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Sample records for potential tumor marker

  1. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  2. Analysis of laser-microdissected prostate cancer tissues reveals potential tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Lindstrot, Andreas; Buettner, Reinhard; Wernert, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is a clinically heterogeneous and often multifocal disease with a clinical outcome difficult to predict. A deeper knowledge of the molecular basis of the disease may lead to a better prediction of prognosis. Therefore, in this study we investigated the molecular basis of PCA by identifying potential tumor markers in laser-microdisected PCA tissues. Among a group of PCA patients, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed to compare the expression of 70 genes. These genes were selected from the results of two microarrays which investigated the gene expression profile differences between moderately or poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma glands and the corresponding normal glands. Among the genes examined, CDKN2A, GATA3, CREBBP, ITGA2, NBL1 and TGM4 were down-regulated in the prostate carcinoma glands compared to the corresponding normal glands, whereas TFF3, TMPRSS2 and ERG were up-regulated. Our findings indicate that these genes may play roles as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in PCA, and may serve as potential tumor markers and novel therapeutic targets.

  3. Differential protein mapping of ovarian serous adenocarcinomas: identification of potential markers for distinct tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Wu, Rong; Cho, Kathleen R; Thomas, Dafydd G; Gossner, Gabrielle; Liu, J Rebecca; Giordano, Thomas J; Shedden, Kerby A; Misek, David E; Lubman, David M

    2009-03-01

    Ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) comprise over half of all ovarian carcinomas and account for the majority of ovarian cancer-related deaths. We used a 2-dimensional liquid-based protein mapping strategy to characterize global protein expression patterns in 19 OSC tumor samples from 15 different patients to facilitate molecular classification of tumor stage. Protein expression profiles were produced, using pI-based separation in the first dimension and hydrophobicity-based separation in the second dimension, over a pH range of 4.0-7.0. Hierarchical clustering was applied to protein maps to indicate the tumor interrelationships. The 19 tumor samples could be classified into two different groups, one group associated with low stage (Stage 1) tumors and the other group associated with high stage (Stages 3/4) tumors. Proteins that were differentially expressed in different groups were selected for identification by LTQ-ESI-MS/MS. Fourteen of the selected proteins were overexpressed in the low stage tumors; 46 of the proteins were overexpressed in the high stage tumors. These proteins are known to play an important role in cellular functions such as glycolysis, protein biosynthesis, and cytoskeleton rearrangement and may serve as markers associated with different stages of OSCs. To further confirm the stage-dependent protein identifications, Lamin A/C and Vimentin expression in ovarian serous carcinomas was assessed by immunohistochemistry using ovarian tumor tissue microarrays for 66 samples.

  4. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c–d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors. PMID:26999178

  5. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers.

    PubMed

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-03-17

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c-d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors.

  6. CD146 is a novel marker for highly tumorigenic cells and a potential therapeutic target in malignant rhabdoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    Nodomi, S; Umeda, K; Saida, S; Kinehara, T; Hamabata, T; Daifu, T; Kato, I; Hiramatsu, H; Watanabe, K-i; Kuwahara, Y; Iehara, T; Adachi, S; Konishi, E; Nakahata, T; Hosoi, H; Heike, T

    2016-01-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a rare, highly aggressive pediatric malignancy that primarily develops during infancy and early childhood. Despite the existing standard of intensive multimodal therapy, the prognosis of patients with MRT is dismal; therefore, a greater understanding of the biology of this disease is required to establish novel therapies. In this study, we identified a highly tumorigenic sub-population in MRT, based on the expression of CD146 (also known as melanoma cell adhesion molecule), a cell adhesion molecule expressed by neural crest cells and various derivatives. CD146+ cells isolated from four MRT cell lines by cell sorting exhibited enhanced self-renewal and invasive potential in vitro. In a xenograft model using immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid IL-2Rγ-null mice, purified CD146+ cells obtained from MRT cell lines or a primary tumor exhibited the exclusive ability to form tumors in vivo. Blocking of CD146-related mechanisms, either by short hairpin RNA knockdown or treatment with a polyclonal antibody against CD146, effectively suppressed tumor growth of MRT cells both in vitro and in vivo via induction of apoptosis by inactivating Akt. Furthermore, CD146 positivity in immunohistological analysis of 11 MRT patient samples was associated with poor patient outcomes. These results suggest that CD146 defines a distinct sub-population in MRT with high tumorigenic capacity and that this marker represents a promising therapeutic target. PMID:27041577

  7. Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: B2M; B 2 M; β2-Microglobulin; Thymotaxin Formal name: Beta 2 ...

  8. Identification of serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prolactin as potential tumor markers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Who-Whong; Ang, Soo Fan; Kumar, Rajneesh; Heah, Charmain; Utama, Andi; Tania, Navessa Padma; Li, Huihua; Tan, Sze Huey; Poo, Desmond; Choo, Su Pin; Chow, Wan Cheng; Tan, Chee Kiat; Toh, Han Chong

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of hepatocellullar carcinoma (HCC) remains a challenge. The current practice of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) measurement is inadequate. Here we utilized a proteomic approach to identify novel serum biomarkers for distinguishing HCC patients from non-cancer controls. We profiled the serum proteins in a group of 58 resectable HCC patients and 11 non-HCC chronic hepatitis B (HBV) carrier samples from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) using the RayBio® L-Series 507 Antibody Array and found 113 serum markers that were significantly modulated between HCC and control groups. Selected potential biomarkers from this list were quantified using a multiplex sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) array in an expanded SGH cohort (126 resectable HCC patients and 115 non-HCC chronic HBV carriers (NC group)), confirming that serum prolactin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly upregulated in HCC patients. This finding of serum MCP-1 elevation in HCC patients was validated in a separate cohort of serum samples from the Mochtar Riady Institute for Nanotechnology, Indonesia (98 resectable HCC, 101 chronic hepatitis B patients and 100 asymptomatic HBV/HCV carriers) by sandwich ELISA. MCP-1 and prolactin levels were found to correlate with AFP, while MCP-1 also correlated with disease stage. Subsequent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of AFP, prolactin and MCP-1 in the SGH cohort and comparing their area under the ROC curve (AUC) indicated that neither prolactin nor MCP-1 on their own performed better than AFP. However, the combination of AFP+MCP-1 (AUC, 0.974) had significantly superior discriminative ability than AFP alone (AUC, 0.942; p<0.001). In conclusion, prolactin and MCP-1 are overexpressed in HCC and are conveniently quantifiable in patients' sera by ELISA. MCP-1 appears to be a promising complementary biomarker for HCC diagnosis and this MCP-1+AFP model should be further evaluated as potential

  9. Markers of bile duct tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Paladina, Isabella; Rando, Alessandra; Uccello, Mario; Basile, Francesco; Biondi, Antonio; Carnazzo, Santo; Alessandria, Innocenza; Mazzarino, Clorinda

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract carcinomas are relatively rare, representing less than 1% of cancers. However, their incidence has increased in Japan and in industrialized countries like the USA. Biliary tract tumors have a poor prognosis and a high mortality rate because they are usually detected late in the course of the disease; therapeutic treatment options are often limited and of minimal utility. Recent studies have shown the importance of serum and molecular markers in the diagnosis and follow up of biliary tract tumors. This review aims to introduce the main features of the most important serum and molecular markers of biliary tree tumors. Some considerable tumor markers are cancer antigen 125, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen, chromogranin A, mucin 1, mucin 5, alpha-fetoprotein, claudins and cytokeratins. PMID:21528090

  10. Association of FOXM1 expression with tumor histology and prognosis in Wilms tumor: Potential for a new prognostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Apelt, Nadja; Hubertus, Jochen; Mayr, Doris; Graf, Norbert; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Kappler, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common pediatric renal malignancy. A recent ontogenic model suggests that undifferentiated tumor state, and hence poor prognosis, in WT is determined by stabilization of β-catenin in the nucleus. Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) is a downstream component of the Wnt pathway and promotes nuclear localization of β-catenin. As elevation of FOXM1 gene expression is prognostic in various types of malignancy, we hypothesized that high FOXM1 expression in WT is associated with undifferentiated histology and thus poor prognosis. In the current study, the expression of FOXM1 mRNA was determined in 46 WT specimens and 11 renal tissue controls from patients undergoing tumor nephrectomy, and these data were assessed with regard to clinicopathological parameters. The results demonstrated an upregulation of FOXM1 in WT by 10-fold compared to normal tissue. Expression differed significantly between controls and tumors of intermediate- and high-risk histopathology (P<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis), and distinguished normal tissue from tumors of good and adverse clinical outcome (P<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis). Notably, FOXM1 expression was significantly lower (P=0.009) in patients that received preoperative doxorubicin. These results suggest that FOXM1 may serve as a companion diagnostic factor for doxorubicin-based therapies in WT.

  11. Soluble mesothelin-related peptides (SMRP) - high stability of a potential tumor marker for mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel G; Taeger, Dirk; Pesch, Beate; Kraus, Thomas; Brüning, Thomas; Johnen, Georg

    2007-01-01

    SMRP (soluble mesothelin-related peptides) is a promising marker for detection of malignant mesotheliomas (MM) in serum that has not yet been validated in appropriate epidemiological studies. Field studies might not always provide optimal conditions for storage and transport of samples, and follow-up studies have to rely on sample integrity. Proper validation of the marker would require sufficient stability of the antigen and robustness of the assay. SMRP concentrations were evaluated in serum samples of 98 healthy donors, using the MESOMARK ELISA kit. The SMRP distribution in the healthy study population was determined and biological and pre-analytical variations were examined regarding their influence on SMRP concentrations. For diagnostic decisions a best statistical and unbiased cut-off between 1.5 and 1.6 nmol/L was determined (95th percentile). No age- or gender-specific differences could be observed. SMRP exhibits excellent stability regarding short-term storage, long-term storage, and repeated freeze/thaw cycles. Scientific studies as well as real life applications that employ SMRP would not be limited by sample stability issues.

  12. [CA 125--a tumor marker?].

    PubMed

    Pabst, T; Ludwig, C

    1995-06-17

    Tumor markers are useful tools in monitoring malignancies postoperatively or under hormone-/chemotherapy. In contrast, they usually lack diagnostic relevance and uncritical use may result in confusing situations. We describe three cases of diagnostic determinations of the tumor marker CA 125 resulting in subsequent partially invasive procedures. Based on these three cases, serum CA 125 levels were examined in 49 patients with abdominal diseases. We found CA 125 to be less a tumor product than an unspecific expression of stimulated mesothelial cells of the peritoneum. CA 125 was a marker for ascites (16 of 16 patients) and an indicator of infra-diaphragmatic involvement in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (11 of 12 patients). Furthermore, 5 of 6 patients with inflammatory abdominal diseases showed elevated CA 125 levels, as did 13 of 15 patients with solid abdominal tumors of different histology (all non-ovarian cancer, no ascites). In conclusion, CA 125 remains a good marker for follow-up of ovarian cancer, but should not be used for diagnosis of abdominal processes.

  13. Tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YAN-JIE; JU, QIANG; LI, GUAN-CHENG

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. HCC affects approximately one million individuals annually worldwide, with the incidence equal to the mortality rate. In 2008, HCC was listed as the third most lethal cancer. Thus, early diagnosis is crucial for improving the survival rate for patients. α-fetoprotein (AFP) together with iconography and pathology detection are commonly used in the clinical early diagnosis of liver cancer. However, the specificity and sensitivity of AFP used in screening for liver cancer are not satisfactory. Athough the development of molecular biology has led to the identification of new tumor markers, including proteantigens, cytokines, enzymes and isoenzymes, as well as related genes that can be used in the treatment and prognosis of liver cancer, more tumor markers are required for effective early diagnosis of diseases and monitoring of the curative effect. PMID:24649215

  14. [Tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Ryosuke; Enooku, Kenichiro; Shiina, Shuichiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Three tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are available in Japan: alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II (PIVKA-II), and Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3). Although AFP has drawbacks in its specificity, it is widely utilized in treatment evaluation and prognosis prediction. PIVKA-II is a unique marker that does not correlate with AFP value and can predict microvascular invasion. AFP-L3 is a highly specific marker and strong predictor of poor prognosis. These three markers are indispensable in every aspect of clinical practice of hepatocellular carcinoma including surveillance, diagnosis, treatment evaluation, and prognosis prediction.

  15. Proteomics of Genetically Engineered Mouse Mammary Tumors Identifies Fatty Acid Metabolism Members as Potential Predictive Markers for Cisplatin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Warmoes, Marc; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Xu, Guotai; Sampadi, Bharath K.; Pham, Thang V.; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Boven, Epie; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to various signatures that predict the prognosis of breast cancer patients, markers that predict chemotherapy response are still elusive. To detect such predictive biomarkers, we investigated early changes in protein expression using two mouse models for distinct breast cancer subtypes who have a differential knock-out status for the breast cancer 1, early onset (Brca1) gene. The proteome of cisplatin-sensitive BRCA1-deficient mammary tumors was compared with that of cisplatin-resistant mammary tumors resembling pleomorphic invasive lobular carcinoma. The analyses were performed 24 h after administration of the maximum tolerable dose of cisplatin. At this time point, drug-sensitive BRCA1-deficient tumors showed DNA damage, but cells were largely viable. By applying paired statistics and quantitative filtering, we identified highly discriminatory markers for the sensitive and resistant model. Proteins up-regulated in the sensitive model are involved in centrosome organization, chromosome condensation, homology-directed DNA repair, and nucleotide metabolism. Major discriminatory markers that were up-regulated in the resistant model were predominantly involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty-acid synthase. Specific inhibition of fatty-acid synthase sensitized resistant cells to cisplatin. Our data suggest that exploring the functional link between the DNA damage response and cancer metabolism shortly after the initial treatment may be a useful strategy to predict the efficacy of cisplatin. PMID:23397111

  16. Tumor endothelial marker 1-specific DNA vaccination targets tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Facciponte, John G; Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Liping; Nair, Gautham; Sehgal, Sandy; Raj, Arjun; Matthaiou, Efthymia; Coukos, George; Facciabene, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1; also known as endosialin or CD248) is a protein found on tumor vasculature and in tumor stroma. Here, we tested whether TEM1 has potential as a therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy by immunizing immunocompetent mice with Tem1 cDNA fused to the minimal domain of the C fragment of tetanus toxoid (referred to herein as Tem1-TT vaccine). Tem1-TT vaccination elicited CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cell responses against immunodominant TEM1 protein sequences. Prophylactic immunization of animals with Tem1-TT prevented or delayed tumor formation in several murine tumor models. Therapeutic vaccination of tumor-bearing mice reduced tumor vascularity, increased infiltration of CD3+ T cells into the tumor, and controlled progression of established tumors. Tem1-TT vaccination also elicited CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses against murine tumor-specific antigens. Effective Tem1-TT vaccination did not affect angiogenesis-dependent physiological processes, including wound healing and reproduction. Based on these data and the widespread expression of TEM1 on the vasculature of different tumor types, we conclude that targeting TEM1 has therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy.

  17. [Circulating "tumor markers" in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Borlinghaus, P; Lamerz, R

    1991-09-01

    Tumor markers (TM) of the neoplastic cell can be divided into non-shedded substances and antigens shedded in blood, urine or other body fluids. For clinicians circulating TM are more important. All relevant circulating TM are not useful in screening of asymptomatic patients because of insufficient sensitivity and specificity. With caution they are useful in the observation of risk groups. Circulating TM have their main significance as additional parameters in monitoring symptomatic patients with malignancies. Several follow up determinations are more important than one single measurement. During follow up of tumor patients TM should not be checked automatically if there are no diagnostic or therapeutical consequences. The clinically most important circulating TM in non-hormone secreting tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are the oncofetal antigens CEA and AFP and antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies e. g. CA 19-9 and CA 72-4. AFP is the primary TM in hepatocellular carcinoma, often elevated in hepatoblastoma and always normal in cholangiocellular carcinoma. CEA is the TM of first choice in patients with colorectal carcinomas and liver metastasis. CA 19-9 is TM of first choice in pancreatic carcinoma and additionally of diagnostic value in cholangiocellular carcinoma and tumors of the bile ducts. In cancer of the stomach CA 19-9 and CEA are secondary TM in combination with CA 72-4 as primary TM. Care should be taken that slight and moderate elevations of TM can be observed in benign diseases of liver, pancreas and bowel.

  18. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  19. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  20. Preoperative Volume-Based PET Parameter, MTV2.5, as a Potential Surrogate Marker for Tumor Biology and Recurrence in Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the role of volume-based positron emission tomography parameters as potential surrogate markers for tumor recurrence in resected pancreatic cancer. Between January 2008 and October 2012, medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and completed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT as a part of preoperative staging work-up were retrospectively reviewed. Not only clinicopathologic variables but also positron emission tomography parameters such as SUVmax, MTV2.5 (metabolic tumor volume), and TLG (total lesion glycolysis) were obtained. Twenty-six patients were women and 31 were men with a mean age of 62.9 ± 9.1 years. All patients were preoperatively determined to resectable pancreatic cancer except 1 case with borderline resectability. R0 resection was achieved in all patients and 45 patients (78.9%) received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Median overall disease-free survival was 12.8 months with a median overall disease-specific survival of 25.1 months. SUVmax did not correlate with radiologic tumor size (P = 0.501); however, MTV2.5 (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.009) were significantly associated with radiologic tumor size. In addition, MTV2.5 (P < 0.001) and TLG (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with a tumor differentiation. There were no significant differences in TLG and SUVmax according to lymph node ratio; only MTV2.5 was related to lymph node ratio with marginal significance (P = 0.055). In multivariate analysis, lymph node ratio (Exp [β] = 2.425, P = 0.025) and MTV2.5 (Exp[β] = 2.273, P = 0.034) were identified as independent predictors of tumor recurrence following margin-negative resection. Even after tumor size-matched analysis, MTV2.5 was still identified as significant prognostic factor in resected pancreatic cancer (P < 0.05). However, preoperative

  1. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cancer procoagulant and its potential as a new tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Cross, B A

    1990-10-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a Mr 68,000 cysteine proteinase that initiates blood coagulation and is expressed by a variety of malignant cells but not by normally differentiated cells. Polyclonal immunoglobulin G and monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibodies were developed to purified CP and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to analyze the antigen in human serum samples. The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine whether or not the analysis of CP in the serum might be a useful tumor marker. Pure CP was added to normal serum to establish a quantitative standard curve; the correlation coefficient of seven standard curves was 0.99. The upper limit of the normal range was established with 46 normal sera (mean +/- 2 SD = 0.57 microgram/ml). A total of 128 blinded serum samples were analyzed: 54 were from cancer patients (29 with gastrointestinal cancer, 22 with lung cancer, and three with urogenital cancer); 20 were from benign disease patients; and 54 were from normal individuals. All of the 13 early stage cancers were greater than 0.57 microgram/ml (positive), 31 of 41 (76%) of the late stage cancers were positive; overall, 44 of the 54 cancers (81%) were positive. Forty-nine of 54 (91%) of the normal sera and 16 of 20 (80%) of the benign disease sera were negative. Overall, the assay had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 88%.

  2. [Tumor markers in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Hisanao

    2002-04-01

    There are two markers, pepsinogen isoenzymes and antibody against Helicobactor pyroli, for screening of high-risk group for gastric cancer. Most of markers are used in diagnosis, staging, monitoring and differentiating subgroups of gastric cancer. Markers in ascitic fluid are used for diagnosing peritoneal invasion of gastric cancer. PMID:11977555

  3. Methodological issues associated with tumor marker development. Biostatistical aspects.

    PubMed

    Faraggi; Kramar

    2000-09-01

    The search for markers as potential prognostic factors for different stages of disease is becoming a major task in clinical research. Enormous amounts of information on the effectiveness of tumor markers are being published, and many of these results are conflicting and thus adding confusion to the area. In this paper we discuss the problem of multiplicity that we believe is one of the major statistical reasons for the conflicting results. We further review the ROC curve and the area under it as a popular statistical tool for evaluating the ability of a marker to distinguish between two populations. Finally we provide an extension to the ROC analysis when several markers are available.

  4. [Tumor markers of urinary tract carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruhito

    2004-04-01

    The tumor markers for malignant tumors arisen from urinary system including prostate cancer were reviewed. As for renal cell carcinoma there was no good marker used in routine test level at present. In the diagnosis of urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma, mainly bladder cancer, 3 methods (urinary BTA, NMP22 and BFP) are used now in Japan. They all seem to be not fully sufficient in respect of the specificity. In foreign countries, new tests such as urinary telomerase and BLCA-4 are used and have been evaluated. On the diagnosis of prostate cancer, serum total PSA is well established and used. Various PSA relation markers have been advocated for the differentiation between benign prostate hypertrophy and carcinoma in so called "gray zone" level of total PSA. In methods based on the molecular forms of PSA, the ratio of free PSA to total PSA (f/T) is widely use, and proPSA is a test that is expected. Other approaches such as volume of index PSA, age specific PSA reference range and PSA velocity are also in practical application. Human glandular kallikrein 2, which belong to the human kallikrein family as well as PSA, is expected as a tumor specific marker.

  5. [Urinary tumor marker for urothelial cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, M; Iwasaki, A; Shiraiwa, H

    2001-11-01

    The urinary tumor markers BTA, BFP and NMP22 used for urothelial cancer in Japan are reviewed briefly. We also evaluate and compare the sensitivity and specificity of BTA, BFP and NMP22 with urine cytology in detecting bladder cancer in 24 of our patients. The results showed that the sensitivity with urine cytology, BTA, BFP and NMP22 was 37, 54, 66 and 62% respectively. The specificity of BTA, BFP and NMP22 with urine cytology was 100, 65, 60 and 70% respectively. The sensitivity with BTA, BFP and NMP22 for urothelial cancer was higher than that with urine cytology. However, all except for urine cytology showed high false positive rates (83-90%) for urinary tract infection. These markers may thus complement urine cytology, which has a low sensitivity for urothelial cancer. Quite possibly they could act as low-cost and useful tumor markers, which could in turn reduce the number of invasive cystoscopic examinations. However, considering their high false positive rates for benign disease such as urinary tract infection, we must acknowledge that an ideal urothelial tumor marker, which is simple, non-invasive, inexpensive and accurate with high sensitivity and specificity has yet to be developed.

  6. Useful Immunohistochemical Markers of Tumor Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Painter, J. T.; Clayton, N. P.; Herbert, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been somewhat underutilized in the practice of toxicological pathology but can be a valuable tool for the evaluation of rodent neoplasms, both in a diagnostic and an investigational role. Determining an exact tumor type using standard hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of formalin-fixed tissues can be challenging, especially with metastatic and/or poorly differentiated tumors. Successful IHC is dependent on many factors, including species and tissue type, type and duration of fixation, quality fresh or frozen sectioning, and antibody specificity. The initial approach of most tumor diagnosis IHC applications is distinguishing epithelial from mesenchymal differentiation using vimentin and cytokeratin markers, although false-negative and/or false-positive results may occur. Experimentally, IHC can be employed to investigate the earliest changes in transformed tissues, identifying cellular changes not normally visible with H&E. Individual markers for proliferation, apoptosis, and specific tumor proteins can be used to help distinguish hyperplasia from neoplasia and determine specific tumor origin/type. IHC provides a relatively rapid and simple method to better determine the origin of neoplastic tissue or investigate the behavior or progression of a given neoplasm. Several experimental and diagnostic examples will be presented to illustrate the utility of IHC as a supplement to standard staining techniques. PMID:20028992

  7. Potential prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic markers for human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chia-Siu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer (GC) and its consequent mortality rate severely threaten human health. GC is frequently not diagnosed until a relatively advanced stage. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment. Thus, early screening and diagnosis are critical for improving prognoses in patients with GC. Gastroscopy with biopsy is an appropriate method capable of aiding the diagnosis of specific early GC tumor types; however, the stress caused by this method together with it being excessively expensive makes it difficult to use it as a routine method for screening for GC on a population basis. The currently used tumor marker assays for detecting GC are simple and rapid, but their use is limited by their low sensitivity and specificity. In recent years, several markers have been identified and tested for their clinical relevance in the management of GC. Here, we review the serum-based tumor markers for GC and their clinical significance, focusing on discoveries from microarray/proteomics research. We also review tissue-based GC tumor markers and their clinical application, focusing on discoveries from immunohistochemical research. This review provides a brief description of various tumor markers for the purposes of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics, and we include markers already in clinical practice and various forthcoming biomarkers. PMID:25320517

  8. [Ovarian tumor markers of presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Lahlou, N; Brun, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Cancer Antigen 125 (CA125) and Human Epididymis Protein 4 (HE4) are the most studied ovarian tumor markers. Their diagnostic performance for identification of ovarian cancer are superior to CA19-9, CA72-4, and carcinoembryonic antigen, which are no more recommended for the diagnosis of presumed benign ovarian tumor. HE4 (>140 pmol/L) is superior to CA125 (>30 U/mL) in terms of specificity and positive likelihood ratio. CA125 and HE4 can be combined into an algorithm ROMA, or associated to clinical information (composite index), biological data (OVA1) or imaging (Risk for Malignancy Index (RMI), LR2). ROMA algorithm is an exponential equation combining plasmatic concentrations of HE4 and CA125. ROMA is more sensitive and less specific than HE4 in predicting epithelial ovarian cancer. ROMA is more accurate in post-menopausal women. The performance of ROMA is lower than the ultrasound model LR2 in differentiating malignant from benign ovarian tumors, whatever the hormonal status. The composite index combining CA125 with a symptoms index (pain, abdominal distension, bloating, difficulty eating) has a good sensitivity in a screening program, but because of a 12% false positive rate, ultrasound is required before management. The RMI algorithm is based on serum CA125, ultrasound findings (septation, solid zones, metastases, ascite, bilaterality) and menopausal status. RMI is less sensitive, but more specific than ROMA or OVA1 for the classification of ovarian masses. The addition of HE4 to RMI seems to be the most accurate. The subjective evaluation of ovarian cysts by sonography and color Doppler is better than ROMA and RMI algorithms, and not affected by the hormonal status.

  9. Prognostic value of immunohistochemical markers in malignant thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leisibach, Priska; Schneiter, Didier; Soltermann, Alex; Yamada, Yoshi; Weder, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Background Thymic epithelial tumors (TET) are rare neoplasms with inconsistent treatment strategies. When researching for molecular pathways to find new therapies, the correlation between specific molecular markers and outcome has only rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between survival, metastatic potential and invasiveness of aggressive subtypes of TET and immunohistochemical markers. Methods Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), progression-free survival (PFS) and metastasis-free survival (MFS) of patients with WHO type B2/B3 mixed type thymoma (MT), thymoma type B3 (B3) and thymic carcinoma (TC), undergoing surgery [1998–2013] were determined. Tumor specimens were stained using a tissue microarray (TMA) (CD117, CD5, p63, p40, p21, p27, p53, Bcl-2, Ki67, podoplanin, synaptophysin, PTEN and Pax8). Invasive behavior of primary tumors and the presence of extrathoracic metastases were assessed. Results We found in 23 patients included into this study (four MT, ten B3, nine TC) that (I) p21 expression in the cytoplasm significantly correlated with a decrease of OS (P=0.016), PFS (P=0.034) and MFS (P=0.005); (II) MFS was significantly shorter when the combination of p21-low p27-low p53-high was present (P=0.029); and (III) nuclear p27 (P=0.042), Ki-67 (P=0.024) and podoplanin (P=0.05) expression correlated with the presence of extrathoracic metastases. Conclusions The main finding of this study is that cytoplasmic p21 expression negatively influences the outcome of malignant TETs and correlates with metastatic activity. Additionally, selected immunohistochemical markers correlate with the distant metastatic potential of TETs. These results may contribute to the stratification of diagnosis and improvement of treatment strategies for thymic malignancies. PMID:27747012

  10. Potential role of nuclear PD-L1 expression in cell-surface vimentin positive circulating tumor cells as a prognostic marker in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Batth, Izhar Singh; Brownlee, Zachary; Rojas, Christina; Meng, Qing H.; Kopetz, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, determining their prognostic role in cancer patients undergoing treatment is a challenge. We evaluated the prognostic value of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in CTCs in colorectal and prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 30 metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTCs were isolated from the samples using magnetic separation with the cell-surface vimentin(CSV)-specific 84-1 monoclonal antibody that detects epithelial-mesenchymal transitioned (EMT) CTCs. CTCs were enumerated and analyzed for PD-L1 expression using confocal microscopy. PD-L1 expression was detectable in CTCs and was localized in the membrane and/or cytoplasm and nucleus. CTC detection alone was not associated with poor progression-free or overall survival in colorectal cancer or prostate cancer patients, but nuclear PD-L1 (nPD-L1) expression in these patients was significantly associated with short survival durations. These results demonstrated that nPD-L1 has potential as a clinically relevant prognostic biomarker for colorectal and prostate cancer. Our data thus suggested that use of CTC-based models of cancer for risk assessment can improve the standard cancer staging criteria and supported the incorporation of nPD-L1 expression detection in CTCs detection in such models. PMID:27363678

  11. Potential Markers in Cardiac Hypertrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Fulgheri, Gabriele; Wicinski, Michal; Grzesk, Elzbieta; Odrowaz-Sypniewska, Grazyna; Grześk, Grzegorz; Darwish, Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed based on medical history of patient (symptoms and family history), physical examination, results of echocardiogram and in some situations additionally ECG or chest-X-ray results. Currently used non-invasive diagnostic methods, could be complemented by biochemical tests. In this review some emerging potential biomarkers such as: osteopontin, ST-2 receptor, osteoprotegerin, neopterin, urocortins, growth differentiation factor 15 and urotensin II are described. In current article human and non human investigations have been reviewed, since rat is most commonly used model in experimental cardiology and gives important foundations to clinical knowledge.

  12. Tumor track seeding: A new complication of fiducial marker insertion

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Zeal; Retrouvey, Michele; Vingan, Harlan; Williams, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death. Candidates for tumor ablation using CyberKnife® require fiducial placement in or near the target tumor to achieve precision. Placing these reference points may lead to complications including pneumothorax and/or hemorrhage. We report a new complication: the appearance of metastatic foci along the track of the fiducial marker. Since the marker was inserted by traversing the original primary tumor, we hypothesize that malignant cells were seeded along the track. In light of this new complication, current techniques for the insertion of fiducial markers should consider a peripheral approach when possible to avoid tracking of malignant cells. PMID:27186243

  13. Standardization of tumor markers - priorities identified through external quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Tumor markers are often heterogeneous substances that may be present in elevated concentrations in the serum of cancer patients. Typically measured by immunoassay, they contribute to clinical management, particularly in screening, case-finding, prognostic assessment, and post-treatment monitoring. Data both from external quality assessment (EQA) schemes and clinical studies demonstrate significant variation in tumor marker results obtained for the same specimen using different methods. Between-method between-laboratory coefficients of variation (CV) reported by EQA schemes generally reflect the complexity of the measurand, ranging from <5% for the structurally relatively simple α-fetoprotein (AFP) to >25% for the complex mucinous cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). Improving the standardization of tumor marker measurements is particularly important for three reasons. The primary use of tumor markers is in monitoring cancer patients over long periods of time. Clinical interpretation of trends may consequently be affected if results are obtained in different laboratories using different methods or if a laboratory has to change method. Differences in results may have major implications for adoption of area-wide decision cut-offs and make implementation of these difficult. Method-related differences also make it difficult to compare clinical studies. Improving comparability of tumor marker results requires broad international agreement about which molecular forms of the measurand have clinical utility, identifying and adopting pure molecular forms as calibrants, and defining antibody specificities for their optimal detection. These aims have been achieved to varying extents for the most frequently measured serum tumor markers as described in this paper. PMID:27542005

  14. Standardization of tumor markers - priorities identified through external quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Tumor markers are often heterogeneous substances that may be present in elevated concentrations in the serum of cancer patients. Typically measured by immunoassay, they contribute to clinical management, particularly in screening, case-finding, prognostic assessment, and post-treatment monitoring. Data both from external quality assessment (EQA) schemes and clinical studies demonstrate significant variation in tumor marker results obtained for the same specimen using different methods. Between-method between-laboratory coefficients of variation (CV) reported by EQA schemes generally reflect the complexity of the measurand, ranging from <5% for the structurally relatively simple α-fetoprotein (AFP) to >25% for the complex mucinous cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). Improving the standardization of tumor marker measurements is particularly important for three reasons. The primary use of tumor markers is in monitoring cancer patients over long periods of time. Clinical interpretation of trends may consequently be affected if results are obtained in different laboratories using different methods or if a laboratory has to change method. Differences in results may have major implications for adoption of area-wide decision cut-offs and make implementation of these difficult. Method-related differences also make it difficult to compare clinical studies. Improving comparability of tumor marker results requires broad international agreement about which molecular forms of the measurand have clinical utility, identifying and adopting pure molecular forms as calibrants, and defining antibody specificities for their optimal detection. These aims have been achieved to varying extents for the most frequently measured serum tumor markers as described in this paper.

  15. Tumor Marker Usage and Medical Care Costs Among Older Early-Stage Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Henry, N. Lynn; Gralow, Julie R.; Mirick, Dana K.; Barlow, William; Etzioni, Ruth; Mummy, David; Thariani, Rahber; Veenstra, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines discourage the use of tumor marker assessment for routine surveillance in nonmetastatic breast cancer, their use in practice is uncertain. Our objective was to determine use of tumor marker tests such as carcinoembryonic antigen and CA 15-3/CA 27.29 and associated Medicare costs in early-stage breast cancer survivors. Methods By using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare records for patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer between 2001 and 2007, tumor marker usage within 2 years after diagnosis was identified by billing codes. Logistic regression models were used to identify clinical and demographic factors associated with use of tumor markers. To determine impact on costs of care, we used multivariable regression, controlling for other factors known to influence total medical costs. Results We identified 39,650 eligible patients. Of these, 16,653 (42%) received at least one tumor marker assessment, averaging 5.7 tests over 2 years, with rates of use per person increasing over time. Factors significantly associated with use included age at diagnosis, diagnosis year, stage at diagnosis, race/ethnicity, geographic region, and urban/rural status. Rates of advanced imaging, but not biopsies, were significantly higher in the assessment group. Medical costs for patients who received at least one test were approximately 29% greater than costs for those who did not, adjusting for other factors. Conclusion Breast cancer tumor markers are frequently used among women with early-stage disease and are associated with an increase in both diagnostic procedures and total cost of care. A better understanding of factors driving the use of and the potential benefits and harms of surveillance-based tumor marker testing is needed. PMID:25332254

  16. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue. PMID:27526128

  17. Ovarian cancer and tumor markers: sialic acid, galactosyltransferase and CA-125.

    PubMed

    Goldhirsch, A; Berger, E; Müller, O; Maibach, R; Misteli, S; Buser, K; Roesler, H; Brunner, K

    1988-01-01

    In an effort to correlate the serum values of potential markers, including CA-125, galactosyltransferase, and total sialic acid, with residual tumor mass after initial surgery, 43 patients with FIGO stage IIb and c, III and IV ovarian cancer were studied. The sensitivity of galactosyltransferase and sialic acid levels was sufficient to correlate their serum values with the corresponding residual tumor mass. Furthermore, 28 patients were histopathologically evaluated for their response to chemotherapy. Determination of these tumor markers did not permit discrimination between small residual disease (less than or equal to 1 cm) and a state of 'no evidence of disease'. Conversely, progression of disease has been associated with a sensitive increase in the level of all three markers. CA-125 has been found to be the most useful of the three for distinguishing between responders and nonresponders.

  18. Tumor M2 pyruvate kinase: a tumor marker and its clinical application in gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Philip D; Ewald, Nils

    2008-09-01

    Proliferating cells, in particular tumor cells, express a dimeric isoenzyme of pyruvate kinase, termed Tumor M2 pyruvate kinase. In the last few years, much attention has been paid to this novel tumor marker that can be determined in EDTA-plasma and in the feces. It has been used in diagnosis and surveillance of a variety of malignant diseases. As compared with the established tumor markers, Tumor M2-PK in EDTA-plasma proves to have at least equal sensitivity in pancreatic, gastric, esophageal, colorectal and cholangiocellular cancer. In combination with established tumor markers, EDTA-plasma M2-PK is a useful tool in diagnosis and surveillance of gastrointestinal tumors. In colorectal cancer, M2-PK in EDTA-plasma even proves superiority as compared with CEA. Fecal Tumor M2-PK testing resembles a good noninvasive screening parameter for colorectal cancer with a reported sensitivity of 68.8-91.0% and a specificity of 71.9-100%. It is superior to fecal occult blood testing in colorectal cancer screening. Since it is effective, easy to handle and bears rather low costs, fecal Tumor M2-PK testing is recommended for large-scale CRC screening.

  19. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity. PMID:24591761

  20. Tumor markers used in monitoring the tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    BURZ, CLAUDIA; AZIZ, BEN YOUSSEF MOHAMED; BĂLĂCESCU, LOREDANA; LELUŢIU, LUMINIŢA; BUIGA, RAREŞ; SAMASCA, GABRIEL; IRIMIE, ALEXANDRU; LISENCU, COSMIN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to investigate the value of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) correlated with some tissue molecules as predictive markers for recurrence in colon cancer. Methods A total of 30 patients diagnosed with colon cancer stage II or III who underwent optimal surgery were enrolled in study. Tumor markers CEA and CA 19-9 were determined before surgery. Tumor samples were prepared using tissue microarray kit (TMA) then stained for different cellular markers (Ki 67, HER2, BCL2, CD56, CD4, CD8) and analyzed using Inforatio programme for quantitative determination. All patients received standard adjuvant treatment, which consisted of eight cycles chemotherapy type XELOX. The patients were followed up for 3 years. Results Upon 3 years follow-up, 67% of patients developed tumor relapse, the most common site of metastasis being the liver. No correlations were observed between either serum or tissue tumor markers and the risk of tumor relapse. Conclusion Over 50% of patients with colon cancer who had optimal treatment developed metastasis. No statistically significant predictive value for investigated molecules was found. Future studies are needed to confirm the use of molecular markers in monitoring patients with colorectal cancer PMID:27547057

  1. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26475217

  2. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of endothelial cell markers in solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Namie; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Naito, Zenya; Maeda, Shotaro; Sugisaki, Yuichi; Asano, Goro

    2002-12-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is an uncommon tumor first reported in the pleura, but recently described in other tissues. CD34, which is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and vascular endothelial cells, is observed in most SFT and some investigators believe that its expression is a definitive marker of this tumor. In the present study, the expression of vascular endothelial cell markers, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1 (flt-1), VEGFR-2 (flk-1/KDR), Tie-2 and c-Met, was examined in SFT to clarify the relationship between SFT and endothelial cells. By immunohistochemical staining of tumor cells from 26 patients, VEGFR-1 was detected in 24 (92%), VEGFR-2 in five (19%), Tie-2 in 14 (54%), and c-Met, a specific receptor of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in 23 patients (88%). Furthermore, VEGFR-3 (flt-4) immunoreactivity was detected in eight of 26 patients (31%). In contrast, VEGF, VEGF-C and HGF, which are ligands for the receptors, were not localized in the SFT cells. These findings indicate that most SFT may closely relate to vascular or lymphatic endothelial cells and the endothelial growth factors may contribute to the growth of SFT in a paracrine manner.

  4. Tumor Vascular Permeability to a Nanoprobe Correlates to Tumor-Specific Expression Levels of Angiogenic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Chan, Leslie; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; McNeeley, Kathleen; D'Orsi, Carl J.; Annapragada, Ananth V.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 is the major mediator of the mitogenic, angiogenic, and vascular hyperpermeability effects of VEGF on breast tumors. Overexpression of VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 is associated with the degree of pathomorphosis of the tumor tissue and unfavorable prognosis. In this study, we demonstrate that non-invasive quantification of the degree of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe correlates with the VEGF and its receptor levels and tumor growth. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed an imaging nanoprobe and a methodology to detect the intratumoral deposition of a 100 nm-scale nanoprobe using mammography allowing measurement of the tumor vascular permeability in a rat MAT B III breast tumor model. The tumor vascular permeability varied widely among the animals. Notably, the VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 gene expression of the tumors as measured by qRT-PCR displayed a strong correlation to the imaging-based measurements of vascular permeability to the 100 nm-scale nanoprobe. This is in good agreement with the fact that tumors with high angiogenic activity are expected to have more permeable blood vessels resulting in high intratumoral deposition of a nanoscale agent. In addition, we show that higher intratumoral deposition of the nanoprobe as imaged with mammography correlated to a faster tumor growth rate. This data suggest that vascular permeability scales to the tumor growth and that tumor vascular permeability can be a measure of underlying VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 expression in individual tumors. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that quantitative imaging of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe represents a form of a surrogate, functional biomarker of underlying molecular markers of angiogenesis. PMID:19513111

  5. The correlation between internal and external markers for abdominal tumors: Implications for respiratory gating

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, David P. . E-mail: dgierga@partners.org; Brewer, Johanna; Sharp, Gregory C.; Betke, Margrit; Willett, Christopher G.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: The correlation of the respiratory motion of external patient markers and abdominal tumors was examined. Data of this type are important for image-guided therapy techniques, such as respiratory gating, that monitor the movement of external fiducials. Methods and Materials: Fluoroscopy sessions for 4 patients with internal, radiopaque tumor fiducial clips were analyzed by computer vision techniques. The motion of the internal clips and the external markers placed on the patient's abdominal skin surface were quantified and correlated. Results: In general, the motion of the tumor and external markers were well correlated. The maximum amount of peak-to-peak craniocaudal tumor motion was 2.5 cm. The ratio of tumor motion to external-marker motion ranged from 0.85 to 7.1. The variation in tumor position for a given external-marker position ranged from 2 to 9 mm. The period of the breathing cycle ranged from 2.7 to 4.5 seconds, and the frequency patterns for both the tumor and the external markers were similar. Conclusions: Although tumor motion generally correlated well with external fiducial marker motion, relatively large underlying tumor motion can occur compared with external-marker motion and variations in the tumor position for a given marker position. Treatment margins should be determined on the basis of a detailed understanding of tumor motion, as opposed to relying only on external-marker information.

  6. Ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (borderline tumors): immune morphology and current status.

    PubMed

    Neunteufel, W; Gitsch, G; Schieder, K; Kölbl, H; Breitenecker, G

    1989-01-01

    CA 125, CA 19-9 and CEA were demonstrated in tissue samples of 30 ovarian borderline tumors by immunohistochemistry. Of the 21 serous and 9 mucinous borderline tumors, 23 were in stage I and 7 stage III. None of the patients died of disease. All mucinous borderline tumors were CA 125 negative, 89% CA 19-9 positive and 44% CEA positive. 62% of the serous borderline tumors were CA 125 positive, 52% CA 19-9 and 19% CEA positive. Tumors of low malignant potential responded to CA 19-9 like invasive carcinomas. The incidence of positive responses to CA 125 ands CEA fell between that of benign and malignant tumors. The marker pattern did not correlate with tumor stage and cytological grading. The biological behavior of ovarian borderline tumors ranges between that of benign tumors and invasive carcinomas and cannot be classified as definitely belonging to either group. It is plausible that they are primarily of the borderline type, and not benign tumors that undergo malignant degeneration.

  7. A new tumor marker: CA125 for ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Ohta, H.; Torizuka, K.; Konishi, I.; Fujii, S.; Mori, T.

    1985-05-01

    To evaluate CA125 as a tumor marker for ovarian carcinomas, CA125 concentrations were measured by the simultaneous immunoradiometric assay. The binding of I-125 labeled monoclonal antibody to the bead-bound antigen was greatly influenced by many factors, such as the incubation time, pH, IgG concentrations of samples, the sequence of addition of the tracer and samples and so on. By applying the forward two-step assay, diminished binding was observed than in the simultaneous assay, probably due to the relatively low affinity of the antibody. This simultaneous immunoradiometric assay resulted in the ''prozone'' or ''hook'' effect at high CA125 samples and proper dilution was necessary to determine the accurate CA125 values. All 72 normal control subjects had low concentrations of under 35 U/ml. Elevated serum CA125 was observed in 43% (9/21) cases with malignant ovarian tumors, depending on the stage and the histopathological findings. All 4 serous cystadenocarcinomas and 2 of 3 endometrioid carcinomas were positive and the measurement of serum CA125 was useful in the sequential monitoring of these cases. In contrast, 51 benign gynecological diseases, none had elevated serum CA125 except one with follicular cyst. Among 75 cases with non-gynecological benign and malignant diseases, only 1 of 12 gastric carcinomas and 2 of 13 pancreatic carcinomas had elevated CA125 levels. In summary, CA125 is a promising and relatively specific marker for ovarian carcinomas.

  8. Detection of tumor markers with ProteinChip technology.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Andreas

    2004-02-01

    The early diagnosis of cancer at a curable stage is crucial for the successful treatment of this disease. Most of the currently used tumor assays appear too late and rely on single biomarkers with high false-negative and/or false-positive rates. As an additional burden for the patient, the traditional assays often require biopsy material instead of less invasively taken samples like serum. With the hope for more reliable DNA- and RNA-based screening tools, the research activities of the past 20 years have focused on the genomic characteristics of cancer cells. But, up to now, the output from this strategy has been disappointingly low and the disillusionment is paired with a return to proteins as the real key players in all physiological and pathological processes. Meanwhile, comparative protein profiling is generally acknowledged as a promising way for the detection of specific and predictive protein patterns reflecting certain stages of cancer without dependency on single markers. To meet the new technological demands, the ProteinChip Biomarker System was developed for the Expression Difference Mapping analysis of several hundreds of samples per day on a single, uncomplicated platform; with software support for the construction of multi-marker predictive models. The Interaction Discovery Mapping platform is introduced as the next methodical step for investigations about protein binding partners of possible importance in diagnosis and therapy. This review summarizes the current state in cancer diagnosis, provides an introduction into the ProteinChip technology, and gives an update on publications and research collaborations in SELDI-based tumor marker discovery.

  9. Paraganglioma: a potentially challenging tumor.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Mark; Silverman, Jan; Colonias, Athanasios; Lee, Vincent; Mohanty, Alok; Parda, David

    2008-03-01

    Paragangliomas are usually low-grade neoplasms with a benign natural history. While the treatment of paraganglioma has historically been controversial, surgery and radiotherapy have become standardized as therapies of choice for primary therapy. More recently, stereotactic radiosurgery has been used effectively against this rare tumor. The development of metastatic disease in patients with paraganglioma is an unusual and challenging event. This case report and review describes the specific features of this disease and the multiple therapeutic options.

  10. Mena, a new available marker in tumors of salivary glands?

    PubMed

    Gurzu, S; Krause, M; Ember, I; Azamfirei, L; Gobel, G; Feher, K; Jung, I

    2012-01-01

    Mena (mammalian Ena) is an actin regulatory protein involved in cell motility and adhesion. Based on its potential role in malignant transformation revealed in other organs, we analyzed the Mena expression in normal salivary glands (SG) and salivary tumors. Mena expression was determined in normal SG (n=10) and also benign (n=20) and malignant (n=35) lesions of SG. For the immunohistochemical staining we used the anti-Mena antibody. All normal SG and the benign lesions (10 pleomorphic adenomas, 10 Warthin's tumors) were Mena negative. Salivary duct carcinomas (n=5), carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma (n=5), acinic cell carcinomas (n=5), squamous cell carcinomas (n=10) and high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=2) were positive. The lymphomas (n=5) and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=1) were Mena negative. In one case the lymphoblastic cells stained positive for Mena. Some of the endothelial cells, in the peritumoral vessels, were Mena positive. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in the literature about Mena expression in salivary tumors. Our study suggests that Mena protein seems to play a role in malignant transformation and its intensity is correlated with the type and grade of tumor and also with vascular invasion. Its positivity in endothelial cells may suggest its potential role in tumor angiogenesis.

  11. Surgical site markers: potential source of infection.

    PubMed

    Driessche, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Observing licensed independent practitioners mark surgical sites with all types of marking pens is a concern related to the potential spread of infections from patient to patient. The practice of using the same marking pen to mark a surgical site has been questioned as a source of cross contamination. A literature review was done on recent studies and best practice recommendations to determine whether marking pens can act as fomites for nosocomial infections. The review indicated that surgical site markers, ink pens, and aging permanent marking pens can be a source for cross-infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, other bacteria, fungus, or virus. The type of marking pens used and the act of using the same marking pen from patient to patient could contribute to nosocomial infections. The literature reviewed recommends a single time use of a surgical marking pen. Interventions to prevent cross contamination and postoperative surgical site infections are a major concern in the care of the orthopaedic patient. PMID:23168939

  12. Surgical site markers: potential source of infection.

    PubMed

    Driessche, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Observing licensed independent practitioners mark surgical sites with all types of marking pens is a concern related to the potential spread of infections from patient to patient. The practice of using the same marking pen to mark a surgical site has been questioned as a source of cross contamination. A literature review was done on recent studies and best practice recommendations to determine whether marking pens can act as fomites for nosocomial infections. The review indicated that surgical site markers, ink pens, and aging permanent marking pens can be a source for cross-infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, other bacteria, fungus, or virus. The type of marking pens used and the act of using the same marking pen from patient to patient could contribute to nosocomial infections. The literature reviewed recommends a single time use of a surgical marking pen. Interventions to prevent cross contamination and postoperative surgical site infections are a major concern in the care of the orthopaedic patient.

  13. CRX Is a Diagnostic Marker of Retinal and Pineal Lineage Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Maire, Cecile L.; Idbaih, Ahmed; Geffers, Lars; Correll, Mick; Holton, Kristina; Quackenbush, John; Ligon, Keith L.

    2009-01-01

    Background CRX is a homeobox transcription factor whose expression and function is critical to maintain retinal and pineal lineage cells and their progenitors. To determine the biologic and diagnostic potential of CRX in human tumors of the retina and pineal, we examined its expression in multiple settings. Methodology/Principal Findings Using situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we show that Crx RNA and protein expression are exquisitely lineage restricted to retinal and pineal cells during normal mouse and human development. Gene expression profiling analysis of a wide range of human cancers and cancer cell lines also supports that CRX RNA is highly lineage restricted in cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of 22 retinoblastomas and 13 pineal parenchymal tumors demonstrated strong expression of CRX in over 95% of these tumors. Importantly, CRX was not detected in the majority of tumors considered in the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumors (n = 78). The notable exception was medulloblastoma, 40% of which exhibited CRX expression in a heterogeneous pattern readily distinguished from that seen in retino-pineal tumors. Conclusions/Significance These findings describe new potential roles for CRX in human cancers and highlight the general utility of lineage restricted transcription factors in cancer biology. They also identify CRX as a sensitive and specific clinical marker and a potential lineage dependent therapeutic target in retinoblastoma and pineoblastoma. PMID:19936203

  14. A discrimination index for selecting markers of tumor growth dynamic across multiple cancer studies with a cure fraction.

    PubMed

    Rouam, Sigrid; Broët, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    To identify genomic markers with consistent effect on tumor dynamics across multiple cancer series, discrimination indices based on proportional hazards models can be used since they do not depend heavily on the sample size. However, the underlying assumption of proportionality of the hazards does not always hold, especially when the studied population is a mixture of cured and uncured patients, like in early-stage cancers. We propose a novel index that quantifies the capability of a genomic marker to separate uncured patients, according to their time-to-event outcomes. It allows to identify genomic markers characterizing tumor growth dynamic across multiple studies. Simulation results show that our index performs better than classical indices based on the Cox model. It is neither affected by the sample size nor the cure rate fraction. In a cross-study of early-stage breast cancers, the index allows to select genomic markers with a potential consistent effect on tumor growth dynamics.

  15. Tumor marker analyses in patients with brain metastases: patterns of practice and implications for survival prediction research.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Carsten; Dalhaug, Astrid; Haukland, Ellinor; Mannsåker, Bård; Pawinski, Adam

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to explore patterns of practice of tumor marker analyses and potential prognostic impact of abnormal markers in patients with brain metastases from solid tumors. Previously, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and albumin were identified as relevant biomarkers. We performed a retrospective analysis of 120 patients with known LDH and albumin treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in two different situations: (1) brain metastases detected at initial cancer diagnosis (n = 46) and (2) brain metastases at later time points (n = 74, median interval 13 months). Twenty-six patients (57 %) from group 1 had at least one tumor marker analyzed, and 11 patients (24 %) had abnormal results. Twenty-two patients (30 %) from group 2 had at least one tumor marker analyzed, and 16 patients (22 %) had abnormal results. When assuming that LDH and albumin would be standard tests before WBRT, additional potential biomarkers were found in 36 % of patients with normal LDH and albumin. Marker positivity rates were for example 80 % for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in colorectal cancer and 79 % for CA 15-3 in breast cancer. Abnormal markers were associated with presence of liver metastases. CA 15-3 values above median predicted shorter survival in patients with breast cancer (median 1.9 vs. 13.8 months, p = 0.1). Comparable trends were not observed for various markers in other tumor types. In conclusion, only a minority of patients had undergone tumor marker analyses. Final group sizes were too small to perform multivariate analyses or draw definitive conclusions. We hypothesize that CA 15-3 could be a promising biomarker that should be studied further.

  16. Electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for tumor markers based on biological barcode mode with conductive nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuping; Guo, Zhiyong; Chen, Beibei; Sha, Yuhong; Jiang, Xiaohua; Li, Xing; Gan, Ning; Wang, Sui

    2014-03-15

    A novel sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was developed for highly sensitive and selective determination of tumor markers based on biological barcode mode. N-(4-aminobutyl)-N-ethylisoluminol (ABEI) and the second antibody (Ab2) were simultaneously immobilized on conductive nanospheres to construct ABEI/Ab2-CNSs probes, which could form sandwich immunocomplex by Ab2 and emit ECL signals by ABEI. The gold layer coated on the surface of the conductive nanospheres could extend the outer Helmholtz plane (OHP) of the ECL immunosensor effectively. Benefited from it, all ABEI molecules immobilized on conductive nanospheres would act as biological barcode to give in-situ ECL signals without interfering with the activity of the second antibody. In such a case, the sensitivity of the ECL immunosensor would be greatly improved because an antigen molecule would correspond to ECL signals of thousands of ABEI molecules. Using prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a model tumor marker, the ECL intensity was found to increase with the logarithm of PSA concentration with a wide linear range from 0.04 to 10 fg/mL. In addition, specificity, stability, reproducibility, regeneration and application were satisfactory. Therefore, this developed ECL immunosensor has a potential for practical detection of disease-related proteins besides tumor markers in the clinical diagnostics.

  17. Molecular beacon imaging of tumor marker gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily; Cao, Zehong; Lin, Yiming; Wood, William C; Staley, Charles A

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a fluorescence imaging-based approach to detect expression of tumor marker genes in pancreatic cancer cells using molecular beacons (MBs). MBs are short hairpin oligonucleotide probes that bind to specific oligonucleotide sequences and produce fluorescent signals. MBs targeting transcripts of two tumor marker genes, mutant K-ras and survivin, were synthesized and their specificity in detection of the expression of those genes in pancreatic cancer cells was examined. We found that K-ras MBs differentially bind to mutant K-ras mRNAs, resulting in strong fluorescent signals in pancreatic cancer cells with specific mutant K-ras genes but not in normal cells or cancer cells expressing either wild type or a different mutation of the K-ras gene. Additionally, MBs targeting survivin mRNA produced a bright fluorescent signal specifically in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that MBs labeled with different fluorophores could detect survivin and mutant K-ras mRNAs simultaneously in single cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that survivin and K-ras MBs have a high specificity in identifying cancer cells on frozen sections of pancreatic cancer tissues. In conclusion, molecular beacon-based imaging of expression of tumor marker genes has potential for the development of novel approaches for the detection of pancreatic cancer cells.

  18. Solitary fibrous tumor with malignant potential arising in sublingual gland.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Ikuko; Sato, Sunao; Kudo, Yasusei; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Suei, Yoshikazu; Takata, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    A rare case is described of a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) with malignant potential arising in the sublingual gland. A 59-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of a slowly enlarging painless mass in the center of the floor of the mouth. The tumor was a well-demarcated, firm mass with a multicystic lesion. The tumor exhibited highly cellular areas of spindle cells with patternless architecture alternating with hypocellular areas. The tumor cells were positive for CD34 and bcl-2 as well as vimentin, and negative for epithelial, myogenic, neurogenic and histiocytic markers. The tumor cells formed multiple satellite nodules around dilated ducts in the multicystic lesion, indicating infiltrative growth. In addition, areas exhibiting higher cellularity with increased mitoses were noticed in the satellite nodules, although cellular atypia was not obvious. These findings led to a final diagnosis of SFT with malignant potential. There has been no recurrence or metastasis for 27 months after the surgery. Solitary fibrous tumor of the salivary gland must be differentiated from various spindle cell neoplasms including myogenic, peripheral nerve sheath, fibroblastic and fibro-histiocytic spindle cell neoplasms, hemangiopericytoma and myoepithelioma. In addition to characteristic morphological features, an immunohistochemical positivity for CD34 and bcl-2 may aid in the diagnosis of SFT.

  19. Tumor Endothelial Marker Imaging in Melanomas Using Dual-Tracer Fluorescence Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Turk, Mary-Jo; Hasan, Tayyaba; Stan, Radu V.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-specific endothelial markers available for intravascular binding are promising targets for new molecular therapies. In this study, a molecular imaging approach of quantifying endothelial marker concentrations (EMCI) is developed and tested in highly light-absorbing melanomas. The approach involves injection of targeted imaging tracer in conjunction with an untargeted tracer, which is used to account for nonspecific uptake and tissue optical property effects on measured targeted tracer concentrations. Procedures Theoretical simulations and a mouse melanoma model experiment were used to test out the EMCI approach. The tracers used in the melanoma experiments were fluorescently labeled anti-Plvap/PV1 antibody (plasmalemma vesicle associated protein Plvap/PV1 is a transmembrane protein marker exposed on the luminal surface of endothelial cells in tumor vasculature) and a fluorescent isotype control antibody, the uptakes of which were measured on a planar fluorescence imaging system. Results The EMCI model was found to be robust to experimental noise under reversible and irreversible binding conditions and was capable of predicting expected overexpression of PV1 in melanomas compared to healthy skin despite a 5-time higher measured fluorescence in healthy skin compared to melanoma: attributable to substantial light attenuation from melanin in the tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of EMCI to quantify endothelial marker concentrations in vivo, an accomplishment that is currently unavailable through any other methods, either in vivo or ex vivo. PMID:24217944

  20. Use of preoperative FLAIR MRI and ependymal proximity of tumor enhancement as surrogate markers of brain tumor origin.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy R; Hulou, M Maher; Abecassis, Josh; Das, Sunit; Chandler, James P

    2015-09-01

    Neural stem cells proliferate in the subventricular zone and give rise to progeny that differentiate and migrate throughout the brain. We aimed to test the hypothesis that glioma behavior and grade may correlate with the identity of the tumor cell of origin. We evaluated three preoperative radiographic features (fluid attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR] MRI characteristics, tumor proximity to ventricular ependyma, and subependymal representation) as surrogate markers of tumor origin using a retrospective cohort design. The medical records of 228 patients who underwent surgical resection of a glioma from January 2004 to August 2008 were reviewed. Average patient age was 54.5 years (standard deviation [SD] 15.3) with a male predominance (62.9%). World Health Organization glioma grades amongst the cohort were Grade IV (71.6%), Grade III (21.3%) and Grade II (7.1%). Mean survival was 11.2 months (SD 10.5) with a mean follow up of 12.8 months (SD 11.3). Glioma tumor grade was significantly correlated to FLAIR signal proximity to the ependymal surface (p<0.01) and inversely with proximity of tumor mass to the ependyma (p<0.01). The mean distance of tumor-associated FLAIR signal from the ependymal surface for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was 1.2mm (SD 3.3) compared to 4.8 (SD 6.5) for anaplastic astrocytomas and 6.6mm (SD 6.7; p<0.01) for low grade gliomas. Conversely, the mean distance of the enhancing tumor mass from the ependyma for GBM was 7.3mm (SD 9.4), Grade III glioma 2.3mm (SD 4.9), and Grade II glioma 3.8mm (SD 6.8; p<0.05). These findings suggest that higher grade gliomas might arise from less differentiated neuroepithelial cells in the subventricular zone that possess greater migratory potential.

  1. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma), mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning. PMID:22408433

  2. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search. PMID:27416153

  3. Genetic markers: Potential candidates for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rather, Riyaz Ahmad; Dhawan, Veena

    2016-10-01

    The effective prevention of cardiovascular disease depends upon the ability to recognize the high-risk individuals at an early stage of the disease or long before the development of adverse events. Evolving technologies in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and genomics have played a significant role in the discovery of cardiovascular biomarkers, but so far these methods have achieved the modest success. Hence, there is a crucial need for more reliable, suitable, and lasting diagnostic and therapeutic markers to screen the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Gene polymorphisms associated with the cardiovascular disease play a decisive role in the disease onset. Therefore, the genetic marker evaluation to classify high-risk patients from low-risk patients trends an effective approach to patient management and care. Currently, there are no genetic markers available for extensive adoption as risk factors for coronary vascular disease, yet, there are numerous promising, biologically acceptable candidates. Many of these gene biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play an essential role in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. The present review highlights some putative emerging genetic biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVD. This review also briefly describes few technological approaches employed in the biomarker search.

