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Sample records for potential tumor marker

  1. MMP13 is potentially a new tumor marker for breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Jen; Yang, Ming-Je; Yang, Yu-Hsiang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsueh, Er-Jung; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2009-11-01

    Within the past decade, the incidence of breast cancer in Taiwan has been rising year after year. Breast cancer is the first most prevalent cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in Taiwan. The early stage of breast cancer not only have a wider range of therapeutic options, but also obtain a higher success rate of therapy than those with advanced breast cancer. A test for tumor markers is the most convenient method to screen for breast cancer. However, the tumor markers currently available for breast cancer detection include carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 15.3 (CA15.3), and carbohydrate antigen 27.29 (CA27.29) exhibited certain limitations. Poor sensitivity and specificity greatly limits the diagnostic accuracy of these markers. This study aims to identify potential tumor markers for breast cancer. At first, we analyzed genes expression in infiltrating lobular carcinoma, metaplastic carcinoma, and infiltrating ductal carcinoma of paired specimens (tumor and normal tissue) from breast cancer patients using microarray technology. We selected 371 overexpressed genes in all of the three cell type. In advanced breast cancer tissue, we detected four genes MMP13, CAMP, COL10A1 and FLJ25416 from 25 overexpressed genes which encoded secretion protein more specifically for breast cancer than other genes. After validation with 15 pairs of breast cancer tissue and paired to normal adjacent tissues by membrane array and quantitative RT-PCR, we found MMP13 was 100% overexpressed and confirmed to be a secreted protein by Western blot analysis of the cell culture medium. The expression level of MMP13 was also measured by immunohistochemical staining. We suggest that MMP13 is a highly overexpressed secretion protein in breast cancer tissue. It has potential to be a new tumor marker for breast cancer diagnosis.

  2. Urinary 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Concentrations as a Potential Tumor Marker for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Yosuke; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Ota, Urara; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Arita, Tomohiro; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Tanaka, Tohru; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-05-01

    Tumor biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), are used to screen and monitor tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). 5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is used in photodynamic diagnosis and therapy. Porphyrins produced by tumor cells are excreted in the urine after 5-ALA administration. In this study, we evaluated the use of porphyrins as novel tumor markers in urine samples from patients with CRC. Porphyrin metabolite concentrations were measured in urine samples of 33 patients with CRC, 16 patients with benign disease and 8 healthy adults, after 5-ALA administration. The porphyrin metabolite concentrations were significantly increased in the CRC group compared to the control group, while in CRC patients, the porphyrin metabolite concentrations in urine were significantly decreased after surgery. These results suggest that the measurement of porphyrin metabolites in urine may potentially serve as a new screening and recurrence marker for CRC. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Classification of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Suresh, M R

    1996-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first tumor markers more than a century ago (Bence-Jones proteins), a vast array of molecules have been described as being associated with cancer. These are generally naturally occurring biomolecules with the exception of neo-antigens expressed in certain tumors induced by viruses. Tumor markers can be broadly classified into tumor specific antigens and tumor-associated markers. Most tumor markers were often heralded as highly tumor specific but subsequent studies demonstrated their presence in normal tissues of the adult or in various stages of ontogeny. As a result, very few tumor-specific antigens can be recognized. The idiotypes of immunoglobulins of B cell tumors and certain neo-antigens of virus induced tumors are two examples that are strictly tumor specific. The vast majority of tumor markers are in reality tumor-associated antigens and can be classified into two types based on their size. The low-molecular weight tumor markers (approximately < 1000 Daltons) include some nucleosides, lipid associated sialic acid, polyamines, pseudouridine, pigment derivatives, and other metabolites. The macromolecular tumor antigens are the most important sub-type useful in the clinical management of cancer patients. The large cancer antigens are either enzymes, growth factors, hormones, receptors, biological response modifiers, oncogenes and their products, or glycoconjugates which include glycoproteins and glycolipids. Collectively all the commercial tumor marker assays available to the oncologist for cancer patient management amount to an annual sales of > $1 billion world wide. The demonstrated clinical usefulness and commercial success of tumor markers have continued to fuel exciting research into the discovery and novel uses of new analytes.

  4. Serum tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Greg L; Slater, Evan D; Sanders, Georganne K; Prichard, John G

    2003-09-15

    Monoclonal antibodies are used to detect serum antigens associated with specific malignancies. These tumor markers are most useful for monitoring response to therapy and detecting early relapse. With the exception of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), tumor markers do not have sufficient sensitivity or specificity for use in screening. Cancer antigen (CA) 27.29 most frequently is used to follow response to therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Carcinoembryonic antigen is used to detect relapse of colorectal cancer, and CA 19-9 may be helpful in establishing the nature of pancreatic masses. CA 125 is useful for evaluating pelvic masses in postmenopausal women, monitoring response to therapy in women with ovarian cancer, and detecting recurrence of this malignancy. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a marker for hepatocellular carcinoma, sometimes is used to screen highly selected populations and to assess hepatic masses in patients at particular risk for developing hepatic malignancy. Testing for the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is an integral part of the diagnosis and management of gestational trophoblastic disease. Combined AFP and beta-hCG testing is an essential adjunct in the evaluation and treatment of nonseminomatous germ cell tumors, and in monitoring the response to therapy. AFP and beta-hCG also may be useful in evaluating potential origins of poorly differentiated metastatic cancer. PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer, detect recurrence of the malignancy, and evaluate specific syndromes of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary.

  5. Diagnostic potential in prostate cancer of a panel of urinary molecular tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Talesa, Vincenzo N; Antognelli, Cinzia; Del Buono, Chiara; Stracci, Fabrizio; Serva, Maria R; Cottini, Emanuele; Mearini, Ettore

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a heterogeneous, multifactorial and multifocal disease. Therefore, the search for a combination of assays using a panel of tumor markers is fundamental for a more precise and reliable diagnosis. In the present study we investigated the diagnostic value of five different genes, associated with PCa carcinogenesis, encoding for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), serine protease Hepsin, PCa antigen 3 (PCA3), UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galatosamine transferase (GalNAC-T3) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Forty-four patients, with previously untreated, histologically verified PCa and forty-six patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were enrolled in this study. Absolute concentration of the transcript levels of each gene was calculated by quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis in urine sediments of men suffering from PCa or BPH after prostatic massage. The diagnostic value of a concomitant examination of these markers was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. We demonstrated that the diagnostic potential of the combined urinary PSA and PSMA level was significantly better than that of each singularly considered marker, including total serum PSA, the present gold standard test for PCa diagnosis.

  6. Identification of Apolipoprotein C-I as a Potential Wilms’ Tumor Marker after Excluding Inflammatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Guo, Fei; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Da; Yang, Heying; Yu, Jiekai; Niu, Lili; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Shu; Wang, Jiaxiang

    2014-01-01

    Wilms’ tumor is one of the most common malignant tumors observed in children, and its early diagnosis is important for late-stage treatment and prognosis. We previously screened and identified protein markers for Wilms’ tumor; however, these markers lacked specificity, and some were associated with inflammation. In the current study, serum samples from children with Wilms’ tumors were compared with those of healthy controls and patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). After exclusion of factors associated with inflammation, specific protein markers for Wilms’ tumors were identified. After comparing the protein peak values obtained from all three groups, a protein with a m/z of 6438 Da was specified. Purification and identification of the target protein using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-linearion trap mass spectrometry(2D-LC-LTQ-MS) mass spectrometry, respectively, revealed that it was apolipoprotein C-I (APO C-I). Thus, APO C-I is a specific protein marker for Wilms’ tumor. PMID:25222555

  7. Absence of the Epithelial Glycocalyx As Potential Tumor Marker for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Katrin; Bade, Steffen; Röckendorf, Niels; Meckelein, Barbara; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Schultz, Holger; Fröschle, Günter-Willi; Frey, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Detection of cancer at an early stage is pivotal for successful treatment and long term survival, yet early diagnosis requires sensitive and specific markers that can be easily detected by screening procedures. Differences in the surface structure of tumor and healthy cells, if sufficiently pronounced and discernible, may serve that purpose. We analyzed the luminal surface of healthy and neoplastic human colorectal tissues for the presence and architecture of the glycocalyx—a dense network of highly glycosylated proteins—using transmission electron microscopy. The ultrastructural analyses showed that 93% of healthy mucosae were covered by an intact glycocalyx. Contrarily, on over 90% of the surface of neoplastic cells the glycocalyx was absent. The sensitivity and specificity of our marker “absence of a glycocalyx” are excellent, being 91% (83–96%) and 96% (89–99%) for adenocarcinomas and 94% (73–100%) and 92% (85–97%) for precancerous polyps (means and 95% confidence intervals). Using a cell culture model we could demonstrate that a particulate probe targeting a cell surface receptor usually concealed beneath the glycocalyx can bind selectively to glycocalyx-free areas of a tumor cell layer. We propose that the absence of a glycocalyx may serve as novel type of tumor marker. If the absence of the glycocalyx can be detected e.g. via binding of imaging probes to non-shielded surface receptors of anomalously differentiated cells, this tumor marker could be used to enable early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. PMID:28033349

  8. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers.

    PubMed

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-03-17

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c-d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors.

  9. Assessment of Environmental and Hereditary Influence on Development of Pituitary Tumors Using Dermatoglyphic Traits and Their Potential as Screening Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gradiser, Marina; Matovinovic Osvatic, Martina; Dilber, Dario; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess environmental and hereditary influence on development of pituitary tumors using dermatoglyphic traits. The study was performed on 126 patients of both genders with pituitary tumors (60 non-functional and 66 functional pituitary tumor patients) in comparison to the control group of 400 phenotypically healthy individuals. Statistical analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits of digito-palmar dermatoglyphics was performed, and hormonal status was determined according to the standard protocols. Although we did not find markers that could specifically distinguish functional from non-functional tumors, we have found markers predisposing to the development of tumors in general (a small number of ridges between triradius of both hands, a smaller number of ridges between the triradius of c–d rc R), those for endocrine dysfunction (increased number of arches and reduced number of whorls, difference of pattern distribution in the I3 and I4 interdigital space), and some that could potentially be attributed to patients suffering from pituitary tumors (small number of ridges for variables FRR 5, smaller number of ridges in the FRL 4 of both hands and difference of pattern distribution at thenar of I1 and I2 interdigital space). The usage of dermatoglyphic traits as markers of predisposition of pituitary tumor development could facilitate the earlier detection of patients in addition to standard methods, and possibly earlier treatment and higher survival rate. Finally, our results are consistent with the hypothesis about multifactorial nature of pituitary tumor etiology comprised of both gene instability and environmental factors. PMID:26999178

  10. Plasma protoporphyrin IX following administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid as a potential tumor marker

    PubMed Central

    OTA, URARA; FUKUHARA, HIDEO; ISHIZUKA, MASAHIRO; ABE, FUMINORI; KAWADA, CHIAKI; TAMURA, KENJI; TANAKA, TOHRU; INOUE, KEIJI; OGURA, SHUN-ICHIRO; SHUIN, TARO

    2015-01-01

    Exogenously administered 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is metabolized to protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which specifically accumulates in cancer cells and emits red fluorescence by blue light irradiation. These phenomena are applied for the intraoperative diagnosis of cancer. Based on the fact that accumulated PpIX in cancer cells is exported extracellularly via the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2, we hypothesized that the measurement of plasma PpIX concentrations could be applied as a tumor marker for cancer screening. In the present study, the use of plasma samples from bladder cancer patients were evaluated as a tumor marker. ALA, 1.0 g, was orally administered to bladder cancer patients and healthy adults. The plasma concentration of PpIX was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography system. The plasma PpIX concentration following ALA administration was significantly higher in bladder cancer patients than that in the healthy adults, suggesting the effectiveness of plasma PpIX analysis following ALA administration for cancer screening. Additionally, 4 h after ALA administration, plasma PpIX showed high sensitivity (94.4%) and high specificity (80.0%). PMID:26171183

  11. Pituitary tumor transforming gene and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor expression and immunohistochemical measurement of Ki-67 as potential prognostic markers of pituitary tumors aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tejada, Laura; Sánchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Moreno-Pérez, Oscar; Montañana, Carmen Fajardo; Niveiro, Maria; Tritos, Nicholas A; Alfonso, Antonio M Picó

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict recurrence of pituitary adenoma (PA) after surgery may be helpful to determine follow-up frequency and the need for adjuvant treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic capacity of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), and Ki-67. In this retrospective study, the normalized copy number (NCN) of PTIG and IGF1R mRNA was measured using RT-PCR, and the Ki-67 index was measured by immunohistochemistry in 46 PA samples. Clinical data, histological subtype, and radiographic characteristics were collected to assess associations between variables and tumor behavior. Progression of tumor remnants and its association to markers was also studied in 14 patients with no adjuvant treatment after surgery followed up for 46±36 months. Extrasellar tumors had a lower PTTG expression as compared to sellar tumors (0.065 [1st-3rd quartile: 0.000-0.089] NCN vs. 0.135 [0.105-0.159] NCN, p=0.04). IGF1R expression changed depending on histological subtype (p=0.014), and was greater in tumor with remnant growth greater than 20% during follow-up (10.69±3.84 NCN vs. 5.44±3.55 NCN, p=0.014). Our results suggest that the IGF1R is a more helpful molecular marker than PTTG in PA management. Ki-67 showed no association to tumor behavior. However, the potential of these markers should be established in future studies with standardized methods and on larger samples. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular signature of salivary gland tumors: potential use as diagnostic and prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Sena Filho, Marcondes; Altemani, Albina; Speight, Paul M; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland tumors are a highly heterogeneous group of lesions with diverse microscopic appearances and variable clinical behavior. The use of clinical and histological parameters to predict patient prognosis and survival rates has been of limited utility, and the search for new biomarkers that could not only aid in a better understanding of their pathogenesis but also be reliable auxiliaries for prognostic determination and useful diagnostic tools has been performed in the last decades with very exciting results. Hence, gene rearrangements such as CRTC1-MAML2 in mucoepidermoid carcinomas have shown excellent specificity, and more than that, it has been strongly correlated with low-grade tumors and consequently with an increased survival rate and better prognosis of patients affected by neoplasms carrying this translocation. Moreover, MYB-NFIB and EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusions were shown to be specifically found in cases of adenoid cystic carcinomas and hyalinizing clear cell carcinomas, respectively, in the context of salivary gland tumors, becoming reliable diagnostic tools for these entities and potential therapeutic targets for future therapeutic protocols. Finally, the identification of ETV6-NTRK3 in cases previously diagnosed as uncommon acinic cell carcinomas, cystadenocarcinomas, and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified led to the characterization of a completely new and now widely accepted entity, including, therefore, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma in the list of well-recognized salivary gland carcinomas. Thus, further molecular investigations of salivary gland tumors are warranted, and the recognition of other genetic abnormalities can lead to the acknowledgment of new entities and the acquirement of reliable biomarkers.

  13. Identification of Serum Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 and Prolactin as Potential Tumor Markers in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Heah, Charmain; Utama, Andi; Tania, Navessa Padma; Li, Huihua; Tan, Sze Huey; Poo, Desmond; Choo, Su Pin; Chow, Wan Cheng; Tan, Chee Kiat; Toh, Han Chong

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of hepatocellullar carcinoma (HCC) remains a challenge. The current practice of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) measurement is inadequate. Here we utilized a proteomic approach to identify novel serum biomarkers for distinguishing HCC patients from non-cancer controls. We profiled the serum proteins in a group of 58 resectable HCC patients and 11 non-HCC chronic hepatitis B (HBV) carrier samples from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) using the RayBio® L-Series 507 Antibody Array and found 113 serum markers that were significantly modulated between HCC and control groups. Selected potential biomarkers from this list were quantified using a multiplex sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) array in an expanded SGH cohort (126 resectable HCC patients and 115 non-HCC chronic HBV carriers (NC group)), confirming that serum prolactin and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly upregulated in HCC patients. This finding of serum MCP-1 elevation in HCC patients was validated in a separate cohort of serum samples from the Mochtar Riady Institute for Nanotechnology, Indonesia (98 resectable HCC, 101 chronic hepatitis B patients and 100 asymptomatic HBV/HCV carriers) by sandwich ELISA. MCP-1 and prolactin levels were found to correlate with AFP, while MCP-1 also correlated with disease stage. Subsequent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of AFP, prolactin and MCP-1 in the SGH cohort and comparing their area under the ROC curve (AUC) indicated that neither prolactin nor MCP-1 on their own performed better than AFP. However, the combination of AFP+MCP-1 (AUC, 0.974) had significantly superior discriminative ability than AFP alone (AUC, 0.942; p<0.001). In conclusion, prolactin and MCP-1 are overexpressed in HCC and are conveniently quantifiable in patients’ sera by ELISA. MCP-1 appears to be a promising complementary biomarker for HCC diagnosis and this MCP-1+AFP model should be further evaluated as potential

  14. Secreted clusterin in colon tumor cell models and its potential as diagnostic marker for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Piñeiro, A M; García-Lorenzo, A; Blanco-Prieto, S; Alvarez-Chaver, P; Rodríguez-Berrocal, F J; Cadena, M Páez de la; Martínez-Zorzano, V S

    2012-01-01

    We studied the specific changes of the secreted protein clusterin and its cytoplasmic precursor regarding colorectal tumorigenesis, using in vitro differentiation of Caco-2 cells. In tumor-like stage, we observed an overexpression of both precursor and secreted clusterin, corroborated in the cell line SW-480. Noticeably, SW-620 cells (from a tumoral node, thus with metastatic capacity) did not show overexpression of either precursor or secreted clusterin, suggesting a downregulation related to local metastasis. We further investigated clusterin in serum, finding a significant increase in colorectal cancer patients, with 81% sensitivity, 79% specificity, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.85.

  15. Association of FOXM1 expression with tumor histology and prognosis in Wilms tumor: Potential for a new prognostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Apelt, Nadja; Hubertus, Jochen; Mayr, Doris; Graf, Norbert; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Kappler, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common pediatric renal malignancy. A recent ontogenic model suggests that undifferentiated tumor state, and hence poor prognosis, in WT is determined by stabilization of β-catenin in the nucleus. Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) is a downstream component of the Wnt pathway and promotes nuclear localization of β-catenin. As elevation of FOXM1 gene expression is prognostic in various types of malignancy, we hypothesized that high FOXM1 expression in WT is associated with undifferentiated histology and thus poor prognosis. In the current study, the expression of FOXM1 mRNA was determined in 46 WT specimens and 11 renal tissue controls from patients undergoing tumor nephrectomy, and these data were assessed with regard to clinicopathological parameters. The results demonstrated an upregulation of FOXM1 in WT by 10-fold compared to normal tissue. Expression differed significantly between controls and tumors of intermediate- and high-risk histopathology (P<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis), and distinguished normal tissue from tumors of good and adverse clinical outcome (P<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis). Notably, FOXM1 expression was significantly lower (P=0.009) in patients that received preoperative doxorubicin. These results suggest that FOXM1 may serve as a companion diagnostic factor for doxorubicin-based therapies in WT. PMID:27698870

  16. Markers of bile duct tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Paladina, Isabella; Rando, Alessandra; Uccello, Mario; Basile, Francesco; Biondi, Antonio; Carnazzo, Santo; Alessandria, Innocenza; Mazzarino, Clorinda

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract carcinomas are relatively rare, representing less than 1% of cancers. However, their incidence has increased in Japan and in industrialized countries like the USA. Biliary tract tumors have a poor prognosis and a high mortality rate because they are usually detected late in the course of the disease; therapeutic treatment options are often limited and of minimal utility. Recent studies have shown the importance of serum and molecular markers in the diagnosis and follow up of biliary tract tumors. This review aims to introduce the main features of the most important serum and molecular markers of biliary tree tumors. Some considerable tumor markers are cancer antigen 125, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen, chromogranin A, mucin 1, mucin 5, alpha-fetoprotein, claudins and cytokeratins. PMID:21528090

  17. LncRNA HOTAIR as Prognostic Circulating Marker and Potential Therapeutic Target in Patients with Tumor Diseases.

    PubMed

    Botti, Gerardo; Marra, Laura; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Anniciello, Annamaria; Botti, Chiara; Franco, Renato; Cantile, Monica

    2017-01-01

    In the recent years the importance of the role played by non-coding RNA on the regulation of gene expression was increased by numerous studies. The research mainly focused on small ncRNAs, such as miRNAs, while the functions of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) have been much less studied. lncRNAs can be transcribed from intergenic, intragenic or specific chromosomal regions. Compared to miRNAs, lncRNAs have a complex secondary and tertiary structure which allows to bind proteins, RNA, DNA and to carry out their regulatory functions. Several studies showed that extracellular ncRNAs can circulate in the blood of both healthy and diseased patients. Most of the circulating ncRNAs are included in lipid or lipoprotein vesicles, such as apoptotic bodies, macrovesicles or exosomes, in which they are highly stable. The presence of circulating ncRNAs in the blood of cancer patients versus normal subjects suggested the possibility that these molecules may represent new diagnostic markers. HOTAIR is a HOX transcript antisense RNA, located in the HOXC locus, able to repress transcription in the posterior region of the HOXD locus. HOTAIR has been involved in the evolution of several primary tumors, wherein increase of HOTAIR expression has endorsed invasion and metastasis. In this review, we describe the experimental evidences on the potential role as circulating marker of lncRNA HOTAIR.

  18. Proteomics of Genetically Engineered Mouse Mammary Tumors Identifies Fatty Acid Metabolism Members as Potential Predictive Markers for Cisplatin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Warmoes, Marc; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Xu, Guotai; Sampadi, Bharath K.; Pham, Thang V.; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Boven, Epie; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to various signatures that predict the prognosis of breast cancer patients, markers that predict chemotherapy response are still elusive. To detect such predictive biomarkers, we investigated early changes in protein expression using two mouse models for distinct breast cancer subtypes who have a differential knock-out status for the breast cancer 1, early onset (Brca1) gene. The proteome of cisplatin-sensitive BRCA1-deficient mammary tumors was compared with that of cisplatin-resistant mammary tumors resembling pleomorphic invasive lobular carcinoma. The analyses were performed 24 h after administration of the maximum tolerable dose of cisplatin. At this time point, drug-sensitive BRCA1-deficient tumors showed DNA damage, but cells were largely viable. By applying paired statistics and quantitative filtering, we identified highly discriminatory markers for the sensitive and resistant model. Proteins up-regulated in the sensitive model are involved in centrosome organization, chromosome condensation, homology-directed DNA repair, and nucleotide metabolism. Major discriminatory markers that were up-regulated in the resistant model were predominantly involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty-acid synthase. Specific inhibition of fatty-acid synthase sensitized resistant cells to cisplatin. Our data suggest that exploring the functional link between the DNA damage response and cancer metabolism shortly after the initial treatment may be a useful strategy to predict the efficacy of cisplatin. PMID:23397111

  19. Mapping of global R1 and R2* values versus lipids R1 values as potential markers of hypoxia in human glial tumors: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marta M; Colliez, Florence; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Raftopoulos, Christian; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Availability of an innocuous and repeatable technique for monitoring tumor oxygenation throughout therapeutic course should be a key factor for adaptative therapeutic strategies. We previously qualified lipids R1 as a marker of oxygen level on experimental tumor models. The objectives of the present study were to assess the applicability of measuring lipids R1 in primary central nervous system malignancies in a clinical setting as well as to compare lipids R1 with global (water+lipids) R1 and R2* which are also sensitive to the oxygen environment. 25 patients with brain neuroepithelial tumors were examined on a clinical 3T MR system. Values obtained within regions of interest contouring contrast-enhanced tumor (C+), unenhanced tumor (C-), peritumoral edema, and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) were compared to those obtained for the normal brain parenchyma of 17 healthy volunteers. Global R1 and lipids R1 values were significantly lower in tumors than in NAWM of patients or healthy brain of normal volunteers. In contrast, R2* values were not significantly different in tumors compared to NAWM or healthy brains. None of them showed significant difference between C+ and C- tumors. Global R1 values within NAWM were significantly different from that of both tumor and peritumoral edema, but lacked sensitivity to differentiate between tumor and peritumoral edema. In turn, lipids R1 measurements enabled discrimination between tumor areas and peritumoral edema. In conclusion, global R1 and lipids R1 deserve further attention as potential markers of tumor hypoxia in primary brain tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantum dots based potential-resolution dual-targets electrochemiluminescent immunosensor for subtype of tumor marker and its serological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Jiang, Hui; Fang, Yuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Nianyue; Zang, Guizhen

    2015-09-15

    The identification of subtypes of known tumor markers is of great importance for clinical diagnosis but still a great challenge in novel detection methodologies with simple operation and acceptable sensitivity. This work for the first time reported a quantum dots (QDs) based potential-resolved electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunosensor to realize simultaneous detection of dual targets. Because of different surface microstructures, dimercaptosuccinic acid stabilized CdTe (DMSA-CdTe) QDs and TiO2 nanoparticles-glutathione stabilized CdTe (TiO2-GSH-CdTe) QDs composites showed a large difference of ECL peak potential (∼360 mV), which provided an access for potential-resolution detection. The ECL emission on indium tin oxide electrodes showed consistent strength during the cyclic scan, and intensity data were collected at -0.89 V and -1.25 V (vs Ag/AgCl) for DMSA-CdTe QDs and TiO2-GSH-CdTe QDs composites, respectively. The interface modification procedures of immunosensor construction were characterized by atomic force microscopy. The portion of Lens culinaris lectin affiliated isoform of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), AFP-L3%, in total AFP, is recently a novel criteria showing even higher sensitivity and specificity than AFP at the early stage of cancer. Combined with the enzyme cyclic amplification strategy, linear ranges for AFP-L3 and AFP dual-targets detection were 3.24 pg mL(-1)-32.4 ng mL(-1) and 1.0 pg mL(-1)-20 ng mL(-1), with limits of detection of 3.24 pg mL(-1) and 1.0 pg mL(-1), respectively. Compared with clinical detection data, the calculated portion of AFP-L3% by as-prepared immunosensor showed acceptable accuracy. These results open a new avenue for facile and rapid multiple-components detection based on the nano-ECL technique and provide a new clinical diagnosis platform for HCC.

  1. [History of tumor markers for cancers of the digestive system].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2013-05-26

    Tumor markers are gene products which signal the occurrence of tumors in different organs as well as their response to surgery and chemotherapy. The discovery of tumor markers occurred after the demonstration of tumor-specific transplantation antigens in chemically or virally induced tumors in syngenic rodents. The history of currently used tumor markers began in the 1940s, the first discovered being alpha-fetoprotein in 1956, followed by that of carcinoembryonic antigen in 1965. Since then the range of tumor markers has widened continously. Their chemical structure and genetics is now well known. Some may play part in tumor growth and development of metastases. The potential uses of tumor markers are general or high risk population screening, adjunct in diagnosis of cancer, preoperative indicator of tumor burden, indicator of therapeutic success, evidence of postoperative recurrences and use in tumor localization. However, there is no ideal tumor marker fulfilling all the criteria. Isotope-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies and small molecular E-selectin inhibitors could play a role in the molecular radio- and chemotherapy of colon and pancreatic carcinomas.

  2. Assessing the clinical significance of tumor markers in common neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Beketic-Oreskovic, Lidija; Maric, Petra; Ozretic, Petar; Oreskovic, Darko; Ajdukovic, Mia; Levanat, Sonja

    2012-06-01

    The term tumor markers include a spectrum of molecules and substances with widely divergent characteristics whose presence in the significant amount can be related to the malignant disease. An ideal tumor marker should have high specificity and sensitivity, which would allow its use in early diagnosis and prognosis of malignant disease, as well as in prediction of therapeutic response and follow-up of the patients. Numerous biochemical entities have emerged as potentially valuable tumor markers so far, but only few markers showed to be of considerable clinical reliability and have been accepted into standard clinical practice. Recent development of genomics and proteomics has enabled the examination of many new potential tumor markers. Scientific studies on discovery, development, and application of tumor markers have been proceeding quite rapidly providing great opportunities for improving the management of cancer patients. This review is focusing on the clinical usefulness of various tumor markers already in clinical practice as well as certain potential markers, giving a brief description of their prognostic and predictive significance in most common malignancies.

  3. Integration of zebrafish fin regeneration genes with expression data of human tumors in silico uncovers potential novel melanoma markers

    PubMed Central

    Hooks, Katarzyna B.; Khatib, Abdel-Majid

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration requires expression of a large, unknown number of genes to initiate and maintain cellular processes such as proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, differentiation and migration. A unique model to simulate this process in a controlled manner is the re-growth of the caudal fin of zebrafish after amputation. Within this tissue stem cells differentiate into fibroblasts, epithelial and endothelial cells as well as melanocytes. Many genes implicated in the regeneration process are deregulated in cancer. We therefore undertook a systematic gene expression study to identify genes upregulated during the re-growth of caudal fin tissue. By applying a high stringency cut-off value of 4-fold change, we identified 54 annotated genes significantly overexpressed in regenerating blastema. Further bioinformatics data mining studies showed that 22 out of the 54 regeneration genes where overexpressed in melanoma compared to normal skin or other cancers. Whereas the role of TNC (tenascin C) and FN1 (fibronectin 1) in melanoma development is well documented, implication of MARCKS, RCN3, BAMBI, PEA3/ETV4 and the FK506 family members FKBP7, FKBP10 and FKBP11 in melanoma progression is unclear. Corresponding proteins were detected in melanoma tissue but not in normal skin. High expression of FKBP7, DPYSL5 and MDK was significantly associated with poor survival. We discuss a potential role of these novel melanoma genes, which have promising potential as new therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. PMID:27689402

  4. [Markers of angiogenesis in tumor growth].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, N A; Kharlova, O A; Danilova, N V; Malkov, P G; Gaifullin, N M

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a process of new blood vessels formation. The role of angiogenesis in growth, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumours is nowdays universally recognized. Though, investigation of mechanisms of blood vessels formation and elaboration methods for assessment of tumour angiogenesis are still up-dated. Another important concern are different aspects of usage of immunohistochemical markers of blood vessels endothelium (CD31 and CD34) for assessment of tumour aggressiveness and prognosis. The problems of malignant lymphangiogenesis are also up-to-date. The focus is on methods of immunohistochemical visualization of forming lymphatic vessels, role of podoplanin, the most reliable marker of lymphatic vessels, in their identification, and formulization of the main criteria for lymphangiogenesis estimation, its correlation with metastatic activity and prognostic potential. Studying of angiogenesis and lymph angiogenesis in malignant tumors is important and challenging direction for researching tumour progression and invention of antiangiogenic therapy.

  5. Molecular characterization of circumventricular organs and third ventricle ependyma in the rat: potential markers for periventricular tumors.

    PubMed

    Szathmari, Alexandru; Champier, Jacques; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François; Jouvet, Anne; Watrin, Chantal; Wierinckx, Anne; Fèvre Montange, Michelle

    2013-02-01

    Circumventricular organs (CVOs) are specialized ventricular structures around the third and fourth ventricles of the brain. In humans, these structures are present during the fetal period and some become vestigial after birth. Some of these organs, such as the pineal gland (PG), subcommissural organ (SCO), and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, might be the sites of origin of periventricular tumors, notably pineal parenchymal tumors, papillary tumor of the pineal region and chordoid glioma. In contrast to the situation in humans, CVOs are present in the adult rat and can be dissected by laser capture microdissection (LCM). In this study, we used LCM and microarrays to analyze the transcriptomes of three CVOs, the SCO, the subfornical organ (SFO), and the PG and the third ventricle ependyma in the adult rat, in order to better characterize these organs at the molecular level. Several genes were expressed only, or mainly, in one of these structures, for example, Erbb2 and Col11a1 in the ependyma, Epcam and Claudin-3 (CLDN3) in the SCO, Ren1 and Slc22a3 in the SFO and Tph, Aanat and Asmt in the PG. The expression of these genes in periventricular tumors should be examined as evidence for a possible origin from the CVOs. Furthermore, we performed an immunohistochemical study of CLDN3, a membrane protein involved in forming cellular tight junctions and found that CLDN3 expression was restricted to the apical pole of ependymocytes in the SCO. This microarray study provides new evidence regarding the possible origin of some rare periventricular tumors.

  6. MR spectroscopy of intracranial tuberculomas: A singlet peak at 3.8 ppm as potential marker to differentiate them from malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, David; Martinot, Carlos; Fayed, Nicolas; Gaskill-Shipley, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculomas is often challenging. Our purpose is to describe the most common metabolic patterns of tuberculomas by MR spectroscopy (MRS) with emphasis on potential specific markers. Methods Single-voxel MRS short echo time was performed in 13 cases of tuberculomas proven by histology and/or response to anti-mycobacterial therapy. For comparison MRS was also performed in 19 biopsy-proven malignant tumors (13 high-grade gliomas and six metastasis). Presence of metabolic peaks was assessed visually and categorical variables between groups were compared using chi-square. Metabolite ratios were compared using Mann-Whitney test and diagnostic accuracy of the metabolite ratios was compared using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves analysis. Results Spectroscopic peaks representing lipids and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) as well as a peak at ∼3.8 ppm were well defined in 77% (10/13), 77% (10/13) and 69% (nine of 13) of tuberculomas, respectively. Lipid and Glx peaks were also present in most of the malignant lesions, 79% (15/19) and 74% (14/19) respectively. However, a peak at ∼3.8 ppm was present in only 10% (two of 19) of the tumor cases (p < 0.001). Higher Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios helped discriminate malignant lesions with an area under the ROC curve of 0.86 (SE: 0.078, p < 0.002, CI: 0.7–1) and 0.8 (SE: 0.1, p < 0.009, CI: 0.6–1), respectively. Threshold values between 1.7–1.9 for Cho/Cr and 0.8–0.9 for mI/Cr provided high specificity (91% for both metabolites) and adequate sensitivity (75% and 80%, respectively) for discrimination of malignant lesions. Conclusion A singlet peak at ∼3.8 ppm is present in the majority of tuberculomas and absent in most malignant tumors, potentially a marker to differentiate these lesions. The assignment of the peak is difficult from our analysis; however, guanidinoacetate (Gua) is a possibility. Higher Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios should favor malignant lesions

  7. Expression of the pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG1) in pheochromocytoma as a potential marker for distinguishing benign versus malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Haji Amousha, Mohamad Reza; Sabetkish, Nastaran; Sabet Kish, Nastaran; Heshmat, Ramin; Rajabiani, Afsaneh; Saffar, Hiva; Haghpanah, Vahid; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The Distinction between malignant and benign pheochromocytoma has always been a diagnostic challenge over the last decades. To date, the only reliable criterion is metastasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible expression of pituitary-tumor transforming gene (PTTG1) and retinoblastoma (Rb) in benign and malignant pheochromocytoma. Paraffin blocks of 44 and 11 patients diagnosed with benign and malignant pheochromocytoma were collected. Parameters such as sex, age, tumor size, necrosis, and histological features were compared between the benign and malignant groups as well as immunohistochemical labeling using specific antibodies. PTTG1 showed negative expression in all (44) benign and 9 out of 11 (81.8%) malignant tumors with only 2 out of 11 (18.2%) malignant tumors showed positive reactivity for PTTG1 (P: 0.037) with spindle cell histological pattern in both of them (P: 0.013). Although Rb expression in malignant tumors (81.8%) was slightly more than the benign ones (52.3%), no statistically significant correlation was observed (P: 0.087). These results suggest that PTTG1 immunostaining may play a key role in distinguishing between benign and malignant phaeochromocytoma. However, larger studies are necessary to confirm the outcomes of the present study.

  8. γH2AX/53BP1 foci as a potential pre-treatment marker of HNSCC tumors radiosensitivity - preliminary methodological study and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Martin; Horakova, Zuzana; Svobodova, Marketa; Masarik, Michal; Kopecna, Olga; Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Depes, Daniel; Bacikova, Alena; Falkova, Iva; Binkova, Hana

    2017-09-01

    In order to improve patients' post-treatment quality of life, a shift from surgery to non-surgical (chemo)radio-treatment is recognized in head and neck oncology. However, about half of HNSCC tumors are resistant to irradiation and an efficient marker of individual tumor radiosensitivity is still missing. We analyzed whether various parameters of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair determined in vitro can predict, prior to clinical treatment initiation, the radiosensitivity of tumors. We compared formation and decrease of γH2AX/53BP1 foci in 48 h after irradiating tumor cell primocultures with 2 Gy of γ-rays. To better understand complex tumor behavior, three different cell type primocultures - CD90-, CD90+, and a mixed culture of these cells - were isolated from 1 clinically radioresistant, 2 radiosensitive, and 4 undetermined HPV-HNSCC tumors and followed separately. While DSB repair was delayed and the number of persisting DSBs increased in the radiosensitive tumors, the results for the radioresistant tumor were similar to cultured normal human skin fibroblasts. Hence, DSB repair kinetics/efficiency may correlate with clinical response to radiotherapy for a subset of HNSCC tumors but the size (and therefore practical relevance) of this subset remains to be determined. The same is true for contribution of different cell type primocultures to tumor radioresistance.

  9. Age-Specific Gene Expression Signatures for Breast Tumors and Cross-Species Conserved Potential Cancer Progression Markers in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Dilek; Nofal, Asmaa; AlBakheet, AlBandary; Nirmal, Maimoona; Jeprel, Hatim; Eldali, Abdelmoneim; AL-Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Ajarim, Dahish; Malik, Osama Al; Kaya, Namik; Park, Ben H.; Bin Amer, Suad M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive with a poorer prognosis and overall survival compared to older women diagnosed with the disease. Despite recent research, the underlying biology and molecular alterations that drive the aggressive nature of breast tumors associated with breast cancer in young women have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we performed transcriptomic profile and network analyses of breast tumors arising in Middle Eastern women to identify age-specific gene signatures. Moreover, we studied molecular alterations associated with cancer progression in young women using cross-species comparative genomics approach coupled with copy number alterations (CNA) associated with breast cancers from independent studies. We identified 63 genes specific to tumors in young women that showed alterations distinct from two age cohorts of older women. The network analyses revealed potential critical regulatory roles for Myc, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and IL-1 in disease characteristics of breast tumors arising in young women. Cross-species comparative genomics analysis of progression from pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) revealed 16 genes with concomitant genomic alterations, CCNB2, UBE2C, TOP2A, CEP55, TPX2, BIRC5, KIAA0101, SHCBP1, UBE2T, PTTG1, NUSAP1, DEPDC1, HELLS, CCNB1, KIF4A, and RRM2, that may be involved in tumorigenesis and in the processes of invasion and progression of disease. Array findings were validated using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and extensive in silico analyses of independently performed microarray datasets. To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive genomic analysis of breast cancer in Middle Eastern women in age-specific cohorts and potential markers for cancer progression in young women. Our data demonstrate that cancer appearing in young women contain distinct biological characteristics and deregulated signaling pathways. Moreover, our integrative genomic and cross

  10. Age-specific gene expression signatures for breast tumors and cross-species conserved potential cancer progression markers in young women.

    PubMed

    Colak, Dilek; Nofal, Asmaa; Albakheet, Albandary; Nirmal, Maimoona; Jeprel, Hatim; Eldali, Abdelmoneim; Al-Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Ajarim, Dahish; Malik, Osama Al; Inan, Mehmet S; Kaya, Namik; Park, Ben H; Bin Amer, Suad M

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive with a poorer prognosis and overall survival compared to older women diagnosed with the disease. Despite recent research, the underlying biology and molecular alterations that drive the aggressive nature of breast tumors associated with breast cancer in young women have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we performed transcriptomic profile and network analyses of breast tumors arising in Middle Eastern women to identify age-specific gene signatures. Moreover, we studied molecular alterations associated with cancer progression in young women using cross-species comparative genomics approach coupled with copy number alterations (CNA) associated with breast cancers from independent studies. We identified 63 genes specific to tumors in young women that showed alterations distinct from two age cohorts of older women. The network analyses revealed potential critical regulatory roles for Myc, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and IL-1 in disease characteristics of breast tumors arising in young women. Cross-species comparative genomics analysis of progression from pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) revealed 16 genes with concomitant genomic alterations, CCNB2, UBE2C, TOP2A, CEP55, TPX2, BIRC5, KIAA0101, SHCBP1, UBE2T, PTTG1, NUSAP1, DEPDC1, HELLS, CCNB1, KIF4A, and RRM2, that may be involved in tumorigenesis and in the processes of invasion and progression of disease. Array findings were validated using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and extensive in silico analyses of independently performed microarray datasets. To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive genomic analysis of breast cancer in Middle Eastern women in age-specific cohorts and potential markers for cancer progression in young women. Our data demonstrate that cancer appearing in young women contain distinct biological characteristics and deregulated signaling pathways. Moreover, our integrative genomic and cross

  11. Evaluation of sHLA-G levels in serum of patients with prostate cancer identify as a potential of tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad Hassan; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Abdollahifar, Mohammad-Amin; Abdi, Shabnam; Barez, Mohamadreza Mashhoudi; Azimi, Hadi; Moradi, Afshin; Bagheri, Amin; Heidari, Matineh; Hessam Mohseni, Jafar; Tadayon, Maryam; Mirsafian, Hoda; Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer type in men and is the second cause of death, due to cancer, in patients over 50, after lung cancer. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a widely used tumor marker for prostate cancer. Recently, PSA is discovered in non-prostatic cancer tissues in men and women raising doubts about its specificity for prostatic tissues. PSA exists in low serum level in healthy men and in higher levels in many prostate disorders, including prostatitis and prostate cancer. Thus, a supplementary tumor marker is needed to accurately diagnose the cancer and to observe the patient after treatment. Recently, soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (sHLA-G) has been introduced as a new tumor marker for different cancer types, including colorectal, breast, lung, and ovary. The present descriptive-experimental study was carried out including patients with malignant prostate tumor, patients with benign prostate tumor, and a group of health men as the control group, as judged by an oncologist as well as a pathologist. After sterile blood sampling, sHLA-G was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in each group. The data was then analyzed using one-way ANOVA. P≤0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The results showed that the mean of sHLA-G level was high in patients. Also, it was found that there was a significant difference in sHLA serum level between the three groups. The data revealed that sHLA-G can be a novel supplementary tumor marker in addition to PSA to diagnose prostate cancer.

  12. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in peri-tumor tissues and pelvic lymph nodes as potential molecular marker of micrometastasis in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Marianna; Annunziata, Clorinda; Liguori, Giuseppina; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Greggi, Stefano; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2016-01-01

    The association between high risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) and cervical cancer has been firmly established. HPV genome is present in nearly all cases of cervical cancer and detection of viral DNA could therefore be used as a surrogate marker of micrometastasis in peri-tumor tissues and lymph nodes. We analyzed primary cervical carcinomas, peri-tumor biopsies and pelvic lymph nodes in 20 women with invasive cancer (FIGO stage I-II) who underwent radical pelvic surgery and lymphadenectomy. HPV DNA was searched by broad spectrum PCR in 142 DNA samples extracted from paraffin embedded tissues. Viral genotypes were identified by direct sequencing analysis. HPV DNA sequences were identified in all available primary cervical tumors (n = 15). The most common genotype was HPV16 (60 %), followed by HPV18 (20 %), HPV35 (7 %), HPV45 (7 %) and HPV66 (7 %). Seven out of 20 (35 %) women had metastatic spread in peri-tumor tissues and/or lymph nodes, as determined by histology. HPV DNA was detected in all histological positive samples as well as in 16 and 25 % of histological negative peri-tumor tissues and lymph nodes, respectively. Three out of 20 (15 %) women without histological evidence of metastatic spread had HPV-positive lymph nodes. HPV genotype was found always concordant between primary tumor and metastatic lesions. The remaining 10 women (50 %) were histology and HPV-negative in all peri-tumor biopsies and lymph nodes analyzed. Evaluation of HPV DNA in peri-tumor tissues as well as pelvic lymph nodes could be a sensitive marker to identify micrometastasis or isolated tumor cells and to monitor the risk of disease recurrence in women with cervical cancer.

  13. Hypodontia, a prospective predictive marker for tumor?

    PubMed

    Yin, W; Bian, Z

    2016-05-01

    Tooth agenesis and tumor are two totally different diseases occurring at different ages. In the past 10 years, more and more evidences suggested there was a relationship between them. High prevalence of breast, colon, lung, and ovary tumor was observed in tooth agenesis patients. But it is still controversial. Therefore, to have a greater understanding of the possible association, a critical review on molecular association for genes involving tooth agenesis and tumorigenesis is necessary. In this current review, we summarized the reported cases of tooth agenesis with different kinds of tumors and the molecular relationship between these two diseases through causative genes. The results indicated tooth agenesis might be a prospective predictive marker for tumor. Through this review, we want to draw more attention on this topic and hope it will be an effective way to predict the risk of tumor. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Practice guidelines for tumor marker use in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Catharine

    2002-08-01

    Increasing interest in implementing the practice of evidence-based medicine in oncology has encouraged the development of clinical guidelines, many of which include recommendations about the appropriate use of serum tumor markers. Recent national and international guidelines relating to the use of tumor markers in germ cell, colorectal, breast, ovarian, prostate, lung, neuroendocrine, and thyroid cancers were identified from the scientific literature and other sources and tabulated. Guideline recommendations developed by national and international groups and relating to the use of tumor markers for specific cancers are reviewed and compared, considering the recommendations made for their use in screening, diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of therapy. Potential advantages and disadvantages of clinical guidelines, how best to implement them, and means of auditing their effectiveness are also considered. Excellent clinical guidelines, including recommendations for the most appropriate use of tumor markers, are already available for many cancers. Many questions relating to optimal use of these important tests remain to be answered, but current guidelines already contain much valuable information and advice. Further dissemination and implementation of the guidelines should encourage better use of tumor markers in clinical practice. Careful audit studies are also required to establish the impact of these guidelines on the practice of evidence-based medicine.

  15. [Tumor markers of urinary tract carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruhito

    2004-04-01

    The tumor markers for malignant tumors arisen from urinary system including prostate cancer were reviewed. As for renal cell carcinoma there was no good marker used in routine test level at present. In the diagnosis of urothelial (transitional cell) carcinoma, mainly bladder cancer, 3 methods (urinary BTA, NMP22 and BFP) are used now in Japan. They all seem to be not fully sufficient in respect of the specificity. In foreign countries, new tests such as urinary telomerase and BLCA-4 are used and have been evaluated. On the diagnosis of prostate cancer, serum total PSA is well established and used. Various PSA relation markers have been advocated for the differentiation between benign prostate hypertrophy and carcinoma in so called "gray zone" level of total PSA. In methods based on the molecular forms of PSA, the ratio of free PSA to total PSA (f/T) is widely use, and proPSA is a test that is expected. Other approaches such as volume of index PSA, age specific PSA reference range and PSA velocity are also in practical application. Human glandular kallikrein 2, which belong to the human kallikrein family as well as PSA, is expected as a tumor specific marker.

  16. Expression of Von Willebrand factor, an endothelial cell marker, is up-regulated by angiogenesis factors: a potential method for objective assessment of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zanetta, L; Marcus, S G; Vasile, J; Dobryansky, M; Cohen, H; Eng, K; Shamamian, P; Mignatti, P

    2000-01-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF), a glycoprotein produced uniquely by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, is routinely used to identify vessels in tissue sections. Vessel density in tumor specimens, as determined by immuno-histochemical staining for vWF or other endothelial cell markers, is a negative prognostic factor for many solid tumors. vWF is heterogeneously distributed throughout the vasculature, transcriptional control in response to the tissue microenvironment being responsible for local variations in endothelial cell levels of vWF. Here, we report that fibroblast growth factor-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor, potent angiogenesis inducers expressed in a variety of tumors, up-regulate expression of vWF mRNA and protein in cultured endothelial cells with a synergistic effect. Our data support the measurement of vWF mRNA in tumors to detect activated endothelium or angiogenesis. For this purpose, we developed a semi-quantitative RT-PCR for vWF mRNA. Preliminary results obtained with specimens from colon carcinoma and the corresponding normal colonic mucosa showed higher vWF mRNA levels in most tumors than in their normal counterparts. The differences in vWF mRNA levels were much larger than the differences in vessel counts between a tumor and the corresponding normal mucosa, indicating that high vWF mRNA levels in tumors may indeed be an early sign of activation of the endothelium. The rapidity, objectivity, sensitivity and specificity of this technique make it suitable for routine clinical application to identify aggressive, highly angiogenic tumors.

  17. Serum tumor markers in pediatric osteosarcoma: a summary review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary high-grade bone tumor in both adolescents and children. Early tumor detection is key to ensuring effective treatment. Serum marker discovery and validation for pediatric osteosarcoma has accelerated in recent years, coincident with an evolving understanding of molecules and their complex interactions, and the compelling need for improved pediatric osteosarcoma outcome measures in clinical trials. This review gives a short overview of serological markers for pediatric osteosarcoma, and highlights advances in pediatric osteosarcoma-related marker research within the past year. Studies in the past year involving serum markers in patients with pediatric osteosarcoma can be assigned to one of four categories, i.e., new approaches and new markers, exploratory studies in specialized disease subsets, large cross-sectional validation studies, and longitudinal studies, with and without an intervention. Most of the studies have examined the association of a serum marker with some aspect of the natural history of pediatric osteosarcoma. As illustrated by the many studies reviewed, several serum markers are emerging that show a credible association with disease modification. The expanding pool of informative osteosarcoma-related markers is expected to impact development of therapeutics for pediatric osteosarcoma positively and, it is hoped, ultimately clinical care. Combinations of serum markers of natural immunity, thyroid hormone homeostasis, and bone tumorigenesis may be undertaken together in patients with pediatric osteosarcoma. These serum markers in combination may do better. The potential effect of an intrinsic dynamic balance of tumor angiogenesis residing within a single hormone (tri-iodothyronine) is an attractive concept for regulation of vascularization in pediatric osteosarcoma. PMID:22587902

  18. Role of tumor markers and circulating tumors cells in the management of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ayman; Abraham, Jame

    2008-06-01

    Along with various imaging modalities, serologic tumor markers such as CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 have been used for decades to monitor treatment response in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Despite the frequent use of these markers, they lack high sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer progression. The prognostic significance of these markers remains indeterminate because of the conflicting outcome of many clinical trials. The circulating tumor cell (CTC) test has recently been studied in clinical trials in patients with MBC. Some of the studies showed that high levels of CTCs are correlated with poor survival in MBC. An intergroup trial is underway to determine the implication of changing treatment based on the CTC level. This article will discuss the current data on these markers, with special emphasis on the CTC test. The potential clinical utility of these markers will also be discussed.

  19. Immunohistochemical and molecular markers in breast phyllodes tumors.

    PubMed

    Korcheva, Veselina B; Levine, Judith; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Countryman, Gayle; Olson, Neal R; Heinrich, Michael C; Corless, Christopher L; Troxell, Megan L

    2011-03-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are diagnostically and managerially enigmatic, as their malignant potential is difficult to predict based on the standard morphologic criteria. Thus, there is a need for additional markers of biologic potential. Although a number of ancillary tests have been reported, consensus in the literature is lacking. We studied 38 cellular fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumors of various grade (World Health Organization benign, borderline, and malignant) with a panel of immunohistochemical stains (p53, CD117, phospho-Histone3, mdm2, cdk4) and screened 26 of the tumors for mutations across 30 cancer-related genes using PCR and mass-spectrometry based methods. p53 and phospho-Histone3 (mitotic marker) showed increased staining in higher grade phyllodes tumors. CD117, mdm2, and cdk4 showed no difference in expression across different grades of phyllodes tumors. Mutational analysis revealed an S8R substitution in FBX4 (an E3 ubiquitin ligase) in 3 cases: 1 benign and 2 borderline. The S8R substitution seems to be more common in phyllodes tumors (11.5%) as compared with other cancers. FBX4 S8R cases had high cyclin D1 expression, but this finding was not specific. Our data support earlier studies showing that p53 has potential use in pathologic assessment of phyllodes tumors, and we newly characterized phospho-Histone3 for this application. Further studies are needed to characterize the molecular pathogenesis of the phyllodes tumors, as we were unable to identify activating mutations despite screening for a large panel of activating hotspot mutations. The significance of the FBX4 substitution deserves further investigation.

  20. Neuroendocrine marker expression in thyroid epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Satoh, F; Umemura, S; Yasuda, M; Osamura, R Y

    2001-01-01

    Tissue sections from 50 cases with thyroid tumors, composed of 11 follicular adenomas, 10 follicular carcinomas, 14 papillary carcinomas, 10 anaplastic carcinomas, and 5 medullary carcinomas, were immunohistochemically analyzed for representative neuroendocrine markers. Immunoexpression ratios of these neuroendocrine markers were as follows: Follicular adenomas, neuron-specific enolase (NSE)63.6%, synaptophysin (SynP) 45.5%, Leu7 27.3%, NCAM 45.5%, chromogranin A (CgA) 0%, SNAP25 0%; follicular carcinomas, NSE 90.0%, SynP 80.0%, Leu7 80.0%, NCAM 0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25 0%; papillary carcinomas, NSE 85.7%, SynP 78.6%, Leu7 100%, NCAM 7.0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25.0%; anaplastic carcinomas, NSE 10.0%, SynP 0%, Leu7 0%, NCAM 0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25 0%; medullary carcinomas, NSE 100%, SynP100%, Leu7 80.0%, NCAM 40.0%, CgA 100%, SNAP25 100%. The two follicular carcinomas, which were morphologically characterized by "insular" (or "alveolar") arrangements, showed distinct immunoexpression of NSE and SynP at the same time. By in situ hybridization (ISH), expression of mRNA for NSE was confirmed in cases with marked immunoexpression of NSE. Although no endocrine granules were found, our results suggested that a specific type of follicular carcinoma, i.e., insular variant, may be immaturely neuroendocrine-differentiated.

