety and efficacy using meta-analysis. This meta-analysis identified 17 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including 6742 patients. These RCTs were separated according to the different agent-based regimens and to autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT). Complete response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and adverse events (AE) were combined. The total weighted risk ratio (RR) of CR was 3.29 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.22–4.88] (P < 0.0001) for the novel agent-based regimens. These novel agent-based regimens showed greater benefit in terms of PFS of all subgroups irrespective of whether the patient received ASCT or not. The hazard ratio (HR) for PFS was 0.64 [95% CI: 0.60–0.69] (P < 0.00001). Improvements of OS could be found only in the bortezomib- and thalidomide-based regimens without ASCT. The pooled HRs were 0.74 [95% CI: 0.65–0.86] (P < 0.0001) and 0.80 [95% CI: 0.70–0.90] (P = 0.0004), respectively. Several AEs were shown more frequently in the novel agent-based regimens compared with controls such as hematologic events (neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal infection, peripheral neuropathy, thrombosis, and embolism events. In conclusion, in spite of the AEs, novel agent-based regimens are safe and effective for the treatment of MM. PMID:26949704

  3. Small Molecule Modulators of Keap1-Nrf2-ARE Pathway as Potential Preventive and Therapeutic Agents$

    PubMed Central

    Magesh, Sadagopan; Chen, Yu; Hu, Longqin

    2012-01-01

    Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway represents one of the most important cellular defense mechanisms against oxidative stress and xenobiotic damage. Activation of Nrf2 signaling induces the transcriptional regulation of ARE-dependent expression of various detoxifying and antioxidant defense enzymes and proteins. Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling has become an attractive target for the prevention and treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases and conditions including cancer, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Over the last few decades, numerous Nrf2 inducers have been developed and some of them are currently undergoing clinical trials. Recently, over-activation of Nrf2 has been implicated in cancer progression as well as in drug resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Thus, Nrf2 inhibitors could potentially be used to improve the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Herein, we review the signaling mechanism of Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway, its disease relevance, and currently known classes of small molecule modulators. We also discuss several aspects of Keap1-Nrf2 interaction, Nrf2-based peptide inhibitor design, and the screening assays currently used for the discovery of direct inhibitors of Keap1-Nrf2 interaction. PMID:22549716

  4. Novel high-throughput screen against Candida albicans identifies antifungal potentiators and agents effective against biofilms

    PubMed Central

    LaFleur, Michael D.; Lucumi, Edinson; Napper, Andrew D.; Diamond, Scott L.; Lewis, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Microbial adhesion and biofilms have important implications for human health and disease. Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen which forms drug-resistant biofilms that contribute to the recalcitrance of disease. We have developed a high-throughput screen for potentiators of clotrimazole, a common therapy for Candida infections, including vaginitis and thrush. The screen was performed against C. albicans biofilms grown in microtitre plates in order to target the most resilient forms of the pathogen. Methods Biofilm growth, in individual wells of 384-well plates, was measured using the metabolic indicator alamarBlue® and found to be very consistent and reproducible. This assay was used to test the effect of more than 120 000 small molecule compounds from the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository, and compounds that enhanced the activity of clotrimazole or acted on the biofilms alone were identified as hits. Results Nineteen compounds (0.016% hit rate) were identified and found to cause more than 30% metabolic inhibition of biofilms compared with clotrimazole alone, which had a modest effect on biofilm viability at the concentration tested. Hits were confirmed for activity against biofilms with dose–response measurements. Several compounds had increased activity in combination with clotrimazole, including a 1,3-benzothiazole scaffold that exhibited a >100-fold improvement against biofilms of three separate C. albicans isolates. Cytotoxicity experiments using human fibroblasts confirmed the presence of lead molecules with favourable antifungal activity relative to cytotoxicity. Conclusions We have validated a novel approach to identify antifungal potentiators and completed a high-throughput screen to identify small molecules with activity against C. albicans biofilms. These small molecules may specifically target the biofilm and make currently available antifungals more effective. PMID:21393183

  5. The potential of gene therapy approaches for the treatment of hemoglobinopathies: achievements and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael A.; Malik, Punam