  4. Stability of Markers Used for Real-Time Tumor Tracking After Percutaneous Intrapulmonary Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Water, Steven van de; Levendag, Peter C.; Holt, Bronno van der; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the stability of markers used for real-time tumor tracking after percutaneous intrapulmonary placement. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with 44 lesions, 111 markers, and {>=}2 repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were studied. The tumor on the repeat CT scans was registered with the tumor on the planning CT scan. Next, the three-dimensional marker coordinates were determined on the planning CT scan and repeat CT scans. Marker stability was analyzed by the displacement of the markers and the displacement of the center of mass (COM) of the marker configurations. In addition, we assessed the reliability of using the intermarker distance as a check for displacements in the COM of the marker configurations. Results: The median marker displacement was 1.3 mm (range, 0.1-53.6). The marker displacement was >5 mm in 12% of the markers and >10 mm in 5% of the markers. The causes of marker displacement >5 mm included marker migration (2 of 13) and target volume changes (5 of 13). Nonsynchronous tumor and marker movement during breathing might have been responsible for the displacements >5 mm in the other 6 of 13 markers. The median displacement in the COM of the marker configurations was 1.0 mm (range, 0.1-23.3). Displacements in the COM of the marker configurations of {>=}2.0 mm were detected by changes in the intermarker distance of >1.5 mm in 96% of the treatment fractions. Conclusion: The median marker displacement was small (1.3 mm). Nevertheless, displacements >5 mm occurred in 12% of the markers. Therefore, we recommend the implantation of multiple markers because multiple markers will enable a quick and reliable check of marker displacement by determining the change in the intermarker distance. A displacement in the COM of the marker configuration of {>=}2.0 mm was almost always detected (96%) by a change in the distance between the markers of >1.5 mm. This enabled the displaced marker to be disabled, such that tumor localization

  5. A SPR biosensor based on signal amplification using antibody-QD conjugates for quantitative determination of multiple tumor markers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Jue; Fu, Weiling; Yao, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    The detection of tumor markers is very important in early cancer diagnosis; however, tumor markers are usually present at very low concentrations, especially in the early stages of tumor development. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is widely used to detect biomolecular interactions; it has inherent advantages of being high-throughput, real-time, and label-free technique. However, its sensitivity needs essential improvement for practical applications. In this study, we developed a signal amplification strategy using antibody-quantum dot (QD) conjugates for the sensitive and quantitative detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin fragment 21-1 (CYFRA 21-1) in clinical samples. The use of a dual signal amplification strategy using AuNP-antibody and antibody-QD conjugates increased the signal amplification by 50-folds. The constructed SPR biosensor showed a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL for AFP, CEA, and CYFRA 21-1. Moreover, the results obtained using this SPR biosensor were consistent with those obtained using the electrochemiluminescence method. Thus, the constructed SPR biosensor provides a highly sensitive and specific approach for the detection of tumor markers. This SPR biosensor can be expected to be readily applied for the detection of other tumor markers and can offer a potentially powerful solution for tumor screening. PMID:27615417

  6. A SPR biosensor based on signal amplification using antibody-QD conjugates for quantitative determination of multiple tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Jue; Fu, Weiling; Yao, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    The detection of tumor markers is very important in early cancer diagnosis; however, tumor markers are usually present at very low concentrations, especially in the early stages of tumor development. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is widely used to detect biomolecular interactions; it has inherent advantages of being high-throughput, real-time, and label-free technique. However, its sensitivity needs essential improvement for practical applications. In this study, we developed a signal amplification strategy using antibody-quantum dot (QD) conjugates for the sensitive and quantitative detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin fragment 21-1 (CYFRA 21-1) in clinical samples. The use of a dual signal amplification strategy using AuNP-antibody and antibody-QD conjugates increased the signal amplification by 50-folds. The constructed SPR biosensor showed a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL for AFP, CEA, and CYFRA 21-1. Moreover, the results obtained using this SPR biosensor were consistent with those obtained using the electrochemiluminescence method. Thus, the constructed SPR biosensor provides a highly sensitive and specific approach for the detection of tumor markers. This SPR biosensor can be expected to be readily applied for the detection of other tumor markers and can offer a potentially powerful solution for tumor screening. PMID:27615417

  7. Improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of gastro-intestinal tumors by fuzzy logic-based tumor marker profiles including the tumor M2-PK.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joachim; Bitterlich, Norman; Schulze, Guntram

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve diagnostic efficiency in the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers by using fuzzy logic modeling in combination with a tumor marker panel (CEA, CA72-4, CA19-9) including Tumor M2-PK. In this prospective study histologically confirmed colorectal (n=247), esophageal (n=86) and gastric cancer (n=122) patients were investigated and compared to control (n=53) persons without any malignant diseases. Tumor M2-PK was measured in plasma with an ELISA (ScheBoBiotech, Germany); all other markers were measured in sera (Roche, Germany). At 95% specificity, tumor detection was possible by the best single marker in colorectal cancer patients in 48% (Tumor M2-PK), in gastric cancers in 61% (CA72-4) and in esophageal cancers in 56% (Tumor M2-PK). A fuzzy logic rule-based system employing a tumor marker panel increased sensitivity significantly in colorectal cancers (p<0. 001) to 63% (Tumor M2-PK and CEA), in gastric cancers (p<0.001) to 81% (Tumor M2-PK and CA 72-4) and in esophageal cancers (p<0.02) to 74% (Tumor M2-PK and CA72-4). Adding a third marker further improved the sensitivity only marginally. Fuzzy logic analysis has proven to be more powerful than measurement of single markers alone or combinations using multiple logistic regression analysis of the markers. Therefore, with the fuzzy logic method and a tumor marker panel (including Tumor M2-PK), a new diagnostic tool for the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers is available.

  8. Procalcitonin as diagnostic marker of infection in solid tumors patients with fever.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, B; Fioroni, I; Pantano, F; Angeletti, S; Dicuonzo, G; Zoccoli, A; Santini, D; Tonini, G

    2016-01-01

    In oncologic patients fever is a non-specific clinical marker of different clinical settings. Procalcitonin (PCT) seems to be the most promising infection marker. We aimed to define the potential role of PCT as an earlier diagnostic marker in patients with fever and solid tumor. This retrospective study enrolled 431 patients. All of them performed hemoculture (HE) and basal PCT assessment (reference laboratory cut-off: ≤0.5 or >0.5 ng/dL) before starting antibiotic therapy. Gram positive (G+), negative (G-) or Fungi infection were detected. A statistically significant difference in PCT levels between patients with positive and negative HE was observed (P < 0.0001). Moreover comparing PCT values in patients with positive and negative HE, we obtain in the positive HE subpopulation an AUC of 0.7 and a cut-off of 1.52 ng/dL reached high sensitivity (61.6%) and specificity (70.1%). Using this last cut-off, instead of the normal reference value, we achieve a risk reduction to overestimate an infection status of 23.4%. We support the clinic usefulness of serum PCT dosage in febrile advanced solid tumor patients. A PCT cut-off of 1.52 ng/dL could be helpful in the management of the antibiotic therapy preventing delays of oncologic treatments. PMID:27312877

  9. Procalcitonin as diagnostic marker of infection in solid tumors patients with fever

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, B.; Fioroni, I.; Pantano, F.; Angeletti, S.; Dicuonzo, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Santini, D.; Tonini, G.

    2016-01-01

    In oncologic patients fever is a non-specific clinical marker of different clinical settings. Procalcitonin (PCT) seems to be the most promising infection marker. We aimed to define the potential role of PCT as an earlier diagnostic marker in patients with fever and solid tumor. This retrospective study enrolled 431 patients. All of them performed hemoculture (HE) and basal PCT assessment (reference laboratory cut-off: ≤0.5 or >0.5 ng/dL) before starting antibiotic therapy. Gram positive (G+), negative (G−) or Fungi infection were detected. A statistically significant difference in PCT levels between patients with positive and negative HE was observed (P < 0.0001). Moreover comparing PCT values in patients with positive and negative HE, we obtain in the positive HE subpopulation an AUC of 0.7 and a cut-off of 1.52 ng/dL reached high sensitivity (61.6%) and specificity (70.1%). Using this last cut-off, instead of the normal reference value, we achieve a risk reduction to overestimate an infection status of 23.4%. We support the clinic usefulness of serum PCT dosage in febrile advanced solid tumor patients. A PCT cut-off of 1.52 ng/dL could be helpful in the management of the antibiotic therapy preventing delays of oncologic treatments. PMID:27312877

  10. The Role of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin as Tumor Marker: Biochemical and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Sisinni, Lorenza; Landriscina, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor markers are biological substances that are produced/released mainly by malignant tumor cells, enter the circulation in detectable amounts and are potential indicators of the presence of a tumor. The most useful biochemical markers are the tumor-specific molecules, i.e., receptors, enzymes, hormones, growth factors or biological response modifiers that are specifically produced by tumor cells and not, or minimally, by the normal counterpart (Richard et al. Principles and practice of gynecologic oncology. Wolters Kluwer Health, Philadelphia, 2009). Based on their specificity and sensitivity in each malignancy, biomarkers are used for screening, diagnosis, disease monitoring and therapeutic response assessment in clinical management of cancer patients.This chapter is focused on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone with a variety of functions and widely used as a tumor biomarker in selected tumors. Indeed, hCG is expressed by both trophoblastic and non-trophoblastic human malignancies and plays a role in cell transformation, angiogenesis, metastatization, and immune escape, all process central to cancer progression. Of note, hCG testing is crucial for the clinical management of placental trophoblastic malignancies and germ cell tumors of the testis and the ovary. Furthermore, the production of hCG by tumor cells is accompanied by varying degrees of release of the free subunits into the circulation, and this is relevant for the management of cancer patients (Triozzi PL, Stevens VC, Oncol Rep 6(1):7-17, 1999).The name chorionic gonadotropin was conceived: chorion derives from the latin chordate meaning afterbirth, gonadotropin indicates that the hormone is a gonadotropic molecule, acting on the ovaries and promoting steroid production (Cole LA, Int J Endocrinol Metab 9(2):335-352, 2011). The function, the mechanism of action and the interaction between hCG and its receptor continue to be the subject of intensive investigation, even though many issues about

  11. Oct4 is a reliable marker of liver tumor propagating cells in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang; Wilson, George; Zhou, Gang; Hebbard, Lionel; George, Jacob; Qiao, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide and the 2nd most common cause of cancer related mortality. The poor prognosis is largely due to the difficulty in early diagnoses and eradication of stem-like cells within HCC, which are termed liver tumor propagating cells (LTPCs). These LTPCs are involved in all stages of tumorigenesis including tumor initiation, progression, and treatment failure. The greatest challenge in understanding these LTPCs is finding effective ways in isolating and characterizing these cells with current methods showing large inter-tumor variability in isolating these cells. Oct4 is a stem cell gene associated with LTPCs and has been shown to be involved in regulating a range of functions in HCC cells associated with LTPC features. In this study we determined the efficacy and reliability in utilizing Oct4 to isolate and characterize LTPCs. We have shown that Oct4 is ubiquitously expressed in all HCC tumors tested whereas other traditional LTPC markers had high intratumor variability in their expression. We then utilized a human Oct4 promoter driving an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter which showed that Oct4+ cells had all the classic features of LTPCs including increased sphere formation in vitro, tumor forming potential in immunocompromised mice, expression of stemness associated genes, and resistance to Sorafenib which is the major drug used to treat advanced HCC. Based on our findings we have identified Oct4 as a reliable marker of LTPCs and discovered a novel way to isolate and characterize LTPCs. PMID:26562475

  12. Prognostic impact of cytological fluid tumor markers in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Arthur; Hur, Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Sae Rom; Suh, Young Joo; Im, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Jung; Lee, Jae Seok; Shim, Hyo Sup; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-03-01

    The serum tumor markers CYFRA 21-1, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) are useful in diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Cytologic tumor markers obtained during needle aspiration biopsies (NAB) of lung lesions are useful for NSCLC diagnosis. This study investigated the incremental prognostic value of cytologic tumor markers compared to serum tumor markers. This prospective study included 253 patients diagnosed with NSCLC by NAB with cytologic tumor marker analysis. Levels of cytologic CYFRA 21-1, CEA, SCCA, and their serum counterparts were followed up for survival analysis. Optimal cutoff values for each tumor marker were obtained for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) analyses. All patients were followed up for a median of 22.8 months. Using cutoff values of 0.44 ng/ml for C-SCCA, 2.0 ng/ml for S-SCCA, and 3.3 ng/ml for S-CYFRA, a multivariate analysis revealed that high S-SCCA (hazard ratio, HR, 1.84) and high C-SCCA (HR, 1.63) were independent predictive factors of OS. The 3-year overall survival rate was 55 vs. 80 % for high and low C-SCCA, respectively. Cytologic tumor marker level detection is easily obtainable and provides prognostic information for NSCLC. Cytologic tumor markers provide comparable prognostic information relative to serum tumor markers, with C-SCCA acting as a strong prognostic factor of overall survival and PFS. PMID:26432331

  13. Angiogenin and gestational trophoblastic tumors, a promising prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Shaarawy, Mohamed; El-Mallah, Samira Y; Sheiba, Mamdouh

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic values of serum angiogenin concentration in cases with gestational trophoblastic diseases (GTDs). Seventy-two patients with GTDs and 20 first trimester healthy pregnant women (controls) participated in this study. According to the WHO scoring system, GTDs were subgrouped into 24 hydatiform mole spontaneous regression (HMSR), 18 postmolar gestational trophoblastic tumors of high risk (PMHR), 16 low-risk choriocarcinoma, and 14 high-risk choriocarcinoma. Before treatment, a blood sample from each case was assayed for human chorionic gonadotrophin , subunit (hCGb) by radioimmunoassay and angiogenin by enzyme immunoassay. Follow-up hCGb and angiogenin assays were carried out for 1 year after treatment. Pretreatment of abnormal values of serum angiogenin (> 711 ng/ml, upper 95% confidence interval of controls) was encountered in 100% of PMHR cases compared to no single case of HMSR. Serum angiogenin levels in low- and high-risk cases with choriocarcinoma were significantly higher than in controls. Abnormal high values were encountered in 25% and 86% of cases, respectively. None of the low-risk cases exceeded 920 ng/ml, while 72% of high-risk cases exceeded this value. Serial angiogenin assays were correlated with disease progression and were positively correlated with serum hCGb (r = 0.75, p < 0.01). In conclusion, serum angiogenin may be a valuable marker of differential diagnosis of GTDs and its serial measurements are suggestive of remission and effective therapeutic intervention or disease progression.

  14. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Yorke, Ellen D.; Davidson, Margaret; Zhang, Zhigang; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig S.; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion.

  15. Tumor Markers for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Simple and Significant Predictors of Outcome in Patients with HCC

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Tada, Toshifumi; Sone, Yasuhiro; Kaneoka, Yuji; Maeda, Atsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of tumor markers in evaluating outcomes of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be clarified. Summary The usefulness of the HCC tumor markers, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3), and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) was reviewed. Elevations in these tumor markers at the time of HCC diagnosis correlate with disease progression as assessed by both imaging studies and pathologic examinations. The combination of these three tumor markers results in good predictive ability for patient survival after diagnosis. In addition, combination at the time of HCC diagnosis of these three tumor markers (as a measure of tumor progression) and serum albumin and bilirubin levels (as indicators of remnant liver function) can be used for HCC staging and further predicts prognosis in patients with HCC. Key Message The prognosis of patients with HCC can be well discriminated based solely on serum markers. Staging of HCC with serum markers is objective; if stored serum samples are available, HCC stages can be standardized across different countries and time periods. PMID:26020034

  16. Analysis of marker-defined HNSCC subpopulations reveals a dynamic regulation of tumor initiating properties.

    PubMed

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49f(high)/ALDH1A1(high)/H3K4/K27me3(low) subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49f(high)/H3K27me3(low) subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49f(high)/ALDH(high), label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49f(low)/ALDH(low), non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49f(high)/ALDH(high), label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f- cells can "reprogram" and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a "moving target" and their eradication might

  17. Analysis of Marker-Defined HNSCC Subpopulations Reveals a Dynamic Regulation of Tumor Initiating Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49fhigh/ALDH1A1high/H3K4/K27me3low subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49fhigh/H3K27me3low subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49flow/ALDHlow, non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f− cells can “reprogram” and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a “moving target” and their eradication might require more

  18. Dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay for ultra-sensitive detection of tumor marker protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ma, Jiehua; Fan, Qiongxuan; Tao, Yaqin; Li, Genxi

    2016-06-14

    A novel dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay that utilizes manganese dioxide nanosheet-modified gold nanoparticles (MnO2-GNPs) as an activatable nanoprobe has been developed to detect tumor markers down to femtomolar levels. PMID:27247980

  19. Mortality and Embolic Potential of Cardiac Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Fernandes, Fábio; Ramires, Félix José Alvarez; Mady, Charles; Albuquerque, Cícero Piva; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are rare, mostly benign with high embolic potential. Objectives To correlate the histological type of cardiac masses with their embolic potential, implantation site and long term follow up in patients undergoing surgery. Methods Between January 1986 and December 2011, we retrospectively analyzed 185 consecutive patients who underwent excision of intracardiac mass (119 females, mean age 48±20 years). In 145 patients, the left atrium was the origin site. 72% were asymptomatic and prior embolization was often observed (19.8%). The diagnosis was established by echocardiography, magnetic resonance and histological examination. Results Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. Myxoma was the most common (72.6%), followed by fibromas (6.9%), thrombi (6.4%) and sarcomas (6.4%). Ranging from 0.6cm to 15cm (mean 4.6 ± 2.5cm) 37 (19.8%) patients had prior embolization, stroke 10.2%, coronary 4.8%, peripheral 4.3% 5.4% of hospital death, with a predominance of malignant tumors (40% p < 0.0001). The histological type was a predictor of mortality (rhabdomyomas and sarcomas p = 0.002) and embolic event (sarcoma, lipoma and fibroelastoma p = 0.006), but not recurrence. Tumor size, atrial fibrillation, cavity and valve impairment were not associated with the embolic event. During follow-up (mean 80±63 months), there were 2 deaths (1.1%) and two recurrences 1 and 11 years after the operation, to the same cavity. Conclusion Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. The histological type was predictor of death and preoperative embolic event, while the implantation site carries no relation with mortality or to embolic event. PMID:25029470

  20. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a ubiquitous tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoyi; Chang, Frank; Zhang, Xinmin; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2012-08-01

    Using an innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of breast cancer patients and was over-expressed in early and late stage breast tumors (Tuszynski, G.P. et al., 2011). In this study we further investigated the significance of GASP-1 as a tumor marker by investigating the expression GASP-1 in different kinds of tumors as well as in the sera of patients with various cancers. Over expression of GASP-1 was detected in brain, pancreatic, and breast cancers as compared to their respective normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays using a "peptide specific" GASP-1 antibody. We found that across these cancers, GASP-1 was expressed approximately 10 fold more in the cancer as compared to normal tissue. The increase in GASP-1 expression was also seen in hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions of breast and pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissue. GASP-1 was primarily expressed in the tumor epithelium of the epithelial-derived cancers and in the transformed glial cells of the brain tumors. Using a sensitive "competitive ELISA" for GASP-1, we found that sera from patients with brain, liver, breast and lung cancers expressed 4-7 fold more GASP-1 peptide than sera from normal healthy individuals. These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for several cancers and suggest that GASP-1 may be a novel target for development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:22483848

  1. Histochemical, immunohistochemical and cytogenetic markers in salivary gland tumor pathology.

    PubMed

    Vered, Marilena; Dayan, Dan

    2007-02-01

    Evaluation of: Adeyemi BF, Kolude BM, Akang EE, Lawoyin JO: A study of silver nucleolar organizer regions in categorization and prognosis of salivary gland tumors. Oral Surg. Oral Med. Oral Pathol. Oral Radiol. Endod. 102, 513-520 (2006). In this study, various confirmed benign and malignant salivary gland tumors underwent a known histochemical silver staining method involving nuclear-associated proteins with diagnostic and prognostic capacity in other malignant tumors. The study examined the methods' ability to differentiate between benign and malignant salivary gland tumors and between different histopathological grades of malignant tumors, and sought correlations between the staining results and staging, metastatic disease and survival. The staining method proved inadequate, confirming many previously published results. This article highlights the growing awareness of pathologists and oral pathologists in developing countries to the uniqueness of salivary gland tumors, and demonstrates their understanding of the importance of both early detection and appropriate treatment.

  2. Effect of cacao liquor extract on tumor marker enzymes during chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Amin, I; Koh, B K; Asmah, R

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cacao liquor extract (CLE) on tumor marker enzymes--alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities--in plasma and/or liver of hepatocarcinogenic rats, which were induced with diethylnitrosamine and 2-acetylaminofluorene. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 150-330 g) were divided into four groups (n = 6-8): normal control group (N), normal group + CLE (NE), cancer group (C), and cancer group + CLE (CE). Analysis of variance showed significant differences (P<.05) in the specific activities of ALP, GGT, and GST between the C and N groups. However, GR activity for the C group was not significantly different compared with the N group. In the CE group, the specific activities of ALP, GGT, GST, and GR were significantly lower (P<.05) compared with the C group. The findings showed that CLE could lower the activity of tumor marker enzymes of rats during hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on the results obtained, polyphenol compounds present in the cacao liquor, extracted by using ethanol, have the potential in decreasing the severity of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  3. Insertion and fixation of fiducial markers for setup and tracking of lung tumors in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, Mikado; Yamazaki, Koichi . E-mail: kyamazak@med.hokudai.ac.jp; Shirato, Hiroki; Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Shimizu, Shinichi; Harada, Toshiyuki; Ogura, Shigeaki; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Internal 1.5-mm fiducial markers were used in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer. The fixation rate of the markers using the bronchial insertion technique, reliability of the setup using markers around the target volume, dislocation of the markers after real-time tumor-tracking RT, and long-term toxicity of marker insertion were investigated. Methods and Materials: Between July 2000 and April 2004, 154 gold markers were inserted into 57 patients with peripheral lung cancer. The distances between the implanted markers in 198 measurements in 71 setups in 11 patients were measured using two sets of orthogonal diagnostic X-ray images of the real-time tumor-tracking RT system. The distance between the markers and the chest wall was also measured in a transaxial CT image on 186 occasions in 48 patients during treatment planning and during follow-up. The median treatment time was 6 days (range, 4-14 days). Results: In 115 (75%) of the 154 inserted markers, the gold marker was detected throughout the treatment period. In 122 markers detected at CT planning, 115 (94%) were detected until the end of treatment. The variation in the distances between the implanted markers was within {+-}2 mm in 95% and {+-}1 mm in 80% during treatment. The variation in the distances between the implanted markers was >2 mm in at least one direction in 9% of the setups for which reexamination with a CT scan was indicated. The fixation rate in the left upper lobe was lower than in the other lobes. A statistically significant relationship was found between a shorter distance between the markers and the chest wall and the fixation rate, suggesting that the markers in the smaller bronchial lumens fixed better than those in the larger lumens. A learning curve among the endoscopists was suggested in the fixation rate. The distance between the markers and the chest wall changed significantly within a median of 44 days (range, 16-181 days) after treatment. Conclusion

  4. Dipeptidase 1: a candidate tumor-specific molecular marker in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McIver, C M; Lloyd, J M; Hewett, P J; Hardingham, J E

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify tumor-specific markers for the detection of rare disseminated colorectal tumor cells in peripheral venous blood and in intra-peritoneal saline lavage samples collected before and after resection of colorectal tumors. Using cDNA micro-array screening, we found dipeptidase 1 (DPEP1) to be highly expressed in colon tumors compared to matched normal mucosa. Relative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR showed that DPEP1 was over-expressed by >/=2 fold in colon tumor compared to normal colonic mucosal tissue in 56/68 (82%) patients. Using immunobead RT-PCR, a technique that first enriches for epithelial cells, we found DPEP1 positive cells in intra-peritoneal lavage and venous blood samples from 15/38 (39%) colorectal cancer cases. This is the first report of DPEP1 as a marker for disseminated colon tumor cells.

  5. General Information about Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Go to ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Chromogranin A – unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  7. Tumor-colonizing bacteria: a potential tumor targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Zu, Chao; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-08-01

    In 1813, Vautier published his observation of tumor regression in patients who had suffered from gas gangrene. Since then, many publications have described the use of bacteria as antitumor therapy. For example, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium have been shown to selectively colonize tumors and to reduce tumor size. In addition, recent studies have focused on the use of genetic engineering to induce the expression of pro-drug converting enzymes, cytokines, specific antibodies, or suicide genes in tumor-colonizing bacteria. Moreover, some animal experiments have reported the treatment of tumors with engineered bacteria, and few side effects were observed. Therefore, based on these advances in tumor targeting therapy, bacteria may represent the next generation of cancer therapy.

  8. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients. PMID:27599779

  9. The Tumor-Associated Marker, PVRL4 (Nectin-4), is the Epithelial Receptor for Morbilliviruses

    PubMed Central

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S.; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    PVRL4 (nectin-4) was recently identified as the epithelial receptor for members of the Morbillivirus genus, including measles virus, canine distemper virus and peste des petits ruminants virus. Here, we describe the role of PVRL4 in morbillivirus pathogenesis and its promising use in cancer therapies. This discovery establishes a new paradigm for the spread of virus from lymphocytes to airway epithelial cells and its subsequent release into the environment. Measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic platform for cancer therapy in the last ten years. Given that PVRL4 is a well-known tumor-associated marker for several adenocarcinoma (lung, breast and ovary), the measles virus could potentially be used to specifically target, infect and destroy cancers expressing PVRL4. PMID:24892636

  10. The tumor-associated marker, PVRL4 (nectin-4), is the epithelial receptor for morbilliviruses.

    PubMed

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S; Richardson, Christopher D

    2014-06-01

    PVRL4 (nectin-4) was recently identified as the epithelial receptor for members of the Morbillivirus genus, including measles virus, canine distemper virus and peste des petits ruminants virus. Here, we describe the role of PVRL4 in morbillivirus pathogenesis and its promising use in cancer therapies. This discovery establishes a new paradigm for the spread of virus from lymphocytes to airway epithelial cells and its subsequent release into the environment. Measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic platform for cancer therapy in the last ten years. Given that PVRL4 is a well-known tumor-associated marker for several adenocarcinoma (lung, breast and ovary), the measles virus could potentially be used to specifically target, infect and destroy cancers expressing PVRL4. PMID:24892636

  11. Sox10 – A marker for not only Schwannian and melanocytic neoplasms but also myoepithelial cell tumors of soft tissue. A systematic analysis of 5134 tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Markku; McCue, Peter A.; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Biernat, Wojciech; Czapiewski, Piotr; Kopczynski, Janusz; Thompson, Lester D.; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zengfeng; Fetsch, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Sox10 transcription factor is expressed in Schwannian and melanocytic lineages and is important in their development and can be used as a marker for corresponding tumors. Additionally, it has been reported in subsets of myoepithelial/basal cell epithelial neoplasms, but its expression remains incompletely characterized. In this study, we examined Sox10 express-ion in 5134 human neoplasms spanning a wide spectrum of neuroectodermal, mesenchymal, lymphoid, and epithelial tumors. A new rabbit monoclonal antibody (clone EP268) and Leica Bond Max automation were used on multitumor block libraries containing 30–70 cases per slide. Sox10 was consistently expressed in benign Schwann cell tumors of soft tissue and the GI-tract and metastatic melanoma, and was variably present in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. In contrast, Sox10 was absent in many potential mimics of nerve sheath tumors such as cellular neurothekeoma, meningioma, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, PEComa, and a variety of fibroblastic-myofibroblastic tumors. Sox10 was virtually absent in mesenchymal tumors but occasionally seen in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In epithelial tumors of soft tissue, Sox10 was expressed only in myoepitheliomas, although often absent in malignant variants. Carcinomas, other than basal cell type breast cancers, were only rarely positive but included rare squamous carcinomas of head and neck and pulmonary small cell carcinomas. Furthermore, Sox10 was often focally expressed in embryonal carcinoma reflecting a primitive Sox10-positive phenotype or neuroectodermal differentiation. Expression of Sox10 in entrapped non-neoplastic Schwann cells or melanocytes in various neoplasms has to be considered in diagnosing Sox10-positive tumors. The Sox10 antibody belongs in a modern immunohistochemical panel for the diagnosis of soft tissue and epithelial tumors. PMID:25724000

  12. Optimal surface marker locations for tumor motion estimation in lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bin; Jiang Graves, Yan; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-12-01

    Using fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to predict the tumor location is a widely used approach in lung cancer radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to propose an algorithm that automatically identifies a sparse set of locations on the patient’s surface with the optimal prediction power for the tumor motion. In our algorithm, it is assumed that there is a linear relationship between the surface marker motion and the tumor motion. The sparse selection of markers on the external surface and the linear relationship between the marker motion and the internal tumor motion are represented by a prediction matrix. Such a matrix is determined by solving an optimization problem, where the objective function contains a sparsity term that penalizes the number of markers chosen on the patient’s surface. Bregman iteration is used to solve the proposed optimization problem. The performance of our algorithm has been tested on realistic clinical data of four lung cancer patients. Thoracic 4DCT scans with ten phases are used for the study. On a reference phase, a grid of points are casted on the patient’s surfaces (except for the patient’s back) and propagated to other phases via deformable image registration of the corresponding CT images. Tumor locations at each phase are also manually delineated. We use nine out of ten phases of the 4DCT images to identify a small group of surface markers that are mostly correlated with the motion of the tumor and find the prediction matrix at the same time. The tenth phase is then used to test the accuracy of the prediction. It is found that on average six to seven surface markers are necessary to predict tumor locations with a 3D error of about 1 mm. It is also found that the selected marker locations lie closely in those areas where surface point motion has a large amplitude and a high correlation with the tumor motion. Our method can automatically select sparse locations on the patient’s external surface and

  13. Advances in carcinogenic metal toxicity and potential molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system's ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  14. Advances in Carcinogenic Metal Toxicity and Potential Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system’s ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  15. Metanephrine neuroendocrine tumor marker detection by SERS using Au nanoparticle/Au film sandwich architecture.

    PubMed

    Boca, Sanda; Farcau, Cosmin; Baia, Monica; Astilean, Simion

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, are dangerous tumors that constitute a potential threat for a large number of patients. Currently, the biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors is based on measurement of the direct secretory products of the adrenomedullary-sympathetic system or of their metabolites, such as catecholamines or their metanephrine derivatives, from plasma or urine. The techniques used for analysis of plasma free metanephrines, i.e. high-performance liquid chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry are technically-demanding and time consuming, which limit their availability. Here we demonstrate a simple, fast and low-cost method for detecting metanephrine by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). The protocol consists in using evaporation-induced self-assembly of gold (Au) nanoparticles incubated with the analyte, on planar gold films. The assembly process produces regions with a dense distribution of both inter-particle gaps and particle-film gaps. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that both kinds of gaps are locations of enhanced electromagnetic fields resulting from inter-particle and particle-film plasmonic coupling, useful for SERS amplification. Metanephrine vibrational bands assignment was performed according to density functional theory calculations. Metanephrine metabolite was detected in liquid at concentration levels lower than previously reported for other similar metabolites. The obtained results demonstrate that the Au nanoparticle/Au film exhibits noticeable SERS amplification of the adsorbed metabolite and can be used in the design of efficient, stable SERS-active substrates for the detection and identification of specific tumor markers.

  16. Metanephrine neuroendocrine tumor marker detection by SERS using Au nanoparticle/Au film sandwich architecture.

    PubMed

    Boca, Sanda; Farcau, Cosmin; Baia, Monica; Astilean, Simion

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, are dangerous tumors that constitute a potential threat for a large number of patients. Currently, the biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors is based on measurement of the direct secretory products of the adrenomedullary-sympathetic system or of their metabolites, such as catecholamines or their metanephrine derivatives, from plasma or urine. The techniques used for analysis of plasma free metanephrines, i.e. high-performance liquid chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry are technically-demanding and time consuming, which limit their availability. Here we demonstrate a simple, fast and low-cost method for detecting metanephrine by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). The protocol consists in using evaporation-induced self-assembly of gold (Au) nanoparticles incubated with the analyte, on planar gold films. The assembly process produces regions with a dense distribution of both inter-particle gaps and particle-film gaps. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that both kinds of gaps are locations of enhanced electromagnetic fields resulting from inter-particle and particle-film plasmonic coupling, useful for SERS amplification. Metanephrine vibrational bands assignment was performed according to density functional theory calculations. Metanephrine metabolite was detected in liquid at concentration levels lower than previously reported for other similar metabolites. The obtained results demonstrate that the Au nanoparticle/Au film exhibits noticeable SERS amplification of the adsorbed metabolite and can be used in the design of efficient, stable SERS-active substrates for the detection and identification of specific tumor markers. PMID:26820563

  17. Microvesicles: potential markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Lin; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Microvesicles (MVs, also known as microparticles) are small membranous structures that are released from platelets and cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microvesicles have been found in blood, urine, synovial fluid, extracellular spaces of solid organs, atherosclerotic plaques, tumors, and elsewhere. Here, we focus on new clinical and basic work that implicates MVs as markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction and hence novel contributors to cardiovascular and other diseases. Recent findings Advances in the detection of MVs and the use of cell type-specific markers to determine their origin have allowed studies that associated plasma concentrations of specific MVs with major types of endothelial dysfunction – namely, inappropriate or maladaptive vascular tone, leukocyte recruitment, and thrombosis. Recent investigations have highlighted microvesicular transport of key biologically active molecules besides tissue factor, such as ligands for pattern-recognition receptors, elements of the inflammasome, and morphogens. Microvesicles generated from human cells under different pathologic circumstances, e.g., during cholesterol loading or exposure to endotoxin, carry different subsets of these molecules and thereby alter endothelial function through several distinct, well-characterized molecular pathways. Summary Clinical and basic studies indicate that MVs may be novel markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction. This work has advanced our understanding of the development of cardiovascular and other diseases. Opportunites and obstacles to clinical applications are discussed. PMID:22248645

  18. ICAM1 Is a Potential Cancer Stem Cell Marker of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sheng-Ta; Wang, Po-Jen; Liou, Nia-Jhen; Lin, Pei-Shan; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Chang, Wei-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for about 90% of esophageal cancer diagnosed in Asian countries, with its incidence on the rise. Cancer stem cell (CSC; also known as tumor-initiating cells, TIC) is inherently resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation and associates with poor prognosis and therapy failure. Targeting therapy against cancer stem cell has emerged as a potential therapeutic approach to develop effective regimens. However, the suitable CSC marker of ESCC for identification and targeting is still limited. In this study, we screened the novel CSC membrane protein markers using two distinct stemness characteristics of cancer cell lines by a comparative approach. After the validation of RT-PCR, qPCR and western blot analyses, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) was identified as a potential CSC marker of ESCC. ICAM1 promotes cancer cell migration, invasion as well as increasing mesenchymal marker expression and attenuating epithelial marker expression. In addition, ICAM1 contributes to CSC properties, including sphere formation, drug resistance, and tumorigenesis in mouse xenotransplantation model. Based on the analysis of ICAM1-regulated proteins, we speculated that ICAM1 regulates CSC properties partly through an ICAM1-PTTG1IP-p53-DNMT1 pathway. Moreover, we observed that ICAM1 and CD44 could have a compensation effect on maintaining the stemness characteristics of ESCC, suggesting that the combination of multi-targeting therapies should be under serious consideration to acquire a more potent therapeutic effect on CSC of ESCC. PMID:26571024

  19. Tumor cell differentiation by marker free fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Brantsch, Marco; Biller, Philipp; Kioschis, Petra; Kessler, Waltraud

    2011-02-01

    Autofluorescence and Raman spectra, images and decay kinetics of U251-MG glioblastoma cells prior and after activation of tumor suppressor genes are compared. While phase contrast images and fluorescence patterns of the tumor (control) cells and the less malignant cells are similar, differences can be deduced from autofluorescence spectra and decay times. In particular, upon excitation around 375nm, the fluorescence ratio of the protein bound and the free coenzyme NADH depends on the state of malignancy. Slight differences are also observed in Raman spectra of these cell lines, in particular at wave numbers around 970 cm-1. While larger numbers of fluorescence and Raman spectra are evaluated by the method of multivariate data analysis, additional information is obtained from spectral images and fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM).

  20. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kengo Shimohira, Masashi; Sasaki, Shigeru Iwata, Hiromitsu Nishikawa, Hiroko Ogino, Hiroyuki Hara, Masaki; Hashizume, Takuya Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.

  1. Radioimmunoassay of tumor markers in serum of patients with renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoni-Voutsas, M.; Glaubitt, D.; Wagner, W.; Lichtenberg, T.

    1984-01-01

    Having noted an increased serum level of TPA and CEA in patients with renal carcinoma the authors extended these studies by using a larger number of tumor markers. In 15 patients (11 men and 4 women after menopause) aged 33 to 74 years who had renal carcinoma, among them 3 with tumor metastases, the serum concentration of TPA, CA 12-5, CEA, AFP, ferritin, prolactin, ..beta..-HCG, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. Monoclonal antibodies were used in the determination of serum CA 12-5 and CEA. In all patients surgical treatment, irradiation, or cytostatic therapy had not been performed. In serum the normal range was exceeded by TPA in 7 patients, CA 12-5 in 3, CEA and AFP in one each, ferritin in 12, prolactin in 2, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in 10 patients. In one man serum prolactin was reduced. Serum ..beta..-HCG was normal in all patients. According to these results serum ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin are of great value as tumor markers in patients with renal carcinoma. In several patients the increase of serum ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin may be ascribed partly to deterioration of renal function. As no consistent patterns of tumor markers in serum were observed it is recommended to determine several tumor markers and not only one of them during the follow-up of patients. Radioimmunoassays for measuring the serum level of tumor markers, especially ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin, may considerably assist in the management of patients with renal carcinoma by providing early information about tumor recurrence or metastases.

  2. Reporting recommendations for tumor marker prognostic studies (REMARK): explanation and elaboration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Reporting Recommendations for Tumor Marker Prognostic Studies (REMARK) checklist consists of 20 items to report for published tumor marker prognostic studies. It was developed to address widespread deficiencies in the reporting of such studies. In this paper we expand on the REMARK checklist to enhance its use and effectiveness through better understanding of the intent of each item and why the information is important to report. Methods REMARK recommends including a transparent and full description of research goals and hypotheses, subject selection, specimen and assay considerations, marker measurement methods, statistical design and analysis, and study results. Each checklist item is explained and accompanied by published examples of good reporting, and relevant empirical evidence of the quality of reporting. We give prominence to discussion of the 'REMARK profile', a suggested tabular format for summarizing key study details. Summary The paper provides a comprehensive overview to educate on good reporting and provide a valuable reference for the many issues to consider when designing, conducting, and analyzing tumor marker studies and prognostic studies in medicine in general. To encourage dissemination of the Reporting Recommendations for Tumor Marker Prognostic Studies (REMARK): Explanation and Elaboration, this article has also been published in PLoS Medicine. PMID:22642691

  3. Cancer procoagulant: a factor X activator, tumor marker and growth factor from malignant tissue.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Mielicki, W P

    1997-03-01

    Hemostatic abnormalities associated with malignant disease led to the search for and discovery of a proteolytic enzyme that activated factor X in the blood coagulation cascade. It was named cancer procoagulant (CP). CP is a cysteine proteinase that is found in malignant and fetal (human amnion-chorion) tissue; it has not been found in normally differentiated tissue. It is a calcium-dependent, Mn2+ stimulated enzyme that has enhanced activity and inhibition in a reduced environment. This review presents a complete compilation and discussion of the known chemical and enzymatic characteristics of CP as well as many purification and assay procedures. Several unique properties of these procedures are described. Some problems and controversies are highlighted in each of the sections. An immunoassay for CP as a tumor marker and some of its potential applications in the diagnosis and monitoring of cancer are reviewed. Some therapeutic implications of CP are noted in light of the observation that antibodies to CP block the metastatic seeding of lung colonies in vivo and diminish the viability of tumor cells in vitro. Finally, comments about the relationship between tissue factor and CP in the malignant cells are provided.

  4. Transgelin: a potentially useful diagnostic marker differentially expressed in triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Deepthi; Kimler, Bruce F; Nothnick, Warren B; Davis, Marilyn K; Fan, Fang; Tawfik, Ossama

    2015-06-01

    Triple negative (TN) (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR] and HER2-) are highly aggressive, rapidly growing, hormone-unresponsive tumors diagnosed at later stage that affect younger women with shorter overall survival. Most TN tumors are of the basal type. For the remainder, identification of target markers for effective treatment strategies remains a challenge. Transgelin (TGLN) is a 22-kd actin-binding protein of the calponin family. It is one of the earliest markers of smooth muscle differentiation. TGLN has been shown to have important biologic activities including regulating muscle fiber contractility, cell migration, and tumor suppression. We examined TGLN expression in the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. TGLN expression was examined as a function of tumor size, grade, histologic type, lymph node status, patients' age and overall survival, ER, PR, HER2, and Ki-67 in 101 tumors that included 35 luminal A, 28 luminal B, 4 HER2, and 34 TN types. TGLN positivity (defined as 2+ or 3+) was associated with more aggressive tumors (10% of grade I/II tumors were TGLN+ versus 53% of grade III tumors; P < .001), high Ki-67 count, and low ER and PR expression (P < .001) but not with tumor size, age, or lymph node metastasis. TN (n = 34) tumors were 7.7 times more likely to be TGLN+ than non-TN (n = 67) tumors (77% versus 10%, respectively; P < .001). TGLN may be an excellent diagnostic marker of TN tumors and could be useful in stratification of patients. TGLN may also prove a potential target for future treatment strategies.

  5. Volatile compounds as potential defective coffee beans' markers.

    PubMed

    Toci, Aline T; Farah, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Although Brazil is the largest raw coffee producer and exporter in the world, a large amount of its Arabica coffee production is considered inappropriate for exportation. This by-product of coffee industry is called PVA due to the presence of black (P), green (V) and sour (A) defective beans, which are known to contribute considerably for cup quality decrease. Data on the volatile composition of Brazilian defective coffee beans are scarce. In this study, we evaluated the volatile composition of defective coffee beans (two lots) compared to good quality beans from the respective lots. Potential defective beans' markers were identified. In the raw samples, 2-methylpyrazine and 2-furylmethanol acetate were identified only in black-immature beans and butyrolactone only in sour beans, while benzaldehyde and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine showed to be potential markers of defective beans in general. In the roasted PVA beans, pyrazine, 2,3-butanediol meso, 2-methyl-5-(1-propenyl)pyrazine, hexanoic acid, 4-ethyl-guayacol and isopropyl p-cresol sulfide also showed to be potential defective coffee beans' markers.

  6. Elevated serum tumor markers in patients with testicular cancer after induction chemotherapy due to a reservoir of markers in cystic differentiated mature teratoma.

    PubMed

    van der Gaast, A; Hoekstra, J W; Croles, J J; Splinter, T A

    1991-04-01

    Elevated serum tumor markers in patients with testicular cancer after induction chemotherapy indicate in most instances the presence of residual malignant disease. We describe 2 patients with elevated tumor markers after chemotherapy and before retroperitoneal lymph node dissection who did not prove to have residual malignant disease but cystic differentiated mature teratoma with a high content of alpha-fetoprotein and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin, respectively, in the cysts. It is postulated that leakage of the contents of these cysts to the plasma compartment was responsible for maintaining elevated serum tumor marker levels. Recognition of such entities is of consequence since unnecessary salvage chemotherapy in these patients may be avoided.

  7. An accurate algorithm to match imperfectly matched images for lung tumor detection without markers.

    PubMed

    Rozario, Timothy; Bereg, Sergey; Yan, Yulong; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Kearney, Vasant; Jiang, Lan; Mao, Weihua

    2015-05-08

    In order to locate lung tumors on kV projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are created and compared with projection images. However, lung tumors always move due to respiration and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs. In addition, global image intensity discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image orientations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported to match imperfectly matched projection images and DRRs. The kV projection images were matched with different DRRs in two steps. Preprocessing was performed in advance to generate two sets of DRRs. The tumors were removed from the planning 3D CT for a single phase of planning 4D CT images using planning contours of tumors. DRRs of background and DRRs of tumors were generated separately for every projection angle. The first step was to match projection images with DRRs of background signals. This method divided global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities were evaluated by calculating normalized cross-correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) was automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single projection tile that had a bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel-based linear transformation was determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The background DRRs were transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contained only the tumor. The second step was to register DRRs of tumors to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. This method was successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (BrainLAB) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers were

  8. The emerging role of the molecular marker p27 in the differential diagnosis of adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sofia S; Morais, Tiago; Costa, Madalena M; Monteiro, Mariana P; Pignatelli, Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Malignant adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) are rare and highly aggressive; conversely, benign tumors are common and frequently found incidentally (the so-called incidentalomas). Currently, the use of molecular markers in the diagnosis of ACTs is still controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the molecular profile of different ACTs with the purpose of identifying markers useful for differentiating between these tumors. The ACTs that were studied (n=31) included nonfunctioning adenomas (ACAn)/incidentalomas (n=13), functioning adenomas with Cushing's syndrome (ACAc) (n=7), and carcinomas (n=11); normal adrenal glands (n=12) were used as controls. For each sample, the percentage area stained for the markers StAR, IGF2, IGF1R, p53, MDM2, p21, p27, cyclin D1, Ki-67, β-catenin, and E-cadherin was quantified using a morphometric computerized tool. IGF2, p27, cyclin D1, and Ki-67 were the markers for which the percentage of stained area was significantly higher in carcinoma samples than in adenoma samples. Ki-67 and p27 were the markers that exhibited the highest discriminative power for differential diagnosis between carcinomas and all type of adenomas, while IGF2 and StAR were only found to be useful for differentiating between carcinomas and ACAn and between carcinomas and ACAc respectively. The usefulness of Ki-67 has been recognized before in the differential diagnosis of malignant tumors. The additional use of p27 as an elective marker to distinguish benign ACTs from malignant ACTs should be considered. PMID:23925558

  9. Potentials and Limitations of Guiding Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Set-Up on Liver-Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderink, Wouter; Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Boer, Hans de; Levendag, Peter; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated the potentials and limitations of guiding liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) set-up on liver-implanted fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing compression-supported SBRT in a stereotactic body frame received fluoroscopy at treatment preparation and before each treatment fraction. In fluoroscopic videos we localized the markers and diaphragm tip at expiration and the spine (measurements on free-breathing and abdominal compression). Day-to-day displacements, rotations (markers only), and deformations were determined. Marker guidance was compared to conventional set-up strategies in treatment set-up simulations. Results: For compression, day-to-day motion of markers with respect to their centers of mass (COM) was {sigma} = 0.9 mm (random error SD), {Sigma} = 0.4 mm (systematic error SD), and <2.1 mm (maximum). Consequently, assuming that markers were closely surrounding spherical tumors, marker COM-guided set-up would have required safety margins of {approx}2 mm. Using marker COM as the gold standard, other set-up methods (using no correction, spine registration, and diaphragm tip craniocaudal registration) resulted in set-up errors of 1.4 mm < {sigma} < 2.8 mm, 2.6 mm < {Sigma} < 5.1 mm, and 6.3 mm < max < 12.4 mm. Day-to-day intermarker motion of <16.7%, 2.2% median, and rotations between 3.5{sup o} and 7.2{sup o} were observed. For markers not surrounding the tumor, e.g., 5 cm between respective COMs, these changes could effect residual tumor set-up errors up to 8.4 mm, 1.1 mm median (deformations), and 3.1 mm to 6.3 mm (rotations). Compression did not systematically contribute to deformations and rotations, since similar results were observed for free-breathing. Conclusions: If markers can be implanted near and around the tumor, residual set-up errors by marker guidance are small compared to those of conventional set-up methods, allowing high-precision tumor radiation set-up. However, substantial

  10. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P < or = .005) correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development. PMID:19724681

  11. Interfractional Position Variation of Pancreatic Tumors Quantified Using Intratumoral Fiducial Markers and Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Astrid van der; Wognum, Silvia; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Jong, Rianne de; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Fockens, Paul; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional pancreatic position variation using fiducial markers visible on daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In addition, we analyzed possible migration of the markers to investigate their suitability for tumor localization. Methods and Materials: For 13 pancreatic cancer patients with implanted Visicoil markers, CBCT scans were obtained before 17 to 25 fractions (300 CBCTs in total). Image registration with the reference CT was used to determine the displacement of the 2 to 3 markers relative to bony anatomy and to each other. We analyzed the distance between marker pairs as a function of time to identify marker registration error (SD of linear fit residuals) and possible marker migration. For each patient, we determined the mean displacement of markers relative to the reference CT (systematic position error) and the spread in displacements (random position error). From this, we calculated the group systematic error, Σ, and group random error, σ. Results: Marker pair distances showed slight trends with time (range, −0.14 to 0.14 mm/day), possibly due to tissue deformation, but no shifts that would indicate marker migration. The mean SD of the fit residuals was 0.8 mm. We found large interfractional position variations, with for 116 of 300 (39%) fractions a 3-dimensional vector displacement of >10 mm. The spread in displacement varied significantly (P<.01) between patients, from a vector range of 9.1 mm to one of 24.6 mm. For the patient group, Σ was 3.8, 6.6, and 3.5 mm; and σ was 3.6, 4.7 and 2.5 mm, in left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior directions, respectively. Conclusions: We found large systematic displacements of the fiducial markers relative to bony anatomy, in addition to wide distributions of displacement. These results for interfractional position variation confirm the potential benefit of using fiducial markers rather than bony anatomy for daily online

  12. Validation of tumor markers in central nervous system germ cell tumors by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dowhan; Lee, Da Hye; Choi, Junjeong; Shim, Kyu Won; Kim, Se Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic protocols for treatment of germinomas and non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCTs) are completely different, so it is important to distinguish pure germinomas from NGGCTs. As it can be difficult to diagnose by morphology alone, immunohisto-chemistry (IHC) has been widely used as an ancillary test to improve diagnostic accuracy. However, IHC has limitations due to the misinterpretation of results or the aberrant loss of immunoreactivity. However, real-time RT-PCR has certain advantages over IHC, including its quantitative nature. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of real-time RT-PCR on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks for the diagnosis of germ cell tumors of the central nervous system. We selected eight markers of germ cell tumors using a literature search, and validated them using real-time RT-PCR. Among them, POU5F1, NANOG and TGFB2 were statistically significant (P=0.05) in multiple comparisons (MANOVA) of three groups (pure germinomas, mature teratomas and malignant germ cell tumors). Two-group (pure germinomas and NGGCTs) discriminant analysis achieved a 70.0% success rate in cross-validation. We concluded that real-time RT-PCR using FFPE tissue has adequate validating power comparable to IHC in the diagnosis of central nervous system germ cell tumors; therefore, when IHC is not available, not conclusive or not informative, RT-PCR is a potential alternative to a repeat biopsy.

  13. Validation of tumor markers in central nervous system germ cell tumors by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dowhan; Lee, Da Hye; Choi, Junjeong; Shim, Kyu Won; Kim, Se Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic protocols for treatment of germinomas and non-germinomatous germ cell tumors (NGGCTs) are completely different, so it is important to distinguish pure germinomas from NGGCTs. As it can be difficult to diagnose by morphology alone, immunohisto-chemistry (IHC) has been widely used as an ancillary test to improve diagnostic accuracy. However, IHC has limitations due to the misinterpretation of results or the aberrant loss of immunoreactivity. However, real-time RT-PCR has certain advantages over IHC, including its quantitative nature. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of real-time RT-PCR on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks for the diagnosis of germ cell tumors of the central nervous system. We selected eight markers of germ cell tumors using a literature search, and validated them using real-time RT-PCR. Among them, POU5F1, NANOG and TGFB2 were statistically significant (P=0.05) in multiple comparisons (MANOVA) of three groups (pure germinomas, mature teratomas and malignant germ cell tumors). Two-group (pure germinomas and NGGCTs) discriminant analysis achieved a 70.0% success rate in cross-validation. We concluded that real-time RT-PCR using FFPE tissue has adequate validating power comparable to IHC in the diagnosis of central nervous system germ cell tumors; therefore, when IHC is not available, not conclusive or not informative, RT-PCR is a potential alternative to a repeat biopsy. PMID:23124437

  14. 53BP1 foci as a marker of tumor cell radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Markova, E; Vasilyev, S; Belyaev, I

    2015-01-01

    Predicting tumor radiosensitivity has yet to be routinely integrated into radiotherapy. We analyzed the possibility to assess radiosensitivity of tumor cells based on endogenous and radiation-induced 53BP1 foci which are molecular markers of DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In eleven tumor cell lines of different origin, radiosensitivity was assessed by surviving cell fraction following irradiation with 2 Gy (SF2). 53BP1 foci were measured at 4 and 12 h post-irradiation by confocal laser microscopy and dedicated software. The correlation of 53BP1 foci and their post-irradiation kinetics with SF2 was assessed using Spearman rank test. The SF2 correlated with both excess of radiation-induced 53BP1 foci per cell at 4 h after irradiation and decay in number of 53BP1 foci from 4 to 12 h post-irradiation. The fraction of cells with multiple endogenous 53BP1 foci also correlated with SF2 of tumor cells. We conclude that the radiosensitivity of tumor cells can be predicted by kinetics of formation and decay of 53BP1 foci after irradiation. For the first time we report that the fraction of cells with multiple endogenous 53BP1 foci can be used as a marker of tumor cell radiosensitivity. PMID:26278144

  15. NHERF1/EBP50 and NF2 as diagnostic markers for choroid plexus tumors.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Mobley, Bret C; Orr, Brent A; Shang, Ping; Lehman, Norman L; Zhu, Xiaoping; O'Neill, Thomas J; Rajaram, Veena; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Timmons, Charles F; Raisanen, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein NHERF1 (Na/H exchanger-3 regulatory factor-1) and its associated ezrin-radixin-moesin-merlin/neurofibromin-2 (ERM-NF2) family proteins are required for epithelial morphogenesis and have been implicated in cancer progression. NHERF1 is expressed in ependymal cells and constitutes a highly sensitive diagnostic marker for ependymoma, where it labels membrane polarity structures. Since NHERF1 and ERM-NF2 proteins show polarized expression in choroid plexus (CP) cells, we tested their diagnostic utility in CP neoplasms. NHERF1 immunohistochemistry in 43 adult and pediatric tumors with papillary morphology revealed strong apical plasma membrane staining in CP papilloma (WHO grade I) and cytoplasmic expression in CP carcinoma (WHO grade III). Ezrin and moesin showed similar but less distinctive staining. NHERF1 also labeled papillary tumors of the pineal region in a microlumen and focal apical membrane pattern, suggestive of a transitional morphology between CP papilloma and ependymoma. CP tumors of all grades could be differentiated from metastatic carcinomas with papillary architecture by NF2, which showed polarized membranous staining in CP tumors. NHERF1 and NF2 immunohistochemistry showed enhanced sensitivity and specificity for CP tumors compared to commonly used markers, including cytokeratins and Kir7.1, emerging as reliable diagnostic tools for the differential diagnosis of papillary tumors of the central nervous system. PMID:27229317

  16. Dosimetric impact of gold markers implanted closely to lung tumors: a Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Sawada, Akira; Ishihara, Yoshitomo; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Kokubo, Masaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-05-08

    We are developing an innovative dynamic tumor tracking irradiation technique using gold markers implanted around a tumor as a surrogate signal, a real-time marker detection system, and a gimbaled X-ray head in the Vero4DRT. The gold markers implanted in a normal organ will produce uncertainty in the dose calculation during treatment planning because the photon mass attenuation coefficient of a gold marker is much larger than that of normal tissue. The purpose of this study was to simulate the dose variation near the gold markers in a lung irradiated by a photon beam using the Monte Carlo method. First, the single-beam and the opposing-beam geometries were simulated using both water and lung phantoms. Subsequently, the relative dose profiles were calculated using a stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment plan for a lung cancer patient having gold markers along the anterior-posterior (AP) and right-left (RL) directions. For the single beam, the dose at the gold marker-phantom interface laterally along the perpendicular to the beam axis increased by a factor of 1.35 in the water phantom and 1.58 in the lung phantom, respectively. Furthermore, the entrance dose at the interface along the beam axis increased by a factor of 1.63 in the water phantom and 1.91 in the lung phantom, while the exit dose increased by a factor of 1.00 in the water phantom and 1.12 in the lung phantom, respectively. On the other hand, both dose escalations and dose de-escalations were canceled by each beam for opposing portal beams with the same beam weight. For SBRT patient data, the dose at the gold marker edge located in the tumor increased by a factor of 1.30 in both AP and RL directions. In clinical cases, dose escalations were observed at the small area where the distance between a gold marker and the lung tumor was ≤ 5 mm, and it would be clinically negligible in multibeam treatments, although further investigation may be required.

  17. Transcriptional repression of cancer stem cell marker CD133 by tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    Park, E K; Lee, J C; Park, J W; Bang, S Y; Yi, S A; Kim, B K; Park, J H; Kwon, S H; You, J S; Nam, S W; Cho, E J; Han, J W

    2015-01-01

    Novel therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome cancer recurrence, metastasis, and resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are major contributors to the malignant transformation of cells due to their capacity for self-renewal. Although various CSC markers have been identified in several types of tumors, they are primarily used as cancer-prediction markers and for the isolation of CSC populations. CD133, one of the best-characterized CSC markers in distinct solid tumor types, was shown to be correlated with CSC tumor-initiating capacity; however, the regulation of CD133 expression and its function in cancer are poorly understood. Here, we show that CD133 expression is negatively regulated by direct binding of the p53 tumor suppressor protein to a noncanonical p53-binding sequence in the CD133 promoter. Binding of p53 recruits Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) to the CD133 promoter and subsequently suppresses CD133 expression by reducing histone H3 acetylation. Furthermore, CD133 depletion suppresses tumor cell proliferation, colony formation, and the expression of core stemness transcription factors including NANOG, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), SOX2, and c-MYC. Critically, the anti-proliferative effects of p53 are antagonized by rescue of CD133 expression in a p53 overexpressing cell line, indicating that the tumor suppressive activity of p53 might be mediated by CD133 suppression. Taken together, our results suggest that p53-mediated transcriptional regulation of CD133 is a key underlying mechanism for controlling the growth and tumor-initiating capacity of CSCs and provide a novel perspective on targeting CSCs for cancer therapy. PMID:26539911

  18. A comparative study of four serological tumor markers for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Shawn R; Beason, Kevin L; Bryant, Sabrina; Johnson, James T; Jackson, Margaret; Wilson, Cynthia; Holifield, Kay; Vincent, Charlton; Hall, Margot

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer in the world. Circulating tumor antigens are often used as a minimally invasive tool for noting breast cancer progression. The objective of this study was to compare four tumor antigens (CA 15-3, CA 27.29, alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], and carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA]) for their diagnostic efficacy in breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that CA 15-3 would proved to be superior to CA 27.29, CEA, and AFP in assay performance. Tumor marker assays were performed according to the manufacturers' directions. Assays used in this study were CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 (Fujirebio Diagnostics/Centocor Inc.), AFP (Abbott Inc.), and CEA (Hybritech Inc.). A total of 554 patient samples were obtained from an area hospital, plus 200 healthy adult samples which were used for the determination of normal reference intervals. The patients included patients with no disease (184), with non-malignant disease (11), with breast cancer (87), and with other types of cancer (272). Diagnostic percent sensitivities for each marker were: CA 15-3 (63%), CA 27.29 (39%), CEA (22%), and AFP (22%). Diagnostic specificities for each marker were comparable, ranging from 80-88%. Analytical parameters were evaluated for the assays and compared favorably. We concluded that CA 15-3 was the best tumor antigen for use as a diagnostic aid and monitoring agent.

  19. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  20. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAIYING; MOLINA, JULIAN; JIANG, JOHN; FERBER, MATTHEW; PRUTHI, SANDHYA; JATKOE, TIMOTHY; DERECHO, CARLO; RAJPUROHIT, YASHODA; ZHENG, JIAN; WANG, YIXIN

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  1. Combined Scintigraphy and Tumor Marker Analysis Predicts Unfavorable Histopathology of Neuroblastic Tumors with High Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Fendler, Wolfgang Peter; Wenter, Vera; Thornton, Henriette Ingrid; Ilhan, Harun; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Coppenrath, Eva; Schmid, Irene; Bartenstein, Peter; Pfluger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to improve the prediction of unfavorable histopathology (UH) in neuroblastic tumors through combined imaging and biochemical parameters. Methods 123I-MIBG SPECT and MRI was performed before surgical resection or biopsy in 47 consecutive pediatric patients with neuroblastic tumor. Semi-quantitative tumor-to-liver count-rate ratio (TLCRR), MRI tumor size and margins, urine catecholamine and NSE blood levels of neuron specific enolase (NSE) were recorded. Accuracy of single and combined variables for prediction of UH was tested by ROC analysis with Bonferroni correction. Results 34 of 47 patients had UH based on the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC). TLCRR and serum NSE both predicted UH with moderate accuracy. Optimal cut-off for TLCRR was 2.0, resulting in 68% sensitivity and 100% specificity (AUC-ROC 0.86, p < 0.001). Optimal cut-off for NSE was 25.8 ng/ml, resulting in 74% sensitivity and 85% specificity (AUC-ROC 0.81, p = 0.001). Combination of TLCRR/NSE criteria reduced false negative findings from 11/9 to only five, with improved sensitivity and specificity of 85% (AUC-ROC 0.85, p < 0.001). Conclusion Strong 123I-MIBG uptake and high serum level of NSE were each predictive of UH. Combined analysis of both parameters improved the prediction of UH in patients with neuroblastic tumor. MRI parameters and urine catecholamine levels did not predict UH. PMID:26177109

  2. MAP17 and SGLT1 Protein Expression Levels as Prognostic Markers for Cervical Tumor Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Marco; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Felipe-Abrio, Blanca; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A.; Lucena-Cacace, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Lleonart, Matilde; Roncador, Guiovanna; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2013-01-01

    MAP17 is a membrane-associated protein that is overexpressed in human tumors. Because the expression of MAP17 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through SGLT1 in cancer cells, in the present work, we investigated whether MAP17 and/or SGLT1 might be markers for the activity of treatments involving oxidative stress, such as cisplatin or radiotherapy. First, we confirmed transcriptional alterations in genes involved in the oxidative stress induced by MAP17 expression in HeLa cervical tumor cells and found that Hela cells expressing MAP17 were more sensitive to therapies that induce ROS than were parental cells. Furthermore, MAP17 increased glucose uptake through SGLT receptors. We then analyzed MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels in cervical tumors treated with cisplatin plus radiotherapy and correlated the expression levels with patient survival. MAP17 and SGLT1 were expressed in approximately 70% and 50% of cervical tumors of different types, respectively, but they were not expressed in adenoma tumors. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels. High levels of either MAP17 or SGLT1 correlated with improved patient survival after treatment. However, the patients with high levels of both MAP17 and SGLT1 survived through the end of this study. Therefore, the combination of high MAP17 and SGLT1 levels is a marker for good prognosis in patients with cervical tumors after cisplatin plus radiotherapy treatment. These results also suggest that the use of MAP17 and SGLT1 markers may identify patients who are likely to exhibit a better response to treatments that boost oxidative stress in other cancer types. PMID:23418532

  3. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2007-10-01

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  4. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G; Sharp, Gregory C; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-10-21

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  5. CA19-9: A promising tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hidaka, A.; Nakashima, T.; Ohta, H.; Torizuka, K.; Naito, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate CA19-9 as a tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma (PC), serum levels of CA19-9 were compared with those of CEA and elastase-1 in 56 patients, consisted of 43 cases with histologically proven adenocarcinomas and 13 cases with chronic pancreatitis. Serum levels were determined by using RIA kit obtained from CIS, France (CA19-9 and CEA) and Abbot (elastase-1). CA19-9 gave the highest accuracy among tumor markers the authors have studied and serum levels were markedly elevated over 100U/ml in 30 (70%) cases with PC, whereas none in chronic pancreatitis. CA19-9 values were closely related to the tumor size and the presence or absence of metastsis on CT findings. Small tumors of less than 3cm in diameter, although the site of tumor was limited to the head of the pancreas, showed positive results in 2 out of 5 cases. Furthermore, CA19-9 was at a level of less than 22U/ml in 98 normal controls and was found to be elevated in only 4 (3%) out of 124 patients with benign diseases, including liver diseases, gastric ulcer, cholelithiasis, and so on. These results indicate that CA19-9 is much better in diagnosis and management of PC than is CEA.

  6. Histopathologic Consideration of Fiducial Gold Markers Inserted for Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy Against Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, Mikado; Yamazaki, Koichi; Kubota, Kanako C.; Itoh, Tomoo; Onimaru, Rikiya; Cho, Yasushi; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kaga, Kichizo; Onodera, Yuya; Ogura, Shigeaki; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Shirato, Hiroki Nishimura, Masaharu

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Internal fiducial gold markers, safely inserted with bronchoscopy, have been used in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy for lung cancer. We investigated the histopathologic findings at several points after the insertion of the gold markers. Methods and Materials: Sixteen gold markers were inserted for preoperative marking in 7 patients who subsequently underwent partial resection of tumors by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery within 7 days. Results: Fibrotic changes and hyperplasia of type 2 pneumocytes around the markers were seen 5 or 7 days after insertion, and fibrin exudation without fibrosis was detected 1 or 2 days after insertion. Conclusions: Because fibroblastic changes start approximately 5 days after gold marker insertion, real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy should be started >5 days after gold marker insertion.

  7. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes for the detection of tumor markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Ping; Tu, Datao; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Xueyuan

    2015-02-01

    Sensitive and specific biodetection of tumor markers is essential for early-stage cancer diagnosis and therapy, and will ultimately increase the patient survival rate. As a new generation of luminescent bioprobes, lanthanide (Ln3+)-doped inorganic luminescent nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest for a variety of biomedical applications due to their superior physicochemical properties. In this feature article, we provide a brief overview of the most recent advances in the development of Ln3+-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes and their promising applications for in vitro detection of tumor markers with an emphasis on the establishment of state-of-the-art assay techniques, such as heterogeneous time-resolved (TR) luminescent bioassay, dissolution-enhanced luminescent bioassay, upconversion (UC) luminescent bioassay, homogeneous TR Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and UC-FRET bioassays. Some future prospects and efforts towards this emerging field are also envisioned.