  1. Interstitial Inorganic Phosphate as a Tumor Microenvironment Marker for Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bobko, Andrey A.; Eubank, Timothy D.; Driesschaert, Benoit; Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Evans, Jason; Mohammad, Rahman; Tchekneva, Elena E.; Dikov, Mikhail M.; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive in vivo assessment of chemical tumor microenvironment (TME) parameters such as oxygen (pO2), extracellular acidosis (pHe), and concentration of interstitial inorganic phosphate (Pi) may provide unique insights into biological processes in solid tumors. In this work, we employ a recently developed multifunctional trityl paramagnetic probe and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique for in vivo concurrent assessment of these TME parameters in various mouse models of cancer. While the data support the existence of hypoxic and acidic regions in TME, the most dramatic differences, about 2-fold higher concentrations in tumors vs. normal tissues, were observed for interstitial Pi - the only parameter that also allowed for discrimination between non-metastatic and highly metastatic tumors. Correlation analysis between [Pi], pO2, pHe and tumor volumes reveal an association of high [Pi] with changes in tumor metabolism and supports different mechanisms of protons and Pi accumulation in TME. Our data identifies interstitial inorganic phosphate as a new TME marker for tumor progression. Pi association with tumor metabolism, buffer-mediated proton transport, and a requirement of high phosphorus content for the rapid growth in the “growth rate hypothesis” may underline its potential role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. PMID:28117423

  2. Gene markers in brain tumors: what the epileptologist should know.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn; Cohen, Mark L; Ondracek, Annie; Sloan, Andrew; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2013-12-01

    Gene markers or biomarkers can be used for diagnostic or prognostic purposes for all different types of complex disease, including brain tumors. Prognostic markers can be useful to explain differences not only in overall survival but also in response to treatment and for development of targeted therapies. Multiple genes with specific types of alterations have now been identified that are associated with improved response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, such as O(6)-methylguanine methyltranferase (MGMT) or loss of chromosomes 1p and/or 19q. Other alterations have been identified that are associated with improved overall survival, such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and/or isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) or having the glioma CpG island DNA methylator phenotype (G-CIMP). There are many biomarkers that may have relevance in brain tumor-associated epilepsy that do not respond to treatment. Given the rapidly changing landscape of high throughput "omics" technologies, there is significant potential for gaining further knowledge via integration of multiple different types of high genome-wide data. This knowledge can be translated into improved therapies and clinical outcomes for patients with brain tumors.

  3. Activated macrophages containing tumor marker in colon carcinoma: immunohistochemical proof of a concept.

    PubMed

    Faber, T J E; Japink, D; Leers, M P G; Sosef, M N; von Meyenfeldt, M F; Nap, M

    2012-04-01

    The presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-containing activated macrophages has been demonstrated in peripheral blood from patients with colorectal carcinoma. Macrophages migrate from the circulation into the tissue, phagocytose debris, and return to the bloodstream. Hence it seems likely that activated macrophages containing tumor debris, i.e., tumor marker, are present in the stroma of colorectal carcinoma. After phagocytosis, they could follow a hematogenic or lymphogenic route to the peripheral blood. The aim of this study is to assess the presence of tumor marker-containing activated macrophages in the stroma of colon carcinoma and in regional lymph nodes. From 10 cases of colon carcinoma, samples of tumor tissue and metastasis-free lymph nodes were cut in serial sections and stained for CD68 to identify macrophages and for CEA, cytokeratin, or M30 presence. Slides were digitalised and visually inspected using two monitors, comparing the CD68 stain to the tumor marker stain to evaluate the presence of tumor marker-positive macrophages. Macrophages containing tumor marker could be identified in tumor stroma and in metastasis-free regional lymph nodes. The distribution varied for the different markers, CEA-positive macrophages being most abundant. The presence of macrophages containing tumor marker in the tumor stroma and lymph nodes from patients with colon carcinoma could be confirmed in this series using serial immunohistochemistry. This finding supports the concept of activated macrophages, after phagocytosing cell debris, being transported or migrating through the lymphatic system. These results support the potential of tumor marker-containing macrophages to serve as a marker for diagnosis and follow-up of colon cancer patients.

  4. Suprabasin as a novel tumor endothelial cell marker

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mohammad T; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Ohga, Noritaka; Akiyama, Kosuke; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that stromal cells contribute to tumor progression. We previously demonstrated that tumor endothelial cells (TEC) characteristics were different from those of normal endothelial cells (NEC). Furthermore, we performed gene profile analysis in TEC and NEC, revealing that suprabasin (SBSN) was upregulated in TEC compared with NEC. However, its role in TEC is still unknown. Here we showed that SBSN expression was higher in isolated human and mouse TEC than in NEC. SBSN knockdown inhibited the migration and tube formation ability of TEC. We also showed that the AKT pathway was a downstream factor of SBSN. These findings suggest that SBSN is involved in the angiogenic potential of TEC and may be a novel TEC marker. PMID:25283635

  5. [Considerations in rational use of tumor markers in breast carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Crombach, G

    1998-04-22

    The objective of this review is to determine clinical practical guidelines for the use of serum tumor markers in the care of breast cancer patients outside of clinical trials. Mucin antigens (CA 15-3, MCA, CA 549) and CEA are established markers in breast cancer. Owing to their low sensitivity, none of these markers can be recommended for screening, diagnosis or staging. During follow-up, increasing marker levels may indicate recurrence 3-6 months earlier than clinical and radiological examinations in about 40-50% of patients. However, the clinical benefit of this lead-time is not established. Tumor markers are able to monitor response to treatment in 70-80% of patients with metastatic breast cancer. However, paradoxical changes of the markers especially in the beginning of treatment, the insufficient concordance with tumor activity in 20-30% of the women, and the lack of curative therapy regimens limit the prospective clinical use of the markers in the individual patient. Therefore, marker changes require confirmation by radiological methods in most cases. The present data are insufficient to recommend routine use of tumor markers alone for monitoring breast cancer patients after primary treatment or during palliative therapy. However, in the absence of readily measurable disease (e. g. bone metastases) continuously increasing marker levels may be used to indicate treatment failure. If high-dose chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer renders to be effective, the clinical impact of tumor markers will increase considerably. Until that time, the analytical performance and the sensitivity of the established marker assays should be improved, and the clinical role of newer marker tests (TPS, CA 27.29) should be evaluated.

  6. Expression of EMT markers and mode of surgery are prognostic in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaolong; Zhao, Lin; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Lv, Shuhua; Niu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare neoplasms that account for <1% of all mammary tumors and 2-3% of fibro-epithelial neoplasms of the breast. We evaluated the clinicopathological characteristics of a cohort of 246 Chinese patients in relation to the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) markers in benign, borderline and malignant tumors and the prognostic value of different surgical regimens. We observed that survival outcomes correlated with the mode of surgical management in the three patient groups. Expression of E-cadherin, Snail, Slug and Twist were higher in epithelial cells from borderline and malignant tumors than those in benign tumors, whereas the expression of N-cadherin was opposite. Levels of the EMT markers Snail and Slug in the stromal compartment increased with the advancing tumor grade. Expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers contributed to the inherent heterogeneity in the malignant tumors. Based on Cox models, surgical management emerged as an independent predictor for disease-free survival, whereas a history of recent growth and tumor grade were independent predictors for overall survival. These findings show that expression of EMT markers, the mode of surgical management, and a history of recent tumor growth had prognostic potential for patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast. PMID:28380418

  7. Expression of EMT markers and mode of surgery are prognostic in phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolong; Zhao, Lin; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Lv, Shuhua; Niu, Yun

    2017-05-16

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare neoplasms that account for <1% of all mammary tumors and 2-3% of fibro-epithelial neoplasms of the breast. We evaluated the clinicopathological characteristics of a cohort of 246 Chinese patients in relation to the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) markers in benign, borderline and malignant tumors and the prognostic value of different surgical regimens. We observed that survival outcomes correlated with the mode of surgical management in the three patient groups. Expression of E-cadherin, Snail, Slug and Twist were higher in epithelial cells from borderline and malignant tumors than those in benign tumors, whereas the expression of N-cadherin was opposite. Levels of the EMT markers Snail and Slug in the stromal compartment increased with the advancing tumor grade. Expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers contributed to the inherent heterogeneity in the malignant tumors. Based on Cox models, surgical management emerged as an independent predictor for disease-free survival, whereas a history of recent growth and tumor grade were independent predictors for overall survival. These findings show that expression of EMT markers, the mode of surgical management, and a history of recent tumor growth had prognostic potential for patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast.

  8. Potential Markers in Cardiac Hypertrophy?

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Bartosz; Fulgheri, Gabriele; Wicinski, Michal; Grzesk, Elzbieta; Odrowaz-Sypniewska, Grazyna; Grześk, Grzegorz; Darwish, Nasser

    2012-07-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed based on medical history of patient (symptoms and family history), physical examination, results of echocardiogram and in some situations additionally ECG or chest-X-ray results. Currently used non-invasive diagnostic methods, could be complemented by biochemical tests. In this review some emerging potential biomarkers such as: osteopontin, ST-2 receptor, osteoprotegerin, neopterin, urocortins, growth differentiation factor 15 and urotensin II are described. In current article human and non human investigations have been reviewed, since rat is most commonly used model in experimental cardiology and gives important foundations to clinical knowledge.

  9. Publication of Tumor Marker Research Results: The Necessity for Complete and Transparent Reporting

    PubMed Central

    McShane, Lisa M.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical management decisions for patients with cancer are increasingly being guided by prognostic and predictive markers. Use of these markers should be based on a sufficiently comprehensive body of unbiased evidence to establish that benefits to patients outweigh harms and to justify expenditure of health care dollars. Careful assessments of the clinical utility of markers by using comparative effectiveness research methods are urgently needed to more rigorously summarize and evaluate the evidence, but multiple factors have made such assessments difficult. The literature on tumor markers is plagued by nonpublication bias, selective reporting, and incomplete reporting. Several measures to address these problems are discussed, including development of a tumor marker study registry, greater attention to assay analytic performance and specimen quality, use of more rigorous study designs and analysis plans to establish clinical utility, and adherence to higher standards for reporting tumor marker studies. More complete and transparent reporting by adhering to criteria such as BRISQ [Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality] criteria for reporting details about specimens and REMARK [Reporting Recommendations for Tumor Marker Prognostic Studies] criteria for reporting a multitude of aspects relating to study design, analysis, and results, is essential for reliable assessment of study quality, detection of potential biases, and proper interpretation of study findings. Adopting these measures will improve the quality of the body of evidence available for comparative effectiveness research and enhance the ability to establish the clinical utility of prognostic and predictive tumor markers. PMID:23071235

  10. Serum tumor markers in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Basso, Stefano M M

    2004-10-01

    Several serum tumor markers have been investigated in patients with breast cancer for assessing outcome, predicting recurrence and monitoring the therapeutic response. There is a general consensus concerning their limited application in diagnosing malignancy; however, serum tumor markers can be considered for the early detection of recurrence. The most effective markers for this indication are cancer antigens (CA)15-3 and 27.29, and c-erbB-2, although their efficacy in establishing disease progression has not been determined to date. In terms of evaluating prognosis and predicting response to therapy, only the expression of c-erbB-2 has clinical evidence. To conclude, at present, no serum tumor marker is cost effective, and none can be used with confidence in the decision making regarding breast cancer patients.

  11. Potential markers of preeclampsia – a review

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Simon; Rusterholz, Corinne; Zanetti-Dällenbach, Rosanna; Tercanli, Sevgi; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Hahn, Sinuhe; Lapaire, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal/neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The early identification of patients with an increased risk for preeclampsia is therefore one of the most important goals in obstetrics. The availability of highly sensitive and specific physiologic and biochemical markers would allow not only the detection of patients at risk but also permit a close surveillance, an exact diagnosis, timely intervention (e.g. lung maturation), as well as simplified recruitment for future studies looking at therapeutic medications and additional prospective markers. Today, several markers may offer the potential to be used, most likely in a combinatory analysis, as predictors or diagnostic tools. We present here the current knowledge on the biology of preeclampsia and review several biochemical markers which may be used to monitor preeclampsia in a future, that, we hope, is not to distant from today. PMID:19602262

  12. Standardization of tumor markers - priorities identified through external quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Tumor markers are often heterogeneous substances that may be present in elevated concentrations in the serum of cancer patients. Typically measured by immunoassay, they contribute to clinical management, particularly in screening, case-finding, prognostic assessment, and post-treatment monitoring. Data both from external quality assessment (EQA) schemes and clinical studies demonstrate significant variation in tumor marker results obtained for the same specimen using different methods. Between-method between-laboratory coefficients of variation (CV) reported by EQA schemes generally reflect the complexity of the measurand, ranging from <5% for the structurally relatively simple α-fetoprotein (AFP) to >25% for the complex mucinous cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). Improving the standardization of tumor marker measurements is particularly important for three reasons. The primary use of tumor markers is in monitoring cancer patients over long periods of time. Clinical interpretation of trends may consequently be affected if results are obtained in different laboratories using different methods or if a laboratory has to change method. Differences in results may have major implications for adoption of area-wide decision cut-offs and make implementation of these difficult. Method-related differences also make it difficult to compare clinical studies. Improving comparability of tumor marker results requires broad international agreement about which molecular forms of the measurand have clinical utility, identifying and adopting pure molecular forms as calibrants, and defining antibody specificities for their optimal detection. These aims have been achieved to varying extents for the most frequently measured serum tumor markers as described in this paper.

  13. Real-time tumor tracking using implanted positron emission markers: concept and simulation study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Wong, Jerry T; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Ducote, Justin L; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-07-01

    16% (84Rb). In addition, four markers (labeled with 124I) inside a 30 cm diameter water phantom were simulated to evaluate the feasibility of the multimarker localization algorithm. Localization was considered successful if a marker was localized to within 2 mm from its true location. The success rate of marker localization was found to depend on the number of annihilation events used and the error in the initial estimate of the marker position. By detecting 250 positron annihilation events from 4 markers (average of 62 events per marker), the marker success rates for initial errors of +/-5, +/-10, and +/-15 mm were 99.9%, 99.6%, and 92.4%, respectively. Moreover, the average localization error was 0.55 (+/-0.27) mm, which was independent of initial error. The computing time for localizing four markers was less than 20 ms (Pentium 4, 2.8 GHz processor, 512 MB memory). In conclusion, preliminary results demonstrate that the PeTrack technique can potentially provide real-time tumor tracking with low doses associated with the marker's activity. Furthermore, the small size of PeTrack markers is expected to facilitate implantation and reduce patient risk.

  14. Real-time tumor tracking using implanted positron emission markers: Concept and simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Tong; Wong, Jerry T.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Ducote, Justin L.; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-07-15

    % ({sup 124}I,{sup 74}As) to 16% ({sup 84}Rb). In addition, four markers (labeled with {sup 124}I) inside a 30 cm diameter water phantom were simulated to evaluate the feasibility of the multimarker localization algorithm. Localization was considered successful if a marker was localized to within 2 mm from its true location. The success rate of marker localization was found to depend on the number of annihilation events used and the error in the initial estimate of the marker position. By detecting 250 positron annihilation events from 4 markers (average of 62 events per marker), the marker success rates for initial errors of {+-}5, {+-}10, and {+-}15 mm were 99.9%, 99.6%, and 92.4%, respectively. Moreover, the average localization error was 0.55 ({+-}0.27) mm, which was independent of initial error. The computing time for localizing four markers was less than 20 ms (Pentium 4, 2.8 GHz processor, 512 MB memory). In conclusion, preliminary results demonstrate that the PeTrack technique can potentially provide real-time tumor tracking with low doses associated with the marker's activity. Furthermore, the small size of PeTrack markers is expected to facilitate implantation and reduce patient risk.

  15. [Ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (borderline ovarian tumors)].

    PubMed

    Luchian, Alina-Mihaela; Pricop, M

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian borderline tumors are rare, their good prognosis depending on their stage at the time of diagnosis, and the presence of invasive implants. There is little information on tumor type identified intra-surgically, as well as on the most favorable treatment in borderline ovarian tumors. To determine the criteria of identification and presurgery and intra-surgery differentiation of the ovarian borderline tumors from the invasive carcinoma and benign ovarian tumors. This study included 54 patients with TPMS (ovarian borderline tumors) surgically treated in the past 22 years (January 1988-December 2009) at the 4th Gynecological Clinic of the lasi "Gr. T. Popa" University of Medicine and Pharmacy. In this interval 1,107 ovarian tumors: 575 benign, 478 malignant, and 54 TPMS (4.87%) were recorded. The age of the patients with borderline tumors ranged between 20 and 78 years, mean age 46 years, and the histological types were: mucinous (27 cases), serous (18 cases), mixed (8 cases), and Brenner tumor (1 case). We have analyzed the distribution of these cases according to the time when surgical treatment was performed. The frequency of borderline ovarian tumors in our study is 4.87%, lower than in the literature. We believe that this low percentage in our study is due to missing the microscopic data in some macroscopic benign tumors. By this research we aimed at elaborating a therapeutic strategy for each case using with discernment the modern treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy), as well as new chemical drugs with the goal of obtaining better results and longer survival. There are no tumor markers which could predict the progression of a borderline ovarian tumor to invasive tumors, but the invasive course is only 0.7%.

  16. REporting recommendations for tumor MARKer prognostic studies (REMARK).

    PubMed

    McShane, Lisa M; Altman, Douglas G; Sauerbrei, Willi; Taube, Sheila E; Gion, Massimo; Clark, Gary M

    2006-11-01

    Despite years of research and hundreds of reports on tumor markers in oncology, the number of markers that have emerged as clinically useful is pitifully small. Often initially reported studies of a marker show great promise, but subsequent studies on the same or related markers yield inconsistent conclusions or stand in direct contradiction to the promising results. It is imperative that we attempt to understand the reasons that multiple studies of the same marker lead to differing conclusions. A variety of methodologic problems have been cited to explain these discrepancies. Unfortunately, many tumor marker studies have not been reported in a rigorous fashion, and published articles often lack sufficient information to allow adequate assessment of the quality of the study or the generalizability of study results. The development of guidelines for the reporting of tumor marker studies was a major recommendation of the National Cancer Institute-European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (NCI-EORTC) First International Meeting on Cancer Diagnostics in 2000. As for the successful CONSORT initiative for randomized trials and for the STARD statement for diagnostic studies, we suggest guidelines to provide relevant information about the study design, pre-planned hypotheses, patient and specimen characteristics, assay methods, and statistical analysis methods. In addition, the guidelines suggest helpful presentations of data and important elements to include in discussions. The goal of these guidelines is to encourage transparent and complete reporting so that the relevant information will be available to others to help them to judge the usefulness of the data and understand the context in which the conclusions apply.

  17. Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers with greater than 1,300,000 cases and 450,000 deaths each year worldwide. The development of breast cancer involves a progression through intermediate stages until the invasive carcinoma and finally into metastatic disease. Given the variability in clinical progression, the identification of markers that could predict the tumor behavior is particularly important in breast cancer. The determination of tumor markers is a useful tool for clinical management in cancer patients, assisting in diagnostic, staging, evaluation of therapeutic response, detection of recurrence and metastasis, and development of new treatment modalities. In this context, this review aims to discuss the main tumor markers in breast carcinogenesis. The most well-established breast molecular markers with prognostic and/or therapeutic value like hormone receptors, HER-2 oncogene, Ki-67, and p53 proteins, and the genes for hereditary breast cancer will be presented. Furthermore, this review shows the new molecular targets in breast cancer: CXCR4, caveolin, miRNA, and FOXP3, as promising candidates for future development of effective and targeted therapies, also with lower toxicity. PMID:24591761

  18. Tumor markers used in monitoring the tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    BURZ, CLAUDIA; AZIZ, BEN YOUSSEF MOHAMED; BĂLĂCESCU, LOREDANA; LELUŢIU, LUMINIŢA; BUIGA, RAREŞ; SAMASCA, GABRIEL; IRIMIE, ALEXANDRU; LISENCU, COSMIN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to investigate the value of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) correlated with some tissue molecules as predictive markers for recurrence in colon cancer. Methods A total of 30 patients diagnosed with colon cancer stage II or III who underwent optimal surgery were enrolled in study. Tumor markers CEA and CA 19-9 were determined before surgery. Tumor samples were prepared using tissue microarray kit (TMA) then stained for different cellular markers (Ki 67, HER2, BCL2, CD56, CD4, CD8) and analyzed using Inforatio programme for quantitative determination. All patients received standard adjuvant treatment, which consisted of eight cycles chemotherapy type XELOX. The patients were followed up for 3 years. Results Upon 3 years follow-up, 67% of patients developed tumor relapse, the most common site of metastasis being the liver. No correlations were observed between either serum or tissue tumor markers and the risk of tumor relapse. Conclusion Over 50% of patients with colon cancer who had optimal treatment developed metastasis. No statistically significant predictive value for investigated molecules was found. Future studies are needed to confirm the use of molecular markers in monitoring patients with colorectal cancer PMID:27547057

  19. Classic tumor markers in gastric cancer. Current standards and limitations.

    PubMed

    Căinap, Călin; Nagy, Viorica; Gherman, Alexandra; Cetean, Sanziana; Laszlo, Istvan; Constantin, Anne-Marie; Căinap, Simona

    2015-01-01

    The progress made in the last few years made available a large amount of information that needs to be integrated and ordered by oncologists. Tumor markers are one of the pieces that physicians need to fit into the bigger puzzle. This article will detail the most frequent etiologies for the surges in the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer-related antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4), cancer-related antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) serum levels and their indications. Although tumor markers are an invaluable asset to medical practice, their role in screening, diagnosis and oncologic treatment remains poorly standardized. Ongoing or future clinical trials will shed light on pending problems.

  20. Variation of tumoral marker after radiofrequency ablation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; De Robertis, Riccardo; Ciaravino, Valentina; Salvia, Roberto; Butturini, Giovanni; Frigerio, Isabella; Milazzo, Teresa; Crosara, Stefano; Paiella, Salvatore; Pederzoli, Paolo; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the correlation between variations of CA 19.9 blood levels and the entity of necrosis at CT after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods In this study, from June 2010 to February 2014, patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure were included. All these patients underwent RFA. CT study was performed 1 week after RFA. The dosage of CA 19.9 levels was performed 1 month after RFA. Features of necrosis at CT, as mean entity, density and necrosis percentages compared to the original lesion, were evaluated and compared by using t-test with CA 19.9 blood levels variations after RFA procedure. Results In this study were included 51 patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure and with CT study and CA 19.9 available for analysis. After the procedure, CA 19.9 blood levels reduced in 24/51 (47%), remained stable in 10/51 (20%) and increased in 17/51 (33%). In patients with CA 19.9 levels reduced, the tumor marker were reduced less than 20% in 4/24 (17%) and more than 20% in 20/24 (83%); instead the tumor marker were reduced less than 30% in 8/24 (33%) and more than 30% in 16/24 (67%). At CT scan necrotic area density difference was not statistically significant. Also there was no statistically significant difference among the mean area, the mean volume and the mean ablation volume in percentage related to the treated tumor among the three different groups of patients divided depending on the CA 19.9 blood levels. But a tendency to a statistically significant difference was found in comparing the mean percentage of ablation volume between two subgroups of patients with a decrease of CA 19.9 levels with less or more than 20% reduction of tumor markers and between two subgroups with less or more than

  1. Potential markers of oxidative stress in stroke.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Antonio; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Polidori, M Cristina; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2005-10-01

    Free radical production is increased in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, leading to oxidative stress that contributes to brain damage. The measurement of oxidative stress in stroke would be extremely important for a better understanding of its pathophysiology and for identifying subgroups of patients that might receive targeted therapeutic intervention. Since direct measurement of free radicals and oxidized molecules in the brain is difficult in humans, several biological substances have been investigated as potential peripheral markers. Among lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde, despite its relevant methodological limitations, is correlated with the size of ischemic stroke and clinical outcome, while F2-isoprostanes appear to be promising, but they have not been adequately evaluated. 8-Hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine has been extensively investigated as markers of oxidative DNA damage but no study has been done in stroke patients. Also enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants have been proposed as indirect markers. Among them ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, uric acid, and superoxide dismutase are related to brain damage and clinical outcome. After a critical evaluation of the literature, we conclude that, while an ideal biomarker is not yet available, the balance between antioxidants and by-products of oxidative stress in the organism might be the best approach for the evaluation of oxidative stress in stroke patients.

  2. Investigation of novel circulating proteins, germ line single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and molecular tumor markers as potential efficacy biomarkers of first-line sunitinib therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motzer, Robert J; Hutson, Thomas E; Hudes, Gary R; Figlin, Robert A; Martini, Jean-Francois; English, Patricia A; Huang, Xin; Valota, Olga; Williams, J Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Sunitinib is a first-line advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) standard of care. In a randomized phase II trial comparing sunitinib treatment schedules, separate exploratory biomarker analyses investigated the correlations of efficacy with selected serum, germ line single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), or tumor markers. Advanced RCC patients received first-line sunitinib 50 mg/day on the approved 4-week-on-2-week-off schedule (n = 146) or 37.5 mg/day continuous dosing (n = 146). The following correlation analyses were performed: (1) response evaluation criteria in solid tumors-defined tumor response with serum soluble protein levels via two distinct multiplex (n < 1,000) platforms; (2) response and time-to-event outcomes with germ line SNPs in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and VEGF receptor (VEGFR)3 genes; and (3) response and time-to-event outcomes with tumor immunohistochemistry status for hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) and carbonic anhydrase-IX or tumor Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene inactivation status. Lower baseline angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and higher baseline matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) levels were identified by both platforms as statistically significantly associated with tumor response. There were no significant correlations between VEGF-A or VEGFR3 SNPs and outcomes. Progression-free survival was longer for HIF-1α percent of tumor expression groups 0-2 (HIF-1α low) versus 3-4 (HIF-1α high; p = 0.034). There were no significant correlations between outcomes and each VHL inactivation mechanism [mutation (86% of VHL-inactive patients), methylation (14%), and large deletion (7%)] or mechanisms combined. Serum Ang-2 and MMP-2 and tumor HIF-1α were identified as relevant baseline biomarkers of sunitinib activity in advanced RCC, warranting further research into their prognostic versus predictive value.

  3. Tumor markers in breast cancer- European Group on Tumor Markers recommendations.

    PubMed

    Molina, Rafael; Barak, Vivian; van Dalen, Arie; Duffy, Michael J; Einarsson, Roland; Gion, Massimo; Goike, Helenka; Lamerz, Rolf; Nap, Marius; Sölétormos, György; Stieber, Petra

    2005-01-01

    Recommendations are presented for the routine clinical use of serum and tissue-based markers in the diagnosis and management of patients with breast cancer. Their low sensitivity and specificity preclude the use of serum markers such as the MUC-1 mucin glycoproteins (CA 15.3, BR 27.29) and carcinoembryonic antigen in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. However, serial measurement of these markers can result in the early detection of recurrent disease as well as indicate the efficacy of therapy. Of the tissue-based markers, measurement of estrogen and progesterone receptors is mandatory in the selection of patients for treatment with hormone therapy, while HER-2 is essential in selecting patients with advanced breast cancer for treatment with Herceptin (trastuzumab). Urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 are recently validated prognostic markers for lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and thus may be of value in selecting node-negative patients that do not require adjuvant chemotherapy.

  4. Metabolic Perturbation and Potential Markers in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Gaoshuang; Wang, Yuqing; Xu, Jin; Liu, Linsheng; Li, Mengjie; Shi, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of esophageal cancer (EC) at early stage is rather difficult. This study aimed to profile the molecules in serum and tissue and identify potential biomarkers in patients with EC. A total of 64 volunteers were recruited, and 83 samples (24 EC serum samples, 21 serum controls, 19 paired EC tissues, and corresponding tumor-adjacent tissues) were analyzed. The gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS) was employed, and principal component analysis was used to reveal the discriminatory metabolites and identify the candidate markers of EC. A total of 41 in serum and 36 identified compounds in tissues were relevant to the malignant prognosis. A marked metabolic reprogramming of EC was observed, including enhanced anaerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, inhibited tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and altered lipid metabolism and amino acid turnover. Based on the potential markers of glucose, glutamic acid, lactic acid, and cholesterol, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated good diagnosis and prognosis of EC. EC patients showed distinct reprogrammed metabolism involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, glutaminolysis, and fatty acid metabolism. The pivotal molecules in the metabolic pathways were suggested as the potential markers to facilitate the early diagnosis of human EC. PMID:28512469

  5. Appropriateness of tumor marker request: a case of study

    PubMed Central

    Trevisiol, Chiara; Fabricio, Aline S. C.

    2017-01-01

    Appropriateness is crucial to provide efficient and high-quality health services at affordable costs. Laboratory medicine is a sector of special interest for the investigation of inappropriateness, due to the high rate of technological innovation and its pivotal role in many diseases and clinical settings. Some subjective aspects related to either the patient or physician seem to have a major role on inappropriateness rates. Given the psychological impact of cancer on both patients and physicians, tumor markers represent a case of study for appropriateness. The assessment of inappropriateness of laboratory tests has been focused mainly on ordering patterns. Appropriateness can barely be appraised by matching the requested test with the clinical problem because clinical information on the test requisition form is usually inadequate. Monitoring inappropriateness through individual clinical information may be feasible in inpatient (clinical data are available), while an indirect approach should be used for outpatients. To estimate inappropriateness in outpatients our group developed innovative models based on comparison between the actually ordered and expected requests of tumor marker, calculated according to recommendations of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) applied to figures of cancer prevalence. The implementation of the model at national scale in Italy led to recognize a very high rate of overordering of tumor markers. The model was further focused by a dedicated algorithm to be adapted to different clinical conditions or organizational settings by applying performance indicators to cohort-wide structured information in electronic health records (EHRs). With this novel approach, we showed that inappropriateness is multifaceted even within the specific category of tumour markers. The model was effective in identifying both over- and underordering. Implementation of evidence based information and monitoring their impact on the clinical practice are parts of

  6. Appropriateness of tumor marker request: a case of study.

    PubMed

    Gion, Massimo; Trevisiol, Chiara; Fabricio, Aline S C

    2017-07-01

    Appropriateness is crucial to provide efficient and high-quality health services at affordable costs. Laboratory medicine is a sector of special interest for the investigation of inappropriateness, due to the high rate of technological innovation and its pivotal role in many diseases and clinical settings. Some subjective aspects related to either the patient or physician seem to have a major role on inappropriateness rates. Given the psychological impact of cancer on both patients and physicians, tumor markers represent a case of study for appropriateness. The assessment of inappropriateness of laboratory tests has been focused mainly on ordering patterns. Appropriateness can barely be appraised by matching the requested test with the clinical problem because clinical information on the test requisition form is usually inadequate. Monitoring inappropriateness through individual clinical information may be feasible in inpatient (clinical data are available), while an indirect approach should be used for outpatients. To estimate inappropriateness in outpatients our group developed innovative models based on comparison between the actually ordered and expected requests of tumor marker, calculated according to recommendations of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) applied to figures of cancer prevalence. The implementation of the model at national scale in Italy led to recognize a very high rate of overordering of tumor markers. The model was further focused by a dedicated algorithm to be adapted to different clinical conditions or organizational settings by applying performance indicators to cohort-wide structured information in electronic health records (EHRs). With this novel approach, we showed that inappropriateness is multifaceted even within the specific category of tumour markers. The model was effective in identifying both over- and underordering. Implementation of evidence based information and monitoring their impact on the clinical practice are parts of

  7. Alternative fiducial markers for Vero real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy: A phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of potential fiducial markers consisting of various materials in a Vero real-time tumor-tracking (RTTT) system. In order to determine the applicability of fiducial markers for the Vero RTTT system, we tested various markers consisting of 8 kinds of material (titanium, stainless steel, high-carbon steel, pure steel, copper, silver, tantalum, and gold) with various diameters ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm and a length of 5 mm. Additionally, a commercial gold coil marker (Visicoil™, IBA dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) of diameter 0.5 mm and length 1 cm was included for evaluation. The radiologic visibility on kV fluoroscopy/kV CT scan images of the fiducial markers was evaluated. The detectability on the RTTT system was tested using a two-dimensional moving phantom (Brainlab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany), producing sinusoidal motion. The target center's accuracy was evaluated by calculating the deviation of the position of a metal sphere from the center on the dose profile. Dose profiles were measured using Gafchromic EBT2 films (International Specialty Products, NJ, USA). All markers were visible on kV fluoroscopy/kV CT while markers with atomic number ≥ 25.7 were detectable on the Vero RTTT system. All the detected markers showed excellent geometric accuracy.

  8. Biomarkers Discovery for Colorectal Cancer: A Review on Tumor Endothelial Markers as Perspective Candidates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. The early detection of CRC, during the promotion/progression stages, is an enormous challenge for a successful outcome and remains a fundamental problem in clinical approach. Despite the continuous advancement in diagnostic and therapeutic methods, there is a need for discovery of sensitive and specific, noninvasive biomarkers. Tumor endothelial markers (TEMs) are associated with tumor-specific angiogenesis and are potentially useful to discriminate between tumor and normal endothelium. The most promising TEMs for oncogenic signaling in CRC appeared to be the TEM1, TEM5, TEM7, and TEM8. Overexpression of TEMs especially TEM1, TEM7, and TEM8 in colorectal tumor tissue compared to healthy tissue suggests their role in tumor blood vessels formation. Thus TEMs appear to be perspective candidates for early detection, monitoring, and treatment of CRC patients. This review provides an update on recent data on tumor endothelial markers and their possible use as biomarkers for screening, diagnosis, and therapy of colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27965519

  9. Diagnostic value of multiple tumor markers for patients with esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Zhenli; Liu, Yan; Jin, Xueyuan; Xu, Zhiwei; Yu, Qiuyan; Li, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Various studies assessing the diagnostic value of serum tumor markers in patients with esophageal cancer remain controversial. This study aims to comprehensively and quantitatively summarize the potential diagnostic value of 5 serum tumour markers in esophageal cancer. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), through February 28, 2013, without language restriction. Studies were assessed for quality using QUADAS (quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy). The positive likelihood ratio (PLR) and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) were pooled separately and compared with overall accuracy measures using diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and symmetric summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves. Of 4391 studies initially identified, 44 eligible studies including five tumor markers met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis, while meta-analysis could not be conducted for 12 other tumor markers. Approximately 79.55% (35/44) of the included studies were of relatively high quality (QUADAS score≥7). The summary estimates of the positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) for diagnosing EC were as follows: CEA, 5.94/0.76/9.26; Cyfra21-1, 12.110.59/22.27; p53 antibody, 6.71/0.75/9.60; SCC-Ag, 7.66/0.68/12.41; and VEGF-C, 0.74/0.37/8.12. The estimated summary receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the performance of all five tumor markers was reasonable. The current evidence suggests that CEA, Cyfra21-1, p53, SCC-Ag and VEGF-C have a potential diagnostic value for esophageal carcinoma.

  10. Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0243 TITLE: Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1...reconstruct tumor cell evolution in tumors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NSCLC; tumor evolution ; whole exome sequencing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  11. Detection of tumor markers with ProteinChip technology.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Andreas

    2004-02-01

    The early diagnosis of cancer at a curable stage is crucial for the successful treatment of this disease. Most of the currently used tumor assays appear too late and rely on single biomarkers with high false-negative and/or false-positive rates. As an additional burden for the patient, the traditional assays often require biopsy material instead of less invasively taken samples like serum. With the hope for more reliable DNA- and RNA-based screening tools, the research activities of the past 20 years have focused on the genomic characteristics of cancer cells. But, up to now, the output from this strategy has been disappointingly low and the disillusionment is paired with a return to proteins as the real key players in all physiological and pathological processes. Meanwhile, comparative protein profiling is generally acknowledged as a promising way for the detection of specific and predictive protein patterns reflecting certain stages of cancer without dependency on single markers. To meet the new technological demands, the ProteinChip Biomarker System was developed for the Expression Difference Mapping analysis of several hundreds of samples per day on a single, uncomplicated platform; with software support for the construction of multi-marker predictive models. The Interaction Discovery Mapping platform is introduced as the next methodical step for investigations about protein binding partners of possible importance in diagnosis and therapy. This review summarizes the current state in cancer diagnosis, provides an introduction into the ProteinChip technology, and gives an update on publications and research collaborations in SELDI-based tumor marker discovery.

  12. Surgical site markers: potential source of infection.

    PubMed

    Driessche, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Observing licensed independent practitioners mark surgical sites with all types of marking pens is a concern related to the potential spread of infections from patient to patient. The practice of using the same marking pen to mark a surgical site has been questioned as a source of cross contamination. A literature review was done on recent studies and best practice recommendations to determine whether marking pens can act as fomites for nosocomial infections. The review indicated that surgical site markers, ink pens, and aging permanent marking pens can be a source for cross-infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, other bacteria, fungus, or virus. The type of marking pens used and the act of using the same marking pen from patient to patient could contribute to nosocomial infections. The literature reviewed recommends a single time use of a surgical marking pen. Interventions to prevent cross contamination and postoperative surgical site infections are a major concern in the care of the orthopaedic patient.

  13. Mena, a new available marker in tumors of salivary glands?

    PubMed

    Gurzu, S; Krause, M; Ember, I; Azamfirei, L; Gobel, G; Feher, K; Jung, I

    2012-02-07

    Mena (mammalian Ena) is an actin regulatory protein involved in cell motility and adhesion. Based on its potential role in malignant transformation revealed in other organs, we analyzed the Mena expression in normal salivary glands (SG) and salivary tumors. Mena expression was determined in normal SG (n=10) and also benign (n=20) and malignant (n=35) lesions of SG. For the immunohistochemical staining we used the anti-Mena antibody. All normal SG and the benign lesions (10 pleomorphic adenomas, 10 Warthin's tumors) were Mena negative. Salivary duct carcinomas (n=5), carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma (n=5), acinic cell carcinomas (n=5), squamous cell carcinomas (n=10) and high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=2) were positive. The lymphomas (n=5) and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas (n=1) were Mena negative. In one case the lymphoblastic cells stained positive for Mena. Some of the endothelial cells, in the peritumoral vessels, were Mena positive. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in the literature about Mena expression in salivary tumors. Our study suggests that Mena protein seems to play a role in malignant transformation and its intensity is correlated with the type and grade of tumor and also with vascular invasion. Its positivity in endothelial cells may suggest its potential role in tumor angiogenesis.

  14. [Tumor markers in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Cappelli, G; Paladini, S; D'Agata, A

    1999-01-01

    The difficulty in an early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is in the absence of early symptoms due to lower limit of detection of the actual imaging techniques. Clinical symptoms like weight loss, abdominal pain and jaundice indicate an advanced cancer stage. Today 50% of pancreatic tumors are diagnosed in advanced metastatic stage and only 20-30% show resectable cancer. Ultrasound and determination of a mucine like antigen as CA 19-9, CA 50 and CA 195 seem to allow an earlier diagnosis with a higher rate of resective surgery and a prolonged survival for these patients. The mucines are high molecular weight glycoproteins consistent of a backbone protein to which oligosaccarides are attached. The linkage of carbohydrate to the peptide is termed O-glycosidic and involves the hydroxylic groups of serine or threonine with N-acetylglucosamine. Only the backbone proteins are genetically determined (genes MUC). The gangliosides are the same or derivative of Lewis antigen. CA 19-9, CA 50 and CA 195 are assays directed to different epitopes probably present on the same mucinous antigen. These epitopes are not present in different mucines as CA 15-3, CA 125 and TAG 72. Recently other two mucines are emploied CA 242 and CAM 17.1 but they are not better than CA 19-9. The use of a "triplet" of tumor markers as CA 19-9, CA 125 and CEA is the best diagnostic tool for cancer of pancreas in an "integrated" use with ultrasonographic evaluation of the lesion. CA 19-9 permits differential diagnosis from neuroendocrine tumor or pancreatitis, the values of CA 125 and CEA are useful in the evaluation of the stage, resectability and prognosis of pancreatic cancer. The recent use of CA19-9 for the evaluation of radiochemotherapy in preoperative management of the patient is a mode of a well known application of tumor markers in a kinetic evaluation of the tumor for the radicality of therapy, follow-up, recurrence and the effectiveness of the palliative therapy.

  15. CRX Is a Diagnostic Marker of Retinal and Pineal Lineage Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Maire, Cecile L.; Idbaih, Ahmed; Geffers, Lars; Correll, Mick; Holton, Kristina; Quackenbush, John; Ligon, Keith L.

    2009-01-01

    Background CRX is a homeobox transcription factor whose expression and function is critical to maintain retinal and pineal lineage cells and their progenitors. To determine the biologic and diagnostic potential of CRX in human tumors of the retina and pineal, we examined its expression in multiple settings. Methodology/Principal Findings Using situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we show that Crx RNA and protein expression are exquisitely lineage restricted to retinal and pineal cells during normal mouse and human development. Gene expression profiling analysis of a wide range of human cancers and cancer cell lines also supports that CRX RNA is highly lineage restricted in cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of 22 retinoblastomas and 13 pineal parenchymal tumors demonstrated strong expression of CRX in over 95% of these tumors. Importantly, CRX was not detected in the majority of tumors considered in the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumors (n = 78). The notable exception was medulloblastoma, 40% of which exhibited CRX expression in a heterogeneous pattern readily distinguished from that seen in retino-pineal tumors. Conclusions/Significance These findings describe new potential roles for CRX in human cancers and highlight the general utility of lineage restricted transcription factors in cancer biology. They also identify CRX as a sensitive and specific clinical marker and a potential lineage dependent therapeutic target in retinoblastoma and pineoblastoma. PMID:19936203

  16. Prognostic value of preoperative serum tumor markers in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ze-Bo; Zhou, Xin; Xu, Jun; Du, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Jian; Shu, Yong-Qian; Liu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9, and CA50 in patients undergoing D2 resection. METHODS: We evaluated 363 patients with gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy at our hospital from January 2006 to December 2009. Blood samples were obtained from each patient within 1 wk before surgery. The cut-off values for serum CEA, CA19-9, and CA50 were 5 ng/mL, 37 U/mL, and 20 U/mL, respectively. The correlation between preoperative tumor marker levels and prognosis was studied by means of univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The preoperative serum positive rates of CEA, CA19-9 and CA50 were 24.0%, 18.9% and 24.5%, respectively. The positivity rate of serum CEA was significantly correlated with age (P < 0.001), sex (P = 0.022), tumor size (P = 0.007) and depth of invasion (P = 0.018); CA19-9 with tumor size (P = 0.042) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001); and CA50 only with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, tumor size, T category, N category, vascular or neural invasion, and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. CA19-9 had an independent prognostic significance in patients without adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.027). CONCLUSION: Preoperative serum CEA, CA19-9 and CA50 are prognostic in patients with gastric cancer. Only CA19-9 is an independent prognostic factor after surgery without adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24829865

  17. A system for tumor heterogeneity evaluation and diagnosis based on tumor markers measured routinely in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liu; Rixv, Liu; Xiuying, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop an efficient and reliable approach to estimate tumor heterogeneity and improve tumor diagnosis using multiple tumor markers measured routinely in the clinical laboratory. A total of 161 patients with different cancers were recruited as the cancer group, and 91 patients with non-oncological conditions were required as the non-oncological disease group. The control group comprised 90 randomly selected healthy subjects. AFP, CEA, CYFRA, CA125, CA153, CA199, CA724, and NSE levels were measured in all these subjects with a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The tumor marker with the maximum S/CO value (sample test value:cutoff value for discriminating individuals with and without tumors) was considered as a specific tumor marker (STM) for an individual. Tumor heterogeneity index (THI)=N/P (N: number of STMs; P: percentage of individuals with STMs in a certain tumor population) was used to quantify tumor heterogeneity: high THI indicated high tumor heterogeneity. The tumor marker index (TMI), TMI = STM×(number of positive tumor markers+1), was used for diagnosis. The THIs of lung, gastric, and liver cancers were 8.33, 9.63, and 5.2, respectively, while the ROC-areas under the curve for TMI were 0.862, 0.809, and 0.966. In this study, we developed a novel index for tumor heterogeneity based on the expression of various routinely evaluated serum tumor markers. Development of an evaluation system for tumor heterogeneity on the basis of this index could provide an effective diagnostic tool for some cancers. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A discrimination index for selecting markers of tumor growth dynamic across multiple cancer studies with a cure fraction.

    PubMed

    Rouam, Sigrid; Broët, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    To identify genomic markers with consistent effect on tumor dynamics across multiple cancer series, discrimination indices based on proportional hazards models can be used since they do not depend heavily on the sample size. However, the underlying assumption of proportionality of the hazards does not always hold, especially when the studied population is a mixture of cured and uncured patients, like in early-stage cancers. We propose a novel index that quantifies the capability of a genomic marker to separate uncured patients, according to their time-to-event outcomes. It allows to identify genomic markers characterizing tumor growth dynamic across multiple studies. Simulation results show that our index performs better than classical indices based on the Cox model. It is neither affected by the sample size nor the cure rate fraction. In a cross-study of early-stage breast cancers, the index allows to select genomic markers with a potential consistent effect on tumor growth dynamics.

  19. Potential Prognostic Markers for Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    such as proliferation, differentiation and assay [15]. TGF[3 may be produced by metastatic motility. Upregulation of growth factor synthesis or prostate...via mod- ronment include neuroendocrine cells. These cells ulation of tumor cell receptor expression. Control of can secrete bombesin, a gastrin ...controls, indicating that addition ofT015 accelerates tumor expansion. TIl15 synthesis triggered a dramatic increase in cell motility, boosting serum

  20. Molecular beacon imaging of tumor marker gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily; Cao, Zehong; Lin, Yiming; Wood, William C; Staley, Charles A

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a fluorescence imaging-based approach to detect expression of tumor marker genes in pancreatic cancer cells using molecular beacons (MBs). MBs are short hairpin oligonucleotide probes that bind to specific oligonucleotide sequences and produce fluorescent signals. MBs targeting transcripts of two tumor marker genes, mutant K-ras and survivin, were synthesized and their specificity in detection of the expression of those genes in pancreatic cancer cells was examined. We found that K-ras MBs differentially bind to mutant K-ras mRNAs, resulting in strong fluorescent signals in pancreatic cancer cells with specific mutant K-ras genes but not in normal cells or cancer cells expressing either wild type or a different mutation of the K-ras gene. Additionally, MBs targeting survivin mRNA produced a bright fluorescent signal specifically in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that MBs labeled with different fluorophores could detect survivin and mutant K-ras mRNAs simultaneously in single cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that survivin and K-ras MBs have a high specificity in identifying cancer cells on frozen sections of pancreatic cancer tissues. In conclusion, molecular beacon-based imaging of expression of tumor marker genes has potential for the development of novel approaches for the detection of pancreatic cancer cells.

  1. Evaluation of tumor markers for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant ascites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Kong, Xinjuan; Dou, Qian; Ye, Jin; Xu, Dong; Shang, Haitao; Xu, Keshu; Song, Yuhu

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant ascites is a challenging problem in clinical practice, non-invasive techniques should be developed to improve diagnostic accuracy. The diagnostic performances of tumor markers in malignant ascites remained unsettled. Our aim was to evaluate diagnostic performance of tumor markers in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant ascites. A total of 437 patients were enrolled, and the relevant parameters of the patients were analyzed for the differentiation of benign ascites from malignant ascites. At the predetermined cutoff values of tumor makers, tumor markers in ascitic fluid showed better diagnostic performance than those in serum. Combined use of tumor markers and the cytology increased the diagnostic yield of the latter by 37%. In cytologically negative malignant ascites, tumor markers provided assistance in differentiating malignant ascites from benign ascites, and the combination of ascitic tumor markers yielded 86% sensitivity, 97% specificity. Use of a panel of tumor markers exhibited excellent diagnostic performance in diagnosing malignant ascites, which indicated the detection of tumor markers may represent a beneficial adjunct to cytology, thus guiding the selection of patients who might benefit from further invasive procedures.

  2. Use of preoperative FLAIR MRI and ependymal proximity of tumor enhancement as surrogate markers of brain tumor origin.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy R; Hulou, M Maher; Abecassis, Josh; Das, Sunit; Chandler, James P

    2015-09-01

    Neural stem cells proliferate in the subventricular zone and give rise to progeny that differentiate and migrate throughout the brain. We aimed to test the hypothesis that glioma behavior and grade may correlate with the identity of the tumor cell of origin. We evaluated three preoperative radiographic features (fluid attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR] MRI characteristics, tumor proximity to ventricular ependyma, and subependymal representation) as surrogate markers of tumor origin using a retrospective cohort design. The medical records of 228 patients who underwent surgical resection of a glioma from January 2004 to August 2008 were reviewed. Average patient age was 54.5 years (standard deviation [SD] 15.3) with a male predominance (62.9%). World Health Organization glioma grades amongst the cohort were Grade IV (71.6%), Grade III (21.3%) and Grade II (7.1%). Mean survival was 11.2 months (SD 10.5) with a mean follow up of 12.8 months (SD 11.3). Glioma tumor grade was significantly correlated to FLAIR signal proximity to the ependymal surface (p<0.01) and inversely with proximity of tumor mass to the ependyma (p<0.01). The mean distance of tumor-associated FLAIR signal from the ependymal surface for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was 1.2mm (SD 3.3) compared to 4.8 (SD 6.5) for anaplastic astrocytomas and 6.6mm (SD 6.7; p<0.01) for low grade gliomas. Conversely, the mean distance of the enhancing tumor mass from the ependyma for GBM was 7.3mm (SD 9.4), Grade III glioma 2.3mm (SD 4.9), and Grade II glioma 3.8mm (SD 6.8; p<0.05). These findings suggest that higher grade gliomas might arise from less differentiated neuroepithelial cells in the subventricular zone that possess greater migratory potential.

  3. Production of immunoreactive calcitonin and some other tumor markers by established human carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsunaga, A; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1986-03-01

    Out of seven human carcinoma cell lines (M7609, CCK-81, FCC-1, RPMI#4788, QGP-1, HLC-1, and KNS-62), 4 cell lines were found to produce immunoreactive calcitonin (ICT), a potential tumor marker for various malignancies. During a 7-day culture, 1.4 X 10(5) QGP-1, RPMI#4788, HLC-1, and KNS-62 cells secreted 7,000 pg, 500 pg, 400 pg, and 400 pg of ICT in the medium, respectively. The production of ICT by QGP-1 cells was increased by addition of pentagastrin or calcium gluconate. Three different components of ICT (peak I, molecular weight greater than 40,000; peak II, 14,000-18,000; peak III, 3,400) were detected by gel filtration of the QGP-1 spent medium. In a competitive inhibition-type radioimmunoassay of serial dilutions of each ICT component, peak III component showed very similar immunoreactivity to synthetic calcitonin. However, the other two components gave clearly different immunoreactivities from the peak III component and showed very similar immunoreactivities to each other. All the cell lines were further screened for synthesis of 7 other tumor markers, carcinoembryonic antigen, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen, CA19-9, tissue polypeptide antigen, alpha-fetoprotein, beta 2-microglobulin and ferritin. Every cell line produced 2 to 6 markers concomitantly, and various combinations of positive markers were found among the cell lines.

  4. Comparison of loss of heterozygosity patterns between ovarian tumors of low malignant potential and malignant ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, E.C.; Miller, D.M.; Finley, W.H.

    1994-09-01

    Ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (LMP) represent a pathologic subtype of ovarian tumor that possess many features common to malignant tumors including epithelial stratification, increased mitotic activity and atypical cellularity. These tumors, however, do not invade the ovarian stroma and have a much improved patient prognosis. Utilizing dinucleotide repeats, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies were performed on a total of 12 ovarian tumors of LMP in 5 regions found to have significant levels of LOH in malignant ovarian tumors. The regions chosen for study were 3p, 6q, 11p, 17p and 17q. LOH could be demonstrated in malignant ovarian tumors in loci from 3p, 11p and both chromosomal arms of 17 when compared to normal tissue from the same patient. Loss in malignant tumors was more common in loci mapped to 3p21 and to 11p15. OH was not noted in any samples for a repeat in the TP53 gene even though flanking markers on 17p were lost in 1 patient with a malignant tumor. Loss was not demonstrated in any of the loci examined from 6q in malignant ovarian tumors. LOH was not demonstrated in any of the 39 loci examined from any of the five chromosomal regions in the ovarian tumors of LMP. Cytogenetic analyses of these LMP tumors were consistent with lack of involvement in these chromosomal regions. These data suggest the mechanism of tumorigenesis is different in tumors of LMP from that in malignant ovarian tumors.