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, including β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD), are a heterogeneous group of commonly inherited disorders affecting the function or levels of hemoglobin. Disease phenotype can be severe with substantial morbidity and mortality. Bone marrow transplantation is curative, but limited to those patients with an appropriately matched donor. Genetic therapy, which utilizes a patient’s own cells, is thus an attractive therapeutic option. Numerous therapies are currently in clinical trials or in development, including therapies utilizing gene replacement therapy using lentiviruses and the latest gene editing techniques. In addition, methods are being developed that may be able to expand gene therapies to those with poor access to medical care, potentially significantly decreasing the global burden of disease. PMID:27695619

  6. In utero stem cell transplantation and gene therapy: Recent progress and the potential for clinical application.

    PubMed

    McClain, Lauren E; Flake, Alan W

    2016-02-01

    Advances in prenatal diagnosis have led to the prenatal management and treatment of a variety of congenital diseases. Although surgical treatment has been successfully applied to specific anatomic defects that place the fetus at a risk of death or life-long disability, the indications for fetal surgical intervention have remained relatively limited. By contrast, prenatal stem cell and gene therapy await clinical application, but they have tremendous potential to treat a broad range of genetic disorders. If there are biological advantages unique to fetal development that favor fetal stem cell or gene therapy over postnatal treatment, prenatal therapy may become the preferred approach to the treatment of any disease that can be prenatally diagnosed and cured by stem cell or gene therapy. Here, we review the field including recent progress toward clinical application and imminent clinical trials for cellular and gene therapy.

  7. Potential Strategies to Address the Major Clinical Hurdles Facing Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Patricia K.; Neofytou, Evgenios; Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Importance While progress continues to be made in the field of stem cell regenerative medicine for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, significant barriers to clinical translation still exist that have thwarted the delivery of cell therapy to the bedside. Objective The purpose of this review is to summarize the major current hurdles for the clinical implementation of stem cell therapy and discuss potential strategies to overcome them. Evidence Review Information for this review was obtained through a search of PubMed and the Cochrane database for English language studies published between January 1, 2000 and June 15, 2016. Ten randomized clinical trials and eight systematic reviews were included in this review. Findings One of the major clinical hurdles facing the routine implementation of stem cell therapy is the limited and inconsistent benefit observed thus far. Reasons for this are unclear but may be due to poor cell retention and survival, as suggested by numerous preclinical studies and a handful of human studies incorporating cell fate imaging. Additional cell fate imaging studies in humans are needed to determine how these factors contribute to limited efficacy. Treatment strategies to address poor cell retention and survival are under investigation and include the following: 1) co-administering of immunosuppressive and pro-survival agents, 2) delivering cardioprotective factors packaged in exosomes rather than the cells themselves, and 3) using tissue engineering strategies to provide structural support for cells. If larger grafts are achieved using the aforementioned strategies, it will be imperative to carefully monitor the potential risks of tumorigenicity, immunogenicity, and arrhythmogenicity. Conclusions and Relevance Despite important achievements to date, stem cell therapy is not yet ready for routine clinical implementation. Significant research is still needed to address the clinical hurdles outlined herein before the next wave of large

  8. Cooperative Strategies for Enhancing Performance of Photothermal Therapy (PTT) Agent: Optimizing Its Photothermal Conversion and Cell Internalization Ability.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoji; Ma, Chongbo; Ding, Guanyu; Han, Xu; Li, Dan; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2017-01-23

    Photothermal conversion ability (PCA) and cell internalization ability (CIA) are two key factors for determining the performance of photothermal agents. The previous studies mostly focus on improving the PCA by exploring new photothermal nanomaterials. Herein, the authors take the hybrids of graphene and gold nanostar (GGN) as an example to investigate the gradually enhanced phototherapy effect by changing the PCA and CIA of photothermal therapy (PTT) agent simultaneously. Based on the GGN, the GGN and the reduced GGN protected by bovine serum albumin (BSA) or BSA-FA (folic acid) are prepared, which are named as GGNB, rGGNB, and rGGNB-FA, respectively. The rGGNB showed an enhanced PCA compared to GGNB, leading to strong cell ablation. On the other hand, the 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammoniumpropan (DOTAP) can activate the endocytosis and promote the CIA of rGGNB, further help rGGNB to be more internalized into the cells. Finally, rGGNB-FA with the target ability can make itself further internalized into the cells with the aid of DOTAP, which can significantly destroy the cancer cells even at the low laser density of 0.3 W cm(-2) . Therefore, a new angle of view is brought out for researching the PTT agents of high performance.