  8. Methylation markers: a potential force driving cancer diagnostics forward.

    PubMed

    Khandige, Surabhi; Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; Kapettu, Satyamoorthy

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics, transcending genetics, genomics, and molecular biology, is now poised to be the avant-garde beacon of biological science. The rise of DNA methylation studies marks a new dawn in the field of epigenetics, which only a few decades ago was largely underestimated, but is now a dynamic area of research challenging and revising traditional paradigms of gene expression and behavior. Cancer research enjoys a major share of this attention to DNA methylation and it has been widely accepted for some time now that cancer is as much an epigenetic phenomenon as it is genetic. Epigenetic lesions and perturbations are acquired during the life of an individual and accumulate with aging and represent the flip side of the same coin that bears genetic mutations. Both events, either individually or in cooperation, result in the development and progression of cancer. Epigenetic research and the hunt for strong methylation markers has been ably mitigated by new and improved high throughput technology that has improved the efficacy and enabled the rapid progress of biomarker evaluation and validation. This review looks into some of the recent strides in biomarker research dealing exclusively with methylation markers and the potential key they may hold to the resilient door shut tight on cancer diagnostics and treatment.

  9. Tumor Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Richard E.

    2000-04-18

    Veterinary oncology has seen tremendous growth since the first textbook devoted to the subject in the late 1970s. Cancer is usually at the top of the list when owners ask about health concerns for their pets (and it remains the leading cause of death among dogs and cats). The volume, Veterinary Oncology Secrets, joins others in the series by presenting in question and answer format the type of information so important to veterinary students, interns and residents, general practitioners, and specialists in a number of clinical fields.

  10. Preliminary clinical evaluation of a protein chip for tumor marker serodiagnosis of various cancers.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Kruavon; Laisupasin, Pikul; Dhepakson, Panadda; Warachit, Jiranan; Jantraraksri, Udom; Issaragrisil, Surapol; Yang, Xiao-Li; Hus, Geng-Xi

    2003-09-01

    This preliminary study aimed to investigate sensitivity and specificity of a protein chip system for multi-tumor marker serodiagnosis of ten types of cancers, and to understand the possible clinical applications of this protein chip for the Thai population. The specific cancers diagnosed by this protein chip are lung, breast, liver, cervix, colo-rectal, stomach, ovary, esophagus, prostate and pancreas cancers. We analyzed 215 serum samples of which 165 were obtained from clinically confirmed cancer patients and 50 from healthy people with no evidence of cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of the protein chip were 82.4% and 94.0%, respectively. The success rate of the protein chip for detecting all 10 types of cancers varied from 57% to 100%. The value of the simultaneous measurement of multiple tumor markers using the protein chip for cancer screening lied in the higher sensitivity compared to using single tumor markers for each type of cancer. In short, protein chips may be useful in mass screening for cancer during health checkups as well as for metastasis follow-up of cancer patients.

  11. Immunohistochemical markers for tumor associated macrophages and survival in advanced classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Espiridión, Beatriz; Martin-Moreno, Ana M.; Montalbán, Carlos; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Vega, Francisco; Younes, Anas; Piris, Miguel A.; Garcia, Juan F.

    2012-01-01

    A subset of patients with advanced classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma is refractory to standard therapies. Therefore, it is relevant to identify new biologically-based prognostic markers. Recently, tumor associated macrophages have been proposed as a factor that predicts survival, although contradictory results have also been reported. Here we analyzed four macrophage markers (CD68, CD163, LYZ, and STAT1) using immunohistochemistry and automated quantification, in two independent series of advanced classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (n=266 and 103 patients, respectively). Our results did not confirm that specific macrophage immunohistochemical markers could be used as surrogates for gene expression profiling studies. Survival analyses did not show correlation between CD163, LYZ or STAT1 and either failure-free or disease-specific survival. There was an association between CD68 and disease-specific survival, but it was not consistent in both series. In conclusion, individual tumor associated macrophage markers cannot be used to predict outcome before technical standardization and prospective validation in independent series of patients with comparable stages and treatments. PMID:22315492

  12. Targeting tumor vasculature: expanding the potential of DNA cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; Facciponte, John G; De Sanctis, Francesco; Facciabene, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Targeting the tumor vasculature with anti-angiogenesis modalities is a bona fide validated approach that has complemented cancer treatment paradigms. Tumor vasculature antigens (TVA) can be immunologically targeted and offers multiple theoretical advantages that may enhance existing strategies against cancer. We focused on tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1/CD248) as a model TVA since it is broadly expressed on many different cancers. Our DNA-based vaccine approach demonstrated that CD248 can be effectively targeted immunologically; anti-tumor responses were generated in several mouse models; and CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cell responses were elicited against peptides derived from CD248 protein. Our work supports our contention that CD248 is a novel immunotherapeutic target for cancer treatment and highlights the efficient, safe and translatable use of DNA-based immunotherapy. We next briefly highlight ongoing investigations targeting CD248 with antibodies as a diagnostic imaging agent and as a therapeutic antibody in an early clinical trial. The optimal approach for generating effective DNA-based cancer vaccines for several tumor types may be a combinatorial approach that enhances immunogenicity such as combination with chemotherapy. Additional combination approaches are discussed and include those that alleviate the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment induced by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and T regulatory cells. Targeting the tumor vasculature by CD248-based immunological modalities expands the armamentarium against cancer.

  13. [Transcripts of satellite DNA in blood plasma: probable markers of tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Kondratova, V N; Botezatu, I V; Shelepov, V P; Likhtenshtein, A V

    2014-01-01

    A recent study of human normal and tumor tissues revealed a high transcriptional activity of pericentromeric satellite DNA repeats (they produce half of all transcripts in tumor cells that is many times higher than in normal ones). It was found also that the two subtypes of satellite DNA (HSATII and GSATII) are transcribed reciprocally, i.e. there is a sharp prevalence of HSATII transcription in tumors, while GSATII transcription prevails in the corresponding normal tissues. As different RNAs are present in blood plasma, and some of them serve as effectivetumor markers, we attempted for the first time to evaluate satellite HSATII and GSATII RNAs in the blood plasma of healthy donors and cancer patients. The RT-PCR protocol designed for this purpose allowed us to detect transcripts of both HSATII and GSATII repeats. As it has been shown, HSATII transcripts are more abundant than GSATII ones in plasma of healthy donors and vice versa in plasma of cancer patients; these ratios being diametrically opposed to those that exist within the cells. Some suggestions concerning origins of circulating satellite RNAs and their probable role as tumor markers are discussed.

  14. Markers of fibroblast-rich tumor stroma and perivascular cells in serous ovarian cancer: Inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity and impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Corvigno, Sara; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Mezheyeuski, Artur; van der Zee, Ate G.J.; Nijman, Hans W.; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Östman, Arne; Dahlstrand, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Inter- and intra-patient variations in tumor microenvironment of serous ovarian cancer are largely unexplored. We aimed to explore potential co-regulation of tumor stroma characteristics, analyze their concordance in primary and metastatic lesions, and study their impact on survival. A tissue microarray (TMA) with 186 tumors and 91 matched metastases was subjected to immunohistochemistry double staining with endothelial cell marker CD34 and fibroblast and pericyte markers α-SMA, PDGFβR and desmin. Images were digitally analyzed to yield “metrics” related to vasculature and stroma features. Intra-case analyses showed that PDGFβR in perivascular cells and fibroblasts were strongly correlated. Similar findings were observed concerning α-SMA. Most stroma characteristics showed large variations in intra-case comparisons of primary tumors and metastasis. Large PDGFβR-positive stroma fraction and high PDGFβFR positive perivascular intensity were both significantly associated with shorter survival in uni- and multi-variate analyses (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.5; HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.8). In conclusion, we found PDGFβR- and α-SMA-expression to be largely independent of each other but concordantly activated in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts within the primary tumor. Stromal characteristics differed between primary tumors and metastases. PDGFβR in perivascular cells and in fibroblasts may be novel prognostic markers in serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26918345

  15. Down-regulation of tumor endothelial marker 8 suppresses cell proliferation mediated by ERK1/2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chuangjie; Wang, Zhuo; Huang, Leilei; Bai, Lihong; Wang, Yuefeng; Liang, Yingjie; Dou, Chengyun; Wang, Liantang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) was recently suggested as a putative anti-tumor target in several types of human cancer based on its selective overexpression in tumor versus normal endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to detect the potential functions of TEM8 in osteosarcoma. Overall, TEM8 was mainly located in cytoplasm and was up-regulated in osteosarcoma compared to benign bone lesions and adjacent non tumor tissue (ANT). High TEM8 expression group had a significant lower overall survival rate than that in the low TEM8 expression group. TEM8 knock-down by siRNA or shRNA results in significant reduction of osteosarcoma cell growth and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Ablation of TEM8 led to increasing of p21 and p27 and suppression of cyclin D1 mediated by Erk1/2 activity. These findings suggest that down-regulation of TEM8 play an important role in the inhibition of tumorigenesis and development of osteosarcoma. PMID:26996335

  16. Exploring the intrinsic differences among breast tumor subtypes defined using immunohistochemistry markers based on the decision tree

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Tang, Xu-Qing; Bai, Zhonghu; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the intrinsic differences among breast cancer subtypes is of crucial importance for precise diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in diseases of high heterogeneity. The subtypes defined with several layers of information are related but not consistent, especially using immunohistochemistry markers and gene expression profiling. Here, we explored the intrinsic differences among the subtypes defined by the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 based on the decision tree. We identified 30 mRNAs and 7 miRNAs differentially expressed along the tree’s branches. The final signature panel contained 30 mRNAs, whose performance was validated using two public datasets based on 3 well-known classifiers. The network and pathway analysis were explored for feature genes, from which key molecules including FOXQ1 and SFRP1 were revealed to be densely connected with other molecules and participate in the validated metabolic pathways. Our study uncovered the differences among the four IHC-defined breast tumor subtypes at the mRNA and miRNA levels, presented a novel signature for breast tumor subtyping, and identified several key molecules potentially driving the heterogeneity of such tumors. The results help us further understand breast tumor heterogeneity, which could be availed in clinics. PMID:27786176

  17. Protein-bound acrolein: Potential markers for oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Koji; Kanematsu, Masamichi; Sakai, Kensuke; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Hattori, Nobutaka; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyata, Toshio; Noguchi, Noriko; Niki, Etsuo; Osawa, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    Acrolein (CH2=CH—CHO) is known as a ubiquitous pollutant in the environment. Here we show that this notorious aldehyde is not just a pollutant, but also a lipid peroxidation product that could be ubiquitously generated in biological systems. Upon incubation with BSA, acrolein was rapidly incorporated into the protein and generated the protein-linked carbonyl derivative, a putative marker of oxidatively modified proteins under oxidative stress. To verify the presence of protein-bound acrolein in vivo, the mAb (mAb5F6) against the acrolein-modified keyhole limpet hemocyanin was raised. It was found that the acrolein-lysine adduct, Nɛ-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino)lysine, constitutes an epitope of the antibody. Immunohistochemical analysis of atherosclerotic lesions from a human aorta demonstrated that antigenic materials recognized by mAb5F6 indeed constituted the lesions, in which intense positivity was associated primarily with macrophage-derived foam cells and the thickening neointima of arterial walls. The observations that (i) oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein with Cu2+ generated the acrolein-low-density lipoprotein adducts and (ii) the iron-catalyzed oxidation of arachidonate in the presence of protein resulted in the formation of antigenic materials suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids are sources of acrolein that cause the production of protein-bound acrolein. These data suggest that the protein-bound acrolein represents potential markers of oxidative stress and long-term damage to protein in aging, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. PMID:9560197

  18. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  19. p63 as a prognostic marker for giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    kakizaki, Hiroshi; Okada, Kyoji; Torigoe, Tomoaki; Kusumi, Tomomi

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is sometimes difficult to distinguish from other giant-cell-rich tumors such as chondroblastoma (CHB) and aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). The usefulness of p63 as a diagnostic marker for GCT is controversial. While there have been no reports about p63 as a prognostic marker for local recurrence, various p63-positive rates in GCT have been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively whether p63 is useful as a diagnostic marker and/or a prognostic marker for local recurrence of GCT. Methods This study included 36 patients diagnosed with either GCT (n = 16), CHB (n = 9), ABC (n = 7), or non-ossifying fibroma (NOF) (n = 4). p63 immunostaining was performed for all specimens. The mean p63-positive rate was compared with the four diseases and between the recurrent and non-recurrent cases of GCT. Results Although the mean p63-positive rate for GCT (36.3%) was statistically higher than that of all other diseases examined (CHB: 15.2%; ABC: 5.8%; NOF: 3.4%), p63 was not specific for GCT. The mean p63-positive rate for recurrent GCT cases (73.6%) was statistically higher than that for non-recurrent cases (29.1%). Conclusion In the diagnosis of GCT, p63 is a useful but not a conclusive marker. However, p63 did appear to indicate the biological aggressiveness of GCT. Therefore, p63 may help surgeons to estimate the risk of recurrence after surgery and help them to choose the best treatment for each GCT case. PMID:23033898

  20. HER-2 gene amplification, serum nucleosomes, CEA and CA15.3 tumor markers in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zeiwar, M M; Zaki, Seham M; Mohammad, Lamiaa A; Zidan, Amal A; El Nagar, Mona Roshdy

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women in the world, for which tumor markers are needed for early detection, clinical prognistication and monitoring. The study was designed to assess the usefulness of HER-2 gene amplification, serum nucleosomes, CEA and CA15.3 tumor markers in the diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma and analyze whether their levels correlate with the clinicopathological features. The study was carried out on fifty patients with invasive ductal carcinoma and 25 age matched women with benign breast diseases (BBD). Cancer patients were categorised into three subgroups according to absence (-) or presence (+) of axillary lymph nodes (N) or presence of distant metastasis (M+) into: subgroup I (N-) included 15 patients, subgroup II (N+) included 20 patients and subgroup III (M+) included 15 patients. All individuals were subjected to CBC, fasting blood sugar, liver & kidney function tests, CEA and CA15.3 by electrochemiluminescence, serum nucleosomes by cell death detection ELISA and amplification of HER-2 gene by differential PCR. The HER-2 gene PCR results were + ve in 28% of cancer patients; 20% of subgroup I, 25% of subgroup II and 40% of subgroup III, but in none of the BBD patients. HER-2 gene amplification results showed significant positive correlation with tumor grade. Serum nucleosomes showed significant increase in cancer patients as compared to that of BBD group, significant negative correlation with HER-2 gene amplification and significant positive correlation with CA15.3. Serum nucleosomes was the most sensitive marker (76% versus 32% and 50% for CEA & CA15.3 respectively) but the least specific (72% versus 92% and 96% for CEA & CA15.3 respectively). Elevated CEA and CA15.3 levels were detected in 13.3% and 33.3% respectively in node negative patients, these percentage increased in node positive patients to 20% and 40% and in metastatic patients to 66.7% and 80% respectively. In conclusion, serum nucleosomes is

  1. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers.

  2. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers. PMID:27455559

  3. ERG is a novel and reliable marker for endothelial cells in central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Haber, Matthew A; Iranmahboob, Amir; Thomas, Cheddhi; Liu, Mengling; Najjar, Amanda; Zagzag, David

    2015-01-01

    ETS-related gene (ERG) is a transcription factor that has been linked to angiogenesis. Very little research has been done to assess ERG expression in central nervous system (CNS) tumors. We evaluated 57 CNS tumors, including glioblastomas (GBMs) and hemangioblastomas (HBs), as well as two arteriovenous malformations and four samples of normal brain tissue with immunohistochemistry using a specific ERG rabbit monoclonal antibody. In addition, immunostains for CD31, CD34, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were performed on all samples. CD31 demonstrated variable and sometimes weak immunoreactivity for endothelial cells. Furthermore, in 1 case of a GBM, CD34 stained not only endothelial cells, but also tumor cells. In contrast, we observed that ERG was only expressed in the nuclei of endothelial cells, for example, in the hyperplastic vascular complexes that comprise the glomeruloid microvascular proliferation seen in GBMs. Conversely, α-SMA immunoreactivity was identified in the abluminal cells of these hyperplastic vessels. Quantitative evaluation with automated methodology and custom Matlab 2008b software was used to calculate percent staining of ERG in each case. We observed significantly higher quantitative expression of ERG in HBs than in other CNS tumors. Our results show that ERG is a novel, reliable, and specific marker for endothelial cells within CNS tumors that can be used to better study the process of neovascularization.

  4. ERG is a novel and reliable marker for endothelial cells in central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Haber, Matthew A; Iranmahboob, Amir; Thomas, Cheddhi; Liu, Mengling; Najjar, Amanda; Zagzag, David

    2015-01-01

    ETS-related gene (ERG) is a transcription factor that has been linked to angiogenesis. Very little research has been done to assess ERG expression in central nervous system (CNS) tumors. We evaluated 57 CNS tumors, including glioblastomas (GBMs) and hemangioblastomas (HBs), as well as two arteriovenous malformations and four samples of normal brain tissue with immunohistochemistry using a specific ERG rabbit monoclonal antibody. In addition, immunostains for CD31, CD34, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were performed on all samples. CD31 demonstrated variable and sometimes weak immunoreactivity for endothelial cells. Furthermore, in 1 case of a GBM, CD34 stained not only endothelial cells, but also tumor cells. In contrast, we observed that ERG was only expressed in the nuclei of endothelial cells, for example, in the hyperplastic vascular complexes that comprise the glomeruloid microvascular proliferation seen in GBMs. Conversely, α-SMA immunoreactivity was identified in the abluminal cells of these hyperplastic vessels. Quantitative evaluation with automated methodology and custom Matlab 2008b software was used to calculate percent staining of ERG in each case. We observed significantly higher quantitative expression of ERG in HBs than in other CNS tumors. Our results show that ERG is a novel, reliable, and specific marker for endothelial cells within CNS tumors that can be used to better study the process of neovascularization. PMID:25881913

  5. Markers of HPV infection and survival in patients with head and neck tumors.

    PubMed

    Koslabova, Eva; Hamsikova, Eva; Salakova, Martina; Klozar, Jan; Foltynova, Eva; Salkova, Eva; Rotnaglova, Eliska; Ludvikova, Viera; Tachezy, Ruth

    2013-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA prevalence in oral rinses and/or HPV-specific antibody levels in the sera of patients with oral/oropharyngeal cancer have prognostic significance. One hundred and forty-two patients with oral/oropharyngeal tumors were enrolled. The presence of HPV DNA was assayed in tumor tissue and oral rinses and HPV-specific antibodies were assessed in the sera. Oral rinses were collected before treatment and one year after the treatment. Sera were drawn before treatment, one month, and one year after the end of the treatment. Altogether, 59.2% of tumors were HPV positive. The presence of HPV DNA in the tumors correlated with HPV DNA positivity in oral rinses and with HPV-specific antibodies in the sera. Out of 66 patients with HPV-positive oral rinses at enrolment, 84.8% became negative at one-year follow-up, while most patients remained seropositive for HPV-specific antigens. However, the mean titers of HPV16 E6 and/or E7 antibodies at follow-up were significantly lower. Of 16 patients with recurrences at follow-up (alive on second sampling), six were positive at enrolment for HPV16 E6 and/or E7 antibodies. In five of these, no decrease in antibody levels was observed. Titers of antibodies specific for HPV16 capsid antigens did not change during the follow-up. Our data suggest that the detection of antibodies specific for the HPV 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins may serve not only as a marker of HPV etiology, but also as a marker of recurrence and a prognostic indicator in patients with HPV-positive tumors.

  6. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal endocrine cells and neuroendocrine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Mashima, Hirosato; Ohno, Hideki; Yamada, Yumi; Sakai, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells along the colorectum. ► INSL5 is expressed increasingly from proximal colon to rectum. ► INSL5 co-localizes rarely with chromogranin A. ► All rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined expressed INSL5. -- Abstract: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a member of the insulin superfamily, and is a potent agonist for RXFP4. We have shown that INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells (EECs) along the colorectum with a gradient increase toward the rectum. RXFP4 is ubiquitously expressed along the digestive tract. INSL5-positive EECs have little immunoreactivity to chromogranin A (CgA) and might be a unique marker of colorectal EECs. CgA-positive EECs were distributed normally along the colorectum in INSL5 null mice, suggesting that INSL5 is not required for the development of CgA-positive EECs. Exogenous INSL5 did not affect the proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines, and chemically-induced colitis in INSL5 null mice did not show any significant changes in inflammation or mucosal healing compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, all of the rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined co-expressed INSL5 and RXFP4. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal EECs, and INSL5–RXFP4 signaling might play a role in an autocrine/paracrine fashion in the colorectal epithelium and rectal neuroendocrine tumors.

  7. A new scoring system using multiple immunohistochemical markers for diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rath-Wolfson, Lea; Rosenblat, Yevgenia; Halpern, Marisa; Herbert, M; Hammel, I; Gal, Rivka; Leabu, M; Koren, Rumelia

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle neoplasms by light microscopy is difficult. Multiple classification schemes have been proposed based on mitotic rate, nuclear atypia, and the presence or absence of necrosis. None of these classification systems has been entirely successful. This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of selected immunohistochemical and histochemical markers in differentiating these tumors, in addition to accepted morphologic criteria. Ten cases of each of the following: leiomyosarcomas (LMS), atypical leiomyomas (AL), cellular leiomyomas (CL) and usual leiomyomas (UL), were classically evaluated for histological diagnosis and were stained for Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2 and p53 using monoclonal antibodies and the avidin-biotin peroxidase method, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNORs). The number of stained cells was counted in the most positively stained region in a 4 mm2 square cover glass mounted on each slide. The mean value was calculated for each group of tumors. The data for Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2, p53 and AgNOR staining respectively, were significantly higher in LMS by comparison to UL, CL or AL. Because many singular cases had superimposed data being difficult to diagnose, a new scoring system for pathological evaluation was created. The results obtained by this scoring system suggest that immunohistochemical markers Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2, p53 together with the AgNOR staining could be useful, by the scoring system, as an adjunct to the current accepted morphologic criteria in differentiating smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. PMID:16563231

  8. Transcriptional control of the tumor- and hypoxia-marker carbonic anhydrase 9: a one transcription factor (HIF-1) show?

    PubMed Central

    Kaluz, Stefan; Kaluzová, Milota; Liao, Shu-Yuan; Lerman, Michael; Stanbridge, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcriptional activation by hypoxia is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) via binding to the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE). Hypoxia in solid tumors associates with poorer outcome of the disease and reliable cellular markers of tumor hypoxia would represent a valuable diagnostic marker and a potential therapeutic target. In this category, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is one of the most promising candidates. Here, we summarize the knowledge about transcriptional regulation of CA9. The HRE is the central regulatory element in the CA9 promoter, whereas other elements are limited to lesser roles of amplification of signals received at the HRE. The analysis of known mechanisms of activation of CA9 reveals the prominent role of the HIF-1 pathway. Experimental paradigms with uncoupled HIF-1α stability and transcriptional activity (pericellular hypoxia, proteasomal inhibitor) provide evidence that CA9 expression monitors transcriptional activity of HIF-1, rather than the abundance of HIF-1α. Furthermore, these paradigms could provide a corollary to some of the apparently discordant cases (CAIX+, HIF-1α−) or (CAIX−, HIF-1α+) observed in vivo. In conclusion, the existing data support the notion that CA9, due to the unique structure of its promoter, is one of the most sensitive endogenous sensors of HIF-1 activity. PMID:19344680

  9. Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potentials in Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Sari; Lenko, Hanna L; Oja, Sakari; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Pietilä, Timo; Mäkipernaa, Anne

    2016-07-01

    This population-based cross-sectional study evaluates the clinical value of electroretinography and visual evoked potentials in childhood brain tumor survivors. A flash electroretinography and a checkerboard reversal pattern visual evoked potential (or alternatively a flash visual evoked potential) were done for 51 survivors (age 3.8-28.7 years) after a mean follow-up time of 7.6 (1.5-15.1) years. Abnormal electroretinography was obtained in 1 case, bilaterally delayed abnormal visual evoked potentials in 22/51 (43%) cases. Nine of 25 patients with infratentorial tumor location, and altogether 12 out of 31 (39%) patients who did not have tumors involving the visual pathways, had abnormal visual evoked potentials. Abnormal electroretinographies are rarely observed, but abnormal visual evoked potentials are common even without evident anatomic lesions in the visual pathway. Bilateral changes suggest a general and possibly multifactorial toxic/adverse effect on the visual pathway. Electroretinography and visual evoked potential may have clinical and scientific value while evaluating long-term effects of childhood brain tumors and tumor treatment.

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Tumor Marker for Prostate Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Major strides in the early detection, staging, monitoring, and risk stratification of men with prostate cancer have been realized over the last few decades. We have recently witnessed a reduction in the death rate for prostate cancer, stage migration with increased numbers of men with local/regional disease, and a greater understanding of the natural history of progression following recurrence. These advances, while not solely dependant on biomarkers, can be attributed to the discovery of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in the late 1970's. In the wake of these discoveries, we still continue to unnecessarily biopsy men at risk for having prostate cancer to identify the 1:4 with the disease, understage men with presumed local disease, continue to lack an accurate method for staging which can direct treatment options for the individual patient and continue to poorly understand the tumor biology and kinetics of disease progression. Clearly, discovery of a new tumor marker and validation/clinical investigation of the markers are mandatory to advance our knowledge and direct the care of men with prostate cancer. With this research, we intend to evaluate the clinical, diagnostic, and prognostic accuracy of new and existing biomarkers on a prospective serum bank collected from men either participating in early detection programs or engaging in pre or post treatment situations. By increasing our clinical research and specimen collections we hope to further advance the staging and direction for treatment in men with prostate cancer. This study approaches patients scheduled for a prostate biopsy, patients visiting the Urology Outpatient Clinic with PSA elevation, patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy, prostate cancer patients with scheduled appointments in Radiation Oncology and men participating in early prostate cancer detection screenings. Subjects will be excluded from the study if: 1) Subjects have any mental impairment that would hinder the ability to provide

  11. Evaluation of a CLEIA automated assay system for the detection of a panel of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Renato; Viggiani, Valentina; Michienzi, Simona; Longo, Flavia; Tudini, Silvestra; Frati, Luigi; Anastasi, Emanuela

    2013-10-01

    Tumor markers are commonly used to detect a relapse of disease in oncologic patients during follow-up. It is important to evaluate new assay systems for a better and more precise assessment, as a standardized method is currently lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between an automated chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay system (LUMIPULSE® G1200) and our reference methods using seven tumor markers. Serum samples from 787 subjects representing a variety of diagnoses, including oncologic, were analyzed using LUMIPULSE® G1200 and our reference methods. Serum values were measured for the following analytes: prostate-specific antigen (PSA), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1). For the determination of CEA, AFP, and PSA, an automatic analyzer based on chemiluminescence was applied as reference method. To assess CYFRA 21-1, CA125, CA19-9, and CA15-3, an immunoradiometric manual system was employed. Method comparison by Passing-Bablok analysis resulted in slopes ranging from 0.9728 to 1.9089 and correlation coefficients from 0.9977 to 0.9335. The precision of each assay was assessed by testing six serum samples. Each sample was analyzed for all tumor biomarkers in duplicate and in three different runs. The coefficients of variation were less than 6.3 and 6.2 % for within-run and between-run variation, respectively. Our data suggest an overall good interassay agreement for all markers. The comparison with our reference methods showed good precision and reliability, highlighting its usefulness in clinical laboratory's routine. PMID:23775009

  12. Evaluation of a CLEIA automated assay system for the detection of a panel of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Renato; Viggiani, Valentina; Michienzi, Simona; Longo, Flavia; Tudini, Silvestra; Frati, Luigi; Anastasi, Emanuela

    2013-10-01

    Tumor markers are commonly used to detect a relapse of disease in oncologic patients during follow-up. It is important to evaluate new assay systems for a better and more precise assessment, as a standardized method is currently lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between an automated chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay system (LUMIPULSE® G1200) and our reference methods using seven tumor markers. Serum samples from 787 subjects representing a variety of diagnoses, including oncologic, were analyzed using LUMIPULSE® G1200 and our reference methods. Serum values were measured for the following analytes: prostate-specific antigen (PSA), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1). For the determination of CEA, AFP, and PSA, an automatic analyzer based on chemiluminescence was applied as reference method. To assess CYFRA 21-1, CA125, CA19-9, and CA15-3, an immunoradiometric manual system was employed. Method comparison by Passing-Bablok analysis resulted in slopes ranging from 0.9728 to 1.9089 and correlation coefficients from 0.9977 to 0.9335. The precision of each assay was assessed by testing six serum samples. Each sample was analyzed for all tumor biomarkers in duplicate and in three different runs. The coefficients of variation were less than 6.3 and 6.2 % for within-run and between-run variation, respectively. Our data suggest an overall good interassay agreement for all markers. The comparison with our reference methods showed good precision and reliability, highlighting its usefulness in clinical laboratory's routine.

  13. Distinguishing primary from secondary mucinous ovarian tumors: an algorithm using the novel marker DPEP1.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takako; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Oura, Tomonori; Yamanishi, Yukio; Horiuchi, Akiko; Hamanishi, Junzo; Baba, Tsukasa; Koshiyama, Masafumi; Shiozawa, Tanri; Konishi, Ikuo

    2011-02-01

    Distinguishing primary mucinous ovarian cancers from ovarian metastases of digestive organ cancers is often challenging. Dipeptidase 1 was selected as the candidate novel marker of colorectal cancer based on an analysis of a gene expression microarray. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that 13/16 ovarian metastases of colorectal cancers, but only 1/58 primary mucinous ovarian cancers, were dipeptidase 1-positive (threshold; ≧25% expression, P<0.0001). Next, five immunohistochemical markers (dipeptidase 1, estrogen receptor-α, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, and caudal type homeobox 2) were analyzed in combination. In a hierarchical clustering analysis, the mutually exclusive expression of cytokeratin 7 and dipeptidase 1 specifically identified the ovarian metastases of colorectal cancers (P<0.0001). In a decision tree analysis, cytokeratin 7, caudal type homeobox 2, and dipeptidase 1 classified primary mucinous ovarian cancers and ovarian metastases of digestive organ cancers with 90% accuracy. Finally, the five immunohistochemical markers were combined with six preoperative factors (patient's age, tumor size, laterality, serum CEA, CA19-9, and CA125) and combinations were analyzed. Of the 11 factors, 4 (dipeptidase 1, cytokeratin 7, caudal type homeobox 2, and tumor size) were used to generate a decision tree to classify primary mucinous ovarian cancers and metastases of digestive organ cancers with 93% accuracy. In conclusion, we identified a novel immunohistochemical marker, dipeptidase 1, to distinguish primary mucinous ovarian cancers from ovarian metastasis of colorectal cancers. The algorithm using immunohistochemical and clinical factors to distinguish metastases of digestive organ cancers from primary mucinous ovarian cancers will be useful to establish a protocol for the diagnosis of ovarian metastasis.

  14. Detection of serum p53 antibodies in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: correlation with clinicopathologic features and tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Shimada, H; Nakajima, K; Ochiai, T; Koide, Y; Okazumi, S I; Matsubara, H; Takeda, A; Miyazawa, Y; Arima, M; Isono, K

    1998-01-01

    The significance of serum p53-Abs in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was determined. Examination of clinicopathological features and assessment of tumor marker sensitivities of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) and CYFRA21-1 were performed. Thirty-three (58%) of 57 patients were positive for serum p53-Abs, however, no relation with cancer progression existed. Fourteen of the 33 sero-positive patients revealed normal levels of all tumor markers tested. Thus, serum p53-Abs appears to be a useful marker for the detection of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. Inflammatory markers and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer by tumor subtypes: the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Jennifer; Schock, Helena; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Baglietto, Laura; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopolou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Masala, Giovanna; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; de Mesquita, H.Bas Bueno; Peeters, Petra H M; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Sánchez, Soledad; Obon-Santacana, Mireia; Sànchez-Pérez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Castaño, José María Huerta; Ardanaz, Eva; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Merrit, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée T

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests an etiologic role for inflammation in ovarian carcinogenesis and heterogeneity between tumor subtypes and anthropometric indices. Prospective studies on circulating inflammatory markers and epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) have predominantly investigated overall risk; data characterizing risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage, dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis) and anthropometric indices are sparse. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and EOC risk by tumor characteristics. A total of 754 eligible EOC cases were identified; two controls (n=1,497) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression to assess associations. Results CRP and IL-6 were not associated with overall EOC risk. However, consistent with prior research, CRP >10 vs. CRP ≤1 mg/L was associated with higher overall EOC risk (OR=1.67 [1.03 - 2.70]). We did not observe significant associations or heterogeneity in analyses by tumor characteristics. In analyses stratified by waist circumference, inflammatory markers were associated with higher risk among women with higher waist circumference; no association was observed for women with normal waist circumference: (e.g., IL-6: waist ≤80: ORlog2=0.97 [0.81 - 1.16]; waist >88: ORlog2=1.78 [1.28 - 2.48], pheterogeneity ≤0.01). Conclusions Our data suggest that high CRP is associated with increased risk of overall EOC, and that IL-6 and CRP may be associated with EOC risk among women with higher adiposity. Impact Our data add to global evidence that ovarian carcinogenesis may be promoted by an inflammatory milieu. PMID:25855626

  16. Current Understanding of Circulating Tumor Cells – Potential Value in Malignancies of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Lukasz A.; Williams, Hannah; Frankow, Aleksandra; Ellis, Hayley Patricia; Haynes, Harry R.; Perks, Claire; Holly, Jeff M. P.; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood via so-called “liquid biopsies” carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity. To date, studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation. However, no method has yet received full recommendation to use in clinical practice, in part because of lack of a sufficient evidence base regarding clinical utility. In CNS malignancies, one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems, such as the widely used Cell Search system, are reliant on markers, such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule, which are not present in CNS tumors. This review examines methods for CTC enrichment and detection, and reviews the progress in non-CNS tumors and the potential for using this technique in human brain tumors. PMID:26322014

  17. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  18. Myoglobin expression in prostate cancer is correlated to androgen receptor expression and markers of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Meller, Sebastian; Bicker, Anne; Montani, Matteo; Ikenberg, Kristian; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Sailer, Verena; Wild, Peter; Dietrich, Dimo; Uhl, Barbara; Sulser, Tullio; Moch, Holger; Gorr, Thomas A; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Hankeln, Thomas; Kristiansen, Glen

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies identified unexpected expression and transcriptional complexity of the hemoprotein myoglobin (MB) in human breast cancer but its role in prostate cancer is still unclear. Expression of MB was immunohistochemically analyzed in three independent cohorts of radical prostatectomy specimens (n = 409, n = 625, and n = 237). MB expression data were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and molecular parameters of androgen and hypoxia signaling. Expression levels of novel tumor-associated MB transcript variants and the VEGF gene as a hypoxia marker were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Fifty-three percent of the prostate cancer cases were MB positive and significantly correlated with androgen receptor (AR) expression (p < 0.001). The positive correlation with CAIX (p < 0.001) and FASN (p = 0.008) as well as the paralleled increased expression of the tumor-associated MB transcript variants and VEGF suggest that hypoxia participates in MB expression regulation. Analogous to breast cancer, MB expression in prostate cancer is associated with steroid hormone signaling and markers of hypoxia. Further studies must elucidate the novel functional roles of MB in human carcinomas, which probably extend beyond its classic intramuscular function in oxygen storage. PMID:25172328

  19. Increased serum midkine concentration as a possible tumor marker in patients with superficial esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Okazumi, Shin-ichi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Muramatsu, Takashi; Ikematsu, Shinya; Sakuma, Sadatoshi; Ochiai, Takenori

    2003-01-01

    Midkine, a heparin-binding growth factor, is expressed in numerous cancer tissues and is reportedly elevated in patients with various neoplasms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathological significance of serum midkine concentration (S-MK) in patients with superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Pretreatment S-MK was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 135 healthy controls, 16 patients with benign esophageal disease, and 60 patients with primary superficial esophageal squamous cell cancer (SESCC). All patients with SESCC underwent curative resection. The disease was staged according to TNM/UICC guidelines. Serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1) were also evaluated in the same populations. S-MK in patients with SESCC (388+/-411 pg/ml) was significantly higher than in benign esophageal disease or healthy controls (183+/-73 and 154+/-76 pg/ml, respectively). Using the mean + 2 standard deviations of healthy control S-MK (300 pg/ml) as the cut-off level, 50% of patients with esophageal SESCC were deemed positive. This S-MK positivity rate for detecting SESCC was significantly higher than for other tumor markers. Thus, S-MK may be useful as a tumor marker to detect SESCC.

  20. Electrochemical stripping analysis of nanogold label-induced silver deposition for ultrasensitive multiplexed detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Lai, Guosong; Wang, Lili; Wu, Jie; Ju, Huangxian; Yan, Feng

    2012-04-01

    A multiplexed electrochemical immunoassay method was developed for simultaneous ultrasensitive measurement of tumor markers based on electrochemical stripping analysis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The Ag NPs were deposited on a disposable immunosensor array with a reduction reaction catalyzed by nanogold labels. The immunosensor array was prepared by covalently immobilizing capture antibodies on chitosan modified screen-printed carbon electrodes. Through a sandwich-type immunoreaction, antibody-functionalized Au NPs were captured onto immunosensor surface to induce the silver deposition from a silver enhancer solution. The deposited Ag NPs could be directly measured by anodic stripping analysis in KCl solution. The catalytic deposition enhanced the analytical sensitivity for detection of protein markers. The interference of dissolved oxygen could be avoided as the detection was performed with positive stripping potential range. Using carcinoembryonic antigen and α-fetoprotein as model analytes, the proposed multiplexed immunoassay method showed wide linear ranges of three orders of magnitude with the detection limits down to 3.5 and 3.9 pg mL(-1), respectively. The localized silver deposition, as well as the stripping detection process, eliminated completely the electrochemical cross talk between adjacent immunosensors. The immunosensor array exhibited acceptable reproducibility, stability and accuracy, showing a promising potential in multianalyte determination for clinical application.

  1. Diagnostic Value of Combining Tumor and Inflammatory Markers in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ho Il; Kwon, Oh-Ran; Kang, Kyung Nam; Shin, Yong Sung; Shin, Ho Sang; Yeon, Eun Hee; Kwon, Keon Young; Hwang, Ilseon; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Yongdai; Kim, Chul Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite major advances in lung cancer treatment, early detection remains the most promising way of improving outcomes. To detect lung cancer in earlier stages, many serum biomarkers have been tested. Unfortunately, no single biomarker can reliably detect lung cancer. We combined a set of 2 tumor markers and 4 inflammatory or metabolic markers and tried to validate the diagnostic performance in lung cancer. Methods We collected serum samples from 355 lung cancer patients and 590 control subjects and divided them into training and validation datasets. After measuring serum levels of 6 biomarkers (human epididymis secretory protein 4 [HE4], carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA], regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES], apolipoprotein A2 [ApoA2], transthyretin [TTR], and secretory vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [sVCAM-1]), we tested various sets of biomarkers for their diagnostic performance in lung cancer. Results In a training dataset, the area under the curve (AUC) values were 0.821 for HE4, 0.753 for CEA, 0.858 for RANTES, 0.867 for ApoA2, 0.830 for TTR, and 0.552 for sVCAM-1. A model using all 6 biomarkers and age yielded an AUC value of 0.986 and sensitivity of 93.2% (cutoff at specificity 94%). Applying this model to the validation dataset showed similar results. The AUC value of the model was 0.988, with sensitivity of 93.33% and specificity of 92.00% at the same cutoff point used in the validation dataset. Analyses by stages and histologic subtypes all yielded similar results. Conclusions Combining multiple tumor and systemic inflammatory markers proved to be a valid strategy in the diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:27722145

  2. Antidepressant fluoxetine and its potential against colon tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stopper, Helga; Garcia, Sergio Britto; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Kannen, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide, with increasing incidence in developing countries. Patients treated with fluoxetine (FLX) have a reduced incidence of colon cancer, although there still remains great controversy about the nature of its effects. Here we explore the latest achievements related to FLX treatment and colon cancer. Moreover, we discuss new ideas about the mechanisms of the effects of FLX treatment in colon cancer. This leads to the hypothesis of FLX arresting colon tumor cells at the at G1 cell-cycle phase through a control of the tumor-related energy generation machinery. We believe that the potential of FLX to act against tumor metabolism warrants further investigation. PMID:24578784

  3. SU-E-J-23: An Accurate Algorithm to Match Imperfectly Matched Images for Lung Tumor Detection Without Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Rozario, T; Bereg, S; Chiu, T; Liu, H; Kearney, V; Jiang, L; Mao, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to locate lung tumors on projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is created and compared with projection images. Since lung tumors always move and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs, a special DRR (background DRR) is generated based on modified anatomy from which lung tumors are removed. In addition, global discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image originations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported. Methods: This method divides global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities will be evaluated by calculating normalized cross correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) will be automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single tile which has bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel based linear transformation will be determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The DRR will be transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contains only the tumor. A DRR of the tumor is registered to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. Results: This method has been successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (Brainlab) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers are implanted and used as ground truth for tumor positions. Although, other organs and bony structures introduce strong signals superimposed on tumors at some angles, this method accurately locates tumors on every projection over 12 gantry angles. The maximum error is less than 2.6 mm while the total average error is 1.0 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting tumor without markers despite strong background signals.

  4. Immunohistochemical study of hepatocyte, cholangiocyte and stem cell markers of hepatocellular carcinoma: the second report: relationship with tumor size and cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Arisa; Sano, Keiji; Inoue, Masafumi; Fujii, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Masaji; Watanabe, Masato; Soejima, Yurie; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Tokairin, Takuo; Saito, Koji; Sasajima, Yuko; Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Uozaki, Hiroshi; Fukusato, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to investigate whether ordinary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) show positivity of stem/progenitor cell markers and cholangiocyte markers during the process of tumor progression. Methods Ninety‐four HCC lesions no larger than 8 cm from 94 patients were immuno‐histochemically studied using two hepatocyte markers (Hep par 1 and α‐fetoprotein), five cholangiocyte markers (cytokeratin CK7, CK19, Muc1, epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen) and three hepatic stem/progenitor cell markers (CD56, c‐Kit and EpCAM). The tumors were classified into three groups by tumor size: S1, < 2.0 cm; S2, 2.0–5.0 cm; S3, 5.0–8.0 cm. The tumors were also classified according to tumor differentiation: well, moderately and poorly differentiated. The relationship between the positive ratios of these markers, tumor size and tumor differentiation was examined. Results The positive ratios of cholangiocyte markers tended to be higher in larger sized and more poorly differentiated tumors (except for CK7). The positive ratios of stem/progenitor cell markers tended to be higher in larger sized and more poorly differentiated tumors (except for c‐Kit). Conclusion Ordinary HCC can acquire the characteristic of positivity of cholangiocyte and stem/progenitor cell markers during the process of tumor progression. PMID:27161394

  5. The Late Positive Potential: A Neurophysiological Marker for Emotion Regulation in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy A.; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Background: The ability to modulate emotional responses, or emotion regulation, is a key mechanism in the development of mood disruptions. Detection of a neural marker for emotion regulation thus has the potential to inform early detection and intervention for mood problems. One such neural marker may be the late positive potential (LPP), which is…

  6. Study of Aided Diagnosis of Hepatic Carcinoma Based on Artificial Neural Network Combined with Tumor Marker Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shanjuan; Feng, Feifei; Wu, Yongjun; Wu, Yiming

    To develop a computer-aided diagnostic scheme by using an artificial neural network (ANN) combined with tumor markers for diagnosis of hepatic carcinoma (HCC) as a clinical assistant method. 140 serum samples (50 malignant, 40 benign and 50 normal) were analyzed for α-fetoprotein (AFP), carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), sialic acid (SA) and calcium (Ca). The five tumor marker values were then used as ANN inputs data. The result of ANN was compared with that of discriminant analysis by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) analysis. The diagnostic accuracy of ANN and discriminant analysis among all samples of the test group was 95.5% and 79.3%, respectively. Analysis of multiple tumor markers based on ANN may be a better choice than the traditional statistical methods for differentiating HCC from benign or normal.

  7. Model-independent evaluation of tumor markers and a logistic-tree approach to diagnostic decision support.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weizeng; Huang, Samuel H; Su, Qiang; Shi, Jinghua

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity of using individual tumor markers hardly meet the clinical requirement. This challenge gave rise to many efforts, e.g., combing multiple tumor markers and employing machine learning algorithms. However, results from different studies are often inconsistent, which are partially attributed to the use of different evaluation criteria. Also, the wide use of model-dependent validation leads to high possibility of data overfitting when complex models are used for diagnosis. We propose two model-independent criteria, namely, area under the curve (AUC) and Relief to evaluate the diagnostic values of individual and multiple tumor markers, respectively. For diagnostic decision support, we propose the use of logistic-tree which combines decision tree and logistic regression. Application on a colorectal cancer dataset shows that the proposed evaluation criteria produce results that are consistent with current knowledge. Furthermore, the simple and highly interpretable logistic-tree has diagnostic performance that is competitive with other complex models. PMID:25516124

  8. LFA-1 expression on exocrine glands as a potential novel marker of malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Futagami-Mizoguchi, E; Yamada, A; Mizoguchi, A; Imai, Y; Yokoyama, M M

    1993-09-01

    The lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 has been found only on leukocytes and lymphoid tissues; however, the expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on nonhematopoietic cells has not been reported previously. In this study, immunohistochemical expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was examined on various tissues from 35 patients with malignant diseases and 36 patients with benign diseases including benign tumors. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was found on various exocrine tissues (eg, gastric glands, bronchial epithelium, alveolar epithelium, duodenal glands, bile ducts, pancreatic acini, and salivary glands) uninvolved by tumor in patients with malignant diseases. Localization of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 was limited to the exocrine glands and differed from tissue-infiltrating leukocytes. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on exocrine tissues was confirmed in all 35 cases of malignant diseases that were examined. These included a wide spectrum of carcinomas and hematopoietic tumors. In contrast, none of the 36 cases with benign diseases examined expressed lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on their exocrine glands. These results indicate a strong correlation between lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 expression on exocrine glands and malignant disease. The expression of lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on nonhematopoietic cells was further confirmed in nonhematopoietic cell lines. Two of 19 nonhematopoietic cell lines (MKN45 and PANC-1; exocrine gland cell lines) examined expressed lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 on both cell surface and cytoplasm. These results suggested that immunohistochemically defined lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 molecules on nontumorous exocrine gland cells are a potential marker for the presence of malignant diseases.

  9. Circulating tumor DNA as an early marker of therapeutic response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tie, J.; Kinde, I.; Wang, Y.; Wong, H. L.; Roebert, J.; Christie, M.; Tacey, M.; Wong, R.; Singh, M.; Karapetis, C. S.; Desai, J.; Tran, B.; Strausberg, R. L.; Diaz, L. A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K. W.; Vogelstein, B.; Gibbs, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early indicators of treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could conceivably be used to optimize treatment. We explored early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels as a marker of therapeutic efficacy. Patients and methods This prospective study involved 53 mCRC patients receiving standard first-line chemotherapy. Both ctDNA and CEA were assessed in plasma collected before treatment, 3 days after treatment and before cycle 2. Computed tomography (CT) scans were carried out at baseline and 8–10 weeks and were centrally assessed using RECIST v1.1 criteria. Tumors were sequenced using a panel of 15 genes frequently mutated in mCRC to identify candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis. For each patient, one tumor mutation was selected to assess the presence and the level of ctDNA in plasma samples using a digital genomic assay termed Safe-SeqS. Results Candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis were identified in 52 (98.1%) of the tumors. These patient-specific candidate tissue mutations were detectable in the cell-free DNA from the plasma of 48 of these 52 patients (concordance 92.3%). Significant reductions in ctDNA (median 5.7-fold; P < 0.001) levels were observed before cycle 2, which correlated with CT responses at 8–10 weeks (odds ratio = 5.25 with a 10-fold ctDNA reduction; P = 0.016). Major reductions (≥10-fold) versus lesser reductions in ctDNA precycle 2 were associated with a trend for increased progression-free survival (median 14.7 versus 8.1 months; HR = 1.87; P = 0.266). Conclusions ctDNA is detectable in a high proportion of treatment naïve mCRC patients. Early changes in ctDNA during first-line chemotherapy predict the later radiologic response. PMID:25851626

  10. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoyong Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    tumor boundary in EPID images by using a LSM-based algorithm. Experimental results conducted on phantom and clinical EPID images demonstrated the effectiveness of the tracking algorithm for visible tumor target. Compared with previous tracking methods, the authors’ algorithm has the potential to improve the tracking accuracy in radiation therapy. In addition, real-time tumor boundary information within the irradiation field will be potentially useful for further applications, such as adaptive beam delivery, dose evaluation.

  11. SOX10 is a novel marker of acinus and intercalated duct differentiation in salivary gland tumors: a clue to the histogenesis for tumor diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ohtomo, Rie; Mori, Taisuke; Shibata, Shinsuke; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko M; Akazawa, Chihiro; Watabe, Yukio; Honda, Kazufumi; Yamada, Tesshi; Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Asai, Masao; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanai, Yae; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-08-01

    Salivary gland tumors are relatively rare and morphologically diverse and heterogeneous tumors; therefore, histogenesis-based tumor markers are sorely needed to aid in diagnosing and determining the cell type of origin. SRY-related HMG-box 10 (SOX10) protein is a transcription factor known to be crucial in the specification of the neural crest and maintenance of Schwann cells and melanocytes. In addition, positive expression has also been implicated in the major salivary gland. Here, we examined SOX10 expression in various salivary gland tumors to correlate this expression with myoepithelial markers. Overall, 76 malignant and 14 benign tumors were examined. SOX10 expression clearly delineated two distinct subtypes of human salivary gland tumors; acinic cell carcinomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas, myoepithelial carcinomas, and pleomorphic adenomas, including the pleomorphic adenoma component of carcinoma, were SOX10 positive, while salivary duct carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas, an oncocytic carcinoma, Oncocytomas, and Warthin tumors were SOX10 negative. Also, SOX10 was expressed in solid-type or non-specific morphology salivary gland tumors, but was not expressed in poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas. In normal human salivary gland tissue, SOX10 expression was specific to the nuclei of acini and both luminal and abluminal cells of intercalated ducts but not in other sites. Moreover, the murine model suggested that SOX10 continued to be expressed from the developmental stage to adulthood in the acinar and both luminal and abluminal intercalated ducts in the major salivary gland. Thus, SOX10 is a novel marker for diagnosing and understanding the histogenesis of salivary gland tumors.

  12. Immunoassay for tumor markers in human serum based on Si nanoparticles and SiC@Ag SERS-active substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Zhou, Jun; Feng, Zhao; Wang, Fuyan; Xie, Shushen; Bu, Shizhong

    2016-04-21

    Based on a sandwich structure consisting of nano-Si immune probes and a SiC@Ag SERS-active immune substrate, a kind of ultra-sensitive immunoassay protocol is presented to detect tumor markers in human serum. The nano-Si immune probes were prepared by immobilizing the detecting antibodies onto the surfaces of SiO2-coated Si nanoparticles (NPs) which were modified with 3-(aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, and the SiC@Ag SERS-active immune substrates were prepared by immobilizing the captured antibodies on Ag film sputtered on SiC sandpaper. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that Si NPs are directly used as Raman tags in an immunoassay strategy. And, the SiC@Ag SERS-active substrates exhibit excellent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performances with an enhancement factor of ∼10(5), owing to the plasmonic effect of the Ag film on the rough surface of the SiC sandpaper. In our experiments, the sandwich immunoassay structure has been successfully applied to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA), α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in a human serum sample and the limit of detections are as low as 1.79 fg mL(-1), 0.46 fg mL(-1) and 1.3 × 10(-3) U mL(-1), respectively. It reveals that the proposed immunoassay protocol has demonstrated a high sensitivity for tumor markers in human serum and a potential practicability in biosensing and clinical diagnostics. PMID:27003871

  13. [Pulmonary Sequestration Associated with Increased Serum Tumor Markers;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Kozo; Ueda, Mamoru; Kusano, Kenji; Sato, Shintaro; Harasawa, Keiji; Ishizu, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman visited our hospital with chief complaints of cough and fever. A chest X-ray detected an abnormal shadow in the right lung field. A chest computed tomography scan showed solid consolidation at S10 of the right lung. A blood test revealed elevated levels of the tumor markers, CEA(12.1 ng/ml), SLX (134 U/ml) and CA19-9 (76.2 U/ml). Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) showed abnormally increased 18F-FDG uptake with an SUV max of 11.29. Lung cancer was strongly suspected, and the surgery was performed. Abnormal blood vessels were found within the pulmonary ligament. Intraoperative rapid pathology indicated no malignancy, and the final diagnosis was pulmonary sequestration. PMID:27476573

  14. Characterization of the role of the tumor marker Nup88 in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are massive multiprotein channels responsible for traffic between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and are composed of approximately 30 proteins, termed nucleoporins (Nup). Our recent studies indicated that the nucleoporins Rae1 and Tpr play critical roles in maintaining the spindle bipolarity during cell division. In the present study, we found that another nucleoporin, Nup88, was localized on the spindles together with Nup214 during mitosis. Nup88 expression is linked to the progression of carcinogenesis, Nup88 has been proposed as a tumor marker. Overexpression of Nup88 enhanced multinucleated cell formation. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Nup88 disrupted Nup214 expression and localization and caused multipolar spindle phenotypes. Our data indicate that proper expression of Nup88 is critical for preventing aneuploidy formation and tumorigenesis. PMID:20497554

  15. Immunohistochemical Markers of Soft Tissue Tumors: Pathologic Diagnosis, Genetic Contributions, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Parham, David M

    2015-01-01

    After ~30 years of widespread usage, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become a standard method of diagnosis for surgical pathology. Because of the plethora of diagnoses and often subtle nature of diagnostic criteria, IHC finds particular utility in soft tissue tumors. The use of progressively small amounts of tissue for diagnosis highlights the importance of this method. The sensitivity and crispness of IHC stains have progressively improved with the advent of new techniques. Traditionally, IHC detects cell-typic markers that characterize cell phenotypes, such as chromogranin for neuroectodermal tissue, myogenin for skeletal muscle, and cytokeratin for epithelium. However, the advent of genetic discoveries have led to IHC testing for detection of fusion gene products or overexpressed oncogenes associated with deletions and mutations. Proliferation-based markers such as Ki-67 can also be used for prognosis and grading, but more standardization is needed. Development of monoclonal antibody-based pharmaceuticals, such as imatinib or crizotinib, holds the promise of tailored anticancer therapy. IHC thus has assumed importance not only for diagnosis but also for guidance of personalized medicine. PMID:26549970

  16. Mast Cells as a Potential Prognostic Marker in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Gianluigi; Giusti, Guido; Seveso, Mauro; Hurle, Rodolfo; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Stifter, Sanja

    2013-01-01

    Despite years of intensive investigation that has been made in understanding prostate cancer, it remains one of the major men's health issues and the leading cause of death worldwide. It is now ascertained that prostate cancer emerges from multiple spontaneous and/or inherited alterations that induce changes in expression patterns of genes and proteins that function in complex networks controlling critical cellular events. It is now accepted that several innate and adaptive immune cells, including T- and B-lymphocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells (MCs), infiltrate the prostate cancer. All of these cells are irregularly scattered within the tumor and loaded with an assorted array of cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory and cytotoxic mediators. This complex framework reflects the diversity in tumor biology and tumor-host interactions. MCs are well-established effector cells in Immunoglobulin-E (Ig-E) associated immune responses and potent effector cells of the innate immune system; however, their clinical significance in prostate cancer is still debated. Here, these controversies are summarized, focusing on the implications of these findings in understanding the roles of MCs in primary prostate cancer. PMID:24324287

  17. Development of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS): A potential risk factor in cancer patients receiving anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Qureshi, Muhammad Saeed; Ahmad, Riaz; Manan, Abdul; Asif, Muhammad; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is characterized by hyperuricaemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalaemia, as well as hypocalcaemia due to the breakdown of tumor cells undergoing cancer therapy (chemo/radio). Therefore it is of interest to evaluate oxidative stress using selective biological markers [Malondialdehyde (MDA), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Glutathione (GSH) and Catalase (CAT)] in TLS. We report the marked differences (statistically significant with control) observed among a selected set of biomarkers of oxidative stress (MDA = 8.66±1.37; SOD = 0.15±0.11; GSH = 2.25±.77; CAT = 0.76±.57) in TLS patients in addition to other conventional biomarkers. Moreover, correlation was investigated among the parameters of oxidative stress and other circulating biomarkers of TLS. Data suggest the use of SOD, MDA, and GSH as potential diagnostic biomarker for TLS with other biomarkers. PMID:25512688

  18. Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 Amplifies Canonical Wnt Signaling in Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Kiran; Gu, Jingsheng; Werner, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Tumor Endothelial Marker 8/Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1 (TEM8/ANTXR1) expression is induced in the vascular compartment of multiple tumors and therefore, is a candidate molecule to target tumor therapies. This cell surface molecule mediates anthrax toxin internalization, however, its physiological function in blood vessels remains largely unknown. We identified the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) as a model system to study the endogenous function of TEM8 in blood vessels as we found that TEM8 expression was induced transiently between day 10 and 12 of embryonic development, when the vascular tree is undergoing final development and growth. We used the cell-binding component of anthrax toxin, Protective Antigen (PA), to engage endogenous TEM8 receptors and evaluate the effects of PA-TEM8 complexes on vascular development. PA applied at the time of highest TEM8 expression reduced vascular density and disrupted hierarchical branching as revealed by quantitative morphometric analysis of the vascular tree after 48h. PA-dependent reduced branching phenotype was partially mimicked by Wnt3a application and ameliorated by the Wnt antagonist, Dikkopf-1. These results implicate TEM8 expression in endothelial cells in regulating the canonical Wnt signaling pathway at this day of CAM development. Consistent with this model, PA increased beta catenin levels acutely in CAM blood vessels in vivo and in TEM8 transfected primary human endothelial cells in vitro. TEM8 expression in Hek293 cells, which neither express endogenous PA-binding receptors nor Wnt ligands, stabilized beta catenin levels and amplified beta catenin-dependent transcriptional activity induced by Wnt3a. This agonistic function is supported by findings in the CAM, where the increase in TEM8 expression from day 10 to day 12 and PA application correlated with Axin 2 induction, a universal reporter gene for canonical Wnt signaling. We postulate that the developmentally controlled expression of TEM8 modulates

  19. Assessment of KL-6 as a tumor marker in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Amal; Tanaka, Eiji; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Wahab, Moushira Abd-el; Serwah, Abd el-Hamid; Attia, Fawzy; Ali, Khalil; Hassouba, Howayda; el-Deeb, Abd el-Raoof; Ichijyo, Tetsuya; Umemura, Takeji; Muto, Hidetomo; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Kiyosawa, Kendo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical significance of KL-6 as a tumor marker of HCC in two different ethnic groups with chronic liver disease consecutively encountered at outpatient clinics. METHODS: Serum KL-6 was measured by the sandwich enzyme immunoassay method using the KL-6 antibody (Ab) as both the capture and tracer Ab according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Eisai, Tokyo, Japan). Assessment of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced vitamin K deficiency or absence (PIVKA-II) was performed in both groups using commercially available kits. RESULTS: A significantly higher mean serum KL-6 (556±467 U/L) was found in HCC in comparison with non-HCC groups either with (391±176 U/L; P<0.001) or without (361±161 U/L; P<0.001) liver cirrhosis (LC). Serum KL-6 level did not correlate with either AFP or PIVKA-II serU/Levels. Using receiver operating curve analysis for KL-6 as a predictor for HCC showed that the area under the curve was 0.574 (95%CI = 0.50-0.64) and the KL-6 level that gave the best sensitivity (61%) was found to be 334 U/L but according to the manufacturer’s instructions; a cut-off point of 500 U/L was used that showed the highest specificity (80%) in comparison with AFP and PIVKA-II (78% vs 72% respectively). Combining the values of the three markers improved specificity of AFP for HCC diagnosis from 78% for AFP alone; 93% for AFP plus PIVKA-II to 99% for both plus KL-6 value (P<0.001). Mean serum alkaline phosphatase level was significantly higher in KL-6 positive (564±475) in comparison with KL-6 negative (505±469) HCC patients (P = 0.021), but such a difference was not found among non-HCC corresponding groups. CONCLUSION: KL-6 is suggested as a tumor for HCC. Its positivity may reflect HCC-associated cholestasis and/or local tumor invasion. PMID:16425352

  20. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes expressing IOT-10 marker. An immunohistochemical study of a series of 185 brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Zurita, M; Vaquero, J; Coca, S; Oya, S; Garcia, N

    1993-04-01

    The presence of IOT-10-positive lymphocytes among the tumor-infiltrating-lymphocyte (TIL) population was studied in a series of 185 brain tumors. In most of the tumors, IOT-10-positive lymphocytes were identified, but generally they were scarce and masked among the tumor cells, suggesting that NK-cells exercise a poor participation in the tissular response against brain tumors. Isolated tumor cells showing IOT-10-positivity were found in low-grade astrocytomas, neurinomas and medulloblastomas. IOT-10-positivity on both tumor neuropil and tumor cells was considered a characteristic finding in oligodendrogliomas. The number of IOT-10-positive NK-cells in brain metastases and in cerebellar hemangioblastomas was comparatively greater than in other types of brain tumor. Since in brain metastases, the presence of IOT-10-positive NK-cells can be related to the tissular response to an extracerebral malignancy, their considerable presence in cerebellar hemangioblastomas is an enigmatic finding that deserves further attention.

  1. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine; Eul, Bastian G.; Lang, Nico; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An Hanxiang; Rose, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas after IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Curcumin for the Treatment of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Brain malignancies currently carry a poor prognosis despite the current multimodal standard of care that includes surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. As new therapies are desperately needed, naturally occurring chemical compounds have been studied for their potential chemotherapeutic benefits and low toxicity profile. Curcumin, found in the rhizome of turmeric, has extensive therapeutic promise via its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative properties. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo data have shown it to be an effective treatment for brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme. These effects are potentiated by curcumin's ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest, activation of apoptotic pathways, induction of autophagy, disruption of molecular signaling, inhibition of invasion, and metastasis and by increasing the efficacy of existing chemotherapeutics. Further, clinical data suggest that it has low toxicity in humans even at large doses. Curcumin is a promising nutraceutical compound that should be evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of human brain tumors. PMID:27807473

  3. Potential diagnostic markers for disseminated intravascular coagulation of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Ito, Takashi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Jilma, Bernd; Brenner, Thorsten; Müller, Marcella C A; Juffermans, Nicole P; Thachil, Jecko

    2016-03-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired thrombo-haemorrhagic disorder which arises in clinical scenarios like sepsis, trauma and malignancies. The clinic-laboratory diagnosis of DIC is made in a patient who develops the combination of laboratory abnormalities in the appropriate clinical scenario. The most common laboratory parameters in this setting have been the clotting profile, platelet count, serum fibrinogen and fibrin degradation markers. These tests had the advantage that they could be performed easily and in most laboratories. However, with the better understanding of the pathophysiology of DIC, in recent years, more specific tests have been suggested to be useful in this setting. The newer tests can also prove to be useful in prognostication in DIC. In addition, they may provide assistance in the selection and monitoring of patients diagnosed with DIC.

  4. Stress protein synthesis, a potential toxicity marker in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Odberg-Ferragut, C; Espigares, M; Dive, D

    1991-06-01

    Various chemicals were tested in Escherichia coli for the ability to modify the cellular growth rate and to induce the synthesis of heat shock and stress proteins. The toxicity of chemicals as observed by modification of the growth rate depended on concentration and duration of treatment, except for thiram. In this last case, no modification was observed up to a concentration of 10 micrograms.ml-1. In contrast, all toxicants tested enhanced the synthesis of heat shock and stress proteins. The stress response was similar but not identical. Heat shock proteins and stress proteins appear to be a more sensitive toxicity marker than growth inhibition. Suggestions for the use of stress proteins as a practical bioassay are made.