  5. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma), mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning. PMID:22408433

  6. Clinically Meaningful Use of Blood Tumor Markers in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaro, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Before the introduction of modern imaging techniques and the recent developments in molecular diagnosis, tumor markers (TMs) were among the few available diagnostic tools for the management of cancer patients. Easily obtained from serum or plasma samples, TMs are minimally invasive and convenient, and the associated costs are low. Single TMs were traditionally used but these have come under scrutiny due to their low sensitivity and specificity when used, for example, in a screening setting. However, recent research has shown superior performance using a combination of multiple TMs as a panel for assessment, or as part of validated algorithms that also incorporate other clinical factors. In addition, newer TMs have been discovered that have an increased sensitivity and specificity profile for defined malignancies. The aim of this review is to provide a concise overview of the appropriate uses of both traditional and newer TMs and their roles in diagnosis, prognosis, and the monitoring of patients in current clinical practice. We also look at the future direction of TMs and their integration with other diagnostic modalities and other emerging serum based biomarkers, such as circulating nucleic acids, to ultimately advance diagnostic performance and improve patient management. PMID:28042579

  7. Hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes for multiplex detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yueshuang; Zhang, Xiaoping; Luan, Chengxin; Wang, Huan; Chen, Baoan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-01-15

    Barcodes-based suspension array have for demonstrated values in multiplex assay of tumor markers. Photonic barcodes which are encoded by their characteristic reflection peaks are the important supports for suspension array due to their stable code, low fluorescent background and high surface-volume ratio. Attempts to develop this technology tend to improve the function of the photonic barcodes. Here, we present a new type of hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes for efficient multiplex assays. This photonic barcodes are hybrid inverse opal hydrogel composed of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose. The polymerized PEG-DA hydrogel could guarantee the stabilities of the inverse opal structure and its resultant code, while the agarose could offer active chemical groups for the probe immobilization and homogeneous water surrounding for the bioassay. In addition, the interconnected pores inverse opal structure could provide channels for biomolecules diffusing and reaction into the voids of barcodes. These features imparted the hybrid hydrogel photonic barcodes with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.78ng/mL for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and 0.21ng/mL for α-fetoprotein (AFP), respectively. It was also demonstrated that the proposed barcodes showed acceptable accuracy and detection reproducibility, and the results were in acceptable agreement with those from common clinic method for the detections of practical clinical samples. Thus, our technique provides a new platform for simultaneous multiplex immunoassay.

  8. Stability of Markers Used for Real-Time Tumor Tracking After Percutaneous Intrapulmonary Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Water, Steven van de; Levendag, Peter C.; Holt, Bronno van der; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the stability of markers used for real-time tumor tracking after percutaneous intrapulmonary placement. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with 44 lesions, 111 markers, and {>=}2 repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were studied. The tumor on the repeat CT scans was registered with the tumor on the planning CT scan. Next, the three-dimensional marker coordinates were determined on the planning CT scan and repeat CT scans. Marker stability was analyzed by the displacement of the markers and the displacement of the center of mass (COM) of the marker configurations. In addition, we assessed the reliability of using the intermarker distance as a check for displacements in the COM of the marker configurations. Results: The median marker displacement was 1.3 mm (range, 0.1-53.6). The marker displacement was >5 mm in 12% of the markers and >10 mm in 5% of the markers. The causes of marker displacement >5 mm included marker migration (2 of 13) and target volume changes (5 of 13). Nonsynchronous tumor and marker movement during breathing might have been responsible for the displacements >5 mm in the other 6 of 13 markers. The median displacement in the COM of the marker configurations was 1.0 mm (range, 0.1-23.3). Displacements in the COM of the marker configurations of {>=}2.0 mm were detected by changes in the intermarker distance of >1.5 mm in 96% of the treatment fractions. Conclusion: The median marker displacement was small (1.3 mm). Nevertheless, displacements >5 mm occurred in 12% of the markers. Therefore, we recommend the implantation of multiple markers because multiple markers will enable a quick and reliable check of marker displacement by determining the change in the intermarker distance. A displacement in the COM of the marker configuration of {>=}2.0 mm was almost always detected (96%) by a change in the distance between the markers of >1.5 mm. This enabled the displaced marker to be disabled, such that tumor localization

  9. A SPR biosensor based on signal amplification using antibody-QD conjugates for quantitative determination of multiple tumor markers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Jue; Fu, Weiling; Yao, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    The detection of tumor markers is very important in early cancer diagnosis; however, tumor markers are usually present at very low concentrations, especially in the early stages of tumor development. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is widely used to detect biomolecular interactions; it has inherent advantages of being high-throughput, real-time, and label-free technique. However, its sensitivity needs essential improvement for practical applications. In this study, we developed a signal amplification strategy using antibody-quantum dot (QD) conjugates for the sensitive and quantitative detection of α-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin fragment 21-1 (CYFRA 21-1) in clinical samples. The use of a dual signal amplification strategy using AuNP-antibody and antibody-QD conjugates increased the signal amplification by 50-folds. The constructed SPR biosensor showed a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL for AFP, CEA, and CYFRA 21-1. Moreover, the results obtained using this SPR biosensor were consistent with those obtained using the electrochemiluminescence method. Thus, the constructed SPR biosensor provides a highly sensitive and specific approach for the detection of tumor markers. This SPR biosensor can be expected to be readily applied for the detection of other tumor markers and can offer a potentially powerful solution for tumor screening. PMID:27615417

  10. Is Bax/Bcl-2 ratio considered as a prognostic marker with age and tumor location in colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Khodapasand, Ehsan; Jafarzadeh, Narges; Farrokhi, Farid; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Bax and Bcl-2 are the major members of Bcl-2 family whose play a key role in tumor progression or inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic pathway triggered by mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic members of this family can determine the cellular fate. In this study, the relative level of mRNA expression of Bax and Bcl-2 genes was determined using RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and RT-qPCR technique from 22 tumoral tissues and adjacent non-tumoral tissues from adenocarcinoma colorectal cancer. The potential prognostic and predictive significance of Bax and Bcl-2 gene expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were demonstrated in colorectal cancer. The significant correlation between qPCR data and different clinicopathologic parameters of colorectal carcinoma, including age, gender, tumor size, tumor stage, tumor location, and tumor differentiation was also examined. Interestingly, no significant correlation was seen between Bax and Bcl-2 expressions and clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer. However, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was statistically correlated with age and tumor location. Patients with age above 50 showed decreased levels of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was significantly lower in tumors resected from colon compared to sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid and rectum tumors. This study indicates a significant correlation between age and tumor location with Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio, suggesting predictive value as a potential molecular marker of colorectal cancer.

  11. Is Bax/Bcl-2 Ratio Considered as a Prognostic Marker with Age and Tumor Location in Colorectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Khodapasand, Ehsan; Jafarzadeh, Narges; Farrokhi, Farid; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bax and Bcl-2 are the major members of Bcl-2 family whose play a key role in tumor progression or inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic pathway triggered by mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic members of this family can determine the cellular fate. Methods: In this study, the relative level of mRNA expression of Bax and Bcl-2 genes was determined using RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and RT-qPCR technique from 22 tumoral tissues and adjacent non-tumoral tissues from adenocarcinoma colorectal cancer. Results: The potential prognostic and predictive significance of Bax and Bcl-2 gene expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were demonstrated in colorectal cancer. The significant correlation between qPCR data and different clinicopathologic parameters of colorectal carcinoma, including age, gender, tumor size, tumor stage, tumor location, and tumor differentiation was also examined. Interestingly, no significant correlation was seen between Bax and Bcl-2 expressions and clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer. However, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was statistically correlated with age and tumor location. Patients with age above 50 showed decreased levels of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was significantly lower in tumors resected from colon compared to sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid and rectum tumors. Conclusion: This study indicates a significant correlation between age and tumor location with Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio, suggesting predictive value as a potential molecular marker of colorectal cancer. PMID:25864810

  12. Hair shaft miRNA-221 levels as a new tumor marker of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Inada, Taisuke; Fukushima, Satoshi; Murai, Masayuki; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Miyashita, Azusa; Nakahara, Satoshi; Yamashita, Junji; Aoi, Jun; Masuguchi, Shinichi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2015-02-01

    miRNA-221 (miR-221) is known to be abnormally expressed in many human cancers. The serum levels of miR-221 have been reported as a tumor marker for malignant melanoma (MM). We hypothesized that the hair shaft miR-221 levels may be increased in patients with MM. We therefore assessed the possibility that hair shaft miR-221 levels could be a marker for MM. The hair shaft miR-221 levels were significantly higher in patients with MM than controls. The rates of increased hair shaft miR-221 levels above the cut-off value were comparable to those of serum 5-S-CD, which is a tumor marker commonly used for MM. Measurements of the hair shaft miR-221 levels could have potential clinical value in the detection of MM. This is the first report investigating the hair shaft levels of an miRNA in patients with MM. Our investigations offer new insight into the relationship between miR-221 and MM, and may provide a new, non-invasive way to screen for melanoma.

  13. The Role of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin as Tumor Marker: Biochemical and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Sisinni, Lorenza; Landriscina, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor markers are biological substances that are produced/released mainly by malignant tumor cells, enter the circulation in detectable amounts and are potential indicators of the presence of a tumor. The most useful biochemical markers are the tumor-specific molecules, i.e., receptors, enzymes, hormones, growth factors or biological response modifiers that are specifically produced by tumor cells and not, or minimally, by the normal counterpart (Richard et al. Principles and practice of gynecologic oncology. Wolters Kluwer Health, Philadelphia, 2009). Based on their specificity and sensitivity in each malignancy, biomarkers are used for screening, diagnosis, disease monitoring and therapeutic response assessment in clinical management of cancer patients.This chapter is focused on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone with a variety of functions and widely used as a tumor biomarker in selected tumors. Indeed, hCG is expressed by both trophoblastic and non-trophoblastic human malignancies and plays a role in cell transformation, angiogenesis, metastatization, and immune escape, all process central to cancer progression. Of note, hCG testing is crucial for the clinical management of placental trophoblastic malignancies and germ cell tumors of the testis and the ovary. Furthermore, the production of hCG by tumor cells is accompanied by varying degrees of release of the free subunits into the circulation, and this is relevant for the management of cancer patients (Triozzi PL, Stevens VC, Oncol Rep 6(1):7-17, 1999).The name chorionic gonadotropin was conceived: chorion derives from the latin chordate meaning afterbirth, gonadotropin indicates that the hormone is a gonadotropic molecule, acting on the ovaries and promoting steroid production (Cole LA, Int J Endocrinol Metab 9(2):335-352, 2011). The function, the mechanism of action and the interaction between hCG and its receptor continue to be the subject of intensive investigation, even though many issues about

  14. Mortality and Embolic Potential of Cardiac Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Fernandes, Fábio; Ramires, Félix José Alvarez; Mady, Charles; Albuquerque, Cícero Piva; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are rare, mostly benign with high embolic potential. Objectives To correlate the histological type of cardiac masses with their embolic potential, implantation site and long term follow up in patients undergoing surgery. Methods Between January 1986 and December 2011, we retrospectively analyzed 185 consecutive patients who underwent excision of intracardiac mass (119 females, mean age 48±20 years). In 145 patients, the left atrium was the origin site. 72% were asymptomatic and prior embolization was often observed (19.8%). The diagnosis was established by echocardiography, magnetic resonance and histological examination. Results Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. Myxoma was the most common (72.6%), followed by fibromas (6.9%), thrombi (6.4%) and sarcomas (6.4%). Ranging from 0.6cm to 15cm (mean 4.6 ± 2.5cm) 37 (19.8%) patients had prior embolization, stroke 10.2%, coronary 4.8%, peripheral 4.3% 5.4% of hospital death, with a predominance of malignant tumors (40% p < 0.0001). The histological type was a predictor of mortality (rhabdomyomas and sarcomas p = 0.002) and embolic event (sarcoma, lipoma and fibroelastoma p = 0.006), but not recurrence. Tumor size, atrial fibrillation, cavity and valve impairment were not associated with the embolic event. During follow-up (mean 80±63 months), there were 2 deaths (1.1%) and two recurrences 1 and 11 years after the operation, to the same cavity. Conclusion Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. The histological type was predictor of death and preoperative embolic event, while the implantation site carries no relation with mortality or to embolic event. PMID:25029470

  15. Prognostic impact of cytological fluid tumor markers in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Arthur; Hur, Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Sae Rom; Suh, Young Joo; Im, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Jung; Lee, Jae Seok; Shim, Hyo Sup; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-03-01

    The serum tumor markers CYFRA 21-1, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) are useful in diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Cytologic tumor markers obtained during needle aspiration biopsies (NAB) of lung lesions are useful for NSCLC diagnosis. This study investigated the incremental prognostic value of cytologic tumor markers compared to serum tumor markers. This prospective study included 253 patients diagnosed with NSCLC by NAB with cytologic tumor marker analysis. Levels of cytologic CYFRA 21-1, CEA, SCCA, and their serum counterparts were followed up for survival analysis. Optimal cutoff values for each tumor marker were obtained for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) analyses. All patients were followed up for a median of 22.8 months. Using cutoff values of 0.44 ng/ml for C-SCCA, 2.0 ng/ml for S-SCCA, and 3.3 ng/ml for S-CYFRA, a multivariate analysis revealed that high S-SCCA (hazard ratio, HR, 1.84) and high C-SCCA (HR, 1.63) were independent predictive factors of OS. The 3-year overall survival rate was 55 vs. 80 % for high and low C-SCCA, respectively. Cytologic tumor marker level detection is easily obtainable and provides prognostic information for NSCLC. Cytologic tumor markers provide comparable prognostic information relative to serum tumor markers, with C-SCCA acting as a strong prognostic factor of overall survival and PFS.

  16. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Yorke, Ellen D.; Davidson, Margaret; Zhang, Zhigang; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig S.; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion.

  17. The relationship between tumor markers and pulmonary embolism in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Xu, Mei; Guo, Jian; Pudasaini, Bigyan; Wu, Xueling; Liu, Jinming

    2017-06-20

    Tumor markers (TMs) and D-Dimer are both hallmarks of severity and prognosis of lung cancer. Tumor markers could be related to pulmonary embolism (PE) in lung cancer. The number of abnormal tumor markers of lung cancer patients with pulmonary embolism (3.9 ± 1.1vs1.6 ± 0.6,P 0.005) was more than that in patients without pulmonary embolism. TMs panel (P trend < 0.001), CEA (R2 0.735, P0.003) and CYFRA21-1 (R2 0.718, P0.005) were positively correlated with D-Dimer in patients with pulmonary embolism. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, for tumor markers, TMs panel (OR5.98, P < 0.001) had the strongest correlation with pulmonary embolism. The AUC (area under curve) of TMs panel and CEA were 0.82 [95%CI (0.71-0.95), P < 0.001] and 0.71 [95%CI (0.62-0.84), P 0.002] by ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analysis, respectively. Tumor markers were compared between lung cancer patients complicated with pulmonary embolism and those without pulmonary embolism Then the correlation between each tumor marker as well as panel of combined TMs and D-Dimer as well as pulmonary embolism were analyzed for patients with pulmonary embolism. There is a relationship between tumor markers and pulmonary embolism in patients with lung cancer. The panel of combined tumor markers is a valuable diagnostic marker for pulmonary embolism in lung cancer.

  18. Morphoproteomic Characterization of Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Fragmentation, a Histological Marker of Increased Tumor Invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Ruben; Xia, Daniel; Rulle, Undine; Nanni, Paolo; Grossmann, Jonas; Vrugt, Bart; Wettstein, Reto; Ballester, Rafael; Astolfo, Alberto; Weder, Walter; Moch, Holger; Stampanoni, Marco; Beck, Andrew H; Soltermann, Alex

    2017-05-15

    Accurate stratification of tumors is imperative for adequate cancer management. In addition to staging, morphologic subtyping allows stratification of patients into additional prognostic groups. In this study, we used an image-based computational method on pan-cytokeratin IHC stainings to quantify tumor fragmentation (TF), a measure of tumor invasiveness of lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). In two independent clinical cohorts from tissue microarrays (TMA: n = 208 patients) and whole sections (WS: n = 99 patients), TF was associated with poor prognosis and increased risk of blood vessel infiltration. A third cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA: n = 335 patients) confirmed the poor prognostic value of TF using a similar human-based score on hematoxylin-eosin staining. Integration of RNA-seq data from TCGA and LC-MS/MS proteomics from WS revealed an upregulation of extracellular matrix remodeling and focal adhesion processes in tumors with high TF, supporting their increased invasive potential. This proposed histologic parameter is an independent and unfavorable prognostic marker that could be established as a new grading parameter for LSCC. Cancer Res; 77(10); 2585-93. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Analysis of Marker-Defined HNSCC Subpopulations Reveals a Dynamic Regulation of Tumor Initiating Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49fhigh/ALDH1A1high/H3K4/K27me3low subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49fhigh/H3K27me3low subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49flow/ALDHlow, non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f− cells can “reprogram” and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a “moving target” and their eradication might require more

  20. Quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads for multiplex detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Wang, Huan; Dong, Shujun; Zhu, Peizhi; Diao, Guowang; Yang, Zhanjun

    2014-12-04

    Novel quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads were fabricated for multiplex detection of tumor markers via self-assembly of quantum dot-embedded polystyrene nanospheres into photonic crystal beads through a microfluidic device.

  1. HOX Genes as Potential Markers of Circulating Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R; El-Tanani, M

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have significant diagnostic potential as they can reflect both the presence and recurrence of a wide range of cancers. However, this potential continues to be limited by the lack of robust and accessible isolation technologies. An alternative to isolation might be their direct detection amongst other peripheral blood cells, although this would require markers that allow them to be distinguished from an exceptionally high background signal. This review assesses the potential role of HOX genes, a family of homeodomain containing transcription factors with key roles in both embryonic development and oncogenesis, as unique and possibly disease specific markers of CTCs.

  2. Tumor markers in clinical practice: a review focusing on common solid cancers.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Tumor markers are playing an increasingly important role in cancer detection and management. These laboratory-based tests are potentially useful in screening for early malignancy, aiding cancer diagnosis, determining prognosis, surveillance following curative surgery for cancer, up front predicting drug response or resistance, and monitoring therapy in advanced disease. Clinically useful markers include fecal occult blood testing in screening for early colorectal cancer, carcinoembryonic antigen in the management of patients with colorectal cancer, both α-fetoprotein and human chorionic gonadotrophin in the management of patients with non-seminomatous germ cell tumors, CA 125 for monitoring therapy in patients with ovarian cancer, estrogen receptors for predicting response to hormone therapy in breast cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 for the identification of women with breast cancer likely to respond to trastuzumab (Herceptin) and KRAS mutational status for identifying patients with advanced colorectal cancer likely to benefit from treatment with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab. Although widely used, the value of prostate-specific antigen screening in reducing mortality from prostate cancer is unclear.

  3. Serum tumor markers in chronic kidney disease: as clinical tool in diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is singled out as the biggest cause of death in the world, predicted to reach 13.1 million cancer-related deaths by the year 2030. Although there are no specific tumor markers used in cancer screening, some markers can be used to assist in making a diagnosis and determining a prognosis. They can be used to follow in cases where the diagnosis is cancer through monitoring of the disease recurrence and/or evaluating the response to therapy. These markers are not specific as the number increases in multiple cases of cancer. Some markers are positive in a single type of cancer; others are detectable in more than one type. An ideal tumor marker should be highly sensitive, specific, and reliable with high prognostic value. Other characteristics of an ideal tumor marker are organ specificity and correlation of it with tumor stages. However, none of the tumor markers reported to date has all these characteristics. Influence of different stages of chronic kidney function on serum tumor markers is variable. Furthermore, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation affect on tumor markers differently. Sometimes, no study has been found in the literature review. Combined serum tumor markers may also be valuable. This literature review points the role of serum tumor markers in screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of cancer patients in chronic kidney disease patients and renal allograft recipients. In addition, impact of chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation on different serum tumor markers is briefly explored.

  4. High-level expression of divergent endodermal lineage markers in gonadal and extra-gonadal yolk sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Hadi; Hong, Hong; Redline, Raymond W

    2016-10-01

    Yolk sac tumors occur at both gonadal and extra-gonadal sites. A recent case of ovarian endometrioid-pattern yolk sac tumor with strong diffuse expression of TTF-1 illustrated the potential for misdiagnosis due to divergent expression of endodermal lineage markers. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of four divergent endodermal lineage markers, TTF-1, CDX2, Hep Par 1, and Napsin A, in gonadal and extra-gonadal yolk sac tumors of differing age, sex, and location (excluding foci of overt hepatoid differentiation). We identified 26 cases (5 ovarian, 15 testicular, and 6 extra-gonadal) containing yolk sac tumor as identified by typical histology and confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining for alpha-fetoprotein and glypican-3. Mixed or ambiguous foci were confirmed by immunohistochemistry (SALL4 positive and Oct-4 negative). The relative proportion of three histologic patterns: reticular/cystic, solid/myxoid, and glandular was estimated. Percent positivity for the four divergent endodermal lineage markers was compared within yolk sac tumor areas according to site, age group, and histologic pattern. High-level (>25%) staining for one or more divergent endodermal lineage markers was seen in eleven cases: Hep Par 1 in seven cases, all post-pubertal, TTF-1 in four cases, two ovarian and two extra-gonadal, and CDX2 in three cases, with no age or site predilection. No case highly expressed all three divergent endodermal lineage markers, but four co-expressed high levels of two markers: two ovarian yolk sac tumors with TTF-1 and Hep Par 1, one testicular yolk sac tumor with CDX2 and Hep Par 1, and one extra-gonadal yolk sac tumors with TTF-1 and CDX2. While no absolute correlation of high-level divergent endodermal lineage marker expression with histologic subtype was observed, TTF-1 and CDX2 expression was predominantly seen in reticular/cystic and glandular areas while Hep Par 1 was most frequent in myxoid/solid and glandular areas.

  5. Segmental distribution of some common molecular markers for colorectal cancer (CRC): influencing factors and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Papagiorgis, Petros Christakis

    2016-05-01

    Proximal and distal colorectal cancers (CRCs) are regarded as distinct disease entities, evolving through different genetic pathways and showing multiple clinicopathological and molecular differences. Segmental distribution of some common markers (e.g., KRAS, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, COX-2) is clinically important, potentially affecting their prognostic or predictive value. However, this distribution is influenced by a variety of factors such as the anatomical overlap of tumorigenic molecular events, associations of some markers with other clinicopathological features (stage and/or grade), and wide methodological variability in markers' assessment. All these factors represent principal influences followed by intratumoral heterogeneity and geographic variation in the frequency of detection of particular markers, whereas the role of other potential influences (e.g., pre-adjuvant treatment, interaction between markers) remains rather unclear. Better understanding and elucidation of the various influences may provide a more accurate picture of the segmental distribution of molecular markers in CRC, potentially allowing the application of a novel patient stratification for treatment, based on particular molecular profiles in combination with tumor location.

  6. Inhibition of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt Signaling Suppresses Tumor Cell Proliferation and Neuroendocrine Marker Expression in GI Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Susan C.; Chen, Herbert; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2010-01-01

    Background Over-activation of PI3K/Akt signaling facilitates tumor proliferation in several cancers. We have shown that various signal transduction pathways promote tumorigenesis in carcinoid tumors, which exhibit endogenously high levels of active, phosphorylated Akt. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway would suppress carcinoid tumor cell growth and neuroendocrine (NE) marker production. Methods Human carcinoid BON cells were treated in vitro with LY294002, a PI3 kinase inhibitor, or transfected with Akt1 siRNA. Tumor cell proliferation was measured by MTT for six days. The effect of LY294002 or Akt1 siRNA treatment was assessed by western analysis. We examined the levels of phosphorylated Akt, total Akt, Akt1, and the NE markers human achaete-scute homolog1 (ASCL1) and chromogranin A (CgA). Results Treatment of BON cells with LY294002 reduced tumor cell proliferation (76%) in a dose-dependent manner. Growth also decreased in Akt1 siRNA transfected cells (29%). Levels of active, phosphorylated Akt and the NE tumor markers, ASCL1 and CgA, were diminished with both LY294002 and Akt1 siRNA treatments proportional to the degree of Akt inhibition. Total Akt, Akt2, and Akt3 levels were unaffected by these experiments. Conclusions These data indicate that PI3K/Akt signaling performs a critical role in human carcinoid tumor cell survival and NE hormone generation. Furthermore, the development of novel therapeutics targeting Akt1 or components of the PI3K/Akt pathway may enhance the management of carcinoid disease. Synopsis Carcinoid tumor cells were treated with a PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, and Akt1 siRNA to delineate the role of PI3K/Akt signaling in carcinoids. The effects of treatment on cellular proliferation and neuroendocrine marker expression were observed. PMID:19588205

  7. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    such measures in order to distinguish between benign and RCC tumors in patients using the non - invasive rapid hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Review of...using RCC human cells to capture a range of aggressive renal tumors. And have shown using such a model several approaches to non -invasively assess...recent study reported that CHKA forms a complex with EGF receptor (EGFR) in a c-Src– dependent manner, and functions cooper- atively with EGFR and c-Src

  8. KIT is an independent prognostic marker for pancreatic endocrine tumors: a finding derived from analysis of islet cell differentiation markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhi; Smyrk, Thomas C; Oliveira, Andre M; Lohse, Christine M; Zhang, Shuya; Johnson, Michele R; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2009-10-01

    Prediction of the biologic behavior of pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET) without local invasion or metastasis is often difficult. The 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) classification uses size, angioinvasion, mitotic activity, and Ki-67 index as prognostic criteria. Recently, cytokeratin 19 (CK19) was shown to be another prognostic marker, but the mechanism by which CK19 predicts prognosis is unknown. As CK19 is the first cytokeratin expressed in all epithelial cells in fetal pancreas, we sought to test expression of other markers of islet cell differentiation including KIT, Pdx-1, Pax4, and Pax6 in PET and correlation of these markers with clinical behavior. Clinical information and histology was reviewed in 97 PETs. All tumors were classified according to WHO criteria and a tumor, node, and metastases stage system. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies to Ki-67, KIT, CK19, Pdx-1, Pax4, and Pax6. Associations of clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features with prognosis were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. WHO and tumor, node, and metastases classifications, mitotic counts and Ki-67 labeling, infiltrative border, necrosis, perineural invasion, extrapancreatic extension, tumor size, and positive CK19 and KIT expression were significantly associated with death from disease in a univariate setting. In multivariate analysis, only WHO criteria and KIT expression were shown to be independent. An immunohistochemical classification system was derived from a combination of KIT and CK19 expression: low risk (KIT-/CK19-), intermediate risk (KIT-/CK19+), and high risk (KIT+/CK19+). Survival, metastases, and recurrence of PET were significantly different among the 3 groups. These results indicate that KIT is a new and independent prognostic marker for PETs. The classification system derived from KIT and CK19 was able to predict clinical behavior of PET.

  9. Recognition of Transmembrane Protein 39A as a Tumor-Specific Marker in Brain Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jisoo; Lee, Hyunji; Tran, Quangdon; Mun, Kisun; Kim, Dohoon; Hong, Youngeun; Kwon, So Hee; Brazil, Derek; Park, Jongsun; Kim, Seon-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane protein 39A (TMEM39A) belongs to the TMEM39 family. TMEM39A gene is a susceptibility locus for multiple sclerosis. In addition, TMEM39A seems to be implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus. However, any possible involvement of TMEM39A in cancer remains largely unknown. In the present report, we provide evidence that TMEM39A may play a role in brain tumors. Western blotting using an anti-TMEM39A antibody indicated that TMEM39A was overexpressed in glioblastoma cell lines, including U87-MG and U251-MG. Deep-sequencing transcriptomic profiling of U87-MG and U251-MG cells revealed that TMEM39A transcripts were upregulated in such cells compared with those of the cerebral cortex. Confocal microscopic analysis of U251-MG cells stained with anti-TMEM39A antibody showed that TMEM39A was located in dot-like structures lying close to the nucleus. TMEM39A probably located to mitochondria or to endosomes. Immunohistochemical analysis of glioma tissue specimens indicated that TMEM39A was markedly upregulated in such samples. Bioinformatic analysis of the Rembrandt knowledge base also supported upregulation of TMEM39A mRNA levels in glioma patients. Together, the results afford strong evidence that TMEM39A is upregulated in glioma cell lines and glioma tissue specimens. Therefore, TMEM39A may serve as a novel diagnostic marker of, and a therapeutic target for, gliomas and other cancers. PMID:28133515

  10. Is a comparative clinical trial for breast cancer tumor markers to monitor disease recurrence warranted? A value of information analysis.

    PubMed

    Thariani, Rahber; Henry, Norah Lynn; Ramsey, Scott D; Blough, David K; Barlow, Bill; Gralow, Julie R; Veenstra, David L

    2013-05-01

    Breast cancer tumor markers are used by some clinicians to screen for disease recurrence risk. Since there is limited evidence of benefit, additional research may be warranted. To assess the potential value of a randomized clinical trial of breast tumor marker testing in routine follow-up of high-risk, stage II-III breast cancer survivors. We developed a decision-analytic model of tumor marker testing plus standard surveillance every 3-6 months for 5 years. The expected value of sample information was calculated using probabilistic simulations and was a function of: the probability of selecting the optimal monitoring strategy with current versus future information; the impact of choosing the nonoptimal strategy; and the size of the population affected. The value of information for a randomized clinical trial involving 9000 women was US$214 million compared with a cost of US$30-60 million to conduct such a trial. The probability of making an alternate, nonoptimal decision and choosing testing versus no testing was 32% with current versus future information from the trial. The impact of a nonoptimal decision was US$2150 and size of population impacted over 10 years was 308,000. The value of improved information on overall survival was US$105 million, quality of life US$37 million and test performance US$71 million. Conducting a randomized clinical trial of breast cancer tumor markers appears to offer a good societal return on investment. Retrospective analyses to assess test performance and evaluation of patient quality of life using tumor markers may also offer valuable areas of research. However, alternative investments may offer even better returns in investments and, as such, the trial concept deserves further study as part of an overall research-portfolio evaluation.

  11. Magic roundabout, a tumor endothelial marker: expression and signaling.

    PubMed

    Seth, Pankaj; Lin, Yanfeng; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Shivalingappa, Venkatesha; Duyao, Mabel P; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2005-07-01

    Molecular signals that guide blood vessels to specific paths are not fully deciphered, but are thought to be similar to signals that mediate neuronal guidance. These cues are not only critical for normal blood vessel development, but may also play a major role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we have demonstrated the tumor endothelial specific expression of a Robo family member, magic roundabout (MRB), functionally characterized its role in endothelial cell migration and defined a signaling pathway that might mediate this function. We show that MRB is differentially over-expressed in tumor endothelial cells versus normal adult endothelial cells in numerous solid tumors. Moreover, over-expression of MRB in endothelial cells activates MRB in a ligand-independent fashion, and activation of MRB via Slit2, a putative ligand, results in inhibition of VEGF and FGF induced migration. We also demonstrate that MRB induced inhibition of endothelial migration is partially mediated by the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk signaling pathway. We therefore hypothesize that expression of MRB is involved in regulating the migration of endothelial cells during tumor angiogenesis.

  12. Chromogranin A – unspecific neuroendocrine marker. Clinical utility and potential diagnostic pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Fischbach, Jakub; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A, despite a number of limitations, is still the most valuable marker of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Granins belong to the family of acidic proteins that constitute a major component of secretory granules of various endocrine and neuroendocrine cells, which are components of both the classical endocrine glands and the diffuse neuroendocrine system. These cells are a potential source of transformation into neuroendocrine tumors. The awareness of potential causes influencing the false results of its concentrations simplifies diagnosis and treatment. One of the disadvantages of this marker is its non-specificity and the existence of a number of pathological processes leading to an increase in its concentration, which often results in confusion and diagnostic difficulties. The molecular structure is characterized by a number of sites susceptible to the proteolytic activity of enzymes, resulting in the formation of a number of biologically active peptides. Presumably they act as precursors of active proteins. Chromogranin expression correlates with the amount of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. The peptide chain during biochemical changes becomes a precursor of biologically active proteins with a wide range of activities. There are a number of commercially available kits for the determination of chromogranin A, which differ in methodology. We present the evaluation of chromogranin A as a marker of neuroendocrine tumors in clinical practice and the possible factors that may affect the outcome of its concentration. PMID:26925113

  13. Molecular predictive markers in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Eirini; Metaxa-Mariatou, Vasiliki; Tsaousis, Georgios; Tsoulos, Nikolaos; Tsirigoti, Angeliki; Efstathiadou, Chrisoula; Apessos, Angela; Agiannitopoulos, Konstantinos; Pepe, Georgia; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Nasioulas, George

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal malignancies are among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Like all human malignancies they are characterized by accumulation of mutations which lead to inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of oncogenes. Advances in Molecular Biology techniques have allowed for more accurate analysis of tumors’ genetic profiling using new breakthrough technologies such as next generation sequencing (NGS), leading to the development of targeted therapeutical approaches based upon biomarker-selection. During the last 10 years tremendous advances in the development of targeted therapies for patients with advanced cancer have been made, thus various targeted agents, associated with predictive biomarkers, have been developed or are in development for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer patients. This review summarizes the advances in the field of molecular biomarkers in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, with focus on the available NGS platforms that enable comprehensive tumor molecular profile analysis. PMID:27895815

  14. Sox10 – A marker for not only Schwannian and melanocytic neoplasms but also myoepithelial cell tumors of soft tissue. A systematic analysis of 5134 tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Markku; McCue, Peter A.; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Biernat, Wojciech; Czapiewski, Piotr; Kopczynski, Janusz; Thompson, Lester D.; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zengfeng; Fetsch, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Sox10 transcription factor is expressed in Schwannian and melanocytic lineages and is important in their development and can be used as a marker for corresponding tumors. Additionally, it has been reported in subsets of myoepithelial/basal cell epithelial neoplasms, but its expression remains incompletely characterized. In this study, we examined Sox10 express-ion in 5134 human neoplasms spanning a wide spectrum of neuroectodermal, mesenchymal, lymphoid, and epithelial tumors. A new rabbit monoclonal antibody (clone EP268) and Leica Bond Max automation were used on multitumor block libraries containing 30–70 cases per slide. Sox10 was consistently expressed in benign Schwann cell tumors of soft tissue and the GI-tract and metastatic melanoma, and was variably present in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. In contrast, Sox10 was absent in many potential mimics of nerve sheath tumors such as cellular neurothekeoma, meningioma, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, PEComa, and a variety of fibroblastic-myofibroblastic tumors. Sox10 was virtually absent in mesenchymal tumors but occasionally seen in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In epithelial tumors of soft tissue, Sox10 was expressed only in myoepitheliomas, although often absent in malignant variants. Carcinomas, other than basal cell type breast cancers, were only rarely positive but included rare squamous carcinomas of head and neck and pulmonary small cell carcinomas. Furthermore, Sox10 was often focally expressed in embryonal carcinoma reflecting a primitive Sox10-positive phenotype or neuroectodermal differentiation. Expression of Sox10 in entrapped non-neoplastic Schwann cells or melanocytes in various neoplasms has to be considered in diagnosing Sox10-positive tumors. The Sox10 antibody belongs in a modern immunohistochemical panel for the diagnosis of soft tissue and epithelial tumors. PMID:25724000

  15. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-11-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients.

  16. Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst₂) is a potential prognostic marker and a therapeutic target in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Remke, Marc; Hering, Esther; Gerber, Nicolas U; Kool, Marcel; Sturm, Dominik; Rickert, Christian H; Gerß, Joachim; Schulz, Stefan; Hielscher, Thomas; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jeibmann, Astrid; Hans, Volkmar; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D; Pietsch, Torsten; Rutkowski, Stefan; Korshunov, Andrey; Monoranu, Carmelia-Maria; Frühwald, Michael C

    2013-08-01

    Neuroectodermal tumors in general demonstrate high and dense expression of the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst₂). It controls proliferation of both normal and neoplastic cells. sst₂ has thus been suggested as a therapeutic target and prognostic marker for certain malignancies. To assess global expression patterns of sst 2 mRNA, we evaluated normal (n = 353) and tumor tissues (n = 340) derived from previously published gene expression profiling studies. These analyses demonstrated specific upregulation of sst 2 mRNA in medulloblastoma (p < 0.001). sst₂ protein was investigated by immunohistochemistry in two independent cohorts. Correlation of sst₂ protein expression with clinicopathological variables revealed significantly higher levels in medulloblastoma (p < 0.05) compared with CNS-PNET, ependymoma, or pilocytic astrocytoma. The non-SHH medulloblastoma subgroup tumors showed particularly high expression of sst₂, when compared to other tumors and normal tissues. Furthermore, we detected a significant survival benefit in children with tumors exhibiting high sst₂ expression (p = 0.02) in this screening set. A similar trend was observed in a validation cohort including 240 independent medulloblastoma samples. sst₂ is highly expressed in medulloblastoma and deserves further evaluation in the setting of prospective trials, given its potential utility as a prognostic marker and a therapeutic target.

  17. Markers for Sebaceoma Show a Spectrum of Cell Cycle Regulators, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Ana Maria Abreu; Howard, Michael S; Kim, Jinah; Googe, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sebaceoma is a tumor for which the causative oncogenes are not well-understood. Sebaceomas demonstrate some histopathologic features similar to basal cell carcinoma (BCC), such as palisading borders and basaloid cells with additional features, including foamy cytoplasm and indented nuclei. Aims: We examine multiple cell-cycle, oncogene, and tumor suppressor gene markers in sebaceomas, to try to find some suitable biological markers for this tumor, and compare with other published studies. Materials and Methods: We investigated a panel of immunohistochemical (IHC) stains that are important for cellular signaling, including a cell cycle regulator, tumor suppressor gene, oncogene, hormone receptor, and genomic stability markers in our cohort of sebaceomas. We collected 30 sebaceomas from three separate USA dermatopathology laboratories. The following IHC panel: Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)/CD227, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, cyclin D1, human breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA-1), C-erb-2, Bcl-2, human androgen receptor (AR), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27kip1), p53, topoisomerase II alpha, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and Ki-67 were tested in our cases. Results: EMA/CD227 was positive in the well-differentiated sebaceomas (13/30). Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B was positive in tumors with intermediate differentiation (22/30). The less well-differentiated tumors failed to stain with EMA and AR. Most of the tumors with well-differentiated palisaded areas demonstrated positive staining for topoisomerase II alpha, p27kip1, and p53, with positive staining in tumoral basaloid areas (22/30). Numerous tumors were focally positive with multiple markers, indicating a significant degree of variability in the complete group. Conclusions: Oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle regulators, and hormone receptors are variably expressed in sebaceomas. Our results suggest that in these tumors, selected marker staining seems to correlate with tumor

  18. Identifying molecular markers for the sensitive detection of residual atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Vu-Han, Tu-Lan; Frühwald, Michael C; Hasselblatt, Martin; Kerl, Kornelius; Nagel, Inga; Obser, Tobias; Oyen, Florian; Siebert, Reiner; Schneppenheim, Reinhard

    2014-09-01

    Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT), a rare and highly malignant tumor entity of the central nervous system that presents in early childhood, has a poor prognosis. AT/RTs are characterized by biallelic inactivating mutations of the gene SMARCB1 in 98% of patients; these mutations may serve as molecular markers for residual tumor cell detection in liquid biopsies. We developed a marker-specific method to detect residual AT/RT cells. Seven of 150 patient samples were selected, each with a histological and genetically ascertained diagnosis of AT/RT. Tumor tissue was either formalin fixed or fresh frozen. DNA was extracted from the patients' peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, DNA sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to characterize the tumors' mutations. Residual tumor cell detection used mutation-specific primers and real-time PCR. The detection limit for the residual tumor cell search was 1-18%, depending on the quality of the template provided. The residual tumor cell search in PBL and CSF was negative for all seven patients. The SMARCB1 region of chromosome 22 is prone to DNA double-strand breaks. The individual breakpoints and breakpoint-specific PCR offer the option to detect minimal residual tumor cells in CSF or blood. Even if we did not detect minimal residual tumor cells in the investigated material, proof of principle for this method was confirmed.

  19. Optimal surface marker locations for tumor motion estimation in lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bin; Jiang Graves, Yan; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-12-01

    Using fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to predict the tumor location is a widely used approach in lung cancer radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to propose an algorithm that automatically identifies a sparse set of locations on the patient’s surface with the optimal prediction power for the tumor motion. In our algorithm, it is assumed that there is a linear relationship between the surface marker motion and the tumor motion. The sparse selection of markers on the external surface and the linear relationship between the marker motion and the internal tumor motion are represented by a prediction matrix. Such a matrix is determined by solving an optimization problem, where the objective function contains a sparsity term that penalizes the number of markers chosen on the patient’s surface. Bregman iteration is used to solve the proposed optimization problem. The performance of our algorithm has been tested on realistic clinical data of four lung cancer patients. Thoracic 4DCT scans with ten phases are used for the study. On a reference phase, a grid of points are casted on the patient’s surfaces (except for the patient’s back) and propagated to other phases via deformable image registration of the corresponding CT images. Tumor locations at each phase are also manually delineated. We use nine out of ten phases of the 4DCT images to identify a small group of surface markers that are mostly correlated with the motion of the tumor and find the prediction matrix at the same time. The tenth phase is then used to test the accuracy of the prediction. It is found that on average six to seven surface markers are necessary to predict tumor locations with a 3D error of about 1 mm. It is also found that the selected marker locations lie closely in those areas where surface point motion has a large amplitude and a high correlation with the tumor motion. Our method can automatically select sparse locations on the patient’s external surface and

  20. Advances in Carcinogenic Metal Toxicity and Potential Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Seo, Young Rok

    2011-01-01

    Metal compounds such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, mercury, and nickel are classified as carcinogens affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in tumor formation are not well clarified. Interference of metal homeostasis may result in oxidative stress which represents an imbalance between production of free radicals and the system’s ability to readily detoxify reactive intermediates. This event consequently causes DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, and possibly symptomatic effects for various diseases including cancer. This review discusses predominant modes of action and numerous molecular markers. Attention is paid to metal-induced generation of free radicals, the phenomenon of oxidative stress, damage to DNA, lipid, and proteins, responsive signal transduction pathways with major roles in cell growth and development, and roles of antioxidant enzymatic and DNA repair systems. Interaction of non-enzymatic antioxidants (carotenoids, flavonoids, glutathione, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin E, and others) with cellular oxidative stress markers (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) as well as certain regulatory factors, including AP-1, NF-κB, Ref-1, and p53 is also reviewed. Dysregulation of protective pathways, including cellular antioxidant network against free radicals as well as DNA repair deficiency is related to oncogenic stimulation. These observations provide evidence that emerging oxidative stress-responsive regulatory factors and DNA repair proteins are putative predictive factors for tumor initiation and progression. PMID:22272150

  1. Effect of obesity-related plasma hemodilution on serum tumor marker concentration in women.

    PubMed

    Park, Minyoung; Chang, In Ho; Kang, Hyun; Han, Seung Su

    2015-05-01

    We determined to investigate the effect of plasma hemodilution on tumor marker concentration in obese women. We collected the data for tumor markers (cancer-associated antigen 125 [CA125], carbohydrate antigen 19-9 [CA19-9], carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA] and α-fetoprotein) from 6917 healthy women who visited the health promotion center at the Chung-Ang University Hospital from 2003 to 2011. We used multivariate linear regression analysis and χ(2) -test for linear-by-linear association adjusting for age, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine to determine the association between the serum tumor marker concentrations, plasma volume, tumor marker mass, and body mass index (BMI). Higher BMI was significantly associated with higher plasma volume (P < 0.001 for trend). The lower concentrations of CA125 and CA19-9 were significantly associated with increasing BMI (P < 0.001). Serum concentration and mass of CEA and α-fetoprotein were increased with higher BMI in obese women (P < 0.001). CEA in women had the opposite result to that in men due to visceral fat in women. This study shows that we should consider the hemodilution effect in Asian obese women when interpreting serum tumor marker concentration in cancer screening. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Metanephrine neuroendocrine tumor marker detection by SERS using Au nanoparticle/Au film sandwich architecture.

    PubMed

    Boca, Sanda; Farcau, Cosmin; Baia, Monica; Astilean, Simion

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, are dangerous tumors that constitute a potential threat for a large number of patients. Currently, the biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors is based on measurement of the direct secretory products of the adrenomedullary-sympathetic system or of their metabolites, such as catecholamines or their metanephrine derivatives, from plasma or urine. The techniques used for analysis of plasma free metanephrines, i.e. high-performance liquid chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry are technically-demanding and time consuming, which limit their availability. Here we demonstrate a simple, fast and low-cost method for detecting metanephrine by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). The protocol consists in using evaporation-induced self-assembly of gold (Au) nanoparticles incubated with the analyte, on planar gold films. The assembly process produces regions with a dense distribution of both inter-particle gaps and particle-film gaps. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that both kinds of gaps are locations of enhanced electromagnetic fields resulting from inter-particle and particle-film plasmonic coupling, useful for SERS amplification. Metanephrine vibrational bands assignment was performed according to density functional theory calculations. Metanephrine metabolite was detected in liquid at concentration levels lower than previously reported for other similar metabolites. The obtained results demonstrate that the Au nanoparticle/Au film exhibits noticeable SERS amplification of the adsorbed metabolite and can be used in the design of efficient, stable SERS-active substrates for the detection and identification of specific tumor markers.

  3. Fascin is a circulating tumor marker for head and neck cancer as determined by a proteomic analysis of interstitial fluid from the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Yu; Chen, Yin-Ju; Lu, Ya-Ching; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, I-How; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Huang, Yu-Chen; Chen, Wen-Ho; Huang, Chi-Che; Tsai, Chi-Ying; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is a prevalent cancer worldwide; however, clinically useful tumor markers for HNC have not been identified. Here, we aimed to identify secretory proteins from the tumor microenvironment as candidate circulating tumor markers. Samples derived from seven pairs of tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) and normal interstitial fluid (NIF) samples from patients with HNC were analyzed. The proteomes were determined by gel-based-mass-spectrometry proteomic methods. The most up-regulated protein, fascin was confirmed in the cancer tissues and cell culture supernatant by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry assays. Serum fascin was determined in 40 HNC and 40 normal individuals by ELISA. After proteomics analysis, 189 peptides were identified, corresponding to 75 proteins. Of the 21 proteins which were identified more than twice, five up-regulated proteins identified most frequently including fascin. The most elevated fascin was over-expressed in cancer tissues and cell culture supernatant. Serum fascin was significantly up-regulated in the cancer patients (p<0.001) and correlated with pathological lymph node metastasis (p=0.022). To assess the diagnostic efficacy, serum levels of fascin and another potential biomarker SCCA were determined. Fascin showed a high predictable value with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.808 (95% CI 0.723-0.901) in the receiver operator curve (ROC), compared to 0.501 (95% CI 0.378-0.634) for SCCA. We have identified 75 potential circulating tumor markers associated with HNC, including fascin. Serum fascin could discriminate cancer patients from healthy individuals; thus, it may serve as a circulating biomarker for HNC.

  4. Microvesicles: potential markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Lin; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2012-04-01

    Microvesicles (also known as microparticles) are small membranous structures that are released from platelets and cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microvesicles have been found in blood, urine, synovial fluid, extracellular spaces of solid organs, atherosclerotic plaques, tumors, and elsewhere. Here, we focus on new clinical and basic work that implicates microvesicles as markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction and hence novel contributors to cardiovascular and other diseases. Advances in the detection of microvesicles and the use of cell type-specific markers to determine their origin have allowed studies that associated plasma concentrations of specific microvesicles with major types of endothelial dysfunction - namely, inappropriate or maladaptive vascular tone, leukocyte recruitment, and thrombosis. Recent investigations have highlighted microvesicular transport of key biologically active molecules besides tissue factor, such as ligands for pattern-recognition receptors, elements of the inflammasome, and morphogens. Microvesicles generated from human cells under different pathologic circumstances, for example, during cholesterol loading or exposure to endotoxin, carry different subsets of these molecules and thereby alter endothelial function through several distinct, well characterized molecular pathways. Clinical and basic studies indicate that microvesicles may be novel markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction. This work has advanced our understanding of the development of cardiovascular and other diseases. Opportunities and obstacles to clinical applications are discussed.

  5. Tumor cell differentiation by marker free fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Brantsch, Marco; Biller, Philipp; Kioschis, Petra; Kessler, Waltraud

    2011-02-01

    Autofluorescence and Raman spectra, images and decay kinetics of U251-MG glioblastoma cells prior and after activation of tumor suppressor genes are compared. While phase contrast images and fluorescence patterns of the tumor (control) cells and the less malignant cells are similar, differences can be deduced from autofluorescence spectra and decay times. In particular, upon excitation around 375nm, the fluorescence ratio of the protein bound and the free coenzyme NADH depends on the state of malignancy. Slight differences are also observed in Raman spectra of these cell lines, in particular at wave numbers around 970 cm-1. While larger numbers of fluorescence and Raman spectra are evaluated by the method of multivariate data analysis, additional information is obtained from spectral images and fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM).

  6. Molecular Markers for Novel Therapeutic Strategies in Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Judith A.; Adhikari, Laura J.; Lloyd, Ricardo V.; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Muders, Michael H.; Ames, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) share numerous features with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors. Targets of novel therapeutic strategies previously assessed in carcinoid tumors were analyzed in PETs (44 cases). Methods Activating mutations in EGFR, KIT, and PDGFRA, and non-response mutations in KRAS, were evaluated. Copy number of EGFR and HER-2/neu was quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Expression of EGFR, PDGFRA, VEGFR1, TGFBR1, Hsp90, SSTR2A, SSTR5, IGF1R, mTOR, and MGMT was measured immunohistochemically. Results Elevated EGFR copy number was found in 38% of cases, but no KRAS non-response mutations. VEGFR1, TGFBR1, PDGFRA, SSTR5, SSTR2A, and IGF1R exhibited the highest levels of expression in the largest percentages of PETs. Anticancer drugs BMS-754807 (selective for IGF1R/IR), 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, targeting Hsp90), and axitinib (directed toward VEGFR1–3/PDGFRA-B/KIT) induced growth inhibition of human QGP-1 PET cells with IC50 values (nM) of 273, 723, and 743, respectively. At growth-inhibiting concentrations, BMS-754807 inhibited IGF1R phosphorylation; 17-AAG induced loss of EGFR, IGF1R, and VEGFR2; and axitinib increased p21Waf1/Cip1(CDKN1A) expression without inhibiting VEGFR2 phosphorylation. Conclusions Results encourage further research into multi-drug strategies incorporating inhibitors targeting IGF1R or Hsp90 and into studies of axitinib combined with conventional chemotherapeutics toxic to tumor cells in persistent growth arrest. PMID:23211371

  7. SALL4 is a novel diagnostic marker for testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dengfeng; Li, Jianping; Guo, Charles C; Allan, Robert W; Humphrey, Peter A

    2009-07-01

    The diagnosis of testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) sometimes can be challenging without ancillary markers. Here we performed an immunohistochemical study of a novel stem cell marker SALL4 in a large series of 110 primary testicular GCTs (65 pure and 45 mixed) containing the following types of tumors and/or tumor components: 50 intratubular germ cell neoplasias (ITGCNs), 62 classic seminomas, 2 spermatocytic seminomas, 39 embryonal carcinomas (EC), 5 pediatric and 26 postpubertal yolk sac tumors (YST), 7 pediatric and 25 postpubertal teratomas, and 5 choriocarcinomas. We compared SALL4 with OCT4 in all GCTs, and SALL4 to alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and glypican-3 in all YSTs. To test SALL4 specificity, 23 testicular non-GCTs (10 Leydig cell tumors, 4 Sertoli cell tumors, 3 adenomatoid tumors, 3 paratesticular rhabdomyosarcomas, 2 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and 1 rete testis papillary cystadenoma) and 275 nontesticular tumors (158 metastatic carcinomas, 12 metastatic melanomas, 11 primary and 2 metastatic mesotheliomas, and 72 primary and 20 metastatic sarcomas) were also stained for SALL4. All ITGCNs, classic seminomas, and ECs demonstrated strong SALL4 and OCT4 staining in more than 90% tumor cells. All 31 YSTs (5 pediatric and 26 postpubertal) showed strong positive SALL4 staining in more than 90% tumor cells but had negative OCT4 staining. Both spermatocytic seminomas showed positive SALL4 staining in 80% to 95% tumor cells in all 3 types of tumor cells with weak-to-moderate staining intensity. Mononucleated trophoblastic cells were variably positive for SALL4 staining in all 5 choriocarcinomas. Focal SALL4 staining was seen in 4 of 7 pediatric and 23 of 27 postpubertal teratomas. OCT4 staining was not seen in any spermatocytic seminoma, choriocarcinoma, or teratoma. No SALL4 staining was seen in all 23 testicular non-GCTs. Of 275 nontesticular tumors, only 10 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma showed focal (<25% tumor cells) weak SALL4 staining. The only non

  8. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kengo Shimohira, Masashi; Sasaki, Shigeru Iwata, Hiromitsu Nishikawa, Hiroko Ogino, Hiroyuki Hara, Masaki; Hashizume, Takuya Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.