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia after myelodysplastic syndrome and failure of therapy with hypomethylating agents: an emerging entity with a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Ghanem, Hady; Huang, Xuelin; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stephan; Pierce, Sherry; Choi, Sangbum; Verstovsek, Srdan; Brandt, Mark; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the outcomes of 63 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) arising from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after hypomethylating agent failure. Their median age was 63 years. All 63 patients had received ≥ 1 salvage regimens for AML, and 35 patients (55%) had received ≥ 2. Of the 31 patients (49%) who had received high-dose cytarabine (HDAC) at first relapse, 2 (6%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (13%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 19%). Of the 32 patients (51%) who had received other treatments, including investigational agents, 4 (12%) achieved CR and 4 (12%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 24%). The median response duration was 20 weeks. With a median follow-up of 42 months from the AML diagnosis, the median survival (21 weeks) was similar between the 2 groups. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 19% and 8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified low albumin, HDAC treatment, and platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L as independent adverse factors for CR and a platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L and age > 65 years as independent adverse factors for survival. Thus, the outcome of AML evolving from MDS after hypomethylating agent failure is poor and not improved with HDAC. Novel therapies directed toward this emerging entity are urgently needed.

  10. G9a inhibition potentiates the anti-tumour activity of DNA double-strand break inducing agents by impairing DNA repair independent of p53 status.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Jackson, Stephen P

    2016-10-01

    Cancer cells often exhibit altered epigenetic signatures that can misregulate genes involved in processes such as transcription, proliferation, apoptosis and DNA repair. As regulation of chromatin structure is crucial for DNA repair processes, and both DNA repair and epigenetic controls are deregulated in many cancers, we speculated that simultaneously targeting both might provide new opportunities for cancer therapy. Here, we describe a focused screen that profiled small-molecule inhibitors targeting epigenetic regulators in combination with DNA double-strand break (DSB) inducing agents. We identify UNC0638, a catalytic inhibitor of histone lysine N-methyl-transferase G9a, as hypersensitising tumour cells to low doses of DSB-inducing agents without affecting the growth of the non-tumorigenic cells tested. Similar effects are also observed with another, structurally distinct, G9a inhibitor A-366. We also show that small-molecule inhibition of G9a or siRNA-mediated G9a depletion induces tumour cell death under low DNA damage conditions by impairing DSB repair in a p53 independent manner. Furthermore, we establish that G9a promotes DNA non-homologous end-joining in response to DSB-inducing genotoxic stress. This study thus highlights the potential for using G9a inhibitors as anti-cancer therapeutic agents in combination with DSB-inducing chemotherapeutic drugs such as etoposide.

  11. Microbiota abnormalities in inflammatory airway diseases - Potential for therapy.

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, Eva S; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly the development of novel therapeutic strategies is taking into consideration the contribution of the intestinal microbiota to health and disease. Dysbiosis of the microbial communities colonizing the human intestinal tract has been described for a variety of chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and asthma. In particular, reduction of several so-called probiotic species including Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria that are generally considered to be beneficial, as well as an outgrowth of potentially pathogenic bacteria is often reported. Thus a tempting therapeutic approach is to shape the constituents of the microbiota in an attempt to restore the microbial balance towards the growth of 'health-promoting' bacterial species. A twist to this scenario is the recent discovery that the respiratory tract also harbors a microbiota under steady-state conditions. Investigators have shown that the microbial composition of the airway flora is different between healthy lungs and those with chronic lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as cystic fibrosis. This is an emerging field, and thus far there is very limited data showing a direct contribution of the airway microbiota to the onset and progression of disease. However, should future studies provide such evidence, the airway microbiota might soon join the intestinal microbiota as a target for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we highlight the major advances that have been made describing the microbiota in chronic lung disease and discuss current and future approaches concerning manipulation of the microbiota for the treatment and prevention of disease.

  12. [Potential for use of hydroxypropyl guar in tear substitute therapy].