  5. Stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers are frequently overexpressed in circulating tumor cells of metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Bahriye; Tewes, Mitra; Fehm, Tanja; Hauch, Siegfried; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The persistence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in breast cancer patients might be associated with stem cell like tumor cells which have been suggested to be the active source of metastatic spread in primary tumors. Furthermore, these cells also may undergo phenotypic changes, known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which allows them to travel to the site of metastasis formation without getting affected by conventional treatment. Here we evaluated 226 blood samples of 39 metastatic breast cancer patients during a follow-up of palliative chemo-, antibody – or hormonal therapy for the expression of the stem cell marker ALDH1 and markers for EMT and correlated these findings with the presence of CTC and response to therapy. Methods 2 × 5 ml blood was analyzed for CTC with the AdnaTest BreastCancer (AdnaGen AG) for the detection of EpCAM, MUC-1 and HER2 transcripts. The recovered c-DNA was additionally multiplex tested for three EMT markers [Twist1, Akt2, PI3Kα] and separately for the tumor stem-cell markers ALDH1. The identification of EMT markers was considered positive if at least one marker was detected in the sample. Results 97% of 30 healthy donor samples investigated were negative for EMT and 95% for ALDH1 transcripts. CTC were detected in 69/226 (31%) cancer samples. In the CTC (+) group, 62% were positive for at least one of the EMT markers and 69% for ALDH1, respectively. In the CTC (-) group the percentages were 7% and 14%, respectively. In non-responders, EMT and ALDH1 expression was found in 62% and 44% of patients, in responders the rates were 10% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions Our data indicate that a major proportion of CTC of metastatic breast cancer patients shows EMT and tumor stem cell characteristics. Further studies are needed to prove whether these markers might serve as an indicator for therapy resistant tumor cell populations and, therefore, an inferior prognosis. PMID:19589136

  6. Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Potential Markers and Bioprocesses Altered in Bladder Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K.; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T.; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R.; Fischer, Steven M.; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J.; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z.; Terris, Martha K.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    While alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer (BCa), the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in BCa. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from BCa. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing BCa from controls, and also non-muscle from muscle-invasive BCa. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in BCa. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 promoters of BCa tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR, and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 BCa cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Further, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of BCa specimens compared to matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of BCa, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression. PMID:21990318

  7. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression. PMID:21990318

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of SALL4 in hepatocellular carcinoma, a potential pitfall in the differential diagnosis of yolk sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Katz, Betina; Chaux, Alcides; Sharma, Rajni; Munari, Enrico; Faraj, Sheila F; Illei, Peter B; Torbenson, Michael; Netto, George J

    2013-07-01

    SALL4 is a transcription factor that serves as a marker of yolk sac tumor. Yolk sac tumor and hepatocellular carcinoma share histologic, serologic, and immunohistochemical features. Previous studies have shown lack of SALL4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting utility in this differential diagnosis. Sixty-nine samples of hepatocellular carcinoma were retrieved from surgical pathology archives and used to construct 9 tissue microarrays. A germ cell tumor tissue microarray containing 10 yolk sac tumors was used for comparison. Extent, intensity, and pattern of nuclear SALL4 expression were assessed in each spot. Mean percentage of expression was calculated for each tumor and used during analysis. Optimal discriminatory extent of expression cutoff was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Other potential discriminatory markers including Hep Par1 were also evaluated. Forty-six percent (32/69) of hepatocellular carcinoma and all yolk sac tumors revealed at least focal expression of SALL4. A unique punctuate/clumped pattern of nuclear staining was present in 94% (30/32) of hepatocellular carcinoma, whereas all yolk sac tumors displayed a diffuse finely granular nuclear staining pattern. A 25% extent of SALL4 expression cutoff was found to be optimal for the distinction of yolk sac tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma yielding a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 92.8%, and a positive predictive value of 66.6% for yolk sac tumor diagnosis. The addition of Hep Par1 increased the specificity (99%) and positive predictive value (90%). This is the first report of SALL4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma. Our finding should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and yolk sac tumor. The unique punctuate/clumped pattern seen in hepatocellular carcinoma cases could be of further discriminatory value. PMID:23347651

  9. Identification of potential genetic markers for improved growth rate in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of genetic polymorphism associated with muscle growth would improve selection efficiency of channel catfish broodstock. Because faster growth is typically associated with increased food intake, factors involved in food intake regulation may serve as potential gene markers for selecti...

  10. Identification of Novel Tumor Markers in Prostate, Colon and Breast Cancer by Unbiased Methylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woonbok; Kwabi-Addo, Bernard; Ittmann, Michael; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Shen, Lanlan; Yu, Yinhua; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2008-01-01

    DNA hypermethylation is a common epigenetic abnormality in cancer and may serve as a useful marker to clone cancer-related genes as well as a marker of clinical disease activity. To identify CpG islands methylated in prostate cancer, we used methylated CpG island amplification (MCA) coupled with representational difference analysis (RDA) on prostate cancer cell lines. We isolated 34 clones that corresponded to promoter CpG islands, including 5 reported targets of hypermethylation in cancer. We confirmed the data for 17 CpG islands by COBRA and/or pyrosequencing. All 17 genes were methylated in at least 2 cell lines of a 21-cancer cell line panel containing prostate cancer, colon cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer. Based on methylation in primary tumors compared to normal adjacent tissues, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS and NSE1 are candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer (methylation range 50%–85%). The combination of NSE1 or SPOCK2 hypermethylation showed a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 95% in differentiating cancer from normal. Similarly NKX2-5, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS and GALR2 are candidate biomarkers for colon cancer (methylation range 60%–95%) and GALR2 hypermethylation showed a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 95%. Finally, SLC16A12, GALR2, TOX, SPOCK2, EGFR5 and DPYS are candidate biomarkers for breast cancer (methylation range 33%–79%) with the combination of EGFR5 or TOX hypermethylation showing a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 92%. Expression analysis for eight genes that had the most hypermethylation confirmed the methylation associated silencing and reactivation with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment. Our data identify new targets of transcriptional silencing in cancer, and provide new biomarkers that could be useful in screening for prostate cancer and other cancers. PMID:18446232

  11. Oligonucleotide array-CGH identifies genomic subgroups and prognostic markers for tumor stage mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Rocío; Servitje, Octavio; Gallardo, Fernando; Vermeer, Maarten H; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L; Karpova, Maria B; Zipser, Marie C; Muniesa, Cristina; García-Muret, María P; Estrach, Teresa; Salido, Marta; Sánchez-Schmidt, Júlia; Herrera, Marta; Romagosa, Vicenç; Suela, Javier; Ferreira, Bibiana I; Cigudosa, Juan C; Barranco, Carlos; Serrano, Sergio; Dummer, Reinhard; Tensen, Cornelis P; Solé, Francesc; Pujol, Ramon M; Espinet, Blanca

    2010-04-01

    Mycosis fungoide (MF) patients who develop tumors or extracutaneous involvement usually have a poor prognosis with no curative therapy available so far. In the present European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) multicenter study, the genomic profile of 41 skin biopsies from tumor stage MF (MFt) was analyzed using a high-resolution oligo-array comparative genomic hybridization platform. Seventy-six percent of cases showed genomic aberrations. The most common imbalances were gains of 7q33.3q35 followed by 17q21.1, 8q24.21, 9q34qter, and 10p14 and losses of 9p21.3 followed by 9q31.2, 17p13.1, 13q14.11, 6q21.3, 10p11.22, 16q23.2, and 16q24.3. Three specific chromosomal regions, 9p21.3, 8q24.21, and 10q26qter, were defined as prognostic markers showing a significant correlation with overall survival (OS) (P=0.042, 0.017, and 0.022, respectively). Moreover, we have established two MFt genomic subgroups distinguishing a stable group (0-5 DNA aberrations) and an unstable group (>5 DNA aberrations), showing that the genomic unstable group had a shorter OS (P=0.05). We therefore conclude that specific chromosomal abnormalities, such as gains of 8q24.21 (MYC) and losses of 9p21.3 (CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP) and 10q26qter (MGMT and EBF3) may have an important role in prognosis. In addition, we describe the MFt genomic instability profile, which, to our knowledge, has not been reported earlier.

  12. KIAA1114, a full-length protein encoded by the trophinin gene, is a novel surface marker for isolating tumor-initiating cells of multiple hepatocellular carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Won; Yang, Hyun Gul; Kang, Moon Cheol; Lee, Seungwon; Namkoong, Hong; Lee, Seung-Woo; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Identification of novel biomarkers for tumor-initiating cells (TICs) is of critical importance for developing diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against cancers. Here we identified the role of KIAA1114, a full-length translational product of the trophinin gene, as a distinctive marker for TICs in human liver cancer by developing a DNA vaccine-induced monoclonal antibody targeting the putative extracellular domain of KIAA1114. Compared with other established markers of liver TICs, KIAA1114 was unique in that its expression was detected in both alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-positive and AFP-negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines with the expression levels of KIAA1114 being positively correlated to their tumorigenic potentials. Notably, KIAA1114 expression was strongly detected in primary hepatic tumor, but neither in the adjacent non-tumorous tissue from the same patient nor normal liver tissue. KIAA1114high cells isolated from HCC cell lines displayed TIC-like features with superior functional and phenotypic traits compared to their KIAA1114low counterparts, including tumorigenic abilities in xenotransplantation model, in vitro colony- and spheroid-forming capabilities, expression of stemness-associated genes, and migratory capacity. Our findings not only address the value of a novel antigen, KIAA1114, as a potential diagnostic factor of human liver cancer, but also as an independent biomarker for identifying TIC populations that could be broadly applied to the heterogeneous HCC subtypes. PMID:24713374

  13. Potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Valdespino, Victor; Valdespino, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease with both genetic and epigenetic origins. The growing field of epigenetics has contributed to our understanding of oncogenesis and tumor progression, and has allowed the development of novel therapeutic drugs. First-generation epigenetic inhibitor drugs have obtained modest clinical results in two types of hematological malignancy. Second-generation epigenetic inhibitors are in development, and have intrinsically greater selectivity for their molecular targets. Solid tumors are more genetic and epigenetically complex than hematological malignancies, but the transcriptome and epigenome biomarkers have been identified for many of these malignancies. This solid tumor molecular aberration profile may be modified using specific or quasi-specific epidrugs together with conventional and innovative anticancer treatments. In this critical review, we briefly analyze the strategies to select the targeted epigenetic changes, enumerate the second-generation epigenetic inhibitors, and describe the main signs indicating the potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors. We also highlight the work of consortia or academic organizations that support the undertaking of human epigenetic therapeutic projects as well as some examples of transcriptome/epigenome profile determination in clinical assessment of cancer patients treated with epidrugs. There is a good chance that epigenetic therapies will be able to be used in patients with solid tumors in the future. This may happen soon through collaboration of diverse scientific groups, making the selection of targeted epigenetic aberration(s) more rapid, the design and probe of drug candidates, accelerating in vitro and in vivo assays, and undertaking new cancer epigenetic-therapy clinical trails. PMID:26346546

  14. Validation of tumor protein marker quantification by two independent automated immunofluorescence image analysis platforms.

    PubMed

    Peck, Amy R; Girondo, Melanie A; Liu, Chengbao; Kovatich, Albert J; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D; Hu, Hai; Mitchell, Edith P; Freydin, Boris; Hyslop, Terry; Chervoneva, Inna; Rui, Hallgeir

    2016-10-01

    .98. Data-driven optimal cutpoints for outcome prediction by either platform were reciprocally applicable to the data derived by the alternate platform, identifying patients with low Nuc-pYStat5 at ~3.5-fold increased risk of disease progression. Our analyses identified two highly concordant fluorescence immunohistochemistry platforms that may serve as benchmarks for testing of other platforms, and low interoperator variability supports the implementation of objective tumor marker quantification in pathology laboratories.

  15. Validation of tumor protein marker quantification by two independent automated immunofluorescence image analysis platforms

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Amy R; Girondo, Melanie A; Liu, Chengbao; Kovatich, Albert J; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D; Hu, Hai; Mitchell, Edith P; Freydin, Boris; Hyslop, Terry; Chervoneva, Inna; Rui, Hallgeir

    2016-01-01

    .98. Data-driven optimal cutpoints for outcome prediction by either platform were reciprocally applicable to the data derived by the alternate platform, identifying patients with low Nuc-pYStat5 at ~3.5-fold increased risk of disease progression. Our analyses identified two highly concordant fluorescence immunohistochemistry platforms that may serve as benchmarks for testing of other platforms, and low interoperator variability supports the implementation of objective tumor marker quantification in pathology laboratories. PMID:27312066

  16. Plasma DCLK1 is a marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Targeting DCLK1 prevents HCC tumor xenograft growth via a microRNA-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Ali, Naushad; Fazili, Javid; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ding, Kai; Lightfoot, Stanley A.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor stem cell marker Doublecortin-like kinase1 (DCLK1) is upregulated in several solid tumors. The role of DCLK1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. We immunostained tissues from human livers with HCC, cirrhosis controls (CC), and non-cirrhosis controls (NCC) for DCLK1. Western blot and ELISA analyses for DCLK1 were performed with stored plasma samples. We observed increased immunoreactive DCLK1 in epithelia and stroma in HCC and CCs compared with NCCs, and observed a marked increase in plasma DCLK1 from patients with HCC compared with CC and NCC. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas’ HCC dataset revealed that DCLK1 is overexpressed in HCC tumors relative to adjacent normal tissues. High DCLK1-expressing cells had more epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Various tumor suppressor miRNAs were also downregulated in HCC tumors. We evaluated the effects of DCLK1 knockdown on Huh7.5-derived tumor xenograft growth. This was associated with growth arrest and a marked downregulation of cMYC, and EMT transcription factors ZEB1, ZEB2, SNAIL, and SLUG via let-7a and miR-200 miRNA-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, upregulation of miR-143/145, a corresponding decrease in pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG, KLF4, and LIN28, and a reduction of let-7a, miR-143/145, and miR-200-specific luciferase activity was observed. These findings suggest that the detection of elevated plasma DCLK1 may provide a cost-effective, less invasive tool for confirmation of clinical signs of cirrhosis, and a potential companion diagnostic marker for patients with cirrhosis and HCC. Our results support evaluating DCLK1 as a biomarker for detection and as a therapeutic target for eradicating HCC. PMID:26468984

  17. Drosophila as a Potential Model for Ocular Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Daimark; Lyulcheva, Ekaterina; Cobbe, Neville

    2015-04-01

    Drosophila has made many contributions to our understanding of cancer genes and mechanisms that have subsequently been validated in mammals. Despite anatomical differences between fly and human eyes, flies offer a tractable genetic model in which to dissect the functional importance of genetic lesions found to be affected in human ocular tumors. Here, we discuss different approaches for using Drosophila as a model for ocular cancer and how studies on ocular cancer genes in flies have begun to reveal potential strategies for therapeutic intervention. We also discuss recent developments in the use of Drosophila for drug discovery, which is coming to the fore as Drosophila models are becoming tailored to study tumor types found in the clinic. PMID:27172095

  18. Established breast cancer stem cell markers do not correlate with in vivo tumorigenicity of tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Christian; Jobs, Gabriele; Thomas, Markus; Burtscher, Helmut; Kubbies, Manfred

    2012-12-01

    The tumor-initiating capacity of primary human breast cancer cells is maintained in vitro by culturing these cells as spheres/aggregates. Inoculation of small cell numbers derived from these non-adherent cultures leads to rapid xenograft tumor formation in mice. Accordingly, injection of more differentiated monolayer cells derived from spheres results in significantly decelerated tumor growth. For our study, two breast cancer cell lines were generated from primary tumors and cultured as mammospheres or as their adherent counterparts. We examined the in vivo tumorigenicity of these cells by injecting serial dilutions into immunodeficient mice. Inoculation of 106 cells per mouse led to rapid tumor formation, irrespective of cell line or culture conditions. However, after injection of only 103 cells, solely sphere cells were highly tumorigenic. In vitro, we investigated differentiation markers, established breast CSC markers and conducted mRNA profiling. Cytokeratin 5 and 18 were increased in both monolayer cell types, indicating a more differentiated phenotype. All cell lines were CD24(-)/CD44(+) and did not express CD133, CD326 or E-cadherin. ALDH1 activity was not detectable in any cell line. A verapamil‑sensitive Hoechst side population was present in sphere cells, but there was no correlation with tumorigenicity in vivo. mRNA profiling did not reveal upregulation of relevant transcription factors. In vitro cell cycle kinetics and in vivo tumor doubling times displayed no difference between sphere and monolayer cultures. Our data indicate that intrinsic genetic and functional markers investigated are not indicative of the in vivo tumori-genicity of putative breast tumor-initiating cells.

  19. SMAD4 is a potential prognostic marker in human breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-nan; Xi, Yue; Callaghan, Michael U.; Fribley, Andrew; Moore-Smith, Lakisha; Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Pasche, Boris

    2014-01-01

    SMAD4 is a downstream mediator of transforming growth factor beta. While its tumor suppressor function has been investigated as a prognostic biomarker in several human malignancies, its role as a prognostic marker in breast carcinoma is still undefined. We investigated SMAD4 expression in breast carcinoma samples of different histologic grades to evaluate the association between SMAD4 and outcome in breast cancer. We also investigated the role of SMAD4 expression status in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells in responding to TGF-β stimulation. SMAD4 expression was assessed in 53 breast ductal carcinoma samples and in the surrounding normal tissue from 50 of the samples using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR. TGF-β-SMAD and non-SMAD signaling was assessed by Western blot in MDA-MB-468 cells with and without SMAD4 restoration. SMAD4 expression was reduced in ductal breast carcinoma as compared to surrounding uninvolved ductal breast epithelia (p <0.05). SMAD4 expression levels decreased from Grade 1 to Grade 3 ductal breast carcinoma as assessed by immunohistochemistry (p <0.05). Results were recapitulated by tissue array. In addition, immunohistochemistry results were further confirmed at the protein and mRNA level. We then found that non-SMAD MEK/MAPK signaling was significantly different between SMAD4 expressing MDA-MB-468 cells and SMAD4-null MDA-MB-468 cells. This is the first study indicating that SMAD4 plays a key role in shifting MAPK signaling. Further, we have demonstrated that SMAD4 has a potential role in the development of breast carcinoma and SMAD4 was a potential prognostic marker of breast carcinoma. Our findings further support the role of SMAD4 in breast carcinoma development. In addition, we observed an inverse relationship between SMAD4 levels and breast carcinoma histological grade. Our finding indicated that SMAD4 expression level in breast cancer cells played a role in responding non-SMAD signaling but not the canonic SMAD

  20. Immunohistochemical evaluation of stem cell markers and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in solitary fibrous tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengyan; Qi, Yan; Liu, Ruixue; Lan, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Yang; Ju, Xinxin; Chen, Dongdong; Zou, Hong; Li, Shugang; Hu, Jianming; Zhao, Jin; Shen, Yaoyuan; Sun, Zhenzhu; Pang, Lijuan; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are fibroblastic, ubiquitous mesenchymal tumors. Although several SFT studies have been conducted, the cell of origin of SFT remains controversial and reliable diagnostic markers are needed for SFT identification for proper prognosis and therapeutics. To analyze the immunophenotype of SFT for the identification of specific diagnostic markers and the cell of origin of this tumor, we performed an immunohistochemical study of stem cell markers [aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), CD29, CD44, CD133, and nestin] and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in 18 cases of SFT. The results demonstrated that ALDH1 was present in 16 cases (16/18), STAT6 in 13 cases (13/18), CD44 in 8 cases (8/18), and CD29 in 1 case (1/18), whereas CD133 and nestin were absent in all cases (0/18). Our results indicate that combination with ALDH1 and STAT6 can improve the diagnostic value of CD34 for SFT. The immunohistochemical findings for stem cell surface markers indicate that SFT may originate from stem cells and that ALDH1 plays an important role in the development of SFT. PMID:26617768

  1. Immunohistochemical evaluation of stem cell markers and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in solitary fibrous tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengyan; Qi, Yan; Liu, Ruixue; Lan, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Yang; Ju, Xinxin; Chen, Dongdong; Zou, Hong; Li, Shugang; Hu, Jianming; Zhao, Jin; Shen, Yaoyuan; Sun, Zhenzhu; Pang, Lijuan; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are fibroblastic, ubiquitous mesenchymal tumors. Although several SFT studies have been conducted, the cell of origin of SFT remains controversial and reliable diagnostic markers are needed for SFT identification for proper prognosis and therapeutics. To analyze the immunophenotype of SFT for the identification of specific diagnostic markers and the cell of origin of this tumor, we performed an immunohistochemical study of stem cell markers [aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), CD29, CD44, CD133, and nestin] and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in 18 cases of SFT. The results demonstrated that ALDH1 was present in 16 cases (16/18), STAT6 in 13 cases (13/18), CD44 in 8 cases (8/18), and CD29 in 1 case (1/18), whereas CD133 and nestin were absent in all cases (0/18). Our results indicate that combination with ALDH1 and STAT6 can improve the diagnostic value of CD34 for SFT. The immunohistochemical findings for stem cell surface markers indicate that SFT may originate from stem cells and that ALDH1 plays an important role in the development of SFT.

  2. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: Comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goethals, Laurence; Debucquoy, Annelies; Perneel, Christiaan; Geboes, Karel; Ectors, Nadine; De Schutter, Harlinde; Penninckx, Freddy; McBride, William H.; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin M. . E-mail: karin.haustermans@uzleuven.be

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intrinsic markers of hypoxia. Methods and Material: Twenty patients with an adenocarcinoma of the left colon and rectum treated by primary surgery were injected with pimonidazole and IdUrd. Serial sections of tumor biopsies were single stained for VEGF, EGFR, Ki67, and double stained for blood vessels in combination with either pimonidazole, IdUrd, or CA IX. Percentage of expression was scored as well as colocalization of pimonidazole with CA IX. Results: The median percentage of hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole staining, was 16.7% (range, 0-52.4%). The expression of pimonidazole correlated inversely with the total MVD and endothelial cord MVD (R = -0.55, p = 0.01; R = -0.47, p = 0.04). Good colocalization was found between pimonidazole and CA IX in only 30% of tumors, with no correlation overall between pimonidazole and CA IX, VEGF, or EGFR or between the different intrinsic markers. Cells around some vessels (0.08-11%) were negative for IdUrd but positive for Ki 67, which indicated their lack of perfusion at the time of injection. Conclusion: Chronic and acute hypoxic regions are present in colorectal tumors, as shown by pimonidazole and IdUrd staining. Only in a minority of tumors did an association exist between the areas stained by pimonidazole and those positive for CA IX. Pimonidazole also did not correlate with expression of other putative intrinsic hypoxia markers (VEGF, EGFR)

  3. Regulatory T cells with multiple suppressive and potentially pro-tumor activities accumulate in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Timperi, Eleonora; Pacella, Ilenia; Schinzari, Valeria; Focaccetti, Chiara; Sacco, Luca; Farelli, Francesco; Caronna, Roberto; Del Bene, Gabriella; Longo, Flavia; Ciardi, Antonio; Morelli, Sergio; Vestri, Anna Rita; Chirletti, Piero; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Piconese, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Tregs can contribute to tumor progression by suppressing antitumor immunity. Exceptionally, in human colorectal cancer (CRC), Tregs are thought to exert beneficial roles in controlling pro-tumor chronic inflammation. The goal of our study was to characterize CRC-infiltrating Tregs at multiple levels, by phenotypical, molecular and functional evaluation of Tregs from the tumor site, compared to non-tumoral mucosa and peripheral blood of CRC patients. The frequency of Tregs was higher in mucosa than in blood, and further significantly increased in tumor. Ex vivo, those Tregs suppressed the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. A differential compartmentalization was detected between Helios(high) and Helios(low) Treg subsets (thymus-derived versus peripherally induced): while Helios(low) Tregs were enriched in both sites, only Helios(high) Tregs accumulated significantly and specifically in tumors, displayed a highly demethylated TSDR region and contained high proportions of cells expressing CD39 and OX40, markers of activation and suppression. Besides the suppression of T cells, Tregs may contribute to CRC progression also through releasing IL-17, or differentiating into Tfr cells that potentially antagonize a protective Tfh response, events that were both detected in tumor-associated Tregs. Overall, our data indicate that Treg accumulation may contribute through multiple mechanisms to CRC establishment and progression. PMID:27622025

  4. Investigation of the change in marker geometry during respiration motion: a preliminary study for dynamic-multi-leaf real-time tumor tracking

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is rapidly increasing. Presently, the most accurate method uses fiducial markers implanted near the tumor. A shortcoming of this method is that the beams turn off during the majority of the respiratory cycle, resulting in a prolonged treatment time. Recent advances in collimation technology have enabled continuous irradiation to a moving tumor. However, the lung is a dynamic organ characterized by inhalation exhalation cycles, during which marker/tumor geometry may change (i.e., misalignment), resulting in under-dosing to the tumor. Findings Eight patients with lung cancer who were candidates for stereotactic radiotherapy were examined with 4D high-resolution CT. As a marker surrogate, virtual bronchoscopy using the pulmonary artery (VBPA) was conducted. To detect possible marker/tumor misalignment during the respiration cycle, the distance between the peripheral bronchus, where a marker could be implanted, and the center of gravity of a tumor were calculated for each respiratory phase. When the respiration cycle was divided into 10 phases, the median value was significantly larger for the 30%-70% respiratory phases compared to that for the 10% respiratory phase (P<0.05, Mann–Whitney U-test). Conclusions These results demonstrate that physiological aspect must be considered when continuous tumor tracking is applied to a moving tumor. To minimize an “additional” internal target volume (ITV) margin, a marker should be placed approximately 2.5 cm from the tumor. PMID:23249681

  5. Higher importance of interleukin 6 than classic tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen and squamous cell cancer antigen) in the diagnosis of esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Łukaszewicz-Zając, M; Mroczko, B; Kozłowski, M; Nikliński, J; Laudański, J; Szmitkowski, M

    2012-04-01

    It has been suggested that interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a potential role in the growth and progression of tumors, including esophageal cancer (EC). The aim of the study was to compare clinical significance of serum IL-6 with classic tumor markers - carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cell cancer antigen (SCC-Ag) - in EC patients in relation to its histological types - squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (AD) of esophagus. The study included 53 EC patients and 90 healthy subjects. Serum IL-6 and CEA levels were determined using immunoenzyme assays, while SCC-Ag - chemiluminescent assay. The diagnostic criteria and prognostic values for markers were defined. The levels of all proteins tested in EC, ESCC, and AD were higher than in healthy subjects. The percentage of elevated results was substantially higher for IL-6 (86%) than for CEA (30%) and SCC-Ag (24%) in EC, similarly as in ESCC (87%, 23%, and 33%) and AD (87%, 39%, and 13%, respectively) patients. Concentrations of IL-6 depended on distant metastases and patients' survival in EC and were significantly higher in ESCC patients with more advanced tumor stage and nodal metastases. The IL-6 area under receiver operating characteristic curve (0.92) was larger than for CEA (0.84) and SCC-Ag (0.62) in EC, likewise in ESCC (0.92, 0.87, 0.77) and AD (0.91, 0.79, 0.57, respectively). Our findings indicate better usefulness of IL-6 than classic tumor markers in the diagnosis of EC, especially in patients with ESCC.

  6. [hScrib: a potential novel tumor suppressor].

    PubMed

    Borg, J-P

    2004-07-01

    Establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity rely on finely tuned protein networks comprising cell surface molecules, cytoplasmic adaptors, and enzymes connected to the actin cytoskeleton. Oncogenes and tumor suppressors promote cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis and, in many cases, alter some of these molecular scaffolds, and profoundly affect the epithelial cytoarchitecture. Reciprocally, loss of central actors of epithelial polarity unleashes normally repressed signaling pathways and perturb the shape and functions of epithelial tissues. Among the newcomers impacting on epithelial integrity, Scribble is a scaffold protein of a remarkable importance that furthermore displays a tumor suppressing activity in Drosophila melanogaster. Together with Discs Large (Dlg) and Lethal Giant Larvae (Lgl), two known tumor suppressors, Scribble acts on the correct positioning of epithelial junctions required to organize functional epithelial sheets. Scribble, Dlg and Lgl proteins are well conserved during evolution at the molecular and subcellular level implying their potential role in cell polarity and tumorigenesis in humans. Recent findings on hScrib, the human orthologue of Scribble, are discussed here.

  7. May Sonic Hedgehog proteins be markers for malignancy in uterine smooth muscle tumors?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalia; Bozzini, Nilo; Baiocchi, Glauco; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes; Soares Junior, José Maria; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Carvalho, Katia Candido

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway (SHH) plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cellular differentiation. We analyzed the protein expression of SHH pathway components and evaluated whether their profile could be useful for the diagnosis, prognosis, or prediction of the risk of malignancy for uterine smooth muscle tumors (USMTs). A total of 176 samples (20 myometrium, 119 variants of leiomyoma, and 37 leiomyosarcoma) were evaluated for the protein expression of the SHH signaling components, HHIP1 (SHH inhibitor), and BMP4 (SHH target) by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis was performed to verify the specificity of the antibodies. We grouped leiomyoma samples into conventional leiomyomas and unusual leiomyomas that comprise atypical, cellular, mitotically active leiomyomas and uterine smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that SMO, SUFU, GLI1, GLI3, and BMP4 expression gradually increased depending on to the histologic tissue type. The protein expression of SMO, SUFU, and GLI1 was increased in unusual leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma samples compared to normal myometrium. The inhibitor HHIP1 showed higher expression in myometrium, whereas only negative or basal expression of SMO, SUFU, GLI1, and GLI3 was detected in these samples. Strong expression of SHH was associated with poorer overall survival. Our data suggest that the expression of SHH proteins can be useful for evaluating the potential risk of malignancy for USMTs. Moreover, GLI1 and SMO may serve as future therapeutic targets for women with USMTs. PMID:26997437

  8. Cancer and the microbiome: potential applications as new tumor biomarker.

    PubMed

    Shahanavaj, Khan; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio; Castiglia, Marta; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Carreca, Anna P; del Pozo, José Luis; Russo, Antonio; Peeters, Marc; Rolfo, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Microbial communities that colonize in humans are collectively described as microbiome. According to conservative estimates, about 15% of all types of neoplasms are related to different infective agents. However, current knowledge is not sufficient to explain how the microbiome contributes to the growth and development of cancers. Large and thorough studies involving colonized, diverse and complex microbiome entities are required to identify microbiome as a potential cancer marker and to understand how the immune system is involved in response to pathogens. This article reviews the existing evidence supporting the enigmatic association of transformed microbiome with the development of cancer through the immunological modification. Ascertaining the connection between microbiome and immunological responses with risk of cancer may direct to explaining significant advances in the etiology of cancer, potentially disclosing a novel paradigm of research for the management and prevention of cancer.

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using CD68 Marker: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bagul, Neeta; Roy, Souparna; Ganjre, Anjali; Meher, Aishwarya; Singh, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers in India. Clear evidence regarding inflammation being an etiological factor of cancer was found only in the last few decades. A major inflammatory component in the tumor tissue is Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs). The CD68 antibody is a marker for staining TAMs. Aim The aim of this study is to quantify the macrophage count in healthy oral mucosa and OSCC and comparing TAMs in different histopathological grades of OSCC immunohistochemically. Materials and Methods Thirty archival specimens of OSCC patients and 10 healthy biopsy samples were collected. Immunohistochemical staining was done using a CD68 marker. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test. Results Comparing CD68 expression in various study groups showed a significant difference (p=0.000). The pair-wise analysis showed different grades of OSCC, which differed significantly for CD68 expression from the normal oral mucosa. Conclusion The most significant cells present in tumor stroma are TAMs, which remain in close proximity to neoplastic cells and interact with them via several chemical mediators, which may serve to increase the invasiveness of the malignant epithelium. Dense infiltration of TAMs adjacent to tumor cells and islands vividly implies their role in tumor progression. PMID:27190959

  10. Interfractional Positional Variability of Fiducial Markers and Primary Tumors in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer During Audiovisual Biofeedback Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Nicholas O.; Shepherd, Wes; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate implanted markers as a surrogate for tumor-based setup during image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy with audiovisual biofeedback. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were implanted bronchoscopically with gold coils. Markers, tumor, and a reference bony structure (vertebra) were contoured for all 10 phases of the four-dimensional respiration-correlated fan-beam computed tomography and weekly four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Results: The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-tumor centroid displacements were 2/3, 2/2, and 3/3 mm in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) directions, respectively. The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/3, and 2/3 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. The systematic/random tumor-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/4, and 4/4 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. All displacements changed significantly over time (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although marker-based image guidance may decrease the risk for geometric miss compared with bony anatomy-based positioning, the observed displacements between markers and tumor centroids indicate the need for repeated soft tissue imaging, particularly in situations with large tumor volume change and large initial marker-to-tumor centroid distance.

  11. Tumor markers for diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jie-Xian; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Ting; Tian, Bao-Guo; Du, Li-Li; Zhao, Xian-Wen; Han, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the value of combined detection of serum CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS for the clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer and to analyze the efficacy of these tumor markers (TMs) in evaluating curative effects and prognosis. A total of 573 patients with upper GIT cancer between January 2004 and December 2007 were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were examined preoperatively and every 3 months postoperatively by ELISA. The sensitivity of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were 26.8%, 36.2%, 42.9%, 2.84%, 25.4%, 34.6%, 34.2% and 30.9%, respectively. The combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 had higher sensitivity and specificity in gastric cancer (GC) and cardiac cancer, while CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC was the best combination of diagnosis for esophageal cancer (EC). Elevation of preoperative CEA, CA19-9 and CA24-2, SCC and CA72-4 was significantly associated with pathological types (p<0.05) and TNM staging (p<0.05). Correlation analysis showed that CA24-2 was significantly correlated with CA19-9 (r=0.810, p<0.001). The levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC decreased obviously 3 months after operations. When metastasis and recurrence occurred, the levels of TMs significantly increased. On multivariate analysis, high preoperative CA72-4, CA24-2 and SCC served as prognostic factors for cardiac carcinoma, GC and EC, respectively. combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC proved to be the most economic and practical strategy in diagnosis of EC; CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 proved to be a better evaluation indicator for cardiac cancer and GC. CEA and CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC, examined postoperatively during follow-up, were useful to find early tumor recurrence and metastasis, and evaluate prognosis. AFP, TPA and TPS have no significant value in diagnosis of patients with upper GIT cancer.

  12. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy of breast cancer: tumor markers as predictors of pathologic response, recurrence, and survival.

    PubMed

    Precht, Lisa M; Lowe, Kimberly A; Atwood, Mary; Beatty, J David

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the value of the tumor markers estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in predicting the response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A community cancer center prospectively maintained breast cancer database containing over 8,000 patient records was used. Since 1989, 464 patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection and were tested for ER and PR. Estrogen receptor and/or PR positive patients were considered hormone receptor (HR) positive. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status was available on 368 patients. Total, breast, and nodal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates, recurrence, and overall survival were assessed. Total and breast pCR rates were higher in HR negative (HR-) patients (26% and 32%, respectively) than in HR positive (HR+) patients (4% and 7%, respectively; p < 0.001). Compared to HR+ patients, HR- patients had higher recurrence rates (38% versus 22%; p < 0.001), a shorter time to recurrence (1.28 versus 2.14 years; p < 0.001), and decreased overall survival (67% versus 81%; p < 0.001). Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients treated with neoadjuvant trastuzumab (NAT) demonstrated higher total pCR (34% versus 13%; p = 0.008), breast pCR (37% versus 17%; p = 0.02), and nodal pCR rates (47% versus 23%; p = 0.05) compared to HER2+ patients not treated with NAT. Furthermore, HER2+ patients who received NAT had lower recurrence rates (5% versus 42%; p < 0.001) and increased overall survival (97% versus 68%; p < 0.001). In conclusion, breast cancer HR status is predictive of total and breast pCR rates after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Although HR- patients derive greater benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy in terms of pathologic response, they have worse outcomes in terms of recurrence and survival. Hormone receptor positive patients demonstrate significantly less response to neoadjuvant

  13. IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL MARKERS OF THE SUN'S GIANT CONVECTIVE SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Leamon, Robert J.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2014-04-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are analyzed using a diagnostic known as the magnetic range of influence (MRoI). The MRoI is a measure of the length over which a photospheric magnetogram is balanced and so its application gives the user a sense of the connective length scales in the outer solar atmosphere. The MRoI maps and histograms inferred from the SDO/HMI magnetograms primarily exhibit four scales: a scale of a few megameters that can be associated with granulation, a scale of a few tens of megameters that can be associated with super-granulation, a scale of many hundreds to thousands of megameters that can be associated with coronal holes and active regions, and a hitherto unnoticed scale that ranges from 100 to 250 Mm. We infer that this final scale is an imprint of the (rotationally driven) giant convective scale on photospheric magnetism. This scale appears in MRoI maps as well-defined, spatially distributed concentrations that we have dubbed ''g-nodes''. Furthermore, using coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO, we see that the vicinity of these g-nodes appears to be a preferred location for the formation of extreme-ultraviolet (and likely X-Ray) brightpoints. These observations and straightforward diagnostics offer the potential of a near real-time mapping of the Sun's largest convective scale, a scale that possibly reaches to the very bottom of the convective zone.

  14. Potential effect of matrix stiffness on the enrichment of tumor initiating cells under three-dimensional culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Xu, Xiao-xi; Wu, Hao; Xie, Hong-guo; Chen, Li; Lu, Ting; Yang, Li; Guo, Xin; Sun, Guang-wei; Wang, Wei; Ma, Xiao-jun; He, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) or tumor initiating cell (TIC) plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Biophysical forces in tumor microenvironment have an important effect on tumor formation and development. In this study, the potential effect of matrix stiffness on the biological characteristics of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) TICs, especially the enrichment of HNSCC TICs, was investigated under three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions by means of alginate gel (ALG) beads with different matrix stiffnesses. ALG beads with soft (21 kPa), moderate (70 kPa) and hard (105 kPa) stiffness were generated by changing alginate concentration. It was found that significant HNSCC TIC enrichment was achieved in the ALG beads with moderate matrix stiffness (70 kPa). The gene expression of stemness markers Oct3/4 and Nanog, TIC markers CD44 and ABCG2 was enhanced in cells under this moderate (70 kPa) stiffness. HNSCC TIC proportion was also highly enriched under moderate matrix stiffness, accompanying with higher tumorigenicity, metastatic ability and drug resistance. And it was also found that the possible molecular mechanism underlying the regulated TIC properties by matrix stiffness under 3D culture conditions was significantly different from 2D culture condition. Therefore, the results achieved in this study indicated that 3D biophysical microenvironment had an important effect on TIC characteristics and alginate-based biomimetic scaffolds could be utilized as a proper platform to investigate the interaction between tumor cells and 3D microenvironment.

  15. Simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers with a rapid and sensitive multicolor quantum dots based immunochromatographic test strip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunying; Hou, Fei; Ma, Yicai

    2015-06-15

    A novel multicolor quantum dots (QDs) based immunochromatographic test strip (ICTS) was developed for simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers, by utilizing alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as models. The immunosensor could realize simultaneous quantitative detection of tumor markers with only one test line and one control line on the nitrocellulose membrane (NC membrane) due to the introduction of multicolor QDs. In this method, a mixture of mouse anti-AFP McAb and mouse anti-CEA McAb was coated on NC membrane as test line and goat anti-mouse IgG antibody was coated as control line. Anti-AFP McAb-QDs546 conjugates and anti-CEA McAb-QDs620 conjugates were mixed and applied to the conjugate pad. Simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers was achieved by detecting the fluorescence intensity of captured QDs labels on test line and control line using a test strip reader. Under the optimum conditions, AFP and CEA could be detected as low as 3 ng/mL and 2 ng/mL in 15 min with a sample volume of 80 μL, and no obvious cross-reactivity was observed. The immunosensor was validated with 130 clinical samples and in which it exhibited high sensitivity (93% for AFP and 87% for CEA) and specificity (94% for AFP and 97% for CEA). The immunosensor also demonstrated high recoveries (87.5-113% for AFP and 90-97.3% for CEA) and low relative standard deviations (RSDs) (2.8-6.2% for AFP and 4.9-9.6% for CEA) when testing spiked human serum. This novel multicolor QDs based ICTS provides an easy and rapid, simultaneous quantitative detecting strategy for point-of-care testing of tumor markers. PMID:25562743

  16. Prognostic significance of tissue DF3 antigen and CA15-3 tumor marker in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dimas, C; Fragos-Plemenos, M; Gennatas, C; Kouskouni, E; Kondi-Paphitis, A

    2000-01-01

    The specific monoclonal antibody, DF3, for breast cancer and the corresponding tumor marker CA15-3 were evaluated in 108 patients with primary cancer of the breast. These antigens correlated poorly with the known prognostic parameters. Elevated CA15-3 serum values were associated with the cytoplasmic distribution of the DF3 antigen in the cell. The DF3 distribution pattern and the CA15-3 serum values had prognostic significance for disease-free interval.

  17. Microfluidic, marker-free isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Nezihi Murat; Spuhler, Philipp S; Fachin, Fabio; Lim, Eugene J; Pai, Vincent; Ozkumur, Emre; Martel, Joseph M; Kojic, Nikola; Smith, Kyle; Chen, Pin-i; Yang, Jennifer; Hwang, Henry; Morgan, Bailey; Trautwein, Julie; Barber, Thomas A; Stott, Shannon L; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Kapur, Ravi; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-03-01

    The ability to isolate and analyze rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has the potential to further our understanding of cancer metastasis and enhance the care of cancer patients. In this protocol, we describe the procedure for isolating rare CTCs from blood samples by using tumor antigen-independent microfluidic CTC-iChip technology. The CTC-iChip uses deterministic lateral displacement, inertial focusing and magnetophoresis to sort up to 10⁷ cells/s. By using two-stage magnetophoresis and depletion antibodies against leukocytes, we achieve 3.8-log depletion of white blood cells and a 97% yield of rare cells with a sample processing rate of 8 ml of whole blood/h. The CTC-iChip is compatible with standard cytopathological and RNA-based characterization methods. This protocol describes device production, assembly, blood sample preparation, system setup and the CTC isolation process. Sorting 8 ml of blood sample requires 2 h including setup time, and chip production requires 2-5 d.

  18. Microfluidic, marker-free isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood samples

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Nezihi Murat; Spuhler, Philipp S; Fachin, Fabio; Lim, Eugene J; Pai, Vincent; Ozkumur, Emre; Martel, Joseph M; Kojic, Nikola; Smith, Kyle; Chen, Pin-i; Yang, Jennifer; Hwang, Henry; Morgan, Bailey; Trautwein, Julie; Barber, Thomas A; Stott, Shannon L; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Kapur, Ravi; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The ability to isolate and analyze rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has the potential to further our understanding of cancer metastasis and enhance the care of cancer patients. In this protocol, we describe the procedure for isolating rare CTCs from blood samples by using tumor antigen–independent microfluidic CTC-iChip technology. The CTC-iChip uses deterministic lateral displacement, inertial focusing and magnetophoresis to sort up to 107 cells/s. By using two-stage magnetophoresis and depletion antibodies against leukocytes, we achieve 3.8-log depletion of white blood cells and a 97% yield of rare cells with a sample processing rate of 8 ml of whole blood/h. The CTC-iChip is compatible with standard cytopathological and RNA-based characterization methods. This protocol describes device production, assembly, blood sample preparation, system setup and the CTC isolation process. Sorting 8 ml of blood sample requires 2 h including setup time, and chip production requires 2–5 d. PMID:24577360

  19. Cost/effectiveness ratio of carcinoembryonic antigen--importance of adequacy of routine requests of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Gion, M; Rampazzo, A; Mione, R; Bruscagnin, G

    1992-01-01

    Since 1987 we have been evaluating the cost/effectiveness ratio of tumor markers using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a leading indicator. Preliminary to the evaluation of cost/effectiveness ratio we verified the fitness of CEA requests to the proper clinical problems in order to identify any bias of cost due to inadequate CEA use. 2677 CEA orders were evaluated in 1987. The percentage of inadequate requests was very high (43%). Therefore, it seemed not advisable to carry out the evaluation of cost/effectiveness ratio, while educational actions (divulgation of informative material, service of telephone consultation) were addressed to the physicians of the geographic area of laboratory users. In 1991 the adequacy of CEA requests was reevaluated. The percentage of inadequate requests on 2647 orders was 29.4%. This result, although not yet satisfactory, suggests that proper educational programs may probably improve the fitness of tumor marker requests to correct clinical problems. Additional educational actions are mandatory to further reduce the rate of inadequate tumor marker orders.

  20. A multiplexed marker-based algorithm for diagnosis of carcinoma of unknown primary using circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Matthew, Elizabeth M; Zhou, Lanlan; Yang, Zhaohai; Dicker, David T; Holder, Sheldon L; Lim, Bora; Harouaka, Ramdane; Zheng, Si-Yang; Drabick, Joseph J; Lamparella, Nicholas E; Truica, Cristina I; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2016-01-26

    Real-time, single-cell multiplex immunophenotyping of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hypothesized to inform diagnosis of tissue of origin in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP). In 20 to 50% of CUP patients, the primary site remains unidentified, presenting a challenge for clinicians in diagnosis and treatment. We developed a post-CellSearch CTC assay using multiplexed Q-dot or DyLight conjugated antibodies with the goal of detecting multiple markers in single cells within a CTC population. We adapted our approach to size-based CTC enrichment protocols for capturing CTCs and subsequent immunofluorescence (IF) using a minimal set of markers to predict the primary sites for common metastatic tumors. The carcinomas are characterized with cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), estrogen receptor (ER) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA. IF has been optimized in cultured tumor cells with individual antibodies, then with conjugated antibodies to form a multiplex antibody set. With IF, we evaluated antibodies specific to these 5 markers in lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer cell lines and blood from metastatic prostate and breast cancer patients. This advanced technology provides a noninvasive, diagnostic blood test as an adjunct to routine tissue biopsy. Its further implementation requires prospective clinical testing.

  1. A multiplexed marker-based algorithm for diagnosis of carcinoma of unknown primary using circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaohai; Dicker, David T.; Holder, Sheldon L.; Lim, Bora; Harouaka, Ramdane; Zheng, Si-Yang; Drabick, Joseph J.; Lamparella, Nicholas E.; Truica, Cristina I.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time, single-cell multiplex immunophenotyping of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hypothesized to inform diagnosis of tissue of origin in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP). In 20 to 50% of CUP patients, the primary site remains unidentified, presenting a challenge for clinicians in diagnosis and treatment. We developed a post-CellSearch CTC assay using multiplexed Q-dot or DyLight conjugated antibodies with the goal of detecting multiple markers in single cells within a CTC population. We adapted our approach to size-based CTC enrichment protocols for capturing CTCs and subsequent immunofluorescence (IF) using a minimal set of markers to predict the primary sites for common metastatic tumors. The carcinomas are characterized with cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), estrogen receptor (ER) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA. IF has been optimized in cultured tumor cells with individual antibodies, then with conjugated antibodies to form a multiplex antibody set. With IF, we evaluated antibodies specific to these 5 markers in lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer cell lines and blood from metastatic prostate and breast cancer patients. This advanced technology provides a noninvasive, diagnostic blood test as an adjunct to routine tissue biopsy. Its further implementation requires prospective clinical testing. PMID:26695546

  2. Label-free detection of tumor markers in a colon carcinoma tumor progression model by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Rück, Angelika; Udart, Martin; Hauser, Carmen; Dürr, Christine; Kriebel, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Living colon carcinoma cells were investigated by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. An in vitro model of tumor progression was established. Evaluation of data sets by cluster analysis reveals that lipid bodies might be a valuable diagnostic parameter for early carcinogenesis.

  3. An increase of B cells in the tumor-bearing state has the potential to induce anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ito, O; Harada, M; Takenoyama, M; Sumichika, H; Matsuzaki, G; Nomoto, K

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the role of an increased amount of B cells in the tumor-bearing state. The proportion of B cells increased concomitantly with tumor development in the regional lymph nodes (LN) of BALB/c mice bearing Meth A fibrosarcoma (Meth A). Tumor development was accompanied by an increased level of IgG antibodies against Meth A. CD4+ T cells of the regional LN in the early tumor-bearing stage produced significant levels of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 in response to in vitro stimulation with coated anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, whereas such capacities decreased in the late tumor-bearing stage. In a tumor-neutralizing assay, the growth of Meth A was significantly suppressed by a co-inoculation with splenic B cells from BALB/c mice in the late tumor-bearing state. This suppression of Meth A growth was tumor-specific and was abolished by the in vivo depletion of either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. These findings thus suggest that tumor development was accompanied by an increase of B cells and tumor-specific IgG production, but such kinetic changes were not the result of a preferential activation of Th2 type CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the increase of B cells in the tumor-bearing state has the potential to induce anti-tumor-specific T cell immunity.

  4. A method of surface marker location optimization for tumor motion estimation in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Bo Park, Justin C.; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Accurately localizing lung tumor localization is essential for high-precision radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Since direct monitoring of tumor motion is not always achievable due to the limitation of imaging modalities for treatment guidance, placement of fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to act as a surrogate for tumor position prediction is a practical alternative for tracking lung tumor motion during SBRT treatments. In this work, the authors propose an innovative and robust model to solve the multimarker position optimization problem. The model is able to overcome the major drawbacks of the sparse optimization approach (SOA) model. Methods: The principle-component-analysis (PCA) method was employed as the framework to build the authors’ statistical prediction model. The method can be divided into two stages. The first stage is to build the surrogate tumor matrix and calculate its eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. The second stage is to determine the “best represented” columns of the eigenvector matrix obtained from stage one and subsequently acquire the optimal marker positions as well as numbers. Using 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and breath hold CT imaging data, the PCA method was compared to the SOA method with respect to calculation time, average prediction accuracy, prediction stability, noise resistance, marker position consistency, and marker distribution. Results: The PCA and SOA methods which were both tested were on all 11 patients for a total of 130 cases including 4DCT and breath-hold CT scenarios. The maximum calculation time for the PCA method was less than 1 s with 64 752 surface points, whereas the average calculation time for the SOA method was over 12 min with 400 surface points. Overall, the tumor center position prediction errors were comparable between the two methods, and all were less than 1.5 mm. However, for the extreme scenarios (breath hold), the

  5. Mutations in p53 as potential molecular markers for human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Runnebaum, I.B.; Nagarajan, M.; Bowman, M.; Soto, D.; Sukumar, S. )

    1991-12-01

    Based on the high incidence of loss of heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p in the vicinity of the p53 locus in human breast tumors. The authors investigated the frequency and effects of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene in mammary neoplasia. They examined the p53 gene in 20 breast cancer cell lines and 59 primary breast tumors. Northern blot analysis, immunoprecipitation, and nucleotide sequencing analysis revealed aberrant mRNA expression, over-expression of protein, and point mutations in the p53 gene in 50% of the cell line tested. A multiplex PCR assay was developed to search for deletions in the p53 genomic locus. Multiplex PCR of genomic DNA showed that up to 36% of primary tumors contained aberrations in the p53 locus. Mutations in exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were found in 10 out of 59 (17%) of the primary tumors studied by single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. They conclude that, compared to amplification of HER2/NEU, MYC, or INT2 oncogene loci, p53 gene mutations and deletions are the most frequently observed genetic change in breast cancer related to a single gene. Correlated to disease status, p53 gene mutations could prove to be a valuable marker for diagnosis and/or prognosis of breast neoplasia.

  6. Small renal masses: The molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirina, L. V.; Usynin, Y. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Yurmazov, Z. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Pikalova, L. V.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of molecular mechanisms of tumor cell behavior in small renal masses is required to achieve the better cancer survival. The aim of the study is to find molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less. A homogenous group of 20 patients T1N0M0-1 (mean age 57.6 ± 2.2 years) with kidney cancer was selected for the present analysis. The content of transcription and growth factors was determined by ELISA. The levels of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway components were measured by Western blotting analysis. The molecular markers associated with unfavorable outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less were high levels of NF-kB p50, NF-kB p65, HIF-1, HIF-2, VEGF and CAIX. AKT activation with PTEN loss also correlated with the unfavorable outcome of kidney cancer patients with tumor size 7 cm or less. It is observed that the biological features of kidney cancer could predict the outcome of patients.

  7. Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/regucalcin (RGN) expression decreases with aging, acute liver injuries and tumors in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Terai, Shuji; Hirose, Yoshikazu; Takami, Taro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Zebrafish SMP30/RGN mRNA expression decreases with aging. {yields} Decreased expression was observed in liver tumors as compared to the surrounding area. {yields} SMP30/RGN is important for liver proliferation and tumorigenesis. -- Abstract: Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/regucalcin (RGN) is known to be related to aging, hepatocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis. However, expression and function of non-mammalian SMP30/RGN is poorly understood. We found that zebrafish SMP30/RGN mRNA expression decreases with aging, partial hepatectomy and thioacetamide-induced acute liver injury. SMP30/RGN expression was also greatly decreased in a zebrafish liver cell line. In addition, we induced liver tumors in adult zebrafish by administering diethylnitrosamine. Decreased expression was observed in foci, hepatocellular carcinomas, cholangiocellular carcinomas and mixed tumors as compared to the surrounding area. We thus showed the importance of SMP30/RGN in liver proliferation and tumorigenesis.

  8. Integrated analysis of pediatric glioblastoma reveals a subset of biologically favorable tumors with associated molecular prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Andrey; Ryzhova, Marina; Hovestadt, Volker; Bender, Sebastian; Sturm, Dominik; Capper, David; Meyer, Jochen; Schrimpf, Daniel; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Zheludkova, Olga; Milde, Till; Witt, Olaf; Kulozik, Andreas E; Reifenberger, Guido; Jabado, Nada; Perry, Arie; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; Jones, David T W

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric glioblastoma (pedGBM) is amongst the most common malignant brain tumors of childhood and carries a dismal prognosis. In contrast to adult GBM, few molecular prognostic markers for the pediatric counterpart have been established. We, therefore, investigated the prognostic significance of genomic and epigenetic alterations through molecular analysis of 202 pedGBM (1-18 years) with comprehensive clinical annotation. Routinely prepared formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples were assessed for genome-wide DNA methylation profiles, with known candidate genes screened for alterations via direct sequencing or FISH. Unexpectedly, a subset of histologically diagnosed GBM (n = 40, 20 %) displayed methylation profiles similar to those of either low-grade gliomas or pleomorphic xanthoastrocytomas (PXA). These tumors showed a markedly better prognosis, with molecularly PXA-like tumors frequently harboring BRAF V600E mutations and 9p21 (CDKN2A) homozygous deletion. The remaining 162 tumors with pedGBM molecular signatures comprised four subgroups: H3.3 G34-mutant (15 %), H3.3/H3.1 K27-mutant (43 %), IDH1-mutant (6 %), and H3/IDH wild-type (wt) GBM (36 %). These subgroups were associated with specific cytogenetic aberrations, MGMT methylation patterns and clinical outcomes. Analysis of follow-up data identified a set of biomarkers feasible for use in risk stratification: pedGBM with any oncogene amplification and/or K27M mutation (n = 124) represents a particularly unfavorable group, with 3-year overall survival (OS) of 5 %, whereas tumors without these markers (n = 38) define a more favorable group (3-year OS ~70 %).Combined with the lower grade-like lesions, almost 40 % of pedGBM cases had distinct molecular features associated with a more favorable outcome. This refined prognostication method for pedGBM using a molecular risk algorithm may allow for improved therapeutic choices and better planning of clinical trial stratification for this otherwise devastating

  9. Evaluation of Tumor Shape Variability in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Over the Course of Radiation Therapy Using Implanted Gold Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Kranen, Simon Robert van; Beek, Suzanne van; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Herk, Marcel van; Brekel, Michiel Wilhelmus Maria van den; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Rasch, Coenraad Robert Nico

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies tumor shape variability in head-and-neck cancer patients during radiation therapy using implanted markers. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with oropharyngeal tumors treated with (chemo)radiation were included. Helical gold markers (0.35 Multiplication-Sign 2 mm, 3-10/patient, average 6) were implanted around the tumor. Markers were identified on planning computed tomography (CT) and daily cone beam CT (CBCT). After bony anatomy registration, the daily vector length on CBCT in reference to the planning CT and daily marker movement perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) surface at planning CT (d{sub normal}) of each marker were analyzed. Time trends were assessed with linear regression of the {sub markers}. In 2 patients, 2 markers were implanted in normal tissue to evaluate migration by measuring intermarker distances. Results: Marker implantation was feasible without complications. Three-dimensional vectors (4827 measurements, mean 0.23 cm, interquartile ratio 0.24 cm) were highest in base of tongue sublocalization (P<.001) and bulky tumors (vectors exceeded 0.5 cm in 5.7% [0-20 mL], 12.0% [21-40 mL], and 21.7% [{>=}41 mL], respectively [P<.001] of measurements). The measured inward time trend in 11/27 patients correlated with the visual observed marker pattern. In patients with an outward trend (5/27) or no trend (11/27), visual observation showed predominantly an inhomogeneous pattern. Remarkably, in 6 patients, outward marker movement was observed in the posterior pharyngeal wall. The difference in distance between normal tissue markers (1 SD) was 0.05-0.06 cm without time trend, indicating that implanted markers did not migrate. Conclusions: During head-and-neck radiation therapy, normal tissue markers remained stable. Changes in position of tumor markers depended on sublocalization and tumor volume. Large differences in marker patterns between patients as well as within patients were observed

  10. Stepwise Application of Urine Markers to Detect Tumor Recurrence in Patients Undergoing Surveillance for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Todenhöfer, Tilman; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Esser, Michael; Mohrhardt, Sarah; Aufderklamm, Stefan; Böttge, Johannes; Rausch, Steffen; Mischinger, Johannes; Gakis, Georgios; Kuehs, Ursula; Schwentner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background. The optimal use of urine markers in the surveillance of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) remains unclear. Aim of the present study was to investigate the combined and stepwise use of the four most broadly available urine markers to detect tumor recurrence in patients undergoing surveillance of NMIBC. Patients and Methods. 483 patients with history of NMIBC were included. Cytology, UroVysion, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunocytology (uCyt+), and NMP22 ELISA were performed before surveillance cystoscopy. Characteristics of single tests and combinations were assessed by contingency analysis. Results. 128 (26.5%) patients had evidence of tumor recurrence. Sensitivities and negative predictive values (NPVs) of the single tests ranged between 66.4–74.3 and 82.3–88.2%. Two-marker combinations showed sensitivities and NPVs of 80.5–89.8 and 89.5–91.2%. A stepwise application of the two-test combinations with highest accuracy (cytology and FISH; cytology and uCyt+; uCyt+ and FISH) showed NPVs for high-risk recurrences (G3/Cis/pT1) of 98.8, 98.8, and 99.1%, respectively. Conclusions. Combinations of cytology, FISH, immunocytology, and NMP22 show remarkable detection rates for recurrent NMIBC. Stepwise two-test combinations of cytology, FISH, and immunocytology have a low probability of missing a high-risk tumor. The high sensitivities may justify the use of these combinations in prospective studies assessing the use of urine markers to individualize intervals between cystoscopies during follow-up. PMID:25587206

  11. SOX10 and Olig2 as negative markers for the diagnosis of ependymomas: An immunohistochemical study of 98 glial tumors.

    PubMed

    Švajdler, Marián; Rychlý, Boris; Mezencev, Roman; Fröhlichová, Lucia; Bednárová, Antónia; Pataky, František; Daum, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    SOX10 belongs to the family of transcription factors essential for the development of neural crest, peripheral nervous system and melanocytes. It is presently used in histopathology as a marker of melanocytic differentiation. SOX10 is expressed in normal brain tissue in oligodendrocytes, but the information about SOX10 expression in primary tumors of the central nervous system is quite limited. In this study, we examined the expression of SOX10 and Olig2 by immunohistochemistry in a series of 98 glial tumors and explored their specificity and sensitivity for differential diagnosis of ependymal vs non-ependymal tumors. In addition, we examined the expression of EMA and CD99 in ependymal tumors. SOX10 and Olig2 staining were scored as negative if no positive cells or only a few positive cells (typically up to 1-3%) were found. In all other instances, SOX10 or Olig2 staining was scored as positive. Out of 44 examined ependymal tumors none was found to express SOX10 and 7 specimens showed only a few SOX10-positive cells that likely corresponded to entrapped non-neoplastic oligodendrocytes. In contrast, non-ependymal tumors expressed SOX10 in 26/54 (48%) specimens. Olig2 was positive in 5 out of 44 ependymomas (11%) and 50 out of 54 (93%) non-ependymal tumors (astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas). EMA and CD99 expression was found in 33/44 (75%) and 11/44 (25%) of ependymomas, respectively. SOX10-positivity rules out the diagnosis of ependymoma among other glial tumors with high confidence. PMID:26287936

  12. A Sensitive IHC Method for Monitoring Autophagy-Specific Markers in Human Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    He, Helen; Yang, Yu; Xiang, Zhongmin; Yu, Lunyin; Chouitar, Jouhara; Yu, Jie; D'Amore, Natalie Roy; Li, Ping; Li, Zhi; Bowman, Douglas; Theisen, Matthew; Brownell, James E; Tirrell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Use of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to detect autophagy biomarkers in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) xenograft tissue. Materials and Methods. Autophagy marker regulation was studied in xenograft tissues using Amp HQ IHC and standard IHC methods. Results. The data demonstrate the feasibility of using high sensitivity TSA IHC assays to measure low abundant autophagy markers in FFPE xenograft tissue. PMID:27247826

  13. A Sensitive IHC Method for Monitoring Autophagy-Specific Markers in Human Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    He, Helen; Yang, Yu; Xiang, Zhongmin; Yu, Lunyin; Chouitar, Jouhara; Yu, Jie; D'Amore, Natalie Roy; Li, Ping; Li, Zhi; Bowman, Douglas; Theisen, Matthew; Brownell, James E.; Tirrell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Use of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to detect autophagy biomarkers in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) xenograft tissue. Materials and Methods. Autophagy marker regulation was studied in xenograft tissues using Amp HQ IHC and standard IHC methods. Results. The data demonstrate the feasibility of using high sensitivity TSA IHC assays to measure low abundant autophagy markers in FFPE xenograft tissue. PMID:27247826

  14. The relationship between clinicopathological features and expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in spontaneous canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kota; Yoshida, Saori; Choisunirachon, Nan; Saito, Tomochika; Matsumoto, Kaori; Saeki, Kohei; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    It is known that epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to the acquisition of malignant property in human cancers. However, the role of EMT in canine tumors remains to be elucidated. To evaluate the correlation between expression levels of protein markers involved in EMT and clinicopathological characteristics in canine mammary gland tumors, immunohistochemistry using antibodies against ZO-1, E-cadherin, vimentin, N-cadherin and fibronectin was performed on 119 clinical tissue samples. Consequently, loss of ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and gain of vimentin and N-cadherin were more frequently observed in malignant tumors than in benign tumors. However, there was no correlation among expression of these molecules. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified that loss of E-cadherin independently had a low one-year survival rate (adjusted odds ratio: 2.3, P=0.02). These results suggested that EMT might relate to acquisition of malignancy, and additionally, E-cadherin was strongly correlated with malignant behavior in canine mammary gland tumors.