  9. Therapeutic potential of bacteria against solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Lopez Alfonso, Juan Carlos; Leschner, Sara; Weiss, Siegfried; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2017-02-15

    Intentional bacterial infections can produce efficacious anti-tumor responses in mice, rats, dogs and humans. However, low overall success rates and intense side-effects prevent such approaches from being employed clinically. In this work, we titered bacteria and/or the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in a set of established murine models of cancer. To interpret the experiments conducted, we considered and calibrated a tumor-effector cell recruitment model under the influence of functional tumor-associated vasculature. In this model, bacterial infections and TNF-α enhanced immune activity and altered vascularization in the tumor bed. Information to predict bacterial therapy outcomes was provided by pre-treatment tumor size and the underlying immune recruitment dynamics. Notably, increasing bacterial loads did not necessarily produce better long-term tumor control, suggesting that tumor sizes affected optimal bacterial loads. Short-term treatment responses were favored by high concentrations of effector cells post-injection, such as induced by higher bacterial loads, but in the longer term did not correlate with an effective restoration of immune surveillance. Overall, our findings suggested that a combination of intermediate bacterial loads with low levels TNF-α administration could enable more favorable outcomes elicited by bacterial infections in tumor-bearing subjects.

  10. CPTAC Investigators Identify Rogue Breast Tumor Proteins That Point To Potential Drug Therapies | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    For patients with difficult-to-treat cancers, doctors increasingly rely on genomic testing of tumors to identify errors in the DNA that indicate a tumor can be targeted by existing therapies. But this approach overlooks another potential marker — rogue proteins — that may be driving cancer cells and also could be targeted with existing treatments.

  11. Radioimmunoassay of tumor markers in serum of patients with renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoni-Voutsas, M.; Glaubitt, D.; Wagner, W.; Lichtenberg, T.

    1984-01-01

    Having noted an increased serum level of TPA and CEA in patients with renal carcinoma the authors extended these studies by using a larger number of tumor markers. In 15 patients (11 men and 4 women after menopause) aged 33 to 74 years who had renal carcinoma, among them 3 with tumor metastases, the serum concentration of TPA, CA 12-5, CEA, AFP, ferritin, prolactin, ..beta..-HCG, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. Monoclonal antibodies were used in the determination of serum CA 12-5 and CEA. In all patients surgical treatment, irradiation, or cytostatic therapy had not been performed. In serum the normal range was exceeded by TPA in 7 patients, CA 12-5 in 3, CEA and AFP in one each, ferritin in 12, prolactin in 2, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in 10 patients. In one man serum prolactin was reduced. Serum ..beta..-HCG was normal in all patients. According to these results serum ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin are of great value as tumor markers in patients with renal carcinoma. In several patients the increase of serum ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin may be ascribed partly to deterioration of renal function. As no consistent patterns of tumor markers in serum were observed it is recommended to determine several tumor markers and not only one of them during the follow-up of patients. Radioimmunoassays for measuring the serum level of tumor markers, especially ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin, may considerably assist in the management of patients with renal carcinoma by providing early information about tumor recurrence or metastases.

  12. Reporting recommendations for tumor marker prognostic studies (REMARK): explanation and elaboration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Reporting Recommendations for Tumor Marker Prognostic Studies (REMARK) checklist consists of 20 items to report for published tumor marker prognostic studies. It was developed to address widespread deficiencies in the reporting of such studies. In this paper we expand on the REMARK checklist to enhance its use and effectiveness through better understanding of the intent of each item and why the information is important to report. Methods REMARK recommends including a transparent and full description of research goals and hypotheses, subject selection, specimen and assay considerations, marker measurement methods, statistical design and analysis, and study results. Each checklist item is explained and accompanied by published examples of good reporting, and relevant empirical evidence of the quality of reporting. We give prominence to discussion of the 'REMARK profile', a suggested tabular format for summarizing key study details. Summary The paper provides a comprehensive overview to educate on good reporting and provide a valuable reference for the many issues to consider when designing, conducting, and analyzing tumor marker studies and prognostic studies in medicine in general. To encourage dissemination of the Reporting Recommendations for Tumor Marker Prognostic Studies (REMARK): Explanation and Elaboration, this article has also been published in PLoS Medicine. PMID:22642691

  13. Circulating Tumor Cells: Markers and Methodologies for Enrichment and Detection.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Cubero, M J; Lorente, J A; Robles-Fernandez, I; Rodriguez-Martinez, A; Puche, J L; Serrano, M J

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of disease worldwide; however, nowadays many points of its initiation processes are unknown. In this chapter, we are focusing on the role of liquid biopsies in cancer detection and progression. CTCs are one of the main components of liquid biopsies, they represent a subset of tumor cells that have acquired the ability to disseminate from the primary tumor and intravasate to the circulatory system. The greatest challenge in the detection of CTCs is their rarity in the blood. Human blood consists of white blood cells (5-10 × 10(6)/mL), red blood cells (5-9 × 10(9)/mL), and platelets (2.5-4 × 10(8)/mL); very few CTCs will be present even in patients with known metastatic disease, with often less than one CTC per mL of blood. CTCs are found in frequencies on the order of 1-10 CTCs per mL of whole blood in patients with metastatic disease, and it is reduced in half for non-metastatic stages. Therefore, accurate methodologies for their capture and analysis are really important. The main aim of the present chapter is to describe different methodologies for CTCs capturing and analysis.

  14. Transgelin: a potentially useful diagnostic marker differentially expressed in triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Deepthi; Kimler, Bruce F; Nothnick, Warren B; Davis, Marilyn K; Fan, Fang; Tawfik, Ossama

    2015-06-01

    Triple negative (TN) (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR] and HER2-) are highly aggressive, rapidly growing, hormone-unresponsive tumors diagnosed at later stage that affect younger women with shorter overall survival. Most TN tumors are of the basal type. For the remainder, identification of target markers for effective treatment strategies remains a challenge. Transgelin (TGLN) is a 22-kd actin-binding protein of the calponin family. It is one of the earliest markers of smooth muscle differentiation. TGLN has been shown to have important biologic activities including regulating muscle fiber contractility, cell migration, and tumor suppression. We examined TGLN expression in the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. TGLN expression was examined as a function of tumor size, grade, histologic type, lymph node status, patients' age and overall survival, ER, PR, HER2, and Ki-67 in 101 tumors that included 35 luminal A, 28 luminal B, 4 HER2, and 34 TN types. TGLN positivity (defined as 2+ or 3+) was associated with more aggressive tumors (10% of grade I/II tumors were TGLN+ versus 53% of grade III tumors; P < .001), high Ki-67 count, and low ER and PR expression (P < .001) but not with tumor size, age, or lymph node metastasis. TN (n = 34) tumors were 7.7 times more likely to be TGLN+ than non-TN (n = 67) tumors (77% versus 10%, respectively; P < .001). TGLN may be an excellent diagnostic marker of TN tumors and could be useful in stratification of patients. TGLN may also prove a potential target for future treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Volatile compounds as potential defective coffee beans' markers.

    PubMed

    Toci, Aline T; Farah, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Although Brazil is the largest raw coffee producer and exporter in the world, a large amount of its Arabica coffee production is considered inappropriate for exportation. This by-product of coffee industry is called PVA due to the presence of black (P), green (V) and sour (A) defective beans, which are known to contribute considerably for cup quality decrease. Data on the volatile composition of Brazilian defective coffee beans are scarce. In this study, we evaluated the volatile composition of defective coffee beans (two lots) compared to good quality beans from the respective lots. Potential defective beans' markers were identified. In the raw samples, 2-methylpyrazine and 2-furylmethanol acetate were identified only in black-immature beans and butyrolactone only in sour beans, while benzaldehyde and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine showed to be potential markers of defective beans in general. In the roasted PVA beans, pyrazine, 2,3-butanediol meso, 2-methyl-5-(1-propenyl)pyrazine, hexanoic acid, 4-ethyl-guayacol and isopropyl p-cresol sulfide also showed to be potential defective coffee beans' markers. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumor vascular reactivity as a marker to predict tumor response to chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Songhyun; Seong, Myeongsu; Jeong, Hyeryun; Kim, Jae G.

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers for females. To monitor chemotherapeutic efficacy of breast cancer, medical imaging systems such as X-ray mammography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography have been used. Currently, it can take up to 3 to 6 weeks to see the tumor response from chemotherapy by monitoring tumor volume changes. In this study, we used near infrared spectroscopy to see if we can predict breast cancer treatment efficacy earlier than tumor volume changes by monitoring tumor vascular reactivity during inhalational gas interventions. The results show the amplitude of oxy-hemoglobin changes (vascular reactivity) during hyperoxic gas inhalation is well correlated with tumor growth, and responded 1 day earlier than tumor volume changes after chemotherapy. In addition, we fitted oxyhemoglobin concentration increase during hyperoxic gas intervention using a double exponential fitting model. From these, we found the change of amplitude 1 value is well matched with tumor growth and regression. Especially, it predicts the chemotherapeutic response of breast tumor better than the amplitude of oxyhemoglobin concentration change during hyperoxic gas intervention. These results may imply that near infrared spectroscopy with respiratory challenges can be useful in early detection of tumor and also in prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy.

  17. Marker-free phenotyping of tumor cells by fractal analysis of reflection interference contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katharina; Maier, Timo; Hirschfeld-Warneken, Vera C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2013-01-01

    Phenotyping of tumor cells by marker-free quantification is important for cancer diagnostics. For the first time, fractal analysis of reflection interference contrast microscopy images of single living cells was employed as a new method to distinguish between different nanoscopic membrane features of tumor cells. Since tumor progression correlates with a higher degree of chaos within the cell, it can be quantified mathematically by fractality. Our results show a high accuracy in identifying malignant cells with a failure chance of 3%, which is far better than today's applied methods.

  18. The effect of artificial neural network model combined with six tumor markers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feifei; Wu, Yiming; Wu, Yongjun; Nie, Guangjin; Ni, Ran

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the diagnosis potential of artificial neural network (ANN) model combined with six tumor markers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer, to differentiate lung cancer from lung benign disease, normal control, and gastrointestinal cancers. Serum carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), gastrin, neurone specific enolase (NSE), sialic acid (SA), Cu/Zn, Ca were measured through different experimental procedures in 117 lung cancer patients, 93 lung benign disease patients, 111 normal control, 47 gastric cancer patients, 50 patients with colon cancer and 50 esophagus cancer patients, 19 parameters of basic information were surveyed among lung cancer, lung benign disease and normal control, then developed and evaluated ANN models to distinguish lung cancer. Using the ANN model with the six serum tumor markers and 19 parameters to distinguish lung cancer from benign lung disease and healthy people, the sensitivity was 98.3%, the specificity was 99.5% and the accuracy was 96.9%. Another three ANN models with the six serum tumor markers were employed to differentiate lung cancer from three gastrointestinal cancers, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of distinguishing lung cancer from gastric cancer by the ANN model of lung cancer-gastric cancer were 100%, 83.3% and 93.5%, respectively; The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of discriminating lung cancer by lung cancer-colon cancer ANN model were 90.0%, 90.0%, and 90.0%; And which were 86.7%, 84.6%, and 86.0%, respectively, by lung cancer-esophagus cancer ANN model. ANN model built with the six serum tumor markers could distinguish lung cancer, not only from lung benign disease and normal people, but also from three common gastrointestinal cancers. And our evidence indicates the ANN model maybe is an excellent and intelligent system to discriminate lung cancer.

  19. Identification of potential protein markers of noble rot infected grapes.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Millioni, Renato; Franchin, Cinzia; Zapparoli, Giacomo; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Simonato, Barbara

    2015-07-15

    The evaluation of Botrytis cinerea as noble rot on withered grapes is of great importance to predict the wine sensory/organoleptic properties and to manage the winemaking process of Amarone, a passito dry red wine. This report describes the first proteomic analysis of grapes infected by noble rot under withering conditions to identify possible markers of fungal infection. 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed that protein profiles of infected and not infected grape samples are significantly different in terms of number of spots and relative abundance. Protein identification by MS analysis allowed to identify only in infected berries proteins of B. cinerea that represent potential markers of the presence of the fungus in the withered grapes.

  20. Specific Immunoassays for Placental Alkaline Phosphatase As a Tumor Marker

    PubMed Central

    Stinghen, Sérvio T.; Moura, Juliana F.; Zancanella, Patrícia; Rodrigues, Giovanna A.; Pianovski, Mara A.; Lalli, Enzo; Arnold, Dodie L.; Minozzo, João C.; Callefe, Luis G.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Figueiredo, Bonald C.

    2006-01-01

    Human placental (hPLAP) and germ cell (PLAP-like) alkaline phosphatases are polymorphic and heat-stable enzymes. This study was designed to develop specific immunoassays for quantifying hPLAP and PLAP-like enzyme activity (EA) in sera of cancer patients, pregnant women, or smokers. Polyclonal sheep anti-hPLAP antibodies were purified by affinity chromatography with whole hPLAP protein (ICA-PLAP assay) or a synthetic peptide (aa 57–71) of hPLAP (ICA-PEP assay); the working range was 0.1–11 U/L and cutoff value was 0.2 U/L EA for nonsmokers. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 3.7%–6.5% (ICA-PLAP assay) and 9.0%–9.9% (ICA-PEP assay). An insignificant cross-reactivity was noted for high levels of unheated intestinal alkaline phosphatase in ICA-PEP assay. A positive correlation between the regression of tumor size and EA was noted in a child with embryonal carcinoma. It can be concluded that ICA-PEP assay is more specific than ICA-PLAP, which is still useful to detect other PLAP/PLAP-like phenotypes. PMID:17489017

  1. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P < or = .005) correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development.

  2. Identification of novel markers that outperform EpCAM in quantifying circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Choi, Na Young; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2014-08-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be used to predict the spread of cancer to distant sites, to monitor the clinical response to therapy and to predict patient survival. The currently used EpCAM antibody-mediated identification of CTCs may lead to false negative results due to the low level or absence of EpCAM expression in several types of cancer, thus provoking a need to identify novel CTC markers. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) microarray dataset, storing 18,915 gene expression profiles across 967 cancer cell lines derived from 25 primary sites, was systematically analyzed. The results obtained were cross-validated using an independent microarray dataset generated from 1,911 clinical cancer specimens derived from 15 different cancers. Through bioinformatics analyses we identified, categorized and prioritized three classes of novel markers: pan-CTC markers (n = 45), EpCAM((-/low)) CTC markers (n = 16) and single cancer type-specific markers (n = 74). The pan-CTC markers were significantly, uniformly and constitutively over-expressed in most cancer types, except in cancers of hematopoietic and lymphoid origin. The EpCAM((-/low)) CTC markers were over-expressed in cancers with low or undetectable EpCAM expression levels. Among these, 22 markers were validated in an independent microarray dataset. In addition, 74 markers that were over-expressed in only single cancer types were categorized. The combined use of these novel markers in conjunction with cancer type-specific markers should be able to quantify CTCs that are not captured by EpCAM antibodies, and to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of CTC detection among admixtures containing leucocytes or other types of contaminants.

  3. Potentials and Limitations of Guiding Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Set-Up on Liver-Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderink, Wouter; Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Boer, Hans de; Levendag, Peter; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated the potentials and limitations of guiding liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) set-up on liver-implanted fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing compression-supported SBRT in a stereotactic body frame received fluoroscopy at treatment preparation and before each treatment fraction. In fluoroscopic videos we localized the markers and diaphragm tip at expiration and the spine (measurements on free-breathing and abdominal compression). Day-to-day displacements, rotations (markers only), and deformations were determined. Marker guidance was compared to conventional set-up strategies in treatment set-up simulations. Results: For compression, day-to-day motion of markers with respect to their centers of mass (COM) was {sigma} = 0.9 mm (random error SD), {Sigma} = 0.4 mm (systematic error SD), and <2.1 mm (maximum). Consequently, assuming that markers were closely surrounding spherical tumors, marker COM-guided set-up would have required safety margins of {approx}2 mm. Using marker COM as the gold standard, other set-up methods (using no correction, spine registration, and diaphragm tip craniocaudal registration) resulted in set-up errors of 1.4 mm < {sigma} < 2.8 mm, 2.6 mm < {Sigma} < 5.1 mm, and 6.3 mm < max < 12.4 mm. Day-to-day intermarker motion of <16.7%, 2.2% median, and rotations between 3.5{sup o} and 7.2{sup o} were observed. For markers not surrounding the tumor, e.g., 5 cm between respective COMs, these changes could effect residual tumor set-up errors up to 8.4 mm, 1.1 mm median (deformations), and 3.1 mm to 6.3 mm (rotations). Compression did not systematically contribute to deformations and rotations, since similar results were observed for free-breathing. Conclusions: If markers can be implanted near and around the tumor, residual set-up errors by marker guidance are small compared to those of conventional set-up methods, allowing high-precision tumor radiation set-up. However, substantial

  4. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and gastrointestinal stromal cancers: European group on tumor markers 2014 guidelines update.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M J; Lamerz, R; Haglund, C; Nicolini, A; Kalousová, M; Holubec, L; Sturgeon, C

    2014-06-01

    Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and management of patients with several different types of gastrointestinal cancer, especially colorectal, gastric, gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) adenocarcinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of this article is to provide updated and evidence-based guidelines for the use of biomarkers in the different gastrointestinal malignancies. Recommended biomarkers for colorectal cancer include an immunochemical-based fecal occult blood test in screening asymptomatic subjects ≥50 years of age for neoplasia, serial CEA levels in postoperative surveillance of stage II and III patients who may be candidates for surgical resection or systemic therapy in the event of distant metastasis occurring, K-RAS mutation status for identifying patients with advanced disease likely to benefit from anti-EGFR therapeutic antibodies and microsatellite instability testing as a first-line screen for subjects with Lynch syndrome. In advanced gastric or GOJ cancers, measurement of HER2 is recommended in selecting patients for treatment with trastuzumab. For patients with suspected GIST, determination of KIT protein should be used as a diagnostic aid, while KIT mutational analysis may be used for treatment planning in patients with diagnosed GISTs.

  5. Interfractional Position Variation of Pancreatic Tumors Quantified Using Intratumoral Fiducial Markers and Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Astrid van der; Wognum, Silvia; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Jong, Rianne de; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Fockens, Paul; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional pancreatic position variation using fiducial markers visible on daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In addition, we analyzed possible migration of the markers to investigate their suitability for tumor localization. Methods and Materials: For 13 pancreatic cancer patients with implanted Visicoil markers, CBCT scans were obtained before 17 to 25 fractions (300 CBCTs in total). Image registration with the reference CT was used to determine the displacement of the 2 to 3 markers relative to bony anatomy and to each other. We analyzed the distance between marker pairs as a function of time to identify marker registration error (SD of linear fit residuals) and possible marker migration. For each patient, we determined the mean displacement of markers relative to the reference CT (systematic position error) and the spread in displacements (random position error). From this, we calculated the group systematic error, Σ, and group random error, σ. Results: Marker pair distances showed slight trends with time (range, −0.14 to 0.14 mm/day), possibly due to tissue deformation, but no shifts that would indicate marker migration. The mean SD of the fit residuals was 0.8 mm. We found large interfractional position variations, with for 116 of 300 (39%) fractions a 3-dimensional vector displacement of >10 mm. The spread in displacement varied significantly (P<.01) between patients, from a vector range of 9.1 mm to one of 24.6 mm. For the patient group, Σ was 3.8, 6.6, and 3.5 mm; and σ was 3.6, 4.7 and 2.5 mm, in left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior directions, respectively. Conclusions: We found large systematic displacements of the fiducial markers relative to bony anatomy, in addition to wide distributions of displacement. These results for interfractional position variation confirm the potential benefit of using fiducial markers rather than bony anatomy for daily online

  6. Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30) serves as a potential prognostic indicator in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Zhijing; Zheng, Shunxin; Lv, Zhilue; Zhuang, Yuan; Lan, Xiuwan; Wang, Feng; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang; Zhou, Sufang

    2016-01-01

    Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30) has been identified as a tumor-related molecule of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Its clinical significance and underlying mechanisms in HCC tissues, however, remain largely unexplored. We have demonstrated a preferentially expressed SMP30 in normal liver using a tissue microarray. By employing real-time quantitative PCR, two tissue microarrays and Oncomine database analysis, we have also shown that the SMP30 in HCC tissues has significantly reduced when compared with that in paired adjacent non-tumor tissues (P = 0.0037). The reduced expression of SMP30 is very noticeably related to larger tumor size (P = 0.012), enhanced TNM (P = 0.009) and worse survival (P < 0.0001) in HCC patients. The analyses using Cox regression have indicated that the decreased SMP30 expression is an independent risk to the reduced overall survival rate of HCC patients (P = 0.001), and the down-regulation of SMP30 in HCC might be mediated by DNA methylation. Moreover, genes co-expressed with SMP30 may affect the prognosis through apoptotic process, biological adhesion and blood coagulation by PANTHER analyses. Our studies have indicated that the SMP30 may serve as a candidate of HCC clinical prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27991558

  7. LIN28A immunoreactivity is a potent diagnostic marker of embryonal tumor with multilayered rosettes (ETMR).

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Andrey; Ryzhova, Marina; Jones, David T W; Northcott, Paul A; van Sluis, Peter; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Perry, Arie; Picard, Daniel; Rosenblum, Marc; Giangaspero, Felice; Aronica, Eleonora; Schüller, Ulrich; Hasselblatt, Martin; Collins, V Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Huang, Annie; Pfister, Stefan M; Kool, Marcel

    2012-12-01

    Embryonal tumor with multilayered rosettes (ETMR, previously known as ETANTR) is a highly aggressive embryonal CNS tumor, which almost exclusively affects infants and is associated with a dismal prognosis. Accurate diagnosis is of critical clinical importance because of its poor response to current treatment protocols and its distinct biology. Amplification of the miRNA cluster at 19q13.42 has been identified previously as a genetic hallmark for ETMR, but an immunohistochemistry-based assay for clinical routine diagnostics [such as INI-1 for atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT)] is still lacking. In this study, we screened for an ETMR-specific marker using a gene-expression profiling dataset of more than 1,400 brain tumors and identified LIN28A as a highly specific marker for ETMR. The encoded protein binds small RNA and has been implicated in stem cell pluripotency, metabolism and tumorigenesis. Using an LIN28A specific antibody, we carried out immunohistochemical analysis of LIN28A in more than 800 childhood brain-tumor samples and confirmed its high specificity for ETMR. Strong LIN28A immunoexpression was found in all 37 ETMR samples tested, whereas focal reactivity was only present in a small (6/50) proportion of AT/RT samples. All other pediatric brain tumors were completely LIN28A-negative. In summary, we established LIN28A immunohistochemistry as a highly sensitive and specific, rapid, inexpensive diagnostic tool for routine pathological verification of ETMR.

  8. Immunomagnetic separation of tumor initiating cells by screening two surface markers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Hsieh, Yuan-Pang; Ma, Sai; Geng, Shuo; Cao, Zhenning; Li, Liwu; Lu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    Isolating tumor initiating cells (TICs) often requires screening of multiple surface markers, sometimes with opposite preferences. This creates a challenge for using bead-based immunomagnetic separation (IMS) that typically enriches cells based on one abundant marker. Here, we propose a new strategy that allows isolation of CD44+/CD24− TICs by IMS involving both magnetic beads coated by anti-CD44 antibody and nonmagnetic beads coated by anti-CD24 antibody (referred to as two-bead IMS). Cells enriched with our approach showed significant enhancement in TIC marker expression (examined by flow cytometry) and improved tumorsphere formation efficiency. Our method will extend the application of IMS to cell subsets characterized by multiple markers. PMID:28074882

  9. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP): a transformation sensitive protein with potentials of a cancer marker.

    PubMed

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Ten Kate, J; Meera Khan, P

    1983-01-01

    Several observations by independent investigators in the past have indicated that adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP), present in considerable quantities in certain human tissues, was absent or decreased in the cancers originated from them. During the present study, electrophoretic analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) isozymes and radioimmunoassay for ADCP in the primary fibroblasts and the transformed as well as certain tumor derived cell lines have demonstrated that ADCP present in large quantities in the primary cells was absent or nearly absent in the transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. Though the mechanisms involved are not yet clear, the above observations indicate that ADCP has the potentials of a useful marker in the studies on transformed cells and cancer tissues.

  10. Potential role of BCL2 in the recurrence of uterine smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Conconi, Donatella; Chiappa, Valentina; Perego, Patrizia; Redaelli, Serena; Bovo, Giorgio; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Milani, Rodolfo; Dalprà, Leda; Lissoni, Andrea Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Uterine smooth muscle tumors are the most common female genital tract neoplasms. While leiomyosarcoma has been studied at length, smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential (STUMPs) still have ambiguous and unresolved issues, with a risk of relapse and evolution largely undefined. We performed an array comparative genomic hybridization analysis on a primitive STUMP and its local recurrence, histologically diagnosed as undifferentiated sarcoma. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first genomic study on primitive STUMPs and the different relapsed tumors. The results showed few copy number alterations shared between both samples and the high heterogeneity in the STUMP was apparently lost in the sarcoma. Surprisingly the STUMP presented an amplification of the BCL2 gene, not observed in the relapsed tumor. Additionally, fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining were performed to confirm BCL2 amplification and expression in these samples and in two other cases of primitive STUMPs and their corresponding relapsed tumors. The presence of BCL2 in multiple copies and expression in the two primitive STUMPs and two relapsed tumors was confirmed. The marked amplification of the BCL2 gene present in the primitive STUMP and the multiple copies also observed in other cases, suggest its potential role as a marker of STUMP malignant potential and recurrence.

  11. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mφ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs. PMID:24827844

  12. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs.

  13. Disruptive mitochondrial DNA mutations in complex I subunits are markers of oncocytic phenotype in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Bonora, Elena; Pennisi, Lucia Fiammetta; Toller, Matteo; Iommarini, Luisa; Ghelli, Anna; Moretti, Massimo; Betts, Christine M; Martinelli, Giuseppe Nicola; Ceroni, Alberto Rinaldi; Curcio, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela; Tallini, Giovanni; Romeo, Giovanni

    2007-05-22

    Oncocytic tumors are a distinctive class of proliferative lesions composed of cells with a striking degree of mitochondrial hyperplasia that are particularly frequent in the thyroid gland. To understand whether specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are associated with the accumulation of mitochondria, we sequenced the entire mtDNA in 50 oncocytic lesions (45 thyroid tumors of epithelial cell derivation and 5 mitochondrion-rich breast tumors) and 52 control cases (21 nononcocytic thyroid tumors, 15 breast carcinomas, and 16 gliomas) by using recently developed technology that allows specific and reliable amplification of the whole mtDNA with quick mutation scanning. Thirteen oncocytic lesions (26%) presented disruptive mutations (nonsense or frameshift), whereas only two samples (3.8%) presented such mutations in the nononcocytic control group. In one case with multiple thyroid nodules analyzed separately, a disruptive mutation was found in the only nodule with oncocytic features. In one of the five mitochondrion-rich breast tumors, a disruptive mutation was identified. All disruptive mutations were found in complex I subunit genes, and the association between these mutations and the oncocytic phenotype was statistically significant (P=0.001). To study the pathogenicity of these mitochondrial mutations, primary cultures from oncocytic tumors and corresponding normal tissues were established. Electron microscopy and biochemical and molecular analyses showed that primary cultures derived from tumors bearing disruptive mutations failed to maintain the mutations and the oncocytic phenotype. We conclude that disruptive mutations in complex I subunits are markers of thyroid oncocytic tumors.

  14. Marker-based quantification of interfractional tumor position variation and the use of markers for setup verification in radiation therapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; van der Horst, Astrid; de Jong, Rianne; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Kamphuis, Martijn; van Wieringen, Niek; Machiels, Melanie; Bel, Arjan; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional esophageal tumor position variation using markers and investigate the use of markers for setup verification. Sixty-five markers placed in the tumor volumes of 24 esophageal cancer patients were identified in computed tomography (CT) and follow-up cone-beam CT. For each patient we calculated pairwise distances between markers over time to evaluate geometric tumor volume variation. We then quantified marker displacements relative to bony anatomy and estimated the variation of systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ). During bony anatomy-based setup verification, we visually inspected whether the markers were inside the planning target volume (PTV) and attempted marker-based registration. Minor time trends with substantial fluctuations in pairwise distances implied tissue deformation. Overall, Σ(σ) in the left-right/cranial-caudal/anterior-posterior direction was 2.9(2.4)/4.1(2.4)/2.2(1.8) mm; for the proximal stomach, it was 5.4(4.3)/4.9(3.2)/1.9(2.4) mm. After bony anatomy-based setup correction, all markers were inside the PTV. However, due to large tissue deformation, marker-based registration was not feasible. Generally, the interfractional position variation of esophageal tumors is more pronounced in the cranial-caudal direction and in the proximal stomach. Currently, marker-based setup verification is not feasible for clinical routine use, but markers can facilitate the setup verification by inspecting whether the PTV covers the tumor volume adequately. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly sensitive detection of multiple tumor markers for lung cancer using gold nanoparticle probes and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanlei; Wang, Wentao; Yao, Shihua; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Honglian; Zhang, Jishen; Jing, Fengxiang; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Cong, Hui; Jia, Chunping; Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Jianlong

    2017-03-15

    Assay of multiple serum tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen (CYFRA21-1), and neuron specific enolase (NSE), is important for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a novel serological and histochemical biomarker, was recently reported to be preferentially expressed in lung cancer. Four target proteins were sandwiched by capture antibodies attached to microarrays and detection antibodies carried on modified gold nanoparticles. Optical signals generated by the sandwich structures were amplified by gold deposition with HAuCl4 and H2O2, and were observable by microscopy or the naked eye. The four tumor markers were subsequently measured in 106 lung cancer patients and 42 healthy persons. The assay was capable of detecting multiple biomarkers in serum sample at concentration of <1 ng mL(-1) in 1 h. Combined detection of the four tumor markers highly improved the sensitivity (to 87.74%) for diagnosis of lung cancer compared with sensitivity of single markers. A rapid, highly sensitive co-detection method for multiple biomarkers based on gold nanoparticles and microarrays was developed. In clinical use, it would be expected to improve the early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  16. The comparison of nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS) with Ki67 proliferation marker expression in common skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Zduniak, Krzysztof; Agrawal, Siddarth; Symonowicz, Krzysztof; Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinases substrate (NUCKS) is a chromosomal protein of unknown function. Its amino acid composition and structure of its DNA binding domain resemble those of high mobility group A (HMGA) proteins which are associated with various malignancies. Since changes in expression of HMGA are considered as a marker of tumor progression, it is possible that similar changes in expression of NUCKS could be a useful tool in diagnosis of malignant skin tumors. To investigate this assumption we used specific antibodies against NUCKS for immunohistochemistry of squamous (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) as well as keratoacanthoma (KA). We found high expression of NUCKS in nuclei of SCC and BCC cells which exceeded expression of the well-known proliferation marker Ki67. Expression of NUCKS in benign KA was much below that of malignant tumors. With the present study and based on our previous experience we would like to suggest the NUCKS protein as a novel proliferation marker for immunohistochemical evaluation of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded skin tumor specimens. We would like to emphasize that NUCKS abundance in malignant skin tumors is higher than that of the well-known proliferation marker Ki67, thus allowing more precise assessment of tumor proliferation potential.

  17. Cell-free tumor DNA in blood plasma as a marker for circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Heidi; Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Müller, Imke; Letang, Nicolas; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Rebillard, Xavier; Pantel, Klaus

    2009-02-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA in the blood of cancer patients harbors tumor-specific aberrations. Here, we investigated whether this DNA might also reflect the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC). To identify the source of cell-free DNA in blood, plasma derived from 81 patients with prostate cancer was examined for CTCs and cell-free DNA. An epithelial immunospot assay was applied for detection of CTCs, and a PCR-based fluorescence microsatellite analysis with a panel of 14 polymorphic markers was used for detection of allelic imbalances (AI). The plasma DNA levels significantly correlated with the diagnosis subgroups of localized (stage M0, n = 69) and metastasized prostate cancer (stage M1, n = 12; P = 0.03) and with the tumor stage of these patients (P < 0.005). AI was found on cell-free DNA in plasma from 45.0% and 58.5% of M0 and M1 patients, respectively. Detection of CTCs showed that 71.0% or 92.0% of the M0 and M1 patients harbored 1 to 40 CTCs in their blood, respectively. The occurrence of CTCs correlated with tumor stage (P < 0.03) and increasing Gleason scores (P = 0.04). Notably, significant associations of the number of CTCs with the AI frequencies at the markers D8S137 (P = 0.03), D9S171 (P = 0.04), and D17S855 (P = 0.02) encoding the cytoskeletal protein dematin, the inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDKN2/p16 and BRCA1, respectively, were observed. These findings show, for the first time, a relationship between the occurrence of CTCs and circulating tumor-associated DNA in blood, which, therefore, might become a valuable new source for monitoring metastatic progression in cancer patients.

  18. Corneal Sensitivity as a Potential Marker of Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sitompul, Ratna

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex and chronic metabolic disorder leading to many complications. One of the most common complications of DM is diabetic neuropathy. There are many studies exploring corneal sensitivity as a potential marker of diabetic neuropathy. This review aims to explore association between corneal sensitivity and diabetic neuropathy. In diabetic neuropathy, corneal sensitivity is impaired due to low level of corneal nerve trophic factors, impaired sensory nerve fibers, and lost communication of dendtritic cell. In diabetic patients, this condition can be assessed by several techniques, such as Cochet Bonnet aesthesiometry, non-contact corneal aesthesiometry, and confocal microscopy. Few promising therapeutic targets for impaired corneal sensitivity include stem cell and growth factor therapy that can be used to prevent complication in patient with diabetic neurotrophic keratopathy. Impaired corneal sensitivity serve as a potential marker of diabetic neuropathy. Doctors, opthalmologists and internists, should anticipate the possibility of observing the following changes in diabetic patients with neuropathy by using corneal sensitivity assessment test.

  19. A comparative study of four serological tumor markers for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Shawn R; Beason, Kevin L; Bryant, Sabrina; Johnson, James T; Jackson, Margaret; Wilson, Cynthia; Holifield, Kay; Vincent, Charlton; Hall, Margot

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer in the world. Circulating tumor antigens are often used as a minimally invasive tool for noting breast cancer progression. The objective of this study was to compare four tumor antigens (CA 15-3, CA 27.29, alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], and carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA]) for their diagnostic efficacy in breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that CA 15-3 would proved to be superior to CA 27.29, CEA, and AFP in assay performance. Tumor marker assays were performed according to the manufacturers' directions. Assays used in this study were CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 (Fujirebio Diagnostics/Centocor Inc.), AFP (Abbott Inc.), and CEA (Hybritech Inc.). A total of 554 patient samples were obtained from an area hospital, plus 200 healthy adult samples which were used for the determination of normal reference intervals. The patients included patients with no disease (184), with non-malignant disease (11), with breast cancer (87), and with other types of cancer (272). Diagnostic percent sensitivities for each marker were: CA 15-3 (63%), CA 27.29 (39%), CEA (22%), and AFP (22%). Diagnostic specificities for each marker were comparable, ranging from 80-88%. Analytical parameters were evaluated for the assays and compared favorably. We concluded that CA 15-3 was the best tumor antigen for use as a diagnostic aid and monitoring agent.

  20. Predictive and prognostic value of preoperative serum tumor markers in resectable adenosqamous lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Dongsheng; Li, Kai; Jiang, Richeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Adenosquamous carcinoma is a rare and aggressive form of lung cancer. The prognostic and predictive value of preoperative serum tumor markers and frequency of EGFR mutations in adenosquamous lung carcinoma are unclear. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data and samples collected from 106 radically resected adenosquamous lung carcinoma patients with pathological stage I-IIIA between 2008 and 2013. Correlations between serum tumor marker levels and EGFR mutations as well as survival parameters were analyzed and prognostic factors were identified. Results Of the 106 adenosquamous lung carcinoma patients, 29 (27.4%) harbored EGFR mutations. By univariate analysis, advanced clinical stage (P = 0.009 for disease-free survival [DFS]; P = 0.046 for overall survival [OS]), larger tumor size (P = 0.001 for DFS; P = 0.002 for OS), regional lymph node metastasis (P = 0.024 for DFS; P = 0.030 for OS), higher NSE level (P = 0.002 for DFS; P < 0.001 for OS), and higher TMI (tumor marker index) (P = 0.009 for OS) were significantly correlated with a worse prognosis. By multivariate analysis, NSE (P = 0.014) was confirmed as independent predictor for DFS, while NSE (P = 0.001) and TMI (P = 0.038) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Conclusion Adenosquamous lung carcinoma is an aggressive malignancy with relatively high EGFR mutation frequency. Elevated preoperative NSE level and TMI are adverse predictive and prognostic indicators. PMID:27623437

  1. Serum levels of GFAP and EGFR in primary and recurrent high-grade gliomas: correlation to tumor volume, molecular markers, and progression-free survival.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Aida; Gardberg, Maria; Frantzén, Janek; Parkkola, Riitta; Vuorinen, Ville; Pesola, Marko; Minn, Heikki

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to study the association of two potential serum biomarkers glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with prognostic markers such as IDH1 mutation, tumor burden, and survival in patients with high-grade gliomas (HGG). Additionally, our objective was to evaluate the potential of serum EGFR as a surrogate marker for EGFR status in the tumor. Pre-operative serum samples were prospectively collected from patients with primary (n = 17) or recurrent (n = 10) HGG. Serum GFAP and EGFR levels were determined by ELISA and studied for correlation with molecular markers including EGFR amplification, tumor volume in contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI, and progression-free survival (PFS). Pre-operative serum GFAP level of ≥0.014 ng/ml was 86 % sensitive and 85 % specific for the diagnosis of glioblastoma. High GFAP was related to the lack of IDH1 mutation (P = 0.016), high Ki67 proliferation index (P < 0.001), and poor PFS (HR 5.9, CI 1.2-29.9, P = 0.032). Serum GFAP correlated with enhancing tumor volume in primary (r = 0.64 P = 0.005), but also in recurrent HGGs (r = 0.76 P = 0.011). In contrast, serum EGFR levels did not differ between HGG patients and 13 healthy controls, and were not related to EGFR status in the tumor. We conclude that high serum GFAP associates with IDH1 mutation-negative HGG, and poor PFS. Correlation with tumor burden in recurrent HGG implicates the potential of serum GFAP for detection of tumor recurrence. Our results suggest that circulating EGFR is not derived from glioma cells and cannot be used as a marker for EGFR status in the tumor.

  2. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan CSPG4 as a novel hypoxia-sensitive marker in pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Keleg, Shereen; Titov, Alexandr; Heller, Anette; Giese, Thomas; Tjaden, Christine; Ahmad, Sufian S; Gaida, Matthias M; Bauer, Andrea S; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20), premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55), and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86). Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissue(high)/sera(low)-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct

  3. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan CSPG4 as a Novel Hypoxia-Sensitive Marker in Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Keleg, Shereen; Titov, Alexandr; Heller, Anette; Giese, Thomas; Tjaden, Christine; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Gaida, Matthias M.; Bauer, Andrea S.; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A.

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20), premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55), and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86). Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissuehigh/seralow-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct epithelial

  4. Keratins as markers that distinguish normal and tumor-derived mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, D.K.; Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.A.; Yaswen, P.; Suh, T.; Sager, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Keratin 5 (K5) mRNA and protein are shown to be expressed in normal mammary epithelial cells in culture and are absent from tumor-derived dell lines. To extend these findings, the full complements of keratins in normal, immortalized, and tumor cells were compared. It is shown here that normal cells produce keratins K5, K6, K7, K14, and K17, whereas tumor cells produce mainly keratins K8, K18, and K19. In immortalized cells, which are preneoplastic or partially transformed, the levels of K5 mRNA and protein are lower than in normal cells, whereas the amount of K18 is increased. Thus, K5 is an important marker in the tumorigenic process, distinguishing normal from tumor cells, and decrease K5 expression correlates with tumorigenic progression.

  5. Circulating tumor cells and miRNA as prognostic markers in neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Grossrubatscher, Erika Maria; Guadagno, Elia; Sciammarella, Concetta; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria Al

    2017-04-07

    The prognosis of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) is widely variable and has been shown to associate with several tissue- and blood-based biomarkers in different settings. The identification of prognostic factors predicting NEN outcome is of paramount importance to select the best clinical management for these patients. Prognostic markers have been intensively investigated, also taking advantage of the most modern techniques, in the perspective of personalized medicine and appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the possible role of circulating tumor cells and microRNAs as prognostic markers in NENs.

  6. MAP17 and SGLT1 Protein Expression Levels as Prognostic Markers for Cervical Tumor Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Marco; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Felipe-Abrio, Blanca; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A.; Lucena-Cacace, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Lleonart, Matilde; Roncador, Guiovanna; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2013-01-01

    MAP17 is a membrane-associated protein that is overexpressed in human tumors. Because the expression of MAP17 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through SGLT1 in cancer cells, in the present work, we investigated whether MAP17 and/or SGLT1 might be markers for the activity of treatments involving oxidative stress, such as cisplatin or radiotherapy. First, we confirmed transcriptional alterations in genes involved in the oxidative stress induced by MAP17 expression in HeLa cervical tumor cells and found that Hela cells expressing MAP17 were more sensitive to therapies that induce ROS than were parental cells. Furthermore, MAP17 increased glucose uptake through SGLT receptors. We then analyzed MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels in cervical tumors treated with cisplatin plus radiotherapy and correlated the expression levels with patient survival. MAP17 and SGLT1 were expressed in approximately 70% and 50% of cervical tumors of different types, respectively, but they were not expressed in adenoma tumors. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels. High levels of either MAP17 or SGLT1 correlated with improved patient survival after treatment. However, the patients with high levels of both MAP17 and SGLT1 survived through the end of this study. Therefore, the combination of high MAP17 and SGLT1 levels is a marker for good prognosis in patients with cervical tumors after cisplatin plus radiotherapy treatment. These results also suggest that the use of MAP17 and SGLT1 markers may identify patients who are likely to exhibit a better response to treatments that boost oxidative stress in other cancer types. PMID:23418532

  7. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  8. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAIYING; MOLINA, JULIAN; JIANG, JOHN; FERBER, MATTHEW; PRUTHI, SANDHYA; JATKOE, TIMOTHY; DERECHO, CARLO; RAJPUROHIT, YASHODA; ZHENG, JIAN; WANG, YIXIN

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  9. New Strategies in Personalized Medicine for Solid Tumors: Molecular Markers and Clinical Trial Designs

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensmeier, Juliane M.; Eder, Joseph P.; Herbst, Roy S.

    2017-01-01

    The delineation of signaling pathways to understand tumor biology combined with the rapid development of technologies that allow broad molecular profiling and data analysis, has led to a new era of personalized medicine in oncology. Many academic institutions now routinely profile patients and discuss them in personalized medicine tumor boards before making treatment recommendations. Clinical trials initiated by pharmaceutical companies often require specific markers for enrollment or at least explore multiple options for future markers. In addition to the still small number of targeted agents that are approved for the therapy of patients with histological and molecularly defined tumors, there is a broad range of novel targeted agents in development that are undergoing clinical studies with companion profiling to determine the best responding patient population. While the present focus of profiling are genetic analyses, additional testing of RNA, protein and immune parameters are being developed and incorporated in clinical research and are likely to contribute significantly to future patient selection and treatment approaches. As the advances in tumor biology and human genetics have identified promising tumor targets, the ongoing clinical evaluation of novel agents will now need to show if the promise can be translated into benefit for patients. PMID:25183480

  10. CA19-9: A promising tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hidaka, A.; Nakashima, T.; Ohta, H.; Torizuka, K.; Naito, A.; Suzuki, T.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate CA19-9 as a tumor marker for pancreatic carcinoma (PC), serum levels of CA19-9 were compared with those of CEA and elastase-1 in 56 patients, consisted of 43 cases with histologically proven adenocarcinomas and 13 cases with chronic pancreatitis. Serum levels were determined by using RIA kit obtained from CIS, France (CA19-9 and CEA) and Abbot (elastase-1). CA19-9 gave the highest accuracy among tumor markers the authors have studied and serum levels were markedly elevated over 100U/ml in 30 (70%) cases with PC, whereas none in chronic pancreatitis. CA19-9 values were closely related to the tumor size and the presence or absence of metastsis on CT findings. Small tumors of less than 3cm in diameter, although the site of tumor was limited to the head of the pancreas, showed positive results in 2 out of 5 cases. Furthermore, CA19-9 was at a level of less than 22U/ml in 98 normal controls and was found to be elevated in only 4 (3%) out of 124 patients with benign diseases, including liver diseases, gastric ulcer, cholelithiasis, and so on. These results indicate that CA19-9 is much better in diagnosis and management of PC than is CEA.

  11. Dclk1, a tumor stem cell marker, regulates pro-survival signaling and self-renewal of intestinal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Yao, Jiannan; Qu, Dongfeng; May, Randal; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ge, Yang; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M; Gude, Modhi; Vega, Kenneth; Bannerman-Menson, Eddie; Xia, Lijun; Bronze, Michael; An, Guangyu; Houchen, Courtney W

    2017-02-01

    More than 80% of intestinal neoplasia is associated with the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1), a kinase protein, is overexpressed in colorectal cancer and specifically marks tumor stem cells (TSCs) that self-renew and increased the tumor progeny in Apc (Min/+) mice. However, the role of Dclk1 expression and its contribution to regulating pro-survival signaling for tumor progression in Apc mutant cancer is poorly understood. We analyzed DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling gene expression datasets of 329 specimens from TCGA Colon Adenocarcinoma Cancer Data. The network of DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling was analyzed utilizing the GeneMANIA database. We examined the expression levels of Dclk1 and other stem cell-associated markers, pro-survival signaling pathways, cell self-renewal in the isolated intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice with high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. To determine the functional role of Dclk1 for tumor progression, we knocked down Dclk1 and determined the pro-survival signaling pathways and stemness. We used siRNA technology to gene silence pro-survival signaling in colon cancer cells in vitro. We utilized FACS, IHC, western blot, RT-PCR, and clonogenic (self-renewal) assays. We found a correlation between DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling expression. The expression of Dclk1 and stem cell-associated markers Lgr5, Bmi1, and Musashi1 were significantly higher in the intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice than in wild-type controls. Intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice showed increased expression of pro-survival signaling, pluripotency and self-renewal ability. Furthermore, the enteroids formed from the intestinal Dclk1(+) cells of Apc (Min/+) mice display higher pluripotency and pro-survival signaling. Dclk1 knockdown in Apc (Min/+) mice attenuates intestinal adenomas and adenocarcinoma, and decreases pro-survival signaling and self-renewal. Knocking down RELA and NOTCH1

  12. Distinct expression profile of stem cell markers, LGR5 and LGR6, in basaloid skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bo Gun; Lee, Cheol; Kim, Hye Sung; Shin, Myung Soo; Cheon, Min Seok; Kim, Jae Wang; Kim, Woo Ho

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian epidermis, which is composed of hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and interfollicular epidermis, is maintained by discrete stem cells. In vivo lineage tracing demonstrated that murine LGR5 cells are mainly responsible for hair follicle regeneration whereas LGR6 cells generate sebaceous glands and interfollicular epidermis. However, little is known about their expression in the human skin tumors. In this study, we investigated the expression profile of LGR5 and LGR6 in a variety of human skin tumors including basaloid tumors with follicular differentiation (94 basal cell carcinomas, 18 trichoepitheliomas, 3 basaloid follicular hamartomas, and 12 pilomatricomas) and tumors with ductal differentiation (7 eccrine poromas, 8 hidradenomas, and 5 spiradenomas). LGR5 expression was highest in basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) followed by trichoepitheliomas (TEs) and basaloid follicular hamartomas. LGR6 had the same expression pattern as LGR5, even though its expression was lower. Interestingly, LGR6 expression was detected in stromal cells around the tumor and papillary mesenchymal bodies of TEs but not in stromal cells of BCCs, suggesting different characteristics of tumor-associated fibroblasts between TEs and BCCs. It was unexpected to find that pilomatricomas exclusively expressed LGR6, and its expression was limited to the basaloid cells. Notably, LGR6-positive cells were observed in sweat gland ductal cells in normal skin. This might explain, in part, the finding that LGR6 expression was relatively higher in basaloid tumors with ductal differentiation than in those with follicular differentiation. In particular, spiradenomas displayed the same distribution pattern of LGR6 as normal sweat glands, suggesting the possibility of LGR6-positive cells as tumor stem cells. In conclusion, we documented the different expression patterns of stem cell markers, LGR5 and LGR6 in various skin tumors. These data may provide important insights to understand the origin and

  13. Oxidized macrophage migration inhibitory factor is a potential new tissue marker and drug target in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schinagl, Alexander; Thiele, Michael; Douillard, Patrice; Völkel, Dirk; Kenner, Lukas; Kazemi, Zahra; Freissmuth, Michael; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Kerschbaumer, Randolf J.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, which was shown to be upregulated in cancers and to exhibit tumor promoting properties. Unlike other cytokines, MIF is ubiquitously present in the circulation and tissue of healthy subjects. We recently described a previously unrecognized, disease-related isoform of MIF, designated oxMIF, which is present in the circulation of patients with different inflammatory diseases. In this article, we report that oxMIF is also linked to different solid tumors as it is specifically expressed in tumor tissue from patients with colorectal, pancreatic, ovarian and lung cancer. Furthermore, oxMIF can be specifically targeted by a subset of phage display-derived fully human, monoclonal anti-MIF antibodies (mAbs) that were shown to neutralize pro-tumorigenic activities of MIF in vivo. We further demonstrate that anti-oxMIF mAbs sensitize human cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3, A2780 and A2780ADR) to the action of cytotoxic drugs (mitoxantrone, cisplatin and doxorubicin) in vitro and in an A2780 xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. We conclude that oxMIF is the disease related isoform of MIF in solid tumors and a potential new diagnostic marker and drug target in cancer. PMID:27636991

  14. Potential usefulness of biological markers in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, F.

    1987-12-01

    Substantial data have been generated during the last 5 years in experimental systems and human populations which shed light on the potential usefulness of biological markers in human cancer risk assessment. Following a brief review of overall progress to date in the biomonitoring of human populations, this paper turns to the growing body of data regarding carcinogen-DNA and protein adducts as illustrative markers of biologically effective dose of carcinogens. The data base illustrates considerable human interindividual variation in binding and the presence of significant background levels of adducts-both of which support the absence of human population thresholds for exposure to carcinogens. The contribution of adduct data to our understanding of the shape of low-dose-response curve and the reliability of interspecies extrapolation, as well as the relevance of adducts to cancer risk, are also discussed. Even though adducts can now be useful in hazard identification or qualitative risk assessment,more research is needed before they can serve as quantitative predictors of human cancer risk.

  15. Tumor Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Richard E.

    2000-04-18

    Veterinary oncology has seen tremendous growth since the first textbook devoted to the subject in the late 1970s. Cancer is usually at the top of the list when owners ask about health concerns for their pets (and it remains the leading cause of death among dogs and cats). The volume, Veterinary Oncology Secrets, joins others in the series by presenting in question and answer format the type of information so important to veterinary students, interns and residents, general practitioners, and specialists in a number of clinical fields.

  16. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis and to assess response to treatment Nuclear matrix protein 22 Cancer type: Bladder cancer Tissue analyzed: ... are turning to proteomics (the study of protein structure, function, and patterns of expression) in hopes of ...

  17. Detection of multiple tumor markers using ultra-long carbon nanotube devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hye-Mi; Park, Dong-Won; Kim, Beom Soo; Kong, Ki-Jeong; Buh, Gyoung-Ho; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O.; Kong, Jing

    2008-03-01

    For the simultaneous detection of multiple tumor markers, we have fabricated ultra-long carbon nanotube sensors that can detect carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), simultaneously. Ultra-long carbon nanotubes, several millimeters long, were grown by ethanol CVD, and fabricated as FET sensors by using conventional photolithography. To functionalize each segment of a single ultra-long nanotube device with multiple-tumor markers, we first functionalize the entire device with CDI-Tween 20 linking molecules, and then immobilized CEA and PSA antibodies using the microfluidic channel. The electrical conductance from CEA-antibody functionalized and PSA-antibody functionalized segment of a ultra-long carbon nanotube device was monitored simultaneously with Ag/AgCl reference electrode as a liquid gate. We will discuss the advantages of long-nanotube device in detail.

  18. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes for the detection of tumor markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Ping; Tu, Datao; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Xueyuan

    2015-02-01

    Sensitive and specific biodetection of tumor markers is essential for early-stage cancer diagnosis and therapy, and will ultimately increase the patient survival rate. As a new generation of luminescent bioprobes, lanthanide (Ln3+)-doped inorganic luminescent nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest for a variety of biomedical applications due to their superior physicochemical properties. In this feature article, we provide a brief overview of the most recent advances in the development of Ln3+-doped luminescent nano-bioprobes and their promising applications for in vitro detection of tumor markers with an emphasis on the establishment of state-of-the-art assay techniques, such as heterogeneous time-resolved (TR) luminescent bioassay, dissolution-enhanced luminescent bioassay, upconversion (UC) luminescent bioassay, homogeneous TR Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and UC-FRET bioassays. Some future prospects and efforts towards this emerging field are also envisioned.