    PubMed

    Brzhesky, V V; Golubev, S Yu

    2017-01-01

    Of the large number of polymers used in artificial tear formulations, natural polysaccharides - hydroxypropyl guar, sodium hyaluronate, chondroitin sulfate, dextran, etc., are gaining more and more popularity. Hydroxypropyl guar stands out through its ability to form a long-lasting structured matrix adhered to the damaged ocular surface and ensuring good wettability of the latter and regeneration of epithelial cells. At that, the viscosity of hydroxypropyl guar increases with increasing tear pH (which, in turn, correlates with the severity of xerosis) and further prolongs the moisturizing effect. According to experimental studies, the in vitro protective activity of hydroxypropyl guar surpasses that of sodium hyaluronate, which is widely used. Thus, corneal epithelial cell cultures were more tolerant to drying and pericardial leaflets showed lower friction coefficient, if pretreated with hydroxypropyl guar and not hyaluronic acid. Subsequent clinical studies showed that Systane Ultra was more effective in patients with dry eye syndrome than a carboxymethylcellulose and glycerol-containing drug. It has been also proved that Systane Balance provides a greater increase in thickness of the tear film lipid layer and in overall stability of the tear film as compared to SootheXP, which has a similar lipid composition. The present review also covers potential utility of other artificial tear formulations that, besides the moisturizing effect, are able to reduce the tear film osmolarity, prevent further oxidative stress, and abate the inflammatory process.

  13. Response Surface Methodology: An Extensive Potential to Optimize in vivo Photodynamic Therapy Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tirand, Loraine; Bastogne, Thierry; Bechet, Denise M.Sc.; Linder, Michel; Thomas, Noemie; Frochot, Celine; Guillemin, Francois; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the interaction of a photosensitizing (PS) agent, light, and oxygen. Few new PS agents are being developed to the in vivo stage, partly because of the difficulty in finding the right treatment conditions. Response surface methodology, an empirical modeling approach based on data resulting from a set of designed experiments, was suggested as a rational solution with which to select in vivo PDT conditions by using a new peptide-conjugated PS targeting agent, neuropilin-1. Methods and Materials: A Doehlert experimental design was selected to model effects and interactions of the PS dose, fluence, and fluence rate on the growth of U87 human malignant glioma cell xenografts in nude mice, using a fixed drug-light interval. All experimental results were computed by Nemrod-W software and Matlab. Results: Intrinsic diameter growth rate, a tumor growth parameter independent of the initial volume of the tumor, was selected as the response variable and was compared to tumor growth delay and relative tumor volumes. With only 13 experimental conditions tested, an optimal PDT condition was selected (PS agent dose, 2.80 mg/kg; fluence, 120 J/cm{sup 2}; fluence rate, 85 mW/cm{sup 2}). Treatment of glioma-bearing mice with the peptide-conjugated PS agent, followed by the optimized PDT condition showed a statistically significant improvement in delaying tumor growth compared with animals who received the PDT with the nonconjugated PS agent. Conclusions: Response surface methodology appears to be a useful experimental approach for rapid testing of different treatment conditions and determination of optimal values of PDT factors for any PS agent.

  14. Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teitel, Jerome M.

    1984-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic diseases are among the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in Canada. Agents which interfere with the coagulation mechanism are highly effective in treating these disorders, but at the potentially high cost of serious hemorrhagic complications. The optimal prevention of both serious outcomes and complications of therapy can be achieved by prophylactic treatment of high risk patients. Heparin and vitamin K antagonists remain the mainstays of antithrombotic therapy. The pharmacology of these agents is reviewed, and a rational approach to their clinical use is presented. PMID:21279098

  15. Characterization of novel diaryl oxazole-based compounds as potential agents to treat pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Arthur Y; Henderson, Meredith C; Flynn, Gary; Samulitis, Betty; Han, Haiyong; Stratton, Steve P; Chow, H-H Sherry; Hurley, Laurence H; Dorr, Robert T

    2009-11-01

    A series of diaryl- and fluorenone-based analogs of the lead compound UA-62784 [4-(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)oxazol-2-yl)-9H-fluoren-9-one] was synthesized with the intention of improving upon the selective cytotoxicity of UA-62784 against human pancreatic cancer cell lines with a deletion of the tumor suppressor gene deleted in pancreas cancer locus 4 (DPC-4, SMAD-4). Over 80 analogs were synthesized and tested for antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer (PC) cell lines (the PC series). Despite a structural relationship to UA-62784, which inhibits the mitotic kinesin centromere protein E (CENP-E), none of the analogs was selective for DPC-4-deleted pancreatic cancer cell lines. Furthermore, none of the analogs was a potent or selective inhibitor of four different mitotic kinesins (mitotic kinesin-5, CENP-E, mitotic kinesin-like protein-1, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesin). Therefore, other potential mechanisms of action were evaluated. A diaryl oxazole lead analog from this series, PC-046 [5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-(3-(3-methoxyphenyl)pyridin-4-yl) oxazole], was shown to potently inhibit several protein kinases that are overexpressed in human pancreatic cancers, including tyrosine receptor kinase B, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4, and proto-oncogene Pim-1. Cells exposed to PC-046 exhibit a cell cycle block in the S-phase followed by apoptotic death and necrosis. PC-046 effectively reduced MiaPaca-2 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by 80% compared with untreated controls. The plasma half-life was 7.5 h, and cytotoxic drug concentrations of >3 muM were achieved in vivo in mice. The diaryl oxazole series of compounds represent a new chemical class of anticancer agents that inhibit several types of cancer-relevant protein kinases.