  15. Novel chemical scaffolds of the tumor marker AKR1B10 inhibitors discovered by 3D QSAR pharmacophore modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Son, Minky; Bavi, Rohit; Lee, Yuno; Park, Chanin; Arulalapperumal, Venkatesh; Cao, Guang Ping; Kim, Hyong-ha; Suh, Jung-keun; Kim, Yong-seong; Kwon, Yong Jung; Lee, Keun Woo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 (AKR1B10) may be a potential diagnostic or prognostic marker of human tumors, and that AKR1B10 inhibitors offer a promising choice for treatment of many types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to identify novel chemical scaffolds of AKR1B10 inhibitors using in silico approaches. Methods: The 3D QSAR pharmacophore models were generated using HypoGen. A validated pharmacophore model was selected for virtual screening of 4 chemical databases. The best mapped compounds were assessed for their drug-like properties. The binding orientations of the resulting compounds were predicted by molecular docking. Density functional theory calculations were carried out using B3LYP. The stability of the protein-ligand complexes and the final binding modes of the hit compounds were analyzed using 10 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Results: The best pharmacophore model (Hypo 1) showed the highest correlation coefficient (0.979), lowest total cost (102.89) and least RMSD value (0.59). Hypo 1 consisted of one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one hydrogen-bond donor, one ring aromatic and one hydrophobic feature. This model was validated by Fischer's randomization and 40 test set compounds. Virtual screening of chemical databases and the docking studies resulted in 30 representative compounds. Frontier orbital analysis confirmed that only 3 compounds had sufficiently low energy band gaps. MD simulations revealed the binding modes of the 3 hit compounds: all of them showed a large number of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions with the active site and specificity pocket residues of AKR1B10. Conclusion: Three compounds with new structural scaffolds have been identified, which have stronger binding affinities for AKR1B10 than known inhibitors. PMID:26051108

  16. Naïve CD8+ T cell derived tumor-specific cytotoxic effectors as a potential remedy for overcoming TGF-β immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Kim, Therasa; Song, Sang Yun; Park, Somang; Cho, Hyang Hee; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Hee-Ok; Cho, Jae-Ho; Yang, Deok-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Despite of the potential implications for cancer immunotherapy, conventional approaches using in vitro expanded CD8+ T cells have suboptimal outcomes, mostly due to loss of functionality from cellular exhaustion. We therefore investigated the phenotypic and functional differences among in vitro activated CD8+ T cells of three different sources, namely naïve (NTeff), memory (MTeff) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILeff) from human and mice, to better understand mechanisms behind potent effector functions and potential for overcoming current limitations. In line with the greater proliferation activity and longer telomere lengths of NTeff populations, cells of naïve origin exhibited significantly less amounts of T cell exhaustion markers than those of MTeff and TILeff, and moreover, acquired distinct expression patterns of memory-promoting transcription factors, T-bet and Eomes, induced in a rapid and sustainable manner. NTeff cells appeared to have lower expression of Foxp1 and were refractory to apoptosis upon TGF-β conditioning, implying better survival potential and resistance to tumor-induced immune suppression. Of CD8+ T cell pools activated to tumor-specific CTLs, naïve cell generated effectors possessed the most potent cytotoxic activity, validating implications for use in rational design of adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27306834

  17. In vivo potential of recombinant granulysin against human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wasaby, Sameer; de Miguel, Diego; Aporta, Adriana; Naval, Javier; Conde, Blanca; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Anel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    9 kDa granulysin is a protein present in the granules of human CTL and NK cells, with cytolytic activity against microbes and tumors. Previous work from our group demonstrated that this granulysin isoform induced apoptosis in vitro on hematological tumor cells and on primary tumor cells from B-CLL patients. In the present work, recombinant 9 kDa granulysin was used as an anti-tumoral agent to study its in vivo effect on tumor development in athymic “nude” mice models bearing human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 or multiple myeloma NCI-H929–derived xenografts. Granulysin prevented the in vivo development of detectable MDA-MB-231-derived tumors. In addition, recombinant granulysin was able to completely eradicate NCI-H929-derived tumors. All granulysin-treated tumors exhibited signs of apoptosis induction and an increased NK cell infiltration inside the tumor tissue comparing to control ones. Moreover, no in vivo deleterious effects of the recombinant 9 kDa granulysin doses used in this study were observed on the skin or on the internal organs of the animals. In conclusion, granulysin was able to inhibit the progression of MDA-MB-231-derived xenografts and also to eradicate multiple myeloma NCI-H929-derived xenografts. This work opens the door to the initiation of preclinical and possibly clinical studies for the use of 9 kDa granulysin as a new anti-tumoral treatment. PMID:26405603

  18. Cancer vaccines: harnessing the potential of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Although the presence of cancer suggests failure of the immune system to protect against development of tumors, the possibility that immunity can be redirected and focused to generate an anti-tumor response offers great translational possibility. The key to this is identifying antigens likely to be present in any given tumor and functionally critical to tumor survival and growth. Such tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are varied and optimally should be absent from normal tissue. Of particular interest are TAAs associated with the tumor stroma, as immunity directed against the stroma may restrict the ability of the tumor to grow and metastasize. Important to directing the immune system toward an effect anti-tumor response is the understanding of how TAAs are processed and how the tumor is able to evade immune elimination. The process of immunoediting happens in response to the selective pressure that the immune system places upon tumor cell populations and allows for emergence of tumor cells capable of escaping immune destruction. Efforts to harness the immune system for clinical application has been aided by vaccines based on purified recombinant protein or nucleic acid TAAs. For example, a vaccine for canine melanoma has been developed and approved based on immunization with DNA components of tyrosinase, a glycoprotein essential to melanin synthesis. The performance of cancer vaccines has been aided in some cases when supplemented with immunostimulatory molecules such as interleukin 2 or a novel extracellular matrix vaccine adjuvant. Vaccines with the broadest menu of antigenic targets may be those most likely to succeed against cancer. For this reason, tissue vaccines produced from harvested tumor material may offer significant benefit. With several cancer vaccines on the veterinary and human markets, efforts to understand basic tumor immunology are soon to yield great dividends. PMID:23850019

  19. Myc Promoter-Binding Protein-1 (MBP-1) Is a Novel Potential Prognostic Marker in Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Flavia; Mazzarella, Claudia; Sbacchi, Silvia; Roz, Elena; Lupo, Carmelo; Perconti, Giovanni; Giallongo, Agata; Migliorini, Paola; Marrazzo, Antonio; Feo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Background Alpha-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the formation of phosphoenolpyruvate in the cell cytoplasm. α-Enolase and the predominantly nuclear Myc promoter-binding protein-1 (MBP-1) originate from a single gene through the alternative use of translational starting sites. MBP-1 binds to the P2 c-myc promoter and competes with TATA-box binding protein (TBP) to suppress gene transcription. Although several studies have shown an antiproliferative effect of MBP-1 overexpression on several human cancer cells, to date detailed observations of α-enolase and MBP-1 relative expression in primary tumors versus normal tissues and their correlation with clinicopathological features have not been undertaken. Methodology and Findings We analyzed α-enolase and MBP-1 expression in normal breast epithelium and primary invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC) from 177 patients by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, using highly specific anti-α-enolase monoclonal antibodies. A significant increase in the expression of cytoplasmic α-enolase was observed in 98% of the tumors analysed, compared to normal tissues. Nuclear MBP-1 was found in almost all the normal tissues while its expression was retained in only 35% of the tumors. Statistically significant associations were observed among the nuclear expression of MBP-1 and ErbB2 status, Ki-67 expression, node status and tumor grade. Furthermore MBP-1 expression was associated with good survival of patients with IDC. Conclusions MBP-1 functions in repressing c-myc gene expression and the results presented indicate that the loss of nuclear MBP-1 expression in a large number of IDC may be a critical step in the development and progression of breast cancer and a predictor of adverse outcome. Nuclear MBP-1 appears to be a novel and valuable histochemical marker with potential prognostic value in breast cancer. PMID:20886042

  20. DNA Methylation Profiling Identifies Global Methylation Differences and Markers of Adrenocortical Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rechache, Nesrin S.; Wang, Yonghong; Stevenson, Holly S.; Killian, J. Keith; Edelman, Daniel C.; Merino, Maria; Zhang, Lisa; Nilubol, Naris; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Meltzer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Context: It is not known whether there are any DNA methylation alterations in adrenocortical tumors. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the methylation profile of normal adrenal cortex and benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors. Methods: Genome-wide methylation status of CpG regions were determined in normal (n = 19), benign (n = 48), primary malignant (n = 8), and metastatic malignant (n = 12) adrenocortical tissue samples. An integrated analysis of genome-wide methylation and mRNA expression in benign vs. malignant adrenocortical tissue samples was also performed. Results: Methylation profiling revealed the following: 1) that methylation patterns were distinctly different and could distinguish normal, benign, primary malignant, and metastatic tissue samples; 2) that malignant samples have global hypomethylation; and 3) that the methylation of CpG regions are different in benign adrenocortical tumors by functional status. Normal compared with benign samples had the least amount of methylation differences, whereas normal compared with primary and metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma samples had the greatest variability in methylation (adjusted P ≤ 0.01). Of 215 down-regulated genes (≥2-fold, adjusted P ≤ 0.05) in malignant primary adrenocortical tumor samples, 52 of these genes were also hypermethylated. Conclusions: Malignant adrenocortical tumors are globally hypomethylated as compared with normal and benign tumors. Methylation profile differences may accurately distinguish between primary benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors. Several differentially methylated sites are associated with genes known to be dysregulated in malignant adrenocortical tumors. PMID:22472567

  1. Molecular and immunologic markers of kidney cancer-potential applications in predictive, preventive and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mickley, Amanda; Kovaleva, Olga; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gratchev, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Kidney cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies due to frequent late diagnosis (33 % or renal cell carcinoma are metastatic at diagnosis) and poor treatment options. There are two major subtypes of kidney cancer: renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and renal pelvis carcinoma. The risk factors for RCC, accounting for more than 90 % of all kidney cancers, are smoking, obesity, hypertension, misuse of pain medication, and some genetic diseases. The most common molecular markers of kidney cancer include mutations and epigenetic inactivation of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, genes of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CIAX). The role of epigenetic pathways, including DNA methylation and chromatin structure remodeling, was also demonstrated. Immunologic properties of RCC enable this type of tumor to escape immune response effectively. An important role in this process is played by tumor-associated macrophages that demonstrate mixed M1/M2 phenotype. In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular aspects for RCC development and current state of knowledge allowing personalized approaches for diagnostics and prognostic prediction of this disease. A set of macrophage markers is suggested for the analysis of the association of macrophage phenotype and disease prognosis. PMID:26500709

  2. New perspective on molecular markers as promising therapeutic targets in germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chieffi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most frequent solid malignant tumors in men 20–40 years of age and the most frequent cause of death from solid tumors in this age group. TGCTs comprise two major histologic groups: seminomas and non-seminomas germ cell tumors (NSGCTs). NSGCTs can be further divided into embryonal carcinoma, Teratoma, yolk sac tumor, and choriocarcinoma. Seminomas and NSGCTs present significant differences in clinical features, therapy, and prognosis, and both show characteristics of the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs). Many discovered biomarkers including HMGA1, GPR30, Aurora-B, estrogen receptor β, and others have given further advantages to discriminate between histological subgroups and could represent useful therapeutic targets. PMID:27195201

  3. Potential use of radiolabelled porphyrins for tumor scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Thaller, R.A.; Lyster, D.M.; Dolphin, D.

    1983-01-01

    Fe-TMPI, Fe-TCP and protohemins showed high initial uptake using tissue culture techniques with mouse tumor cells (P815). However, the tumor uptake in the in vivo model was poor. Of the radionuclides investigated, iron labelled to TMPI demonstrated the best uptake by tumor in vitro. As has been previously demonstrated, the unnatural meso-arylporphyrin derivatives showed better uptake than did naturally occurring porphyrins and their derivatives.

  4. Optimum location of external markers using feature selection algorithms for real-time tumor tracking in external-beam radiotherapy: a virtual phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nankali, Saber; Esmaili Torshabi, Ahmad; Samadi Miandoab, Payam; Baghizadeh, Amin

    2016-01-01

    In external-beam radiotherapy, using external markers is one of the most reliable tools to predict tumor position, in clinical applications. The main challenge in this approach is tumor motion tracking with highest accuracy that depends heavily on external markers location, and this issue is the objective of this study. Four commercially available feature selection algorithms entitled 1) Correlation-based Feature Selection, 2) Classifier, 3) Principal Components, and 4) Relief were proposed to find optimum location of external markers in combination with two "Genetic" and "Ranker" searching procedures. The performance of these algorithms has been evaluated using four-dimensional extended cardiac-torso anthropomorphic phantom. Six tumors in lung, three tumors in liver, and 49 points on the thorax surface were taken into account to simulate internal and external motions, respectively. The root mean square error of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) as prediction model was considered as metric for quantitatively evaluating the performance of proposed feature selection algorithms. To do this, the thorax surface region was divided into nine smaller segments and predefined tumors motion was predicted by ANFIS using external motion data of given markers at each small segment, separately. Our comparative results showed that all feature selection algorithms can reasonably select specific external markers from those segments where the root mean square error of the ANFIS model is minimum. Moreover, the performance accuracy of proposed feature selection algorithms was compared, separately. For this, each tumor motion was predicted using motion data of those external markers selected by each feature selection algorithm. Duncan statistical test, followed by F-test, on final results reflected that all proposed feature selection algorithms have the same performance accuracy for lung tumors. But for liver tumors, a correlation-based feature selection algorithm, in

  5. Characterization of phenotype markers and neuronotoxic potential of polarised primary microglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chhor, Vibol; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Oré, Marie-Virgine; Celador, Idoia Lara; Josserand, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Jacotot, Etienne; Hagberg, Henrik; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2013-01-01

    Microglia mediate multiple facets of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype is an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy but a comprehensive study of classical and more novel microglial phenotypic markers in vitro is lacking. The aim of this study was to outline the temporal expression of a battery of phenotype markers from polarised microglia to generate an in vitro tool for screening the immunomodulatory potential of novel compounds. We characterised expression of thirty-one macrophage/microglial phenotype markers in primary microglia over time (4, 12, 36, and 72 h), using RT-qPCR or multiplex protein assay. Firstly, we selected Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the strongest M1–M2 polarising stimuli, from six stimuli tested. At each time point, markers useful to identify that microglia were M1 included iNOS, Cox-2 and IL-6 and a loss of M2a markers. Markers useful for quantifying M2b-immunomodulatory microglia included, increased IL-1RA and SOCS3 and for M2a-repair and regeneration, included increased arginase-1, and a loss of the M1 and M2b markers were discriminatory. Additional markers were regulated at fewer time points, but are still likely important to monitor when assessing the immunomodulatory potential of novel therapies. Further, to facilitate identification of how novel immunomodulatory treatments alter the functional affects of microglia, we characterised how the soluble products from polarised microglia affected the type and rate of neuronal death; M1/2b induced increasing and M2a-induced decreasing neuronal loss. We also assessed any effects of prior activation state, to provide a way to identify how a novel compound may alter phenotype depending on the stage of injury/insult progression. We identified generally that a prior M1/2b reduced the ability of microglia to switch to

  6. Low doses of gamma irradiation potentially modifies immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment by retuning tumor-associated macrophages: lesson from insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Hridayesh; Klug, Felix; Nadella, Vinod; Mazumdar, Varadendra; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Umansky, Liudmila

    2016-03-01

    Tumor infiltrating iNOS+ macrophages under the influence of immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment gets polarized to tumor-promoting and immunosuppressive macrophages, known as tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Their recruitment and increased density in the plethora of tumors has been associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. Therefore, retuning of TAM to M1 phenotype would be a key for effective immunotherapy. Radiotherapy has been a potential non-invasive strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy and tumor immune rejection. Irradiation of late-stage tumor-bearing Rip1-Tag5 mice twice with 2 Gy dose resulted in profound changes in the inflammatory tumor micromilieu, characterized by induction of M1-associated effecter cytokines as well as reduction in protumorigenic and M2-associated effecter cytokines. Similarly, in vitro irradiation of macrophages with 2 Gy dose-induced expression of iNOS, NO, NFκBpp65, pSTAT3 and proinflammatory cytokines secretion while downregulating p38MAPK which are involved in iNOS translation and acquisition of an M1-like phenotype. Enhancement of various M2 effecter cytokines and angiogenic reprogramming in iNOs+ macrophage depleted tumors and their subsequent reduction by 2 Gy dose in Rip1-Tag5 transgenic mice furthermore demonstrated a critical role of peritumoral macrophages in the course of gamma irradiation mediated M1 retuning of insulinoma. PMID:26785731

  7. The anti-tumor potential of zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Croucher, P; Jagdev, S; Coleman, R

    2003-08-01

    Bone is a favorable microenvironment for tumor cell colonization because of abundant growth factors released during active bone resorption. Bisphosphonates can dramatically affect the ability of tumor cells to grow in bone by inhibiting osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and by depriving tumors of growth-promoting signals. Moreover, bisphosphonates have direct anti-tumor effects in vitro via induction of apoptosis. Zoledronic acid is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies have provided important clues as to the molecular mechanisms by which zoledronic acid induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. Studies in multiple myeloma and breast cancer models have shed further light on the possible mechanisms underlying the in vivo anti-tumor effects of zoledronic acid. These studies have led to the development of novel strategies to target specific molecular pathways involved in osteoclast maturation and activity, tumor cell metastasis, and tumor growth and survival. The clinical application of these strategies may ultimately prevent bone metastasis.

  8. Tumor metabolism of lactate: the influence and therapeutic potential for MCT and CD147 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Kelly M; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Tumor metabolism consists of complex interactions between oxygenation states, metabolites, ions, the vascular network and signaling cascades. Accumulation of lactate within tumors has been correlated with poor clinical outcomes. While its production has negative implications, potentially contributing to tumor progression, the implications of the ability of tumors to utilize lactate can offer new therapeutic targets for the future. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) of the SLC16A gene family influence substrate availability, the metabolic path of lactate and pH balance within the tumor. CD147, a chaperone to some MCT subtypes, contributes to tumor progression and metastasis. The implications and consequences of lactate utilization by tumors are currently unknown; therefore future research is needed on the intricacies of tumor metabolism. The possibility of metabolic modification of the tumor microenvironment via regulation or manipulation of MCT1 and CD147 may prove to be promising avenues of therapeutic options. PMID:20021214

  9. Evaluation of Colon Cancer – Specific Antigen 2 as a Potential Serum Marker for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Eddy S.; Schoen, Robert E.; Magheli, Ahmed; Sokoll, Lori J.; Chan, Daniel W.; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A blood test to detect colon cancer at a preventable stage would represent a major advancement. We have previously identified colon cancer – specific markers using focused proteomics analysis of nuclear structural proteins. Two of these markers, colon cancer – specific antigen (CCSA)-3 and CCSA-4, have been developed into blood-based markers that are able to distinguish individuals with colorectal cancer from those without. CCSA-2 is a distinct novel colon cancer marker identified using focused proteomics. Experimental Design Using an indirect ELISA on serum samples obtained from two institutions, we evaluated CCSA-2 as a serum-based colon cancer marker. A total of111serumsamples from individuals who underwent colonoscopy and were subsequently diagnosed as either being normal or having hyperplastic polyps, nonadvanced adenomas, advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer were evaluated. A diverse control population that consisted of 125 serum samples was also included in this study. Results Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CCSA-2. CCSA-2 at a cutoff of 10.8 µg/mL has overall specificity of 78.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 67.3–87.1%] and sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI, 85.8–99.5%) in separating individuals with advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer from normal, hyperplastic, and nonadvanced adenoma populations. The receiver operating characteristic curve for CCSA-2 has an area under the curve of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.83–0.95). Conclusion Our initial study shows that CCSA-2 is a potential serum-based marker for colon cancer detection with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:18316554

  10. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lohmueller, Jason J; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M; Tucker, Meghan A; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Finn, Olivera J

    2016-08-22

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1(+) target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs.

  11. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lohmueller, Jason J; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M; Tucker, Meghan A; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Finn, Olivera J

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1(+) target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  12. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lohmueller, Jason J.; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M.; Tucker, Meghan A.; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M.; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D.; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1+ target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  13. [Comparison of the diagnostic value of different tumor markers in prostatic cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Romics, I

    1992-06-14

    The author compared the tumour markers of hundred virginell prostatic cancer patients. There were investigated the activity of prostatic acid phosphatase (SP) and its isoenzyme (SPP) by enzymatic method (PAP) as well. The concentration of prostatic specific antigen (PSA) was determined too. The sensibility of markers are growing on the row, SP, SPP, PAP, PSA. Summarising the results, the determination of PAP together with PSA seems to be not necessary. Because of the low price of SP, SPP their determinations is indicated in selected cases. Regarding of costs-benefit the author advises selected investigations in different stage and in different indications.

  14. Potential tumor-targeting peptide vector of histidylated oligolysine conjugated to a tumor-homing RGD motif.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Y; Hosaka, S; Kawa, S; Kiyosawa, K

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a potential tumor-targeting peptide vector (cRGD-hK) that is intended to be systemically and repeatedly administered to patients with advanced solid tumors. The peptide vector of 36 l-amino acid residues, CRGDCF(K[H-]KKK)6, comprises a tumor-homing RGD motif, a DNA-binding oligolysine, and histidyl residues to facilitate the delivery into the cytosol. Using cytomegalovirus-driven luciferase expression plasmids as a reporter, we tested the transfection efficiency of cRGD-hK in hepatoma and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Transfection with the cRGD-hK/plasmid complexes (molar ratio 4000:1) was inhibited by 50 nM bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of the vacuolar ATPase endosomal proton pump, or 10 microM cycloRGDfV, an integrin alphavbeta3 antagonist, indicating that the three elements of cRGD-hK could function as expected, at least in vitro. In nude mice bearing tumors created by subcutaneous inoculation, luciferase activity in the tumor tissues 48 hours after the injection of the cRGD-hK/plasmid complexes through the tail vein (20 microg plasmids per mouse) was significantly higher than that in the lung, kidney, and spleen, but only slightly higher than that in the liver. Although the latter difference was small, we propose a potential nonviral gene therapy for advanced solid tumors through use of the tumor-targeting peptide vector.

  15. Tumor of the maxilla-odontogenic or glandular? A diagnostic challenge and the role of immunohistochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Jaya; Manjunatha, B S; Kumar, Harish; Kumar, Pratiksha

    2015-01-01

    Today's practice in medicine has reached remarkable change mainly due to the advances in the field. Odontogenic tumors represent a spectrum of lesions ranging from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms. Rarely, odontogenic tumors pose a challenge due to varied histological features. But appropriate and accurate diagnosis is crucial for further treatment and follow-up as these have an influence on the prognosis. In such situations, immunohistochemical. (IHC) markers play a significant role in the differentiating various lesions. Within its palette of histology, there are multiple histopathological presentations, many a times these features come in an intermixed pattern simulating different origin. We here, report such a case presented in a 70-year-old female came with a complaint of swelling in the posterior maxilla. The microscopic findings were indicative of a benign neoplasm. To know the nature of the lesion and arrive at a diagnosis, many IHC markers were used. Based on all these findings, a final diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma was arrived. PMID:26881616

  16. Circulating Tumor Cells from Patients with Advanced Prostate and Breast Cancer Display Both Epithelial and Mesenchymal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Andrew J.; Marengo, Matthew S.; Oltean, Sebastian; Kemeny, Gabor; Bitting, Rhonda L.; Turnbull, James; Herold, Christina I.; Marcom, Paul K.; George, Daniel; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2011-01-01

    During cancer progression malignant cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions (METs) as part of a broad invasion and metastasis program. We previously observed MET events among lung metastases in a preclinical model of prostate adenocarcinoma that suggested a relationship between epithelial plasticity and metastatic spread. We thus sought to translate these findings into clinical evidence by examining the existence of EMT in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients with progressive metastatic solid tumors, with a focus on men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and women with metastatic breast cancer (BC). We show that the majority (>80%) of these CTCs in patients with metastatic CRPC co-express epithelial proteins such as EpCAM, CK, and E-cadherin, mesenchymal proteins, including vimentin, N-cadherin, and O-cadherin, and the stem cell marker CD133. Equally, we find that over 75% of CTCs from women with metastatic BC co-express cytokeratin, vimentin, and N-cadherin. The existence and high frequency of these CTCs co-expressing epithelial, mesenchymal, and stem-cell markers in patients with progressive metastases has important implications for the application and interpretation of approved methods to detect CTCs. PMID:21665936

  17. A comparison of oral and intravenous pimonidazole in canine tumors using intravenous CCI-103F as a control hypoxia marker

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiter, Miriam M.; Thrall, Donald E.; Malarkey, David E.; Ji Xiaoshen; Lee, David Y.W.; Chou, S.-C.; Raleigh, James A. . E-mail: james_raleigh@med.unc.edu

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: Pimonidazole HCl is widely used in immunohistochemical analyses of hypoxia in normal and malignant tissues. The present study investigates oral administration as a means of minimizing invasiveness. Methods and Materials: Twelve dogs with confirmed malignancy received 0.5 g/m{sup 2} of pimonidazole HCl: 6 by mouth and 6 by i.v. infusion. All dogs received i.v. CCI-103F as a control. Plasma levels of pimonidazole, pimonidazole N-oxide, and CCI-103F were measured. Tumor biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded, sectioned, immunostained, and analyzed for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding. pH dependence for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding was studied in vitro. Results: Pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding in carcinomas and sarcomas was strongly correlated for both oral and i.v. pimonidazole HCl (r {sup 2} = 0.97). On average, the extent of pimonidazole binding exceeded that for CCI-103F by a factor of approximately 1.2, with the factor ranging from 1.0 to 1.65. Binding of both markers was pH dependent, but pimonidazole binding was greater at all values of pH. Conclusions: Oral pimonidazole HCl is effective as a hypoxia marker in spontaneously arising canine tumors. Selective cellular uptake and concomitant higher levels of binding in regions of hypoxia at the high end of pH gradients might account for the greater extent of pimonidazole binding.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum kelch 13: a potential molecular marker for tackling artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Mita, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Although artemisinin combination therapies have been deployed as a first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in almost all endemic countries, artemisinin-resistant parasites have emerged and have gradually spread across the Greater Mekong subregions. There is growing concern that the resistant parasites may migrate to or emerge indigenously in sub-Saharan Africa, which might provoke a global increase in malaria-associated morbidity and mortality. Therefore, development of molecular markers that enable identification of artemisinin resistance with high sensitivity is urgently required to combat this issue. In 2014, a potential artemisinin-resistance responsible gene, Plasmodium falciparum kelch13, was discovered. Here, we review the genetic features of P. falciparum kelch13 and discuss its related resistant mechanisms and potential as a molecular marker.

  19. Ultrastructural study of benign, low-malignant potential (LMP), and malignant ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Ishioka, Shin-ichi; Sagae, Satoru; Ito, Eiki; Kudo, Ryuichi

    2004-03-01

    Ultrastructural characteristics of benign, low-malignant potential (LMP), and malignant ovarian tumors were investigated, considering the aspects of histologic subtypes and histologic grading. In addition, the histogenesis of ovarian cancer was histologically investigated in an attempt to elucidate whether malignant tumor was generated from benign or LMP tumor, or whether it was generated de novo from normal tissues. Although all the benign, LMP, and malignant tumors appeared to be derived from Mullerian duct in serous tumors, the origin of endometrioid or mucinous tumor could not be ultrastructurally clarified. However, there was ultrastructural similarity between benign and malignant tumors among serous, endometrioid, and mucinous tumors, and it was suggested that benign adenoma may be the developmental origin of malignant tumors regardless of the histologic subtype. In addition, the investigation of endometrioid tumors revealed that the differences of histologic grading in malignant tumors reflected the ultrastructural differences, and that G1 tumor had an ultrastructure that was more similar to that of benign and LMP tumors than to that of G2 tumor.

  20. Sperm midpiece apoptotic markers: impact on fertilizing potential in in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Talarczyk-Desole, Joanna; Kotwicka, Małgorzata; Jendraszak, Magdalena; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Murawski, Marek; Jędrzejczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between apoptotic markers present in human spermatozoa, namely phosphatidylserine translocation (PST) from the inner to the outer layer of the cytomembrane and the active form of caspase-3 (c3) versus the fertilizing potential of male gametes in conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) models. A total of 116 male patients treated with their partners for infertility underwent basic semen analysis and an assessment of the presence of PST and the active c3 in sperm using flow cytometry. Forty patients underwent IVF, group A, while 76 patients underwent ICSI, group B. The fertilizing potential of the gametes was measured as the percentage of oocytes with pronuclei present after either procedure. PST and active c3 were identified in vital gametes, mainly in the midpiece area. Concentration, motility, morphology, and viability of spermatozoa strongly negatively correlated with both markers. In group A, a negative correlation between both markers and the success rate of conventional IVF was observed (r = -0.4, p = 0.04 for PST; r = -0.4, p = 0.02 for active c3, respectively). In group B, the success rate of ICSI did not correlate with either marker (r = -0.2, p = 0.85 for PST and r = 0.1, p = 0.51 for active c3). The two apoptotic markers localized in the sperm midpiece area may affect their function not only by decreasing basic andrologic parameters but also by reducing the probability of conception. Therefore, analysis of PST and active c3 in the sperm of patients undergoing infertility treatment should be recommended.

  1. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) as an endogenous marker of chronic hypoxia in live human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Kaffer, Anja; Riedl, Susanne; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Published clinical studies provide conflicting data regarding the prognostic significance of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) overexpression as an endogenous marker of tumor hypoxia and its comparability with other methods of hypoxia detection. We performed a systematic analysis of CA IX protein levels under various in vitro conditions of tumor hypoxia in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma and FaDu human pharyngeal carcinoma cells. Because sorting of live CA IX positive cells from tumors provides a tool to study the radiosensitivity of chronically hypoxic cells, we modified and tested a CA IX flow cytometry protocol on mixed hypoxic/aerobic suspensions of HT 1080 and FaDu cells. Methods and materials: HT 1080 and FaDu cells were treated with up to 24 h of in vitro hypoxia and up to 96 h of reoxygenation. To test the effect of nonhypoxic stimuli, glucose and serum availability, pH and cell density were modified. CA IX protein was quantified in Western blots of whole-cell lysates. Mixed suspensions with known percentages of hypoxic cells were prepared for CA IX flow cytometry. The same mixtures were assayed for clonogenic survival after 10 Gy. Results: Hypoxia-induced CA IX protein expression was seen after >6 h at {<=}5% O{sub 2}, and protein was stable over 96 h of reoxygenation in both cell lines. Glucose deprivation abolished the hypoxic CA IX response, and high cell density caused CA IX induction under aerobic conditions. Measured percentages of CA IX-positive cells in mixtures closely reflected known percentages of hypoxic cells in HT 1080 and were associated with radioresistance of mixtures after 10 Gy. Conclusion: CA IX is a stable marker of current or previous chronic hypoxia but influenced by nonhypoxic stimuli. Except the time course of accumulation, all properties of this marker resembled our previous findings for hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. A modified flow cytometry protocol provided good separability of CA IX-negative and -positive cells in vitro

  2. Cystatin C: a new renal marker and its potential use in small animal medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghys, L; Paepe, D; Smets, P; Lefebvre, H; Delanghe, J; Daminet, S

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of chronic kidney disease is underestimated in both human and veterinary medicine. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is considered the gold standard for evaluating kidney function. However, GFR assessment is time-consuming and labor-intensive and therefore not routinely used in practice. The commonly used indirect GFR markers, serum creatinine (sCr) and urea, are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to detect early renal dysfunction. Serum cystatin C (sCysC), a proteinase inhibitor, has most of the properties required for an endogenous GFR marker. In human medicine, numerous studies have evaluated its potential use as a GFR marker in several populations. In veterinary medicine, this marker is gaining interest. The measurement is easy, which makes it an interesting parameter for clinical use. This review summarizes current knowledge about cystatin C (CysC) in humans, dogs, and cats, including its history, assays, relationship with GFR, and biological and clinical variations in both human and veterinary medicine. PMID:24814357

  3. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  4. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Hansen, Morten Høgh; Nielsen, Dorte; Sölétormos, György

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the interrelationship between protein tumor markers, the global DNA hypomethylation, and hypermethylated genes in serum from patients with advanced disease. Twenty-nine patients with histologically proven advanced breast cancer received first-line chemotherapy with epirubicin. Samples were collected prior to each treatment and prospectively analyzed for CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA. The same samples were retrospectively analyzed for the concentration of hypermethylated RASSF1A and for global DNA hypomethylation using LINE-1. Among patients with elevated concentrations of the protein markers, concordance could be observed between serial changes of the hypermethylated RASSF1A gene and the protein markers. Among patients with lower concentrations, RASSF1A could only be detected periodically. There was discordance between changes of the hypomethylated LINE-1 as compared to the protein markers. Circulating hypermethylated RASSF1A and protein markers may have similar kinetics during monitoring of tumor burden. Further investigations are needed to determine whether any of the hypermethylated DNA genes may provide predictive information during monitoring. PMID:26339655

  5. Identification of CD146 as a marker enriched for tumor-propagating capacity reveals targetable pathways in primary human sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Voisin, Veronique; Sato, Shingo; Hirata, Makoto; Whetstone, Heather; Han, Ilkyu; Ailles, Laurie; Bader, Gary D.; Wunder, Jay; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-propagating cells (TPCs) are believed to drive cancer initiation, progression and recurrence. These cells are characterized by enhanced tumorigenicity and self-renewal. The ability to identify such cells in primary human sarcomas relies on the dye exclusion ability of tumor side population (SP) cells. Here, we performed a high-throughput cell surface antigen screen and found that CD146 is enriched in the SP population. In vivo serial transplantation assays showed that CD146+ cells are highly tumorigenic, capable of self-renewal and thus enriches for the TPC population. In addition, depletion of SP cells from the CD146+ population show that CD146+ cells and SP cells are a distinct and overlapping TPC populations. Gene expression profiling of CD146+ and SP cells revealed multiple pathways commonly upregulated in both of these populations. Inhibition of one of these upregulated pathways, Notch signaling, significantly reduced tumor growth and self-renewal. Our data demonstrate that CD146 is an effective cell surface marker for enriching TPCs in primary human sarcomas. Targeting differentially activated pathways in TPCs may provide new therapeutic strategies for treating sarcoma. PMID:26517673

  6. Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a promising target for cholangiocarcinoma treatment and bile LCN2 level is a potential cholangiocarcinoma diagnostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Wu, Ren-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Juang, Horng-Heng; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating disease due to resistance to traditional chemotherapies and radiotherapies. New therapeutic strategies against CCA are urgently needed. This study investigated the role of lipocalin-2 (LCN2) in human cholangiocarcinoma as a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. So far, the role of LCN2 in cancer is still controversial and studies regarding the role of LCN2 in CCA are limited. LCN2 knockdown inhibited CCA cell growth in vitro and in vivo through induction of cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phases and decreased metastatic potential due to repression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Overexpression of LCN2 in CCA cells increased cell metastatic potential. We showed for the first time that the N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) and NDRG2, known as tumor suppressor genes, are negatively regulated by LCN2 in CCA cells. LCN2 concentration in bile was higher in patients with CCA than that in patients with gallstones, with a cutoff value of 20.08 ng/ml making this a potential diagnostic marker. Higher LCN2 expression was associated with worse survival in patients with CCA. LCN2 is a promising target for CCA treatment and bile LCN2 level is a potential diagnostic marker for CCA. PMID:27782193

  7. Molecular Markers of Diabetic Retinopathy: Potential Screening Tool of the Future?

    PubMed Central

    Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Learn-Han; Abdul Kadir, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is among the leading causes of new onset blindness in adults. Effective treatment may delay the onset and progression of this disease provided it is diagnosed early. At present retinopathy can only be diagnosed via formal examination of the eye by a trained specialist, which limits the population that can be effectively screened. An easily accessible, reliable screening biomarker of diabetic retinopathy would be of tremendous benefit in detecting the population in need of further assessment and treatment. This review highlights specific biomarkers that show promise as screening markers to detect early diabetic retinopathy or even to detect patients at increased risk of DR at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. The pathobiology of DR is complex and multifactorial giving rise to a wide array of potential biomarkers. This review provides an overview of these pathways and looks at older markers such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), inflammatory markers, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as other newer proteins with a role in the pathogenesis of DR including neuroprotective factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF); SA100A12, pentraxin 3, brain natriuretic peptide, apelin 3, and chemerin as well as various metabolites such as lipoprotein A, folate, and homocysteine. We also consider the possible role of proteins identified through proteomics work whose levels are altered in the sera of patients with DR as screening markers though their role in pathophysiology remains to be characterized. The role of microRNA as a promising new screening marker is also discussed. PMID:27313539

  8. High Retention and Safety of Percutaneously Implanted Endovascular Embolization Coils as Fiducial Markers for Image-Guided Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Pulmonary Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Yu Yao; Rao, Aarti K.; Dieterich, Sonja; Maxim, Peter G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Diehn, Maximilian; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kothary, Nishita; Loo, Billy W.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the retention rates of two types of implanted fiducial markers for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of pulmonary tumors, smooth cylindrical gold 'seed' markers ('seeds') and platinum endovascular embolization coils ('coils'), and to compare the complication rates associated with the respective implantation procedures. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the retention of percutaneously implanted markers in 54 consecutive patients between January 2004 and June 2009. A total of 270 markers (129 seeds, 141 coils) were implanted in or around 60 pulmonary tumors over 59 procedures. Markers were implanted using a percutaneous approach under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postimplantation and follow-up imaging studies were analyzed to score marker retention relative to the number of markers implanted. Markers remaining near the tumor were scored as retained. Markers in a distant location (e.g., pleural space) were scored as lost. CT imaging artifacts near markers were quantified on radiation therapy planning scans. Results: Immediately after implantation, 140 of 141 coils (99.3%) were retained, compared to 110 of 129 seeds (85.3%); the difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001). Of the total number of lost markers, 45% were reported lost during implantation, but 55% were lost immediately afterwards. No additional markers were lost on longer-term follow-up. Implanted lesions were peripherally located for both seeds (mean distance, 0.33 cm from pleural surface) and coils (0.34 cm) (p = 0.96). Incidences of all pneumothorax (including asymptomatic) and pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement were lower in implantation of coils (23% and 3%, respectively) vs. seeds (54% and 29%, respectively; p = 0.02 and 0.01). The degree of CT artifact was similar between marker types. Conclusions: Retention of CT-guided percutaneously implanted coils is significantly better than that of seed markers. Furthermore, implanting coils is at

  9. Potential of palladium-109-labeled antimelanoma monoclonal antibody for tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Wang, T.S.T.; Srivastava, S.C.; Rosen, J.M.; Ferrone, S.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-07-01

    Palladium-109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, was chelated to the monoclonal antibody 225.28S to the high molecular weight antigen associated with human melanoma. Injection of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody into nude mice bearing human melanoma resulted in significant accumulation of the radiolabel in the tumors: 19% injected dose/g; 38:1 and 61:1 tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 and 48 hr, respectively. The localization of the radiolabeled antibody in liver and kidney also was high, but appreciably lower than that achieved in tumor. These results suggest Pd-109-labeled monoclonal antibody to tumor-associated antigens may have potential applications in tumor immunotherapy.

  10. Assessing the quality of studies on the diagnostic accuracy of tumor markers

    PubMed Central

    Goebell, Peter J.; Kamat, Ashish M.; Sylvester, Richard J.; Black, Peter; Droller, Michael; Godoy, Guilherme; Hudson, M’Liss A.; Junker, Kerstin; Kassouf, Wassim; Knowles, Margaret A.; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Seiler, Roland; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives With rapidly increasing numbers of publications, assessments of study quality, reporting quality, and classification of studies according to their level of evidence or developmental stage have become key issues in weighing the relevance of new information reported. Diagnostic marker studies are often criticized for yielding highly discrepant and even controversial results. Much of this discrepancy has been attributed to differences in study quality. So far, numerous tools for measuring study quality have been developed, but few of them have been used for systematic reviews and meta-analysis. This is owing to the fact that most tools are complicated and time consuming, suffer from poor reproducibility, and do not permit quantitative scoring. Methods The International Bladder Cancer Network (IBCN) has adopted this problem and has systematically identified the more commonly used tools developed since 2000. Results In this review, those tools addressing study quality (Quality Assessment of Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale), reporting quality (Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy), and developmental stage (IBCN phases) of studies on diagnostic markers in bladder cancer are introduced and critically analyzed. Based upon this, the IBCN has launched an initiative to assess and validate existing tools with emphasis on diagnostic bladder cancer studies. Conclusions The development of simple and reproducible tools for quality assessment of diagnostic marker studies permitting quantitative scoring is suggested. PMID:25159014

  11. Diagnostic potential of tumor DNA from ovarian cyst fluid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxuan; Sundfeldt, Karin; Mateoiu, Constantina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Kurman, Robert J; Schaefer, Joy; Silliman, Natalie; Kinde, Isaac; Springer, Simeon; Foote, Michael; Kristjansdottir, Björg; James, Nathan; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Diaz, Luis A; Vogelstein, Bert

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether the mutations found in ovarian cancers could be identified in the patients' ovarian cyst fluids. Tumor-specific mutations were detectable in the cyst fluids of 19 of 23 (83%) borderline tumors, 10 of 13 (77%) type I cancers, and 18 of 18 (100%) type II cancers. In contrast, no mutations were found in the cyst fluids of 18 patients with benign tumors or non-neoplastic cysts. Though large, prospective studies are needed to demonstrate the safety and clinical utility of this approach, our results suggest that the genetic evaluation of cyst fluids might be able to inform the management of the large number of women with these lesions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15175.001 PMID:27421040

  12. Recent progress in canine tumor vaccination: potential applications for human tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Denies, Sofie; Sanders, Niek N

    2012-11-01

    Tumor vaccination holds great promise for the treatment of cancer and research concerning tumor vaccination in dogs is of great interest for veterinary as well as human medicine. Indeed, cancer is the leading cause of death in adult dogs and companion animals are acknowledged as excellent preclinical models for human oncology. The license of the veterinary melanoma vaccine (Oncept™) and Provenge® for the treatment of prostate cancer in men established tumor vaccination as a valid treatment modality for cancer. Although the results with this and other vaccines are promising, there are still some hurdles to overcome. In this article, preclinical and clinical trials with tumor vaccines in dogs are discussed, as well as the surplus value of canine cancer patients for human medicine. PMID:23249236

  13. Mitosis Is a Source of Potential Markers for Screening and Survival and Therapeutic Targets in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Ana María; Alfaro, Ana; Roman-Basaure, Edgar; Guardado-Estrada, Mariano; Palma, Ícela; Serralde, Cyntia; Medina, Ingrid; Juárez, Eligia; Bermúdez, Miriam; Márquez, Edna; Borges-Ibáñez, Manuel; Muñoz-Cortez, Sergio; Alcántara-Vázquez, Avissai; Alonso, Patricia; Curiel-Valdez, José; Kofman, Susana; Villegas, Nicolas; Berumen, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The effect of preventive human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on the reduction of the cervical cancer (CC) burden will not be known for 30 years. Therefore, it’s still necessary to improve the procedures for CC screening and treatment. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize cellular targets that could be considered potential markers for screening or therapeutic targets. A pyramidal strategy was used. Initially the expression of 8,638 genes was compared between 43 HPV16-positive CCs and 12 healthy cervical epitheliums using microarrays. A total of 997 genes were deregulated, and 21 genes that showed the greatest deregulation were validated using qRT-PCR. The 6 most upregulated genes (CCNB2, CDC20, PRC1, SYCP2, NUSAP1, CDKN3) belong to the mitosis pathway. They were further explored in 29 low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN1) and 21 high-grade CIN (CIN2/3) to investigate whether they could differentiate CC and CIN2/3 (CIN2+) from CIN1 and controls. CCNB2, PRC1, and SYCP2 were mostly associated with CC and CDC20, NUSAP1, and CDKN3 were also associated with CIN2/3. The sensitivity and specificity of CDKN3 and NUSAP1 to detect CIN2+ was approximately 90%. The proteins encoded by all 6 genes were shown upregulated in CC by immunohistochemistry. The association of these markers with survival was investigated in 42 CC patients followed up for at least 42 months. Only CDKN3 was associated with poor survival and it was independent from clinical stage (HR = 5.9, 95%CI = 1.4–23.8, p = 0.01). CDKN3 and NUSAP1 may be potential targets for the development of screening methods. Nevertheless, further studies with larger samples are needed to define the optimal sensitivity and specificity. Inhibition of mitosis is a well-known strategy to combat cancers. Therefore, CDKN3 may be not only a screening and survival marker but a potential therapeutic target in CC. However, whether it’s indispensable for tumor growth remains to be

  14. Monitoring response to treatment in melanoma patients: potential of a serum glycomic marker.

    PubMed

    Selvan, Senthamil R; Dillman, Robert O; Fowler, Abner W; Carbonell, Denysha J; Ravindranath, Mepur H

    2008-03-15

    A mechanistic marker correlating with tumor progression and clinical response is useful for assessing therapeutic response and determining the course of therapy. Since serum-total-ganglioside (sTG) and antiganglioside-IgM antibody levels reflected tumor progression, the feasibility of utilizing sTG for assessing the response to immunotherapy of metastatic-melanoma was tested. Patients (n = 34) were immunized with dendritic cells cocultured with irradiated, IFN gamma-treated autologous tumor cells admixed with GM-CSF. Levels of sTG and antiganglioside-IgM antibody titers were measured in sera of vaccine recipients at 0, 4 and 24 weeks of treatment. Based on sTG-level, whether lower (L) or higher (H) than the mean + 1 SD of normal and healthy volunteers on weeks 0, 4 and 24, patients were categorized into cohorts-I (LLL, n = 16), II (HHL/HLL, n = 4), III (LLH/LHH/LHL, n = 7) and IV (HHH/HLH, n = 7). The cohorts were regrouped as sTG- downregulators (sTG-DR; n = 20) and upregulators (sTG-UR; n = 14). These two cohorts differed significantly in their overall (p < 0.012) and progression-free (p = 0.0001) survival post-treatment. 43% sTG-UR died within 39 months, with a median survival of 39 months, whereas 61% of the sTG-DR survived for 48 months. Both endogenous and vaccine-induced antiganglioside-IgM antibodies appeared to regulate sTG levels. Nonresponders had increased sTG with no or low IgM antibody response. The sTG level is regulated within 24 weeks post-treatment and therefore, may serve as an ideal biomarker for assessing therapeutic responses in patients. Clinical correlations of sTG indicate that sTG-downregulating therapy may be an effective treatment strategy for melanoma. PMID:17960619

  15. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, H.; Egashira, Y.; Shioyama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Yoshidome, S.; Anai, S.; Nomoto, S.; Honda, H.; Toyofuku, F.; Higashida, Y.; Onizuka, Y.; Terashima, H.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 × 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s-1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  16. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo anti-tumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone). Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse) was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 μg, 35 μg, and 52.5 μg per animal) were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom) and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. PMID:27799739

  17. Specific markers, micro-environmental anomalies and tropism: opportunities for gold nanorods targeting of tumors in laser-induced hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatini, Francesca; Ratto, Fulvio; Centi, Sonia; Landini, Ida; Nobili, Stefania; Witort, Ewa; Fusi, Franco; Capaccioli, Sergio; Mini, Enrico; Pini, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) are optimal contrast agents for near-infrared (NIR) laser-induced photothermal ablation of cancer. Selective targeting of cancer cells can be pursued by attaching specific molecules on the particles surface or by the use of cellular vectors loaded with GNRs. We performed and tested various targeting approaches by means of GNRs functionalization with (i) antibodies against Cancer-Antigen-125 (CA-125), (ii) inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) and (iii) by the use of macrophages as cellular vectors. GNRs with a NIR absorption band at 810 nm were synthesized and PEGylated. For GNRs functionalization the targets of choice were CA-125, the most widely used biomarker for ovarian cancer, and CA9, overexpressed by hypoxic cells which are often located within the tumor mass. In the case of cellular vectors, to be used as Trojan horses naturally able to reach tumor areas, the surface of PEG-GNRs was modified to achieve unspecific interactions with macrophage membranes. In all cases the cellular uptake was evaluated by silver staining and cell viability was assessed by MTT test. Then tests of laser-induced GNRs-mediated hyperthermia were performed in various cell cultures illuminating with an 810 nm diode laser (CW, 0,5-4 W/cm2 power density, 1-10 min exposure time) and cell death was evaluated. Each targeting strategy we tested may be used alone or in combination, to maximize the tumor loading and therefore the efficiency of the laser treatment. Moreover, a multiple approach could help when the tumor variability interferes with the targeting directed to a single marker.

  18. Marker-free lung tumor trajectory estimation from a cone beam CT sinogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Liang, Jian; Yan, Di

    2010-05-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate the 3D lung tumor position using the projection data forming a cone beam CT sinogram and a template registration method. A pre-existing respiration-correlated CT image was used to generate templates of the target, which were then registered to the individual cone beam CT projections, and estimates of the target position were made for each projection. The registration search region was constrained based on knowledge of the mean tumor position during the cone beam CT scan acquisition. Several template registration algorithms were compared, including correlation coefficient and robust methods such as block correlation, robust correlation coefficient and robust gradient correlation. Robust registration metrics were found to be less sensitive to occlusions such as overlying tissue and the treatment couch. The mean accuracy of the position estimation was 1.4 mm in phantom with a robust registration algorithm. In two research subjects with peripheral tumors, the mean position and mean target excursion were estimated to within 2.0 mm compared to the results obtained with a '4D' registration of 4D image volumes.

  19. Potential of Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Goya, R G.; Sarkar, D.K.; Brown, O.A.; Hereñú, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas constitute the most frequent neuroendocrine pathology, comprising up to 15% of primary intracranial tumors. Current therapies for pituitary tumors include surgery and radiotherapy, as well as pharmacological approaches for some types. Although all of these approaches have shown a significant degree of success, they are not devoid of unwanted side effects, and in most cases do not offer a permanent cure. Gene therapy—the transfer of genetic material for therapeutic purposes—has undergone an explosive development in the last few years. Within this context, the development of gene therapy approaches for the treatment of pituitary tumors emerges as a promising area of research. We begin by presenting a brief account of the genesis of prolactinomas, with particular emphasis on how estradiol induces prolactinomas in animals. In so doing, we discuss the role of each of the recently discovered growth inhibitory and growth stimulatory substances and their interactions in estrogen action. We also evaluate the cell-cell communication that may govern these growth factor interactions and subsequently promote the growth and survival of prolactinomas. Current research efforts to implement gene therapy in pituitary tumors include the treatment of experimental prolactinomas or somatomammotropic tumors with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the suicide gene for the herpes simplex type 1 (HSV1) thymidine kinase, which converts the prodrug ganciclovir into a toxic metabolite. In some cases, the suicide transgene has been placed under the control of pituitary cell-type specific promoters, like the human prolactin or human growth hormone promoters. Also, regulatable adenoviral vector systems are being assessed in gene therapy approaches for experimental pituitary tumors. In a different type of approach, an adenoviral vector, encoding the human retinoblastoma suppressor oncogene, has been successfully used to rescue the phenotype of spontaneous pituitary

  20. Gene expression screening of salivary gland neoplasms: molecular markers of potential histogenetic and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Maruya, Shin-Ichiro; Kim, Hyung-Woo; Weber, Randal S; Lee, Jack J; Kies, Merril; Luna, Mario A; Batsakis, John G; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2004-08-01

    Salivary gland neoplasms comprise phenotypically and biologically diverse lesions of uncertain histogenesis. The molecular events associated with their development and clinicopathological heterogeneity remain unknown. To reveal these events, we performed microarray expression analysis using a nylon-filter membrane platform on 18 primary lesions representing the most common benign and malignant types. Our study identified a small set of genes that are differentially altered between normal salivary gland tissues and benign and malignant tumors. Of the 5000 genes arrayed, 136 genes were differentially expressed by normal tissue, benign tumors, and various malignant neoplasms. Hierarchical clustering analysis differentiated between adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) and other malignant subtypes. Non-ACC specimens manifested overlapping patterns of gene expression within and between tumors. Most of the differentially expressed genes share functional similarities with members of the adhesion, proliferation, and signal transduction pathways. Our study identified: 1) a set of genes that differentiate normal tissue from tumor specimens, 2) genes that differentiate pleomorphic adenoma and ACCs from other malignant salivary gland neoplasms, and 3) different patterns of expression between ACCs arising from major and minor salivary gland sites. The differentially expressed genes provide new information on potential genetic events of biological significance in future studies of salivary gland tumorigenesis.

  1. Predictive potential of photoacoustic spectroscopy in breast tumor detection based on xenograft serum profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Chandra, Subhas; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Ray, Satadru; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer all over the world. Heterogeneity in breast cancer makes it a difficult task to detect with the existing serum markers at an early stage. With an aim to detect the disease early at the pre-malignant level, MCF-7 cells xenografts were developed using female nude mice and blood serum were extracted on days 0th, 10th, 15th & 20th post tumor cells injection (N=12 for each time point). Photoacoustic spectra were recorded on the serum samples at 281nm pulsed laser excitations. A total of 144 time domain spectra were recorded from 48 serum samples belonging to 4 different time points. These spectra were then converted into frequency domain (0-1250kHz) using MATLAB algorithms. Subsequently, seven features (mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation, area under the curve & spectral residuals after 10th degree polynomial fit) were extracted from them and used for PCA. Further, using the first three Principal components (PCs) of the data, Linear Discriminate Analysis has been carried out. The performance of the analysis showed 82.64% accuracy in predicting various time points under study. Further, frequency-region wise analysis was also performed on the data and found 95 - 203.13 kHz region most suitable for the discrimination among the 4 time points. The analysis provided a clear discrimination in most of the spectral features under study suggesting that the photoacoustic technique has the potential to be a diagnostic tool for early detection of breast tumor development

  2. Characterization of three amino-functionalized surfaces and evaluation of antibody immobilization for the multiplex detection of tumor markers involved in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhugen; Chevolot, Yann; Géhin, Thomas; Dugas, Vincent; Xanthopoulos, Nicolas; Laporte, Vincent; Delair, Thierry; Ataman-Önal, Yasemin; Choquet-Kastylevsky, Geneviève; Souteyrand, Eliane; Laurenceau, Emmanuelle

    2013-02-01

    Antibody microarrays are powerful and high-throughput tools for screening and identifying tumor markers from small sample volumes of only a few microliters. Optimization of surface chemistry and spotting conditions are crucial parameters to enhance antibodies' immobilization efficiency and to maintain their biological activity. Here, we report the implementation of an antibody microarray for the detection of tumor markers involved in colorectal cancer. Three-dimensional microstructured glass slides were functionalized with three different aminated molecules ((3-aminopropyl)dimethylethoxysilane (APDMES), Jeffamine, and chitosan) varying in their chain length, their amine density, and their hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance. The physicochemical properties of the resulting surfaces were characterized. Antibody immobilization efficiency through physical interaction was studied as a function of surface properties as well as a function of the immobilization conditions. The results show that surface energy, steric hindrance, and pH of spotting buffer have great effects on protein immobilization. Under optimal conditions, biological activities of four immobilized antitumor marker antibodies were evaluated in multiplex immunoassay for the detection of the corresponding tumor markers. Results indicated that the chitosan functionalized surface displayed the highest binding capacity and allowed to retain maximal biological activity of the four tested antibody/antigen systems. Thus, we successfully demonstrated the application of amino-based surface modification for antibody microarrays to efficiently detect tumor markers. PMID:23305497

  3. iRFP is a sensitive marker for cell number and tumor growth in high-throughput systems.

    PubMed

    Hock, Andreas K; Lee, Pearl; Maddocks, Oliver Dk; Mason, Susan M; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    GFP and luciferase are used extensively as markers both in vitro and in vivo although both have limitations. The utility of GFP fluorescence is restricted by high background signal and poor tissue penetrance. Luciferase throughput is limited in vitro by the requirement for cell lysis, while in vivo, luciferase readout is complicated by the need for substrate injection and the dependence on endogenous ATP. Here we show that near-infrared fluorescent protein in combination with widely available near-infrared scanners overcomes these obstacles and allows for the accurate determination of cell number in vitro and tumor growth in vivo in a high-throughput manner and at negligible per-well costs. This system represents a significant advance in tracking cell proliferation in tissue culture as well as in animals, with widespread applications in cell biology. PMID:24200967

  4. Prognostic Value of Invasion, Markers of Proliferation, and Classification of Giant Pituitary Tumors, in a Georeferred Cohort in Brazil of 50 Patients, with a Long-Term Postoperative Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, Albino Verçosa

    2016-01-01

    Although some pituitary adenomas may have an aggressive behavior, the vast majority are benign. There are still controversies about predictive factors regarding the biological behavior of these particular tumors. This study evaluated potential markers of invasion and proliferation compared to current classification patterns and epidemiogeographical parameters. The study included 50 patients, operated on for tumors greater than 30 mm, with a mean postoperative follow-up of 15.2 ± 4.8 years. Pituitary magnetic resonance was used to evaluate regrowth, invasion, and extension to adjacent tissue. Three tissue biomarkers were analyzed: p53, Ki-67, and c-erbB2. Tumors were classified according to a combination of histological and radiological features, ranging from noninvasive and nonproliferative (grade 1A) to invasive-proliferative (grade 2B). Tumors grades 2A and 2B represented 42% and 52%, respectively. Ki-67 (p = 0.23) and c-erbB2 (p = 0.71) had no significant relation to tumor progression status. P53 (p = 0.003), parasellar invasion (p = 0.03), and classification, grade 2B (p = 0.01), were associated with worse clinical outcome. Parasellar invasion prevails as strong predictive factor of tumor recurrence. Severe suprasellar extension should be considered as invasion parameter and could impact prognosis. No environmental factors or geographical cluster were associated with tumor behavior.

  5. Prognostic Value of Invasion, Markers of Proliferation, and Classification of Giant Pituitary Tumors, in a Georeferred Cohort in Brazil of 50 Patients, with a Long-Term Postoperative Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, Albino Verçosa

    2016-01-01

    Although some pituitary adenomas may have an aggressive behavior, the vast majority are benign. There are still controversies about predictive factors regarding the biological behavior of these particular tumors. This study evaluated potential markers of invasion and proliferation compared to current classification patterns and epidemiogeographical parameters. The study included 50 patients, operated on for tumors greater than 30 mm, with a mean postoperative follow-up of 15.2 ± 4.8 years. Pituitary magnetic resonance was used to evaluate regrowth, invasion, and extension to adjacent tissue. Three tissue biomarkers were analyzed: p53, Ki-67, and c-erbB2. Tumors were classified according to a combination of histological and radiological features, ranging from noninvasive and nonproliferative (grade 1A) to invasive-proliferative (grade 2B). Tumors grades 2A and 2B represented 42% and 52%, respectively. Ki-67 (p = 0.23) and c-erbB2 (p = 0.71) had no significant relation to tumor progression status. P53 (p = 0.003), parasellar invasion (p = 0.03), and classification, grade 2B (p = 0.01), were associated with worse clinical outcome. Parasellar invasion prevails as strong predictive factor of tumor recurrence. Severe suprasellar extension should be considered as invasion parameter and could impact prognosis. No environmental factors or geographical cluster were associated with tumor behavior. PMID:27635138

  6. Prognostic Value of Invasion, Markers of Proliferation, and Classification of Giant Pituitary Tumors, in a Georeferred Cohort in Brazil of 50 Patients, with a Long-Term Postoperative Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Zakir, Juliano Coelho de Oliveira; Casulari, Luiz Augusto; Rosa, José Wilson Corrêa; Rosa, João Willy Corrêa; de Mello, Paulo Andrade; de Magalhães, Albino Verçosa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli

    2016-01-01

    Although some pituitary adenomas may have an aggressive behavior, the vast majority are benign. There are still controversies about predictive factors regarding the biological behavior of these particular tumors. This study evaluated potential markers of invasion and proliferation compared to current classification patterns and epidemiogeographical parameters. The study included 50 patients, operated on for tumors greater than 30 mm, with a mean postoperative follow-up of 15.2 ± 4.8 years. Pituitary magnetic resonance was used to evaluate regrowth, invasion, and extension to adjacent tissue. Three tissue biomarkers were analyzed: p53, Ki-67, and c-erbB2. Tumors were classified according to a combination of histological and radiological features, ranging from noninvasive and nonproliferative (grade 1A) to invasive-proliferative (grade 2B). Tumors grades 2A and 2B represented 42% and 52%, respectively. Ki-67 (p = 0.23) and c-erbB2 (p = 0.71) had no significant relation to tumor progression status. P53 (p = 0.003), parasellar invasion (p = 0.03), and classification, grade 2B (p = 0.01), were associated with worse clinical outcome. Parasellar invasion prevails as strong predictive factor of tumor recurrence. Severe suprasellar extension should be considered as invasion parameter and could impact prognosis. No environmental factors or geographical cluster were associated with tumor behavior. PMID:27635138

  7. Is Serum Prostate-specific Antigen a Diagnostic Marker for Benign and Malignant Breast Tumors in Women?

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Hasan Emami; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Abdollahi, Alireza; Shoar, Saeed; Omranipour, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a marker of prostate gland malignancy, which has been considered in cases with breast cancer in recent years. The goal of this study was to determine total and free PSA levels in cases with malignant and benign breast lesions. Methods: In this case–control study, ninety women with histological proved malignant breast masses and 90 with benign breast masses were enrolled. Total and free PSA levels along with Histological grade and conditions of vascular and perinural invasion, status of hormonal tumor receptors, immune-histo-chemistry markers recorded for all cases. Total and free PSA levels were assessed after treatment in cases with malignant masses. Results: Total and free PSA levels were significantly higher in cases with malignant masses. The best cut-off point for total PSA to differentiate benign and malignant masses was 0.31 with sensitivity and specificity of 100%, 100% (area under the curve [AUC] =1, P < 0.001) and the best cut-off point for free PSA to differentiate benign and malignant masses was 0.19 with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 100% (AUC = 1, P < 0.001). After treatment, mean free PSA level was significantly lower than free PSA before treatment (0.23 ± 0.1 vs. 0.3 ± 0.08, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Serum PSA level could be applied for differentiating benign and malignant breast masses. PMID:25789147

  8. Sharks: a potential source of antiangiogenic factors and tumor treatments.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung; Kim, Young

    2002-12-01

    Since angiogenesis is a key feature of tumor growth, inhibiting this process is one way to treat cancer. Cartilage is a natural source of material with strong antiangiogenic activity. This report reviews knowledge of the anticancer properties of shark cartilage and clinical information on drugs such as neovastat and squalamine. Because their entire endoskeleton is composed of cartilage, sharks are thought to be an ideal source of angiogenic and tumor growth inhibitors. Shark cartilage extract has shown antiangiogenic and antitumor activities in animals and humans. The oral administration of cartilage extract was efficacious in reducing angiogenesis. Purified antiangiogenic factors from shark cartilage, such as U-995 and neovastat (AE-941), also showed antiangiogenic and antitumor activity. AE-941 is under phase III clinical investigation. Squalamine, a low molecular weight aminosterol, showed strong antitumor activity when combined with chemotherapeutic materials. The angiogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 3 (TIMP-3) and tumor suppressor protein (snm23) genes from shark cartilage were cloned and characterized. PMID:14961226

  9. Transmembrane voltage potential is an essential cellular parameter for the detection and control of tumor development in a Xenopus model.