  19. Optoelectrofluidic sandwich immunoassays for detection of human tumor marker using surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Chon, Hyangah; Choo, Jaebum; Park, Je-Kyun

    2010-09-15

    A sandwich immunoassay is a powerful tool for identifying a specific substance in a biological sample. However, its heterogeneous strategy always requires repetitive liquid handlings and long processing time. Here an optoelectrofluidic immunoassay platform for simple, fast, and automated detection of human tumor marker based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been developed. By using a conventional optoelectrofluidic device and a liquid crystal display module, simple and quantitative detection of human tumor marker, alpha-fetoprotein, in a ∼500 nL sample droplet has been automatically conducted with lower detection limit of about 0.1 ng/mL within 5 min. This study depicts the first practical application, for protein detection, of the optoelectrofluidic manipulation technology. This image-driven immunoassay platform opens a new way for simple, fast, automated, and highly sensitive detection of antigens.

  20. Ultrasensitive Luminescent In Vitro Detection for Tumor Markers Based on Inorganic Lanthanide Nano‐Bioprobes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Shanyong; Xu, Jin; Liu, Yongsheng; Huang, Ping; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasensitive and accurate detection of tumor markers is of vital importance for the screening or diagnosis of cancers at their early stages and for monitoring cancer relapse after surgical resection. Inorganic lanthanide (Ln3+) nanoparticles (NPs), owing to their superior physicochemical characteristics, are regarded as a new generation of luminescent nano‐bioprobes in the field of cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this progress report, a focus is set on our recent efforts on the development of inorganic Ln3+‐NPs as efficient luminescent nano‐bioprobes for the ultrasensitive in vitro biodetection of tumor markers, with an emphasis on the dissolution‐enhanced luminescent bioassay (DELBA), an emerging technique recently developed toward practical medical applications. PMID:27980996

  1. Ulex europaeus I lectin as a marker for tumors derived from endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, M; Holthofer, H; Lehto, V P; Miettinen, A; Virtanen, I

    1983-01-01

    Some skin and soft tumors, which generally are assumed to be derived from endothelial cells or blood vessels, were characterized with fluorochrome-labeled Ulex europaeus I agglutinin (UEA I), recently shown to bind specifically to endothelial cells in various normal human tissues. The staining pattern was compared with that obtained with immunostaining using antibodies against factor-VIII-related antigen (FVIII-RAG), a known marker for endothelial cells. The results showed that UEA-I is a specific and a more sensitive marker for the endothelial cells in benign vascular lesions as compared with anti-FVIII-RAG. UEA-I also stained many neoplastic cells of endothelial sarcomas, which generally were negative for FVIII-RAG. Melanomas, anaplastic carcinomas, and other types of sarcomas were negative for both UEA-I and FVIII-RAG. The results suggest that UEA-I lectin is a specific and sensitive adjunct tool in demonstrating endothelial cells and endothelial derivation of human tumors.

  2. Cell-free methylation markers with diagnostic and prognostic potential in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chang-Yi; Chen, Shih-Ya; Peng, Hui-Ling; Kan, Pu-Yeh; Chang, Wan-Chi; Yen, Chia-Jui

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly malignant tumor with poor prognosis and high mortality. There is a dearth of effective early diagnostic tools, so liver resection surgery and liver transplantation are the only effective medical treatments. The most commonly used marker for HCC detection is serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP), which has low sensitivity and specificity. Because aberrant DNA methylation of genes and miRNAs occurs early in most cancers, we explored whether circulating methylation markers could be promising clinical tools for HCC diagnosis. Using a whole-genome approach, we identified many hyper-methylated miRNAs in HCC. Furthermore, three abnormally methylated genes and one miRNA were combined to establish a methylation predictive model and tested for its diagnostic and prognostic potential in HCC. Using plasma samples, the predictive model exhibited high sensitivity and specificity (> 80%) for HBV-related HCC. Most importantly, nearly 75% of patients who could not be diagnosed with AFP at 20 ng/mL were detected by this model. Further, the predictive model exhibited an exceedingly high ability to predict 5-year overall survival in HCC patients. These data demonstrate the high diagnostic and prognostic potential of methylation markers in the plasma of HCC patients. PMID:28031532

  3. Dynamic studies of positron-emitting putative tumor marker /sup 132/Cs in mice show differential tumor and regional uptake

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, J.S.; Durocher, J.J.; Bose, R.; Gusdal, M.I.; Sharma, G.P.; Pinsky, C.; Gallop, D.

    1985-01-01

    Positron-emitting /sup 132/Cs (t1/2 = 6.47 days) was generated from stable /sup 133/CsCl via the /sup 133/Cs (p,pn) /sup 132/Cs reaction. BALB/c mice, bearing implanted MT296 mammary tumors, were given 4.6 mEq kg-1 of /sup 132/CsCl via a single intraperitoneal injection. Postinjection uptake of /sup 132/Cs into body regions was monitored in vivo with external detectors. Positron emission from the tumor region was continuously greater than that from the head, the numerical ratio of mean emission intensities being fourfold at 10 min postinjection. Tissues excised from these mice postmortem showed sequence of relative tissue cesium uptake rates to be kidney 1.8, small intestine 1.7, tumor 1.0, skin 0.75, liver 0.75, skeletal muscle 0.4, and brain 0.28. Comparative studies with multiple injections of stable cesium and rubidium showed this sequence to be ion-specific. These observations suggest that positron-emitting isotopes of cesium could provide useful markers for tumors of several tissues.

  4. Tyrosine kinase A receptor (trkA): a potential marker in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Verónica; Gabler, Fernando; Muñoz, Marcela; Yazigi, Roberto; Paredes, Alfonso; Selman, Alberto; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the role of trkA receptor as a potential tumor marker in serous epithelial ovarian cancer and its relationship with the angiogenic factors expression as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). Additionally, to examine whether NGF and VEGF secreted by epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) explants and from epithelial ovarian cancer cell line (A2780) are involved in the process of angiogenesis, such as cellular proliferation, migration and differentiation of the human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). The mRNA levels of VEGF, NGF and trkA receptors were measured using PCR in 60 ovarian samples. Cellular localization and semi-quantitative estimation of VEGF, NGF, total trkA and p-trkA was performed using IHC in epithelial cells. NGF, total trkA and p-trkA protein were also evaluated in endothelial cells from the same tissues. Human endothelial cell line EA.hy926 was cultured with conditioned media obtained from both EOC explants and from the A2780 cell line, with or without NGF stimulus. Significantly higher levels of NGF, total trkA and p-trkA protein expressions were observed in epithelial and endothelial cells in poorly differentiated EOC versus normal ovary. Interestingly, the p-trkA receptor expression level showed the most significant difference and its presence was only found in borderline tumor and EOC samples indicating the importance of trkA receptor in EOC as a potential tumor marker. A significant increase in proliferation, migration and differentiation of EA.hy926 cells was observed with NGF, and this effect was significantly reverted when NGF was immuno-blocked and when a trkA inhibitor was used, showing that NGF is an important angiogenic factor in EOC by activating its trkA receptor. These results indicate that p-trkA may be considered as a new potential tumor marker in EOC, and that NGF may also act as a direct angiogenic factor in EOC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunohistochemistry as potential diagnostic pitfall in the most common solid tumors of children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Magro, Gaetano; Longo, Francesca Romana; Angelico, Giuseppe; Spadola, Saveria; Amore, Flavia Francesca; Salvatorelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Making a correct diagnosis when dealing with a small round blue cell tumor (SRBCT) of children and adolescents may be relatively straightforward if the tumor arises in the typical clinical setting and the classic pathologic features are all recognizable. However it is widely known that diagnostic difficulties may arise because of: (i) many tumors share overlapping morphological and/or immunohistochemical features; (ii) considerable clinical, pathologic, and immunohistochemical variations do exist; (iii) the increasing use of small biopsies in daily practice makes the diagnosis of these neoplasms more challenging. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analyses are currently mandatory in establishing the correct diagnosis. In this regard there is the need to identify more sensitive and specific immunomarkers useful in the distinction of the several tumor entities. Over the last decades, several markers, such as CD99, WT1 protein, desmin, myogenin, NB84, and INI1 have been identified, providing a considerable help in recognition of the most common solid tumors (ESW/pPNET, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor, desmoplastic small round cell tumor; malignant rhabdoid tumor) in children and adolescents. However, at the same time, their unusual, unexpected expression can result in a misinterpretation of the immunohistochemical results, especially by pathologists who are not familiar with oncologic pediatric pathology. Therefore the present review focuses on the potential immunohistochemical pitfalls which should be kept in mind by pathologists to prevent diagnostic errors when dealing with SRBCTs.

  6. RNA-binding protein LIN28 is a marker for testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dengfeng; Allan, Robert W; Cheng, Liang; Peng, Yan; Guo, Charles C; Dahiya, Neha; Akhi, Shirin; Li, Jianping

    2011-05-01

    LIN28 is an RNA-binding protein involved in maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. Using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, we performed immunohistochemical staining of LIN28 in 103 primary and 81 metastatic testicular germ cell tumors (54 intratubular germ cell neoplasias, unclassified type; 49 primary and 20 metastatic classic seminomas; 35 primary and 24 metastatic embryonal carcinomas; 35 primary and 15 metastatic yolk sac tumors; 23 primary and 12 metastatic teratomas; 6 primary and 10 metastatic choriocarcinomas; and 5 spermatocytic seminomas). The percentage of tumor cell stained was scored as 0 (0%), 1+ (≤30%), 2+ (31%-60%), 3+ (61%-90%), and 4+ (>90%). We stained LIN28 in 327 non-germ cell tumors to determine its specificity. We also compared LIN28 with SALL4 (Sal-like 4) and OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4) in all germ cell tumors. The staining was cytoplasmic for LIN28 and nuclear for SALL4 and OCT4. Strong 4+ LIN28 staining was seen in all 54 intratubular germ cell neoplasias, 59 embryonal carcinomas, and 50 yolk sac tumors. Positive LIN28 staining was seen in all 69 classic seminomas (1+ in 3, 3+ in 3, and 4+ in 63) (63, strong). Variable staining of LIN28 was seen in 10 of 35 teratomas (1+ to 3+, weak to strong intensity), 12 of 16 choriocarcinomas (1+ to 4+, weak to strong intensity), and 1 of 5 spermatocytic seminomas (2+, weak). Only 10 of 327 non-germ cell tumors showed 1+ weak LIN28 staining. Therefore, LIN28 is a highly sensitive marker for testicular intratubular germ cell neoplasias, classic seminomas, embryonal carcinomas, and yolk sac tumors with relatively high specificity. LIN28 can be used as a diagnostic marker for these tumors and has demonstrated a similar level of diagnostic utility as SALL4 (except for a few classic seminomas), although it does not show an advantage over SALL4. The major advantage of LIN28 over OCT4 is in diagnosing yolk sac tumors (yolk sac tumors negative for OCT4

  7. Classification of circulating tumor cells by epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiyang; Liu, Suyan; Liu, Zhiming; Huang, Jiefeng; Pu, Xiaoyu; Li, Jing; Yang, Dinghua; Deng, Haijun; Yang, Ning; Xu, Jiasen

    2015-01-01

    In cancer, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is associated with metastasis. Characterizing EMT phenotypes in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been challenging because epithelial marker-based methods have typically been used for the isolation and detection of CTCs from blood samples. The aim of this study was to use the optimized CanPatrol CTC enrichment technique to classify CTCs using EMT markers in different types of cancers. The first step of this technique was to isolate CTCs via a filter-based method; then, an RNA in situ hybridization (RNA-ISH) method based on the branched DNA signal amplification technology was used to classify the CTCs according to EMT markers. Our results indicated that the efficiency of tumor cell recovery with this technique was at least 80%. When compared with the non-optimized method, the new method was more sensitive and more CTCs were detected in the 5-ml blood samples. To further validate the new method, 164 blood samples from patients with liver, nasopharyngeal, breast, colon, gastric cancer, or non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were collected for CTC isolation and characterization. CTCs were detected in 107 (65%) of 164 blood samples, and three CTC subpopulations were identified using EMT markers, including epithelial CTCs, biophenotypic epithelial/mesenchymal CTCs, and mesenchymal CTCs. Compared with the earlier stages of cancer, mesenchymal CTCs were more commonly found in patients in the metastatic stages of the disease in different types of cancers. Circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) with a mesenchymal phenotype were also detected in the metastatic stages of cancer. Classifying CTCs by EMT markers helps to identify the more aggressive CTC subpopulation and provides useful evidence for determining an appropriate clinical approach. This method is suitable for a broad range of carcinomas.

  8. Asymmetric Meckel Cave Enlargement: A Potential Marker of PHACES Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wright, J N; Wycoco, V

    2017-06-01

    PHACES syndrome is a complex of morphologic abnormalities of unknown cause and includes posterior fossa abnormalities; head and neck infantile hemangiomas; arterial, cardiac, and eye anomalies; and sternal or abdominal wall defects. Accurate identification of the syndrome is important for optimal treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of asymmetric Meckel cave enlargement, a potential novel imaging marker, in a population of patients referred for evaluation of possible PHACES syndrome. Eighty-five patients referred for neuroimaging evaluation of possible PHACES syndrome were identified and stratified on the basis of their ultimate clinical PHACES diagnosis categorization into PHACES, possible PHACES, or not PHACES. MR imaging studies were subsequently reviewed for the presence or absence of unilateral Meckel cave enlargement, with the reviewer blinded to the ultimate PHACES syndrome categorization. Twenty-five of 85 patients (29%) were ultimately categorized as having PHACES or possible PHACES according to consensus guidelines. Asymmetric Meckel cave enlargement was present in 76% (19/25) of these patients and in 82% (19/23) of only those patients with definite PHACES. This finding was present in none of the 60 patients determined not to have PHACES syndrome. In 7/19 patients (37%) with this finding, subtle MR imaging abnormalities consistent with PHACES were missed on the initial MR imaging interpretation. Asymmetric Meckel cave enlargement was a common feature of patients with PHACES in our cohort and may serve as a novel imaging marker. Increased awareness of this imaging feature has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of PHACES. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Evaluation of inter- and intrafractional motion of liver tumors using interstitial markers and implantable electromagnetic radiotransmitters in the context of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) - the ESMERALDA trial.

    PubMed

    Habermehl, Daniel; Naumann, Patrick; Bendl, Rolf; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-07-14

    With the development of more conformal and precise radiation techniques such as Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) and Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT), patients with hepatic tumors could be treated with high local doses by sparing normal liver tissue. However, frequently occurring large HCC tumors are still a dosimetric challenge in spite of modern high sophisticated RT modalities. This interventional clinical study has been set up to evaluate the value of different fiducial markers, and to use the modern imaging methods for further treatment optimization using physical and informatics approaches. Surgically implanted radioopaque or electromagnetic markers are used to detect tumor local-ization during radiotherapy. The required markers for targeting and observation during RT can be implanted in a previously defined optimal position during the oncologically indicated operation. If there is no indication for a surgical resection or open biopsy, markers may be inserted into the liver or tumor tissue by using ultrasound-guidance. Primary study aim is the detection of the patients' anatomy at the time of RT by observation of the marker position during the indicated irradiation (IGRT). Secondary study aims comprise detection and recording of 3D liver and tumor motion during RT. Furthermore, the study will help to develop technical strategies and mechanisms based on the recorded information on organ motion to avoid inaccurate dose application resulting from fast organ motion and deformation. This is an open monocentric non-randomized, prospective study for the evaluation of organ motion using interstitial markers or implantable radiotransmitter. The trial will evaluate the full potential of different fiducial markers to further optimize treatment of moving targets, with a special focus on liver lesions.

  10. Analysis of Contractility and Invasion Potential of Two Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Rajakylä, Kaisa; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Tojkander, Sari

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells are surrounded by a mechanically and biochemically distinct microenvironment that undergoes dynamic changes throughout the neoplastic progression. During this progression, some cancer cells acquire abnormal characteristics that potentiate their escape from the primary tumor site, to establish secondary tumors in distant organs. Recent studies with several human cancer cell lines have shown that the altered physical properties of tumor cells, such as their ability to apply high traction forces to the surroundings, are directly linked with their potential to invade and metastasize. To test the hypothetical interconnection between actomyosin-mediated traction forces and invasion potential within 3D-microenvironment, we utilized two canine mammary tumor cell lines with different contractile properties. These cell lines, canine mammary tumor (CMT)-U27 and CMT-U309, were found to have distinct expression patterns of lineage-specific markers and organization of actin-based structures. In particular, CMT-U309 carcinoma cells were typified by thick contractile actomyosin bundles that exerted high forces to their environment, as measured by traction force microscopy. These high contractile forces also correlated with the prominent invasiveness of the CMT-U309 cell line. Furthermore, we found high contractility and 3D-invasion potential to be dependent on the activity of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), as blocking AMPK signaling was found to reverse both of these features. Taken together, our findings implicate that actomyosin forces correlate with the invasion potential of the studied cell lines.

  11. Analysis of Contractility and Invasion Potential of Two Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Kaisa; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Tojkander, Sari

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells are surrounded by a mechanically and biochemically distinct microenvironment that undergoes dynamic changes throughout the neoplastic progression. During this progression, some cancer cells acquire abnormal characteristics that potentiate their escape from the primary tumor site, to establish secondary tumors in distant organs. Recent studies with several human cancer cell lines have shown that the altered physical properties of tumor cells, such as their ability to apply high traction forces to the surroundings, are directly linked with their potential to invade and metastasize. To test the hypothetical interconnection between actomyosin-mediated traction forces and invasion potential within 3D-microenvironment, we utilized two canine mammary tumor cell lines with different contractile properties. These cell lines, canine mammary tumor (CMT)-U27 and CMT-U309, were found to have distinct expression patterns of lineage-specific markers and organization of actin-based structures. In particular, CMT-U309 carcinoma cells were typified by thick contractile actomyosin bundles that exerted high forces to their environment, as measured by traction force microscopy. These high contractile forces also correlated with the prominent invasiveness of the CMT-U309 cell line. Furthermore, we found high contractility and 3D-invasion potential to be dependent on the activity of 5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), as blocking AMPK signaling was found to reverse both of these features. Taken together, our findings implicate that actomyosin forces correlate with the invasion potential of the studied cell lines. PMID:28955712

  12. Ki-67 is a prognostic marker for hormone receptor positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, M E; García-Gómez, J; Alves, M T; Paradela, A; García-Mata, J; García-Caballero, T

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the utility of Ki67 as a prognostic marker in Luminal B node-negative breast cancer patients. We identified 888 patients with invasive breast carcinomas who underwent surgery between 1997 and 2004. Several classical factors were collected: age, tumor size, node involvement, tumor grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 and Ki-67 expression. We analyzed if these parameters could be considered as a prognostic factor. In early Luminal B group, we investigated which of the following biological features provide information about bad prognosis: lack of progesterone receptor expression, HER2 overexpression/amplification or high Ki-67 value. The majority of patients were alive and without relapse of tumor at the moment of the analysis (70 %). The prognostic factors founded in multivariate analysis were: tumor size, node involvement, grade 3 and Ki-67 expression. When we stratified the sample by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tumor subtypes, we assessed 680 patients and we observed 191 Luminal B tumors. The biological parameter related to the worst survival in absence of nodal involvement was Ki-67 value. Ki-67 represents an additional predictor of survival in Luminal B node negative breast cancer. Conversely, neither Progesterone-receptor nor HER2 status proved prognostic significance in this group in our study.

  13. Ubiquitin: a potential cerebrospinal fluid progression marker in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Vinther-Jensen, T; Simonsen, A H; Budtz-Jørgensen, E; Hjermind, L E; Nielsen, J E

    2015-10-01

    Finding early and dynamic biomarkers in Huntington's disease is a key to understanding the early pathology of Huntington's disease and potentially to tracking disease progression. This would benefit the future evaluation of potential neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies, as well as aid in identifying an optimal time point for initiating a potential therapeutic intervention. This explorative proteomics study evaluated cerebrospinal fluid from 94 Huntington's disease gene-expansion carriers (39 premanifest and 55 manifest) and 27 Huntington's disease gene-expansion negative individuals using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Differences in peak intensity from SELDI-TOF spectra were evaluated. Levels of 10 peaks were statistically significantly different between manifest gene-expansion carriers and controls. One of them identified as ubiquitin was shown to be dependent on the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale Total Functional Capacity, a pseudo-measure of disease severity (P = 0.001), and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (0.04) in manifest and CAG-age product score (P = 0.019) in all gene-expansion carriers. Multiple studies have shown that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in Huntington's disease pathogenesis and understanding of this involvement may have therapeutic potential in humans. This is the first study on cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in Huntington's disease. Furthermore it is shown that ubiquitin increases with disease progression and CAG-age product score and therefore may have the potential as a Huntington's disease progression marker, also prior to motor onset. © 2015 EAN.

  14. CA9 as a molecular marker for differential diagnosis of cystic renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Guorong; Bilal, Issam; Gentil-Perret, Anne; Feng, Gang; Zhao, An; Peoc'h, Michel; Genin, Christian; Tostain, Jacques; Gigante, Marc

    2012-01-01

    CA9 is proven to be a powerful marker for clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The studies on CA9 have been limited to solid renal cell carcinomas (RCC). We have conducted a study of CA9 expression in renal cystic tumors. The purpose of the present study was to extend the utility of CA9 for cystic renal tumors. Immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect CA9 expression in cystic renal tumors. Forty-three cystic renal tumors (22 benign and 21 malignant) were included for the immunohistochemical staining. Thirty-six patients with a cystic renal mass (20 malignant and 16 benign cystic tumors) were studied to measure CA9 level in the fluid by ELISA. Sixteen cysts (9 malignant and 7 benign cysts) were subjected both to immunohistochemistry and CA9 measurement in the fluid. Using immunohistochemical staining, all the benign cystic renal tumors including the 18 simple cyst and 4 benign multilocular cystic nephromas did not express CA9. All 13 cystic clear cell RCC were scored as strong staining for CA9. For 8 multilocular clear cell RCC, 7 were scored as strong staining for CA9 and the other one was negative. There was a significant difference in positive percentage (P < 0.001) between the 2 groups of malignant and benign cysts. For the 16 benign cysts, the mean concentration of CA9 in the fluid of cyst was 162 ± 133 pg/ml (median: 0 pg/ml; range: 0-2140 pg/ml). For the 20 malignant renal cystic tumors, the mean concentration of CA9 in the fluid of cyst was 2043 ± 62 pg/ml (median: 2,140 pg/ml; range: 1,112-2,140 pg/ml). There was a significant difference in mean concentration of CA9 between the two groups of malignant and benign cysts (P < 0.001). The presence or absence of CA9 expression measured by immunohistochemistry and ELISA test was concordant in 14 out of 16 cases (88%). Malignant cystic renal tumors expressed strongly CA9 while the benign renal cysts did not express CA9. CA9 can be detected in the fluid of malignant

  15. Peptide Agonists of Vasopressin V2 Receptor Reduce Expression of Neuroendocrine Markers and Tumor Growth in Human Lung and Prostate Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pifano, Marina; Garona, Juan; Capobianco, Carla S.; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Alonso, Daniel F.; Ripoll, Giselle V.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies that express neuropeptides as synaptophysin, chromogranin A (CgA), and specific neuronal enolase (NSE), among others. Vasopressin (AVP) is a neuropeptide with an endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine effect in normal and pathological tissues. AVP receptors are present in human lung, breast, pancreatic, colorectal, and gastrointestinal tumors. While AVP V1 receptors are associated with stimulation of cellular proliferation, AVP V2 receptor (V2r) is related to antiproliferative effects. Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a synthetic analog of AVP that acts as a selective agonist for the V2r, which shows antitumor properties in breast and colorectal cancer models. Recently, we developed a derivative of dDAVP named [V4Q5]dDAVP, which presents higher antitumor effects in a breast cancer model compared to the parental compound. The goal of present work was to explore the antitumor properties of the V2r agonist dDAVP and its novel analog [V4Q5]dDAVP on aggressive human lung (NCI-H82) and prostate cancer (PC-3) cell lines with neuroendocrine (NE) characteristics. We study the presence of specific NE markers (CgA and NSE) and V2r expression in NCI-H82 and PC-3. Both cell lines express high levels of NE markers NSE and CgA but then incubation with dDAVP diminished expression levels of both markers. DDAVP and [V4Q5]dDAVP significantly reduced proliferation, doubling time, and migration in both tumor cell cultures. [V4Q5]dDAVP analog showed a higher cytostatic effect than dDAVP, on cellular proliferation in the NCI-H82 cell line. Silencing of V2r using small interfering RNA significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP on NCI-H82 cell proliferation. We, preliminarily, explored the in vivo effect of dDAVP and [V4Q5]dDAVP on NCI-H82 small cell lung cancer xenografts. Treated tumors (0.3 μg kg−1, thrice a week) grew slower in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. In this work, we demonstrated

  16. An approach of selecting appropriate markers from the primary tumor to enable detection of circulating tumor cells in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Warawdekar, Ujjwala M; Sirajuddin, Mohamed M; Pramesh, Conjeevaram S; Mistry, Rajesh C

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare and difficult to isolate, and require selecting minimal but appropriate markers. The aim of this study was to identify markers in the primary non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue to guide isolation of CTCs from the peripheral blood of patients with lung cancer. The expression of CK-19, EGFR and MUC-1 was evaluated by RT-PCR in the NSCLC tumor and paired adjacent normal tissues from 27 patients. The normal cytology, and the neoplastic and fibrotic pathology of the tissue were analyzed by histochemistry. The expression of the markers was analyzed in relation to the stage and grade of disease. Expression analysis showed that 42% of the tumors were positive for CK-19, whereas 85% for both EGFR and MUC-1. Ninety two percent of the tumors expressed any one marker. All (100%) adjacent normal tissues were CK-19 negative, 52% EGFR negative and 44% MUC-1 negative. CK-19 expression was specific to the tumor tissue but it was expressed by only 42% of them, manifesting a need for at least three markers to guide the detection of CTCs isolated from the peripheral blood of NSCLC patients. Histopathology demonstrated that 58% were adenocarcinomas, 35% squamous cell carcinomas and 7% had mixed pathology. This data serves as a prelude and emphasizes the importance of selecting markers expressed in the primary tumor tissue to facilitate and enable enumeration of CTCs.

  17. Biological treatment for liver tumor and new potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Grizzi, Fabio; Wachtel, Mitchell S; Jenkins, Marjorie; Ferrari, Raffaele; Cobos, Everardo; Frezza, Eldo E

    2008-03-01

    The search for effective and efficacious therapy for liver tumor was started many years ago and is still ongoing. Despite all of the surgical advances, much work needs to be done to improve understanding of the biology of the tumor and its treatment. The rules of hepatic surgery are changing because of two recent major trends: (1) technical simplification, and (2) the endeavor to treat an increasing number of patients. T lymphocytes are potent cellular effectors of the immune system and possess a memory that responds to rechallenge by the same antigen. Being more specific and less toxic than chemotherapy, tumor infusion could be an ideal adjuvant therapy for patients with primary and secondary liver malignancies. Moreover, tumor cell vaccines have demonstrated efficacy in terms of minimal residual disease and are being investigated, but the requirement for an adequate supple of autologos tumor may limit the general applicability of these approaches. Various studies have demonstrated the aberrant expression of germ-cell proteins called cancer-testis (CT) antigens in liver neoplastic cells. Their selective normal-tissue expression makes them ideal antigens for immune targeting of malignant disease. Specific expression of CT antigens also suggests their application as tumor markers to detect circulating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, as an adjuvant diagnostic tool, and as indicators for recurrence and prognosis. Biological therapy is now generating more clinical trials. More studies need to be performed and further experiments need to be done, although currently this seems a valid pathway for the treatment of liver cancer. Cytoreduction treatment of liver tumor and the vaccine might be the future of the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumor.

  18. Induction of short-term markers of tumor promotion by organic peroxides.

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Conti, I; Viaje, A; Chesner, J; Conti, C; Slaga, T J

    1991-04-01

    Experiments from different laboratories have shown that benzoyl peroxide (BzPo) and other organic peroxides are effective tumor promoters in the mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis system. In the present paper we have studied the short-term effect of six other organic peroxides, which have not been previously assayed as skin tumor promoters. These compounds were chosen for their molecular diversity, the type of radical predicted to be formed, solubility and availability. The parameters evaluated in this study include a series of short-term markers of tumor promotion, hyperplasia, induction of dark basal keratinocytes and induction of ornithine decarboxylase activity. After single applications the biological activity of the compounds was: m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid greater than di-m-methylbenzoyl peroxide greater than dicumyl peroxide greater than O,O-t-butyl-O-(2-ethylhexyl)mono-peroxycarbonate greater than benzoyl peroxide greater than di-m-chlorobenzoyl peroxide greater than di-t-butyl peroxide greater than t-butyl hydroperoxide. After multiple applications, the order of activity of the compounds was: dicumyl peroxide greater than di-m-methyl-benzoyl peroxide greater than O,O-t-butyl-O-(2-ethylhexyl)monoperoxy carbonate greater than m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid greater than di-m-chlorobenzoyl peroxide greater than t-butyl hydroperoxide greater than benzoyl peroxide greater than di-t-butyl peroxide. The difference of activity among the different compounds did not seem to correlate directly with the chemical stability of the compound; it is more likely that the activity depends on different factors such as percutaneous absorption, metabolism, and the rate of free radical formation in vivo. The data presented here further support the association between free radicals and tumor promotion since all of the compounds, with the exception of one, were active in inducing the short-term markers of tumor promotion. It will also establish conditions for future tumor experiments.

  19. Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potentials in Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Sari; Lenko, Hanna L; Oja, Sakari; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Pietilä, Timo; Mäkipernaa, Anne

    2016-07-01

    This population-based cross-sectional study evaluates the clinical value of electroretinography and visual evoked potentials in childhood brain tumor survivors. A flash electroretinography and a checkerboard reversal pattern visual evoked potential (or alternatively a flash visual evoked potential) were done for 51 survivors (age 3.8-28.7 years) after a mean follow-up time of 7.6 (1.5-15.1) years. Abnormal electroretinography was obtained in 1 case, bilaterally delayed abnormal visual evoked potentials in 22/51 (43%) cases. Nine of 25 patients with infratentorial tumor location, and altogether 12 out of 31 (39%) patients who did not have tumors involving the visual pathways, had abnormal visual evoked potentials. Abnormal electroretinographies are rarely observed, but abnormal visual evoked potentials are common even without evident anatomic lesions in the visual pathway. Bilateral changes suggest a general and possibly multifactorial toxic/adverse effect on the visual pathway. Electroretinography and visual evoked potential may have clinical and scientific value while evaluating long-term effects of childhood brain tumors and tumor treatment.

  20. MAGEA4 expression in bone and soft tissue tumors: its utility as a target for immunotherapy and diagnostic marker combined with NY-ESO-1.

    PubMed

    Iura, Kunio; Kohashi, Kenichi; Ishii, Takeaki; Maekawa, Akira; Bekki, Hirofumi; Otsuka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-07-26

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens have promise as targets for immunotherapy, because of their restricted expression in tumor or testis tissue. MAGEA4 is both a MAGE family member and a CT antigen, and has attracted attention as a potential immunotherapeutic target. We investigated MAGEA4 expression by immunohistochemistry in bone and soft tissue tumor specimens that consisted of 35 malignant or intermediate and 24 benign histological subtypes, in order to evaluate its possible utility as an immunotherapy target and its potential use as a diagnostic marker when combined with another CT antigen, NY-ESO-1. Among these tumors, MAGEA4 was detected in 82.2% of synovial sarcomas, 67.7% of myxoid liposarcomas, 43.8% of osteosarcomas, 41.4% of angiosarcomas, 24.6% of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), and 21.4% of chondrosarcomas. NY-ESO-1 expression was found in 88.2% of myxoid liposarcomas, 61.1% of synovial sarcomas, 31.3% of osteosarcomas, 21.4% of pleomorphic liposarcomas, 16.7% of desmoplastic small round cell tumors, and 14.3% of chondrosarcomas. Benign tumors and non-tumorous tissue, except for testis tissue, did not express MAGEA4 or NY-ESO-1. Combined use of MAGEA4 and NY-ESO-1 increased the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values for distinguishing synovial sarcoma from spindle cell tumors and other mimicking tumors, compared to individual use of MAGEA4 or NY-ESO-1. Our results support the immunotherapy targeting MAGEA4 or NY-ESO-1 can be an ancillary therapy in the above-mentioned tumors, and the potential utility of MAGEA4 as an ancillary diagnostic marker for synovial sarcoma combined with NY-ESO-1.

  1. Differentiation between borderline and benign ovarian tumors: combined analysis of MRI with tumor markers for large cystic masses (≥5 cm).

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Yoon; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul

    2016-05-01

    There is overlap in imaging features between borderline and benign ovarian tumors. To analyze diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with tumor markers for differentiating borderline from benign ovarian tumor. Ninety-nine patient with MRI and surgically confirmed ovarian tumors 5 cm or larger (borderline, n = 37; benign, n = 62) were included. On MRI, tumor size, septal number (0; 1-4; 5 or more), and presence of solid portion such as papillary projection or septal thickening 0.5 cm or larger were investigated. Serum tumor markers (carbohydrate antigen 125 [CA 125] and CA 19-9) were recorded. Multivariate analysis was conducted for assessing whether combined MRI with tumor markers could differentiate borderline from benign tumor. The diagnostic performance was also analyzed. Incidence of solid portion was 67.6% (25/37) in borderline and 3.2% (2/62) in benign tumors (P < 0.05). In all patients, without combined analysis of MRI with tumor markers, multivariate analysis revealed solid portion (P < 0.001) and CA 125 (P = 0.039) were significant for predicting borderline tumors. When combined analysis of MRI with CA 125 ((i) the presence of solid portion or (ii) CA 125 > 44.1 U/mL with septal number ≥5 for borderline tumor) is incorporated to multivariate analysis, it was only significant (P = 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of combined analysis of MRI with CA 125 were 89.1%, 91.9%, 86.8%, 93.4, and 90.9%, respectively. Combined analysis of MRI with CA 125 may allow better differentiation between borderline and benign ovarian tumor compared with MRI alone. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  2. A comparison of cancer stem cell markers and nonclassical major histocompatibility complex antigens in colorectal tumor and noncancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Özgül Özdemir, Rabia Bilge; Özdemir, Alper Tunga; Oltulu, Fatih; Kurt, Kamile; Yiğittürk, Gürkan; Kırmaz, Cengiz

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most fatal types of cancer in both women and men, and, unfortunately, patients are often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are associated with poor prognosis, metastasis, and recurrence, as well as chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Therefore, different treatment alternatives are needed to facilitate the elimination of CSCs. One such approach is immunotherapy; however, tumor cells can evade immune cells by alteration of the expression patterns of human leukocyte antigens (HLA). In this study, we immunohistochemically investigated the expression patterns of CSC-specific markers CD44, CD133, Nanog, and Oct3/4, and immunosuppressive molecules HLA-G and -E in advanced CRC tumor tissues and noncancerous colon biopsies. We found significantly increased CD44, Nanog, Oct3/4, HLA-G, and HLA-E expression in the CRC tumor tissues compared with the noncancerous colon biopsies. These findings suggest that some tumor cells may be CSC-like and that the increased expression of HLA-G and HLA-E may be considered as an immune-evasive adaptation. Therefore, the nonclassical major histocompatibility complex class Ib antigens HLA-G and HLA-E may be potential targets in the elimination of CRC-CSCs. However, more detailed studies are required to support our findings.

  3. Down-regulation of tumor endothelial marker 8 suppresses cell proliferation mediated by ERK1/2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chuangjie; Wang, Zhuo; Huang, Leilei; Bai, Lihong; Wang, Yuefeng; Liang, Yingjie; Dou, Chengyun; Wang, Liantang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) was recently suggested as a putative anti-tumor target in several types of human cancer based on its selective overexpression in tumor versus normal endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to detect the potential functions of TEM8 in osteosarcoma. Overall, TEM8 was mainly located in cytoplasm and was up-regulated in osteosarcoma compared to benign bone lesions and adjacent non tumor tissue (ANT). High TEM8 expression group had a significant lower overall survival rate than that in the low TEM8 expression group. TEM8 knock-down by siRNA or shRNA results in significant reduction of osteosarcoma cell growth and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Ablation of TEM8 led to increasing of p21 and p27 and suppression of cyclin D1 mediated by Erk1/2 activity. These findings suggest that down-regulation of TEM8 play an important role in the inhibition of tumorigenesis and development of osteosarcoma. PMID:26996335

  4. Exploring the intrinsic differences among breast tumor subtypes defined using immunohistochemistry markers based on the decision tree

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Tang, Xu-Qing; Bai, Zhonghu; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the intrinsic differences among breast cancer subtypes is of crucial importance for precise diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in diseases of high heterogeneity. The subtypes defined with several layers of information are related but not consistent, especially using immunohistochemistry markers and gene expression profiling. Here, we explored the intrinsic differences among the subtypes defined by the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 based on the decision tree. We identified 30 mRNAs and 7 miRNAs differentially expressed along the tree’s branches. The final signature panel contained 30 mRNAs, whose performance was validated using two public datasets based on 3 well-known classifiers. The network and pathway analysis were explored for feature genes, from which key molecules including FOXQ1 and SFRP1 were revealed to be densely connected with other molecules and participate in the validated metabolic pathways. Our study uncovered the differences among the four IHC-defined breast tumor subtypes at the mRNA and miRNA levels, presented a novel signature for breast tumor subtyping, and identified several key molecules potentially driving the heterogeneity of such tumors. The results help us further understand breast tumor heterogeneity, which could be availed in clinics. PMID:27786176

  5. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  6. Effect of HPV on tumor expression levels of the most commonly used markers in HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Polanska, Hana; Heger, Zbynek; Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Svobodova, Marketa; Balvan, Jan; Fojtu, Michaela; Binkova, Hana; Horakova, Zuzana; Kostrica, Rom; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene; Masarik, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 90 % of head and neck cancers are squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), and the overall 5-year survival rate is not higher than 50 %. There is much evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may influence the expression of commonly studied HNSCC markers. Our study was focused on the possible HPV-specificity of molecular markers that could be key players in important steps of cancerogenesis (MKI67, EGF, EGFR, BCL-2, BAX, FOS, JUN, TP53, MT1A, MT2A, VEGFA, FLT1, MMP2, MMP9, and POU5F). qRT-PCR analysis of these selected genes was performed on 74 biopsy samples of tumors from patients with histologically verified HNSCC (22 HPV-, 52 HPV+). Kaplan-Meier analysis was done to determine the relevance of these selected markers for HNSCC prognosis. In conclusion, our study confirms the impact of HPV infection on commonly studied HNSCC markers MT2A, MMP9, FLT1, VEGFA, and POU5F that were more highly expressed in HPV-negative HNSCC patients and also shows the relevance of studied markers in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC patients.

  7. p63 as a prognostic marker for giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Michiro; Kakizaki, Hiroshi; Okada, Kyoji; Torigoe, Tomoaki; Kusumi, Tomomi

    2013-03-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is sometimes difficult to distinguish from other giant-cell-rich tumors such as chondroblastoma (CHB) and aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). The usefulness of p63 as a diagnostic marker for GCT is controversial. While there have been no reports about p63 as a prognostic marker for local recurrence, various p63-positive rates in GCT have been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively whether p63 is useful as a diagnostic marker and/or a prognostic marker for local recurrence of GCT. This study included 36 patients diagnosed with either GCT (n = 16), CHB (n = 9), ABC (n = 7), or non-ossifying fibroma (NOF) (n = 4). p63 immunostaining was performed for all specimens. The mean p63-positive rate was compared with the four diseases and between the recurrent and non-recurrent cases of GCT. Although the mean p63-positive rate for GCT (36.3%) was statistically higher than that of all other diseases examined (CHB: 15.2%; ABC: 5.8%; NOF: 3.4%), p63 was not specific for GCT. The mean p63-positive rate for recurrent GCT cases (73.6%) was statistically higher than that for non-recurrent cases (29.1%). In the diagnosis of GCT, p63 is a useful but not a conclusive marker. However, p63 did appear to indicate the biological aggressiveness of GCT. Therefore, p63 may help surgeons to estimate the risk of recurrence after surgery and help them to choose the best treatment for each GCT case.

  8. ERG is a novel and reliable marker for endothelial cells in central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Haber, Matthew A; Iranmahboob, Amir; Thomas, Cheddhi; Liu, Mengling; Najjar, Amanda; Zagzag, David

    2015-01-01

    ETS-related gene (ERG) is a transcription factor that has been linked to angiogenesis. Very little research has been done to assess ERG expression in central nervous system (CNS) tumors. We evaluated 57 CNS tumors, including glioblastomas (GBMs) and hemangioblastomas (HBs), as well as two arteriovenous malformations and four samples of normal brain tissue with immunohistochemistry using a specific ERG rabbit monoclonal antibody. In addition, immunostains for CD31, CD34, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were performed on all samples. CD31 demonstrated variable and sometimes weak immunoreactivity for endothelial cells. Furthermore, in 1 case of a GBM, CD34 stained not only endothelial cells, but also tumor cells. In contrast, we observed that ERG was only expressed in the nuclei of endothelial cells, for example, in the hyperplastic vascular complexes that comprise the glomeruloid microvascular proliferation seen in GBMs. Conversely, α-SMA immunoreactivity was identified in the abluminal cells of these hyperplastic vessels. Quantitative evaluation with automated methodology and custom Matlab 2008b software was used to calculate percent staining of ERG in each case. We observed significantly higher quantitative expression of ERG in HBs than in other CNS tumors. Our results show that ERG is a novel, reliable, and specific marker for endothelial cells within CNS tumors that can be used to better study the process of neovascularization.

  9. Myo-inositol: a marker of reactive astrogliosis in glial tumors?

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; Raab, Peter; Franz, Kea; Zanella, Friedhelm E; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Pilatus, Ulrich

    2008-03-01

    In a prospective study, two-dimensional (1)H-MRS with TE of 30 ms was performed before surgery in 56 patients with glial brain tumors. Concentrations of myo-inositol (MI), trimethylamine (TMA) and creatine/phosphocreatine (tCr) were evaluated for the whole tumor and scaled to the normal-appearing contralateral brain tissue. To assign changes in MI to specific tissue pathology, the normalized peak and mean concentrations of MI were correlated with TMA and tCr concentrations. TMA is accepted as a marker of proliferating tumor tissue, and tCr might be a marker of reactive astrogliosis. The mean and peak concentrations of MI and tCr correlated positively (r = 0.7), but not the concentrations of MI and TMA. The absolute concentration of MI was significantly increased in all tumor tissues (5.55 +/- 2.92 mM; mean +/- SD) compared with the normal-appearing white matter (4.33 +/- 1.22 mM, p = 0.005), with the highest concentrations for gliomatoses (n = 10) and grade II oligoastrocytomas (n = 3). Significant differences (P = 0.004) between low- and high-grade astrocytomas were found for TMA (1.67 +/- 0.32 mM and 2.65 +/- 0.86 mM, respectively), but not for MI (5.92 +/- 1.98 mM and 5.49 +/- 3.27 mM, respectively). As increased MI and tCr concentrations were found in gliomatosis and other cerebral diseases associated with marked astrogliosis, this process may also be responsible for the observed changes in MI in other glial tumors. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. GLUT1 expression in malignant tumors and its use as an immunodiagnostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Kátia C; Cunha, Isabela W; Rocha, Rafael M; Ayala, Fernanda R; Cajaíba, Mariana M; Begnami, Maria D; Vilela, Rafael S; Paiva, Geise R; Andrade, Rodrigo G; Soares, Fernando A

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze glucose transporter 1 expression patterns in malignant tumors of various cell types and evaluate their diagnostic value by immunohistochemistry. INTRODUCTION: Glucose is the major source of energy for cells, and glucose transporter 1 is the most common glucose transporter in humans. Glucose transporter 1 is aberrantly expressed in several tumor types. Studies have implicated glucose transporter 1 expression as a prognostic and diagnostic marker in tumors, primarily in conjunction with positron emission tomography scan data. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter 1 was performed in tissue microarray slides, comprising 1955 samples of malignant neoplasm from different cell types. RESULTS: Sarcomas, lymphomas, melanomas and hepatoblastomas did not express glucose transporter 1. Forty-seven per cent of prostate adenocarcinomas were positive, as were 29% of thyroid, 10% of gastric and 5% of breast adenocarcinomas. Thirty-six per cent of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were positive, as were 42% of uterine cervix squamous cell carcinomas. Glioblastomas and retinoblastomas showed membranous glucose transporter 1 staining in 18.6% and 9.4% of all cases, respectively. Squamous cell carcinomas displayed membranous expression, whereas adenocarcinomas showed cytoplasmic glucose transporter 1 expression. CONCLUSION: Glucose transporter 1 showed variable expression in various tumor types. Its absence in sarcomas, melanomas, hepatoblastomas and lymphomas suggests that other glucose transporters mediate the glycolytic pathway in these tumors. The data suggest that glucose transporter 1 is a valuable immunohistochemical marker that can be used to identify patients for evaluation by positron emission tomography scan. The function of cytoplasmic glucose transporter 1 in adenocarcinomas must be further examined. PMID:21808860

  11. Evaluation of lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) as a tumor marker.

    PubMed

    López Sáez, J J; Senra-Varela, A

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is the evaluation of serum levels of lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) as a of marker cancer. This is a case-control study, and the levels of LSA were determined with blinded duplicates of cases and controls. Histologic verification of all cancer cases was used to confirm the diagnosis. The study included 135 patients with cancer (breast carcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer and gastrointestinal cancer) and 95 controls (57 normal subjects and 38 with chronic non-malignant diseases). Marker determination was done by the spectrophotometric procedure of Katopodis with resorcinol. The mean LSA level in the 57 healthy individuals was 15.09 mg/dl(95% C.I., 13.51-16.67), in the entire control group of 95 non-tumoral individuals it was 19.21 mg/dl (17.18-21.24), and in the 135 cancer patients it was 26.64 mg/dl (24.42-28.87). There was a statistically significant difference between patients with chronic non-tumoral diseases and healthy individuals (p < 0.001) and also between cancer patients and healthy individuals (p > 0.001), but not between cancer patients and patients with chronic non-tumoral diseases (p> 0.05). The mean LSA serum values related to tumor site were (mg/dl): breast cancer, 21.49; gastrointestinal tumors, 28.45; head and neck cancer, 28.61 and lung cancer, 32.54. The means according to clinical stage were: complete remission, 18.50 significantly higher than the healthy controls (p< 0.05); local disease, 23.50 (p < 0.01); locoregional disease, (p < 0.05); local disease, 23.50 (p < 0.01); locoregional disease, 27.21 (p < 0.001); metastatic disease, 34.49 (p < 0.001), and relapses, 20.87 (p< 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Tumor cell and circulating markers in melanoma: diagnosis, prognosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Kounalakis, Nicole; Goydos, James S

    2005-09-01

    The search is on for biomarkers for use in the diagnosis, staging, prognosis, and management of patients with melanoma. As with many types of cancer, the hematogenous spread of melanoma is a bad prognostic sign, and many groups have attempted to detect circulating melanoma cells in patients with different stages of melanoma. Some studies have used direct extraction of intact tumor cells from the peripheral blood and others the detection of surrogate markers of circulating melanoma cells, such as tyrosinase or MART-1. However, a correlation between the detection of intact melanoma cells in the circulation and prognosis is controversial. Many other biomarkers have also been studied, including lactate dehydrogenase, S100, TA90, and C-reactive protein. Much progress has been made, and preliminary studies have shown promise with many of these markers. Finally, the detection of tumor-specific circulating DNA has shown promise as a prognostic and diagnostic marker of disease in melanoma as well. In this review we examine the most promising biomarkers for use in patients with cutaneous melanoma.

  13. Inflammatory markers in blood and serum tumor markers predict survival in patients with epithelial appendiceal neoplasms undergoing surgical cytoreduction and intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chua, Terence C; Chong, Chanel H; Liauw, Winston; Zhao, Jing; Morris, David L

    2012-08-01

    The study examines the role inflammatory and tumor markers as biomarkers to preoperatively predict outcome in patients with epithelial appendiceal neoplasm undergoing cytoreduction and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Associations between baseline variables, tumor markers [CEA (carcinoembyronic antigen], CA125, CA199), inflammatory markers including neutrophils-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were examined in patients undergoing surgical cytoreduction and intraperitoneal chemotherapy for epithelial appendiceal neoplasm. A total of 174 patients with epithelial appendiceal neoplasm (low-grade pseudomyxoma, n = 117; appendiceal cancer, n = 57) underwent cytoreduction. On univariate analysis, all 3 inflammatory and tumor markers predicted for both PFS and OS, respectively; NLR ≤ 2.6 (P = 0.01, P = 0.002), PLR ≤ 166 (P = 0.006, P = 0.016), CRP ≤ 12.5 (P = 0.001, P = 0.008), CEA (P < 0.001, P = 0.001), CA125 (P = 0.004, P < 0.001), CA199 (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, there were no independent predictors of OS. PFS was independently associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.02), CA199 > 37 (P = 0.003), and a CRP > 12.5 (P = 0.013). A higher peritoneal cancer index (PCI > 24) was associated with elevation in CEA > 12, CA125 > 39, CA199 > 37, PLR > 166 and CRP > 12. The tumor histologic subtype was associated with CA 199 levels. The results from this investigation suggest that preoperative inflammatory markers in blood and serologic tumor markers may predict outcomes and are associated with tumor biology in patients with epithelial appendiceal neoplasm undergoing cytoreduction and intraperitoneal chemotherapy treatment.

  14. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal endocrine cells and neuroendocrine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Mashima, Hirosato; Ohno, Hideki; Yamada, Yumi; Sakai, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells along the colorectum. ► INSL5 is expressed increasingly from proximal colon to rectum. ► INSL5 co-localizes rarely with chromogranin A. ► All rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined expressed INSL5. -- Abstract: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a member of the insulin superfamily, and is a potent agonist for RXFP4. We have shown that INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells (EECs) along the colorectum with a gradient increase toward the rectum. RXFP4 is ubiquitously expressed along the digestive tract. INSL5-positive EECs have little immunoreactivity to chromogranin A (CgA) and might be a unique marker of colorectal EECs. CgA-positive EECs were distributed normally along the colorectum in INSL5 null mice, suggesting that INSL5 is not required for the development of CgA-positive EECs. Exogenous INSL5 did not affect the proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines, and chemically-induced colitis in INSL5 null mice did not show any significant changes in inflammation or mucosal healing compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, all of the rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined co-expressed INSL5 and RXFP4. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal EECs, and INSL5–RXFP4 signaling might play a role in an autocrine/paracrine fashion in the colorectal epithelium and rectal neuroendocrine tumors.

  15. Molecular markers: a potential resource for ginger genetic diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nor Asiah; Rafii, M Y; Mahmud, T M M; Hanafi, M M; Miah, Gous

    2016-12-01

    Ginger is an economically important and valuable plant around the world. Ginger is used as a food, spice, condiment, medicine and ornament. There is available information on biochemical aspects of ginger, but few studies have been reported on its molecular aspects. The main objective of this review is to accumulate the available molecular marker information and its application in diverse ginger studies. This review article was prepared by combing material from published articles and our own research. Molecular markers allow the identification and characterization of plant genotypes through direct access to hereditary material. In crop species, molecular markers are applied in different aspects and are useful in breeding programs. In ginger, molecular markers are commonly used to identify genetic variation and classify the relatedness among varieties, accessions, and species. Consequently, it provides important input in determining resourceful management strategies for ginger improvement programs. Alternatively, a molecular marker could function as a harmonizing tool for documenting species. This review highlights the application of molecular markers (isozyme, RAPD, AFLP, SSR, ISSR and others such as RFLP, SCAR, NBS and SNP) in genetic diversity studies of ginger species. Some insights on the advantages of the markers are discussed. The detection of genetic variation among promising cultivars of ginger has significance for ginger improvement programs. This update of recent literature will help researchers and students select the appropriate molecular markers for ginger-related research.