  16. Omega-3 fatty acid is a potential preventive agent for recurrent colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Anita; Yu, Yingjie; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Woods, James; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G.; Patel, Aamil; Dyson, Gregory; Levi, Edi; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Majumdar, Adhip P.N.; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contention that many malignancies, including sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC), are driven by the self-renewing, chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSCs/CSLCs) underscoring the need for improved preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs/CSLCs. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), have been reported to inhibit the growth of primary tumors, but their potential as a preventive agent for recurring cancers is un-explored. The primary objectives of this investigation are to examine whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; one of the ω-3 PUFA) synergizes with FuOx (5-FU+Oxaliplatin), the backbone of colon cancer chemotherapy, and (b) whether EPA by itself or in combination with conventional chemotherapy prevents the recurrence of colon cancer via eliminating/suppressing CSCs/CSLCs. FuOx-resistant (chemo-resistant; CR) colon cancer cells, highly enriched in CSCs, were utilized for this study. While EPA alone was effective, combination of EPA and FuOx was more potent in (a) inhibiting cell growth, colonosphere formation and sphere-forming frequency, (b) increasing sphere disintegration, (c) suppressing the growth of SCID mice xenografts of CR colon cancer cells, and (d) decreasing pro-inflammatory metabolites in mice. Additionally, EPA + FuOx caused a reduction in CSC/CSLC population. The growth reduction by this regimen is the result of increased apoptosis as evidenced by PARP cleavage. Furthermore, increased pPTEN, decreased pAkt, normalization of β-catenin expression, localization and transcriptional activity by EPA suggests a role for PTEN/Akt axis and Wnt signaling in regulating this process. Our data suggest that EPA by itself or in combination with FuOx could be an effective preventive strategy for recurring CRC. PMID:25193342

  17. Shikimate kinase: a potential target for development of novel antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José H; Vasconcelos, Igor B; Oliveira, Jaim S; Caceres, Rafael A; de Azevedo, Walter F; Basso, Luis A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2007-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of mortality due to a bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, no new classes of drugs for TB have been developed in the past 30 years. Therefore there is an urgent need to develop faster acting and effective new antitubercular agents, preferably belonging to new structural classes, to better combat TB, including MDR-TB, to shorten the duration of current treatment to improve patient compliance, and to provide effective treatment of latent tuberculosis infection. The enzymes in the shikimate pathway are potential targets for development of a new generation of antitubercular drugs. The shikimate pathway has been shown by disruption of aroK gene to be essential for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The shikimate kinase (SK) catalyses the phosphorylation of the 3-hydroxyl group of shikimic acid (shikimate) using ATP as a co-substrate. SK belongs to family of nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinases. The enzyme is an alpha/beta protein consisting of a central sheet of five parallel beta-strands flanked by alpha-helices. The shikimate kinases are composed of three domains: Core domain, Lid domain and Shikimate-binding domain. The Lid and Shikimate-binding domains are responsible for large conformational changes during catalysis. More recently, the precise interactions between SK and substrate have been elucidated, showing the binding of shikimate with three charged residues conserved among the SK sequences. The elucidation of interactions between MtSK and their substrates is crucial for the development of a new generation of drugs against tuberculosis through rational drug design.