    PubMed

    Chernet, Brook T; Levin, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Understanding mechanisms that orchestrate cell behavior into appropriately patterned tissues and organs within the organism is an essential element of preventing, detecting and treating cancer. Bioelectric signals (resting transmembrane voltage potential gradients in all cells) underlie an important and broadly conserved set of control mechanisms that regulate pattern formation. We tested the role of transmembrane potential in tumorigenesis mediated by canonical oncogenes in Xenopus laevis. Depolarized membrane potential (Vmem) was a characteristic of induced tumor-like structures (ITLSs) generated by overexpression of Gli1, Kras(G12D), Xrel3 or p53(Trp248). This bioelectric signature was also present in precursor ITLS sites. Vmem is a bioelectric marker that reveals ITLSs before they become histologically and morphologically apparent. Moreover, voltage was functionally important: overexpression of hyperpolarizing ion transporters caused a return to normal Vmem and significantly reduced ITLS formation in vivo. To characterize the molecular mechanism by which Vmem change regulates ITLS phenotypes, we performed a suppression screen. Vmem hyperpolarization was transduced into downstream events via Vmem-regulated activity of SLC5A8, a sodium-butyrate exchanger previously implicated in human cancer. These data indicate that butyrate, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, might be responsible for transcriptional events that mediate suppression of ITLSs by hyperpolarization. Vmem is a convenient cellular parameter by which tumors induced by human oncogenes can be detected in vivo and represents a new diagnostic modality. Moreover, control of resting membrane potential is functionally involved in the process by which oncogene-bearing cells depart from normal morphogenesis programs to form tumors. Modulation of Vmem levels is a novel and promising strategy for tumor normalization. PMID:23471912

  10. Functionalization of Carbon Nanomaterial Surface by Doxorubicin and Antibodies to Tumor Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelytsina, Olena M.; Yakymchuk, Olena M.; Sydorenko, Mychailo V.; Bakalinska, Olga N.; Bloisi, Francesco; Vicari, Luciano Rosario Maria

    2016-06-01

    The actual task of oncology is effective treatment of cancer while causing a minimum harm to the patient. The appearance of polymer nanomaterials and technologies launched new applications and approaches of delivery and release of anticancer drugs. The goal of work was to test ultra dispersed diamonds (UDDs) and onion-like carbon (OLCs) as new vehicles for delivery of antitumor drug (doxorubicin (DOX)) and specific antibodies to tumor receptors. Stable compounds of UDDs and OLCs with DOX were obtained. As results of work, an effectiveness of functionalization was 2.94 % w/ w for OLC-DOX and 2.98 % w/ w for UDD-DOX. Also, there was demonstrated that UDD-DOX and OLC-DOX constructs had dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on tumor cells in the presence of trypsin. The survival of adenocarcinoma cells reduced from 52 to 28 % in case of incubation with the UDD-DOX in concentrations from 8.4-2.5 to 670-20 μg/ml and from 72 to 30 % after incubation with OLC-DOX. Simultaneously, antibodies to epidermal growth factor maintained 75 % of the functional activity and specificity after matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation deposition. Thus, the conclusion has been made about the prospects of selected new methods and approaches for creating an antitumor agent with capabilities targeted delivery of drugs.

  11. Functionalization of Carbon Nanomaterial Surface by Doxorubicin and Antibodies to Tumor Markers.

    PubMed

    Perepelytsina, Olena M; Yakymchuk, Olena M; Sydorenko, Mychailo V; Bakalinska, Olga N; Bloisi, Francesco; Vicari, Luciano Rosario Maria

    2016-12-01

    The actual task of oncology is effective treatment of cancer while causing a minimum harm to the patient. The appearance of polymer nanomaterials and technologies launched new applications and approaches of delivery and release of anticancer drugs. The goal of work was to test ultra dispersed diamonds (UDDs) and onion-like carbon (OLCs) as new vehicles for delivery of antitumor drug (doxorubicin (DOX)) and specific antibodies to tumor receptors. Stable compounds of UDDs and OLCs with DOX were obtained. As results of work, an effectiveness of functionalization was 2.94 % w/w for OLC-DOX and 2.98 % w/w for UDD-DOX. Also, there was demonstrated that UDD-DOX and OLC-DOX constructs had dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on tumor cells in the presence of trypsin. The survival of adenocarcinoma cells reduced from 52 to 28 % in case of incubation with the UDD-DOX in concentrations from 8.4-2.5 to 670-20 μg/ml and from 72 to 30 % after incubation with OLC-DOX. Simultaneously, antibodies to epidermal growth factor maintained 75 % of the functional activity and specificity after matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation deposition. Thus, the conclusion has been made about the prospects of selected new methods and approaches for creating an antitumor agent with capabilities targeted delivery of drugs.

  12. Functionalization of Carbon Nanomaterial Surface by Doxorubicin and Antibodies to Tumor Markers.

    PubMed

    Perepelytsina, Olena M; Yakymchuk, Olena M; Sydorenko, Mychailo V; Bakalinska, Olga N; Bloisi, Francesco; Vicari, Luciano Rosario Maria

    2016-12-01

    The actual task of oncology is effective treatment of cancer while causing a minimum harm to the patient. The appearance of polymer nanomaterials and technologies launched new applications and approaches of delivery and release of anticancer drugs. The goal of work was to test ultra dispersed diamonds (UDDs) and onion-like carbon (OLCs) as new vehicles for delivery of antitumor drug (doxorubicin (DOX)) and specific antibodies to tumor receptors. Stable compounds of UDDs and OLCs with DOX were obtained. As results of work, an effectiveness of functionalization was 2.94 % w/w for OLC-DOX and 2.98 % w/w for UDD-DOX. Also, there was demonstrated that UDD-DOX and OLC-DOX constructs had dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on tumor cells in the presence of trypsin. The survival of adenocarcinoma cells reduced from 52 to 28 % in case of incubation with the UDD-DOX in concentrations from 8.4-2.5 to 670-20 μg/ml and from 72 to 30 % after incubation with OLC-DOX. Simultaneously, antibodies to epidermal growth factor maintained 75 % of the functional activity and specificity after matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation deposition. Thus, the conclusion has been made about the prospects of selected new methods and approaches for creating an antitumor agent with capabilities targeted delivery of drugs. PMID:27356561

  13. Phosphoproteomic profiling of tumor tissues identifies HSP27 Ser82 phosphorylation as a robust marker of early ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Wu, Xinyan; Pinto, Sneha M.; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Kim, Min-Sik; Fetics, Barry; Philip, Mathew; Barnes, Sheri R.; Godfrey, Beverly; Gabrielson, Edward; Nevo, Erez; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Delays between tissue collection and tissue fixation result in ischemia and ischemia-associated changes in protein phosphorylation levels, which can misguide the examination of signaling pathway status. To identify a biomarker that serves as a reliable indicator of ischemic changes that tumor tissues undergo, we subjected harvested xenograft tumors to room temperature for 0, 2, 10 and 30 minutes before freezing in liquid nitrogen. Multiplex TMT-labeling was conducted to achieve precise quantitation, followed by TiO2 phosphopeptide enrichment and high resolution mass spectrometry profiling. LC-MS/MS analyses revealed phosphorylation level changes of a number of phosphosites in the ischemic samples. The phosphorylation of one of these sites, S82 of the heat shock protein 27 kDa (HSP27), was especially abundant and consistently upregulated in tissues with delays in freezing as short as 2 minutes. In order to eliminate effects of ischemia, we employed a novel cryogenic biopsy device which begins freezing tissues in situ before they are excised. Using this device, we showed that the upregulation of phosphorylation of S82 on HSP27 was abrogated. We thus demonstrate that our cryogenic biopsy device can eliminate ischemia-induced phosphoproteome alterations, and measurements of S82 on HSP27 can be used as a robust marker of ischemia in tissues. PMID:26329039

  14. Identification of MicroRNAs as Potential Prognostic Markers in Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Fabricio F.; Lulla, Rishi R.; Wang, Min; Sredni, Simone T.; Rajaram, Veena; de Fátima Bonaldo, Maria; Wang, Deli; Goldman, Stewart; Tomita, Tadanori; Soares, Marcelo B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We have examined expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in ependymomas to identify molecular markers of value for clinical management. miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that can block mRNA translation and affect mRNA stability. Changes in the expression of miRNAs have been correlated with many human cancers. Materials and Methods We have utilized TaqMan Low Density Arrays to evaluate the expression of 365 miRNAs in ependymomas and normal brain tissue. We first demonstrated the similarity of expression profiles of paired frozen tissue (FT) and paraffin-embedded specimens (FFPE). We compared the miRNA expression profiles of 34 FFPE ependymoma samples with 8 microdissected normal brain tissue specimens enriched for ependymal cells. miRNA expression profiles were then correlated with tumor location, histology and other clinicopathological features. Results We have identified miRNAs that are over-expressed in ependymomas, such as miR-135a and miR-17-5p, and down-regulated, such as miR-383 and miR-485-5p. We have also uncovered associations between expression of specific miRNAs which portend a worse prognosis. For example, we have identified a cluster of miRNAs on human chromosome 14q32 that is associated with time to relapse. We also found that miR-203 is an independent marker for relapse compared to the parameters that are currently used. Additionally, we have identified three miRNAs (let-7d, miR-596 and miR-367) that strongly correlate to overall survival. Conclusion We have identified miRNAs that are differentially expressed in ependymomas compared with normal ependymal tissue. We have also uncovered significant associations of miRNAs with clinical behavior. This is the first report of clinically relevant miRNAs in ependymomas. PMID:22053178

  15. Tumor markers CEA and CA 19-9 correlate with radiological imaging in metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving first-line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Michl, M; Koch, J; Laubender, R P; Modest, D P; Giessen, C; Schulz, Ch; Heinemann, V

    2014-10-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), radiological imaging represents the current standard to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy. However, with growing knowledge about tumor biology, other diagnostic tools become of interest which can supplement radiology. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation of tumor and serum markers with radiological imaging in patients with mCRC receiving first-line therapy. Patients were included if tumor (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9)) and serum marker (lactatdehydrogenase (LDH), γ-glutamyltransferase (γGT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), C-reactive protein (CRP), leucocyte count (WBC), hemoglobin (Hb)) levels were available at baseline and at least two times during treatment. The decline and increase of tumor and serum markers over time were approximated for each patient by estimating slopes depending on the radiological assessment. A linear mixed effects multiple regression model for each subject was used to evaluate the intra-class correlation of these slopes modeling tumor and serum marker changes with radiological imaging. Data of 124 patients (41 female, 83 male; median age 62.9 years, range 27-85) who received first-line chemotherapy for mCRC from 11/2007 to 04/2010 were analyzed retrospectively. CEA level slopes (n = 49; slopes = 102) differed between radiologically determined progressive disease (PD) and partial response (PR) (p = 0.005) and between PD and stable disease (SD) (p = 0.042). CA 19-9 level slopes (n = 57; slopes = 127) also showed a significant difference between PD and PR (p = 0.002) and PD and SD (p = 0.058). Furthermore, CRP slopes (n = 62; slopes = 134) differed significantly between PD and PR (p = 0.009). For LDH, ALP, γGT, Hb, and WBC, no correlations were observed. The results indicate the correlation of the tumor markers CEA, CA 19-9, and the serum marker CRP with radiological imaging in

  16. Hepatoprotective and anti-tumor effects of targeting MMP-9 in hepatocellular carcinoma and its relation to vascular invasion markers.

    PubMed

    Elewa, Mohammed A F; Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M; Schaalan, Mona F; Abd El Galil, Khaled H; Ebrahim, Mohamed A; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M

    2015-06-01

    The current study aims to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antitumor efficacy of doxycycline, as an matrix metalloproteases-9 (MMP-9) inhibitor, in an in vivo model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC was induced experimentally by thiocetamide (200 mg/kg) in rats that were treated with doxycycline (5 mg/kg for 16 weeks). Tumor severity was evaluated by measuring α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, histopathologically by investigating liver sections stained with hematoxylin/eosin and assessing the survival rate. Liver homogenates were used for the measurements of MMP-9, fascin and hepatic heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) levels. Oxidative stress markers [malonaldehyde (MDA) and glutathione] as well as fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) gene expression were also among the assessed indicators. HCC in human and animal samples showed significant elevation in the levels of MMP-9 (231.7, 90 %), fascin (33.17, 140 %), as well as FGF-2 gene expression (342 % in animal samples; all respectively), associated with a significant decrease in hepatic HSPG level. Treatment of rats with doxycycline increased the animal survival rate (90 %) and decreased serum AFP level. Moreover, doxycycline ameliorated fibrosis and the induced massive hepatic tissue breakdown. It also restored the integrity of hepatic HSPGs and showed a magnificent inhibitory effect of tumor invasion cascade by significantly reducing the activities of MMP-9 (42 %) and fascin (50 %), as well as reducing the gene expression of FGF-2 (85.7 %). Furthermore, the antioxidant impact of doxycycline was evidenced by the significant elevation in glutathione level and depressing MDA level. To this end, doxycycline, proved promising hepatoprotective and antitumor activity and opens, thereby, a new horizon against vascular migration ability of the tumor cells.

  17. CD133 expression in circulating tumor cells from breast cancer patients: potential role in resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Rosa; Ortega, F Gabriel; Salido, Marta; Lorente, Jose A; Rodríguez-Rivera, Maria; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Macià, Marta; Fernández, Ana; Corominas, Josep M; García-Puche, J Luis; Sánchez-Rovira, Pedro; Solé, Francesc; Serrano, M Jose

    2013-11-15

    CD133 has been associated with cell properties such as self renewal, migration and vasculogenic mimicry, potentially involved in generation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We characterized CD133 expression in CTCs of 98 nometastatic breast cancer (BC) patients. CTCs were isolated by immunomagnetic techniques using magnetic beads labeled with a multicytokeratin(CK)-specific antibody (CK3-11D5) and CTCs and CD133 detection through immunocytochemical methods. CK(+) /CD133(+) CTCs were identified in 65% of patients at baseline and 47.8% after systemic therapy (p = 0.53). Correlation of CD133 status in CTCs with classical clinicopathological characteristics and response to therapy was performed. Her2 not amplified and low Ki-67 index were positively correlated with presence of CK(+) /CD133(+) CTCs. Before any treatment, CK(+) /CD133(+) CTCs were more frequently isolated in patients with luminal BC subtype. No statistically significant differences were found between proportion of CK(+) /CD133(+) CTCs and BC subtypes after systemic therapy, implying a relative enrichment of CK(+) /CD133(+) CTCs in triple negative and HER2-amplified tumors. While CK(+) /CTCs decreases after chemotherapy when analyzing the whole population, CK(+) /CD133(+) CTCs were enriched in post-treatment samples in nonluminal BC subtypes. These findings suggest the potential role of CD133 as a promising marker of chemoresistance in nonluminal BC patients. Further prospective studies and extensive preclinical modeling will be needed to confirm whether CD133 is a marker of resistance to chemotherapy, and its role as a target for novel anticancer therapies targeting cancer stem cells and tumor vasculature. PMID:23661576

  18. Crystal structure of human esterase D: a potential genetic marker of retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Li, Yang; Song, Gaojie; Zhang, David; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2009-07-10

    Retinoblastoma (RB), a carcinoma of the retina, is caused by mutations in the long arm of chromosome 13, band 13q14. The esterase D (ESD) gene maps at a similar location as the RB gene locus and therefore serves as a potential marker for the prognosis of retinoblastoma. Because very little is known about the structure and function of ESD, we determined the 3-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution using X-ray crystallography. ESD shows a single domain with an {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold. A number of insertions are observed in the canonical {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold. The active site is located in a positively charged, shallow cleft on the surface lined by a number of aromatic residues. Superimposition studies helped identify the typical catalytic triad residues -- Ser-153, His264, and Asp230 -- involved in catalysis. Mutagenesis of any of the catalytic triad residues to alanine abolished the enzyme activity. Backbone amides of Leu54 and Met150 are involved in the formation of the oxyanion hole. Interestingly, a M150A mutation increased the enzyme activity by 62%. The structure of human ESD determined in this study will aid the elucidation of the physiological role of the enzyme in the human body and will assist in the early diagnosis of retinoblastoma. Wu, D., Li, Y., Song, G., Zhang, D., Shaw, N., Liu, Z. J. Crystal structure of human esterase D: a potential genetic marker of retinoblastoma.

  19. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes: Paradigms, puzzles, and potential.

    PubMed

    Kazanets, Anna; Shorstova, Tatiana; Hilmi, Khalid; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cancer constitutes a set of diseases with heterogeneous molecular pathologies. However, there are a number of universal aberrations common to all cancers, one of these being the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). The silencing of TSGs is thought to be an early, driving event in the oncogenic process. With this in consideration, great efforts have been made to develop small molecules aimed at the restoration of TSGs in order to limit tumor cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular forces that drive the broad epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional repression of these genes remain ill-defined. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular underpinnings of transcriptionally silenced TSGs will aid us in our ability to reactivate these key anti-cancer targets. Here, we describe what we consider to be the five most logical molecular mechanisms that may account for this widely observed phenomenon: 1) ablation of transcription factor binding, 2) overexpression of DNA methyltransferases, 3) disruption of CTCF binding, 4) elevation of EZH2 activity, 5) aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs. The strengths and weaknesses of each proposed mechanism is highlighted, followed by an overview of clinical efforts to target these processes.

  20. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes: Paradigms, puzzles, and potential.

    PubMed

    Kazanets, Anna; Shorstova, Tatiana; Hilmi, Khalid; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cancer constitutes a set of diseases with heterogeneous molecular pathologies. However, there are a number of universal aberrations common to all cancers, one of these being the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). The silencing of TSGs is thought to be an early, driving event in the oncogenic process. With this in consideration, great efforts have been made to develop small molecules aimed at the restoration of TSGs in order to limit tumor cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular forces that drive the broad epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional repression of these genes remain ill-defined. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular underpinnings of transcriptionally silenced TSGs will aid us in our ability to reactivate these key anti-cancer targets. Here, we describe what we consider to be the five most logical molecular mechanisms that may account for this widely observed phenomenon: 1) ablation of transcription factor binding, 2) overexpression of DNA methyltransferases, 3) disruption of CTCF binding, 4) elevation of EZH2 activity, 5) aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs. The strengths and weaknesses of each proposed mechanism is highlighted, followed by an overview of clinical efforts to target these processes. PMID:27085853

  1. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers: A potential resource for studies in plant molecular biology1

    PubMed Central

    Robarts, Daniel W. H.; Wolfe, Andrea D.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, many investigations in the field of plant biology have employed selectively neutral, multilocus, dominant markers such as inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to address hypotheses at lower taxonomic levels. More recently, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers have been developed, which are used to amplify coding regions of DNA with primers targeting open reading frames. These markers have proven to be robust and highly variable, on par with AFLP, and are attained through a significantly less technically demanding process. SRAP markers have been used primarily for agronomic and horticultural purposes, developing quantitative trait loci in advanced hybrids and assessing genetic diversity of large germplasm collections. Here, we suggest that SRAP markers should be employed for research addressing hypotheses in plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and beyond. We provide an overview of the SRAP literature to date, review descriptive statistics of SRAP markers in a subset of 171 publications, and present relevant case studies to demonstrate the applicability of SRAP markers to the diverse field of plant biology. Results of these selected works indicate that SRAP markers have the potential to enhance the current suite of molecular tools in a diversity of fields by providing an easy-to-use, highly variable marker with inherent biological significance. PMID:25202637

  2. Potentiated cyclophosphane: experimental study of the effect on tumor development and efficiency of cytostatic therapy.

    PubMed

    Amosova, E N; Zueva, E P; Razina, T G; Krylova, S G; Shilova, N V; Epstein, O I

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on animals with transplanted tumors (Lewis lung carcinoma and carcinosarcoma Walker-256) showed that combination treatment with cyclophosphane and its homeopathically potentiated forms increases antiblastic activity of the preparation.

  3. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p < 0.0001, n = 30), and K{sup trans} decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p < 0.0001, n = 20). Tumors in metastasis-positive mice had significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p < 0.0001, n = 50). Significant correlations between v{sub e} and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K{sup trans} values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological

  4. 18F-fludrodeoxyglucose maximal standardized uptake value and metabolic tumor burden are associated with major chemotherapy-related tumor markers in NSCLC patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lu; Guo, Chihua; Wang, Jiansheng; Liu, Xiang; Li, Yang; Li, Miao; Guo, Youmin; Duan, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolic activity and tumor burden are significant for prognosis and metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Chemotherapy resistance is a great challenge for treating NSCLC patients and is also closely related with several biomarkers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p53, and excision repair cross-complementing group 1 protein (ERCC1). Our purpose was to determine the correlation between positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) parameters and tumor markers-related chemotherapy resistance in NSCLC. Methods Forty-six NSCLC chemotherapy-naïve patients were enrolled. The SUVmax, MTV, and TLG were calculated by PET/CT imaging, and expression of EGFR, p53, and ERCC1 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry on tissues. SUVmax, MTV, and TLG compared for their performance in predicting the expression of EGFR, p53, and ERCC1 were illustrated with statistical analysis. Results SUVmax was significantly correlated with p53 expression (P=0.001), and MTV and TLG were significantly associated with ERCC1 (P=0.000; P=0.000). Furthermore, multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that SUVmax was the primary predictor for p53, MTV and TLG was the primary predictor for ERCC1. SUVmax had a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 50% for the detection of p53 positive. The sensitivities of MTV and TLG were 83% and 80%, and specificities were 69% and 75% for the detection of ERCC1 positive, respectively. When we suggested p53 or ERCC1 positive, the cutoff value of SUVmax, MTV, and TLG were 7.68, 23.62, and 129.65 cm3, respectively. Conclusion SUVmax, MTV, and TLG were closely associated with p53 and ERCC1’ expressions. Therefore, 18F-fludrodeoxyglucose PET/CT could be a new way of predicting p53 or ERCC1-related chemotherapy effect in NSCLC patients with more convenience. PMID:27789962

  5. Stromal cells in phyllodes tumors of the breast are enriched for EZH2 and stem cell marker expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Liss, Adam L; Chung, Eugene; Pierce, Lori J; Kleer, Celina G

    2016-07-01

    Phyllodes tumors (PTs) of the breast are fibroepithelial neoplasms with stromal hypercellularity, which is the basis for their classification as benign, borderline, and malignant. The histologic diagnosis of PTs is often difficult, and the pathological features may not always predict clinical behavior. The pathobiology of PT remains poorly understood. Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2) epigenetically regulates cell-type identity, cellular differentiation, and breast cancer stem cells. EZH2 exerts oncogenic functions in breast cancer and is associated with metastasis. We hypothesized that in PTs, EZH2 and the stem cell marker ALDH1 may be expressed in stromal cells and may be associated with their degree of differentiation. Forty PTs were histologically characterized at our institution following the World Health Organization criteria. We investigated the expression of EZH2 and ALDH1 by immunohistochemistry and recorded as percentage of positive epithelial and stromal cells. EZH2 was positive when over 10 % of cells exhibited nuclear staining; ALDH1 was positive when over 5 % of cells had cytoplasmic staining. Of the 40 PTs, 24 (60 %) were histologically benign, 8 (20 %) borderline, and 8 (20 %) malignant. Stromal EZH2 was significantly associated with the diagnosis of malignant PT, as it was detected in 1 of 24 (4 %) benign, 3 of 8 (37.5 %) borderline, and 5 of 8 (62.5 %) malignant tumors. Stromal EZH2 was significantly associated with stromal overgrowth (p = 0.01), atypia (p = 0.01), hypercellularity (p = 0.01), and mitoses (p = 0.02), all features of malignant PT. Stromal EZH2 and ALDH1 were significantly associated with grade of PT (p = 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively). In conclusion, EZH2 and ALDH1 expression in the stroma of PT may mark malignant progression and may be helpful to distinguish histologically benign from borderline and malignant tumors in challenging cases. Our study also suggests that PTs contain mesenchymal stem cells, shedding light

  6. HER3 Expression Is a Marker of Tumor Progression in Premalignant Lesions of the Gastroesophageal Junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Paul J.; Furth, Emma E.; Ginsberg, Gregory G.; McMillan, Matthew T.; Datta, Jashodeep; Czerniecki, Brian J.; Roses, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), including members of the HER family, has prognostic and therapeutic significance in invasive esophagogastric carcinoma. RTK expression in premalignant gastroesophageal lesions has not been extensively explored. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of esophageal biopsy specimens from 73 patients with Barrett’s esophagus with either low-grade dysplasia (LGD) (n = 32) or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) (n = 59) were analyzed for HER1, HER2, HER3 and CMET expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Immunophenotype was correlated with histologic and clinical features. High-grade dysplasia (HGD) was associated with overexpression of HER1 (20.7% vs. 3.1%, p = 0.023), HER2 (5.3% vs. 0.0%, p = 0.187) and HER3 (47.4% vs. 9.4%, p<0.001) compared to low-grade dysplasia (LGD). There was a significant association of HER2 (20.0% vs. 2.1%, p = 0.022) and HER3 (80.0% vs. 40.4%, p = 0.023) overexpression in HGD lesions associated with foci of invasive carcinoma compared to those without invasive foci. Overexpression of CMET was observed in 42.9% of specimens, was increasingly observed with HGD compared to LGD (58.3% vs. 36.7%, p = 0.200), and was most often co-expressed with HER3 (62.5% of HER3-positive specimens vs. 38.2% of HER3-negative specimens, p = 0.212). In summary, HER3 is frequently overexpressed in high-grade dysplastic lesions of the gastroesophageal junction and may be a marker of invasive progression. These data provide rationale for targeting HER2 and HER3 pathways in an early disease setting to prevent disease progression. PMID:27559738

  7. Trehalose as an indicator of desiccation stress in Drosophila melanogaster larvae: A potential marker of anhydrobiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Thorat, Leena J.; Gaikwad, Sushama M.; Nath, Bimalendu B.

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report confirming anhydrobiosis in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis and accumulation in larvae that hydrolyzed on rehydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis in concert with the enzymes involved in trehalose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of trehalose hydrolysis in presence of a specific trehalase inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose proposed as a reliable marker for biomonitoring of climate change studies. -- Abstract: In the current scenario of global climate change, desiccation is considered as one of the major environmental stressors for the biota exposed to altered levels of ambient temperature and humidity. Drosophila melanogaster, a cosmopolitan terrestrial insect has been chosen as a humidity-sensitive bioindicator model for the present study since its habitat undergoes frequent stochastic and/or seasonally aggravated dehydration regimes. We report here for the first time the occurrence of anhydrobiosis in D. melanogaster larvae by subjecting them to desiccation stress under laboratory conditions. Larvae desiccated for ten hours at <5% relative humidity could enter anhydrobiosis and could revive upon rehydration followed by resumption of active metabolism. As revealed by FTIR and HPLC analyzes, our findings strongly indicated the synthesis and accumulation of trehalose in the desiccating larvae. Biochemical measurements pointed out the desiccation-responsive trehalose metabolic pathway that was found to be coordinated in concert with the enzymes trehalose 6-phosphate synthase and trehalase. Further, an inhibitor-based experimental approach using deoxynojirimycin, a specific trehalase inhibitor, demonstrated the pivotal role of trehalose in larval anhydrobiosis of D. melanogaster. We therefore propose trehalose as a potential marker for the assessment of anhydrobiosis in Drosophila. The present findings thus add

  8. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR is a marker for hepatocellular carcinoma progression and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIAN-ZHI; LI, JIA; DU, JING-LI; LI, XIAO-LEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression level of HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its association with various clinicopathological characteristics, and to further explore the molecular mechanisms of HOTAIR function in HCC. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression level of HOTAIR in 60 paired fresh HCC samples and adjacent normal liver tissue samples. The association between HOTAIR expression and clinicopathological parameters was analyzed. Lentivirus-mediated HOTAIR-specific small hairpin RNA vectors were transfected into HepG2 cells. Cell proliferation and invasion in vitro were examined by MTT and Transwell assays, respectively. A xenograft model was used to analyze the tumorigenesis of liver cancer cells in vivo. In addition, semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to detect the expression level of Wnt/β-catenin signaling molecules under the condition of HOTAIR inhibition. The results revealed that the expression level of HOTAIR in HCC tissues was higher than that in adjacent non-cancerous tissues. HOTAIR expression was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation (P=0.002), metastasis (P=0.002) and early recurrence (P=0.001). In vitro, the inhibition of HOTAIR in liver cancer cells resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation and invasion. HOTAIR depletion significantly inhibited the rate of growth of liver cancer cells in vivo. Furthermore, the expression levels of Wnt and β-catenin were downregulated when HOTAIR expression was suppressed. In conclusion, HOTAIR is important in the progression and recurrence of HCC, partly through the regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Targeting HOTAIR may be a novel therapeutic strategy for HCC. PMID:26998078

  9. Prognostic significance of USP10 as a tumor-associated marker in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhi; Wu, Hong-Xue; Zhan, Na; Huang, Ya-Bing; Wang, Ze-Sheng; Yang, Gui-Fang; Wang, Ping; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2014-04-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10), a novel deubiquitinating enzyme, had been associated with growth of tumor cell. However, the role of USP10 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis had not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression level of USP10 in gastric carcinoma (GC) tissues and cell lines, then to evaluate the clinical significance of USP10 in GC patients. USP10, E-cadherin, Ki67 and p53 expressions were detected in 365 GC and 40 non-cancerous mucosa tissues by immunohistochemistry. Western blot for USP10 was performed on additional fresh GC tissues and GC cell lines. The expression level of USP10 in GC tissues was proved lower than that in non-cancerous mucosa tissues (p < 0.05). It was also lower in GC cell lines (AGS, BGC-823 and MKN45 cells) than that in gastric epithelial immortalized cell line (GES-1). Clinicopathological analysis showed that USP10 expression was negatively correlated with gastric wall invasion (p = 0.009), nodal metastasis (p = 0.002), and TNM stage (p = 0.000). In contrast, a positively correlation between the expression of USP10 and E-cadherin was found (p < 0.05), but there was no relationship proved between Ki67, p53 and USP10 (p > 0.05). On the Kaplan-Meier survival curves, we found poor prognosis in GC patients was associated with negative USP10 expression (p < 0.05). Moreover, USP10 expression was an independent prognostic factor for the overall survival in multivariate analysis. Our findings suggested that USP10 was an independent predictor of prognosis of GC patients.

  10. Differentially expressed genes in human peripheral blood as potential markers for statin response.

    PubMed

    Won, Hong-Hee; Kim, Suk Ran; Bang, Oh Young; Lee, Sang-Chol; Huh, Wooseong; Ko, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyung-Gun; McLeod, Howard L; O'Connell, Thomas M; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2012-02-01

    There is a considerable inter-individual variation in response to statin therapy and one third of patients do not meet their treatment goals. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes that might be involved in the effects of statin treatment and to suggest potential markers to guide statin therapy. Forty-six healthy Korean subjects received atorvastatin; their whole-genome expression profiles in peripheral blood were analyzed before and after atorvastatin administration in relation with changes in lipid profiles. The expression patterns of the differentially expressed genes were also compared with the data of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients and controls. Pairwise comparison analyses revealed differentially expressed genes involved in diverse biological processes and molecular functions related with immune responses. Atorvastain mainly affected antigen binding, immune or inflammatory response including interleukin pathways. Similar expression patterns of the genes were observed in patients with FH and controls. The Charcol-Leyden crystal (CLC), CCR2, CX3CR1, LRRN3, FOS, LDLR, HLA-DRB1, ERMN, and TCN1 genes were significantly associated with cholesterol levels or statin response. Interestingly, the CLC gene, which was significantly altered by atorvastatin administration and differentially expressed between FH patients and controls, showed much bigger change in high-responsive group than in low-responsive group. We identified differentially expressed genes that might be involved in mechanisms underlying the known pleiotropic effects of atorvastatin, baseline cholesterol levels, and drug response. Our findings suggest CLC as a new candidate marker for statin response, and further validation is needed.

  11. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-02-29

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo.

  12. Analysis of water soluble polysaccharides as a potential chemotaxonomic marker for landraces in Bixa orellana.

    PubMed

    Parimalan, Rangan; Mahendranath, Gondi; Giridhar, Parvatam

    2014-02-01

    Annatto tree (Bixa orellana L.) is native to Brazil and is now under cultivation in many parts of world for its reddish orange 'annatto' dye. There are three types of landraces in annatto and they are distinguished based on fruit shape i.e., ovate, conical and hemispherical, whose pigment yield differs. Since annatto pigment yield varies with landrace, it is necessary to characterize markers towards the identification of landraces. In this study, we characterized water soluble polysaccharides (WSP) of twigs from three landraces using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier-transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas liquid chromatography (GLC) for their potential use as chemotaxonomic markers to distinguish the landraces. GLC analysis on WSP showed hemispherical type contained 38% rhamnose, while conical and ovate types contained 17% and 34% glucose, respectively. Thus, glucose and rhamnose content of WSP could be used to distinguish the three landraces. Further, differences in calculated molecular weight as revealed by SEC (281.8, 151.3 and 79.4 kDa for conical, hemispherical and ovate types, respectively) could also be used to distinguish the three landraces. PMID:24791421

  13. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  14. Marine-continental tephra correlations (Pantelleria, Italy, and Ionian Basin): the potential for Mediterranean marker horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Palaeo-environmental records from marine and terrestrial archives in the Mediterranean show broad-scale and millennial-scale climatic changes. Synchronising these records requires robust chronological control which may be achieved using isochronous tephra marker horizons. These need to be widespread and sufficiently unique in chemistry to be distinguished from each other. Pantelleria volcano, Italy, satisfies these criteria, with eruptions blanketing the Mediterranean Sea and being distinct from every other volcano in the region. This peralkaline volcano is already well-known for its 46 ka marker horizon (Y-6) but there is potential for extending correlations further back in time. Until recently, correlations were limited by scarce onshore glass data and few sediment cores covering sufficiently long time periods to compare with Pantelleria's >200 ka explosive volcanic history. Building on recent work that has established a detailed onshore stratigraphy, glass data are presented from Pantelleria and site 964 of ODP leg 160 which is situated ~400 km downwind from the volcano. New correlations can be established and previous suggestions are discussed in the light of this new data, representing a significant step forward in confident marine-continental tephra correlations.

  15. The immunological contribution of NF-κB within the tumor microenvironment: A potential protective role of zinc as an anti-tumor agent

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Thakur, Archana; Li, Yiwei; Ahmad, Aamir; Azmi, Asfar S.; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Ali, Shadan; Lum, Lawrence G.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    Over decades, cancer treatment has been mainly focused on targeting cancer cells and not much attention to host tumor microenvironment. Recent advances suggest that the tumor microenvironment requires in-depth investigation for understanding the interactions between tumor cell biology and immunobiology in order to optimize therapeutic approaches. Tumor microenvironment consists of cancer cells and tumor associated reactive fibroblasts, infiltrating non-cancer cells, secreted soluble factors or molecules, and non-cellular support materials. Tumor associated host immune cells such as Th1, Th2, Th17, regulatory cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells are major components of the tumor microenvironment. Accumulating evidence suggests that these tumor associated immune cells may play important roles in cancer development and progression. However, the exact functions of these cells in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In the tumor microenvironment, NF-κB plays an important role in cancer development and progression because this is a major transcription factor which regulates immune functions within the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we will focus our discussion on the immunological contribution of NF-κB in tumor associated host immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. We will also discuss the potential protective role of zinc, a well-known immune response mediator, in the regulation of these immune cells and cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment especially because zinc could be useful for conditioning the tumor microenvironment toward innovative cancer therapy. PMID:22155217

  16. The Regulation and Function of Lactate Dehydrogenase A: Therapeutic Potential in Brain Tumor.

    PubMed

    Valvona, Cara J; Fillmore, Helen L; Nunn, Peter B; Pilkington, Geoffrey J

    2016-01-01

    There are over 120 types of brain tumor and approximately 45% of primary brain tumors are gliomas, of which glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive with a median survival rate of 14 months. Despite progress in our knowledge, current therapies are unable to effectively combat primary brain tumors and patient survival remains poor. Tumor metabolism is important to consider in therapeutic approaches and is the focus of numerous research investigations. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is a cytosolic enzyme, predominantly involved in anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect); however, it has multiple additional functions in non-neoplastic and neoplastic tissues, which are not commonly known or discussed. This review summarizes what is currently known about the function of LDHA and identifies areas that would benefit from further exploration. The current knowledge of the role of LDHA in the brain and its potential as a therapeutic target for brain tumors will also be highlighted. The Warburg effect appears to be universal in tumors, including primary brain tumors, and LDHA (because of its involvement with this process) has been identified as a potential therapeutic target. Currently, there are, however, no suitable LDHA inhibitors available for tumor therapies in the clinic.

  17. Potential role of the glycolytic oscillator in acute hypoxia in tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Fru, Leonard; Adamson, Erin B.; Campos, David D.; Fain, Sean B.; Jacques, Steven L.; van der Kogel, Albert J.; Nickel, Kwang P.; Song, Chihwa; Kimple, Randall J.; Kissick, Michael W.

    2015-12-01

    Tumor acute hypoxia has a dynamic component that is also, at least partially, coherent. Using blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging, we observed coherent oscillations in hemoglobin saturation dynamics in cell line xenograft models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We posit a well-established biochemical nonlinear oscillatory mechanism called the glycolytic oscillator as a potential cause of the coherent oscillations in tumors. These data suggest that metabolic changes within individual tumor cells may affect the local tumor microenvironment including oxygen availability and therefore radiosensitivity. These individual cells can synchronize the oscillations in patches of similar intermediate glucose levels. These alterations have potentially important implications for radiation therapy and are a potential target for optimizing the cancer response to radiation.

  18. Tumor-derived CCL-2 and CXCL-8 as possible prognostic markers of breast cancer: correlation with estrogen and progestrone receptor phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Maher, Sara; Abdel-Aty, Asmaa; Saad, A; Kazem, A; Demian, S R

    2009-01-01

    Prognosis of breast cancer is believed to be a multifactorial process best achieved by complex factors including host and tumor-derived biomarkers together with traditional clinicopathological parameters and tumor histologic markers. The present study aimed at evaluating the prognostic significance of chemokine ligand-2 (CCL-2) and interleukin-8 (CXCL-8) expression in extracts of breast carcinomas through correlation with clinicopathological aspects as well as estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) phenotyping. The study was conducted on 30 Egyptian breast cancer patients diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and subjected to modified radical mastectomy. Excised tissues were used to prepare tissue sections and extracts for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Expression of CCL-2 and CXCL-8 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 26 patients had invasive ductal carcinoma, grades II and III with metastasis to axillary lymph nodes and ER and PR positive phenotype. Expression of CCL-2 and CXCL-8 was significantly influenced by patient's age, menopausal status, nodal involvement, tumor grade and the ER phenotype. In contrast, it was not affected by either tumor size or PR staining pattern. Both chemokines correlated positively to each other and to tumor grade and negatively to age, menopausal status of patients and ER phenotyping. It is concluded that the angiogenic chemokine CXCL-8 and the macrophage chemoattractant CCL-2 might be useful prognostic markers where their routine follow up might be of importance in assessment of tumor aggressiveness in clinical settings.

  19. Tumor-derived CCL-2 and CXCL-8 as possible prognostic markers of breast cancer: correlation with estrogen and progestrone receptor phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Maher, Sara; Abdel-Aty, Asmaa; Saad, A; Kazem, A; Demian, S R

    2009-01-01

    Prognosis of breast cancer is believed to be a multifactorial process best achieved by complex factors including host and tumor-derived biomarkers together with traditional clinicopathological parameters and tumor histologic markers. The present study aimed at evaluating the prognostic significance of chemokine ligand-2 (CCL-2) and interleukin-8 (CXCL-8) expression in extracts of breast carcinomas through correlation with clinicopathological aspects as well as estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) phenotyping. The study was conducted on 30 Egyptian breast cancer patients diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and subjected to modified radical mastectomy. Excised tissues were used to prepare tissue sections and extracts for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Expression of CCL-2 and CXCL-8 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). 26 patients had invasive ductal carcinoma, grades II and III with metastasis to axillary lymph nodes and ER and PR positive phenotype. Expression of CCL-2 and CXCL-8 was significantly influenced by patient's age, menopausal status, nodal involvement, tumor grade and the ER phenotype. In contrast, it was not affected by either tumor size or PR staining pattern. Both chemokines correlated positively to each other and to tumor grade and negatively to age, menopausal status of patients and ER phenotyping. It is concluded that the angiogenic chemokine CXCL-8 and the macrophage chemoattractant CCL-2 might be useful prognostic markers where their routine follow up might be of importance in assessment of tumor aggressiveness in clinical settings. PMID:22059352

  20. Corpus Callosum Pathology as a Potential Surrogate Marker of Cognitive Impairment in Diffuse Axonal Injury.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Shiho; Ueda, Keita; Sugihara, Genichi; Yassin, Walid; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is a major form of traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychological assessments and high-resolution structural MRI were conducted using T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. This study included 10 patients with diffuse axonal injury (all men, mean age 30.8±10.5 years) and 12 age- and sex-matched normal control participants. Patients with diffuse axonal injury had widespread volume reductions and lower fractional anisotropy in the corpus callosum (CC) compared with controls. Furthermore, cognitive processing speed was associated with reductions in white matter volume and fractional anisotropy in the CC. These findings suggest that CC pathology may be a potential surrogate marker of the cognitive deficits in these patients. PMID:26569151

  1. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  2. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kourea, Helen; Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-07-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  3. An immature B cell population from peripheral blood serves as surrogate marker for monitoring tumor angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic therapy in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Fagiani, Ernesta; Bill, Ruben; Pisarsky, Laura; Ivanek, Robert; Rüegg, Curzio; Christofori, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Tumor growth depends on the formation of new blood vessels (tumor angiogenesis) either from preexisting vessels or by the recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells. Despite encouraging results obtained with preclinical cancer models, the therapeutic targeting of tumor angiogenesis has thus far failed to deliver an enduring clinical response in cancer patients. One major obstacle for improving anti-angiogenic therapy is the lack of validated biomarkers, which allow patient stratification for suitable treatment and a rapid assessment of therapy response. Toward these goals, we have employed several mouse models of tumor angiogenesis to identify cell populations circulating in their blood that correlated with the extent of tumor angiogenesis and therapy response. Flow cytometry analyses of different combinations of cell surface markers that define subsets of bone marrow-derived cells were performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from tumor-bearing and healthy mice. We identified one cell population, CD45(dim)VEGFR1(-)CD31(low), that was increased in levels during active tumor angiogenesis in a variety of transgenic and syngeneic transplantation mouse models of cancer. Treatment with various anti-angiogenic drugs did not affect CD45(dim)VEGFR1(-)CD31(low) cells in healthy mice, whereas in tumor-bearing mice, a consistent reduction in their levels was observed. Gene expression profiling of CD45(dim)VEGFR1(-)CD31(low) cells characterized these cells as an immature B cell population. These immature B cells were then directly validated as surrogate marker for tumor angiogenesis and of pharmacologic responses to anti-angiogenic therapies in various mouse models of cancer. PMID:26021306

  4. The tumor microenvironment: a potential arbitrator of the tumor suppressive and promoting actions of TGFbeta.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Nancy; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2002-12-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) members are secreted in biologically inactive complexes that must be activated in order to enable binding to their cell surface receptors. Interestingly, many of the proteins that can activate TGFbeta have been implicated in either suppressing or promoting tumorigenesis. Included among these are matrix proteins (thrombospondin-1), receptors (integrins alphanubeta6 and alphanubeta8) and proteases (matrix metalloproteases and plasmin). These proteins cannot only activate TGFbeta, but can also modulate cell responsiveness to TGFbeta. In this section, we review data highlighting the complexity and bidirectionality of TGFbeta matrix interactions within the tumor microenvironment, and propose that these dynamic interactions are a critical spatial and temporal determinant of the effects of TGFbeta on tumorigenesis.

  5. Maximum recovery potential of human tumor cells may predict clinical outcome in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.

    1987-05-01

    We studied inherent radiosensitivity/resistance (D0), ability to accumulate sublethal damage (n) and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in established human tumor cell lines as well as early passage human tumor cell lines derived from patients with known outcome following radiotherapy. Survival 24 hrs after treatment of human tumor cells with X rays in plateau phase cultures is a function of initial damage (D0, n), as well as recovery over 24 hrs (PLDR). A surviving fraction greater than .1 24 hrs following treatment with 7 Gy in plateau phase cultures is associated with tumor cell types (melanoma, osteosarcoma) with a high probability of radiotherapy failure or tumor cells derived from patients who actually failed radiotherapy. Therefore, total cellular recovery following radiation may be an important determinant of radiocurability. Accurate assays of radiotherapy outcome may need to account for all these radiobiological parameters.

  6. Endocrine markers for identifying prolificacy potential and predicting fetal number in goats.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Avijit; Pal, Saumen K; Chakraborty, Sandip; Hazorika, Mausumi; Pan, Subhransu; Majumdar, Debasis; Biswas, Chanchal K; Patra, Aditi; Mirmahmoudi, Rouhollah; Prakash, Bukkaaraya S

    2013-07-01

    Identifying prolificacy potential and determination of fetal number during pregnancy for proper care and management of the pregnant goats bearing multiple fetuses and achieving the benefits out of multiple births are essential for sustainable goat farming. Our objectives were (1) to examine prolificacy potential in goats by using pituitary response to gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge test, (2) to investigate hormonal profiles for the prediction of fetal number in pregnant goats and (3) to find out the most reliable timing of blood sampling for discriminating prolificacy trait and differentiating the goats bearing single, twin and triplet fetuses. In first experiment (GnRH challenge test), plasma FSH concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.01) among the goats belonging to triplet vs. twin vs. single kidding size groups after GnRH administration. Multivariate stepwise discriminant function analysis recognized that one blood sampling at 220min after GnRH administration can be used to distinguish prolificacy potential in goats. In second experiment, plasma progesterone levels were significantly higher (P<0.01) in goats bearing triplet vs. twin vs. single fetus between day 84 and 21 prior to parturition. Plasma estrone sulphate concentrations were found to be higher (P<0.05) in does bearing multiple fetuses than the does bearing single fetus between day 126 and 28 prior to parturition. A single blood sampling at day 63 prior to parturition was the most probable suitable time for discriminating kidding size by using plasma progesterone as marker. PMID:23787106

  7. Evaluation of Potential Clinical Surrogate Markers of a Trauma Induced Alteration of Clotting Factor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Payas, Arzu; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Wegner, Alexander; Kauther, Max Daniel; Lendemans, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify routinely available clinical surrogate markers for potential clotting factor alterations following multiple trauma. Methods. In 68 patients admitted directly from the scene of the accident, all soluble clotting factors were analyzed and clinical data was collected prospectively. Ten healthy subjects served as control group. Results. Patients showed reduced activities of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X and calcium levels (all P < 0.0001 to 0.01). Levels of hemoglobin and base deficit correlated moderately to highly with the activities of a number of clotting factors. Nonsurvivors and patients who needed preclinical intubation or hemostatic therapy showed significantly reduced factor activities at admission. In contrast, factor VIII activity was markedly elevated after injury in general (P < 0.0001), but reduced in nonsurvivors (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Multiple trauma causes an early reduction of the activities of nearly all soluble clotting factors in general. Initial hemoglobin and, with certain qualifications, base deficit levels demonstrated a potential value in detecting those underlying clotting factor deficiencies. Nevertheless, their role as triggers of a hemostatic therapy as well as the observed response of factor VIII to multiple trauma and also its potential prognostic value needs further evaluation. PMID:27433474

  8. Sandwich-format electrochemiluminescence assays for tumor marker based on PAMAM dendrimer-L-cysteine-hollow gold nanosphere nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Ying; Gui, Guofeng; Chai, Yaqin; Liao, Ni; Xiao, Kai; Yuan, Ruo

    2014-03-15

    In this work, a novel polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer-L-cysteine-hollow gold nanospheres nanocomposite was fabricated and used as the promoter for the peroxydisulfate/O2 ECL system to detect the concentration of the tumor marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Herein, the carboxyl-terminated PAMAM dendrimers were decorated with L-cysteine (L-Cys) by EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. Then, the hollow gold nanospheres (HGNPs) were employed as effective nano-carriers for the assembly of PAMAM-L-Cys via thiols-Au bonding, which was used for further loading of detection antibody (Ab2) to form the PAMAM-L-Cys-HGNPs-Ab2 bioconjugates. In the presence of target CEA, the sandwiched immuno-structure can be formed between the capture anti-CEA antibodies (Ab1), which self-assembled on deposited gold modified electrode, and the Ab2 on the PAMAM-L-Cys-HGNPs, thereby resulting in a proportional increase in ECL response, due to the significant enhancement of PAMAM-L-Cys-HGNPs toward peroxydisulfate/O2 ECL system. As a result, a sandwich ECL assay for CEA detection was developed with excellent sensitivity of a large concentration variation from 20 fg/mL to 1.0 ng/mL and a detection limit of 6.7 fg mL(-1).

  9. Sensitive detection of tumor marker CA15-3 in human serum by capillary electrophoretic immunoassay with chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ming; Zheng, Yan-Li; Cao, Jun-Tao; Chen, Yong-Hong; Li, Fu-Rong

    2008-04-01

    A new and sensitive non-competitive immunoassay (IA) for tumor marker carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) by CE coupling with ECL detection has been developed. This method is based on luminol-H(2)O(2 )reaction catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The optimum CE separation and CL detection conditions were investigated. After the non-competitive immunoreaction, the free HRP-labeled CA15-3 antibody (Ab*) and the bound Ab*-antigen (Ab*-Ag) complex were separated in a separation capillary and then catalyzed the CL reaction of luminol and H(2)O(2 )in a reaction capillary following the separation capillary. The calibration curve based on the peak areas of Ab*-Ag complex plotted against the concentrations of CA15-3 is in the range of 0-250 U/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9983 and the detection limit is 0.035 U/mL (S/N = 3). The response for five consecutive injections of 125 U/mL CA15-3 resulted in RSDs of 0.83% and 3.1% for the migration time and the peak area, respectively. The method was successfully used for the quantification of CA15-3 in human sera obtained from healthy persons and from patients with breast cancer.

  10. Towards intrinsic graphene biosensor: A label-free, suspended single crystalline graphene sensor for multiplex lung cancer tumor markers detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Bo; Cui, Tianhong

    2015-10-15

    Graphene biosensors reported so far are based on polycrystalline graphene flakes which are anchored on supporting substrates. The influence of grain boundary and the scattering from substrate drastically degrade the properties of graphene and conceal the performance of intrinsic graphene as a sensor. Here we report a label-free biosensor based on suspended single crystalline graphene (SCG), which can get rid of grain boundary and substrate scattering, revealing the biosensing mechanism of intrinsic graphene for the first time. Monolayer SCG flakes were derived from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) method. Multiplex detection of three different lung cancer tumor markers was realized. The suspended structure can largely improve the sensitivity and detection limit (0.1 pg/ml) of the sensor, and the single crystalline nature of SCG enable the biosensor to have superior uniformity compared to polycrystalline ones. The SCG sensors exhibit superb specificity and large linear detection range from 1 pg/ml to 1 μg/ml, showing the prominent advantages of graphene as a sensing material.

  11. Simultaneous analysis of neuroendocrine tumor markers by HPLC-electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Manickum, T

    2009-12-15

    A validated, high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for simultaneous quantitation of urinary catecholic acids 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymandelic acid (HMMA) (vanylmandelic acid) (VMA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylacetic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) was developed. Sample preparation involved liquid-liquid extraction of acidified urine, containing iso-HMMA (IS) as internal standard, with ether, evaporation of the organic extract, followed by reconstitution of the residue in phosphate buffer at pH 3.3. After reversed-phase HPLC at 35 degrees C and separation on a Licrospher 125mmx4mm C(18) column (5microm particle size) with phosphate buffer (pH 3.5)-acetone (950:50, v/v) as eluent, quantitation is achieved by electrochemical detection using coulometric detection at a potential of +350mV. The method was successfully applied to routine diagnosis of neuroblastoma, carcinoid syndrome and pheochromocytoma. PMID:19926540

  12. The effect of high level natural ionizing radiation on expression of PSA, CA19-9 and CEA tumor markers in blood serum of inhabitants of Ramsar, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad Hassan; Porghasem, Mohsen; Mirzaei, Nazanin; Mohseni, Jafar Hesam; Heidari, Matine; Azargashb, Eznollah; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Heidari, Reihane; Molouki, Aidin; Larijani, Leila

    2014-02-01

    Since several high level natural radiation areas (HLNRAs) exist on our planet, considerable attention has been drawn to health issues that may develop as the result of visiting or living in such places. City of Ramsar in Iran is an HNLRA, and is a tourist attraction mainly due to its hot spas. However, the growing awareness over its natural radiation sources has prompted widespread scientific investigation at national level. In this study, using an ELISA method, the level of expression of three tumor markers known as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and carcino antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in blood serum of 40 local men of Ramsar (subject group) was investigated and compared to 40 men from the city of Noshahr (control group). Noshahr was previously identified as a normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) that is some 85 km far from Ramsar. According to statistical analysis, there was a significant difference in the levels of PSA and CA19-9 markers between the two groups (p < 0.001) with those of Ramsar being considerably higher. CEA level did not show any difference. Although some of the volunteers tested positive to the markers, they were in good health as confirmed by the physician. Moreover, the high number of positive markers in Noshahr was considerable. Therefore, future study is needed to further validate this result and to determine the level of positivity to tumor markers in both cities.

  13. Multiplatform molecular profiling identifies potentially targetable biomarkers in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Gatalica, Zoran; Vranic, Semir; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Xiu, Joanne; Ocal, Idris Tolgay; McGill, John; Bender, Ryan P; Discianno, Erin; Schlum, Aaron; Sanati, Souzan; Palazzo, Juan; Reddy, Sandeep; Pockaj, Barbara

    2016-01-12

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare breast malignancy with sarcomatous overgrowth and with limited effective treatment options for recurrent and metastatic cases. Recent clinical trials indicated a potential for anti-angiogenic, anti-EGFR and immunotherapeutic approaches for patients with sarcomas, which led us to investigate these and other targetable pathways in malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Thirty-six malignant phyllodes tumors (including 8 metastatic tumors with two cases having matched primary and metastatic tumors) were profiled using gene sequencing, gene copy number analysis, whole genome expression, and protein expression. Whole genome expression analysis demonstrated consistent over-expression of genes involved in angiogenesis including VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2, VCAM1, PDGFRA, and PTTG1. EGFR protein overexpression was observed in 26/27 (96%) of cases with amplification of the EGFR gene in 8/24 (33%) cases. Two EGFR mutations were identified including EGFRvIII and a presumed pathogenic V774M mutation, respectively. The most common pathogenic mutations included TP53 (50%) and PIK3CA (15%). Cases with matched primary and metastatic tumors harbored identical mutations in both sites (PIK3CA/KRAS and RB1 gene mutations, respectively). Tumor expression of PD-L1 immunoregulatory protein was observed in 3/22 (14%) of cases. Overexpression of molecular biomarkers of increased angiogenesis, EGFR and immune checkpoints provides novel targeted therapy options in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast.

  14. Multiplatform molecular profiling identifies potentially targetable biomarkers in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Gatalica, Zoran; Vranic, Semir; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Xiu, Joanne; Ocal, Idris Tolgay; McGill, John; Bender, Ryan P.; Discianno, Erin; Schlum, Aaron; Sanati, Souzan; Palazzo, Juan; Reddy, Sandeep; Pockaj, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare breast malignancy with sarcomatous overgrowth and with limited effective treatment options for recurrent and metastatic cases. Recent clinical trials indicated a potential for anti-angiogenic, anti-EGFR and immunotherapeutic approaches for patients with sarcomas, which led us to investigate these and other targetable pathways in malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Thirty-six malignant phyllodes tumors (including 8 metastatic tumors with two cases having matched primary and metastatic tumors) were profiled using gene sequencing, gene copy number analysis, whole genome expression, and protein expression. Whole genome expression analysis demonstrated consistent over-expression of genes involved in angiogenesis including VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2, VCAM1, PDGFRA, and PTTG1. EGFR protein overexpression was observed in 26/27 (96%) of cases with amplification of the EGFR gene in 8/24 (33%) cases. Two EGFR mutations were identified including EGFRvIII and a presumed pathogenic V774M mutation, respectively. The most common pathogenic mutations included TP53 (50%) and PIK3CA (15%). Cases with matched primary and metastatic tumors harbored identical mutations in both sites (PIK3CA/KRAS and RB1 gene mutations, respectively). Tumor expression of PD-L1 immunoregulatory protein was observed in 3/22 (14%) of cases. Overexpression of molecular biomarkers of increased angiogenesis, EGFR and immune checkpoints provides novel targeted therapy options in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast. PMID:26625196

  15. All-graphene composite materials for signal amplification toward ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensing of tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Zhang, Lina; Yu, Jinghua; Ge, Shenguang; Song, Xianrang

    2015-09-15

    Graphene has shown great potential for use in biosensors because of its versatile surface modification, good water dispersibility, and extraordinary electrical conductivity. Here, a novel enzyme-free and all-graphene electrochemical immunosensor, based on two novel graphene nanocomposites, for the ultrasensitive immunosensing of α-fetoprotein (AFP) was reported. Noncovalent ultrathin gold nanowire functionalized graphene sheets (GNWs/GO) with the extraordinary biological and electrical properties, which exhibited high water solubility and further biological molecule functionalization, was prepared in situ solution phase to be used as an enhanced electrochemical sensing platform. In addition, a new electrocatalyst, CuS nanoparticle-decorated graphene (CuS/GO) composites was successfully prepared by a simple method for in situ growth of CuS on the surface of graphene sheets. Covalent binding of the detection antibody of AFP on the CuS/GO composites produced a sensitive electrochemical bioprobe for detection of AFP by sandwich immunosensing. The corresponding immunosensor, employing an inexpensive and portable 3D paper-based analytical device, possessed a wide calibration range of 0.001-10 ng mL(-1) and a low detection limit of 0.5 pg mL(-1) (S/N=3), which was successfully applied to the detection of AFP in serum samples from both healthy people and cancer patients. The present work thus demonstrated the promising application of graphene-based nanocomposites in developing highly sensitive, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective electrochemical biosensors.

  16. Molecular beacon-based quantitiation of epithelial tumor marker mucin 1.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seonmi; Nam, Hye Yeon; Lee, Eun Jeong; Jung, Woong; Hah, Sang Soo

    2012-10-01

    Mucin 1 (Muc1) is a glycoprotein expressed on most epithelial cell surfaces, which has been confirmed as a useful biomarker for the diagnosis of early cancers. In this study, we demonstrate that a quantum dot (QD)-aptamer beacon acts by folding-induced dissociation of a DNA intercalating dye, BOBO-3, in the presence of the target molecules, Muc1. Release of intercalated BOBO-3s from the QD-conjugated aptamers results in a decrease in QD fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-mediated BOBO-3 emission, allowing for label-free Muc1 detection and quantitation. We attain highly specific and wide-range detection (from 50nM to 20μM) of Muc1, suggesting that our QD-aptamer beacon can be a potential alternative to immuno-based assays for Muc1 detection. The detection methodology is expected to be improved for the early diagnosis of different types of epithelial cancers of large populations.

  17. Functional and molecular characterization of cancer stem-like cells in bladder cancer: a potential signature for muscle-invasive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Teixeira, Margarida; Parada, Belmiro; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Alves, Vera; Ramalho, José S.; Caramelo, Francisco; Sousa, Vitor; Reis, Flávio; Gomes, Célia M.

    2015-01-01

    Striking evidence associates cancer stem cells (CSCs) to the high recurrence rates and poor survival of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (BC). However, the prognostic implication of those cells in risk stratification is not firmly established, mainly due to the functional and phenotypic heterogeneity of CSCs populations, as well as, to the conflicting data regarding their identification based on a single specific marker. This emphasizes the need to exploit putative CSC-related molecular markers with potential prognostic significance in BC patients. This study aimed to isolate and characterize bladder CSCs making use of different functional and molecular approaches. The data obtained provide strong evidence that muscle-invasive BC is enriched with a heterogeneous stem-like population characterized by enhanced chemoresistance and tumor initiating properties, able to recapitulate the heterogeneity of the original tumor. Additionally, a logistic regression analysis identified a 2-gene stem-like signature (SOX2 and ALDH2) that allows a 93% accurate discrimination between non-muscle-invasive and invasive tumors. Our findings suggest that a stemness-related gene signature, combined with a cluster of markers to more narrowly refine the CSC phenotype, could better identify BC patients that would benefit from a more aggressive therapeutic intervention targeting CSCs population. PMID:26452033

  18. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Montzka, Katrin; Lassonczyk, Nina; Tschöke, Beate; Neuss, Sabine; Führmann, Tobias; Franzen, Rachelle; Smeets, Ralf; Brook, Gary A; Wöltje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b) are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP) could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as well as contributing to the

  19. CD14/TLR4 priming potentially recalibrates and exerts anti-tumor efficacy in tumor associated macrophages in a mouse model of pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Hridayesh; Nadella, Vinod; Singh, Sandhya; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth major cause of cancer related deaths in the world and 5 year survival is below 5%. Among various tumor directed therapies, stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLR) has shown promising effects in various tumor models. However, pancreatic cancer cells frequently express these receptors themselves and their stimulation (TLR 2 and/or 4 particularly) within tumor microenvironment is known to potentially enhance tumor cell proliferation and cancer progression. Consistent stimulation of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs), in particular with tumor derived TLR ligand within the tumor microenvironment promotes cancer related inflammation, which is sterile, non-immunogenic and carcinogenic in nature. In view of this, recalibrating of TAM has the potential to induce immunogenic inflammation. Consistent with this, we provide experimental evidence for the first time in this study that priming of TAMs with TLR4 ligend (LPS) alone or in combination with IFN-γ not only recalibrates pancreatic tumor cells induced M2 polarization, but also confers anti-tumor potential in TAMs. Most interestingly, reduced tumor growth in macrophage depleted animals suggests that macrophage directed approaches are important for the management of pancreatic tumors. PMID:27511884

  20. Fermented wheat aleurone enriched with probiotic strains LGG and Bb12 modulates markers of tumor progression in human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Borowicki, Anke; Michelmann, Anke; Stein, Katrin; Scharlau, Daniel; Scheu, Kerstin; Obst, Ursula; Glei, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fiber by the microflora enhances the levels of effective metabolites, which are potentially protective against colon cancer. The specific addition of probiotics may enhance the efficiency of fermentation of wheat aleurone, a source of dietary fiber. We investigated the effects of aleurone, fermented with fecal slurries with the addition of the probiotics LGG and Bb12 (aleurone(+)), on cell growth, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as expression of genes related to growth and apoptosis using two different human colon cell lines (HT29: adenocarcinoma cells; LT97: adenoma cells). The efficiency of fermentation of aleurone was only slightly enhanced by the addition of LGG/Bb12, resulting in an increased concentration of butyrate. In LT97 cells, the growth inhibition of aleurone(+) was stronger than in HT29 cells. In HT29 cells, a cell cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1) and the alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation, were enhanced by the fs aleurone(+). Treatment with all fermentation supernatants resulted in a significant increase in apoptosis and an upregulation of genes involved in cell growth and apoptosis (p21 and WNT2B). In conclusion, fs aleurone(+) modulated markers of cancer prevention, namely inhibition of cell growth and promotion of apoptosis as well as differentiation.

  1. Fermented wheat aleurone enriched with probiotic strains LGG and Bb12 modulates markers of tumor progression in human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Borowicki, Anke; Michelmann, Anke; Stein, Katrin; Scharlau, Daniel; Scheu, Kerstin; Obst, Ursula; Glei, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fiber by the microflora enhances the levels of effective metabolites, which are potentially protective against colon cancer. The specific addition of probiotics may enhance the efficiency of fermentation of wheat aleurone, a source of dietary fiber. We investigated the effects of aleurone, fermented with fecal slurries with the addition of the probiotics LGG and Bb12 (aleurone(+)), on cell growth, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as expression of genes related to growth and apoptosis using two different human colon cell lines (HT29: adenocarcinoma cells; LT97: adenoma cells). The efficiency of fermentation of aleurone was only slightly enhanced by the addition of LGG/Bb12, resulting in an increased concentration of butyrate. In LT97 cells, the growth inhibition of aleurone(+) was stronger than in HT29 cells. In HT29 cells, a cell cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1) and the alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation, were enhanced by the fs aleurone(+). Treatment with all fermentation supernatants resulted in a significant increase in apoptosis and an upregulation of genes involved in cell growth and apoptosis (p21 and WNT2B). In conclusion, fs aleurone(+) modulated markers of cancer prevention, namely inhibition of cell growth and promotion of apoptosis as well as differentiation. PMID:21161821

  2. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  3. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 as an early potential diagnostic marker for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaeho; Lee, Hye-Ja; Song, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang Ick; Kim, Hyunyoung

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in individuals over 65 years old. However, to date, no useful early diagnostic markers for AD have been discovered. We examined the utility of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a potential biomarker for AD in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD, as well as in nondemented healthy controls. Plasma PAI-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in samples collected from 76 patients with MCI, 74 patients with AD, and 76 healthy controls. Our results show that plasma PAI-1 levels gradually increased as dementia progressed. The mean levels of plasma PAI-1 in patients with MCI and AD patients were significantly higher than those of in healthy controls. Consistently, neuropsychological examination (e.g., MMSE, CDR) also demonstrated significant correlations between the plasma PAI-1 levels and cognitive function. In conclusion, the level of plasma PAI-1 is a potential biomarker for the early detection and diagnosis of AD.