  16. Oxidative Stress in COPD: Sources, Markers, and Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Adam John Anthony; Sapey, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Markers of oxidative stress are increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are able to alter biological molecules, signaling pathways and antioxidant molecule function, many of which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD. However, the involvement of ROS in the development and progression of COPD is not proven. Here, we discuss the sources of ROS, and the defences that have evolved to protect against their harmful effects. We address the role that ROS may have in the development and progression of COPD, as well as current therapeutic attempts at limiting the damage they cause. Evidence has indicated that the function of several key cells appears altered in COPD patients, and expression levels of important oxidant and antioxidant molecules may be abnormal. Therapeutic trials attempting to restore equilibrium to these molecules have not impacted upon all facets of disease and whilst the theory behind ROS influence in COPD appears sound, current models testing relevant pathways to tissue damage are limited. The heterogeneity seen in COPD patients presents a challenge to our understanding, and further research is essential to identify potential targets and stratified COPD patient populations where ROS therapies may be maximally efficacious. PMID:28212273

  17. Oral keratinocyte stem/progenitor cells: specific markers, molecular signaling pathways and potential uses.

    PubMed

    Calenic, Bogdan; Greabu, Maria; Caruntu, Constantin; Tanase, Cristiana; Battino, Maurizio

    2015-10-01

    Oral keratinocyte stem cells reside in the basal layers of the oral epithelium, representing a minor population of cells with a great potential to self-renew and proliferate over the course of their lifetime. As a result of the potential uses of oral keratinocyte stem cells in regenerative medicine and the key roles they play in tissue homeostasis, inflammatory conditions, wound healing and tumor initiation and progression, intense scientific efforts are currently being undertaken to identify, separate and reprogram these cells. Although currently there is no specific marker that can characterize and isolate oral keratinocyte stem cells, several suggestions have been made. Thus, different stem/progenitor-cell subpopulations have been categorized based on combinations of positive and/or negative membrane-surface markers, which include integrins, clusters of differentiation and cytokeratins. Important advances have also been made in understanding the molecular pathways that govern processes such as self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation, wound healing and programmed cell death. A thorough understanding of stem-cell biology and the molecular players that govern cellular fate is paramount in the quest for using stem-cell-derived therapies in the treatment of various oral pathologies. The current review focuses on recent advances in understanding the molecular signaling pathways coordinating the behavior of these cells and in identifying suitable markers used for their isolation and characterization. Special emphasis will also be placed on the roles played by oral keratinocyte stem and progenitor cells in normal and diseased oral tissues and on their potential uses in the fields of general medicine and dentistry.

  18. Development and Evaluation of a Tumor Marker for Prostate Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Major strides in the early detection, staging, monitoring, and risk stratification of men with prostate cancer have been realized over the last few decades. We have recently witnessed a reduction in the death rate for prostate cancer, stage migration with increased numbers of men with local/regional disease, and a greater understanding of the natural history of progression following recurrence. These advances, while not solely dependant on biomarkers, can be attributed to the discovery of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in the late 1970's. In the wake of these discoveries, we still continue to unnecessarily biopsy men at risk for having prostate cancer to identify the 1:4 with the disease, understage men with presumed local disease, continue to lack an accurate method for staging which can direct treatment options for the individual patient and continue to poorly understand the tumor biology and kinetics of disease progression. Clearly, discovery of a new tumor marker and validation/clinical investigation of the markers are mandatory to advance our knowledge and direct the care of men with prostate cancer. With this research, we intend to evaluate the clinical, diagnostic, and prognostic accuracy of new and existing biomarkers on a prospective serum bank collected from men either participating in early detection programs or engaging in pre or post treatment situations. By increasing our clinical research and specimen collections we hope to further advance the staging and direction for treatment in men with prostate cancer. This study approaches patients scheduled for a prostate biopsy, patients visiting the Urology Outpatient Clinic with PSA elevation, patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy, prostate cancer patients with scheduled appointments in Radiation Oncology and men participating in early prostate cancer detection screenings. Subjects will be excluded from the study if: 1) Subjects have any mental impairment that would hinder the ability to provide

  19. Marker formation vs. marker offset - on the resolution potential of tectono-geomorphic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the recurrence and actual size of large and damaging earthquakes is an important step towards mitigating the hazard of future seismic events. Coseismically displaced geomorphic and stratigraphic markers are commonly utilized to constrain the recurrence history of surface-rupturing events. An underlying assumption of this approach is that the formation of new geomorphic markers is (distinctly) more frequent than the occurrence of surface-rupturing earthquakes that will disrupt and offset them (the markers). If this assumption is valid, then the offsets that are caused by individual earthquakes can be distinguished, providing valuable information on the causative earthquake size and its variability. Many of the currently existing earthquake recurrence models, such as the characteristic, the uniform-slip, and the variable-slip earthquake model were formulated following this general approach and the underlying assumption. However, whether this assumption is valid or not is essentially never tested or questioned. How sensitive are those recurrence models with regards to the validity of the afore-mentioned assumption that marker formation is more frequent than marker offset? Could it be that the observed recurrence characteristics represent the properties of climatic forcing rather than tectonic activity? To address this question, I utilize a statistical model in which I create markers and then displace them by sampling from a number of different probability distributions for marker formation and offset. In doing so, I create a library of recurrence patterns in which the corresponding patterns depend on timing and relative strength of marker formation and marker offset events. In my presentation I compare these model results with reported earthquake recurrence data (i.e., slip accumulation patterns). This comparison indicates that the surface displacement of ground-rupturing earthquakes is required to exhibit some form of "characteristic" behavior (with

  20. Analytical and clinical evaluation of a new tumor marker in breast cancer: CA 27.29.

    PubMed

    Correale, M; Abbate, I; Gargano, G; Catino, A; Dragone, C D; Musci, M D; Serio, G; Paradiso, A; De Lena, M

    1992-01-01

    Evaluation of a radioimmunoassay for a new tumor marker, named CA 27.29, recently proposed for use in breast cancer patients, is reported in this study. After considering the analytical performance, the clinical study was directed to a control group of 66 apparently healthy subjects (Controls), a group of 25 women with benign breast disease (BBD) and a group of 164 breast cancer patients divided into primary before any treatment (M-), in follow-up with no evidence of disease (NED) and presence of metastases (M+). When compared to CA 15.3, our results showed similar sensitivity of both markers with a slightly lower specificity for CA 27.29. In some cases, however, CA 27.29 elevation appears earlier than CA 15.3 as a sign of metastases. We thus propose their associated use.

  1. Comparison of tumor markers and inflammatory biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Barouchos, Nikolaos; Papazafiropoulou, Athanasia; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Vrachnis, Nikolaos; Barouchos, Nektarios; Armeniakou, Eleni; Dionyssopoulou, Vasiliki; Mathioudakis, Alexandros G; Christopoulou, Eleni; Koltsida, Spiridoula; Bassiakou, Eleni

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was: (a) to measure levels of the tumor markers, Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), Cancer antigen 125 (CA125), Neuron specific enolase (NSE) and Cytokeratin fragments 19 (CYFRA21-1); (b) to investigate any correlation between them and the inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein (CRP), Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and white blood cells count (WBC), in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation, who belong in groups of severity C and D, as classified by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD); (c) and finally, to compare these results in these two groups. Fifty-two patients with COPD exacerbation [35 male/17 female, mean age (± SD) 68.3 ± 6.4 years] were the study subjects, and were classified in severity groups C (n = 27) and D (n = 25), based on the spirometric classification, the number of exacerbations in the preceding year and the assessment of their symptoms by GOLD. Results. CEA and CA125 were increased in group D. In group C, there was a significant correlation between CRP and CA125 (p = 0.05). In group D, there was a significant correlation between WBC and NSE (p = 0.02), between CRP and CA19-9 (p = 0.02) and NSE (p < 0.001), and between the ESR and NSE (p = 0.03). CA125 (p = 0.01) and CA19-9 (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in group D compared to group C. In contrast, there was no significant difference in two groups for NSE, CEA and CYFRA21-1. Certain tumor markers were increased and were associated with increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers and with the disease severity. Inflammation might have a key pathogenetic role linking the above tumor markers with the severity of COPD.

  2. SC-27CD13 REPRESENTS A NOVEL BRAIN TUMOR STEM CELL MARKER FOR GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Nathaniel; Markert, Tara; Oliva, Claudia; Griguer, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a very deadly and highly vascularized tumor, but targeting glioma angiogenesis by vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition has been minimally successful. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that control glioma angiogenesis and progression could lead to significant new therapies. We previously described that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induces increased tumor angiogenesis, decreased mouse survival, increased resistance to chemotherapy, and an increase in CD133 (a well-known stem cell marker). Because glioma enriched with brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) share similar properties with mtDNA depleted glioma cells, we hypothesize that genes up-regulated in mitochondrial depleted cells could be signature markers of BTSCs. Thus, mtDNA could be essential for the maintenance and expansion of BTSC populations. We ran an RT Profiler PCR array for angiogenesis on both U251 ρ° cells depleted of mtDNA and on the parental, isogenic U251 glioma cells. CD13 mRNA expression was increased 200 fold in ρ° cells over U251 cells. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and immunocytochemisty we found that CD13 is significantly increased in ρ° cells over U251 cells, and is not regulated by hypoxia (1% O2). Purification of the CD13+ population by magnetic-activated cell sorting revealed that these cells form neurospheres when cultured in Neurobasal (NB) medium. In addition, 60% of CD13+ cells were also CD133+ in NB medium, while only 10% of CD13+ cells were also CD133+ in DMEM/F-12 medium. These findings suggest CD13 may be a marker of cancer stem cells in GBM. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling the expression of CD13 may reveal novel therapuetic targets capable of improving the treatment of GBM.

  3. Physiologic variations of serum tumor markers in gynecological malignancies during pregnancy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent insights provide support for the treatment of cancer during pregnancy, a coincidence that poses both mother and fetus at risk. Our aim was to critically review studies on the physiologic variations during pregnancy, the most common tumor markers used in diagnosis and follow-up of gynecological cancers. Methods We conducted a systematic review of six tumor markers during normal pregnancy: carbohydrate antigen (CA) 15-3 (breast cancer); squamous cell carcinoma antigen (cervical cancer); and CA 125, anti-Müllerian hormone, inhibin B and lactate dehydrogenase (ovarian cancer). Results For CA 15-3, 3.3% to 20.0% of all measurements were above the cut-off (maximum 56 U/mL in the third trimester). Squamous cell carcinoma antigen values were above cut-off in 3.1% and 10.5% of the measurements (maximum 4.3 µg/L in the third trimester). Up to 35% of CA 125 levels were above cut-off: levels were highest in the first trimester, with a maximum value up to 550 U/mL. Inhibin B, anti-Müllerian hormone and lactate dehydrogenase levels were not elevated in maternal serum during normal pregnancy. Conclusion During normal pregnancy, tumor markers including CA 15.3, squamous cell carcinoma antigen and CA 125 can be elevated; inhibin B, anti-Müllerian hormone and lactate dehydrogenase levels remain below normal cut-off values. Knowledge of physiological variations during pregnancy can be clinically important when managing gynecological cancers in pregnant patients. PMID:22873292

  4. The Potential for Circulating Tumor Cells in Pancreatic Cancer Management

    PubMed Central

    Pimienta, Michael; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Wang, Ruoxiang; Pandol, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one the most lethal malignancies. Only a small proportion of patients with this disease benefit from surgery. Chemotherapy provides only a transient benefit. Though much effort has gone into finding new ways for early diagnosis and treatment, average patient survival has only been improved in the order of months. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors, including pre-malignant phases. These cells possess information about the genomic characteristics of their tumor source in situ, and their detection and characterization holds potential in early cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Liquid Biopsies present an alternative to tumor biopsy that are hard to sample. Below we summarize current methods of CTC detection, the current literature on CTCs in pancreatic cancer, and future perspectives. PMID:28626429

  5. Tumor Initiation in Human Malignant Melanoma and Potential Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been identified in several human malignancies, including human malignant melanoma. The frequency of malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs), which are identified by their expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member ABCB5, correlates with disease progression in human patients. Furthermore, targeted MMIC ablation through ABCB5 inhibits tumor initiation and growth in preclinical xenotransplantation models, pointing to potential therapeutic promise of the CSC concept. Recent advances also show that CSCs can exert pro-angiogenic roles in tumor growth and serve immunomodulatory functions related to the evasion of host anti-tumor immunity. Thus, MMICs might initiate and sustain tumorigenic growth not only as a result of CSC-intrinsic self-renewal, differentiation and proliferative capacity, but also based on pro-tumorigenic interactions with the host environment. PMID:20184545

  6. Tumor initiation in human malignant melanoma and potential cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H

    2010-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been identified in several human malignancies, including human malignant melanoma. The frequency of malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs), which are identified by their expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member ABCB5, correlates with disease progression in human patients. Furthermore, targeted MMIC ablation through ABCB5 inhibits tumor initiation and growth in preclinical xenotransplantation models, pointing to potential therapeutic promise of the CSC concept. Recent advances also show that CSCs can exert pro-angiogenic roles in tumor growth and serve immunomodulatory functions related to the evasion of host anti-tumor immunity. Thus, MMICs might initiate and sustain tumorigenic growth not only as a result of CSC-intrinsic self-renewal, differentiation and proliferative capacity, but also based on pro-tumorigenic interactions with the host environment.

  7. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Grönberg, Malin; Ahlin, Cecilia; Naeser, Ylva; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Holmberg, Lars; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer with tumor size ≤ 50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy, 190 women were identified who died from breast cancer and randomly selected 190 women alive at the corresponding time as controls. Tumor tissues were immunostained with antibodies versus the peptides. Ghrelin expression was associated with better breast cancer specific survival in univariate analyses (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36-0.84) and in multivariate models, adjusted for endocrine treatment and age (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.36-0.89). Obestatin expression was non-informative (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.60-2.46). Ghrelin expression is independent prognostic factor for breast cancer death in node negative patients-halving the risk for dying of breast cancer. Our data implies that ghrelin could be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment.

  8. Uterine Tumor Resembling Ovarian Sex Cord Tumor (UTROSCT) Commonly Exhibits Positivity With Sex Cord Markers FOXL2 and SF-1 but Lacks FOXL2 and DICER1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Croce, Sabrina; de Kock, Leanne; Boshari, Talia; Hostein, Isabelle; Velasco, Valerie; Foulkes, William D; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor (UTROSCT) is a rare neoplasm which morphologically and immunohistochemically exhibits overlap with an ovarian sex cord tumor. Although many of these neoplasms are positive with markers of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, staining is often limited and the pathogenesis of UTROSCT is unknown. To further explore the sex cord lineage of UTROSCT, we studied 19 of these neoplasms and examined the expression of 2 recently described markers of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, FOXL2, and steroidogenic factor-1. We also undertook FOXL2 and DICER1 mutation analysis in these cases; a somatic missense mutation in codon C134W (402C→G) of FOXL2 gene has been demonstrated in the vast majority (>95%) of ovarian adult granulosa cell tumors and somatic DICER1 mutations are found in approximately 60% of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. Ten of 19 cases (53%) exhibited nuclear immunoreactivity with FOXL2 and 11 of 19 (58%) exhibited nuclear staining with steroidogenic factor-1. Neither FOXL2 nor DICER1 mutations were identified in any case where there was sufficient tumor tissue for analysis (18 and 9 cases, respectively). Despite exhibiting an immunophenotype characteristic of a sex cord-stromal tumor, mutations in FOXL2 and DICER1, the 2 most common mutations hitherto reported in ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, are not a feature of UTROSCT.

  9. Role of miR-139 as a surrogate marker for tumor aggression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongyan; Gallagher, Dan; Schmitt, Sarah; Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Fan, Fang; Godwin, Andrew K; Tawfik, Ossama

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNAs are non-protein coding molecules that play a key role in oncogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis in many types of malignancies including breast cancer. In the current study, we studied the expression of microRNA-139-5p (miR-139) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast and correlated its expression with tumor grade, molecular subtype, hormonal status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, proliferation index, tumor size, lymph node status, patient's age, and overall survival in 74 IDC cases. In addition, we compared and correlated miR-139 expression in 18 paired serum and tissue samples from patients with IDC to assess its value as a serum marker. Our data showed that miR-139 was down-regulated in all tumor tissue samples compared with control. More pronounced down-regulation was seen in tumors that were higher grade, estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative, more proliferative, or larger in size (P < .05). Although not statistically significant, lower miR-139 level was frequently associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression. In addition, significantly lower miR-139 tissue level was seen in patients who were deceased (P = .027), although older age (>50 years) and positive local nodal disease did not adversely affect miR-139 expression. In contrast, serum miR-139 profile of the patients appeared similar to that of normal control. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-139 was associated with aggressive tumor behavior and disease progression in breast cancer. miR-139 may serve as a risk assessment biomarker in tailoring treatment options.

  10. Inflammatory markers and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer by tumor subtypes: the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Jennifer; Schock, Helena; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Baglietto, Laura; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopolou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Masala, Giovanna; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; de Mesquita, H.Bas Bueno; Peeters, Petra H M; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Sánchez, Soledad; Obon-Santacana, Mireia; Sànchez-Pérez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Castaño, José María Huerta; Ardanaz, Eva; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Merrit, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée T

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests an etiologic role for inflammation in ovarian carcinogenesis and heterogeneity between tumor subtypes and anthropometric indices. Prospective studies on circulating inflammatory markers and epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) have predominantly investigated overall risk; data characterizing risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage, dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis) and anthropometric indices are sparse. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and EOC risk by tumor characteristics. A total of 754 eligible EOC cases were identified; two controls (n=1,497) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression to assess associations. Results CRP and IL-6 were not associated with overall EOC risk. However, consistent with prior research, CRP >10 vs. CRP ≤1 mg/L was associated with higher overall EOC risk (OR=1.67 [1.03 - 2.70]). We did not observe significant associations or heterogeneity in analyses by tumor characteristics. In analyses stratified by waist circumference, inflammatory markers were associated with higher risk among women with higher waist circumference; no association was observed for women with normal waist circumference: (e.g., IL-6: waist ≤80: ORlog2=0.97 [0.81 - 1.16]; waist >88: ORlog2=1.78 [1.28 - 2.48], pheterogeneity ≤0.01). Conclusions Our data suggest that high CRP is associated with increased risk of overall EOC, and that IL-6 and CRP may be associated with EOC risk among women with higher adiposity. Impact Our data add to global evidence that ovarian carcinogenesis may be promoted by an inflammatory milieu. PMID:25855626

  11. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 is a prognostic marker and its kinase a potential therapeutic target in HCC.

    PubMed

    Pott, Leona L; Hagemann, Sascha; Reis, Henning; Lorenz, Kristina; Bracht, Thilo; Herold, Thomas; Skryabin, Boris V; Megger, Dominik A; Kälsch, Julia; Weber, Frank; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A

    2017-02-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a cancer with increasing incidence and largely refractory to current anticancer drugs. Since Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor has shown modest efficacy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma additional treatments are highly needed. Protein phosphorylation via kinases is an important post-translational modification to regulate cell homeostasis including proliferation and apoptosis. Therefore kinases are valuable targets in cancer therapy. To this end we performed 2D differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis of phosphoprotein-enriched lysates of tumor and corresponding non-tumorous liver samples to detect differentially abundant phosphoproteins to screen for novel kinases as potential drug targets. We identified 34 differentially abundant proteins in phosphoprotein enriched lysates. Expression and distribution of the candidate protein eEF2 and its phosphorylated isoform was validated immunohistochemically on 78 hepatocellular carcinoma and non-tumorous tissue samples. Validation showed that total eEF2 and phosphorylated eEF2 at threonine 56 are prognostic markers for overall survival of HCC-patients. The activity of the regulating eEF2 kinase, compared between tumor and non-tumorous tissue lysates by in vitro kinase assays, is more than four times higher in tumor tissues. Functional analyzes regarding eEF2 kinase were performed in JHH5 cells with CRISPR/Cas9 mediated eEF2 kinase knock out. Proliferation and growth is decreased in eEF2 kinase knock out cells. eEF2 and phosphorylated eEF2 are prognostic markers for survival of hepatocellular carcinoma patients and the regulating eEF2 kinase is a potential drug target for tumor therapy.

  12. The cancer-retina antigen recoverin as a potential biomarker for renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Golovastova, Marina O; Tsoy, Larisa V; Bocharnikova, Anna V; Korolev, Dmitry O; Gancharova, Olga S; Alekseeva, Ekaterina A; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina B; Savvateeva, Lyudmila V; Skorikova, Elena E; Strelnikov, Vladimir V; Varshavsky, Vladimir A; Vinarov, Andrey Z; Nikolenko, Vladimir N; Glybochko, Peter V; Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Zamyatnin, Andrey A; Bazhin, Alexandr V; Philippov, Pavel P

    2016-07-01

    The renal cell carcinoma is the ninth most common cancer with an increasing occurrence and mortality. Recoverin is the first retina-specific photoreceptor protein that was shown to undergo aberrant expression, due to its promoter demethylation, as a cancer-retina antigen in a number of malignant tumors. In this work, we demonstrated that recoverin is indeed expressed in 68.4 % of patients with different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma, and this expression has tendency to correlate with tumor size. Interestingly, 91.7 % of patients with the benign renal tumor, oncocytoma, express recoverin as well in their tumor. Epigenetic analysis of the recoverin gene promoter revealed a stable mosaic methylation pattern with the predominance of the methylated state, with the exception of -80 and 56 CpG dinucleotides (CpGs). While the recoverin expression does not correlate withoverall survival of the tumor patients, the methylation of the recoverin gene promoter at -80 position is associated with better overall survival of the patients. This work is the first report pointing towards the association of overall survival of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with promoter methylation of a cancer-retina antigen. Taken together, these data allow to consider recoverin as a potential therapeutic target and/or marker for renal tumors.

  13. Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Low Tumor Marker Expression Benefits More From Anatomical Resection Than Tumors With Aggressive Biology.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Young-Joo; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2017-08-23

    We assessed prognostic advantage of anatomical resection (AR) over nonanatomical resection (NAR) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) according to multiplication of α-fetoprotein, des-γ-carboxyprothrombin, and tumor volume (ADV) scores. Superiority of AR over NAR is debated. ADV score is surrogate marker of postresection prognosis for solitary HCC. This study included 1572 patients who underwent curative resection for solitary HCC of 2.0 to 5.0 cm between 2006 and 2014. Preoperative patient profiles were not statistically different between AR and NAR groups. In 1324 naïve patients without preoperative treatment, AR group showed lower recurrence rates (P = 0.003) and higher patient survival rates (P = 0.012) than NAR group. AR group showed lower recurrence rates in patients with ADV ≤5 log (P ≤ 0.046). ADV scores >4 log and >3 log were independent risk factors for tumor recurrence and patient survival in treatment-naïve patients, respectively. In treatment-naïve group with preserved hepatic functional reserve, AR group showed lower recurrence rates in patients with ADV ≤4 log (P = 0.026). Absence of microvascular invasion also showed lower recurrence rates (P = 0.007) in AR group. In 248 patients with preoperative treatment, AR group showed lower recurrence rates (P = 0.001) and higher patient survival rates (P = 0.006). AR group showed lower recurrence rates in patients with ADV ≤4 log (P < 0.001) and higher survival rates in patients with ADV ≤5 log (P ≤ 0.043). Prognostic benefit of AR was evident in patients with ADV score ≤4 log or absence of microvascular invasion. Patients with less aggressive tumor biology benefit more from AR than NAR, thus being reasonably indicated for AR.

  14. Exosome levels in human body fluids: A tumor marker by themselves?

    PubMed

    Cappello, Francesco; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Campanella, Claudia; Bavisotto, Celeste Caruso; Marcilla, Antonio; Properzi, Francesca; Fais, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable research efforts, the finding of reliable tumor biomarkers remains challenging and unresolved. In recent years a novel diagnostic biomedical tool with high potential has been identified in extracellular nanovesicles or exosomes. They are released by the majority of the cells and contain detailed molecular information on the cell of origin including tumor hallmarks. Exosomes can be isolated from easy accessible body fluids, and most importantly, they can provide several biomarkers, with different levels of specificity. Recent clinical evidence shows that the levels of exosomes released into body fluids may themselves represent a predictive/diagnostic of tumors, discriminating cancer patients from healthy subjects. The aim of this review is to highlight these latest challenging findings to provide novel and groundbreaking ideas for successful tumor early diagnosis and follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reprint of "EXOSOME LEVELS IN HUMAN BODY FLUIDS: A TUMOR MARKER BY THEMSELVES?"

    PubMed

    Cappello, Francesco; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Campanella, Claudia; Bavisotto, Celeste Caruso; Marcilla, Antonio; Properzi, Francesca; Fais, Stefano

    2017-02-15

    Despite considerable research efforts, the finding of reliable tumor biomarkers remains challenging and unresolved. In recent years a novel diagnostic biomedical tool with high potential has been identified in extracellular nanovesicles or exosomes. They are released by the majority of the cells and contain detailed molecular information on the cell of origin including tumor hallmarks. Exosomes can be isolated from easy accessible body fluids, and most importantly, they can at once provide with several biomarkers, with different levels of specificity. Recent clinical evidence shows that the levels of exosomes released into body fluids may by themselves represent a predictive/diagnostic of tumors, discriminating cancer patients from healthy subjects. The aim of this review is to highlight these latest challenging findings to provide novel and groundbreaking ideas for successful tumor early diagnosis and follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Soluble Endoglin (CD105) Serum Level as a Potential Marker in the Management of Head and Neck Paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Litwiniuk, Małgorzata; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Łukawska-Popieluch, Izabela; Grzela, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    To assess the expression of endoglin in head and neck paragangliomas and the soluble endoglin level in serum of paraganglioma patients. Seven tumor samples of patients operated for cervical paraganglioma were assessed, as well as serum samples collected preoperatively, on days 4 and 28 postoperation. Serum level of endoglin in healthy controls was also determined. Tumor samples were subjected to immunofluorescent staining and examined with confocal microscope. The level of soluble endoglin in serum samples was examined using the immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA). Endoglin was highly expressed in all tumor samples. The level of soluble endoglin was significantly higher in paraganglioma patients compared to healthy controls and correlated with the tumor size. The serum level of s-endoglin was reduced after surgical excision of the tumor and remained stable after 4 weeks in all patients with complete resection of the tumor. Endoglin is an important factor in the pathophysiology of head and neck paragangliomas and may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker in these types of tumors.

  17. A simplified technique for tumor localization using preoperative endoscopic clipping and radio-opaque markers during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Su; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byung Sik; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

    2014-12-01

    Tumor localization during intracorporeal anastomosis after totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG) is challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the simplicity and feasibility of locating tumors in the stomach using radio-opaque markers and preoperative endoscopic clipping. The intra- and postoperative findings of 29 patients who underwent TLDG with intracorporeal anastomosis between January 2012 and March 2013 were reviewed. Preoperative endoscopic clips were applied just proximal to the tumor by specialized endoscopists, and surgical gauze with an attached radio-opaque marker (3 mm × 60 mm) was prepared. The marker was fixed to either the anterior or posterior of the stomach, above the predicted site of the tumor, using suture ties. Portable abdominal radiography was used during the laparoscopic surgery, and the stomach was resected using guidance by the radiomarker. The radio-opaque marker and the endoscopic clips were clearly visible by intraoperative abdominal radiography. All patients received curative resection. No complications or deaths were encountered. The mean distance between the endoscopic clips and the radiomarker by portable intraoperative radiography was 21.3 ± 18.3 mm, whereas the actual in situ mean distance was 20.7 ± 17.6 mm. This difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). It is imperative that preoperative endoscopic clips are applied just proximal to the tumor by specialized endoscopists. The use of a radio-opaque marker is a simple and feasible way to locate tumors during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy.

  18. The Number of Positive Tumor Marker Status Is Beneficial for the Selection of Therapeutic Modalities in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beppu, Toru; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Okabe, Hirohisa; Kaida, Takayoshi; Imai, Katsunori; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Koga, Yuki; Kuramoto, Kunitaka; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yo-ichi; Chikamoto, Akira; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Baba, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic resection (HR) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are popular local therapies for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Alpha-fetoprotein, Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein, and des-c-carboxy prothrombin are well-known and useful tumor markers for HCC. The positive number status of these tumor markers has recently been demonstrated as beneficial for predicting outcome for HCC patients treated with local therapy. Although the normal ranges reported have differed by institution, the positivity of tumor markers is consistent and can easily be assessed. Kumamoto and Wakayama’s group clearly demonstrated the following: 1) Regardless of the degree of tumor stage, a triple-positive tumor marker profile can predict poor outcome in HCC patients undergoing HR; 2) For RFA alone, HCC patients with double- and triple-positive status, having less than three lesions and lesions ≤3 cm in diameter show comparably insufficient outcomes; 3) For HCC patients with lesions ≤5 cm in Child–Pugh grade A, HR is preferred over RFA; 4) Microvascular invasion rates increased even in the double-positive patients, while poorly differentiated HCC was frequently observed only in the triple-positive patients; and 5) RFA with chemoembolization, anatomical liver resection, and postoperative adjuvant chemoembolization or hepatic arterial chemotherapy might improve the outcome for patients with highly malignant HCC with multiple positive tumor markers. However, the impacts of these therapies still need to be evaluated in prospective comparative studies. PMID:28660154

  19. Chemometric evaluation of urinary steroid hormone levels as potential biomarkers of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Plenis, Alina; Miękus, Natalia; Olędzka, Ilona; Bączek, Tomasz; Lewczuk, Anna; Woźniak, Zofia; Koszałka, Patrycja; Seroczyńska, Barbara; Skokowski, Jarosław

    2013-10-16

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are uncommon tumors which can secrete specific hormone products such as peptides, biogenic amines and hormones. So far, the diagnosis of NETs has been difficult because most NET markers are not specific for a given tumor and none of the NET markers can be used to fulfil the criteria of high specificity and high sensitivity for the screening procedure. However, by combining the measurements of different NET markers, they become highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. The aim of the work was to identify whether urinary steroid hormones can be identified as potential new biomarkers of NETs, which could be used as prognostic and clinical course monitoring factors. Thus, a rapid and sensitive reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method (RP-HPLC) with UV detection has been developed for the determination of cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, testosterone, epitestosterone and progesterone in human urine. The method has been validated for accuracy, precision, selectivity, linearity, recovery and stability. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.5 and 1 ng mL-1 for each steroid hormone, respectively. Linearity was confirmed within a range of 1-300 ng mL-1 with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9995 for all analytes. The described method was successfully applied for the quantification of six endogenous steroid levels in human urine. Studies were performed on 20 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with NETs. Next, for better understanding of tumor biology in NETs and for checking whether steroid hormones can be used as potential biomarkers of NETs, a chemometric analysis of urinary steroid hormone levels in both data sets was performed.

  20. Serum cytokeratin 19 fragment 21-1 is a useful tumor marker for the assessment of extramammary Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junji; Sumikawa, Yasuyuki; Hida, Tokimasa; Kamiya, Takafumi; Horimoto, Kohei; Kamiya, Shiori; Sato, Sayuri; Takahashi, Hitomi; Sawada, Masahide; Yamashita, Toshiharu

    2017-02-02

    Cytokeratin 19 fragment 21-1 (CYFRA 21-1) has been used as a tumor marker for several malignancies. However, to date, no studies have assessed whether CYFRA 21-1 could be a useful marker for extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD). The present study aimed to evaluate the significance of CYFRA 21-1 as a serum tumor marker for EMPD progression. Concentrations of serum CYFRA 21-1 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in 13 cases of EMPD were measured prior to undergoing treatment at Sapporo Medical University Hospital from January 2014 to May 2016. Four of the 13 patients had lymph node metastases at diagnosis, but none had distant metastases. Immunohistochemistry indicated that all 13 primary tumors and four metastatic tumors in lymph nodes were positive for cytokeratin 19. Although none of the 13 patients showed high serum CEA levels, six patients (46.2%) had elevated serum CYFRA 21-1. Furthermore, CYFRA 21-1 was reduced in association with post-treatment tumor reduction in all six patients. Among these six patients, four developed recurrence and metastasis during the follow-up period. CYFRA 21-1 was re-elevated in all four of these patients; however, serum CEA was elevated only in the patient with distant metastasis. These results suggest that CYFRA 21-1 is more sensitive compared with CEA, and can be useful as a tumor marker for evaluating tumor progression and treatment efficacy in patients with EMPD.

  1. MSC and Tumors: Homing, Differentiation, and Secretion Influence Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    D'souza, Naomi; Burns, Jorge Sans; Grisendi, Giulia; Candini, Olivia; Veronesi, Elena; Piccinno, Serena; Horwitz, Edwin M; Paolucci, Paolo; Conte, Pierfranco; Dominici, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    : Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are adult multipotent progenitors with fibroblast-like morphology able to differentiate into adipocytic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic lineages. Due to these properties, MSC have been studied and introduced as therapeutics in regenerative medicine. Preliminary studies have also shown a possible involvement of MSC as precursors of cellular elements within tumor microenvironments, in particular tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF). Among a number of different possible origins, TAF may originate from a pool of circulating progenitors from bone marrow or adipose tissue-derived MSC. There is growing evidence to corroborate that cells immunophenotypically defined as MSC are able to reside as TAF influencing the tumor microenvironment in a potentially bi-phasic and obscure manner: either promoting or inhibiting growth depending on tumor context and MSC sources. Here we focus on relationships between the tumor microenvironment, cancer cells, and MSC, analyzing their diverse ability to influence neoplastic development. Associated activities include MSC homing driven by the secretion of various mediators, differentiation towards TAF phenotypes, and reciprocal interactions with the tumor cells. These are reviewed here with the aim of understanding the biological functions of MSC that can be exploited for innovative cancer therapy.

  2. Detection of the tumor marker mucine with a diode-laser-based evanescent wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Daniel; Kaul, Sepp; Loescher, Frank; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; Schulz, V.; Ueberfeld, J.; Seeger, Stefan

    1996-11-01

    Optical sensors based on the utilization of the evanescent field arising at the interface between two media in the case of total internal reflection are an excellent tool for the reduction of time consuming and complex chemical analysis. We developed a fiber-optic based set-up with visible diode lasers as excitation sources. As recognition element an optical fiber covered with a photopolymerized antibody monolayer was used. Beside the commercially available cyanine fluorescent dye Cy 5, newly developed fluorescent dyes in the red spectral region were coupled to antibodies. In order to test the set-up in a clinically relevant system the antibodies BM-2 and BM-7 were chosen. With this antibody system the tumor marker mucine in a sandwich immunoassay was investigated. This protein shows increased concentrations in serum and ascites in the case of breast cancer. The combination of semiconductor devices and ultrathin antibody layers together with an antibody system directed against mucine offers the possibility of an on-line detection of the tumor marker.

  3. Field Effect Transistor Biosensor Using Antigen Binding Fragment for Detecting Tumor Marker in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanshan; Hotani, Kaori; Hideshima, Sho; Kuroiwa, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Takuya; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Mori, Yasuro; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe molecules adsorbed to the transistor gate surface, reducing sensor responsiveness. Here, we investigated the effect of probe molecule size on the detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP) using a FET biosensor. We demonstrated that the small receptor antigen binding fragment (Fab), immobilized on a sensing surface as small as 2–3 nm, offers a higher degree of sensitivity and a wider concentration range (100 pg/mL–1 μg/mL) for the FET detection of AFP in buffer solution, compared to the whole antibody. Therefore, the use of a small Fab probe molecule instead of a whole antibody is shown to be effective for improving the sensitivity of AFP detection in FET biosensors. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that a Fab-immobilized FET subjected to a blocking treatment, to avoid non-specific interactions, could sensitively and selectively detect AFP in human serum. PMID:28788579

  4. [Impact of the implementation of a protocol for the adequate and safe use of tumor markers].

    PubMed

    Mérida de la Torre, Francisco Javier; Moreno Campoy, Elvira Eva; Martos Crespo, Francisco

    2015-12-21

    Improper clinical use of tumor markers (TM) may cause unnecessary additional studies to confirm or refute a positive result. After observing 2 adverse events due to a wrong use of TM, a protocol for improving their use was implemented. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the implementation of the protocol. This was a pre-postintervention study, where analytical requests of carcinoembryonic antigen, CA15.3, CA19.9 and CA125 were analyzed during one year in patients not undergoing checking of neoplasia. A protocol was implemented and physicians were trained as recommended by the European Group on Tumor Markers, limiting its use to monitor the disease and its treatment. The study period was 2010-2014. The total number of requests dropped 50.81% and the percentage of adequacy of TM increased, each year, from 31.03 to 77.91%. The implementation of a protocol for the proper use of TM contributes to a safer use, avoiding incorrect studies and unnecessary and harmful tests for the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. HLA Class II Antigen Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Tumors as a Favorable Prognostic Marker12

    PubMed Central

    Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Arriga, Roberto; Coppola, Andrea; Caratelli, Sara; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Lauro, Davide; Lugli, Alessandro; Han, Junyi; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Ferrone, Cristina; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul; Rossi, Piero; Attanasio, Antonio; Ferrone, Soldano; Terracciano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumors, its association with the clinical course of the disease, and the underlying mechanism(s). Two tissue microarrays constructed with 220 and 778 CRC tumors were stained with HLA-DR, DQ, and DP antigen-specific monoclonal antibody LGII-612.14, using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The immunohistochemical staining results were correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The functional role of HLA class II antigens expressed on CRC cells was analyzed by investigating their in vitro interactions with immune cells. HLA class II antigens were expressed in about 25% of the 220 and 21% of the 778 tumors analyzed with an overall frequency of 23%. HLA class II antigens were detected in 19% of colorectal adenomas. Importantly, the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity were significantly lower than those detected in CRC tumors. However, HLA class II antigen staining was weakly detected only in 5.4% of 37 normal mucosa tissues. HLA class II antigen expression was associated with a favorable clinical course of the disease. In vitro stimulation with interferon gamma (IFNγ) induced HLA class II antigen expression on two of the four CRC cell lines tested. HLA class II antigen expression on CRC cells triggered interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by resting monocytes. HLA class II antigen expression in CRC tumors is a favorable prognostic marker. This association may reflect stimulation of IL-1β production by monocytes. PMID:24563618

  6. The prognostic value of tumor markers doubling times in medullary thyroid carcinoma - preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Tomasz; d'Amico, Andrea; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Skoczylas, Aleksander; Gubała, Elżbieta; Chorąży, Anna; Gorczewski, Kamil; Włoch, Jan; Jarząb, Barbara

    2010-11-03

    Calcitonin (Ct) and carcinoembrional antigen (CEA) are widely used as tumor markers for the post-operative follow-up of patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC).In patients with elevated serum Ct and CEA their dynamics can be described by calculating the doubling time (DT) - the time, they need to double the serum concentration. Previous reports concluded that the Ct and CEA DT have prognostic value in MTC patients. We retrospectively analyzed data of 70 MTC patients with elevated serum Ct or CEA. In total, doubling times were calculated and the DT of the less favorable marker was used to stratify the patients into the low- and high-risk group with the cut-off value of 2 years. The survival analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard method. The doubling time < = 2 years of the less-favorable marker had significant prognostic impact for recurrence-free survival, HR = 2.61 (1.43-4.71) and overall survival, HR = 8.99 (3.51-23.04). The calcitonin and carcinembrional antigen doubling times of less than two years are negative prognostic factors for MTC recurrence-free and total survival in patients with persistent or recurrent disease. They may be used as predictive factors for more intensive search of disease localization in asymptomatic hypercalcitoninemia and for therapy choice in symptomatic disease.

  7. The prognostic value of tumor markers doubling times in medullary thyroid carcinoma - preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Calcitonin (Ct) and carcinoembrional antigen (CEA) are widely used as tumor markers for the post-operative follow-up of patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In patients with elevated serum Ct and CEA their dynamics can be described by calculating the doubling time (DT) - the time, they need to double the serum concentration. Previous reports concluded that the Ct and CEA DT have prognostic value in MTC patients. Patients and methods We retrospectively analyzed data of 70 MTC patients with elevated serum Ct or CEA. In total, doubling times were calculated and the DT of the less favorable marker was used to stratify the patients into the low- and high-risk group with the cut-off value of 2 years. The survival analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard method. Results The doubling time < = 2 years of the less-favorable marker had significant prognostic impact for recurrence-free survival, HR = 2.61 (1.43-4.71) and overall survival, HR = 8.99 (3.51-23.04). Conclusions The calcitonin and carcinembrional antigen doubling times of less than two years are negative prognostic factors for MTC recurrence-free and total survival in patients with persistent or recurrent disease. They may be used as predictive factors for more intensive search of disease localization in asymptomatic hypercalcitoninemia and for therapy choice in symptomatic disease. PMID:21047422

  8. Evaluation of molecular markers in canine mammary tumors: correlation with histological grading.

    PubMed

    Vinothini, G; Balachandran, C; Nagini, S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate molecular markers involved in mammary tumorigenesis in a canine model that mimics many essential elements of human breast cancer. Thirty mammary gland tumors and control tissues obtained from female dogs were included in the study. We analyzed changes in the expression of markers of hormone and receptor status (estradiol, estrogen receptor; ER and HER-2/neu), hormone metabolism (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1), cell proliferation and survival [proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), glutathione S-transferase-P (GST-P), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB-p50, NF-kappaB-p65), phosphorylated-inhibitor of kappaB-alpha (p-IkappaB-alpha) and IkappaB], apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspases, Apaf-1, cytochrome-C, and PARP), invasion [matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 (MMP-2, MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), and reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK)], angiogenesis [vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)], and epigenetics [DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt-1), histone deacetylase (HDAC-1)] by immunohistochemical localization and Western blot analysis and correlated these with histological grade. The present study provides evidence that increased expression of ER, HER-2/neu, estradiol, and its metabolizing enzymes, as well as proteins involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis evasion, invasion, and angiogenesis may confer a selective growth advantage to canine mammary tumors. To our knowledge this is the first report on the hallmark capabilities of canine mammary tumors, which lends credence to the view that the dog is a valuable model for human breast cancer studies.

  9. Grp94 in complexes with IgG is a soluble diagnostic marker of gastrointestinal tumors and displays immune-stimulating activity on peripheral blood immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Tramentozzi, Elisa; Ruli, Erlis; Angriman, Imerio; Bardini, Romeo; Campora, Michela; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Rugge, Massimo; Finotti, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein94 (Grp94), the most represented endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident heat shock protein (HSP), is a tumor antigen shared by different types of solid and hematological tumors. The tumor-specific feature of Grp94 is its translocation from the ER to the cell surface where it displays pro-oncogenic functions. This un-physiological location has important implications for both the tumor pathology and anti-tumor therapy. We wanted to address the question of whether Grp94 could be measured as liquid marker in cancer patients in order to make predictions of diagnostic and therapeutic relevance for the tumor. To this aim, we performed an in-depth investigation on patients with primary tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, using different methodological approaches to detect Grp94 in tumor tissues, plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results indicate that Grp94 is not only the antigen highly expressed in any tumor tissue and in cells of tumor infiltrates, mostly B lymphocytes, but it is also found in the circulation. However, the only form in which Grp94 was detected in the plasma of any patients and in B lymphocytes induced to proliferate, was that of stable complexes with Immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Using a specific immune-enzyme assay to measure plasma Grp94-IgG complexes, we showed that Grp94-IgG complexes were significantly increased in cancer patients compared to healthy control subjects, serving as diagnostic tumor biomarker. Results also demonstrate that the stimulation of patient PBMCs with Grp94-IgG complexes led to an increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines that might drive a potentially beneficial anti-tumor effect. PMID:27662661

  10. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  11. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: As a potential prognostic marker and immunotherapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Kashif; Farooq, Asim; Zulfiqar, Bilal; Rashid, Muhammad Usman

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment which leads towards tumor immune escape. Understanding the intricacy of immunomodulation by tumor cells is essential for immunotherapy. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunosuppressive enzyme which mediates tumor immune escape in various cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). IDO up-regulation in HCC may lead to recruitment of regulatory T-cells into tumor microenvironment and therefore inhibit local immune responses and promote metastasis. HCC associated fibroblasts stimulate natural killer cells dysfunction through prostaglandin E2 and subsequently IDO promotes favorable condition for tumor metastasis. IDO up-regulation induces immunosuppression and may enhance the risk of hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus induced HCC. Therefore, IDO inhibitors as adjuvant therapeutic agents may have clinical implications in HCC. This review proposes future prospects of IDO not only as a therapeutic target but also as a prognostic marker for HCC. PMID:28428708

  12. Integrin α7 Is a Functional Marker and Potential Therapeutic Target in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Haas, Tobias L; Sciuto, Maria Rita; Brunetto, Lidia; Valvo, Cecilia; Signore, Michele; Fiori, Micol E; di Martino, Simona; Giannetti, Stefano; Morgante, Liliana; Boe, Alessandra; Patrizii, Michele; Warnken, Uwe; Schnölzer, Martina; Ciolfi, Andrea; Di Stefano, Chiara; Biffoni, Mauro; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; De Maria, Ruggero

    2017-07-06

    Functionally relevant markers of glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) have potential for therapeutic targeting to treat this aggressive disease. Here we used generation and screening of thousands of monoclonal antibodies to search for receptors and signaling pathways preferentially enriched in GSCs. We identified integrin α7 (ITGA7) as a major laminin receptor in GSCs and in primary high-grade glioma specimens. Analyses of mRNA profiles in comprehensive datasets revealed that high ITGA7 expression negatively correlated with survival of patients with both low- and high-grade glioma. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that ITGA7 plays a key functional role in growth and invasiveness of GSCs. We also found that targeting of ITGA7 by RNAi or blocking mAbs impaired laminin-induced signaling, and it led to a significant delay in tumor engraftment plus a strong reduction in tumor size and invasion. Our data, therefore, highlight ITGA7 as a glioblastoma biomarker and candidate therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SU-E-J-23: An Accurate Algorithm to Match Imperfectly Matched Images for Lung Tumor Detection Without Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Rozario, T; Bereg, S; Chiu, T; Liu, H; Kearney, V; Jiang, L; Mao, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In order to locate lung tumors on projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is created and compared with projection images. Since lung tumors always move and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs, a special DRR (background DRR) is generated based on modified anatomy from which lung tumors are removed. In addition, global discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image originations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported. Methods: This method divides global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities will be evaluated by calculating normalized cross correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) will be automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single tile which has bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel based linear transformation will be determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The DRR will be transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contains only the tumor. A DRR of the tumor is registered to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. Results: This method has been successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (Brainlab) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers are implanted and used as ground truth for tumor positions. Although, other organs and bony structures introduce strong signals superimposed on tumors at some angles, this method accurately locates tumors on every projection over 12 gantry angles. The maximum error is less than 2.6 mm while the total average error is 1.0 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting tumor without markers despite strong background signals.

  14. Comparative Study of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Tumor Marker in Stomach and Colon Cancer Patients in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Bashir; Gul, Bushra; Ali, Sajid; Bashir, Shumaila; Mahmood, Nourin; Ahmad, Jamshed; Nawaz, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increase in morbidity and mortality rate, cancer has become an alarming threat to the human population worldwide. Since cancer is a progressive disorder, timely diagnosis would be helpful to prevent/stop cancer from progressing to severe stage. In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, most of the time, tumors are diagnosed with endoscopy and biopsy; therefore rare studies exist regarding the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GIT) carcinomas based on tumor markers, especially CEA. This study made a comparative analysis of CEA in admitted hospitalized stomach and colon cancer patients diagnosed as GIT with biopsy. In this study, a total of 66 cases were included. The level of CEA was determined in the blood of these patients using ELISA technique. Out of 66 patients, the level of CEA was high in 59.1% of the total, 60.7% in colon cancer patients and 57.9 % in stomach cancer patients. Moreover, the incidence of colorectal and stomach cancer was greater in males as compared to females. Patients were more of the age group of 40- 60 and the level of CEA was comparatively higher in patients (51.5%) with histology which was moderately differentiated, than patients with well differentiated and poorly differentiated tumor histology. CEA level was high in more than 50% of the total patients. Moreover, CEA exhibited higher sensitivity for colon than stomach cancer.

  15. Expression pattern of tumor endothelial marker 8 protein in gallbladder carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Thakur, Mahendra Kumar; Shukla, Hari Shanker

    2011-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 protein (TEM8) is highly specific to tumor angiogenesis and is not required for normal adult angiogenesis and hence might prove to be a target for anti-angiogenic therapies in the future. We here evaluated protein and gene expression patterns in human endothelial cells of benign gallbladder - gallstone diseases (GSDs) and gallbladder carcinomas (GBCs) using immunostaining, immunofluorescence and western blotting techniques. Subjects comprised 175 GBC patients, 38 males and 137 females, aged 30-85 years (mean age 50.3 ± 13.4 years) and twenty with GSDs, aged 30-75 years, (51.4 ± 10.0 years) for comparison (male 4/20 and females 16/20). TEM8 protein expression increased significantly (p < 0.0001) with increasing stage of GBC and was mostly limited to endothelial cells, although there was no significant change with the grade. Interestingly, only 80-85 kDa and 60 kDa isoforms of TEM8 increased significantly whereas 45 kDa isoform was absent in GBCs. Conclusions- These results suggest that TEM8 plays an unknown important biological role to promote tumor angiogenesis in GBC.

  16. IL-6 Potentiates Tumor Resistance to Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

    PubMed Central

    Brackett, Craig M.; Owczarczak, Barbara; Ramsey, Kimberley; Maier, Patricia G.; Gollnick, Sandra O.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an anticancer modality approved for the treatment of early disease and palliation of late stage disease. PDT of tumors results in the generation of an acute inflammatory response. The extent and duration of the inflammatory response is dependent upon the PDT regimen employed and is characterized by rapid induction of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, and activation and mobilization of innate immune cells. The importance of innate immune cells in long-term PDT control of tumor growth has been well defined. In contrast the role of IL-6 in long-term tumor control by PDT is unclear. Previous studies have shown that IL-6 can diminish or have no effect on PDT antitumor efficacy. Study Design/Materials and Methods In the current study we used mice deficient for IL-6, Il6−/−, to examine the role of IL-6 in activation of antitumor immunity and PDT efficacy by PDT regimens known to enhance antitumor immunity. Results Our studies have shown that elimination of IL-6 had no effect on innate cell mobilization into the treated tumor bed or tumor draining lymph node (TDLN) and did not affect primary antitumor T-cell activation by PDT. However, IL-6 does appear to negatively regulate the generation of antitumor immune memory and PDT efficacy against murine colon and mammary carcinoma models. The inhibition of PDT efficacy by IL-6 appears also to be related to regulation of Bax protein expression. Increased apoptosis was observed following treatment of tumors in Il6−/− mice 24 hours following PDT. Conclusions The development of PDT regimens that enhance antitumor immunity has led to proposals for the use of PDT as an adjuvant treatment. However, our results show that the potential for PDT induced expression of IL-6 to enhance tumor survival following PDT must be considered. PMID:22057495

  17. EST-SSR markers derived from an elite barley cultivar (Hordeum vulgare L. 'Morex'): polymorphism and genetic marker potential.

    PubMed

    Emebiri, Livinus C

    2009-08-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats have become the markers of choice for marker-assisted selection because of their low template DNA requirement, high reproducibility, and high level of polymorphism. This study investigated a new set of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) EST-derived SSR markers designed to target gene sequences expressed during grain development, as they are more likely to be important in determining grain quality. The EST sequences (HVSMEh and HVSMEi) were derived from cDNA libraries of the elite six-rowed cultivar Morex, made from spikes harvested at 5 to 45 days after pollination. Approximately half of the 110 SSR markers derived from the ESTs were polymorphic in a panel of 8 diverse barley genotypes, with PIC values between 0.19 and 0.79. Twenty of the new markers were mapped to chromosomal locations using 2 doubled haploid populations. To demonstrate marker potential, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses were carried out with phenotypic data on wort beta-glucan content and beta-glucanase activity, two traits with a long history of genetic studies. Most of the EST-SSR markers mapped to within 10 cM of the cellulose synthase (HvCesA) and cellulose synthase-like (HvCslF) genes, which provides highly informative functional markers for tracking these genes in breeding programs. It was also observed that on any given chromosome, the QTL for beta-glucan content and beta-glucanase activity were rarely coincident but tended to occur in adjacent intervals along chromosomal regions, which agreed with their independent genetic basis; the adjacent localization may be important for coordination of cell wall degradation during germination and malting.

  18. The Late Positive Potential: A Neurophysiological Marker for Emotion Regulation in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy A.; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Background: The ability to modulate emotional responses, or emotion regulation, is a key mechanism in the development of mood disruptions. Detection of a neural marker for emotion regulation thus has the potential to inform early detection and intervention for mood problems. One such neural marker may be the late positive potential (LPP), which is…

  19. The Late Positive Potential: A Neurophysiological Marker for Emotion Regulation in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy A.; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Background: The ability to modulate emotional responses, or emotion regulation, is a key mechanism in the development of mood disruptions. Detection of a neural marker for emotion regulation thus has the potential to inform early detection and intervention for mood problems. One such neural marker may be the late positive potential (LPP), which is…

  20. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoyong Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    tumor boundary in EPID images by using a LSM-based algorithm. Experimental results conducted on phantom and clinical EPID images demonstrated the effectiveness of the tracking algorithm for visible tumor target. Compared with previous tracking methods, the authors’ algorithm has the potential to improve the tracking accuracy in radiation therapy. In addition, real-time tumor boundary information within the irradiation field will be potentially useful for further applications, such as adaptive beam delivery, dose evaluation.