  18. Novel Pharmacological Activity of Artesunate and Artemisinin: Their Potential as Anti-Tubercular Agents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major infectious disease that globally causes the highest human mortality. From this aspect, this study was carried out to evaluate novel pharmacological activities/effects of artesunate and artemisinin causing anti-tubercular activity/effects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The anti-Mtb activities/effects of artesunate and artemisinin were evaluated using different anti-Mtb indicator assays, such as the resazurin microtiter assay, the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 system assay, and the Ogawa slant medium assay, as well as in vivo tests. Artesunate showed selective anti-Mtb effects by strongly inhibiting the growth of Mtb compared to artemisinin, and consistently induced anti-Mtb activity/effects by effectively inhibiting Mtb in the MGIT 960 system and in Ogawa slant medium for 21 days with a single dose; its minimum inhibitory concentration was 300 µg/mL in in vitro testing. Furthermore, artesunate demonstrated an anti-tubercular effect/action with a daily dose of 3.5 mg/kg in an in vivo test for four weeks, which did not indicate or induce toxicity and side effects. These results demonstrate that artesunate effectively inhibits the growth and/or proliferation of Mtb through novel pharmacological activities/actions, as well as induces anti-Mtb activity. This study shows its potential as a potent candidate agent for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs of an effective/safe next generation, and suggests novel insights into its effective use by repurposing existing drugs through new pharmacological activity/effects as one of the substantive alternatives for inhibiting tuberculosis. PMID:28287416

  19. Chiral lactic hydrazone derivatives as potential bioactive antibacterial agents: Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and molecular docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noshiranzadeh, Nader; Heidari, Azam; Haghi, Fakhri; Bikas, Rahman; Lis, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    A series of novel chiral lactic-hydrazone derivatives were synthesized by condensation of (S)-lactic acid hydrazide with salicylaldehyde derivatives and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic studies (FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy). The structure of one compound was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. Antibacterial activity of the synthesized compounds was studied against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as bacterial cultures by broth microdilution method. All of the synthesized compounds showed good antibacterial activity with MIC range of 64-512 μg/mL. Compounds (S,E)-2-hydroxy-N-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzylidene)propanehydrazide (5) and (S,E)-2-hydroxy-N-((3-hydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methylpyridin-4-yl)propanehydrazide (7) were the most effective antibacterial derivatives against S. aureus and E. coli respectively with a MIC value of 64 μg/mL. Bacterial biofilm formation assay showed that these compounds significantly inhibited biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Also, in silico molecular docking studies were performed to show lipoteichoic acid synthase (LtaS) inhibitory effect of lactic hydrazone derivatives. The association between electronic and structural effects of some substituents on the benzylidene moiety and the biological activity of these chiral compounds were studied. Structural studies show that compound with higher hydrogen bonding interactions show higher antibacterial activity. The results show chiral hydrazone derivatives based on lactic acid hydrazide could be used as potential lead compounds for developing novel antibacterial agents.

  20. Omega-3 fatty acid is a potential preventive agent for recurrent colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anita; Yu, Yingjie; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Woods, James; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G; Patel, Aamil; Dyson, Gregory; Levi, Edi; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contention that many malignancies, including sporadic colorectal cancer, are driven by the self-renewing, chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSC/CSLC), underscoring the need for improved preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs/CSLCs. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), have been reported to inhibit the growth of primary tumors, but their potential as a preventive agent for recurring cancers is unexplored. The primary objectives of this investigation are (i) to examine whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; one of the ω-3 PUFA) synergizes with FuOx (5-FU+Oxaliplatin), the backbone of colon cancer chemotherapy, and (ii) whether EPA by itself or in combination with conventional chemotherapy prevents the recurrence of colon cancer via eliminating/suppressing CSCs/CSLCs. FuOx-resistant (chemoresistant; CR) colon cancer cells, highly enriched in CSCs, were used for this study. Although EPA alone was effective, combination of EPA and FuOx was more potent in (i) inhibiting cell growth, colonosphere formation, and sphere-forming frequency, (ii) increasing sphere disintegration, (iii) suppressing the growth of SCID mice xenografts of CR colon cancer cells, and (iv) decreasing proinflammatory metabolites in mice. In addition, EPA + FuOx caused a reduction in CSC/CSLC population. The growth reduction by this regimen is the result of increased apoptosis as evidenced by PARP cleavage. Furthermore, increased pPTEN, decreased pAkt, normalization of β-catenin expression, localization, and transcriptional activity by EPA suggests a role for the PTEN-Akt axis and Wnt signaling in regulating this process. Our data suggest that EPA by itself or in combination with FuOx could be an effective preventive strategy for recurring colorectal cancer.

  1. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT.