  4. Sustained attention deficits in relation to psychometrically identified schizotypy: evaluating a potential endophenotypic marker.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Diane C; Matts, Christie W; Rollmann, Elizabeth A

    2006-02-15

    Sustained attention deficits have been posited as a potential endophenotypic marker of vulnerability to schizophrenia. Prior studies have indicated that schizophrenia patients, their first-degree relatives, and psychosis-prone individuals, identified on the basis of measures of positive schizotypy, have demonstrated sustained attention deficits. To date, there have been no published reports of sustained attention deficits in individuals with negative schizotypy, as measured by the revised Social Anhedonia Scale. In this study, we examined sustained attention, measured with the CPT-Identical Pairs version, in 160 individuals with elevated scores on the Chapman Perceptual Aberration and/or Magical Ideation Scales, 96 individuals with elevated scales on the Social Anhedonia Scale, and 137 controls. Both psychosis-prone groups performed more poorly than the controls in terms of discrimination ability, as measured by d', though the groups did not differ in terms of either their reaction time or overall response criterion (lnbeta). These results provide evidence that both positive and negative aspects of schizotypy are associated with sustained attention deficits, as measured by the Continuous Performance Test. The findings add to the converging evidence indicating that sustained attention deficits are a potential endophenotypic indicator of a schizophrenia diathesis.

  5. Genetic variants in DNA repair genes as potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin chemotherapy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kap, E J; Seibold, P; Richter, S; Scherer, D; Habermann, N; Balavarca, Y; Jansen, L; Becker, N; Pfütze, K; Popanda, O; Hoffmeister, M; Ulrich, A; Benner, A; Ulrich, C M; Burwinkel, B; Brenner, H; Chang-Claude, J

    2015-12-01

    Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy exerts its effects through generating DNA damage. Hence, genetic variants in DNA repair pathways could modulate treatment response. We used a prospective cohort of 623 colorectal cancer patients with stage II-IV disease treated with adjuvant/palliative chemotherapy to comprehensively investigate 1727 genetic variants in the DNA repair pathways as potential predictive markers for oxaliplatin treatment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associations with overall survival and recurrence-free survival were assessed using a Cox regression model. Pathway analysis was performed using the gamma method. Patients carrying variant alleles of rs3783819 (MNAT1) and rs1043953 (XPC) experienced a longer overall survival after treatment with oxaliplatin than patients who did not carry the variant allele, while the opposite association was found in patients who were not treated with oxaliplatin (false discovery rate-adjusted P-values for heterogeneity 0.0047 and 0.0237, respectively). The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway was found to be most likely associated with overall survival in patients who received oxaliplatin (P-value=0.002). Our data show that genetic variants in the NER pathway are potentially predictive of treatment response to oxaliplatin.

  6. Molecular markers and imaging tools to identify malignant potential in Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Due to its rapidly rising incidence and high mortality, esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major public health concern, particularly in Western countries. The steps involved in the progression from its predisposing condition, gastroesophageal reflux disease, to its premalignant disorder, Barrett’s esophagus, and to cancer, are incompletely understood. Current screening and surveillance methods are limited by the lack of population-wide utility, incomplete sampling of standard biopsies, and subjectivity of evaluation. Advances in endoscopic ablation have raised the hope of effective therapy for eradication of high-risk Barrett’s lesions, but improvements are needed in determining when to apply this treatment and how to follow patients clinically. Researchers have evaluated numerous potential molecular biomarkers with the goal of detecting dysplasia, with varying degrees of success. The combination of biomarker panels with epidemiologic risk factors to yield clinical risk scoring systems is promising. New approaches to sample tissue may also be combined with these biomarkers for less invasive screening and surveillance. The development of novel endoscopic imaging tools in recent years has the potential to markedly improve detection of small foci of dysplasia in vivo. Current and future efforts will aim to determine the combination of markers and imaging modalities that will most effectively improve the rate of early detection of high-risk lesions in Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25400987

  7. Gene expression profiling of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia reveals ADAMTS2 overexpression as a potential marker.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shang-Hui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) as an abnormal bone growth is one of the common fibro-osseous leasions (FOL) in oral and maxillofacial region, however, its etiology still remains unclear. Here, we performed gene expression profiling of FD using microarray analysis to explore the key molecule events in FD development, and develop potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets for FD. We found that 1,881 genes exhibited differential expression with more than two-fold changes in FD compared to normal bone tissues, including 1,200 upregulated genes and 681 downregulated genes. Pathway analysis indicated that obviously activated pathways are Ribosome and ECM-receptor interaction pathways; downregulated pathways are "Hepatitis C" and "cancer" signaling pathways. We further validated the expression of ADAMTS2, one of most differentiated expressed genes, by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 40 of FD cases. Results showed that ADAMTS2 was significantly overexpressed in FD tissues, but rarely expressed in normal bone tissues, suggesting that ADAMTS2 could be a potential biomarker for FD. Thus, this study uncovered differentially expressed candidate genes in FD, which provides pilot data for understanding FD pathogenesis, and developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and targeting of FD.

  8. [Clinical evaluation of the tumor marker CA 19-9 in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in surgical pre- and postoperative diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M; Happ, J; Hottenrott, C; Maul, F D; Baum, R P; Hör, G; Encke, A

    1986-02-01

    A new tumor marker (CA 19-9) was investigated. CA 19-9 is a tumor-associated antigen which is detected by a monoclonal antibody. CA 19-9 (CIS-Centocor) was compared simultaneously with CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) in 347 patients. 123 patients with gastrointestinal tumors showed a sensitivity of 31% for CA 19-9 (CEA 49%), combination increased sensitivity to 58%. The highest sensitivity was found in pancreas carcinoma (CA 19-9 75%, CEA 66%, combination 92%); it was lower in gastric, colon, and oesophagus carcinomas. In relapsed colorectal carcinomas sensitivity was 53% (CEA 78%, combination 85%). In cases of relapse, tumor markers may become positive even if they were not detectable before resection of the primary tumor. Specificity for CA 19-9 was 100% (CEA 84%) compared to a group of non-malignant diseases including patients with inflammations and patients with nicotin abuse (n = 102). Because of its high specificity and superior sensitivity to CEA in pancreas carcinomas CA 19-9 should be determined in primary and relapse diagnosis in combination with CEA. PMID:3459133

  9. [Clinical evaluation of the tumor marker CA 19-9 in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in surgical pre- and postoperative diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M; Happ, J; Hottenrott, C; Maul, F D; Baum, R P; Hör, G; Encke, A

    1986-02-01

    A new tumor marker (CA 19-9) was investigated. CA 19-9 is a tumor-associated antigen which is detected by a monoclonal antibody. CA 19-9 (CIS-Centocor) was compared simultaneously with CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) in 347 patients. 123 patients with gastrointestinal tumors showed a sensitivity of 31% for CA 19-9 (CEA 49%), combination increased sensitivity to 58%. The highest sensitivity was found in pancreas carcinoma (CA 19-9 75%, CEA 66%, combination 92%); it was lower in gastric, colon, and oesophagus carcinomas. In relapsed colorectal carcinomas sensitivity was 53% (CEA 78%, combination 85%). In cases of relapse, tumor markers may become positive even if they were not detectable before resection of the primary tumor. Specificity for CA 19-9 was 100% (CEA 84%) compared to a group of non-malignant diseases including patients with inflammations and patients with nicotin abuse (n = 102). Because of its high specificity and superior sensitivity to CEA in pancreas carcinomas CA 19-9 should be determined in primary and relapse diagnosis in combination with CEA.

  10. Cell Cycle Regulating Kinase Cdk4 as a Potential Target for Tumor Cell Treatment and Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Franziska; Koehler, Lena; Kniess, Torsten; Wuest, Frank; Mosch, Birgit; Pietzsch, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-cyclin D/retinoblastoma (pRb)/E2F cascade, which controls the G1/S transition of cell cycle, has been found to be altered in many neoplasias. Inhibition of this pathway by using, for example, selective Cdk4 inhibitors has been suggested to be a promising approach for cancer therapy. We hypothesized that appropriately radiolabeled Cdk4 inhibitors are suitable probes for tumor imaging and may be helpful studying cell proliferation processes in vivo by positron emission tomography. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological, biochemical, and radiopharmacological characterizations of two 124I-labeled small molecule Cdk4 inhibitors (8-cyclopentyl-6-iodo-5-methyl-2-(4-piperazin-1-yl-phenylamino)-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-7-one (CKIA) and 8-cyclopentyl-6-iodo-5-methyl-2-(5-(piperazin-1-yl)-pyridin-2-yl-amino)-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (CKIB)). Our data demonstrate a defined and specific inhibition of tumor cell proliferation through CKIA and CKIB by inhibition of the Cdk4/pRb/E2F pathway emphasizing potential therapeutic benefit of CKIA and CKIB. Furthermore, radiopharmacological properties of [124I]CKIA and [124I]CKIB observed in human tumor cells are promising prerequisites for in vivo biodistribution and imaging studies. PMID:19551155

  11. Chemotherapy stimulates syndecan-1 shedding: A potentially negative effect of treatment that may promote tumor relapse

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Vishnu C.; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with multiple myeloma, the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138) is shed from the surface of tumor cells and accumulates in the serum and within the extracellular matrix of the bone marrow where it promotes tumor growth and metastasis. In the present study we discovered that commonly used anti-myeloma drugs stimulate syndecan-1 shedding both in vitro and in animals bearing myeloma tumors. Enhanced shedding is accompanied by increased syndecan-1 synthesis prior to drug induced tumor cell death. Addition of a caspase inhibitor blocks the drug-induced shedding of syndecan-1 in vitro indicating that shedding is linked to the onset of apoptosis. ADAMs inhibitors or siRNA targeting ADAMs blocked drug-induced shedding suggesting that up regulation or activation of ADAMs is responsible for cleaving syndecan-1 from the tumor cell surface. These results reveal that myeloma chemotherapy stimulates synthesis and shedding of syndecan-1, a potentially negative side effect that may lead to accumulation of high levels of syndecan-1 to establish a microenvironment that nurtures relapse and promotes tumor progression. Interestingly, we also found that chemotherapeutic drugs stimulated syndecan-1 shedding from pancreatic cancer cells as well, indicating that drug-induced shedding of syndecan-1 may occur in many cancer types. Overall, our results indicate that use of metalloproteinase inhibitors (to inhibit syndecan-1 shedding) in combination with chemotherapy may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent re-establishment of a microenvironment conducive for tumor relapse. PMID:24145151

  12. Tumor necrosis factor and its receptors in human ovarian cancer. Potential role in disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, M S; Stamp, G W; Foulkes, W D; Eccles, D; Balkwill, F R

    1993-01-01

    The gene for tumor necrosis factor, TNF, was expressed in 45 out of 63 biopsies of human epithelial ovarian cancer. In serous tumors, there was a positive correlation between level of TNF expression and tumor grade. TNF mRNA was found in epithelial tumor cells and infiltrating macrophages, whereas TNF protein localized primarily to a subpopulation of macrophages within and in close proximity to tumor areas. mRNA and protein for the p55 TNF receptor gene localized to the tumor epithelium and tumor, but not to stromal macrophages. The p75 TNF receptor was confined to infiltrating cells. Cells expressing TNF mRNA were also found in ovarian cancer ascites and TNF protein was detected in some ascitic fluids. In 2 out of 12 biopsies of normal ovary, TNF mRNA was detected in a minority of cells in the thecal layer of the corpus luteum. Serum levels of TNF and its soluble receptor did not correlate with extent of TNF expression in matched biopsies. Northern and Southern analysis revealed no gross abnormality of the TNF gene. The coexpression of TNF and its receptor in ovarian cancer biopsies suggests the capacity for autocrine/paracrine action. TNF antagonists may have therapeutic potential in this malignancy. Images PMID:8387543

  13. Tissue microarray-based study of hepatocellular carcinoma validating SPIB as potential clinical prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Yueh-Min; Huang, Yen-Chi; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Lin, Liang-In; Lu, Jeng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the prognostic significance of SPIB protein overexpression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of SPIB expression in human HCC in order to determine possible correlations between SPIB expression and clinicopathological findings. The expression of SPIB proteins was detected using immunohistochemical staining in commercial multiple-tissue microarrays as a means of examining expression profiles in patients. Using online biomarker validation tool SurvExpress, we focused on the correlation between SPIB overexpression and survival as well as relapse-free survival (RFS). Results show that SPIB protein expression levels were significantly higher in colon, liver, and stomach tumors than in non-tumor tissues (p<0.05). SPIB overexpression in patients with HCC was also significantly higher than that of the normal samples (p<0.001). Among patients with liver disease, SPIB protein expression levels differ significantly according to the stage of liver disease, specifically between stages I, II, and III of HCC (p<0.05). SPIB expression was also shown to be significantly correlated with age (p=0.046) and histological grade (p=0.027). Furthermore, the SurvExpress analysis suggested that high SPIB and KI-67 mRNA expression were significantly associated with the poor survival of patients with HCC (p<0.05). Our results indicate that cross-talk in the expression of SPIB and KI-67 may be associated with poor prognosis and may potentially serve as a clinical prognostic indicator of HCC. This is the first time that such an association has been reported. PMID:26610895

  14. Stromal interactions as regulators of tumor growth and therapeutic response: A potential target for photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Celli, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    It has become increasingly widely recognized that the stroma plays several vital roles in tumor growth and development and that tumor-stroma interactions can in many cases account poor therapeutic response. Inspired by an emerging body of literature, we consider the potential role of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting interactions with stromal fibroblasts and mechano-sensitive signaling with the extracellular matrix as a means to drive tumors toward a more therapeutically responsive state and synergize with other treatments. This concept is particularly relevant for cancer of the pancreas, which is characterized by tumors with a profoundly dense, rigid fibrous stroma. Here we introduce new in vitro systems to model interactions between pancreatic tumors and their mechanical microenvironment and restore signaling with stromal fibroblasts. Using one such model as a test bed it is shown here that PDT treatment is able to destroy fibroblasts in an in vitro 3D pancreatic tumor-fibroblast co-culture. These results and the literature suggest the further development of PDT as a potential modality for stromal depletion. PMID:23457416

  15. Identification and evaluation of potential forensic marker proteins in vaginal fluid by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Igoh, Akihisa; Doi, Yusuke; Sakurada, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal fluid is one of the most common body fluids found at crime scenes. Discriminating vaginal fluid from other body fluids is important in forensic science; however, few potential protein markers have been reported to date. Proteomic methods for identifying protein markers have gained attention, although few reports have applied this technology to forensic protein markers. Therefore, to identify characteristic vaginal proteins, we examined various body fluids (nasal secretions, saliva, urine, semen, vaginal fluids, and sweat) using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting. We identified three components (average molecular mass values 17,237 ± 2, 18,063 ± 2, and 15,075 ± 1) detectable only in vaginal samples: two human small proline-rich protein 3 (SPRR3) isoforms and a human fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) with an acetylated (+42) N-terminal region lacking the initiator methionine residue (-131). Using ELISA, these yielded markedly high average values in vaginal fluids. The mass spectra of these proteins were not detected in infant saliva but were detected in the vaginal fluid throughout the menstrual cycle. The results of forensic analysis (detection limit, mixed body fluid samples, casework samples, and blind samples) suggest that these proteins are potential forensic markers. In conclusion, high SPRR3 and FABP5 expression levels, which may be used as potential markers for vaginal fluid identification in forensic science, were detected in vaginal fluids from healthy adults.

  16. Association of folate deficiency and selected tumor marker concentrations in long-term hexavalent chromium exposed population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Cheng; Song, Yan-Shuang; Yu, Shan-Fa; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Hui; Gu, Yong-En; Chen, Tian; Jia, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Both hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] exposure and folate deficiency have been associated with increased cancer risks. Our previous studies have found folate deficiency in Cr (VI) exposed population. Here the relationship between some tumor markers and folate status in long-term Cr (VI) exposure was investigated carefully to show the multiple aspects of Cr (VI) carcinogenesis. A group of 115 workers occupationally exposed to chromate and 60 matched, unexposed controls in Shandong province of China were recruited. Environmental and biological exposure assessments including personal exposure to airborne Cr and Cr contents in erythrocytes were performed. Serum folate, plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and plasma carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), neuron specific enolase (NSE), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC), cytokeratin fragment antigen 21-1 (CYFRA 21-1), cancer antigen 72-4 (CA72-4), as well as α-fetoprotein (AFP) were measured. Smoking index (SI) was also calculated to discriminate possible confounding effects of smoking status. Serum folate level decreased significantly, while plasma tHcy, CEA, NSE, SCC, CYFRA21-1, CA72-4 and AFP concentrations increased significantly after Cr (VI) exposure. Meanwhile, plasma CEA, NSE and SCC were negatively correlated with serum folate. SI was negatively correlated with serum folate but positively correlated with plasma tHcy, CEA and NSE levels. Present study suggests that folate deficiency was associated with increased cancer risks and might be affected by smoking in Cr (VI) exposed population. Folate might play a key role in Cr (VI) carcinogenesis although further detailed investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of this process. PMID:23623598

  17. Potential clinical utility of ultrasensitive circulating tumor DNA detection with CAPP-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Bratman, Scott V.; Newman, Aaron M.; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Tumors continually shed DNA into the circulation, where it can be non-invasively accessed. The ability to accurately detect circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) could significantly impact the management of patients with nearly every cancer type. Quantitation of ctDNA could allow objective response assessment, detection of minimal residual disease, and non-invasive tumor genotyping. The latter application overcomes the barriers currently limiting repeated tumor tissue sampling during therapy. Recent technical advancements have improved upon the sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility of ctDNA detection and promise to enable innovative clinical applications. In this review, we focus on the potential clinical utility of ctDNA analysis using CAPP-Seq (CAncer Personalized Profiling by deep Sequencing), a novel next-generation sequencing-based approach for ultrasensitive ctDNA detection. Applications of CAPP-Seq for the personalization of cancer detection and therapy are discussed. PMID:25773944

  18. The Potential of Intralesional Rose Bengal to Stimulate T-Cell Mediated Anti-Tumor Responses

    PubMed Central

    Maker, Ajay V; Prabhakar, Bellur; Pardiwala, Krunal

    2015-01-01

    Rose Bengal (RB) is a red synthetic dye that was initially used in the garment industry and has been used safely for decades as a corneal stain by ophthalmologists. Antineoplastic properties of RB have also been observed, though the mechanism of action remained to be elucidated. Recently, interest in RB as a therapeutic cancer treatment has increased due to significant anti-tumor responses with direct tumor injection in human clinical trials for metastatic melanoma. In these patients, there has been the implication that RB may mount a T-cell mediated anti-tumor response and impart antigen-specific responses in distant bystander lesions. This article serves to evaluate the potential of intralesional rose bengal to stimulate T-cell mediated anti-tumor responses in in-vitro, pre-clinical, and clinical studies. PMID:26618054

  19. 4-1BB Agonists: Multi-Potent Potentiators of Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Curran, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a rapidly expanding field of oncology aimed at targeting, not the tumor itself, but the immune system combating the cancerous lesion. Of the many approaches currently under study to boost anti-tumor immune responses; modulation of immune co-receptors on lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment has thus far proven to be the most effective. Antibody blockade of the T cell co-inhibitory receptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) has become the first FDA approved immune checkpoint blockade; however, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes express a diverse array of additional stimulatory and inhibitory co-receptors, which can be targeted to boost tumor immunity. Among these, the co-stimulatory receptor 4-1BB (CD137/TNFSF9) possesses an unequaled capacity for both activation and pro-inflammatory polarization of anti-tumor lymphocytes. While functional studies of 4-1BB have focused on its prominent role in augmenting cytotoxic CD8 T cells, 4-1BB can also modulate the activity of CD4 T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. 4-1BB’s expression on both T cells and antigen presenting cells, coupled with its capacity to promote survival, expansion, and enhanced effector function of activated T cells, has made it an alluring target for tumor immunotherapy. In contrast to immune checkpoint blocking antibodies, 4-1BB agonists can both potentiate anti-tumor and anti-viral immunity, while at the same time ameliorating autoimmune disease. Despite this, 4-1BB agonists can trigger high grade liver inflammation which has slowed their clinical development. In this review, we discuss how the underlying immunobiology of 4-1BB activation suggests the potential for therapeutically synergistic combination strategies in which immune adverse events can be minimized. PMID:26106583

  20. Expression of T-plastin, FoxP3 and other tumor-associated markers by leukemic T-cells of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Elisabetta; Vonderheid, Eric C; Thoburn, Christopher J; Wasik, Mariusz A; Bahler, David W; Hess, Allan D

    2008-06-01

    Peripheral blood cells from 28 patients with leukemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma including 25 patients with Sezary syndrome were evaluated for expression of regulatory T-cell-associated markers (FoxP3, CD25, CTLA-4, neurophilin-1), T-cell activation markers (CD28 and its ligands B7.1 and B7.2) and NK cell-associated markers (NKG2D and its ligands Mic-A and Mic-B) using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. T-plastin served as a positive genetic marker, and its expression correlated to blood tumor burden. More than 90% of samples had transcripts for CD28 and Mic-B, but less than 30% of samples expressed FoxP3, CTLA-4 and CD25. Expression of Mic-B by neoplastic cells could provide another mechanism to inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. FoxP3 expression correlated with a poor prognosis. Although the underlying mechanisms accounting for this correlation remain unclear, the expression of the Foxp3 and CTLA-4 regulatory elements indicates that a subset of leukemic cases displays a regulatory T-cell phenotype.

  1. A hierarchy of event-related potential markers of auditory processing in disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Beukema, Steve; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Finoia, Paola; Kamau, Evelyn; Allanson, Judith; Chennu, Srivas; Gibson, Raechelle M; Pickard, John D; Owen, Adrian M; Cruse, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging of covert perceptual and cognitive processes can inform the diagnoses and prognoses of patients with disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states (VS;MCS). Here we report an event-related potential (ERP) paradigm for detecting a hierarchy of auditory processes in a group of healthy individuals and patients with disorders of consciousness. Simple cortical responses to sounds were observed in all 16 patients; 7/16 (44%) patients exhibited markers of the differential processing of speech and noise; and 1 patient produced evidence of the semantic processing of speech (i.e. the N400 effect). In several patients, the level of auditory processing that was evident from ERPs was higher than the abilities that were evident from behavioural assessment, indicating a greater sensitivity of ERPs in some cases. However, there were no differences in auditory processing between VS and MCS patient groups, indicating a lack of diagnostic specificity for this paradigm. Reliably detecting semantic processing by means of the N400 effect in passively listening single-subjects is a challenge. Multiple assessment methods are needed in order to fully characterise the abilities of patients with disorders of consciousness. PMID:27595064

  2. Assessment of volatile profile as potential marker of chilling injury of basil leaves during postharvest storage.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Rosaria; Pace, Bernardo; Cefola, Maria; Martignetti, Antonella; Stocchero, Matteo; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Giulio, Beatrice

    2016-12-15

    The volatile profile of three sweet basil cultivars, "Italico a foglia larga", "Cammeo" and "Italiano classico", packaged in air at 4 or 12°C until 9days, was monitored by solid phase microextraction with GC-MS. Chilling injury (CI) score and electrolyte leakage were also assessed. In total, 71 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified in the headspace of basil samples. A preliminary principal component analysis highlighted the dominant effect of the cultivar on VOCs profiles. Data analysis by post-transformation of projection to latent structures regression (ptPLS2) clarified the role played by time and temperature of storage. Temperature influenced the emission of volatiles during storage, with much lower total volatile emissions at 4°C compared to 12°C. Finally, a ptPLS2 regression model performed on VOCs and the two CI parameters allowed selection of 10 metabolites inversely correlated to both CI parameters, which can be considered potential markers of CI in basil leaves. PMID:27451192

  3. Gpnmb Is a Potential Marker for the Visceral Pathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aten, Jan; van Roomen, Cindy P. A. A.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Claessen, Nike; Alfonso, Pilar; Irún, Pilar; Giraldo, Pilar; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; van Eijk, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Impaired function of NPC1 or NPC2 lysosomal proteins leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol, the primary defect underlying Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease. In addition, glycosphingolipids (GSLs) accumulate in lysosomes as well. Intralysosomal lipid accumulation triggers the activation of a set of genes, including potential biomarkers. Transcript levels of Gpnmb have been shown to be elevated in various tissues of an NPC mouse model. We speculated that Gpnmb could serve as a marker for visceral lipid accumulation in NPC disease. We report that Gpnmb expression is increased at protein level in macrophages in the viscera of Npc1nih/nih mice. Interestingly, soluble Gpnmb was also found to be increased in murine and NPC patient plasma. Exposure of RAW264.7 macrophages to the NPC-phenotype-inducing drug U18666A also upregulated Gpnmb expression. Inhibition of GSL synthesis with the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor N-butyl-1-deoxynojirimycin prevented U18666A-induced Gpnmb induction and secretion. In summary, we show that Gpnmb is upregulated in NPC mice and patients, most likely due to GSL accumulation. PMID:26771826

  4. Gpnmb Is a Potential Marker for the Visceral Pathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    PubMed

    Marques, André R A; Gabriel, Tanit L; Aten, Jan; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Claessen, Nike; Alfonso, Pilar; Irún, Pilar; Giraldo, Pilar; Aerts, Johannes M F G; van Eijk, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Impaired function of NPC1 or NPC2 lysosomal proteins leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified cholesterol, the primary defect underlying Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease. In addition, glycosphingolipids (GSLs) accumulate in lysosomes as well. Intralysosomal lipid accumulation triggers the activation of a set of genes, including potential biomarkers. Transcript levels of Gpnmb have been shown to be elevated in various tissues of an NPC mouse model. We speculated that Gpnmb could serve as a marker for visceral lipid accumulation in NPC disease. We report that Gpnmb expression is increased at protein level in macrophages in the viscera of Npc1nih/nih mice. Interestingly, soluble Gpnmb was also found to be increased in murine and NPC patient plasma. Exposure of RAW264.7 macrophages to the NPC-phenotype-inducing drug U18666A also upregulated Gpnmb expression. Inhibition of GSL synthesis with the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor N-butyl-1-deoxynojirimycin prevented U18666A-induced Gpnmb induction and secretion. In summary, we show that Gpnmb is upregulated in NPC mice and patients, most likely due to GSL accumulation. PMID:26771826

  5. Surgical treatment of potentially primary malignant adrenal tumors: an unresolved issue.

    PubMed

    Zografos, George N; Perysinakis, Iraklis; Kyrodimou, Eustathia; Kassi, Eva; Kaltsas, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Although the great majority of incidentalomas are adrenocortical adenomas, a number of them, depending on the size and radiological characteristics of the lesions, will turn out to be carcinomas. These tumors may present as suspicious on initial evaluation and potentially malignant or malignant on histology. Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy with evolving diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Laparoscopic surgery has become the gold standard for surgery of benign adrenal tumors. Despite the extensive experience gained in laparoscopic adrenalectomy, controversy still remains in the management of adrenal tumors with high suspicion or evidence of malignancy. The aim of this review is to update the existing information regarding the diagnostic approach and surgical management of suspicious and potentially malignant primary adrenal tumors.The interpretation of radiologic characteristics is a cornerstone in pre-operative assessment of large adrenal masses, since open surgery remains the preferred procedure when malignancy is suspected in large tumors with possible local invasion. Despite the improvement of imaging techniques, they lack sufficient accuracy to exclude primary malignancy in tumors from 4 cm to 10 cm in size. An initial laparoscopic approach can be used in this group of patients, but early conversion to open technique is mandatory if curative resection cannot be performed. Adrenal tumors >10 cm of malignant potential should be treated by the open approach from the start. Solitary adrenal metastasis from another primary malignancy is usually amenable to laparoscopic surgery. Patients with suspected adrenal cancer should be referred to tertiary centers that perform laparoscopic and open adrenal surgery with minimal morbidity and mortality.

  6. Event-related potential markers of brain changes in preclinical familial Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Ally, B.A.; Celone, K.; McKeever, J.; Ruiz-Rizzo, A.L.; Lopera, F.; Stern, C.E.; Budson, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Event-related potentials (ERPs) can reflect differences in brain electrophysiology underlying cognitive functions in brain disorders such as dementia and mild cognitive impairment. To identify individuals at risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) we used high-density ERPs to examine brain physiology in young presymptomatic individuals (average age 34.2 years) who carry the E280A mutation in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene and will go on to develop AD around the age of 45. Methods: Twenty-one subjects from a Colombian population with familial AD participated: 10 presymptomatic subjects positive for the PSEN1 mutation (carriers) and 11 siblings without the mutation (controls). Subjects performed a visual recognition memory test while 128-channel ERPs were recorded. Results: Despite identical behavioral performance, PSEN1 mutation carriers showed less positivity in frontal regions and more positivity in occipital regions, compared to controls. These differences were more pronounced during the 200–300 msec period. Discriminant analysis at this time interval showed promising sensitivity (72.7%) and specificity (81.8%) of the ERP measures to predict the presence of AD pathology. Conclusions: Presymptomatic PSEN1 mutation carriers show changes in brain physiology that can be detected by high-density ERPs. The relative differences observed showing greater frontal positivity in controls and greater occipital positivity in carriers indicates that control subjects may use frontally mediated processes to distinguish between studied and unstudied visual items, whereas carriers appear to rely more upon perceptual details of the items to distinguish between them. These findings also demonstrate the potential usefulness of ERP brain correlates as preclinical markers of AD. PMID:21775732

  7. Vitamin D receptor expression is linked to potential markers of human thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Izkhakov, Elena; Somjen, Dalia; Sharon, Orli; Knoll, Esther; Aizic, Asaf; Fliss, Dan M; Limor, Rona; Stern, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Genes regulated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been screened as potential markers of malignant thyroid nodules. The mRNA expression levels of two of them, the ECM protein-1 (ECM1) and the type II transmembrane serine protease-4 (TMPRSS4), were shown to be an independent predictor of an existing thyroid carcinoma. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in epithelial cells of the normal thyroid gland, as well as in malignant dividing cells, which respond to the active metabolite of vitamin D by decreased proliferative activity in vitro. We evaluated the relationship between mRNA gene expressions of TMPRSS4, ECM1 and VDR in 21 papillary thyroid carcinoma samples and compared it to 21 normal thyroid tissues from the same patients. Gene expression was considered as up- or down-regulated if it varied by more or less than 2-fold in the cancer tissue relative to the normal thyroid tissue (Ca/N) from the same patient. We found an overall significant adjusted correlation between the mRNA expression ratio (ExR) of VDR and that of ECM1 in Ca/N thyroid tissue (R=0.648, P<0.001). There was a high ExR of VDR between Ca/N thyroid tissue from the same patient (3.06±2.9), which also exhibited a high Ca/N ExR of ECM1 and/or of TMPRSS4 (>2, P=0.05).The finding that increased VDR expression in human thyroid cancer cells is often linked to increased ECM1 and/or TPMRSS4 expression warrants further investigation into the potential role of vitamin D analogs in thyroid carcinoma.

  8. Global Gene Expression Profiling Reveals SPINK1 as a Potential Hepatocellular Carcinoma Marker

    PubMed Central

    Kutter, Claudia; Davies, Susan; Alexander, Graeme; Odom, Duncan T.

    2013-01-01

    potential as a diagnostic HCC marker and should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:23527199

  9. The potential diagnostic power of circulating tumor cell analysis for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kirsty; Pailler, Emma; Faugeroux, Vincent; Taylor, Melissa; Oulhen, Marianne; Auger, Nathalie; Planchard, David; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lindsay, Colin R; Besse, Benjamin; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), genotyping tumor biopsies for targetable somatic alterations has become routine practice. However, serial biopsies have limitations: they may be technically difficult or impossible and could incur serious risks to patients. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offer an alternative source for tumor analysis that is easily accessible and presents the potential to identify predictive biomarkers to tailor therapies on a personalized basis. Examined here is our current knowledge of CTC detection and characterization in NSCLC and their potential role in EGFR-mutant, ALK-rearranged and ROS1-rearranged patients. This is followed by discussion of the ongoing issues such as the question of CTC partnership as diagnostic tools in NSCLC. PMID:26564313

  10. Bromodomain-containing protein 7 (BRD7) as a potential tumor suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiu-Zhong; Tang, Yan; Wang, Qi-Jing; Pan, Ke; Huang, Li-Xi; He, Jia; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Jiang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Zi-Qi; Weng, De-Sheng; Xia, Jian-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomain-containing protein 7 (BRD7) is a subunit of the PBAF complex, which functions as a transcriptional cofactor for the tumor suppressor protein p53. Down-regulation of BRD7 has been demonstrated in multiple types of cancer. This study aimed to investigate BRD7 expression and its tumor suppressive effect in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The expression of BRD7 was examined in clinical specimens of primary HCC and in HCC cell lines through real-time quantitative PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. The prognostic value of BRD7 expression and its correlation with the clinicopathological features of HCC patients were statistically analyzed. The effect of BRD7 on the tumorigenicity of HCC was also examined using proliferation and colony-formation assays, cell-cycle assays, migration and cell-invasion assays, and xenograft nude mouse models. BRD7 was down-regulated in tumor tissues and HCC cell lines. BRD7 protein expression was strongly associated with clinical stage and tumor size. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed higher survival rates in patients with higher BRD7 expression levels compared to those with lower BRD7 levels. A multivariate analysis indicated that BRD7 expression was an independent prognostic marker. The re-introduction of BRD7 expression significantly inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion and led to cell cycle arrest in HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, experiments in mice suggested that BRD7 overexpression suppresses HCC tumorigenicity in vivo. In conclusions, our data indicated that BRD7 may serve as a tumor suppressor in HCC and may be a novel molecular target for the treatment of HCC. PMID:26919247

  11. Giant breast tumors: Surgical management of phyllodes tumors, potential for reconstructive surgery and a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Margaret I; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Patterson, Cynthia C; McKelvey, Michael T; Gordillo, Gayle; Nuovo, Gerard J; Carson, William E

    2008-01-01

    Background Phyllodes tumors are biphasic fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast. While the surgical management of these relatively uncommon tumors has been addressed in the literature, few reports have commented on the surgical approach to tumors greater than ten centimeters in diameter – the giant phyllodes tumor. Case presentation We report two cases of giant breast tumors and discuss the techniques utilized for pre-operative diagnosis, tumor removal, and breast reconstruction. A review of the literature on the surgical management of phyllodes tumors was performed. Conclusion Management of the giant phyllodes tumor presents the surgeon with unique challenges. The majority of these tumors can be managed by simple mastectomy. Axillary lymph node metastasis is rare, and dissection should be limited to patients with pathologic evidence of tumor in the lymph nodes. PMID:19014438

  12. Blood DNA methylation markers in potentially identified Chinese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongying; Yan, Haixiu; Zhang, Jinshu

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether blood DNA methylation is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for Chinese patients, we used genome-wide DNA methylation detection to access the blood samples of Chinese patients by Illumina Human methylation 450K arrays. Sixty potentially gene locis which had different methylated levels significantly among tumor and adjacent normal tissues would be tested in this study. A previous study was conducted in China communities and followed with 7 years. The DNA from white blood cells (WBC) from 192 patients with HCC and 215 matched controls were assayed in this study. The χ2 test was used to measure data to categorize variables and t -test was used to evaluate the different characteristics among groups. Besides, odds ratios (OR) and 95%CI was calculated for matching factors by conditional logistic regression models. We found that high methylation in WNK2 was related to increased risk of HCC, and high methylation in TPO were related to decreased risk of HCC. In our multivariable conditional logistic regression models, these results all exist. Those findings support the methylated changes of WNK2 and TPO may become a new detection index for HCC patients in clinical laboratory. However, the results should be replicated in additional prospective studies with lager samples. PMID:27592479

  13. Prostatic Stromal Tumor of Uncertain Malignant Potential Which Was Difficult to Diagnose

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoko; Nohara, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Seto, Chikashi; Nakanishi, Yuko; Uchiyama, Akio; Ishizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a case of stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) that was difficult to diagnose. A 53-year-old male was found to have a hard nodule on digital rectal examination; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large nodule on the left side of the prostate, indicating prostate cancer. However, pathological diagnosis of the biopsy specimen was benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although a papillary tumor in the prostatic urethra was also seen on urethrocystoscopy, the tumor specimen obtained from transurethral resection was not malignant. The tumor in the prostatic urethra recurred only 3 months after transurethral resection, and pathological findings revealed benign hyperplasia not only in the stromal tissue but also in the epithelium; therefore, the prostate tumor was suspected to be STUMP. It took many prostate pathologists a long time to reach the final diagnosis of STUMP. STUMP is a rare benign tumor, difficult to diagnose, and sometimes transforms into stromal sarcoma. Thus, we should consider radical resection in such cases. PMID:26839730

  14. PEGylated Polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugated with tumor homing peptide as a potential targeted delivery system for glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Lv, Lingyan; Shi, Huihui; Hua, Yabing; Lv, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhen; Xin, Hongliang; Xu, Qunwei

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor with a short survival time. The failure of chemotherapy is ascribed to the low transport of chemotherapeutics across the Blood Brain Tumor Barrier (BBTB) and poor penetration into tumor tissue. In order to overcome the two barriers, small nanoparticles with active targeted capability are urgently needed for GBM drug delivery. In this study, we proposed PEGylated Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nanoparticles conjugated with glioma homing peptides (Pep-1) as potential glioma targeting delivery system (Pep-PEG-PAMAM), where PEGylated PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticle was utilized as carrier due to its small size and perfect penetration into tumor and Pep-1 was used to overcome BBTB via interleukin 13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) mediated endocytosis. The preliminary availability and safety of Pep-PEG-PAMAM as a nanocarrier for glioma was evaluated. In vitro results indicated that a significantly higher amount of Pep-PEG-PAMAM was endocytosed by U87 MG cells. In vivo fluorescence imaging of U87MG tumor-bearing mice confirmed that the fluorescence intensity at glioma site of targeted group was 2.02 folds higher than that of untargeted group (**p<0.01), and glioma distribution experiment further revealed that Pep-PEG-PAMAM exhibited a significantly enhanced accumulation and improved penetration at tumor site. In conclusion, Pep-1 modified PAMAM was a promising nanocarrier for targeted delivery of brain glioma.

  15. Tumor Targeting Potential of Lipid-Based Nano-Pharmaceuticals (LNPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Kshitij; Yavlovich, Amichai; Puri, Anu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated targeted drug delivery has become the modality of interest for cancer/tumor therapy as it reduces the undesirable delivery to normal cells and improves efficacy of the pharmaceuticals. Among all the nanosystems, lipid-based nano-pharmaceuticals (LNPs) have been most extensively studied for cancer therapy. Doxil formulation was the first LNP that has been approved for cancer treatment. When conjugated with ligands, LNPs can be targeted to tumor cells. This chapter focuses on the targeting potential of LNPs for cancer therapy. We will discuss the advantages of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect (passive targeting) for preferential tumor accumulation of LNPs, the importance of pegylation to avoid reticulo-endothelial system uptake and active targeting strategies using various targeting ligands that can be coupled to the LNP surface to target the tumor region (tumor cells/tumor vasculature). Targeted LNPs show higher binding affinity, greater intracellular localization and thereby increased cancer cell killing in comparison to non targeted LNPs. However, contrasting reports exist that pose challenges to the notion that targeted LNPs are advantageous. Recent trends have also demonstrated the concept of dual targeting that simultaneously homes LNPs to receptors on the tumor cells and biomarkers expressed on the tumor vasculature. In addition, targeting with multiple ligands on the LNPs has also been explored. These approaches may prove to be a better answer for next generation of LNPs for delivery of anti-cancer agents. However, more extensive studies are required to get their clinical approval in anti-cancer therapy.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  17. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  18. In Vivo Quantification of Tumor Receptor Binding Potential with Dual-Reporter Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Hextrum, Shannon K.; Yang, Harold H.; Klubben, W. Spencer; Gunn, Jason R.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Receptor availability represents a key component of current cancer management. However, no approaches have been adopted to do this clinically, and the current standard of care is invasive tissue biopsy. A dual-reporter methodology capable of quantifying available receptor binding potential of tumors in vivo within a clinically relevant time scale is presented. Procedures To test the methodology, a fluorescence imaging-based adaptation was validated against ex vivo and in vitro measures of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) binding potential in four tumor lines in mice, each line expected to express a different level of EGFR. Results A strong correlation was observed between in vivo and ex vivo measures of binding potential for all tumor lines (r=0.99, p<0.01, slope=1.80±0.48, and intercept=−0.58±0.84) and between in vivo and in vitro for the three lines expressing the least amount of EGFR (r=0.99, p<0.01, slope=0.64±0.32, and intercept=0.47±0.51). Conclusions By providing a fast and robust measure of receptor density in tumors, the presented methodology has powerful implications for improving choices in cancer intervention, evaluation, and monitoring, and can be scaled to the clinic with an imaging modality like SPECT. PMID:22203241

  19. MEK2 is a prognostic marker and potential chemo-sensitizing target for glioma patients undergoing temozolomide treatment.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Yao, Maojin; Zhang, Wenhao; Tao, Bangbao; Liu, Feili; Li, Shu; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Chenran; Meng, Yicheng; Li, Yuxin; Hu, Guohan; Luo, Chun; Zong, Hui; Lu, Yicheng

    2016-09-01

    Although temozolomide (TMZ) is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for glioblastoma, it is often non-curative due to drug resistance. To overcome the resistance of glioblastoma cells to TMZ, it is imperative to identify prognostic markers for outcome prediction and to develop chemo-sensitizing agents. Here, the gene expression profiles of TMZ-resistant and TMZ-sensitive samples were compared by microarray analysis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was upregulated specifically in resistant glioma cells but not in sensitive tumor cells or non-tumor tissues. Moreover, a comprehensive analysis of patient data revealed that the increased level of MEK2 expression correlated well with the advancement of glioma grade and worse prognosis in response to TMZ treatment. Furthermore, reducing the level of MEK2 in U251 glioma cell lines or xenografted glioma models through shRNA-mediated gene knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced the sensitivity of cells toward TMZ treatment. Further analysis of tumor samples from glioma patients by real-time PCR indicated that an increased MEK2 expression level was closely associated with the activation of many drug resistance genes. Finally, these resistance genes were downregulated after MEK2 was silenced in vitro, suggesting that the mechanism of MEK2-induced chemo-resistance could be mediated by the transcriptional activation of these resistance genes. Collectively, our data indicated that the expression level of MEK2 could serve as a prognostic marker for glioma chemotherapy and that MEK2 antagonists can be used as chemo-sensitizers to enhance the treatment efficacy of TMZ.

  20. MEK2 is a prognostic marker and potential chemo-sensitizing target for glioma patients undergoing temozolomide treatment

    PubMed Central

    He, Hua; Yao, Maojin; Zhang, Wenhao; Tao, Bangbao; Liu, Feili; Li, Shu; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Chenran; Meng, Yicheng; Li, Yuxin; Hu, Guohan; Luo, Chun; Zong, Hui; Lu, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    Although temozolomide (TMZ) is the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for glioblastoma, it is often non-curative due to drug resistance. To overcome the resistance of glioblastoma cells to TMZ, it is imperative to identify prognostic markers for outcome prediction and to develop chemo-sensitizing agents. Here, the gene expression profiles of TMZ-resistant and TMZ-sensitive samples were compared by microarray analysis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 (MEK2) was upregulated specifically in resistant glioma cells but not in sensitive tumor cells or non-tumor tissues. Moreover, a comprehensive analysis of patient data revealed that the increased level of MEK2 expression correlated well with the advancement of glioma grade and worse prognosis in response to TMZ treatment. Furthermore, reducing the level of MEK2 in U251 glioma cell lines or xenografted glioma models through shRNA-mediated gene knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced the sensitivity of cells toward TMZ treatment. Further analysis of tumor samples from glioma patients by real-time PCR indicated that an increased MEK2 expression level was closely associated with the activation of many drug resistance genes. Finally, these resistance genes were downregulated after MEK2 was silenced in vitro, suggesting that the mechanism of MEK2-induced chemo-resistance could be mediated by the transcriptional activation of these resistance genes. Collectively, our data indicated that the expression level of MEK2 could serve as a prognostic marker for glioma chemotherapy and that MEK2 antagonists can be used as chemo-sensitizers to enhance the treatment efficacy of TMZ. PMID:26189368

  1. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  2. Tumor suppression by miR-26 overrides potential oncogenic activity in intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeitels, Lauren R.; Acharya, Asha; Shi, Guanglu; Chivukula, Divya; Chivukula, Raghu R.; Anandam, Joselin L.; Abdelnaby, Abier A.; Balch, Glen C.; Mansour, John C.; Yopp, Adam C.; Richardson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Down-regulation of miR-26 family members has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple malignancies. In some settings, including glioma, however, miR-26-mediated repression of PTEN promotes tumorigenesis. To investigate the contexts in which the tumor suppressor versus oncogenic activity of miR-26 predominates in vivo, we generated miR-26a transgenic mice. Despite measureable repression of Pten, elevated miR-26a levels were not associated with malignancy in transgenic animals. We documented reduced miR-26 expression in human colorectal cancer and, accordingly, showed that miR-26a expression potently suppressed intestinal adenoma formation in Apcmin/+ mice, a model known to be sensitive to Pten dosage. These studies reveal a tumor suppressor role for miR-26 in intestinal cancer that overrides putative oncogenic activity, highlighting the therapeutic potential of miR-26 delivery to this tumor type. PMID:25395662

  3. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects.

    PubMed

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic; Leese, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  4. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects

    PubMed Central

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  5. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid ameliorates cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity and potentiates its anti-tumor activity in DMBA induced breast cancer in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Mundhe, Nitin Arunrao; Kumar, Parveen; Ahmed, Sahabuddin; Jamdade, Vinayak; Mundhe, Sanjay; Lahkar, Mangala

    2015-09-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used antineoplastic drug, but its clinical usefulness is limited due to dose dependent nephrotoxicity. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural compound with broad pharmacological properties like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible beneficial effects of NDGA on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity as well as its anticancer activity in rats bearing DMBA induced mammary tumors. The effect of NDGA on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity was evaluated by checking serum nephrotoxicity markers, antioxidant enzymes and inflammatory markers level and kidney histopathology. NDGA induced amelioration of cisplatin nephrotoxicity was clearly visible from significant reductions in serum blood urea nitrogen (86.51 g/dl) and creatinine (5.30 g/dl) levels and significant improvement in body weight change (-10.34 g) and kidney weight (728 mg/kg). The protective effect of NDGA against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in the rats was further confirmed by significant restoration of antioxidant enzymes like SOD (86.28% inhibition), inflammatory markers like TNF-α (34.6 pg/ml) and histopathological examination. Moreover, our results showed that NDGA potentiated anti-breast cancer activity of cisplatin through an increment in the expression of antioxidant enzymes like SOD (85.35% inhibition) in breast cancer tissue. These results indicated that NDGA potentiated the anti-breast cancer activity of cisplatin, which was clearly evident from the tumor volume and % tumor inhibition in breast cancer rats. The current study demonstrated that NDGA may modify the therapeutic effect of cisplatin in DMBA induced breast cancer in female Sprague-Dawley rats. PMID:26247680

  6. PAX2 Expression in Low Malignant Potential Ovarian Tumors and Low-Grade Ovarian Serous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Celestine S.; Mok, Samuel C.; Tsang, Yvonne T.M.; Zu, Zhifei; Song, Huijuan; Liu, Jinsong; Deavers, Michael; Malpica, Anais; Wolf, Judith K.; Lu, Karen H.; Gershenson, David M.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian tumors of low-malignant potential and low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas are thought to represent different stages on a tumorigenic continuum and to develop along pathways distinct from high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma. We performed gene expression profiling on 3 normal human ovarian surface epithelia samples, and 10 low-grade and 10 high-grade ovarian serous carcinomas. Analysis of gene expression profiles of these samples has identified 80 genes up-regulated and 232 genes down-regulated in low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas. PAX2 was found to be one of the most up-regulated genes in low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma. The up-regulation of PAX2 was validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated a statistically significant difference in PAX2 mRNA expression (expressed as fold change in comparison to normal human ovarian surface epithelia) among ovarian tumors of low-malignant potential (1837.38, N=8), low-grade (183.12, N=17), and high-grade (3.72, N=23) carcinoma samples (p=0.015). Western blot analysis revealed strong PAX2 expression in ovarian tumors of low-malignant potential (67%, N=3) and low-grade carcinoma samples (50%, N=10) but no PAX2 protein expression in high-grade carcinomas (0%, N=10). Using immunohistochemistry, tumors of low-malignant potential (59%, N=17) and low-grade carcinoma (63%, N=16) samples expressed significantly stronger nuclear staining than high-grade ovarian carcinoma samples (9.1%, N=263). Furthermore, consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings, PAX2 expression was found to be expressed in the epithelial cells of fallopian tubes but not in normal ovarian surface epithelial cells. Our findings further support the two-tiered hypothesis that tumors of low-malignant potential and low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma are on a continuum and are distinct from high-grade ovarian carcinomas. Additionally, the absence of PAX2 expression in normal

  7. Bone Tumor Environment as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Redini, Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone tumor, with three cases per million worldwide. In clinical terms, Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, rapidly fatal malignancy that mainly develops not only in osseous sites (85%) but also in extra-skeletal soft tissue. It spreads naturally to the lungs, bones, and bone marrow with poor prognosis in the two latter cases. Bone lesions from primary or secondary (metastases) tumors are characterized by extensive bone remodeling, more often due to osteolysis. Osteoclast activation and subsequent bone resorption are responsible for the clinical features of bone tumors, including pain, vertebral collapse, and spinal cord compression. Based on the “vicious cycle” concept of tumor cells and bone resorbing cells, drugs, which target osteoclasts, may be promising agents as adjuvant setting for treating bone tumors, including Ewing sarcoma. There is also increasing evidence that cellular and molecular protagonists present in the bone microenvironment play a part in establishing a favorable “niche” for tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential therapeutic value of drugs targeting the bone tumor microenvironment in Ewing sarcoma. The first part of the review will focus on targeting the bone resorbing function of osteoclasts by means of bisphosphonates or drugs blocking the pro-resorbing cytokine receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand. Second, the role of this peculiar hypoxic microenvironment will be discussed in the context of resistance to chemotherapy, escape from the immune system, or neo-angiogenesis. Therapeutic interventions based on these specificities could be then proposed in the context of Ewing sarcoma. PMID:26779435

  8. Bone Tumor Environment as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Ewing Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Redini, Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone tumor, with three cases per million worldwide. In clinical terms, Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, rapidly fatal malignancy that mainly develops not only in osseous sites (85%) but also in extra-skeletal soft tissue. It spreads naturally to the lungs, bones, and bone marrow with poor prognosis in the two latter cases. Bone lesions from primary or secondary (metastases) tumors are characterized by extensive bone remodeling, more often due to osteolysis. Osteoclast activation and subsequent bone resorption are responsible for the clinical features of bone tumors, including pain, vertebral collapse, and spinal cord compression. Based on the "vicious cycle" concept of tumor cells and bone resorbing cells, drugs, which target osteoclasts, may be promising agents as adjuvant setting for treating bone tumors, including Ewing sarcoma. There is also increasing evidence that cellular and molecular protagonists present in the bone microenvironment play a part in establishing a favorable "niche" for tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential therapeutic value of drugs targeting the bone tumor microenvironment in Ewing sarcoma. The first part of the review will focus on targeting the bone resorbing function of osteoclasts by means of bisphosphonates or drugs blocking the pro-resorbing cytokine receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand. Second, the role of this peculiar hypoxic microenvironment will be discussed in the context of resistance to chemotherapy, escape from the immune system, or neo-angiogenesis. Therapeutic interventions based on these specificities could be then proposed in the context of Ewing sarcoma. PMID:26779435

  9. Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent p53-negative tumor cell death during chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Clausse, V; Goloudina, A R; Uyanik, B; Kochetkova, E Y; Richaud, S; Fedorova, O A; Hammann, A; Bardou, M; Barlev, N A; Garrido, C; Demidov, O N

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 found in more than half of human cancers is often associated with increased tumor resistance to anti-cancer therapy. We have previously shown that overexpression of the phosphatase Wip1 in p53-negative tumors sensitizes them to chemotherapeutic agents, while protecting normal tissues from the side effects of anti-cancer treatment. In this study, we decided to search for kinases that prevent Wip1-mediated sensitization of cancer cells, thereby interfering with efficacy of genotoxic anti-cancer drugs. To this end, we performed a flow cytometry-based screening in order to identify kinases that regulated the levels of γH2AX, which were used as readout. Another criterion of the screen was increased sensitivity of p53-negative tumor cells to cisplatin (CDDP) in a Wip1-dependent manner. We have found that a treatment with a low dose (75 nM) of MK-1775, a recently described specific chemical inhibitor of Wee1, decreases CDDP-induced H2AX phosphorylation in p53-negative cells and enhances the Wip1-sensitization of p53-negative tumors. We were able to reduce CDDP effective concentration by 40% with a combination of Wip1 overexpression and Wee1 kinase inhibition. We have observed that Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent tumor sensitization effect by reducing levels of Hipk2 kinase, a negative regulator of Wip1 pathway. In addition, during CDDP treatment, the combination of Wee1 inhibition and Wip1 overexpression has a mild but significant protective effect in normal cells and tissues. Our results indicate that inhibition of the negative regulators of Wip1 pathway, Wee1 and Hipk2, in p53-negative tumors could potentiate efficiency of chemotherapeutic agents without concomitant increase of cytotoxicity in normal tissues. The development and clinical use of Wee1 and Hipk1 kinase chemical inhibitors might be a promising strategy to improve anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27077811

  10. Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent p53-negative tumor cell death during chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Clausse, V; Goloudina, A R; Uyanik, B; Kochetkova, E Y; Richaud, S; Fedorova, O A; Hammann, A; Bardou, M; Barlev, N A; Garrido, C; Demidov, O N

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 found in more than half of human cancers is often associated with increased tumor resistance to anti-cancer therapy. We have previously shown that overexpression of the phosphatase Wip1 in p53-negative tumors sensitizes them to chemotherapeutic agents, while protecting normal tissues from the side effects of anti-cancer treatment. In this study, we decided to search for kinases that prevent Wip1-mediated sensitization of cancer cells, thereby interfering with efficacy of genotoxic anti-cancer drugs. To this end, we performed a flow cytometry-based screening in order to identify kinases that regulated the levels of γH2AX, which were used as readout. Another criterion of the screen was increased sensitivity of p53-negative tumor cells to cisplatin (CDDP) in a Wip1-dependent manner. We have found that a treatment with a low dose (75 nM) of MK-1775, a recently described specific chemical inhibitor of Wee1, decreases CDDP-induced H2AX phosphorylation in p53-negative cells and enhances the Wip1-sensitization of p53-negative tumors. We were able to reduce CDDP effective concentration by 40% with a combination of Wip1 overexpression and Wee1 kinase inhibition. We have observed that Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent tumor sensitization effect by reducing levels of Hipk2 kinase, a negative regulator of Wip1 pathway. In addition, during CDDP treatment, the combination of Wee1 inhibition and Wip1 overexpression has a mild but significant protective effect in normal cells and tissues. Our results indicate that inhibition of the negative regulators of Wip1 pathway, Wee1 and Hipk2, in p53-negative tumors could potentiate efficiency of chemotherapeutic agents without concomitant increase of cytotoxicity in normal tissues. The development and clinical use of Wee1 and Hipk1 kinase chemical inhibitors might be a promising strategy to improve anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27077811

  11. Gum arabic-coated magnetic nanoparticles for potential application in simultaneous magnetic targeting and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yu, Faquan; Cole, Adam J; Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E; Wang, Jingkang; Yang, Victor C

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP) coated with gum arabic (GA), a biocompatible phytochemical glycoprotein widely used in the food industry, were successfully synthesized and characterized. GA-coated MNP (GA-MNP) displayed a narrow hydrodynamic particle size distribution averaging about 100 nm; a GA content of 15.6% by dry weight; a saturation magnetization of 93.1 emu/g Fe; and a superparamagnetic behavior essential for most magnetic-mediated applications. The GA coating offers two major benefits: it both enhances colloidal stability and provides reactive functional groups suitable for coupling of bioactive compounds. In vitro results showed that GA-MNP possessed a superior stability upon storage in aqueous media when compared to commercial MNP products currently used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, significant cellular uptake of GA-MNP was evaluated in 9L glioma cells by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and MRI analyses. Based on these findings, it was hypothesized that GA-MNP might be utilized as a MRI-visible drug carrier in achieving both magnetic tumor targeting and intracellular drug delivery. Indeed, preliminary in vivo investigations validate this clinical potential. MRI visually confirmed the accumulation of GA-MNP at the tumor site following intravenous administration to rats harboring 9L glioma tumors under the application of an external magnetic field. ESR spectroscopy quantitatively revealed a 12-fold increase in GA-MNP accumulation in excised tumors when compared to contralateral normal brain. Overall, the results presented show promise that GA-MNP could potentially be employed to achieve simultaneous tumor imaging and targeted intra-tumoral drug delivery.

  12. Examination of ancestral informative markers and self-reported race with tumor characteristics of breast cancer among black and white women

    PubMed Central

    Reding, Kerryn W.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Kahsai, Orsalem; Chen, Christina C.; McDavid, Andrew; Doody, David R.; Chen, Chu; Ornelas, India; Lowe, Kimberly; Bernstein, Leslie; Weiss, Linda; McDonald, Jill A.; Simon, Michael S.; Strom, Brian; Marchbanks, Polly A.; Burkman, Ronald; Spirtas, Robert; Liff, Jonathan M.; Malone, Kathleen E.

    2013-01-01

    Background African American (AA) women have a higher mortality from breast cancer (BC) compared to European American (EA) women. This may be due to the higher proportion of AA women with tumors that are diagnosed at more advanced stages and are characterized as being estrogen receptor negative (ER-)/ progesterone receptor negative (PR-). Our study sought to determine whether self-reported race and percent African ancestry were associated with BC tumor characteristics. Methods In a multi-center, population-based case-control study of BC, we determined percent African ancestry using ancestry informative markers (AIM) among women self-reporting race as AA or Black. Results BC tumor characteristics were associated with self-reported race (including a 30% reduction in ER+/PR+ tumors [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.6-0.9] and a 1.5-fold increased risk of high grade [95% CI: 1.2-1.9] for AA women compared to EA women). AIMs among AA women were not associated with BC tumor characteristics (AA women with ≥ 95% versus < 80% African ancestry, odds ratio [OR]=1.0 for ER+/PR+ [95% CI: 0.6-1.8] and OR=0.9 for high-grade tumors [95% CI: 0.6-1.4]). Similar findings were observed for BC stage. Conclusion While BC subtypes were associated with self-reported race, BC subtypes were not associated with percent African ancestry. Impact These study results suggest that subtle differences in percent African ancestry are less important than the overall presence of African ancestry in relation to BC tumor characteristics. PMID:22648732

  13. Caveolin-1 expression is variably displayed in astroglial-derived tumors and absent in oligodendrogliomas: concrete premises for a new reliable diagnostic marker in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Cassoni, Paola; Senetta, Rebecca; Castellano, Isabella; Ortolan, Erika; Bosco, Martino; Magnani, Ivana; Ducati, Alessandro

    2007-05-01

    Caveolins are basic constituents of flask-shaped cell membrane microdomains (caveolae), which are involved in many cell functions, including signalling, trafficking, and cellular growth control. The distribution of caveolae within the normal brain and in brain tumors is controversial. In the present study, we describe the expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1) in 64 brain tumors of different grade, of either astroglial or oligodendroglial origin. All studied astrocitomas of any grade (from II to IV) were cav-1 positive, displaying staining patterns and intensity specifically associated to the different tumor grades. In all glioblastomas and gliosarcomas, cav-1 staining was extremely intense, typically localized at the cell membrane and recognized a variable percentage of cells, including the majority of spindle cells and palisade-oriented perinecrotic cells. In anaplastic astrocytomas, a less intense membrane staining or a cytoplasmic dotlike immunoreactivity were present, the latter being almost the exclusive pattern observed in diffuse astrocitomas grade II. In contrast to astroglial tumors, the striking totality of grade II oligodendrogliomas and the large majority of grade III were lacking cav-1 expression. Interestingly, a cav-1 distribution overlapping the pattern described in tissues was observed also in primary cell cultures of human glioblastomas and astrocytomas, and also in one established glioblastoma cell line (U251 MG), analyzed by means of confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. In conclusion, among astroglial tumors cav-1 expression varies in distribution, pattern, and intensity specifically according to tumor types and grades. The association between tumor progression and a more structured membranous pattern of cav-1 expression could suggest the hypothesis of a neoplastic shift towards a mesenchymal phenotype, whose behavioral and biologic significance worth further studies. Finally, the lack of cav-1 immunoreactivity in oligodendrogliomas suggests its

  14. Potential of Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers for DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized tritordeums and their respective parents.

    PubMed

    Cabo, Sandra; Ferreira, Luciana; Carvalho, Ana; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Martín, António; Lima-Brito, José Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Hexaploid tritordeum (H(ch)H(ch)AABB; 2n = 42) results from the cross between Hordeum chilense (H(ch)H(ch); 2n = 14) and cultivated durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (AABB; 2n = 28). Morphologically, tritordeum resembles the wheat parent, showing promise for agriculture and wheat breeding. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) polymorphism is a recently developed technique that generates gene-targeted markers. Thus, we considered it interesting to evaluate its potential for the DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized hexaploid tritordeums and their respective parents. In this study, 60 SCoT primers were tested, and 18 and 19 of them revealed SCoT polymorphisms in the newly synthesized tritordeum lines HT27 and HT22, respectively, and their parents. An analysis of the presence/absence of bands among tritordeums and their parents revealed three types of polymorphic markers: (i) shared by tritordeums and one of their parents, (ii) exclusively amplified in tritordeums, and (iii) exclusively amplified in the parents. No polymorphism was detected among individuals of each parental species. Three SCoT markers were exclusively amplified in tritordeums of lines HT22 and HT27, being considered as polyploidization-induced rearrangements. About 70% of the SCoT markers of H. chilense origin were not transmitted to the allopolyploids of both lines, and most of the SCoTs scored in the newly synthesized allopolyploids originated from wheat, reinforcing the potential use of tritordeum as an alternative crop.