  1. Clinical Utility of Serum Homocysteine and Folate as Tumor Markers in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Erugula, Sridhar Reddy; Danappanavar, Prasanna M.; Ealla, Kranti Kiran Reddy; Velidandla, Surekha; Manikya, Sangameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is a common malignancy involving head and neck. Identifying the markers of molecular levels or biochemical markers involving the various metabolic reactions associated with the initiation and biological behavior of individual tumors are very important in diagnosis and prognosis. Aim To measure and compare the levels of serum Homocysteine (Hcy) and serum folate in OSCC patients, smoking group and healthy subjects and also to assess the clinical utility of serum Hcy as a potential tumor marker in OSCC. Materials and Methods The study group comprised of 60 subjects, of whom 30 were classified as OSCC cases (GROUP I) and 15 were classified as smokers without OSCC (GROUP II). The control group included 15 healthy individuals without smoking habit (Group III). Hcy was measured with High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Folate estimation was done by Chemiluminiscence Immuno Assay (CLIA). Comparison of mean Hcy and folate values among the groups was done using ANOVA with Post-Hoc Games Howell test. Gender was compared using Chi-square test. Comparison of mean age was using ANOVA with Post-Hoc Tukey’s test. Results The mean serum folate level in OSCC patients was 5.34ng/mL, 7.68ng/mL in smoking group and 10.99ng/mL in control group. There was a significant difference in the mean serum folate levels among the three study groups (p<0.001). The mean serum Hcy in OSCC patients was 23.58μmol/L, 17.46μmol/L, in smoking group and 10.76μmol/l in controls. There was a significant difference in the mean serum Hcy levels among the three study groups (p<0.001). Conclusion The present study found an interesting association with serum Hcy and folate levels in OSCC which could be useful as a biochemical “Tumor Marker” and thereby providing insights into the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27891452

  2. RNA-binding protein LIN28 is a sensitive marker of pediatric yolk sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaoguang; Huang, Songsong; Tong, Yulong; Chen, Zhongliang; Shen, Delei; Wu, Dazhou; Lai, Xin-He; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-08-01

    RNA-binding protein LIN28 is involved in maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. It has been detected in different types of testicular and ovarian germ cell tumors (GCTs), but its status in pediatric YSTs (yolk sac tumors) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the immunohistochemical profile of LIN28 in pediatric YSTs. Immunohistochemistry detection of LIN28 was performed in 22 cases of pediatric YSTs and 10 mature teratomas. The percentage of tumor cells stained was scored as 0, 1+ (1-30 % cells), 2+ (31-60 %), 3+ (61-90 %), and 4+ (>90 %). To compare its sensitive and specificity with alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), we also stained AFP in 22 cases of pediatric YSTs and 10 mature teratomas in children. LIN28 staining was high in all 22 pediatric yolk sac tumor (2+ in 1, 3+ in 1, and 4+ in 20), and weak staining of LIN28 was seen in 1 of 10 mature teratomas (1+), 9 of 10 mature teratomas were negative expression. However, the expression of AFP in pediatric YST was lower compared with Lin28 (- in 1, 1+ in 8, 2+ in 12, and 3+ in 1), and weak expression of AFP was seen in 2 of 10 mature teratomas (1+), 8 of 10 mature teratomas were negative. LIN28 had higher intensity expression than AFP in pediatric YSTs (P < 0.001). LIN28 is a sensitive marker for pediatric YSTs and it can be used to distinguish them from mature teratomas. LIN28 is likely to become a new and valuable biomarker for diagnosing of pediatric YST.

  3. Evaluation of Near Infrared Dyes as Markers of P-Glycoprotein Activity in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Semenenko, Inessa; Portnoy, Emma; Aboukaoud, Mohammed; Guzy, Serge; Shmuel, Miriam; Itzhak, Gal; Eyal, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1; P-glycoprotein) has been associated with efflux of chemotherapeutic agents from tumor cells and with poor patient prognosis. This study evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive, non-radioactive near infrared (NIR) imaging methodology for detection of MDR1 functional activity in tumors. Methods: Initial accumulation assays were conducted in MDR1-overexpressing MDCK cells (MDCK-MDR1) and control MDCK cells (MDCK-CT) using the NIR dyes indocyanine green (ICG), IR-783, IR-775, rhodamine 800, XenoLight DiR, and Genhance 750, at 0.4 μM-100 μM. ICG and IR-783 were also evaluated in HT-29 cells in which MDR1 overexpression was induced by colchicine (HT-29-MDR1) and their controls (HT-29-CT). In vivo optical imaging studies were conducted using immunodeficient mice bearing HT-29-CT and HT-29-MDR1 xenografts. Results: ICG's emission intensity was 2.0- and 2.2-fold higher in control versus MDR1-overexpressing cells, in MDCK and HT-29 cell lines, respectively. The respective IR-783 control:MDR1 ratio was 1.4 in both MDCK and HT-29 cells. Optical imaging of mice bearing HT-29-CT and HT-29-MDR1 xenografts revealed a statistically non-significant, 1.7-fold difference (p > 0.05) in ICG emission intensity between control and MDR1 tumors. No such differences were observed with IR-783. Conclusion: ICG and IR-783 appear to be weak MDR1 substrates. In vivo, low sensitivity and high between-subject variability impair the ability to use the currently studied probes as markers of tumor MDR1 activity. The results suggest that, for future use of this technology, additional NIR probes should be screened as MDR1 substrates.

  4. Evaluation of Near Infrared Dyes as Markers of P-Glycoprotein Activity in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Semenenko, Inessa; Portnoy, Emma; Aboukaoud, Mohammed; Guzy, Serge; Shmuel, Miriam; Itzhak, Gal; Eyal, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1; P-glycoprotein) has been associated with efflux of chemotherapeutic agents from tumor cells and with poor patient prognosis. This study evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive, non-radioactive near infrared (NIR) imaging methodology for detection of MDR1 functional activity in tumors. Methods: Initial accumulation assays were conducted in MDR1-overexpressing MDCK cells (MDCK-MDR1) and control MDCK cells (MDCK-CT) using the NIR dyes indocyanine green (ICG), IR-783, IR-775, rhodamine 800, XenoLight DiR, and Genhance 750, at 0.4 μM–100 μM. ICG and IR-783 were also evaluated in HT-29 cells in which MDR1 overexpression was induced by colchicine (HT-29-MDR1) and their controls (HT-29-CT). In vivo optical imaging studies were conducted using immunodeficient mice bearing HT-29-CT and HT-29-MDR1 xenografts. Results: ICG’s emission intensity was 2.0- and 2.2-fold higher in control versus MDR1-overexpressing cells, in MDCK and HT-29 cell lines, respectively. The respective IR-783 control:MDR1 ratio was 1.4 in both MDCK and HT-29 cells. Optical imaging of mice bearing HT-29-CT and HT-29-MDR1 xenografts revealed a statistically non-significant, 1.7-fold difference (p > 0.05) in ICG emission intensity between control and MDR1 tumors. No such differences were observed with IR-783. Conclusion: ICG and IR-783 appear to be weak MDR1 substrates. In vivo, low sensitivity and high between-subject variability impair the ability to use the currently studied probes as markers of tumor MDR1 activity. The results suggest that, for future use of this technology, additional NIR probes should be screened as MDR1 substrates. PMID:27895581

  5. Tumor endothelial marker 7 (TEM-7): a novel target for antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Rebecca G; Rouleau, Cecile; Weber, William; Mehraein, Khodadad; Smale, Robert; Curiel, Maritza; Callahan, Michelle; Roy, Andre; Boutin, Paula; St Martin, Thia; Nacht, Mariana; Teicher, Beverly A

    2011-11-01

    Antiangiogenesis has been validated as a therapeutic strategy to treat cancer, however, a need remains to identify new targets and therapies for specific diseases and to improve clinical benefit from antiangiogenic agents. Tumor endothelial marker 7 (TEM-7) was investigated as a possible target for therapeutic antiangiogenic intervention in cancer. TEM-7 expression was assessed by in situ hybridization or by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 130 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and 410 frozen human clinical specimens of cancer plus 301 normal tissue samples. In vitro TEM-7 expression was evaluated in 4 human endothelial cell models and in 32 human cancer cell lines by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. An anti-TEM-7 antibody was tested in vitro on human SKOV3 ovarian and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells that expressed TEM-7 in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis assays. In frozen tumor tissues, TEM-7 mRNA and protein was detected in all but one of the cancer types tested and was infrequently expressed in normal frozen tissues. In FFPE tumor tissues, TEM-7 protein was detected by IHC in colon, breast, lung, bladder, ovarian and endometrial cancers and in sarcomas. TEM-7 protein was not detected in head and neck, prostate or liver cancers. TEM-7 expression was restricted to the vasculature and was absent from tumor cells. In vitro, TEM-7 was not detected in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) but was induced in endothelial precursor/progenitor cells (EPC) in the presence of the mitogen phorbol ester PMA. An anti-TEM-7 antibody mediated ADCC and phagocytosis in SKOV3 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines infected with an adenovirus expressing TEM-7. These data demonstrate that TEM-7 is a vascular protein associated with angiogenic states. TEM-7 is a novel and attractive target for antiangiogenic therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Circulating tumor DNA as an early marker of therapeutic response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tie, J.; Kinde, I.; Wang, Y.; Wong, H. L.; Roebert, J.; Christie, M.; Tacey, M.; Wong, R.; Singh, M.; Karapetis, C. S.; Desai, J.; Tran, B.; Strausberg, R. L.; Diaz, L. A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K. W.; Vogelstein, B.; Gibbs, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early indicators of treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could conceivably be used to optimize treatment. We explored early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels as a marker of therapeutic efficacy. Patients and methods This prospective study involved 53 mCRC patients receiving standard first-line chemotherapy. Both ctDNA and CEA were assessed in plasma collected before treatment, 3 days after treatment and before cycle 2. Computed tomography (CT) scans were carried out at baseline and 8–10 weeks and were centrally assessed using RECIST v1.1 criteria. Tumors were sequenced using a panel of 15 genes frequently mutated in mCRC to identify candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis. For each patient, one tumor mutation was selected to assess the presence and the level of ctDNA in plasma samples using a digital genomic assay termed Safe-SeqS. Results Candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis were identified in 52 (98.1%) of the tumors. These patient-specific candidate tissue mutations were detectable in the cell-free DNA from the plasma of 48 of these 52 patients (concordance 92.3%). Significant reductions in ctDNA (median 5.7-fold; P < 0.001) levels were observed before cycle 2, which correlated with CT responses at 8–10 weeks (odds ratio = 5.25 with a 10-fold ctDNA reduction; P = 0.016). Major reductions (≥10-fold) versus lesser reductions in ctDNA precycle 2 were associated with a trend for increased progression-free survival (median 14.7 versus 8.1 months; HR = 1.87; P = 0.266). Conclusions ctDNA is detectable in a high proportion of treatment naïve mCRC patients. Early changes in ctDNA during first-line chemotherapy predict the later radiologic response. PMID:25851626

  7. Tumor endothelial markers define novel subsets of cancer-specific circulating endothelial cells associated with antitumor efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mehran, Reza; Nilsson, Monique; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Du, Zhiqiang; Cascone, Tina; Wu, Hua Kang; Cortes, Andrea; Xu, Li; Zurita, Amado; Schier, Robert; Riedel, Bernhard; El-Zein, Randa; Heymach, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CEC) are derived from multiple sources including bone marrow (circulating endothelial progenitors [CEP]) and established vasculature (mature CEC). Although CEC have shown promise as a biomarker for cancer patients, their utility has been limited in part by the lack of specificity for tumor vasculature and the different non-malignant causes that can impact CEC. Tumor endothelial markers (TEM) are antigens enriched in tumor vs non-malignant endothelia. We hypothesized that TEMs may be detectable on CEC and that these circulating TEM+ endothelial cells (CTEC) may be a more specific marker for cancer and tumor response than standard CEC. We found that tumor-bearing mice had a relative increase in numbers of circulating CTEC, specifically with increased levels of TEM7 and TEM8 expression. Following treatment with various vascular targeting agents, we observed a decrease in CTEC that correlated with the reductions in tumor growth. We extended these findings to human clinical samples and observed that CTEC were present in esophageal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (N=40) and their levels decreased after surgical resection. These results demonstrate that CTEC are detectable in preclinical cancer models and cancer patients. Further, they suggest that CTEC offer a novel cancer-associated marker that may be useful as a blood-based surrogate for assessing the presence of tumor vasculature and antiangiogenic drug activity. PMID:24626092

  8. h-Caldesmon as a specific marker of smooth muscle cell differentiation in some soft tissue tumors of the skin.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, Stephen F; Morgan, Michael; Talley, Lori; Smoller, Bruce R

    2002-08-01

    An existing problem in contemporary pathology is the classification and distinction of spindle cell soft tissue tumors of the skin. Markers such as alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and desmin, considered specific for smooth muscle cell (SMC), have been shown to be expressed in a variety of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic processes. High-molecular-weight caldesmon (h-caldesmon), one of two isoforms, is reported to be expressed exclusively by SMC and has recently been shown to be a specific marker of SMC tumors. Tumors were obtained from 11 patients taken from the surgical pathology archives of the University of South Florida and cases were coded as smooth muscle hamartoma, myofibroma, and dermatomyofibroma. The case of smooth muscle hamartoma had greater than 90% of tumor cells labeling with anti-h-caldesmon antibodies. Three of three cases of myofibroma had focal areas of positivity representing less than 10% of total tumor cells. Seven of seven dermatomyofibromas showed no apparent labeling with anti-h-caldesmon antibody. Dense reactivity was noted in vascular wall smooth muscle, indicating internal controls. We can conclude that h-caldesmon is a specific marker of fully differentiated smooth muscle and that it can serve to differentiate spindled SMC soft tissue tumors of the skin from tumors of myofibroblastic and/or fibroblastic origin.

  9. Thrombomodulin as a marker for vascular tumors. Comparative study with factor VIII and Ulex europaeus I lectin.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, S; Maruyama, I; Sakae, K; Igata, A; Majerus, P W; Sato, E

    1987-10-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is a newly described endothelial cell-associated protein that functions as a potent natural anticoagulant by converting thrombin from a procoagulant protease to an anticoagulant. Various vascular tumors were characterized with immunoperoxidase staining with the use of a polyclonal anti-TM serum. The staining patterns of TM were compared with those of Factor VIII-related antigen (FVIII-RAG) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), which have been used as markers for endothelial cells. The results showed that TM is a specific and a highly sensitive marker for angiosarcomas in comparison with FVIII-RAG or UEA-I. In contrast, UEA-I is more sensitive for benign vascular tumors than TM or FVIII-RAG. The other mesenchymal tumors of nonvascular origin showed negative staining for three endothelial markers. These results indicate that TM is a new specific and sensitive tool for the diagnosis of angiosarcomas.

  10. Expression profiling of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors identifies subgroups with clinical relevance, prognostic markers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Ellinor; Arvidsson, Yvonne; Swärd, Christina; Hofving, Tobias; Wängberg, Bo; Kristiansson, Erik; Nilsson, Ola

    2016-06-01

    We wanted to define the transcriptome of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors in order to identify clinically relevant subgroups of tumors, prognostic markers and novel targets for treatment. Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted on tumor biopsies from 33 patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the distal ileum and metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis identified three groups of tumors. The largest group, comprising half of the tumors, was characterized by longer patient survival and higher expression of neuroendocrine markers, including SSTR2. Tumors with higher grade (G2/3) or gain of chromosome 14 were associated with shorter patient survival and increased expression of cell cycle-promoting genes. Pathway analysis predicted the prostaglandin E receptor 2 (PTGER2) as the most significantly activated regulator in tumors of higher grade, whereas Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) was the most significantly activated regulator in tumors with gain of chromosome 14. Druggable genes identified from expression profiles included clinically proven SSTR2 and also novel targets, for example, receptor tyrosine kinases (RET, FGFR1/3, PDGFRB and FLT1), epigenetic regulators, molecular chaperones and signal transduction molecules. Evaluation of candidate drug targets on neuroendocrine tumors cells (GOT1) showed significant inhibition of tumor cell growth after treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or inhibitors of HDAC, HSP90 and AKT. In conclusion, we have defined the transcriptome of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors and identified novel subgroups with clinical relevance. We found specific gene expression patterns associated with tumor grade and chromosomal alterations. Our data also suggest novel prognostic biomarkers and therapies for these patients.

  11. Tumor motion changes in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors: an evaluation based on four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography and fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Toya, Ryo; Saito, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Osamu; Maruyama, Masato; Yonemura, Keisuke; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Kai, Yudai; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Araki, Fujio

    2017-03-23

    For stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of liver tumors, tumor motion induced by respiration must be taken into account in planning and treatment. We evaluated whether liver tumor motion at the planning simulation represents liver tumor motion during SBRT, and estimated inter- and intrafractional tumor motion changes in patients undergoing liver SBRT. Ten patients underwent four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) image-guided liver SBRT with abdominal compression (AC) and fiducial markers. 4D-CBCT was performed to evaluate liver tumor motion at the planning simulation, pre-, and post-SBRT. The translational distances at the center position of the fiducial markers from all 10 phases on the 4D-CBCT images were measured as the extent of the liver tumor motion in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate the correlation between liver tumor motion of the planning simulation and the mean liver tumor motion of the pre-SBRT. Inter- and intrafractional liver tumor motion changes were measured based on the 4D-CBCT of planning simulation, pre-, and post-SBRT. Significant inter- and intrafractional changes in liver tumor motion were defined as a change of >3 mm. The mean (± SD) liver tumor motion of the planning simulation 4D-CBCT was 1.7 ± 0.8 mm, 2.4 ± 2.2 mm, and 5.3 ± 3.3 mm, in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. Those of the pre-SBRT 4D-CBCT were 1.2 ± 0.7 mm, 2.3 ± 2.3 mm, and 4.5 ± 3.8 mm, in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. There was a strong significant correlation between liver tumor motion of the planning simulation and pre-SBRT in the LR (R = 0.7, P < 0.01), AP (R = 0.9, P < 0.01), and SI (R = 0.9, P < 0.01) directions. Significant inter- and intrafractional liver tumor motion changes occurred in 10 and 2% of treatment fractions, respectively. Liver tumor

  12. Therapeutic Potential of Curcumin for the Treatment of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Brain malignancies currently carry a poor prognosis despite the current multimodal standard of care that includes surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. As new therapies are desperately needed, naturally occurring chemical compounds have been studied for their potential chemotherapeutic benefits and low toxicity profile. Curcumin, found in the rhizome of turmeric, has extensive therapeutic promise via its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative properties. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo data have shown it to be an effective treatment for brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme. These effects are potentiated by curcumin's ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest, activation of apoptotic pathways, induction of autophagy, disruption of molecular signaling, inhibition of invasion, and metastasis and by increasing the efficacy of existing chemotherapeutics. Further, clinical data suggest that it has low toxicity in humans even at large doses. Curcumin is a promising nutraceutical compound that should be evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of human brain tumors. PMID:27807473

  13. External quality control results for hormones, tumor markers and CRP testing.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, N; Kawano, K; Takubo, T; Nakamura, H; Tsuda, I

    1999-01-01

    Most hormones, tumor markers, C-reactive protein, and rheumatoid factor (RF) are measured immunologically. Immunological methods based on the antigen-antibody reaction have certain specific problems, including their principle of determination, character of antibodies used, reaction conditions, and others. Free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), as well as alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), prostate antigen, carcinoantigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), and CA 125 are very commonly measured in the routine medical laboratory. Authentic materials can be obtained for hormones and CRP, and efforts to improve quality control and standardization have been made for years. Results of surveillance for FT4, TSH, and AFP were not poor, but inter-laboratory differences for CEA, CA 19-9, and RF were not insignificant.

  14. Immunoassay for tumor markers in human serum based on Si nanoparticles and SiC@Ag SERS-active substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Zhou, Jun; Feng, Zhao; Wang, Fuyan; Xie, Shushen; Bu, Shizhong

    2016-04-21

    Based on a sandwich structure consisting of nano-Si immune probes and a SiC@Ag SERS-active immune substrate, a kind of ultra-sensitive immunoassay protocol is presented to detect tumor markers in human serum. The nano-Si immune probes were prepared by immobilizing the detecting antibodies onto the surfaces of SiO2-coated Si nanoparticles (NPs) which were modified with 3-(aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, and the SiC@Ag SERS-active immune substrates were prepared by immobilizing the captured antibodies on Ag film sputtered on SiC sandpaper. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that Si NPs are directly used as Raman tags in an immunoassay strategy. And, the SiC@Ag SERS-active substrates exhibit excellent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performances with an enhancement factor of ∼10(5), owing to the plasmonic effect of the Ag film on the rough surface of the SiC sandpaper. In our experiments, the sandwich immunoassay structure has been successfully applied to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA), α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in a human serum sample and the limit of detections are as low as 1.79 fg mL(-1), 0.46 fg mL(-1) and 1.3 × 10(-3) U mL(-1), respectively. It reveals that the proposed immunoassay protocol has demonstrated a high sensitivity for tumor markers in human serum and a potential practicability in biosensing and clinical diagnostics.

  15. Oncocytic variant of malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Boland, Jennifer M; Folpe, Andrew L

    2016-11-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor (MGNET) is a very rare, aggressive malignant neoplasm that may occur in any location in the gastrointestinal tract. Malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumors typically consist of sheet-like to pseudopapillary proliferation of primitive-appearing epithelioid cells with a moderate amount of lightly eosinophilic cytoplasm, round nuclei and small nucleoli, often in association with osteoclast-like giant cells. By immunohistochemistry, these tumors show expression of S100 protein and SOX10, in the absence of expression of more specific melanocytic markers (eg, HMB45, Melan A). Genetically, malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumors are characterized by rearrangements of the EWSR1 or FUS genes with CREB1 or ATF1. We report a case of gastric malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor occurring in a 46-year-old woman and showing striking oncocytic cytoplasmic change, a previously undescribed potential diagnostic pitfall. An initial needle biopsy showed large, eosinophilic cells with S100 protein and SOX10 expression and lacking expression of KIT, DOG1, Melan A, keratin, chromogranin, or smooth muscle actin, and was interpreted as representing a granular cell tumor. The subsequent excision specimen showed similar-appearing areas, but also contained small more primitive-appearing areas, lacking oncocytic change and having high nuclear grade and brisk mitotic activity. This resection specimen was initially diagnosed as a malignant granular cell tumor. However subsequent gene expression profiling studies showed an EWSR1-ATF1 fusion, confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization for EWSR1, and a final diagnosis of MGNET with oncocytic change was made. This case highlights a previously undescribed pitfall in the diagnosis of MGNET, oncocytic change, and suggests that MGNET should be included in the differential diagnosis for unusual oncocytic neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Tumor markers and oncogene expression in thyroid cancer using biochemical and immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Matsubara, F; Mizukami, Y; Miyazaki, I; Michigishi, T; Yanaihara, N

    1990-04-01

    In 111 thyroid cancer patients consisting of 89 papillary carcinomas, 17 follicular carcinomas, 2 medullary carcinomas, 1 squamous cell carcinoma and 2 malignant lymphomas, the levels of 12 tumor markers, including thyroglobulin (Tg), were measured in the serum by radioimmunoassay and radioimmunoassay related methods. Serum levels of Tg were elevated in 58.6%, those of CA-M26 in 15.7%, CA 19-9 in 5.3%, CT in 3.6%, NSE in 3.6%, CA 15-3 in 2.6%, CA 125 in 2.6%, CEA in 0.9%, CA-M 29 in 0%, ferritin in 0%, SCC in 0% and AFP in 0% of cases. Among the patients, there was a case of thyroid carcinoma secreting thyroglobulin and CA 19-9, both of whose titer decreased after surgery. Immunohistochemical studies were carried out on 57 of the above mentioned patients plus 6 anaplastic carcinomas, 15 adenomas, 5 adenomatous goiters, 6 Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 15 Graves' disease and 15 normal subjects. CA 19-9 was positive in 58% of the papillary carcinomas, EGF in 73% of papillary carcinomas, 67% of anaplastic carcinomas, and 33% of follicular carcinomas, while EGF-R was found in 73% of the papillary carcinomas, and 33% of the follicular carcinomas. Enhanced expression of ras p 21 oncogene and (c-myc oncogene) was demonstrated in 100% (100%) of anaplastic carcinomas, in 100% (67%) of follicular carcinomas and in 63% (90%) of papillary carcinomas. Our results indicate that a better tumor marker is required and more extensive molecular oncology research should be pursued.

  17. Possibility of D2-40 as a diagnostic and tumor differentiation-suggestive marker for some of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor (PMT) has been established as a tumor that causes tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) associated with mesenchymal neoplasm. Its lineage of differentiation has not been elucidated. Previously, the presence of lymphatic vessels inside PMTs has been documented using an anti-podoplanin antibody; the tumor cells of PMTs were reported to not react with it. In this study of 14 cases of PMTs, we used immunohistochemistry of D2-40, a relatively specific lymphatic endothelial marker, to see if they stained PMTs or not, with particular interest in its reaction with microcystic structures containing lymph-like fluid. We report that most of the PMTs (12 out of 14 cases; 86%) were immunostained by D2-40 in their tumor cells; D2-40-positive lymphatic vessels inside the tumor were also observed. We used a proportion score (0-4+), an intensity score (0-3+), and a total score (the sum of the proportion score and the intensity score) to quantitate our results. We report that 50% of cases (7 out of 14 cases) had a total score ≥ 4+; immunostaining of D2-40 in cases with a total score ≥ 4+ was easy to observe at a glance. Most of the tumor cells lining the microcystic structures were immunostained with D2-40. Thus, D2-40 could be a useful diagnostic marker of PMTs and it might also indicate that PMTs take a lymphatic endothelial immunophenotype.

  18. Intracellular TCR-signaling pathway: novel markers for lymphoma diagnosis and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, Claudio; Rizvi, Hasan; Paterson, Jennifer; Shende, Vishvesh; Akarca, Ayse U; Agostini, Elena; Fuligni, Fabio; Righi, Simona; Spagnolo, Sebastiano; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Clark, Edward A; Pileri, Stefano A; Marafioti, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    Despite the immunologic functions of T-cell receptor signaling molecules being extensively investigated, their potential as immunohistochemical markers has been poorly explored. With this background, we evaluated the expression of 5 intracellular proteins-GADS, DOK2, SKAP55, ITK, and PKCα-involved in T-cell receptor signaling in normal and neoplastic hematologic tissue samples, using antibodies raised against fixation-resistant epitopes of the 5 molecules. All 5 antibodies were associated with normal T-cell differentiation. GADS, DOK2, SKAP55, and ITK turned out to be T-cell lineage-specific markers in the setting of lymphoid and myeloid precursor neoplasms but showed differential expression in peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes, being detected in PTCL/not otherwise specified (NOS) and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma but negative in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Peripheral B-cell lymphomas were consistently negative for ITK, with occasional cases showing expression of DOK2 and SKAP55, and a proportion (47%) of hairy cell leukemias were GADS. Notably, PKCα highlighted a defective antigen in both PTCL/NOS (6%) and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (10%), mostly negative in ALCL, and was aberrantly expressed in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (65%), Burkitt lymphoma (48%), and plasma cell myeloma (48%). In conclusion, all five molecules evaluated play a role in T-cell differentiation in normal and neoplastic tissues. They can be applied confidently to routine sections contributing primarily to assignment of T-lineage differentiation in the setting of hematopoietic precursor neoplasms (GADS/DOK2/SKAP55/ITK) and for the differential diagnosis between ALCL and PTCL/NOS (GADS/DOK2/SKAP55/ITK) or classical Hodgkin lymphoma (PKCα). Finally, association with specific tumor subtypes may have therapeutic potential.

  19. Potential immunological markers for diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Rubinsky-Elefant, Guita; Hoshino-Shimizu, Sumie; Jacob, Cristina Miuki Abe; Sanchez, Maria Carmen Arroyo; Ferreira, Antonio Walter

    2011-01-01

    In human toxocariasis, there are few approaches using immunological markers for diagnosis and therapeutic assessment. An immunoblot (IB) assay using excretory-secretory Toxocara canis antigen was standardized for monitoring IgG, IgE and IgA antibodies in 27 children with toxocariasis (23 visceral, three mixed visceral and ocular, and one ocular form) for 22-116 months after chemotherapy. IB sensitivity was 100% for IgG antibodies to bands of molecular weight 29-38, 48-54, 95-116, 121-162, >205 kDa, 80.8% for IgE to 29-38, 48-54, 95-121, > 205 kDa, and 65.4% for IgA to 29-38, 48-54, 81-93 kDa. Candidates for diagnostic markers should be IgG antibodies to bands of low molecular weight (29-38 and 48-54 kDa). One group of patients presented the same antibody reactivity to all bands throughout the follow-up study; in the other group, antibodies decayed partially or completely to some or all bands, but these changes were not correlated with time after chemotherapy. Candidates for monitoring patients after chemotherapy may be IgG antibodies to > 205 kDa fractions, IgA to 29-38, 48-54, 81-93 kDa and IgE to 95-121 kDa. Further identification of antigen epitopes related to these markers will allow the development of sensitive and specific immunoassays for the diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of toxocariasis.

  20. Immunohistochemical Markers of Soft Tissue Tumors: Pathologic Diagnosis, Genetic Contributions, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Parham, David M

    2015-01-01

    After ~30 years of widespread usage, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become a standard method of diagnosis for surgical pathology. Because of the plethora of diagnoses and often subtle nature of diagnostic criteria, IHC finds particular utility in soft tissue tumors. The use of progressively small amounts of tissue for diagnosis highlights the importance of this method. The sensitivity and crispness of IHC stains have progressively improved with the advent of new techniques. Traditionally, IHC detects cell-typic markers that characterize cell phenotypes, such as chromogranin for neuroectodermal tissue, myogenin for skeletal muscle, and cytokeratin for epithelium. However, the advent of genetic discoveries have led to IHC testing for detection of fusion gene products or overexpressed oncogenes associated with deletions and mutations. Proliferation-based markers such as Ki-67 can also be used for prognosis and grading, but more standardization is needed. Development of monoclonal antibody-based pharmaceuticals, such as imatinib or crizotinib, holds the promise of tailored anticancer therapy. IHC thus has assumed importance not only for diagnosis but also for guidance of personalized medicine. PMID:26549970

  1. Usefulness of examination of some tumor markers in diagnostics of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Snarska, Jadwiga; Szajda, Slawomir Dariusz; Puchalski, Zbigniew; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Chabielska, Ewa; Kaminski, Fabian; Zwierz, Piotr; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostics of liver cancer is mainly based on imaging methods: which are ultrasound and computer tomography. Determination of tumor markers is an accessory investigation enabling us to detect cancer, to evaluate the effectiveness of its operative and postoperative treatment and to diagnose early cancer relapse or distant metastases. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a basic well-known marker in diagnostics of liver cancer. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer procoagulant (CP) are also important in case of metastases to this organ, especially from the colon. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of AFP, CEA and CP in detection of liver cancer. The material of the study was the blood serum from 25 patients with liver cancer diagnosed histopathologically and 12 healthy individuals as a control group. The concentrations of AFP and CEP were assessed by immunoenzymatic method (MEIA) in the Axsym analyzer of Abbott and expressed in ng/mL. CP activity was determined by coagulation method worked out by Gordon and Benson and expressed as coagulation time in seconds (s). Based on the results obtained in our study, the concentrations of AFP and CEP were several fold higher in the serum of patients with liver cancer than the relevant values of these markers. CP activity was higher in the serum of patients with liver cancer than the mean values of patients in the control group. The differences found in the study between the groups examined and the control group were statistically significant atp<0.001. The results confirmed a high diagnostic value of AFP and CEA testing and suggest the possibility of using CP activity to detect liver cancer.

  2. CA 125 and other tumor markers in uterine leiomyomas and their association with lesion characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Babacan, Ali; Kizilaslan, Cem; Gun, Ismet; Muhcu, Murat; Mungen, Ercument; Atay, Vedat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with serum levels of several tumor markers in a group of patients operated for uterine myoma. One hundred thirty-seven female patients operated for uterine myoma were included. Serum samples were examined for CA 125, CA 19-9, CA 15-3, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels as part of routine workup. Pathological and morphological characteristics of the patients were retrieved from medical records. The mean age was 46.7 ± 8.8 years (range, 22-85 y). Abnormally high levels of CA 125, CA 19-9, CA 15-3, CEA, and AFP were found in 19.7%, 6.6%, 5.1%, 3.7%, and 1.5% of the patients, respectively. Patients with additional adenomyosis and patients with at least one large myoma (≥ 5 cm diameter) had significantly higher levels of CA 125. Multivariate analysis identified coexistence of adenomyosis (OR 7.7 [95% CI, 2.6-23.0], p < 0.001) and presence of at least one large myoma (OR 5.6 [1.4-22.8], p = 0.016) as independent predictors of abnormally high CA 125 levels. CA 125 levels are affected by the tumor size and coexistence of adenomyosis in uterine leiomyomas. Indirect mechanisms caused by large myoma size such as peritoneal irritation may be responsible for CA 125 elevations. PMID:24955185

  3. Tumor marker nucleoporin 88 kDa regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport of NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nozomi Kilsdonk, Jeroen W.J. van; Ostendorf, Benedikt; Smeets, Ruben; Bruggeman, Sophia W.M.; Alonso, Angel; Loo, Fons van de; Schneider, Matthias; Berg, Wim B. van den; Swart, Guido W.M.

    2008-09-26

    Nucleoporin 88 kDa (Nup88) is a tumor marker, overexpressed in various types of cancer. In Drosophila Nup88 (mbo) was reported to selectively mediate the nucleocytoplasmic transport of NF-{kappa}B, an ubiquitous transcription factor involved in immune responses, apoptosis, and cancer. We addressed the function of Nup88 in mammalian cells. Selective depletion of Nup88 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent reporter gene activation and the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B without affecting the upstream activation pathway in NIH3T3 cells. In contrast, nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptor was not reduced by the depletion of Nup88. In metastatic melanoma cells overexpressing Nup88, constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B was found both in nucleus and cytoplasm. Nup88 depletion in these cells reduced TNF-induced nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B subunits. We conclude that Nup88 regulates the activity of NF-{kappa}B at the level of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Overexpression of Nup88 in tumor cells may, thus be involved in the constitutive NF-{kappa}B activation.

  4. Consistency-based detection of potential tumor-specific deletions in matched normal/tumor genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Structural variations in human genomes, such as insertions, deletion, or rearrangements, play an important role in cancer development. Next-Generation Sequencing technologies have been central in providing ways to detect such variations. Most existing methods however are limited to the analysis of a single genome, and it is only recently that the comparison of closely related genomes has been considered. In particular, a few recent works considered the analysis of data sets obtained by sequencing both tumor and healthy tissues of the same cancer patient. In that context, the goal is to detect variations that are specific to exactly one of the genomes, for example to differentiate between patient-specific and tumor-specific variations. This is a difficult task, especially when facing the additional challenge of the possible contamination of healthy tissues by tumor cells and conversely. Results In the current work, we analyzed a data set of paired-end short-reads, obtained by sequencing tumor tissues and healthy tissues, both from the same cancer patient. Based on a combinatorial notion of conflict between deletions, we show that in the tumor data, more deletions are predicted than there could actually be in a diploid genome. In contrast, the predictions for the data from normal tissues are almost conflict-free. We designed and applied a method, specific to the analysis of such pooled and contaminated data sets, to detect potential tumor-specific deletions. Our method takes the deletion calls from both data sets and assigns reads from the mixed tumor/normal data to the normal one with the goal to minimize the number of reads that need to be discarded to obtain a set of conflict-free deletion clusters. We observed that, on the specific data set we analyze, only a very small fraction of the reads needs to be discarded to obtain a set of consistent deletions. Conclusions We present a framework based on a rigorous definition of consistency between deletions

  5. Livin/BIRC7 expression as malignancy marker in adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Barbara; Sbiera, Silviu; Casa, Silvia Della; Weigand, Isabel; Wild, Vanessa; Steinhauer, Sonja; Fadda, Guido; Kocot, Arkadius; Bekteshi, Michaela; Mambretti, Egle M; Rosenwald, Andreas; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Fassnacht, Martin; Ronchi, Cristina L

    2017-01-01

    Livin/BIRC7 is a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins family, which are involved in tumor development through the inhibition of caspases. Aim was to investigate the expression of livin and other members of its pathway in adrenocortical tumors and in the adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell line NCI-H295R. The mRNA expression of livin, its isoforms α and β, XIAP, CASP3 and DIABLO was evaluated by qRT-PCR in 82 fresh-frozen adrenal tissues (34 ACC, 25 adenomas = ACA, 23 normal adrenal glands = NAG). Livin protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 270 paraffin-embedded tissues (192 ACC, 58 ACA, 20 NAG). Livin, CASP3 and cleaved caspase-3 were evaluated in NCI-H295R after induction of livin overexpression. Relative livin mRNA expression was significantly higher in ACC than in ACA and NAG (0.060 ± 0.116 vs 0.004 ± 0.014 and 0.002 ± 0.009, respectively, p < 0.01), being consistently higher in tumors than in adjacent NAG and isoform β more expressed than α. No significant differences in CASP3, XIAP and DIABLO levels were found among these groups. In immunohistochemistry, livin was localized in both cytoplasm and nuclei. The ratio between cytoplasmic and nuclear staining was significantly higher in ACC (1.51 ± 0.66) than in ACA (0.80 ± 0.35) and NAG (0.88 ± 0.27; p < 0.0001). No significant correlations were observed between livin expression and histopathological parameters or clinical outcome. In NCI-H295R cells, the livin overexpression slightly reduced the activation of CASP3, but did not correlate with cell viability. In conclusion, livin is specifically over-expressed in ACC, suggesting that it might be involved in adrenocortical tumorigenesis and represent a new molecular marker of malignancy. PMID:28030838

  6. Evaluation of Tumor Markers and Their Impact on Prognosis in Gallbladder, Bile Duct and Cholangiocellular Carcinomas - A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Liska, Vaclav; Treska, Vladislav; Skalicky, Tomas; Fichtl, Jakub; Bruha, Jan; Vycital, Ondrej; Topolcan, Ondrej; Palek, Richard; Rosendorf, Jachym; Polivka, Jiri; Holubec, Lubos

    2017-04-01

    The behavior of tumor markers in biliary tract malignancies is not well-known and has been scarcely studied. Such markers could play important roles in diagnostic and prognostic schemes as well as in decision-making about the best treatment strategies. This study analyzed the preoperative serum levels of conventional tumor markers (AFP, CEA, CA 19-9, CA 72-4), proliferative marker thymidine kinase (TK) and cytokeratins (TPA, TPS and CYFRA 21.1) in patients with gallbladder carcinoma, bile duct carcinoma (Klatskin) and cholangiocellular carcinoma, in relation to the patient prognosis. The study aimed in finding the role of tumor markers in not properly investigated diseases, where their importance is often marginalized. The study included 43 patients, who underwent either radical surgical procedure (n=21) or explorative laparotomy without any surgical treatment (n=22) for gallbladder carcinoma, bile duct carcinoma (Klatskin tumor) and cholangiocellular carcinoma (24, 8 and 11 patients, respectively) between 2003 and 2010 at our Department. The association of serum tumor markers and patients' prognosis were assessed for the entire cohort and for each cancer type and also with regard to treatment (radical surgery versus explorative laparotomy). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free interval (DFI) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and statistically evaluated using the LogRank test. DFI was computed only in the subgroup of patients treated by radical surgery. The statistical analysis of tumor markers revealed TK as a poor prognostic factor for shorter DFI (HR=3.5, 95%CI=0.6-21.3, p<0.05) and also OS (HR=4.6, 95%CI=1.0-4.7, p<0.05) in patients with gallbladder carcinoma treated with radical surgery. TPS was demonstrated as a poor prognostic factor for OS in patients with gallbladder carcinoma (HR=12.7, 95%CI=1.4-117.7, p<0.05). CEA was proven to be a factor of poor prognosis with shorter OS in patients after explorative laparotomy for all cumulated studied

  7. Down's syndrome-associated single minded gene as a novel tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Deyoung, Maurice Phil; Scheurle, Daniela; Damania, Hema; Zylberberg, Claudia; Narayanan, Ramaswamy

    2002-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) database has thousands of Expressed Sequence Tags encompassing both known and novel genes. Bioinformatics of the CGAP database led to the prediction that Single Minded Gene (sim2) could be specific to colon tumors. The sim2 gene is located in a minimum region of the chromosome 21 often implicated in trisomia called Down's Syndrome Critical Region. To date, the sim proteins have not been shown to be involved in cancer. Intrigued by the possible association of a Down's syndrome-related gene to solid tumors, efforts were undertaken to validate the expression specificity. The sim2 isoform (sim2-short-form, sim2-s) expression was seen in carcinomas of colon, pancreas and prostate, but not in corresponding normal tissues. Stage-specific expression of the sim2-s protein was seen in normal matched paraffin sections of the colon tumors. In a matched set of tissues of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinomas, sim2-s expression was detected in the BPH. The expression specificity of sim2-s in select solid tumors offers both diagnostic and therapeutic potential and warrants additional study.

  8. Tumor endothelial marker 8 expression levels in dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines are related to clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Venanzi, Franco Maria; Petrini, Massimiliano; Fiammenghi, Laura; Bolli, Elisabetta; Granato, Anna Maria; Ridolfi, Laura; Gabrielli, Federica; Barucca, Alessandra; Concetti, Antonio; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Riccobon, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that tumor endothelial markers (TEMs 1-9) are up modulated in immunosuppressive, pro-angiogenic dendritic cells (DCs) found in tumor microenvironments. We recently reported that monocyte-derived DCs used for vaccination trials may accumulate high levels of TEM8 gene transcripts. Here, we investigate whether TEM8 expression in DC preparations represents a specific tumor-associated change of potential clinical relevance. TEM8 expression at the mRNA and protein level was evaluated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and cytofluorimetric analysis in human clinical grade DCs utilized for the therapeutic vaccination of 17 advanced cancer patients (13 melanoma and 4 renal cell carcinoma). The analyses revealed that DCs from patients markedly differ in their ability to up-modulate TEM8. Indeed, mDCs from eight non-progressing patients [median overall survival (OS) = 32 months, all positive to the delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH)], had similar TEM8 mRNA expression levels [mDCs vs. immature iDCs; mean fold increase (mfi) = 1.97] to those found in healthy donors (mfi = 2.7). Conversely, mDCs from nine progressing patients (OS < 5 months, all but one with negative DTH) showed an increase in TEM8 mRNA levels (mfi = 12.88, p = 0.0018). The present observations suggest that TEM8 expression levels in DC-based therapeutic vaccines would allow the selection of a subgroup of patients who are most likely to benefit from therapeutic vaccination.

  9. Potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Valdespino, Victor; Valdespino, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease with both genetic and epigenetic origins. The growing field of epigenetics has contributed to our understanding of oncogenesis and tumor progression, and has allowed the development of novel therapeutic drugs. First-generation epigenetic inhibitor drugs have obtained modest clinical results in two types of hematological malignancy. Second-generation epigenetic inhibitors are in development, and have intrinsically greater selectivity for their molecular targets. Solid tumors are more genetic and epigenetically complex than hematological malignancies, but the transcriptome and epigenome biomarkers have been identified for many of these malignancies. This solid tumor molecular aberration profile may be modified using specific or quasi-specific epidrugs together with conventional and innovative anticancer treatments. In this critical review, we briefly analyze the strategies to select the targeted epigenetic changes, enumerate the second-generation epigenetic inhibitors, and describe the main signs indicating the potential of epigenetic therapies in the management of solid tumors. We also highlight the work of consortia or academic organizations that support the undertaking of human epigenetic therapeutic projects as well as some examples of transcriptome/epigenome profile determination in clinical assessment of cancer patients treated with epidrugs. There is a good chance that epigenetic therapies will be able to be used in patients with solid tumors in the future. This may happen soon through collaboration of diverse scientific groups, making the selection of targeted epigenetic aberration(s) more rapid, the design and probe of drug candidates, accelerating in vitro and in vivo assays, and undertaking new cancer epigenetic-therapy clinical trails. PMID:26346546

  10. Taming Tumor Glycolysis and Potential Implications for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2017-01-01

    Immune evasion and deregulation of energy metabolism play a pivotal role in cancer progression. Besides the coincidence in their historical documentation and concurrent recognition as hallmarks of cancer, both immune evasion and metabolic deregulation may be functionally linked as well. For example, the metabolic phenotype, particularly tumor glycolysis (aerobic glycolysis), impacts the tumor microenvironment (TME), which in turn acts as a major barrier for successful targeting of cancer by antitumor immune cells and other therapeutics. Similarly, in the light of recent research, it has been known that some of the immune sensitive antigens that are downregulated in cancer may also be restored or induced by cellular/metabolic stress. For instance, cancer cells downregulate the cell surface ligands such as MHC class I chain-related (MIC) protein-(A/B) that are normally upregulated in disease/pathological conditions. Noteworthy, the MHC class I chain-related protein A and B (MIC-A/B) are recognized by natural killer (NK) cells for immune elimination. Interestingly, MIC-A/B is stress inducible as demonstrated by oxidative stress and other cellular-stress factors. Consequently, stimulation of metabolic stress has also been shown to sensitize cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Taken together, data from recent reports imply that dysregulation of tumor glycolysis could facilitate induction of immune sensitive surface ligands leading to increased efficacy of antitumor immunotherapeutics. Nonetheless, dysregulated tumor glycolysis may also impact the TME and alter it from acidic, low pH into a therapeutically desirable TME that can enhance the effective infiltration of antitumor immune cells. In this mini-review, targeting tumor glycolysis has been discussed to evaluate its potential implications to enhance and/or facilitate anticancer immunity. PMID:28348977

  11. Potential diagnostic markers for disseminated intravascular coagulation of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Iba, Toshiaki; Ito, Takashi; Maruyama, Ikuro; Jilma, Bernd; Brenner, Thorsten; Müller, Marcella C A; Juffermans, Nicole P; Thachil, Jecko

    2016-03-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired thrombo-haemorrhagic disorder which arises in clinical scenarios like sepsis, trauma and malignancies. The clinic-laboratory diagnosis of DIC is made in a patient who develops the combination of laboratory abnormalities in the appropriate clinical scenario. The most common laboratory parameters in this setting have been the clotting profile, platelet count, serum fibrinogen and fibrin degradation markers. These tests had the advantage that they could be performed easily and in most laboratories. However, with the better understanding of the pathophysiology of DIC, in recent years, more specific tests have been suggested to be useful in this setting. The newer tests can also prove to be useful in prognostication in DIC. In addition, they may provide assistance in the selection and monitoring of patients diagnosed with DIC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reconstructive potential of the lateral arm flap after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Haas, Franz; Ensat, Florian; Windhager, Reinhard; Stammberger, Heinz; Koch, Horst; Scharnagl, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The reconstruction of extended tumor-related defects in different anatomic regions requires a versatile and reliable flap. For many surgeons, the lateral arm flap has become the technique of choice in the reconstruction of small- to medium-sized defects. The aim of this study was to analyze the reconstructive potential of the lateral arm flap after cancer ablation in various indications. Between 1998 and 2006, 14 patients underwent reconstruction with differently composed and designed lateral arm flaps at our institution. Complete coverage of all defects was achieved with a single surgical procedure. With a flap survival rate of 100% in our series, excellent long term results and high patient satisfaction combined with low donor site morbidity, we can recommend the use of the lateral arm flap in tumor patients. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. The thrombotic potential of circulating tumor microemboli: computational modeling of circulating tumor cell-induced coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Lee, Angela M.; Tormoen, Garth W.; Rigg, Rachel A.; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn; Bethel, Kelly; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Kuhn, Peter; Newton, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic events can herald the diagnosis of cancer, preceding any cancer-related clinical symptoms. Patients with cancer are at a 4- to 7-fold increased risk of suffering from venous thromboembolism (VTE), with ∼7,000 patients with lung cancer presenting from VTEs. However, the physical biology underlying cancer-associated VTE remains poorly understood. Several lines of evidence suggest that the shedding of tissue factor (TF)-positive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and microparticles from primary tumors may serve as a trigger for cancer-associated thrombosis. To investigate the potential direct and indirect roles of CTCs in VTE, we characterized thrombin generation by CTCs in an interactive numerical model coupling blood flow with advection-diffusion kinetics. Geometric measurements of CTCs isolated from the peripheral blood of a lung cancer patient prior to undergoing lobectomy formed the basis of the simulations. Singlet, doublet, and aggregate circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) were investigated in the model. Our numerical model demonstrated that CTM could potentiate occlusive events that drastically reduce blood flow and serve as a platform for the promotion of thrombin generation in flowing blood. These results provide a characterization of CTM dynamics in the vasculature and demonstrate an integrative framework combining clinical, biophysical, and mathematical approaches to enhance our understanding of CTCs and their potential direct and indirect roles in VTE formation. PMID:25411332

  14. Irradiation-Dependent Effects on Tumor Perfusion and Endogenous and Exogenous Hypoxia Markers in an A549 Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Haenze, Joerg; Kamlah, Florentine; Eul, Bastian G.; Lang, Nico; Keil, Boris; Heverhagen, Johannes T.; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; An Hanxiang; Rose, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a major determinant of tumor radiosensitivity, and microenvironmental changes in response to ionizing radiation (IR) are often heterogenous. We analyzed IR-dependent changes in hypoxia and perfusion in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts. Materials and Methods: Immunohistological analysis of two exogenously added chemical hypoxic markers, pimonidazole and CCI-103F, and of the endogenous marker Glut-1 was performed time dependently after IR. Tumor vessels and apoptosis were analyzed using CD31 and caspase-3 antibodies. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and fluorescent beads (Hoechst 33342) were used to monitor vascular perfusion. Results: CCI-103F signals measuring the fraction of hypoxic areas after IR were significantly decreased by approximately 50% when compared with pimonidazole signals, representing the fraction of hypoxic areas from the same tumors before IR. Interestingly, Glut-1 signals were significantly decreased at early time point (6.5 h) after IR returning to the initial levels at 30.5 h. Vascular density showed no difference between irradiated and control groups, whereas apoptosis was significantly induced at 10.5 h post-IR. DCE-MRI indicated increased perfusion 1 h post-IR. Conclusions: The discrepancy between the hypoxic fractions of CCI-103F and Glut-1 forces us to consider the possibility that both markers reflect different metabolic alterations of tumor microenvironment. The reliability of endogenous markers such as Glut-1 to measure reoxygenation in irradiated tumors needs further consideration. Monitoring tumor microvascular response to IR by DCE-MRI and measuring tumor volume alterations should be encouraged.

  15. Immunohistochemical expression of SALL4 in hepatocellular carcinoma, a potential pitfall in the differential diagnosis of yolk sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Katz, Betina; Chaux, Alcides; Sharma, Rajni; Munari, Enrico; Faraj, Sheila F; Illei, Peter B; Torbenson, Michael; Netto, George J

    2013-07-01

    SALL4 is a transcription factor that serves as a marker of yolk sac tumor. Yolk sac tumor and hepatocellular carcinoma share histologic, serologic, and immunohistochemical features. Previous studies have shown lack of SALL4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting utility in this differential diagnosis. Sixty-nine samples of hepatocellular carcinoma were retrieved from surgical pathology archives and used to construct 9 tissue microarrays. A germ cell tumor tissue microarray containing 10 yolk sac tumors was used for comparison. Extent, intensity, and pattern of nuclear SALL4 expression were assessed in each spot. Mean percentage of expression was calculated for each tumor and used during analysis. Optimal discriminatory extent of expression cutoff was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Other potential discriminatory markers including Hep Par1 were also evaluated. Forty-six percent (32/69) of hepatocellular carcinoma and all yolk sac tumors revealed at least focal expression of SALL4. A unique punctuate/clumped pattern of nuclear staining was present in 94% (30/32) of hepatocellular carcinoma, whereas all yolk sac tumors displayed a diffuse finely granular nuclear staining pattern. A 25% extent of SALL4 expression cutoff was found to be optimal for the distinction of yolk sac tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma yielding a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 92.8%, and a positive predictive value of 66.6% for yolk sac tumor diagnosis. The addition of Hep Par1 increased the specificity (99%) and positive predictive value (90%). This is the first report of SALL4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma. Our finding should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and yolk sac tumor. The unique punctuate/clumped pattern seen in hepatocellular carcinoma cases could be of further discriminatory value.

  16. Quality Assessment and Correlation of Microsatellite Instability and Immunohistochemical Markers among Population- and Clinic-Based Colorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cicek, Mine S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Gallinger, Steven; Bapat, Bharati; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Young, Joanne; Buchanan, Daniel; Walsh, Michael D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Burnett, Terrilea; Newcomb, Polly A.; Grady, William M.; Haile, Robert W.; Casey, Graham; Plummer, Sarah J.; Krumroy, Lisa A.; Baron, John A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of defective mismatch repair (MMR), as assessed by the presence of tumor microsatellite instability (MSI) and/or loss of MMR protein expression by IHC, has been useful for risk assessment, prognosis, and prediction of treatment in patients with colorectal cancer. We analyzed tumors for the presence of defective MMR from 5927 Colorectal Cancer Family Registry patients recruited at six international consortium sites. We evaluated the appropriate percentage instability cutoff used to distinguish the three MSI phenotypes [ie, stable (MSS), low instability (MSI-L), and high instability (MSI-H)]; the sensitivity, specificity, and performance characteristics of individual markers; and the concordance between MSI and IHC phenotypes. Guided by the results of the IHC testing, our findings indicate that the distinction between an MSI-H phenotype from a low-instability or MSS phenotype can best be accomplished by using a cutoff of 30% or greater of the markers showing instability. The sensitivity and specificity of the mononucleotide markers were higher than those of the dinucleotide markers. Specifically, BAT26 and BAT25 had the highest sensitivity (94%) and specificity (98%), and the use of mononucleotide markers alone identified 97% of the MSI-H cases correctly. As expected, the presence of MSI-H correlated with an older age of diagnosis, the presence of tumor in the proximal colon, and female sex. PMID:21497289

  17. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression.