  2. Potential of Microbispora sp. V2 as biocontrol agent against Sclerotium rolfsii, the causative agent of southern blight of Zea mays L (Baby corn)--in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Patil, N N; Waghmode, M S; Gaikwad, P S; Gajbhiye, M H; Gunjal, A B; Nawani, N N; Kapadnis, B P

    2014-11-01

    The study was undertaken with the aim of exploring novel and beneficial agro activities of rare actinomycetes like Microbispora sp. V2. The antagonistic activity of Microbispora sp. V2 was evaluated as a biocontrol agents against Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne fungal plant pathogen. The methodology performed for evaluation of biocontrol agent was in vitro evaluation assay which comprised of three tests viz., cellophane overlay technique, seed germination test and Thiram (fungicide) tolerance of Microbispora sp. V2. The isolate was found to inhibit the fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii to 91.43% in cellophane assay. In seed germination assay, Microbispora sp. V2 treated seeds resulted in 25.75% increased germination efficiency, as compared to seeds infected by Sclerotium rolfsii. The isolate Microbispora sp. V2 could tolerate 1000 microg mL(-1) of Thiram (fungicide). The in vitro assay studies proved that Microbispora sp. V2 can be used as antifungal antagonist and thus posses' great potential as biocontrol agent against southern blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii in Zea mays L (Baby corn) which causes large economical losses.

  3. Potential biological control agents for management of cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica 15 (Cyperales: Poaceae)] in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.) Palisot de Beauvois (Cyperales: Poaceae), is a noxious invasive weed in the southeastern USA. Surveys for potential biological control agents of cogongrass were conducted in Asia and East Africa from 2013 to 2016. Several insect herbivores were found that may hav...

  4. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas graminis Strain UASWS1507, a Potential Biological Control Agent and Biofertilizer Isolated in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Chablais, Romain; Cochard, Bastien; Schulz, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    We report here the whole-genome shotgun sequence of the strain UASWS1507 of the species Pseudomonas graminis, isolated in Switzerland from an apple tree. This is the first genome registered for this species, which is considered as a potential and valuable resource of biological control agents and biofertilizers for agriculture. PMID:27795260

  5. Multifunctional Fe3O4-TiO2 nanocomposites for magnetic resonance imaging and potential photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Leyong; Ren, Wenzhi; Xiang, Lingchao; Zheng, Jianjun; Chen, Bin; Wu, Aiguo

    2013-03-07

    Multifunctional Fe(3)O(4)-TiO(2) nanocomposites with Janus structure for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and potential photodynamic therapy (PDT) were synthesized, in which Fe(3)O(4) was used as a MRI contrast agent and TiO(2) as an inorganic photosensitizer for PDT. Their morphology, structure, and MRI and PDT performance were characterized, respectively. Moreover, the location of Fe(3)O(4)-TiO(2) nanocomposites in MCF-7 cells was also investigated by the staining of Prussian blue and alizarin red, respectively. The results showed that the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)-TiO(2) nanocomposites had good T(2)-weighted MRI performance, and the MCF-7 cells incubated with nanocomposites could be killed under the irradiation of UV light. Compared with traditional organic photosensitizers, TiO(2) inorganic photosensitizers could have more stable PDT performance due to their nanoscale size and anti-photodegradable stability. Therefore, the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)-TiO(2) nanocomposites could have potential applications as a new kind of multifunctional agent for both MRI and PDT.

  6. Investigation of a potential macromolecular MRI contrast agent prepared from PPI (G = 2, polypropyleneimine, generation 2) dendrimer bifunctional chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxin Steven

    The long-term objective is to develop magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents that actively and passively target tumors for diagnosis and therapy. Many diagnostic imaging techniques for cancer lack specificity. A dendrimer based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent has been developed with large proton relaxation enhancements and high molecular relaxivities. A new type of linear dendrimer based MRI contrast agent that is built from the polypropyleneimine and polyamidoamine dendrimers in which free amines have been conjugated to the chelate DTPA, which further formed the complex with Gadolinium (Gd) was studied. The specific research goals were to test the hypothesis that a linear chelate with macromolecular agents can be used in vitro and in vivo. This work successfully examined the adequacy and viability of the application for this agent in vitro and in vivo. A small animal whole body counter was designed and constructed to allow us to monitor biodistribution and kinetic mechanisms using a radioisotope labeled complex. The procedures of metal labeling, separation and pu