  15. Elucidation of tumor-promoting potential of a combination pesticide by short-term, in vivo bioassay.

    PubMed

    Murali Mohan, E; Rajaran Gayathri, M; Amirtha Ganesh, D; Banu Priya, C A; Arun Sam Lal, A; Amalan Stanley, V; Sadasivan Pillai, K; Balakrishnamurthy, P

    2001-01-01

    The use of combination pesticide (profenofos 40% + cypermethrin 4% EC) is on the rise in India and elsewhere. Cypermethrin is reported to be a tumor promoter, but its tumor-promoting potential along with profenofos is yet to be studied. A short-term, in vivo test for detection of a tumor promoter is cost-effective, saves time, and requires fewer animals than conventional methods. We report on a short-term test based on mechanisms of significant importance in tumor promotion. In this study, we have tested the tumor-promoting potential of a combination pesticide containing profenofos 40% and cypermethrin 4% EC in Wistar rats. Although cypermethrin has been reported as a tumor promoter, our study shows that the combination pesticide containing profenofos 40% and cypermethrin 4% EC is not a tumor promoter. PMID:11797832

  16. Therapeutic Potential and Challenges of Natural Killer Cells in Treatment of Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gras Navarro, Andrea; Björklund, Andreas T.; Chekenya, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells that hold tremendous potential for effective immunotherapy for a broad range of cancers. Due to the mode of NK cell killing, requiring one-to-one target engagement and site-directed release of cytolytic granules, the therapeutic potential of NK cells has been most extensively explored in hematological malignancies. However, their ability to precisely kill antibody coated cells, cancer stem cells, and genotoxically altered cells, while maintaining tolerance to healthy cells makes them appealing therapeutic effectors for all cancer forms, including metastases. Due to their release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NK cells may potently reverse the anti-inflammatory tumor microenvironment (TME) and augment adaptive immune responses by promoting differentiation, activation, and/or recruitment of accessory immune cells to sites of malignancy. Nevertheless, integrated and coordinated mechanisms of subversion of NK cell activity against the tumor and its microenvironment exist. Although our understanding of the receptor ligand interactions that regulate NK cell functionality has evolved remarkably, the diversity of ligands and receptors is complex, as is their mechanistic foundations in regulating NK cell function. In this article, we review the literature and highlight how the TME manipulates the NK cell phenotypes, genotypes, and tropism to evade tumor recognition and elimination. We discuss counter strategies that may be adopted to augment the efficacy of NK cell anti-tumor surveillance, the clinical trials that have been undertaken so far in solid malignancies, critically weighing the challenges and opportunities with this approach. PMID:25972872

  17. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of novel galloyl pyrrolidine derivatives as potential anti-tumor agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Xun; Li, Yalin; Xu, Wenfang

    2006-03-01

    A series of novel galloyl pyrrolidine derivatives were synthesized as potential anti-tumor agents. Their inhibiting activities on gelatinase (MMP-2 and -9) were tested with succinylated gelatin as the substrate. Structure-activity analyses demonstrate that introduction of longer and more flexible side chains at the C(4) position of the pyrrolidine ring brings higher activity against gelatinase. Free phenol hydroxyl group is more favorable than the methylated one, which confirms the important role of the phenol hydroxyl group when inhibitors interact with gelatinase. In particular, (2S,4S)-4-(3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)acrylamido)-N-hydroxy-1-(3,4,5- trimethoxybenzoyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide (18) stood out as the most attractive compound (IC(50) = 0.9 nM). The anti-metastasis model of mice bearing H(22) tumor cells was used to evaluate their anti-tumor activities in vivo. The assay in vivo revealed that most of these inhibitors displayed favorable inhibitory activities (inhibitory rate >35%) and no significant toxic effects were observed. The inhibition for 62.37% of 19 indicates the strategy used to design MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) of galloyl pyrrolidine derivatives as potential anti-tumor agents is promising.

  18. Apoptotic Death of Hematopoietic Tumor Cells through Potentiated and Sustained Adhesion to Fibronectin via VLA-4*

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yohei; Owaki, Toshiyuki; Matsunaga, Takuya; Saze, Mizue; Miura, Shogo; Maeda, Mao; Eguchi, Mayu; Tanaka, Rika; Taira, Junichi; Kodama, Hiroaki; Goto, Sumio; Niitsu, Yoshiroh; Terada, Hiroshi; Fukai, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that inactivated β1-integrins are involved in the disordered growth of hematopoietic tumor cells. We recently found that TNIIIA2, a peptide derived from tenascin-C, strongly activates β1-integrins through binding with syndecan-4. We show here that Ramos Burkitt's lymphoma cells can survive and grow in suspension but undergo apoptosis when kept adhering to fibronectin by stimulation with TNIIIA2. Other integrin activators, Mg2+ and TS2/16 (an integrin-activating antibody), were also capable of inducing apoptosis. The inactivation of ERK1/2 and Akt and the subsequent activation of Bad were involved in the apoptosis. The results using other hematopoietic tumor cell lines expressing different levels of fibronectin receptors (VLA-4 and VLA-5) showed that potentiated and sustained adhesion to fibronectin via VLA-4 causally induces apoptosis also in various types of hematopoietic tumor cells in addition to Ramos cells. Because TNIIIA2 requires syndecan-4 as a membrane receptor for activation of β1-integrins, it induced apoptosis preferentially in hematopoietic tumor cells, which expressed both VLA-4 and syndecan-4 as membrane receptors mediating the effects of fibronectin and TNIIIA2, respectively. Therefore, normal peripheral blood cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes, which poorly expressed syndecan-4, were almost insusceptible to TNIIIA2-induced apoptosis. The TNIIIA2-related matricryptic site of TN-C could contribute, once exposed, to preventing prolonged survival of hematopoietic malignant progenitors through potentiated and sustained activation of VLA-4. PMID:20007695

  19. Proliferative potential in benign mixed salivary gland tumors and its value in primary and recurrent neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kazanceva, Anna; Groma, Valerie; Smane, Liene; Kornevs, Egils; Teibe, Uldis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Mixed salivary gland tumors are characterized by a marked diversity in the cell proliferation. It course in the stromal component, and, especially in recurrent neoplasms, is not completely understood. This study evaluated cell proliferative potential, its value and the clinical course of primary and recurrent salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas (PA). MATERIALS AND METHODS. 322 benign salivary gland tumors were used in this study. The cell proliferation was estimated by Ki-67 expression levels. RESULTS. Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed a wide range of spectra; in the epithelial and stromal type of PA the cell proliferation had the value from 0.07±0.03 (95% CI 0.01-0.14) to 4.81±0.60 (95% CI 3.61-6.02) and from 0 to 0.79±0.11 (95% CI 0.57-1.00), respectively. The Ki-67 value was higher in recurrent tumors compared with primary, and the mean number of Ki-67-positive cells per visual microscopic field constituted 2.14±1.60 (95% CI 1.47-2.47) comparing with 1.43 (95% CI 0.97-1.55) revealed in primary tumors. CONCLUSION. Cell proliferation values correlate with a recurrence of neoplasm, and elevation of proliferation potential in the stromal component of recurrent PA is indicative of clinical course change for the worse.

  20. Navigated marker placement for motion compensation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterstein, A.; März, K.; Franz, A. M.; Hafezi, M.; Fard, N.; Sterzing, F.; Mehrabi, A.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy is frequently used to treat unoperated or partially resected tumors. Tumor movement, e.g. caused by respiration, is a major challenge in this context. Markers can be implanted around the tumor prior to radiation therapy for accurate tracking of tumor movement. However, accurate placement of these markers while keeping a secure margin around the target and while taking into account critical structures is a difficult task. Computer-assisted needle insertion has been an active field of research in the past decades. However, the challenge of navigated marker placement for motion compensated radiotherapy has not yet been addressed. This work presents a system to support marker implantation for radiotherapy under consideration of safety margins and optimal marker configuration. It is designed to allow placement of markers both percutaneously and during an open liver surgery. To this end, we adapted the previously proposed EchoTrack system which integrates ultrasound (US) imaging and electromagnetic (EM) tracking in a single mobile modality. The potential of our new marker insertion concept was evaluated in a phantom study by inserting sets of three markers around dedicated targets (n=22) simultaneously spacing the markers evenly around the target as well as placing the markers in a defined distance to the target. In all cases the markers were successfully placed in a configuration fulfilling the predefined criteria. This includes a minimum distance of 18.9 ± 2.4 mm between marker and tumor as well as a divergence of 2.1 ± 1.5 mm from the planned marker positions. We conclude that our system has high potential to facilitate the placement of markers in suitable configurations for surgeons without extensive experience in needle punctions as high quality configurations were obtained even by medical non-experts.

  1. Discovery and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Aflatoxin-Resistance: Evaluating Their Potential as Breeding Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilit...

  2. Classification of Extraovarian Implants in Patients With Ovarian Serous Borderline Tumors (Tumors of Low Malignant Potential) Based on Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Jesse K; Gilks, C Blake; Kalloger, Steve; Longacre, Teri A

    2016-09-01

    The classification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants predicts patient outcome in patients with high-stage ovarian serous borderline tumors (tumors of low malignant potential). However, the morphologic criteria used to classify implants vary between studies. To date, there has been no large-scale study with follow-up data comparing the prognostic significance of competing criteria. Peritoneal and/or lymph node implants from 181 patients with high-stage serous borderline tumors were evaluated independently by 3 pathologists for the following 8 morphologic features: micropapillary architecture; glandular architecture; nests of epithelial cells with surrounding retraction artifact set in densely fibrotic stroma; low-power destructive tissue invasion; single eosinophilic epithelial cells within desmoplastic stroma; mitotic activity; nuclear pleomorphism; and nucleoli. Follow-up of 156 (86%) patients ranged from 11 to 264 months (mean, 89 mo; median, 94 mo). Implants with low-power destructive invasion into underlying tissue were the best predictor of adverse patient outcome with 69% overall and 59% disease-free survival (P<0.01). In the evaluation of individual morphologic features, the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion also had excellent reproducibility between observers (κ=0.84). Extraovarian implants with micropapillary architecture or solid nests with clefts were often associated with tissue invasion but did not add significant prognostic value beyond destructive tissue invasion alone. Implants without attached normal tissue were not associated with adverse outcome and appear to be noninvasive. Because the presence of invasion in an extraovarian implant is associated with an overall survival analogous to that of low-grade serous carcinoma, the designation low-grade serous carcinoma is recommended. Even though the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion has excellent interobserver reproducibility, it is further

  3. Increased serum tumor markers (CA125 and CA15.3) in primary plasma cell leukemia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernández; Cibeira, Maria Teresa; Vallansot, Rolando; Colomo, Lluís; Bladé, Joan

    2008-10-01

    73-year-old woman complaining of bone pain and weight loss was suspected to have a malignant disease, and extensive laboratory investigations were carried out. She was diagnosed with multiple myeloma; however, because of the finding of extremely high serum levels of CA125 and CA15.3 and focal liver lesions, a concomitant solid tumor was suspected, which was then excluded with the appropriate tests, including an ultrasound-guided liver biopsy. While being diagnosed, the patient developed a rapidly evolving plasma cell leukemia with a simultaneous increase in CA125 and CA15.3. After treatment with cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone, the peripheral blood plasma cells disappeared and there was a dramatic decrease in the CA125 and CA15.3 tumor markers. High levels of the latter can be observed in patients with aggressive plasma cell dyscrasias, an observation that is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary tests that can result in treatment delay.

  4. Geriatric forensics - Part 2 “Prevalence of elder abuse and their potential forensic markers among medical and dental patients”

    PubMed Central

    Mattoo, Khurshid A.; Garg, Rishabh; Kumar, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Context: This study is a continuation of the earlier studies and has been extended to investigate the potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Aims: To determine the prevalence of elder abuse in various outpatient departments (OPDs). To study the associated parameters related to the abuser and the abused. To determine the existence of potential forensic markers of elder abuse. Settings and Design: The subjects were randomly selected from the medical and the dental OPDs of the university. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and thirty two elderly subjects in the age range 40-60 years were interviewed using a questionnaire to determine the existence of elder abuse. The subjects were investigated and examined for weight, nutrition and hydration, vital signs, habits, existing visual and auditory capabilities, medications, disclosure of wills/deeds, signs of depression, and documented cleanliness. The mini-mental state examination, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Clock drawing test, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale were used to determine the potential forensic markers. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean values in percentage were determined by dividing the number of determined subjects by the total number of subjects for that parameter. Results: About 37% in medical and 41% in dental OPDs were found to have suffered from abuse, mostly in the age group 60-70 years. Females received more abuse and a combination of son and daughter-in-law constituted most abusers. Various potential markers of elder abuse and neglect investigated among the elder abuse victims included depression (89%), signs of improper feeding (83%), changes in personal hygiene (69%), need for medical/dental treatment (78%), medication misuse (67%), changes in wills/deeds (26%), decubiti (10%), bruises (17%), skin tears (27%), and confusion (23%). Conclusions: Elder abuse exists in one or more forms in both medical and dental OPDs among both males and females in all age groups. PMID:26816460

  5. The membrane potential of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells microelectrode measurements and their critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lassen, U V; Nielsen, A M; Pape, L; Simonsen, L O

    1971-12-01

    Intracellular potentials were measured, using a piezoelectric electromechanical transducer to impale Ehrlich ascites tumor cells with capillary microelectrodes. In sodium Ringer's, the potential immediately after the penetration was -24±7 mV, and decayed to a stable value of about -8 mV within a few msec. The peak potentials disappeared in potassium Ringer's and reappeared immediately after resuspension in sodium. Ringer's, whereas the stable potentials were only slightly influenced by the change of medium. The peak potential is in good agreement with the Nernst potential for chloride. This is also the case when cell sodium and potassium have been changed by addition of ouabain. It is concluded that the peak potentials represent the membrane potential of the unperturbed cell, and that chloride is in electrochemical equilibrium across the cell membrane.The membrane potential of about -11 mV previously reported corresponds to the stable potential in this study, and is considered as a junction potential between damaged cells and their environment. Similar potential differences were recorded between a homogenate of cells and Ringer's.The apparent membrane resistance of Ehrlich cells was about 70 Ωcm(2). This is two orders of magnitude less than the value calculated from(36)Cl fluxes, and may, in part, represent a leak in the cell membrane.For comparison, the influence of an eventual leak on measurements in red cells and mitochondria is discussed.

  6. DNA methylome profiling of maternal peripheral blood and placentas reveal potential fetal DNA markers for non-invasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Junyu; Li, Qiaoli; Zhou, Xinyao; Wang, Teng; Xu, Mingqing; Xia, Shihui; Xing, Qinghe; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Utilizing epigenetic (DNA methylation) differences to differentiate between maternal peripheral blood (PBL) and fetal (placental) DNA has been a promising strategy for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) have yet to be fully ascertained. In the present study, we performed genome-wide comparative methylome analysis between maternal PBL and placental DNA from pregnancies of first trimester by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assays. A total of 36 931 DMRs and 45 804 differentially methylated sites (DMSs) covering the whole genome, exclusive of the Y chromosome, were identified via MeDIP-Seq and Infinium 450k array, respectively, of which 3759 sites in 2188 regions were confirmed by both methods. Not only did we find the previously reported potential fetal DNA markers in our identified DMRs/DMSs but also we verified fully the identified DMRs/DMSs in the validation round by MassARRAY EpiTYPER. The screened potential fetal DNA markers may be used for NIPT on aneuploidies and other chromosomal diseases, such as cri du chat syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In addition, these potential markers may have application in the early diagnosis of placental dysfunction, such as pre-eclampsia. PMID:24996894

  7. Outgrowth of drug-resistant carcinomas expressing markers of tumor aggression after long term TβRI/II kinase inhibition with LY2109761

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Erin C.; Saunier, Elise F.; Quigley, David; Luu, Minh Thu; Sapio, Angela De; Hann, Byron; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Akhurst, Rosemary J.

    2011-01-01

    Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) is produced excessively by many solid tumors and can drive malignant progression through multiple effects on the tumor cell and microenvironment. TGF-β signaling pathway inhibitors have shown efficacy in pre-clinical models of metastatic cancer. Here we investigated the effect of systemic LY2109761, a type I /II receptor (TβRI/TβRII) kinase inhibitor, in both a tumor allograft model and in the mouse skin model of de novo chemically-induced carcinogenesis in vivo. Systemic LY2109761 administration disrupted tumor vascular architecture and reduced myofibroblast differentiation of E4 skin carcinoma cells in a tumor allograft. In the 7,12 dimethyl-benzanthracene plus phorbol-myristate-acetate -induced skin chemical carcinogenesis model, acute dosing of established naïve primary carcinomas with LY2109761 (100mg/Kg) every eight hours for ten days (100mg/kg) diminished P-Smad2 levels and marginally decreased the expression of inflammatory and invasive markers. Sustained exposure to LY2109761 (100mg/kg/day) throughout the tumor outgrowth phase had no effect on carcinoma latency or incidence. However, molecular analysis of resultant carcinomas by microarray gene expression, Western blot and immunohistochemistry suggests that long term LY2109761 exposure leads to the outgrowth of carcinomas with elevated P-Smad2 levels that do not respond to drug. This is the first description of acquired resistance to a small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-βRI/II kinase. Resultant carcinomas were more aggressive and inflammatory in nature, with delocalized E-Cadherin and elevated expression of Il23a, laminin V and MMPs. Therefore, TGF-β inhibitors might be clinically useful for applications requiring acute administration, but chronic patient exposure to such drugs should be undertaken with caution. PMID:21282335

  8. Copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) Pharmacokinetics in FaDu Xenograft Tumors and Correlation With Microscopic Markers of Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Keisha C.; Humm, John L.; Bartlett, Rachel; Reese, Megan; Carlin, Sean

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The behavior of copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ({sup 64}Cu-ATSM) in hypoxic tumors was examined through a combination of in vivo dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiographic and histologic evaluation using a xenograft model of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: {sup 64}Cu-ATSM was administered during dynamic PET imaging, and temporal changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution within tumors were evaluated for at least 1 hour and up to 18 hours. Animals were sacrificed at either 1 hour (cohort A) or after 18 hours (cohort B) postinjection of radiotracer and autoradiography performed. Ex vivo analysis of microenvironment subregions was conducted by immunohistochemical staining for markers of hypoxia (pimonidazole hydrochloride) and blood flow (Hoechst-33342). Results: Kinetic analysis revealed rapid uptake of radiotracer by tumors. The net influx (K{sub i}) constant was 12-fold that of muscle, whereas the distribution volume (V{sub d}) was 5-fold. PET images showed large tumor-to-muscle ratios, which continually increased over the entire 18-hour course of imaging. However, no spatial changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution occurred in PET imaging at 20 minutes postinjection. Microscopic intratumoral distribution of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole were not correlated at 1 hour or after 18 hours postinjection, nor was {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and Hoechst-33342. Conclusions: The oxygen partial pressures at which {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole are reduced and bound in cells are theorized to be distinct and separable. However, this study demonstrated that microscopic distributions of these tracers within tumors are independent. Researchers have shown {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake to be specific to malignant expression, and this work has also demonstrated clear tumor targeting by the radiotracer.

  9. Imatinib potentiates anti-tumor T cell responses in gastrointestinal stromal tumor through the inhibition of Ido

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Vinod P.; Cavnar, Michael J.; Zeng, Shan; Bamboat, Zubin M.; Ocuin, Lee M.; Obaid, Hebroon; Sorenson, Eric C.; Popow, Rachel; Ariyan, Charlotte; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Guo, Tianhua; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Taguchi, Takahiro; Yuan, Jianda; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate targets mutated KIT oncoproteins in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and achieves a clinical response in 80% of patients. The mechanism is believed to depend predominantly on the inhibition of KIT-driven signals for tumor cell survival and proliferation. Using a mouse model of spontaneous GIST, we found that the immune system contributes substantially to the anti-tumor effects of imatinib. Imatinib therapy activated CD8+ T cells and induced regulatory T cell (T reg) apoptosis within the tumor by reducing tumor cell expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (Ido). Concurrent immunotherapy augmented the efficacy of imatinib in mouse GIST. In freshly obtained human GIST specimens, the T cell profile correlated with imatinib sensitivity and IDO expression. Thus, T cells are critical to the anti-tumor effects of imatinib in GIST and concomitant immunotherapy may further improve outcome in human cancers treated with targeted agents. PMID:21873989

  10. Polymalic Acid-based Nano Biopolymers for Targeting of Multiple Tumor Markers: An Opportunity for Personalized Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Ding, Hui; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Patil, Rameshwar; Gangalum, Pallavi R.; Chesnokova, Alexandra; Inoue, Satoshi; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Nassoura, Tala; Black, Keith L.; Holler, Eggehard

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with similar grade and morphology often respond differently to the same treatment because of variations in molecular profiling. To account for this diversity, personalized medicine is developed for silencing malignancy associated genes. Nano drugs fit these needs by targeting tumor and delivering antisense oligonucleotides for silencing of genes. As drugs for the treatment are often administered repeatedly, absence of toxicity and negligible immune response are desirable. In the example presented here, a nano medicine is synthesized from the biodegradable, non-toxic and non-immunogenic platform polymalic acid by controlled chemical ligation of antisense oligonucleotides and tumor targeting molecules. The synthesis and treatment is exemplified for human Her2-positive breast cancer using an experimental mouse model. The case can be translated towards synthesis and treatment of other tumors. PMID:24962356

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of two novel 2-nitroimidazole derivatives as potential PET radioligands for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhihao; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yajing; Du, Fenghua; Gan, Hongmei; Qiao, Jinpin; Kung, Hank F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Nitroimidazole (azomycin) derivatives labeled with radioisotopes have been developed as cancer imaging and radiotherapeutic agents based on the oncological hypoxic mechanism. By attaching nitroimidazole core with different functional groups, we synthesized new nitroimidazole derivatives, and evaluated their potentiality as tumor imaging agents. Methods Starting with commercially available 2-nitroimdazole, 2-fluoro-N-(2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl)acetamide (NEFA, [19F]7) and 2-(2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl 2-fluoroacetate (NEFT, [19F]8), as well as radiolabeling precursors - the bromo substituted analogs were quickly synthesized through a three-step synthetic pathway. The precursors were radiolabeled with [18F]F-/18-crown-6/KHCO3 in DMSO at 90 °C for 10 min followed by purification with an Oasis HLB cartridge. Biodistribution studies were carried out in EMT-6 tumor-bearing mice. The uptake (%ID/g) in tumors and normal tissues were measured at 30 min post injection. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to distinguish metabolites from parent drugs in urine and plasma of rat injected with “cold” NEFA ([19F]7) and NEFT ([19F]8). Results Two radiotracers, [18F]NEFA ([18F]7) and [18F]NEFT ([18F]8), were prepared with average yields of 6-7% and 9-10% (no decay corrected). Radiochemical purity for both tracers was >95% as determined by HPLC. Biodistribution studies in EMT-6 tumor-bearing mice indicated that the tumor to blood and tumor to liver ratios of both [18F]7 (0.96, 0.98) and [18F]8 (0.61,1.10) at 30 min were higher than those observed for [18F]FMISO (1) (0.91, 0.59), a well-investigated azomycin type hypoxia radiotacer. LC/MS analysis demonstrated that fluoroacetate was the main in vivo metabolite for both NEFA ([19F]7) and NEFT ([19F]8). Conclusions In this research, two new fluorine-18 labeled 2-nitroimdazole derivatives, [18F]7 and [18F]8, both of which containing in vivo hydrolyzable

  12. Identification of innovative potential quality markers in rocket and melon fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Cavaiuolo, Marina; Cocetta, Giacomo; Bulgari, Roberta; Spinardi, Anna; Ferrante, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Ready-to-eat fresh cut produce are exposed to pre- and postharvest abiotic stresses during the production chain. Our work aimed to identify stress responsive genes as new molecular markers of quality that can be widely applied to leaves and fruits and easily determined at any stage of the production chain. Stress responsive genes associated with quality losses were isolated in rocket and melon fresh-cut produce and their expression levels analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) at different time points after harvest at 20 °C and 4 °C. qRT-PCR results were supported by correlation analysis with physiological and biochemical determinations evaluated at the same conditions such as chlorophyll a fluorescence indices, total, reducing sugars, sucrose, ethylene, ascorbic acid, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species. In both species the putative molecular markers increased their expression soon after harvest suggesting a possible use as novel and objective quality markers of fresh-cut produces.

  13. LyP-1 ultrasonic microbubbles targeting to cancer cell as tumor bio-acoustics markers or drug carriers: targeting efficiency evaluation in, microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Jin, Qiaofeng; Chen, Tan; Zhang, Baoyue; Zheng, Rongqin; Wang, Zhanhui; Zheng, Hairong

    2009-01-01

    Using ultrasonic contrast microbubbles as acoustic biomarkers and drug carrier vehicles by conjugating tumor specific antibody to microbubbles has shown great potential in ultrasonic tumor molecular imaging or drug-delivery and therapy. Microbubble probe targeting efficiency is one of the major challenges. In this study, we developed a novel method to evaluate the targeting capability and efficiency of microbubbles to cells, and more specifically, microbubbles binding LyP-1 (a cyclic nonapeptide acid peptide) target to cancer cell within a microfluidic system. The micro cell sieves within the microfludic channels could trap the tumor cells and enhance the microbubble's interaction with the cell. Assisted with the controllable fluid shear stress, the microbubble's targeting to the cell and the corresponding affinity efficiency could be quantitatively evaluated under a florescent microscope. The system provides a useful low-cost high efficient in vitro platform for studying microbubble-cell interaction for ultrasonic tumor molecular imaging or drug-delivery and therapy.

  14. Is a stable or decreasing prolactin level in a patient with prolactinoma a surrogate marker for lack of tumor growth?

    PubMed

    Alkabbani, Abdulrahman G; Mon, Sann Y; Hatipoglu, Betul; Kennedy, Laurence; Faiman, Charles; Weil, Robert J; Hamrahian, Amir H

    2014-04-01

    The optimal interval for follow-up imaging of patients with prolactinomas is unclear. We wish to determine the likelihood of tumor enlargement in patients with prolactinomas who have a stable or reduced prolactin (PRL) level over time, whether or not they are treated with a dopamine agonist (DA). We identified 80 patients with prolactinomas (34 men, 46 women) who had at least two paired sets of serum PRL levels and pituitary MRIs, 3 or more months apart. Patients with hyperprolactinemia due to drug or stalk effects were excluded. The median (range) age was 45 (25-77) years. Sixty-three patients (78.8%) were treated with DA. PRL levels (ng/mL) at the initial and latest sets were 114 (0.3-15,732) and 16 (0.3-1,204), respectively. In patients with identifiable tumors, the maximum tumor diameters (mm) at the initial and latest MRI studies were 12.5 (2-60) and 12.5 (2-39) respectively, with an interval of 2.9 (0.3-9.7) years. Sixty percent of patients (n = 48) had a macroadenoma. Forty-two (52.5%) patients had either disappearance of the tumor (n = 22) or reduction (n = 20) in tumor size. In the remainder, tumor size was stable in 35 but increased in 3 patients. One of these patients, observed off therapy had a concomitant rise in PRL level. The other 2 had evidence of pituitary hemorrhage with no PRL increase. Tumor growth in prolactinoma patients with a stable or decreasing PRL level, regardless of size, is a rare event. Repetitive pituitary imaging in these patients may not be warranted.

  15. Detection of cancer cells and tumor markers in gastric lavage of patients with gastric cancer: Do these findings have a clinicopathological significance and oncological implication?

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Edoardo; Giarnieri, Enrico; Montagnini, Monica; D'Urso, Rosaria; Proietti, Antonella; Mesiti, Alessandra; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Mercantini, Paolo; Cavallini, Marco; Balducci, Genoveffa

    2016-09-01

    Although decreasing in the incidence over the last years, currently gastric adenocarcinoma represents the second cause of cancer related-death worldwide. Further knowledge and novel therapies are desperately needed in order to make the prognosis of these patients more acceptable. Infact, even though in recent years numerous staging parameters have been largely studied and unanimously recognized for their clinical and prognostic value, today too many shadows still exist around the capacity to predict exactly the natural history or post-treatment behavior of this cancer even among patients of the same stage. This study has identified the presence of isolated cancer cells as well as tumor markers (CEA, Ca 19.9, Ca 72.4 and Ca 50) from the gastric lavage of patients affected by gastric adenocarcinoma. Such findings led to the hypothesis that endoluminal exfoliation of neoplastic cells and the release of their products (tumor markers) into the gastric juice might be an expression of neoplastic behavior as well as aggressive malignancy. Should this hypothesis become a reality, some important progress could be made in the knowledge, staging, prediction as well as management and follow-up of this inauspicious type of cancer. PMID:27515187

  16. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) enhances the carcinogenic potential of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and accelerates the onset of tumor development in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Nida; Bilal, Nayeem; Hasan, Shirin; Ahmad, Ausaf; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Banu, Naheed

    2015-11-01

    Social stressors evolving from individual and population interactions produce stress reactions in many organisms (including humans), influencing homeostasis, altering the activity of the immunological system, and thus leading to various pathological states including cancer and their progression. The present study sought to validate the effectiveness of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) in cancer promotion and to assess oxidative stress outcomes in terms of various in vivo biochemical parameters, oxidative stress markers, DNA damage, and the development of skin tumors in Swiss albino mice. Animals were randomized into different groups based on their exposure to CUS alone, 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) alone (topical), and DMBA-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (topical) and exposure to CUS prior to DMBA or DMBA-TPA treatments and sacrificed after 16 weeks of treatment. Prior exposure to CUS significantly increased the pro-oxidant effect of carcinogen, depicted by compromised levels of antioxidants in the circulation and skin, accompanied by enhanced lipid peroxidation, plasma corticosterone, and marker enzymes as compared to DMBA-alone or DMBA-TPA treatments. DNA damage results corroborated the above biochemical outcomes. Also, the development of skin tumors (in terms of their incidence, tumor yield, and tumor burden) in mice in the presence and absence of stress further strongly supported our above biochemical measurements. CUS may work as a promoter of carcinogenesis by enhancing the pro-oxidant potential of carcinogens. Further studies may be aimed at the development of interventions for disease prevention by identifying the relations between psychological factors and DNA damage.

  17. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) enhances the carcinogenic potential of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and accelerates the onset of tumor development in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Nida; Bilal, Nayeem; Hasan, Shirin; Ahmad, Ausaf; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Banu, Naheed

    2015-11-01

    Social stressors evolving from individual and population interactions produce stress reactions in many organisms (including humans), influencing homeostasis, altering the activity of the immunological system, and thus leading to various pathological states including cancer and their progression. The present study sought to validate the effectiveness of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) in cancer promotion and to assess oxidative stress outcomes in terms of various in vivo biochemical parameters, oxidative stress markers, DNA damage, and the development of skin tumors in Swiss albino mice. Animals were randomized into different groups based on their exposure to CUS alone, 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) alone (topical), and DMBA-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (topical) and exposure to CUS prior to DMBA or DMBA-TPA treatments and sacrificed after 16 weeks of treatment. Prior exposure to CUS significantly increased the pro-oxidant effect of carcinogen, depicted by compromised levels of antioxidants in the circulation and skin, accompanied by enhanced lipid peroxidation, plasma corticosterone, and marker enzymes as compared to DMBA-alone or DMBA-TPA treatments. DNA damage results corroborated the above biochemical outcomes. Also, the development of skin tumors (in terms of their incidence, tumor yield, and tumor burden) in mice in the presence and absence of stress further strongly supported our above biochemical measurements. CUS may work as a promoter of carcinogenesis by enhancing the pro-oxidant potential of carcinogens. Further studies may be aimed at the development of interventions for disease prevention by identifying the relations between psychological factors and DNA damage. PMID:26272695

  18. MicroRNA Levels as Prognostic Markers for the Differentiation Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Donors.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Nicole; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Raiss, Christian C; Groen, Nathalie; Portalska, Karolina Janaeczek; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan; Post, Janine N; van Wijnen, Andre J; Karperien, Marcel

    2015-08-15

    The ability of human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages makes them a promising cell source for the use in tissue repair strategies. Since the differentiation potential of hMSCs differs between donors, it is necessary to establish biomarkers for the identification of donors with high differentiation potential. In this study, we show that microRNA (miRNA) expression levels are effective for distinguishing donors with high differentiation potential from low differentiation potential. Twenty hMSC donors were initially tested for marker expression and differentiation potential. In particular, the chondrogenic differentiation potential was evaluated on the basis of histological matrix formation, mRNA expression levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and quantitative glycosaminoglycan deposition. Three donors out of twenty were identified as donors with high chondrogenic potential, whereas nine showed moderate and eight showed low chondrogenic potential. Expression profiles of miRNAs involved in chondrogenesis and cartilage homeostasis were used for the distinction between high-performance hMSCs and low-performance hMSCs. Global mRNA expression profiles of the donors before the onset of chondrogenic differentiation revealed minor differences in gene expression between low and high chondrogenic performers. However, analysis of miRNA expression during a 7-day differentiation period identified miR-210 and miR-630 as positive regulators of chondrogenesis. In contrast, miR-181 and miR-34a, which are negative regulators of chondrogenesis, were upregulated during differentiation in low-performing donors. In conclusion, profiling of hMSC donors for a specific panel of miRNAs may have a prognostic value for selecting donors with high differentiation potential to improve hMSC-based strategies for tissue regeneration.

  19. Investigation of cyanine dyes for in vivo optical imaging of altered mitochondrial membrane potential in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Satoru; Temma, Takashi; Shimizu, Yoichi; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) alteration is an important target for cancer diagnosis. In this study, we designed a series of near-infrared fluorescent cationic cyanine dyes with varying alkyl chain lengths (IC7-1 derivatives) to provide diverse lipophilicities and serum albumin-binding rates, and we evaluated the usefulness of these derivatives for in vivo Δψm imaging. IC7-1 derivatives with side chains from methyl to hexyl (IC7-1-Me to IC7-1-He) were synthesized, and their optical properties were measured. Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution were investigated with depolarized HeLa cells from carbonyl cyanine m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) treatment using a spectrofluorometer and a fluorescence microscope. Serum albumin-binding rates were evaluated using albumin-binding inhibitors. In vivo optical imaging was performed with HeLa cell xenograft mice following intravenous administration of IC7-1 derivatives with or without warfarin and CCCP as in vivo blocking agents. IC7-1 derivatives showing maximum excitation and emission wavelengths at 823 nm and ∼845 nm, respectively, were synthesized. IC7-1-Me to -Bu showed fluorescence in mitochondria that decreased with CCCP treatment in a concentration-dependent manner, which showed that IC7-1-Me to -Bu successfully indicated Δψm. Tumors were clearly visualized after IC7-1-Bu administration. Treatment with warfarin or CCCP significantly decreased IC7-1-Bu fluorescence in the tumor region. In summary, IC7-1-Bu exhibited fluorescence localized to mitochondria dependent on Δψm, which enabled clear in vivo tumor imaging via serum albumin as a drug carrier for effective tumor targeting. Our data suggest that IC7-1-Bu is a promising NIR probe for in vivo imaging of the altered Δψm of tumor cells. PMID:24737784

  20. Assessing Therapeutic Potential of Magnetic Mesoporous Nanoassemblies for Chemo-Resistant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Lina; Thakur, Bhushan; Srivastava, Rohit; Ray, Pritha; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2016-01-01

    Smart drug delivery system with strategic drug distribution is the future state-of-the-art treatment for any malignancy. To investigate therapeutic potential of such nanoparticle mediated delivery system, we examined the efficacy of dual drug-loaded, pH and thermo liable lipid coated mesoporous iron oxide-based magnetic nanoassemblies (DOX:TXL-LMMNA) in mice bearing both drug sensitive (A2780(S)) and drug resistant (A2780-CisR) ovarian cancer tumor xenografts. In presence of an external AC magnetic field (ACMF), DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles disintegrate to release encapsulated drug due to hyperthermic temperatures (41-45 ºC). In vivo bio distribution study utilizing the optical and magnetic properties of DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles demonstrated minimum organ specific toxicity. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of mice bearing A2780(S) tumors and administered with DOX-TXL-LMMNA followed by the application of ACMF revealed 65% less luminescence signal and 80% mice showed complete tumor regression within eight days. A six months follow-up study revealed absence of relapse in 70% of the mice. Interestingly, the A2780-CisR tumors which did not respond to drug alone (DOX:TXL) showed 80% reduction in luminescence and tumor volume with DOX:TXL-LMMNA after thermo-chemotherapy within eight days. Cytotoxic effect of DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles was more pronounced in A2780-CisR cells than in their sensitive counterpart. Thus these novel stimuli sensitive nanoassemblies hold great promise for therapy resistant malignancies and future clinical applications. PMID:27446490

  1. Assessing Therapeutic Potential of Magnetic Mesoporous Nanoassemblies for Chemo-Resistant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Lina; Thakur, Bhushan; Srivastava, Rohit; Ray, Pritha; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2016-01-01

    Smart drug delivery system with strategic drug distribution is the future state-of-the-art treatment for any malignancy. To investigate therapeutic potential of such nanoparticle mediated delivery system, we examined the efficacy of dual drug-loaded, pH and thermo liable lipid coated mesoporous iron oxide-based magnetic nanoassemblies (DOX:TXL-LMMNA) in mice bearing both drug sensitive (A2780S) and drug resistant (A2780-CisR) ovarian cancer tumor xenografts. In presence of an external AC magnetic field (ACMF), DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles disintegrate to release encapsulated drug due to hyperthermic temperatures (41-45 ºC). In vivo bio distribution study utilizing the optical and magnetic properties of DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles demonstrated minimum organ specific toxicity. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of mice bearing A2780S tumors and administered with DOX-TXL-LMMNA followed by the application of ACMF revealed 65% less luminescence signal and 80% mice showed complete tumor regression within eight days. A six months follow-up study revealed absence of relapse in 70% of the mice. Interestingly, the A2780-CisR tumors which did not respond to drug alone (DOX:TXL) showed 80% reduction in luminescence and tumor volume with DOX:TXL-LMMNA after thermo-chemotherapy within eight days. Cytotoxic effect of DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles was more pronounced in A2780-CisR cells than in their sensitive counterpart. Thus these novel stimuli sensitive nanoassemblies hold great promise for therapy resistant malignancies and future clinical applications. PMID:27446490

  2. Assessing Therapeutic Potential of Magnetic Mesoporous Nanoassemblies for Chemo-Resistant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Lina; Thakur, Bhushan; Srivastava, Rohit; Ray, Pritha; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2016-01-01

    Smart drug delivery system with strategic drug distribution is the future state-of-the-art treatment for any malignancy. To investigate therapeutic potential of such nanoparticle mediated delivery system, we examined the efficacy of dual drug-loaded, pH and thermo liable lipid coated mesoporous iron oxide-based magnetic nanoassemblies (DOX:TXL-LMMNA) in mice bearing both drug sensitive (A2780(S)) and drug resistant (A2780-CisR) ovarian cancer tumor xenografts. In presence of an external AC magnetic field (ACMF), DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles disintegrate to release encapsulated drug due to hyperthermic temperatures (41-45 ºC). In vivo bio distribution study utilizing the optical and magnetic properties of DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles demonstrated minimum organ specific toxicity. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of mice bearing A2780(S) tumors and administered with DOX-TXL-LMMNA followed by the application of ACMF revealed 65% less luminescence signal and 80% mice showed complete tumor regression within eight days. A six months follow-up study revealed absence of relapse in 70% of the mice. Interestingly, the A2780-CisR tumors which did not respond to drug alone (DOX:TXL) showed 80% reduction in luminescence and tumor volume with DOX:TXL-LMMNA after thermo-chemotherapy within eight days. Cytotoxic effect of DOX:TXL-LMMNA particles was more pronounced in A2780-CisR cells than in their sensitive counterpart. Thus these novel stimuli sensitive nanoassemblies hold great promise for therapy resistant malignancies and future clinical applications.

  3. Protein-polyamine conjugates by transglutaminase 2 as potential markers for antineoplastic screening of natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Lentini, A; Provenzano, B; Tabolacci, C; Beninati, S

    2009-04-01

    The role of post-translational modification of cell proteins with polyamines, a reaction catalyzed by a tissue tranglutaminase (TG, EC 2.3.2.13), in the induction of cell differentiation, represents an intriguing strategy to control cell proliferation and metastatic ability of different tumor cell lines. In this review, we focus our attention on the metabolic aspects of some natural compounds (methylxantines, retinoids and flavonoids) responsible of their antitumor effects exerted through the induction of TG activity in cancer cells.

  4. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  5. The potential role of natural tumor promoters in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landsberg, J.H.; Balazs, G.H.; Steidinger, K.A.; Baden, D.G.; Work, T.M.; Russel, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP) in green turtles Chelonia mydas is a debilitating, neoplastic disease that has reached worldwide epizootic levels. The etiology of FP is unknown but has been linked to oncogenic viruses. Toxic benthic dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum spp.) are not typically considered tumorigenic agents, yet they have a worldwide distribution and produce a tumor promoter, okadaic acid (OA). Prorocentrum spp. are epiphytic on macroalgae and seagrasses that are normal components of green turtle diets. Here we show that green turtles in the Hawaiian Islands consume Prorocentrum and that high-risk FP areas are associated with areas where P. lima and P. concavum are both highly prevalent and abundant. The presence of presumptive OA in the tissues of Hawaiian green turtles further suggests exposure and a potential role for this tumor promoter in the etiology of FP.

  6. The role of BRAF V600E mutation as a potential marker for prognostic stratification of papillary thyroid carcinoma: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Mahdi; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Bahar, Mostafa Mehrabi; Arabi, Azadeh; Yadollahi, Mona; Ghafari, Azar; Taghehchian, Negin; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Papillary carcinoma is the most prevalent malignancy of thyroid gland, and its incidence has been recently increased. The BRAF(V600E) mutation is the most frequent genetic alteration in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The role of BRAF(V600E) mutation as a potential prognostic factor has been controversially reported in different studies, with short-term follow-up. In this study, we evaluated the role of BRAF(V600E) mutation as a potential marker for prognostic stratification of patients with PTC in long-term follow-up. We studied 69 PTC patients with a mean follow-up period of 63.9 months (median: 60 m). The BRAF(V600E) mutation was analyzed by PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism and sequencing. The correlation between the presence or absence of the BRAF(V600E) mutation, clinicopathological features and prognosis of PTC patients were studied. The BRAF(V600E) mutation was found in 28 of 69 (40.6%) PTC patients, and it was significantly more frequent in older patients (p < 0.001), in advanced tumor stages (p = 0.006) and in patients with history of radiation exposure (p = 0.037). Incomplete response to treatment in PTC patients was significantly correlated with certain clinicopathological characteristics (follow-up time, distant metastases, advanced stage, first thyroglobulin (fTg) level, history of reoperation and external radiotherapy and delay in iodine therapy) but it was not related to the presence of BRAF(V600E) mutation. Prevalence of BRAF(V600E) mutation was 40.6% in patients with papillary thyroid cancer in northeast of Iran. The BRAF(V600E) mutation was associated with older age and advanced tumor stage but was not correlated with incomplete response during follow-up.

  7. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  8. Predictive and prognostic value of preoperative serum tumor markers is EGFR mutation-specific in resectable non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Richeng; Wang, Xinyue; Li, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background The predictive and prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin-19 fragments (Cyfra21-1), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) has been investigated in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. However, few studies have directly focused on the association between these markers and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status or mutation subtypes. Patients and methods We retrospectively analyzed 1016 patients with stage I-IIIA NSCLC who underwent complete resection between 2008 and 2012. Correlations between serum tumor marker levels and EGFR mutations and survival parameters were analyzed and prognostic factors were identified. Results Cyfra21-1 levels (P = 0.032 for disease-free survival [DFS]; P < 0.001 for overall survival [OS]) and clinical stage were identified as independent predictive and prognostic factors in EGFR-mutated adenocarcinoma patients. CEA levels (P < 0.001 for DFS; P = 0.002 for OS) and clinical stage were independently predictive and prognostic in EGFR wild-type adenocarcinoma patients. Further stratification analysis revealed that in EGFR exon 19 deletion adenocarcinomas, elevated Cyfra21-1 was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.002). Within the Leu858Arg substitution subgroup, increased CEA (P = 0.005) and clinical stage were predictive factors of DFS, while elevated CEA (P = 0.005) and Cyfra21-1 (P = 0.027) were independent prognostic factors. Conclusion Cyfra21-1 and CEA exhibit different predictive and prognostic values between EGFR-mutated and wild-type adenocarcinomas, as well as between EGFR mutation subtypes. The prognostic impact of preoperative serum tumor markers should be evaluated together with EGFR mutation status. PMID:27072585

  9. Astemizole-based anticancer therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and Eag1 channels as potential early-stage markers of HCC.

    PubMed

    de Guadalupe Chávez-López, María; Pérez-Carreón, Julio Isael; Zuñiga-García, Violeta; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis A; Caro-Sánchez, Claudia Haydee; Acuña-Macías, Isabel; Gariglio, Patricio; Hernández-Gallegos, Elizabeth; Chiliquinga, Andrea Jazmín; Camacho, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has very poor prognosis. Astemizole has gained great interest as a potential anticancer drug because it targets several proteins involved in cancer including the Eag1 (ether à-go-go-1) potassium channel that is overexpressed in human HCC. Eag1 channels are regulated by cancer etiological factors and have been proposed as early tumor markers. Here, we found that HepG2 and HuH-7 HCC cells displayed Eag1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression, determined by real-time RT-PCR and immunochemistry, respectively. Astemizole inhibited human HCC cell proliferation (assessed by metabolic activity assay) and induced apoptosis (studied with flow cytometry) in both cell lines. The subcellular Eag1 protein localization was modified by astemizole in the HepG2 cells. The treatment with astemizole prevented diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced rat HCC development in vivo (followed by studying γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activity). The Eag1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in most DEN-treated groups but decreased after astemizole treatment. GGT activity was decreased by astemizole. The Eag1 protein was detected in cirrhotic and dysplastic rat livers. Astemizole might have clinical utility for HCC prevention and treatment, and Eag1 channels may be potential early HCC biomarkers. These data provide significant basis to include astemizole in HCC clinical trials. PMID:25783527

  10. SMARCA4 (BRG1) loss of expression is a useful marker for the diagnosis of ovarian small cell carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (ovarian rhabdoid tumor): a comprehensive analysis of 116 rare gynecologic tumors, 9 soft tissue tumors, and 9 melanomas.

    PubMed

    Karanian-Philippe, Marie; Velasco, Valérie; Longy, Michel; Floquet, Anne; Arnould, Laurent; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Le Naoures-Méar, Cécile; Averous, Gerlinde; Guyon, Frédéric; MacGrogan, Gaëtan; Croce, Sabrina

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian small cell carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT)/ovarian rhabdoid tumor is a rare and highly malignant tumor that typically occurs in young women. Up until now the diagnosis has been made on the basis of morphology without any specific immunohistochemical (IHC) markers. However, several authors have shown recently that SCCOHTs are characterized by inactivation of the SMARCA4 gene (encoding the BRG1 protein) resulting in a loss of BRG1 protein expression in IHC. We evaluated BRG1 and INI1 expression in 12 SCCOHTs and in a series of 122 tumors that could mimic SCCOHT morphologically: 9 juvenile granulosa cell tumors, 47 adult granulosa cell tumors, 33 high-grade ovarian serous carcinomas, 9 desmoplastic round cell tumors, 13 Ewing sarcomas (5 from the pelvis and 8 from soft tissues), 1 round cell sarcoma associated with CIC-DUX4 translocation from soft tissue (thigh), 1 case of high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma of the ovary, and 9 melanomas. Forty-four adult granulosa cell tumors were interpretable by IHC. All 12 SCCOHTs were devoid of BRG1 expression and expressed INI1. All other interpretable 119 tumors showed BRG1 nuclear positivity, with variable staining proportions, ranging from 10% to 100% of positive cells (mean: 77%, median: 80%), variable intensities (weak: 5%, moderate: 37%, strong: 58%), and distributions: diffuse in 82 cases (70%) and heterogenous in 36 cases (30%). BRG1 positivity was heterogenous in desmoplastic round cell tumors and adult granulosa cell tumors. Overall, BRG1 is a useful diagnostic marker in SCCOHT, showing the absence of expression in SCCOHT. Nevertheless, the possible heterogeneity and the variable intensity of this staining warrant caution in the interpretation of BRG1 staining in biopsy specimens.

  11. Discovery and characterization of proteins associated with aflatoxin-resistance: evaluating their potential as breeding markers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert L; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Warburton, Marilyn; Luo, Meng; Menkir, Abebe; Fakhoury, Ahmad; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-04-01

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilitate the transfer of resistance into commercially useful genetic backgrounds without transfer of unwanted traits. To accomplish this, research efforts have focused on the identification of kernel resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) including the employment of comparative proteomics to investigate closely-related maize lines that vary in aflatoxin accumulation. RAPs have been identified and several further characterized through physiological and biochemical investigations to determine their causal role in resistance and, therefore, their suitability as breeding markers. Three RAPs, a 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor, pathogenesis-related protein 10 and glyoxalase I are being investigated using RNAi gene silencing and plant transformation. Several resistant lines have been subjected to QTL mapping to identify loci associated with the aflatoxin-resistance phenotype. Results of proteome and characterization studies are discussed. PMID:22069617

  12. Statistical strategies to reveal potential vibrational markers for in vivo analysis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira Mendes, Thiago de; Pinto, Liliane Pereira; Santos, Laurita dos; Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of biological systems by spectroscopic techniques involves the evaluation of hundreds to thousands of variables. Hence, different statistical approaches are used to elucidate regions that discriminate classes of samples and to propose new vibrational markers for explaining various phenomena like disease monitoring, mechanisms of action of drugs, food, and so on. However, the technical statistics are not always widely discussed in applied sciences. In this context, this work presents a detailed discussion including the various steps necessary for proper statistical analysis. It includes univariate parametric and nonparametric tests, as well as multivariate unsupervised and supervised approaches. The main objective of this study is to promote proper understanding of the application of various statistical tools in these spectroscopic methods used for the analysis of biological samples. The discussion of these methods is performed on a set of in vivo confocal Raman spectra of human skin analysis that aims to identify skin aging markers. In the Appendix, a complete routine of data analysis is executed in a free software that can be used by the scientific community involved in these studies.

  13. Liver protein profiling in chronic hepatitis C: identification of potential predictive markers for interferon therapy outcome.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Ariel Basulto; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Iacono, Oreste Lo; Angeletti, Claudio; Corazzari, Marco; Daniele, Nicola; Testa, Angela; Pisa, Roberto; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Antonucci, Giorgio; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2012-02-01

    The current anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy, based on pegylated-interferon alpha and ribavirin, has limited success rate and is accompanied by several side effects. The aim of this study was to identify protein profiles in pretreatment liver biopsies of HCV patients correlating with the outcome of antiviral therapy. Cytosolic or membrane/organelle-enriched protein extracts from liver biopsies of eight HCV patients were analyzed by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Overall, this analysis identified 21 proteins whose expression levels correlate with therapy response. These factors are involved in interferon-mediated antiviral activity, stress response, and energy metabolism. Moreover, we found that post-translational modifications of dihydroxyacetone kinase were also associated with therapy outcome. Differential expression of the five best performing markers (STAT1, Mx1, DD4, DAK, and PD-ECGF) was confirmed by immunoblotting assays in an independent group of HCV patients. Finally, we showed that a prediction model based on the expression levels of these markers classifies responder and nonresponder patients with an accuracy of 85.7%. These results provide evidence that the analysis of pretreatment liver protein profiles is valuable for discriminating between responder and nonresponder HCV patients, and may contribute to reduce the number of nonresponder patients exposed to therapy-associated risks.

  14. Discovery and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Aflatoxin-Resistance: Evaluating Their Potential as Breeding Markers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert L.; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Warburton, Marilyn; Luo, Meng; Menkir, Abebe; Fakhoury, Ahmad; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Host resistance has become a viable approach to eliminating aflatoxin contamination of maize since the discovery of several maize lines with natural resistance. However, to derive commercial benefit from this resistance and develop lines that can aid growers, markers need to be identified to facilitate the transfer of resistance into commercially useful genetic backgrounds without transfer of unwanted traits. To accomplish this, research efforts have focused on the identification of kernel resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) including the employment of comparative proteomics to investigate closely-related maize lines that vary in aflatoxin accumulation. RAPs have been identified and several further characterized through physiological and biochemical investigations to determine their causal role in resistance and, therefore, their suitability as breeding markers. Three RAPs, a 14 kDa trypsin inhibitor, pathogenesis-related protein 10 and glyoxalase I are being investigated using RNAi gene silencing and plant transformation. Several resistant lines have been subjected to QTL mapping to identify loci associated with the aflatoxin-resistance phenotype. Results of proteome and characterization studies are discussed. PMID:22069617

  15. The Continuum of Serous Tumors of Low Malignant Potential and Low-Grade Serous Carcinomas of the Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Gershenson, David

    2007-01-01

    The role of serous tumors of low malignant potential (LMP) in the development of invasive epithelial cancer of the ovary is debatable. This review summarizes the current clinical, genetic, and genomic evidence for the existence of a continuum comprising both LMP serous tumors and low-grade serous ovarian carcinomas. PMID:18057521

  16. E-cadherin in non-tumor epithelium adjacent to oral cancer as risk marker for the development of multiple tumors.

    PubMed

    González-Moles, M A; Bravo, M; Ruiz-Avila, I; Gil-Montoya, J A; Acebal, F; Esteban, F

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to find out whether the loss of E-cadherin is a risk factor for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and whether it could serve as a diagnostic marker for oral premalignant fields. We studied 77 oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) with associated non-tumour epithelia from 61 patients. Immunohistochemical studies (antibody NHC-38) were used to investigate E-cadherin expression, which was completely lost in basal (48% of cases) and parabasal (43%) layers of non-tumour epithelia close to the tumour and in basal (47%) and parabasal (38%) layers of non-tumour epithelia distant from the tumour. In multiple tumours E-cadherin expression was significantly lower than in single tumours in the basal, parabasal layers, and the middle third of close (p=0.002, <0.001, <0.001) and distant (p=0.041, p<0.001, p=0.005) non-tumour epithelia, respectively. Downregulation of E-cadherin may be valuable as a risk marker for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and for the diagnosis of premalignant fields.

  17. [Circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, O; Pachmann, K

    2015-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells are defined as tumor cells which are circulating in the peripheral blood of the cancer patient. While several large studies have investigated the role of circulating tumor cells in other solid tumors, the importance of these tumor cells in patients with head and neck cancer was turned into the focus not until the recent years. In other solid tumor the presence of circulating tumor cells often seems to be a negative prognostic marker and seems to be a marker for therapy response. The present article wants to give an overview about the knowledge on circulating tumor cells and their clinical relevance in head and neck cancer. The methodology to detect circulating tumor cells will be critically reflected. The future potential of the detection of circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer patients will be discussed.

  18. Evaluation and correlation of risk recurrence in early breast cancer assessed by Oncotype DX(®), clinicopathological markers and tumor cell dissemination in the blood and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Bahriye; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heubner, Martin; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2013-11-01

    The Oncotype DX(®) assay is a validated genomic test that predicts the likelihood of breast cancer recurrence, patient survival within ten years of diagnosis and the benefit of chemotherapy in early-stage, node-negative, estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Further markers of recurrence include disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow (BM) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood, particularly stemness-like tumor cells (slCTCs). In this study, Oncotype DX, DTCs, CTCs and slCTCs were used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in 68 patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative, early-stage breast cancer. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were analyzed for the expression of 16 cancer genes and 5 reference genes by Oncotype DX, yielding a recurrence score (RS). G2 tumors were evaluated for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)/plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1) and Ki-67. Two BM aspirates were analyzed by immunocytochemistry for DTCs using the pan-cytokeratin antibody A45-B/B3. CTCs and slCTCs in the blood were detected using the AdnaTest BreastCancer, AdnaTest EMT and the AdnaTest TumorStemCell. Oncotype DX was performed in 68 cases, yielding a low RS in 30/68 patients (44%), an intermediate RS in 29/68 patients (43%) and a high RS in 9/68 patients (13%). DTCs were detected in 19/68 patients (28%), CTCs in 13/68 patients (19%) and slCTCs in 26/68 (38%) patients. Moreover, 8/68 patients (12%) with G2 tumors were positive for uPA, 6/68 (9%) for PAI1 and 21/68 (31%) for Ki-67. Ki-67, progesterone receptor (PR) and G3 tumors were significantly correlated with RS (P<0.001; P=0.006; and P=0,002, respectively), whereas no correlation was identified between DTCs, CTCs, slCTCs and RS. Ki-67 may support therapeutic decisions in cases where Oncotype DX is not feasible. Larger patient cohorts are required to estimate the additional detection of DTCs and CTCs for the determination of risk recurrence.

  19. Zeta potential change of Neuro-2a tumor cells after exposure to alumina nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, Sergey O.; Fomenko, Alla N.; Korovin, Matvey S.

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, researches have paid much attention to the physical, chemical, biophysical and biochemical properties of a cell surface. It is known that most of the cells' surfaces are charged. This charge depends on the biochemical structure of the cell membranes. Therefore, measurement of a cell surface charge is a significant criterion that gives information about the cell surface. Evaluation of the cells zeta-potential is important to understand the interaction mechanisms of various drugs, antibiotics, as well as the interaction of nanoparticles with the cell surface. In this study, we use the dynamic light scattering method to detect the zeta-potential change of Neuro-2a tumor cells. It has been observed that zeta-potential shifted to negative values after exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles and inducing apoptosis.

  20. [Polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence as a source of enhancement of the discrimination potential of the STR-markers].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Timoshenko, T V; Leonov, S N; Ivanov, P L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present pilot investigation was to reveal and to study polymorphism of nucleotide sequence in the alleles of STR loci of human autosomal DNA with special reference to the role of this phenomenon as a source of the differences between homonymous allelic variants. The secondary objection was to evaluate the possibility of using the data thus obtained for the enhancement of the informative value of the forensic medical genotyping of STR loci by means of identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for the purpose of extending their allelic spectrum. The methodological basis of the study was constituted by the comprehensive amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and amplified fragment sequence polymorphisms (AFSP) analysis of DNA with the use of the PLEX-ID^TM analytical mass-spectrometry platform (Abbot Molecular, USA). The study has demonstrated that polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence can be regarded as the possible source of enhancement of the discriminating potential of STR markers. It means that the analysis of polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence for genotyping AFLP-type markers of chromosomal DNA can considerably increase the effectiveness of their application as individualizing markers for the purpose of molecular genetic expertises.

  1. Ameliorative potential of Coccinia grandis extract on serum and liver marker enzymes and lipid profile in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumari, S.; Bhuvaneswari, P.; Rajeswari, P.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most severe metabolic pandemic of the 21st century, affecting essential biochemical activities in almost every cell in the body. Indian literatures have already mentioned herbal remediation for a number of human ailments. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of Coccinia grandis extract on serum and liver marker enzymes (ALP, AST, ALT and LDH) and lipid profile (total cholesterol, phospholipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids in serum and liver) in streptozotocin induced diabetic animals. The experimental animals were treated with methanolic extract of Coccinia grandis and the levels of marker enzymes and lipid profile were estimated. The ALP, AST, ALT and LDH levels were increased in diabetic rats and restored to near normal levels after administration of plant extract. The lipid profile increased in diabetic group and after the treatment with the plant extract the levels were reverted to near normal. Thus the methanolic extract of Coccinia grandis has a potent ability to restore the marker enzymes and the lipid profile was reverted to near normal levels. PMID:22736887

  2. [Polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence as a source of enhancement of the discrimination potential of the STR-markers].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Timoshenko, T V; Leonov, S N; Ivanov, P L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present pilot investigation was to reveal and to study polymorphism of nucleotide sequence in the alleles of STR loci of human autosomal DNA with special reference to the role of this phenomenon as a source of the differences between homonymous allelic variants. The secondary objection was to evaluate the possibility of using the data thus obtained for the enhancement of the informative value of the forensic medical genotyping of STR loci by means of identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) for the purpose of extending their allelic spectrum. The methodological basis of the study was constituted by the comprehensive amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and amplified fragment sequence polymorphisms (AFSP) analysis of DNA with the use of the PLEX-ID^TM analytical mass-spectrometry platform (Abbot Molecular, USA). The study has demonstrated that polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence can be regarded as the possible source of enhancement of the discriminating potential of STR markers. It means that the analysis of polymorphism of DNA nucleotide sequence for genotyping AFLP-type markers of chromosomal DNA can considerably increase the effectiveness of their application as individualizing markers for the purpose of molecular genetic expertises. PMID:27500481

  3. Expression of p63 and Bcl-2 in Malignant Thyroid Tumors and their Correlation with other Diagnostic Immunocytochemical Markers

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shyama; Khurana, Nita; Kakar, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bcl-2 is a marker recently studied in thyroid tumours and proposed to have prognostic significance. p63 is expressed in a proportion of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases and may have a role in tumour progression. Aim To study expression of Bcl2 and p63 in thyroid tumours and correlation of Bcl-2 with diagnostic markers including Thyroglobulin, Calcitonin and Carcinoembryonic antigen. Materials and Methods Cytology smears of 35 cases of thyroid cancer were studied over a period of 18 months. In 20 cases histopathology was available. Immunocytochemistry for Bcl-2 and p63 was done, and diagnostic markers were applied as and when required. Results p63 showed focal nuclear expression in 46.1% of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases, and was negative in all other tumours. Bcl-2 was positive in 88.9% of follicular carcinomas, 100% of papillary carcinomas and 83.3% of medullary carcinoma cases, and showed focal weak expression in 40% of Anaplastic Carcinoma (ATC) cases, thereby signifying down regulation (p-value = 0.001). There was significant down regulation of Thyroglobulin (Tg) in ATC vs well differentiated follicular derived tumours (p-value ≤ 0.016). Positive correlation was noted between expression of Bcl-2 and Calcitonin (0.93) and Bcl-2 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) (0.89), and weak positive correlation (0.65) between Tg and Bcl-2. Conclusion Bcl-2 is downregulated in anaplastic carcinomas as compared to well differentiated thyroid tumours, and shows correlation with differentiation associated tumour antigens. Thus, loss of Bcl-2 was associated with loss of differentiation in thyroid tumours. Anaplastic carcinoma as such is associated with worse prognosis and loss of Bcl-2 may be partly responsible for the same. p63 is specific but less sensitive marker for PTC. Further studies are required to determine the role of Bcl-2 and p63 in thyroid tumours. PMID:27630849

  4. Expression of p63 and Bcl-2 in Malignant Thyroid Tumors and their Correlation with other Diagnostic Immunocytochemical Markers

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shyama; Khurana, Nita; Kakar, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bcl-2 is a marker recently studied in thyroid tumours and proposed to have prognostic significance. p63 is expressed in a proportion of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases and may have a role in tumour progression. Aim To study expression of Bcl2 and p63 in thyroid tumours and correlation of Bcl-2 with diagnostic markers including Thyroglobulin, Calcitonin and Carcinoembryonic antigen. Materials and Methods Cytology smears of 35 cases of thyroid cancer were studied over a period of 18 months. In 20 cases histopathology was available. Immunocytochemistry for Bcl-2 and p63 was done, and diagnostic markers were applied as and when required. Results p63 showed focal nuclear expression in 46.1% of papillary thyroid carcinoma cases, and was negative in all other tumours. Bcl-2 was positive in 88.9% of follicular carcinomas, 100% of papillary carcinomas and 83.3% of medullary carcinoma cases, and showed focal weak expression in 40% of Anaplastic Carcinoma (ATC) cases, thereby signifying down regulation (p-value = 0.001). There was significant down regulation of Thyroglobulin (Tg) in ATC vs well differentiated follicular derived tumours (p-value ≤ 0.016). Positive correlation was noted between expression of Bcl-2 and Calcitonin (0.93) and Bcl-2 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) (0.89), and weak positive correlation (0.65) between Tg and Bcl-2. Conclusion Bcl-2 is downregulated in anaplastic carcinomas as compared to well differentiated thyroid tumours, and shows correlation with differentiation associated tumour antigens. Thus, loss of Bcl-2 was associated with loss of differentiation in thyroid tumours. Anaplastic carcinoma as such is associated with worse prognosis and loss of Bcl-2 may be partly responsible for the same. p63 is specific but less sensitive marker for PTC. Further studies are required to determine the role of Bcl-2 and p63 in thyroid tumours.

  5. Antioxidant and Tumor Cell Suppression Potential of Premna Serratifolia Linn Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, Thamizh N.; Venkatakrishnan, V.; Damodar, Kumar S.; Elumalai, Preetham

    2012-01-01

    Herbal and natural products have been used in folk medicine for centuries throughout the world. There has been renewed interest in screening higher plants for novel biologically active compounds, particularly those that effectively intervene in human ailments in the field of chronic diseases. The present study has been taken up to evaluate the free radical scavenging activity and tumor cell suppression potential of Premna serratifolia leaf in various in vitro model systems. The methanolic extract of P. serratifolia leaf was obtained by soxhlet extraction method. The superoxide radical scavenging activity, nitric oxide radical, hydroxyl radical, DPPH radical and ABTS radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation were determined. The tumor cell suppression cell potential was determined in three different