  18. Stock-still behavior: a potential developmental marker.

    PubMed

    Sherkow, Susan P; Weinstein, Lissa; Kamens, Sarah R; Megyes, Matthew; Tishman, Lynn P; Williams, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    During the course of a pilot study of toddlers' behavior and play, the experimenters observed a previously undocumented behavior. This behavior now labeled "stock-still" behavior, was noted at the age of 17.5 months and consisted of the toddlers' standing motionless at or near the doorway of a nursery when previously they had marched, seemingly intrepid, into the room on their own. A prospective study of eight children was undertaken to test the hypothesis that this behavior reliably occurs at a set time during the child's development. Analysis of videotape footage determined that the behavior did not occur as an isolated event but instead was part of a series of one to six individual events within a window spanning two to eight weeks, during a discrete period of time from ages 15.5 months to 18.5 months. It was hypothesized that this behavior may be a developmental marker of the moment when a toddler cognitively and affectively registers the differences between "inside" and "outside," self and other and inner space and outer space. This developmental step is manifested behaviorally as the child's ability to inhibit her responses to previously compelling external stimuli. This hypothesis, as well as its limitations, is herein discussed, and additional clarifying observations are suggested.

  19. Comparison of Breast Cancer to Healthy Control Tissue Discovers Novel Markers with Potential for Prognosis and Early Detection

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, Michèl; Green, Ann; Beatty, J. David; Karlan, Beth Y.; Karlan, Scott; Gross, Jenny; Thornton, Sean; McIntosh, Martin; Urban, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    This study was initiated to identify biomarkers with potential value for the early detection of poor-outcome breast cancer. Two sets of well-characterized tissues were utilized: one from breast cancer patients with favorable vs. poor outcome and the other from healthy women undergoing reduction mammaplasty. Over 46 differentially expressed genes were identified from a large list of potential targets by a) mining publicly available expression data (identifying 134 genes for quantitative PCR) and b) utilizing a commercial PCR array. Three genes show elevated expression in cancers with poor outcome and low expression in all other tissues, warranting further investigation as potential blood markers for early detection of cancers with poor outcome. Twelve genes showed lower expression in cancers with poor outcome than in cancers with favorable outcome but no differential expression between aggressive cancers and most healthy controls. These genes are more likely to be useful as prognostic tissue markers than as serum markers for early detection of aggressive disease. As a secondary finding was that, when histologically normal breast tissue was removed from a distant site in a breast with cancer, 7 of 38 specimens displayed a cancer-like expression profile, while the remaining 31 were genetically similar to the reduction mammaplasty control group. This finding suggests that some regions of ipsilateral histologically ‘normal’ breast tissue are predisposed to becoming malignant and that normal-appearing tissue with malignant signature might warrant treatment to prevent new primary tumors. PMID:20161755

  20. Comparison of breast cancer to healthy control tissue discovers novel markers with potential for prognosis and early detection.

    PubMed

    Schummer, Michèl; Green, Ann; Beatty, J David; Karlan, Beth Y; Karlan, Scott; Gross, Jenny; Thornton, Sean; McIntosh, Martin; Urban, Nicole

    2010-02-09

    This study was initiated to identify biomarkers with potential value for the early detection of poor-outcome breast cancer. Two sets of well-characterized tissues were utilized: one from breast cancer patients with favorable vs. poor outcome and the other from healthy women undergoing reduction mammaplasty. Over 46 differentially expressed genes were identified from a large list of potential targets by a) mining publicly available expression data (identifying 134 genes for quantitative PCR) and b) utilizing a commercial PCR array. Three genes show elevated expression in cancers with poor outcome and low expression in all other tissues, warranting further investigation as potential blood markers for early detection of cancers with poor outcome. Twelve genes showed lower expression in cancers with poor outcome than in cancers with favorable outcome but no differential expression between aggressive cancers and most healthy controls. These genes are more likely to be useful as prognostic tissue markers than as serum markers for early detection of aggressive disease. As a secondary finding was that, when histologically normal breast tissue was removed from a distant site in a breast with cancer, 7 of 38 specimens displayed a cancer-like expression profile, while the remaining 31 were genetically similar to the reduction mammaplasty control group. This finding suggests that some regions of ipsilateral histologically 'normal' breast tissue are predisposed to becoming malignant and that normal-appearing tissue with malignant signature might warrant treatment to prevent new primary tumors.

  1. Human mammaglobin: a superior marker for reverse-transcriptase PCR in detecting circulating tumor cells in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, GuangLiang; Zhang, Jing; Jin, KeTao; He, KuiFeng; Wang, HaoHao; Lu, HaiQi; Teng, LiSong

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women in the USA and the second most common cause of death in females who develop cancer. Recently, the detection of circulating tumor cells has emerged as a promising tool for monitoring the progression of clinically occult micrometastases in breast cancer patients. Sensitive molecular techniques, primarily based upon the reverse-transcriptase PCR, using various molecules as markers, have been developed to detect circulating tumor cells. Among those molecules, human mammaglobin mRNA has been found to be the most specific marker for the hematogenous spread of breast cancer cells. In this article, we review the current knowledge regarding the use of reverse-transcriptase PCR for detecting human mammaglobin mRNA as a biomarker for circulating tumor cells in breast cancer patients, and evaluate the clinical implications of human mammaglobin since it was first isolated in 1996.

  2. Identification of potential genetic markers for improved growth rate in channel catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identification of genetic polymorphism associated with muscle growth would improve selection efficiency of channel catfish broodstock. Because faster growth is typically associated with increased food intake, factors involved in food intake regulation may serve as potential gene markers for selecti...

  3. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for Use of Tumor Markers in Clinical Practice: Quality Requirements*

    PubMed Central

    Sturgeon, Catharine M.; Hoffman, Barry R.; Chan, Daniel W.; Ch’ng, Soo-Ling; Hammond, Elizabeth; Hayes, Daniel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Petricoin, Emmanuel F.; Schmitt, Manfred; Semmes, O. John; Söletormos, Györg; van der Merwe, Elena; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND This report presents updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines summarizing quality requirements for the use of tumor markers. METHODS One subcommittee developed guidelines for analytical quality relevant to serum and tissue-based tumor markers in current clinical practice. Two other subcommittees formulated recommendations particularly relevant to the developing technologies of microarrays and mass spectrometry. RESULTS Prerequisites for optimal use of tumor markers in routine practice include formulation of the correct clinical questions to ensure selection of the appropriate test, adherence to good clinical and laboratory practices (e.g., minimization of the risk of incorrect patient and/or specimen identification, tube type, or timing), use of internationally standardized and well-characterized methods, careful adherence to manufacturer instructions, and proactive and timely reactions to information derived from both internal QC and proficiency-testing specimens. Highly desirable procedures include those designed to minimize the risk of the reporting of erroneous results attributable to interferences such as heterophilic antibodies or hook effects, to facilitate the provision of informative clinical reports (e.g., cumulative and/or graphical reports, appropriately derived reference intervals, and interpretative comments), and when possible to integrate these reports with other patient information through electronic health records. Also mandatory is extensive validation encompassing all stages of analysis before introduction of new technologies such as microarrays and mass spectrometry. Provision of high-quality tumor marker services is facilitated by dialogue involving researchers, diagnostic companies, clinical and laboratory users, and regulatory agencies. CONCLUSIONS Implementation of these recommendations, adapted to local practice, should encourage optimization of the clinical use of tumor markers

  4. Identification of novel tumor markers in prostate, colon and breast cancer by unbiased methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woonbok; Kwabi-Addo, Bernard; Ittmann, Michael; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Shen, Lanlan; Yu, Yinhua; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2008-04-30

    DNA hypermethylation is a common epigenetic abnormality in cancer and may serve as a useful marker to clone cancer-related genes as well as a marker of clinical disease activity. To identify CpG islands methylated in prostate cancer, we used methylated CpG island amplification (MCA) coupled with representational difference analysis (RDA) on prostate cancer cell lines. We isolated 34 clones that corresponded to promoter CpG islands, including 5 reported targets of hypermethylation in cancer. We confirmed the data for 17 CpG islands by COBRA and/or pyrosequencing. All 17 genes were methylated in at least 2 cell lines of a 21-cancer cell line panel containing prostate cancer, colon cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer. Based on methylation in primary tumors compared to normal adjacent tissues, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS and NSE1 are candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer (methylation range 50%-85%). The combination of NSE1 or SPOCK2 hypermethylation showed a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 95% in differentiating cancer from normal. Similarly NKX2-5, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS and GALR2 are candidate biomarkers for colon cancer (methylation range 60%-95%) and GALR2 hypermethylation showed a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 95%. Finally, SLC16A12, GALR2, TOX, SPOCK2, EGFR5 and DPYS are candidate biomarkers for breast cancer (methylation range 33%-79%) with the combination of EGFR5 or TOX hypermethylation showing a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 92%. Expression analysis for eight genes that had the most hypermethylation confirmed the methylation associated silencing and reactivation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment. Our data identify new targets of transcriptional silencing in cancer, and provide new biomarkers that could be useful in screening for prostate cancer and other cancers.

  5. Various sulfated carbohydrate tumor marker candidates identified by focused glycomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Mukai, Mikio; Takahashi, Hidenori; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Ohue, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Yasuhide

    2017-05-01

    Glycomic analysis focused on sulfated O-glycans was performed to identify novel serum carbohydrate tumor markers. Sulfated glycans were enriched by α-neuraminidase digestion of pyridylaminated glycans prepared from sera, followed by anion exchange chromatography. Sulfated O-glycan profiles were constructed by two types of high performance liquid chromatography separation. Comparison of the profiles from 20 healthy controls with those of 11 gastric and 9 pancreatic cancer patients identified 14 marker candidates. The structures of these candidates were precisely analyzed using various methods including enzymatic digestion and mass spectrometry. The candidates comprised 9 core1 and 5 core2 glycans. All these candidates were monosulfated, and 11 were also mono- or difucosylated, and included various determinants such as 6-sulfo type2 lactosamine, 6-sulfo Lewis X, 6-sulfo Lewis Y, 3'-sulfo type1 lactosamine and 3'-sulfo Lewis A. Furthermore, among the core1 glycans, five candidates displayed a type1 and type2 lactosamine hybrid backbone. The levels of these candidate glycans in the sera from all 40 subjects were quantified using a selected reaction monitoring assay. These analyses revealed: (i) the levels of all candidates were elevated in sera of at least one or more patients; (ii) core1 candidates having type1-type2 hybrid backbones with 6-sulfo Lewis X, 6-sulfo type2 lactosamine or 3'-sulfo Lewis A were elevated in sera of variety of patients; and (iii) levels of the candidates varied widely among patients, suggesting analysis of multiple candidates will be an effective means of screening various cancers. To fully evaluate the clinical utility of these candidates, a further verification study is required. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Carbon nanoparticle-enhanced immunoelectrochemical detection for protein tumor marker with cadmium sulfide biotracers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ja-an Annie; Lin, Yeh-Chun; Wang, Li-Sheng; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2009-02-15

    We have developed a sensitive electrochemical immunoassay system for the detection of a protein tumor marker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), that is based on a carbon nanoparticle (CNP)/poly(ethylene imine) (PEI)-modified screen-printed graphite electrode (CNP-PEI/SPGE) covered with anti-CEA antibodies. The signal amplification strategy--using CdS nanocrystals as biotracers and CNPs to enhance electron transfer--improves the sensitivity and detection limit for CEA, suggesting that this system holds promise for development into a point-of-care or disposable home-care self-diagnostic tool. This biosensor is based on a sandwich complex immunoassay, which we assembled from sequential layers of the anti-CEA antibody (alphaCEA) on CNP-PEI/SPGE, the CEA sample, and the CdS nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) sensitized with alphaCEA (alphaCEA-CdS QD). We used square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) to amplify the signal current response obtained from the dissolved alphaCEA-CdS QDs. The calibration curve for CEA concentration was linear in the range of 0.032-10 ng/mL; the detection limit (estimated as the mean of the blank sample plus three times the standard deviation obtained on the blank sample) was 32 pg/mL (equivalent to 160 fg in a 5 microL sample). This method is suitably precise and sensitive to function as a means of determining urinary CEA, which is a better marker than serum CEA for the early detection of urothelial carcinoma.

  7. Evaluation of prognostic markers for canine mast cell tumors treated with vinblastine and prednisone

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Joshua D; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Thamm, Douglas H; Hamilton, Elizabeth; Kiupel, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Background Canine cutaneous mast cell tumor (MCT) is a common neoplastic disease associated with a variable biologic behavior. Surgery remains the primary treatment for canine MCT; however, radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy are commonly used to treat aggressive MCT. The goals of this study were to evaluate the prognostic utility of histologic grade, c-KIT mutations, KIT staining patterns, and the proliferation markers Ki67 and AgNORs in dogs postoperatively treated with vinblastine and prednisone +/- RT, and to compare the outcome of dogs treated with post-operative chemotherapy +/- RT to that of a prognostically matched group treated with surgery alone. Associations between prognostic markers and survival were evaluated. Disease-free intervals (DFI) and overall survival times (OS) of dogs with similar pretreatment prognostic indices postoperatively treated with chemotherapy were compared to dogs treated with surgery alone. Results Histologic grade 3 MCTs, MCTs with c-KIT mutations, MCTs with increased cytoplasmic KIT, and MCTs with increased Ki67 and AgNOR values were associated with decreased DFI and OS. Dogs with histologic grade 3 MCT had significantly increased DFI and OS when treated with chemotherapy vs. surgery alone. Although not statistically significant due to small sample sizes, MCTs with c-KIT mutations had increased DFI and OS when treated with chemotherapy vs. surgery alone. Conclusion and clinical importance This study confirms the prognostic value of histologic grade, c-KIT mutations, KIT staining patterns, and proliferation analyses for canine MCT. Additionally, the results of this study further define the benefit of postoperative vinblastine and prednisone for histologic grade 3 MCTs. PMID:18700956

  8. Hypermethylation of the COX-2 gene is a potential prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hoenil; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jae W; Kang, Gyeong H; Park, Noh H; Song, Yong S; Park, Sang Y; Kang, Soon B; Lee, Hyo P

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the DNA hypermethylation profiles of 14 genes known to be associated with tumor behavior and their clinical significance in cervical cancer. The clinical features of 82 patients with stage IB cervical cancer were analyzed in terms of DNA hypermethylation of 14 genes (hMLH1, p16, COX-2, CDH1, APC, DAPK, MGMT, p14, RASSF1A, RUNX3, TIMP3, FHIT, THBS1, and HLTF). Of 14 genes investigated, only hypermethylation of COX-2 showed significant association with poor disease-free survival (P = 0.001). To further investigate an alteration in COX-2 expression by DNA hypermethylation, immunohistochemistry for COX-2 protein was performed in the cervical cancer tissues. We found no significant association between hypermethylation and expression patterns of the COX-2 gene. The present results suggest that DNA hypermethylation of the COX-2 gene may be a potential prognostic marker in early stage cervical cancer, the underlying mechanism of which is independent of gene silencing.

  9. Oncogenic Fli-1 is a potential prognostic marker for the progression of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Hu, Lingyun; Li, Wei; Wang, Guanjun; Li, Yan; Yan, Lei; Li, Ailing; Cui, Jiuwei

    2014-06-12

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, but its etiology remains poorly understood. This study investigated the role of Fli-1 in ovarian carcinogenesis and disease survival. Fli-1 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 104 primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with known follow-up data and 20 controls. Correlation between Fli-1 expression and clinical characteristics was evaluated with the logistic regression. Kaplan Meier analysis was used to assess the impact of Fli-1 expression on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Cell proliferation and migration assay were used to explore the function of Fli-1 in ovarian cancer cells. Fli-1 was expressed in 74% cases and up-regulated in EOC tissues compared with normal control tissues (p< 0.05). The high expression of Fli-1 was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage, positive lymph nodal involvement, and poor OS and DFS (p< 0.05). Further analysis showed Fli-1 is an independent prognostic factor for OS and DFS. Down-regulation of Fli-1 inhibited cell proliferation but did not affect cell migration in SKOV3 cells. This study revealed that Fli-1 played an essential role in the development and progression of ovarian cancers. Its overexpression is intimately related to malignant phenotypes and poor clinical outcome, suggesting that Fli-1 is a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic molecular target in ovarian cancer.

  10. Differential Expression of Growth Factor Receptors and Membrane-Bound Tumor Markers for Imaging in Male and Female Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F.; Kornegoor, Robert; van der Wall, Elsken; van der Groep, Petra; van Diest, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5–1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with female breast cancer. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 133 male breast cancer and 32 gynecomastia cases were stained by immunohistochemistry for a panel of membrane-bound targets and compared with data on 266 female breast cancers. Results Growth factor receptors were variably expressed in 4.5% (MET) up to 38.5% (IGF1-R) of male breast cancers. Compared to female breast cancer, IGF1-R and carbonic anhydrase 12 (CAXII) were more frequently and CD44v6, MET and FGFR2 less frequently expressed in male breast cancer. Expression of EGFR, HER2, CAIX, and GLUT1 was not significantly different between male and female breast cancer. Further, 48.1% of male breast cancers expressed at least one and 18.0% expressed multiple growth factor receptors. Since individual membrane receptors are expressed in only half of male breast cancers, a panel of membrane markers will be required for molecular imaging strategies to reach sensitivity. A potential panel of markers for molecular imaging, consisting of EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, CD44v6, CAXII, GLUT1, and CD44v6 was positive in 77% of male breast cancers, comparable to female breast cancers. Conclusions Expression patterns of growth factor receptors and hypoxia membrane proteins in male breast cancer are different from female breast cancer. For molecular imaging strategies, a putative panel consisting of markers for EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, GLUT1, CAXII, CD44v6 was positive in 77% of cases and might be considered for development of molecular tracers for

  11. Differential expression of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers for imaging in male and female breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Jeroen F; Kornegoor, Robert; van der Wall, Elsken; van der Groep, Petra; van Diest, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5-1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with female breast cancer. Tissue microarrays containing 133 male breast cancer and 32 gynecomastia cases were stained by immunohistochemistry for a panel of membrane-bound targets and compared with data on 266 female breast cancers. Growth factor receptors were variably expressed in 4.5% (MET) up to 38.5% (IGF1-R) of male breast cancers. Compared to female breast cancer, IGF1-R and carbonic anhydrase 12 (CAXII) were more frequently and CD44v6, MET and FGFR2 less frequently expressed in male breast cancer. Expression of EGFR, HER2, CAIX, and GLUT1 was not significantly different between male and female breast cancer. Further, 48.1% of male breast cancers expressed at least one and 18.0% expressed multiple growth factor receptors. Since individual membrane receptors are expressed in only half of male breast cancers, a panel of membrane markers will be required for molecular imaging strategies to reach sensitivity. A potential panel of markers for molecular imaging, consisting of EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, CD44v6, CAXII, GLUT1, and CD44v6 was positive in 77% of male breast cancers, comparable to female breast cancers. Expression patterns of growth factor receptors and hypoxia membrane proteins in male breast cancer are different from female breast cancer. For molecular imaging strategies, a putative panel consisting of markers for EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, GLUT1, CAXII, CD44v6 was positive in 77% of cases and might be considered for development of molecular tracers for male breast cancer.

  12. Improving needle biopsy accuracy in small renal mass using tumor-specific DNA methylation markers.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Sameer; Liu, Jie; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Nichols, Peter W; Aron, Manju; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Collings, Clayton K; Syan, Sumeet; Hu, Brian; Desai, Mihir; Aron, Monish; Duddalwar, Vinay; Gill, Inderbir; Liang, Gangning; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2017-01-17

    The clinical management of small renal masses (SRMs) is challenging since the current methods for distinguishing between benign masses and malignant renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are frequently inaccurate or inconclusive. In addition, renal cancer subtypes also have different treatments and outcomes. High false negative rates increase the risk of cancer progression and indeterminate diagnoses result in unnecessary and potentially morbid surgical procedures. We built a predictive classification model for kidney tumors using 697 DNA methylation profiles from six different subgroups: clear cell, papillary and chromophobe RCC, benign angiomylolipomas, oncocytomas, and normal kidney tissues. Furthermore, the DNA methylation-dependent classifier has been validated in 272 ex vivo needle biopsy samples from 100 renal masses (71% SRMs). In general, the results were highly reproducible (89%, n=70) in predicting identical malignant subtypes from biopsies. Overall, 98% of adjacent-normals (n=102) were correctly classified as normal, while 92% of tumors (n=71) were correctly classified malignant and 86% of benign (n=29) were correctly classified benign by this classification model. Overall, this study provides molecular-based support for using routine needle biopsies to determine tumor classification of SRMs and support the clinical decision-making.

  13. Potential Role of Methylation Marker in Glioma Supporting Clinical Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Furtak, Jacek; Zurawski, Bogdan; Szylberg, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Marzena A.

    2016-01-01

    The IDH1/2 gene mutations, ATRX loss/mutation, 1p/19q status, and MGMT promoter methylation are increasingly used as prognostic or predictive biomarkers of gliomas. However, the effect of their combination on radiation therapy outcome is discussable. Previously, we demonstrated that the IDH1 c.G395A; p.R132H mutation was associated with longer survival in grade II astrocytoma and GBM (Glioblastoma). Here we analyzed the MGMT promoter methylation status in patients with a known mutation status in codon 132 of IDH1, followed by clinical and genetic data analysis based on the two statuses. After a subtotal tumor resection, the patients were treated using IMRT (Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy) with 6 MeV photons. The total dose was: 54 Gy for astrocytoma II, 60 Gy for astrocytoma III, 60 Gy for glioblastoma, 2 Gy per day, with 24 h intervals, five days per week. The patients with MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 somatic mutation (OS = 40 months) had a better prognosis than those with MGMT methylation alone (OS = 18 months). In patients with astrocytoma anaplasticum (n = 7) with the IDH1 p.R132H mutation and hypermethylated MGMT, the prognosis was particularly favorable (median OS = 47 months). In patients with astrocytoma II meeting the above criteria, the prognosis was also better than in those not meeting those criteria. The IDH1 mutation appears more relevant for the prognosis than MGMT methylation. The IDH1 p.R132H mutation combined with MGMT hypermethylation seems to be the most advantageous for treatment success. Patients not meeting those criteria may require more aggressive treatments. PMID:27834917

  14. Potential Role of Methylation Marker in Glioma Supporting Clinical Decisions.

    PubMed

    Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Furtak, Jacek; Zurawski, Bogdan; Szylberg, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Marzena A

    2016-11-10

    The IDH1/2 gene mutations, ATRX loss/mutation, 1p/19q status, and MGMT promoter methylation are increasingly used as prognostic or predictive biomarkers of gliomas. However, the effect of their combination on radiation therapy outcome is discussable. Previously, we demonstrated that the IDH1 c.G395A; p.R132H mutation was associated with longer survival in grade II astrocytoma and GBM (Glioblastoma). Here we analyzed the MGMT promoter methylation status in patients with a known mutation status in codon 132 of IDH1, followed by clinical and genetic data analysis based on the two statuses. After a subtotal tumor resection, the patients were treated using IMRT (Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy) with 6 MeV photons. The total dose was: 54 Gy for astrocytoma II, 60 Gy for astrocytoma III, 60 Gy for glioblastoma, 2 Gy per day, with 24 h intervals, five days per week. The patients with MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 somatic mutation (OS = 40 months) had a better prognosis than those with MGMT methylation alone (OS = 18 months). In patients with astrocytoma anaplasticum (n = 7) with the IDH1 p.R132H mutation and hypermethylated MGMT, the prognosis was particularly favorable (median OS = 47 months). In patients with astrocytoma II meeting the above criteria, the prognosis was also better than in those not meeting those criteria. The IDH1 mutation appears more relevant for the prognosis than MGMT methylation. The IDH1 p.R132H mutation combined with MGMT hypermethylation seems to be the most advantageous for treatment success. Patients not meeting those criteria may require more aggressive treatments.

  15. The potential of hypoxia markers as target for breast molecular imaging – a systematic review and meta-analysis of human marker expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular imaging of breast cancer is a promising emerging technology, potentially able to improve clinical care. Valid imaging targets for molecular imaging tracer development are membrane-bound hypoxia-related proteins, expressed when tumor growth outpaces neo-angiogenesis. We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of such hypoxia marker expression rates in human breast cancer to evaluate their potential as clinically relevant molecular imaging targets. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles describing membrane-bound proteins that are related to hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), the key regulator of the hypoxia response. We extracted expression rates of carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), C-X-C chemokine receptor type-4 (CXCR4), or insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) in human breast disease, evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We pooled study results using random-effects models and applied meta-regression to identify associations with clinicopathological variables. Results Of 1,705 identified articles, 117 matched our selection criteria, totaling 30,216 immunohistochemistry results. We found substantial between-study variability in expression rates. Invasive cancer showed pooled expression rates of 35% for CAIX (95% confidence interval (CI): 26-46%), 51% for GLUT1 (CI: 40-61%), 46% for CXCR4 (CI: 33-59%), and 46% for IGF1R (CI: 35-70%). Expression rates increased with tumor grade for GLUT1, CAIX, and CXCR4 (all p < 0.001), but decreased for IGF1R (p < 0.001). GLUT1 showed the highest expression rate in grade III cancers with 58% (45-69%). CXCR4 showed the highest expression rate in small T1 tumors with 48% (CI: 28-69%), but associations with size were only significant for CAIX (p < 0.001; positive association) and IGF1R (p = 0.047; negative association). Although based on few studies, CAIX, GLUT1, and CXCR4 showed profound lower expression rates in normal breast tissue and benign

  16. Validation of tumor protein marker quantification by two independent automated immunofluorescence image analysis platforms

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Amy R; Girondo, Melanie A; Liu, Chengbao; Kovatich, Albert J; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D; Hu, Hai; Mitchell, Edith P; Freydin, Boris; Hyslop, Terry; Chervoneva, Inna; Rui, Hallgeir

    2016-01-01

    .98. Data-driven optimal cutpoints for outcome prediction by either platform were reciprocally applicable to the data derived by the alternate platform, identifying patients with low Nuc-pYStat5 at ~3.5-fold increased risk of disease progression. Our analyses identified two highly concordant fluorescence immunohistochemistry platforms that may serve as benchmarks for testing of other platforms, and low interoperator variability supports the implementation of objective tumor marker quantification in pathology laboratories. PMID:27312066

  17. Non-Invasive Markers of Tumor Growth, Metastases, and Sensitivity to Anti-Neoplastic Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13 . SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goals of this application are to develop methods to non...The data suggest that lactate is a potential surrogate for measuring tumor hypoxia in this model. 13 Table 1 Average lactate concentration...Lactate (mM/L) Avg # voxels Lactate (mM/L) Avg # voxels I 110-265 0 7 0 1 0 6 II 478-649 1.53 13 1.79 3 1.46 10 III 1035-1207 4.78 17 6.95

  18. Plasma DCLK1 is a marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): Targeting DCLK1 prevents HCC tumor xenograft growth via a microRNA-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Ali, Naushad; Fazili, Javid; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ding, Kai; Lightfoot, Stanley A.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor stem cell marker Doublecortin-like kinase1 (DCLK1) is upregulated in several solid tumors. The role of DCLK1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. We immunostained tissues from human livers with HCC, cirrhosis controls (CC), and non-cirrhosis controls (NCC) for DCLK1. Western blot and ELISA analyses for DCLK1 were performed with stored plasma samples. We observed increased immunoreactive DCLK1 in epithelia and stroma in HCC and CCs compared with NCCs, and observed a marked increase in plasma DCLK1 from patients with HCC compared with CC and NCC. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas’ HCC dataset revealed that DCLK1 is overexpressed in HCC tumors relative to adjacent normal tissues. High DCLK1-expressing cells had more epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Various tumor suppressor miRNAs were also downregulated in HCC tumors. We evaluated the effects of DCLK1 knockdown on Huh7.5-derived tumor xenograft growth. This was associated with growth arrest and a marked downregulation of cMYC, and EMT transcription factors ZEB1, ZEB2, SNAIL, and SLUG via let-7a and miR-200 miRNA-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, upregulation of miR-143/145, a corresponding decrease in pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG, KLF4, and LIN28, and a reduction of let-7a, miR-143/145, and miR-200-specific luciferase activity was observed. These findings suggest that the detection of elevated plasma DCLK1 may provide a cost-effective, less invasive tool for confirmation of clinical signs of cirrhosis, and a potential companion diagnostic marker for patients with cirrhosis and HCC. Our results support evaluating DCLK1 as a biomarker for detection and as a therapeutic target for eradicating HCC. PMID:26468984

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α as a Diagnostic Marker for Neonatal Sepsis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bokun; Huang, Jie; Yuan, Haining; Yan, Wenying

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis (NS) is an important cause of mortality in newborns and life-threatening disorder in infants. The meta-analysis was performed to investigate the diagnosis value of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) test in NS. Our collectible studies were searched from PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library between March 1994 and August 2013. Accordingly, 347 studies were collected totally, in which 15 articles and 23 trials were selected to study the NS in our meta-analysis. The TNF-α test showed moderate accuracy of the diagnosis of NS both in early-onset neonatal sepsis (sensitivity = 0.66, specificity = 0.76, Q∗ = 0.74) and in late-onset neonatal sepsis (sensitivity = 0.68, specificity = 0.89, Q∗ = 0.87). We also found the northern hemisphere group in the test has higher sensitivity (0.84) and specificity (0.83). A diagnostic OR analysis found that the study population may be the major reason for the heterogeneity. Accordingly, we suggest that TNF-α is also a valuable marker in the diagnosis of NS. PMID:24672322

  20. Endosomal recycling regulates Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1/Tumor Endothelial Marker 8-dependent cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jingsheng; Faundez, Victor; Werner, Erica

    2010-07-15

    Mechanisms for receptor-mediated anthrax toxin internalization and delivery to the cytosol are well understood. However, far less is known about the fate followed by anthrax toxin receptors prior and after cell exposure to the toxin. We report that Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1/Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8) localized at steady state in Rab11a-positive and transferrin receptor-containing recycling endosomes. TEM8 followed a slow constitutive recycling route of approximately 30min as determined by pulsed surface biotinylation and chase experiments. A Rab11a dominant negative mutant and Myosin Vb tail expression impaired TEM8 recycling by sequestering TEM8 in intracellular compartments. Sequestration of TEM8 in intracellular compartments with monensin coincided with increased TEM8 association with a multi-protein complex isolated with antibodies against transferrin receptor. Addition of the cell-binding component of anthrax toxin, Protective Antigen, reduced TEM8 half-life from 7 to 3 hours, without preventing receptor recycling. Pharmacological and molecular perturbation of recycling endosome function using monensin, dominant negative Rab11a, or myosin Vb tail, reduced PA binding efficiency and TEM8-dependent cell spreading on PA-coated surfaces without affecting toxin delivery to the cytosol. These results indicate that the intracellular fate of TEM8 differentially affect its cell adhesion and cell intoxication functions.

  1. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: Comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goethals, Laurence; Debucquoy, Annelies; Perneel, Christiaan; Geboes, Karel; Ectors, Nadine; De Schutter, Harlinde; Penninckx, Freddy; McBride, William H.; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin M. . E-mail: karin.haustermans@uzleuven.be

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intrinsic markers of hypoxia. Methods and Material: Twenty patients with an adenocarcinoma of the left colon and rectum treated by primary surgery were injected with pimonidazole and IdUrd. Serial sections of tumor biopsies were single stained for VEGF, EGFR, Ki67, and double stained for blood vessels in combination with either pimonidazole, IdUrd, or CA IX. Percentage of expression was scored as well as colocalization of pimonidazole with CA IX. Results: The median percentage of hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole staining, was 16.7% (range, 0-52.4%). The expression of pimonidazole correlated inversely with the total MVD and endothelial cord MVD (R = -0.55, p = 0.01; R = -0.47, p = 0.04). Good colocalization was found between pimonidazole and CA IX in only 30% of tumors, with no correlation overall between pimonidazole and CA IX, VEGF, or EGFR or between the different intrinsic markers. Cells around some vessels (0.08-11%) were negative for IdUrd but positive for Ki 67, which indicated their lack of perfusion at the time of injection. Conclusion: Chronic and acute hypoxic regions are present in colorectal tumors, as shown by pimonidazole and IdUrd staining. Only in a minority of tumors did an association exist between the areas stained by pimonidazole and those positive for CA IX. Pimonidazole also did not correlate with expression of other putative intrinsic hypoxia markers (VEGF, EGFR)

  2. Ancestry as a potential modifier of gene expression in breast tumors from Colombian women.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Gómez, Silvia J; Sanabria-Salas, María Carolina; Garay, Jone; Baddoo, Melody C; Hernández-Suarez, Gustavo; Mejía, Juan Carlos; García, Oscar; Miele, Lucio; Fejerman, Laura; Zabaleta, Jovanny

    2017-01-01

    Hispanic/Latino populations are a genetically admixed and heterogeneous group, with variable fractions of European, Indigenous American and African ancestries. The molecular profile of breast cancer has been widely described in non-Hispanic Whites but equivalent knowledge is lacking in Hispanic/Latinas. We have previously reported that the most prevalent breast cancer intrinsic subtype in Colombian women was Luminal B as defined by St. Gallen 2013 criteria. In this study we explored ancestry-associated differences in molecular profiles of Luminal B tumors among these highly admixed women. We performed whole-transcriptome RNA-seq analysis in 42 Luminal tumors (21 Luminal A and 21 Luminal B) from Colombian women. Genetic ancestry was estimated from a panel of 80 ancestry-informative markers (AIM). We categorized patients according to Luminal subtype and to the proportion of European and Indigenous American ancestry and performed differential expression analysis comparing Luminal B against Luminal A tumors according to the assigned ancestry groups. We found 5 genes potentially modulated by genetic ancestry: ERBB2 (log2FC = 2.367, padj<0.01), GRB7 (log2FC = 2.327, padj<0.01), GSDMB (log2FC = 1.723, padj<0.01, MIEN1 (log2FC = 2.195, padj<0.01 and ONECUT2 (log2FC = 2.204, padj<0.01). In the replication set we found a statistical significant association between ERBB2 expression with Indigenous American ancestry (p = 0.02, B = 3.11). This association was not biased by the distribution of HER2+ tumors among the groups analyzed. Our results suggest that genetic ancestry in Hispanic/Latina women might modify ERBB2 gene expression in Luminal tumors. Further analyses are needed to confirm these findings and explore their prognostic value.

  3. Ancestry as a potential modifier of gene expression in breast tumors from Colombian women

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Gómez, Silvia J.; Sanabria-Salas, María Carolina; Garay, Jone; Baddoo, Melody C.; Hernández-Suarez, Gustavo; Mejía, Juan Carlos; García, Oscar; Miele, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    Background Hispanic/Latino populations are a genetically admixed and heterogeneous group, with variable fractions of European, Indigenous American and African ancestries. The molecular profile of breast cancer has been widely described in non-Hispanic Whites but equivalent knowledge is lacking in Hispanic/Latinas. We have previously reported that the most prevalent breast cancer intrinsic subtype in Colombian women was Luminal B as defined by St. Gallen 2013 criteria. In this study we explored ancestry-associated differences in molecular profiles of Luminal B tumors among these highly admixed women. Methods We performed whole-transcriptome RNA-seq analysis in 42 Luminal tumors (21 Luminal A and 21 Luminal B) from Colombian women. Genetic ancestry was estimated from a panel of 80 ancestry-informative markers (AIM). We categorized patients according to Luminal subtype and to the proportion of European and Indigenous American ancestry and performed differential expression analysis comparing Luminal B against Luminal A tumors according to the assigned ancestry groups. Results We found 5 genes potentially modulated by genetic ancestry: ERBB2 (log2FC = 2.367, padj<0.01), GRB7 (log2FC = 2.327, padj<0.01), GSDMB (log2FC = 1.723, padj<0.01, MIEN1 (log2FC = 2.195, padj<0.01 and ONECUT2 (log2FC = 2.204, padj<0.01). In the replication set we found a statistical significant association between ERBB2 expression with Indigenous American ancestry (p = 0.02, B = 3.11). This association was not biased by the distribution of HER2+ tumors among the groups analyzed. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic ancestry in Hispanic/Latina women might modify ERBB2 gene expression in Luminal tumors. Further analyses are needed to confirm these findings and explore their prognostic value. PMID:28832682

  4. D-dimer and international normalized ratio (INR) are correlated with tumor markers and disease stage in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Leyla; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sen, Fatma Karagoz; Erdem, Mustafa Genco; Serilmez, Murat; Keskin, Serkan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Karabulut, Senem; Ordu, Cetin; Duranyildiz, Derya; Tas, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation of coagulation tests with various clinicopathological variables and tumor markers among colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Ninety-four CRC patients were included for evaluation of clinicopathological factors, coagulation assays and tumor marker levels. Metastatic disease was related with elevated INR (p= 0.03). Stage III patients had higher D-dimer values compared with stage II patients (p= 0.03). Correlation of tumor markers indicated a tendency towards elevated D-dimer levels for CEA values higher than median (p= 0.01). High CA 19-9 levels were also associated with higher INR (p= 0.007). Elderly age, distant metastasis, high CEA, CA-19-9 and LDH levels were associated with poorer overall-survival. CEA level was the only independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. Coagulation assays can be utilized as predictors of disease extent in CRC. Elevated D-dimer and INR values may indicate higher disease stage. Correlation of D-dimer levels with CEA supports their value for assessing tumor burden.

  5. Circulating levels of cell adhesion molecule L1 as a prognostic marker in gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background L1 cell adhesion molecule (CD171) is expressed in many malignant tumors and its expression correlates with unfavourable outcome. It thus represents a target for tumor diagnosis and therapy. An earlier study conducted by our group identified L1 expression levels in primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) as a prognostic marker. The aim of the current study was to compare L1 serum levels of GIST patients with those of healthy controls and to determine whether levels of soluble L1 in sera could serve as a prognostic marker. Methods Using a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), soluble L1 was measured in sera of 93 GIST patients und 151 healthy controls. Soluble L1 levels were then correlated with clinicopathological data. Results Median levels of soluble L1 were significantly higher (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test) in sera of GIST patients compared to healthy individuals. Median soluble L1 levels were particularly elevated in patients with recurrence and relapse (p < 0.05; Mann Whitney U test). Conclusion These results suggest that high soluble L1 levels predict poor prognosis and may thus be a promising tumor marker that can contribute to individualise therapy. PMID:21600041

  6. Clinical Significance of Serum IL-12 Level in Patients with Early Breast Carcinoma and Its Correlation with Other Tumor Markers

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Samar Samir; Mohammad, Manal Moussa; Ezz-El-Arab, Lobna R.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic significance of Interleukin 12 (IL-12) in breast cancer (BC) and its correlation with other tumor markers including cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and MMP9/TIMP1 ratio. METHODS: Serum levels of IL-12, tumor markers, and hormone receptors were measured in 92 BC and 56 benign lesion patients versus 40 healthy subjects. Clinical stage, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, grade, and histological type were recorded. RESULTS: BC patients have lower IL-12, but higher CA 15.3 and CEA than control group. High levels of serum IL-12 were associated with lymph node positivity and progesterone receptor negativity. IL-12 was significant lower in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared to non IDC histological type. IL-12 was higher in patients with higher stage and grade but the difference was not statistically significant. IL-12 correlates negatively with MMP9/TIMP1 ratio. CONCLUSION: IL-12 is less specific than CEA for screening early BC, but its correlation with tumor aggressiveness and progression markers may have a prognostic value. PMID:27275301

  7. May Sonic Hedgehog proteins be markers for malignancy in uterine smooth muscle tumors?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalia; Bozzini, Nilo; Baiocchi, Glauco; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes; Soares Junior, José Maria; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Carvalho, Katia Candido

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway (SHH) plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cellular differentiation. We analyzed the protein expression of SHH pathway components and evaluated whether their profile could be useful for the diagnosis, prognosis, or prediction of the risk of malignancy for uterine smooth muscle tumors (USMTs). A total of 176 samples (20 myometrium, 119 variants of leiomyoma, and 37 leiomyosarcoma) were evaluated for the protein expression of the SHH signaling components, HHIP1 (SHH inhibitor), and BMP4 (SHH target) by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis was performed to verify the specificity of the antibodies. We grouped leiomyoma samples into conventional leiomyomas and unusual leiomyomas that comprise atypical, cellular, mitotically active leiomyomas and uterine smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that SMO, SUFU, GLI1, GLI3, and BMP4 expression gradually increased depending on to the histologic tissue type. The protein expression of SMO, SUFU, and GLI1 was increased in unusual leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma samples compared to normal myometrium. The inhibitor HHIP1 showed higher expression in myometrium, whereas only negative or basal expression of SMO, SUFU, GLI1, and GLI3 was detected in these samples. Strong expression of SHH was associated with poorer overall survival. Our data suggest that the expression of SHH proteins can be useful for evaluating the potential risk of malignancy for USMTs. Moreover, GLI1 and SMO may serve as future therapeutic targets for women with USMTs.

  8. Menstrual Cycle Dependent Variability for Serum Tumor Markers CEA, AFP, CA 19-9, CA 125 and CA 15-3 in Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Erbağci, Ayşe Binnur; Yilmaz, Necat; Kutlar, Irfan

    1999-01-01

    Information on menstrual cycle dependent variation of tumor markers in healthy women is a subject of diagnostic efficiency and has an impact in elucidating the normal function of these markers. In this study midfollicular and midluteal concentrations of serum CEA, AFP, CA 19-9, CA 125, CA 15-3 and their relations with LH, FSH, prolactin, estradiol and progesterone were evaluated during ovulatory cycles in a group of 23 healthy female individuals. Samples were collected on the 7th and 21st day of the same menstrual cycle. Tumor marker and hormone concentrations were determined with chemiluminescence or electrochemiluminescence EIA methods. A significant phase-dependent difference was observed for CA 15-3, midluteal concentrations (mean ± SEM; 26.33 ± 1.56 U/ml) higher than the midfollicular (mean ± SEM; 19.27 ± 1.49 U/ml) concentrations (p < 0.001). But an obvious difference for other tumor markers investigated did not exist. Significant correlations of follicular and luteal CA 125 levels with body mass index of the subjects were observed (r:0.52, p < 0.05 and r:0.57, p < 0.005, respectively). CA 15-3 antigen is a product of the MUC-1 gene which is expressed in abundance by endometrial epithelial cells in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle which may be the potential source of variability. The association of CA 125 levels with obesity suggests a possible role of adipose tissue in CA 125 metabolism. In conclusion our data suggest that in healthy women serum CA 15-3 levels are significantly elevated in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle compared to midfollicular phase. Therefore, consideration of menstrual cycle dependent variability for CA 15-3 appears indicated in interpretation of individual results. PMID:10689549

  9. Gastric juice long noncoding RNA used as a tumor marker for screening gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yongfu; Ye, Meng; Jiang, Xiaoming; Sun, Weiliang; Ding, Xiaoyun; Liu, Zhong; Ye, Guoliang; Zhang, Xinjun; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2014-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a crucial role in tumorigenesis. However, the value of lncRNAs in the diagnosis of gastric cancer remains unknown. To identify whether lncRNA-AA174084 is a potential marker for the early diagnosis of gastric cancer (GC), the authors investigated its levels in tissues, blood, and gastric juices from patients with various stage of gastric tumorigenesis. Total RNA in 860 specimens from patients and healthy controls was extracted. Levels of AA174084 in 134 paired GC tissues, 127 gastric mucosal tissues, 335 plasma samples, and 130 gastric juice samples at each stage of gastric tumorigenesis were measured using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The potential association between AA174084 levels and patients' clinicopathologic features were analyzed. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed for differentiating GC patients from controls. Expression levels of AA174084 were down-regulated significantly in 95 of 134 GC tissues (71%) compared with the levels in paired, adjacent, normal tissues (P < .001). AA174084 levels had significant, negative correlations with age (P = .031), Borrmann type (P = .016), and perineural invasion (P = .032). Plasma AA174084 levels in patients with GC dropped markedly on day 15 after surgery compared with preoperative levels (P < .001) and were associated with invasion (P = .049) and lymphatic metastasis (P = .042). AA174084 levels in gastric juice from patients with GC were significantly higher than the levels in normal mucosa or in patients with minimal gastritis, gastric ulcers, and atrophic gastritis (P < .001). The area under ROC was up to 0.848 (P < .001). AA174084 may have potential as marker for the early diagnosis of GC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  10. 2D/4D marker-free tumor tracking using 4D CBCT as the reference image.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengjiao; Sharp, Gregory C; Rit, Simon; Delmon, Vivien; Wang, Guangzhi

    2014-05-07

    Tumor motion caused by respiration is an important issue in image-guided radiotherapy. A 2D/4D matching method between 4D volumes derived from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 2D fluoroscopic images was implemented to track the tumor motion without the use of implanted markers. In this method, firstly, 3DCBCT and phase-rebinned 4DCBCT are reconstructed from cone beam acquisition. Secondly, 4DCBCT volumes and a streak-free 3DCBCT volume are combined to improve the image quality of the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Finally, the 2D/4D matching problem is converted into a 2D/2D matching between incoming projections and DRR images from each phase of the 4DCBCT. The diaphragm is used as a target surrogate for matching instead of using the tumor position directly. This relies on the assumption that if a patient has the same breathing phase and diaphragm position as the reference 4DCBCT, then the tumor position is the same. From the matching results, the phase information, diaphragm position and tumor position at the time of each incoming projection acquisition can be derived. The accuracy of this method was verified using 16 candidate datasets, representing lung and liver applications and one-minute and two-minute acquisitions. The criteria for the eligibility of datasets were described: 11 eligible datasets were selected to verify the accuracy of diaphragm tracking, and one eligible dataset was chosen to verify the accuracy of tumor tracking. The diaphragm matching accuracy was 1.88 ± 1.35 mm in the isocenter plane and the 2D tumor tracking accuracy was 2.13 ± 1.26 mm in the isocenter plane. These features make this method feasible for real-time marker-free tumor motion tracking purposes.

  11. 2D/4D marker-free tumor tracking using 4D CBCT as the reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengjiao; Sharp, Gregory C.; Rit, Simon; Delmon, Vivien; Wang, Guangzhi

    2014-05-01

    Tumor motion caused by respiration is an important issue in image-guided radiotherapy. A 2D/4D matching method between 4D volumes derived from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 2D fluoroscopic images was implemented to track the tumor motion without the use of implanted markers. In this method, firstly, 3DCBCT and phase-rebinned 4DCBCT are reconstructed from cone beam acquisition. Secondly, 4DCBCT volumes and a streak-free 3DCBCT volume are combined to improve the image quality of the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Finally, the 2D/4D matching problem is converted into a 2D/2D matching between incoming projections and DRR images from each phase of the 4DCBCT. The diaphragm is used as a target surrogate for matching instead of using the tumor position directly. This relies on the assumption that if a patient has the same breathing phase and diaphragm position as the reference 4DCBCT, then the tumor position is the same. From the matching results, the phase information, diaphragm position and tumor position at the time of each incoming projection acquisition can be derived. The accuracy of this method was verified using 16 candidate datasets, representing lung and liver applications and one-minute and two-minute acquisitions. The criteria for the eligibility of datasets were described: 11 eligible datasets were selected to verify the accuracy of diaphragm tracking, and one eligible dataset was chosen to verify the accuracy of tumor tracking. The diaphragm matching accuracy was 1.88 ± 1.35 mm in the isocenter plane and the 2D tumor tracking accuracy was 2.13 ± 1.26 mm in the isocenter plane. These features make this method feasible for real-time marker-free tumor motion tracking purposes.

  12. Chromosome 9p deletions in cutaneous malignant melanoma tumors: the minimal deleted region involves markers outside the p16 (CDKN2) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Puig, S; Ruiz, A; Lázaro, C; Castel, T; Lynch, M; Palou, J; Vilalta, A; Weissenbach, J; Mascaro, J M; Estivill, X

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed 12 microsatellite markers on chromosome 9p in 54 paired cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) tumors and normal tissues. Forty-six percent of the tumors, including two in situ CMMs, showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 9p. Only one tumor was homozygously deleted for 9p markers. The smallest deleted region was defined by five tumors and included markers D9S126 to D9S259. Loss of eight or more markers correlated significantly with worse prognosis (P < .002). Among the primary tumors, 87.5% of those with large deletions have a high risk of metastasis, as compared with only 18% of those without deletions or with loss of fewer than 8 markers (P < .001). It was not possible to demonstrate homozygous deletions of p16 in any of the CMM tumors. In four tumors, the LOH for 9p markers did not involve p16. The reported data suggest the existence of several tumor suppressor genes at 9p that are involved in the predisposition to and/or progression of CMM and exclude p16 from involvement in the early development of some melanoma tumors. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7668266

  13. Detection of circulating tumor cell-specific markers in breast cancer patients using the quantitative RT-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Ahn, Sungwoo; Kim, Sunghyun; Park, Sunyoung; Jung, Dongju; Park, Sangjung; Han, Hyunju; Sohn, JooHyuk; Kim, SeungIl; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is a highly prevalent disease among women worldwide. While the expression of certain proteins within breast cancer tumors is used to determine the prognosis and select therapies, additional markers need to be identified. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are constituent cells that have detached from a primary tumor to circulate in the bloodstream. CTCs are considered the main source of breast cancer metastases; therefore, detection of CTCs could be a promising diagnostic method for metastatic breast cancer. In this study, the CircleGen CTC RT-qDx assay was used to analyze the mRNA expression levels of six CTC-specific markers including EpCAM, CK19, HER2, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin with a total of 692 peripheral whole blood samples from 221 breast cancer patients and 376 healthy individuals. This assay showed high specificity with multiple markers; none of the healthy controls were detected positive, whereas 21.7 and 14 % of breast cancer patients were positive for EpCAM and CK19, respectively. Of the 221 breast cancer patients, 84 (38 %), 46 (20.8 %), 83 (37.6 %), and 39 (17.6 %) were positively for HER2, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin mRNA, respectively. Of the 84 patients who were HER2 positive, nine (4 %) were also positive for EpCAM, CK19, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin. Of the 139 breast cancer patients who were HER2 negative, 65 (29.1 %) were negative for EpCAM, CK19, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin. Furthermore, the EpCAM-positive population decreased from 21.5 to 8.3 % after completion of anti-tumor treatment (TP4). Similarly, the CK19, HER2, hTERT, and vimentin positives also decreased from 13.9 to 9.5 %, from 37.7 to 21.4 %, from 37.2 to 33.3 %, and from 17.5 to 14.3 %, respectively, after completion of anti-tumor treatment. In contrast, the Ki67 positives increased from 20.6 to 41.7 % after completion of anti-tumor treatment. mRNA overexpression of six CTC-specific markers was detected by the CircleGen CTC RT-qDx assay with high specificity, and the obtained m

  14. Acne - a potential skin marker of internal disease.

    PubMed

    Pace, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent endocrine disorder in adult women. Hyperandrogenism is the crux of the pathogenesis of both acne and hirsutism, the most frequent clinical presentations of the syndrome. The chronic anovulation that may occur, often but not always associated with enlarged cystic ovaries, has long been recognized as an important feature of PCOS. In recent years major changes have occurred with regard to PCOS: Although management of the common cutaneous manifestations, mainly acne, hirsutism, alopecia, and acanthosis nigricans, remains strictly within the realm of daily dermatologic practice, the pendulum is shifting toward greater awareness of the longer-term systemic implications of PCOS, with emphasis on the unique opportunity and privileged position of the dermatologist to diagnose this potentially serious problem at an early stage, when effective long-term treatment can be instituted. Patients need to be advised that PCOS cannot be cured but can be controlled. Management should involve a multidisciplinary team with emphasis on lifestyle change, insulin sensitizing agents, androgen blockers, and attention to specific cutaneous manifestations.

  15. Integrating molecular markers into the World Health Organization classification of CNS tumors: a survey of the neuro-oncology community.

    PubMed

    Aldape, Kenneth; Nejad, Romina; Louis, David N; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2017-03-01

    Molecular markers provide important biological and clinical information related to the classification of brain tumors, and the integration of relevant molecular parameters into brain tumor classification systems has been a widely discussed topic in neuro-oncology over the past decade. With recent advances in the development of clinically relevant molecular signatures and the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) update, the views of the neuro-oncology community on such changes would be informative for implementing this process. A survey with 8 questions regarding molecular markers in tumor classification was sent to an email list of Society for Neuro-Oncology members and attendees of prior meetings (n=5065). There were 403 respondents. Analysis was performed using whole group response, based on self-reported subspecialty. The survey results show overall strong support for incorporating molecular knowledge into the classification and clinical management of brain tumors. Across all 7 subspecialty groups, ≥70% of respondents agreed to this integration. Interestingly, some variability is seen among subspecialties, notably with lowest support from neuropathologists, which may reflect their roles in implementing such diagnostic technologies. Based on a survey provided to the neuro-oncology community, we report strong support for the integration of molecular markers into the WHO classification of brain tumors, as well as for using an integrated "layered" diagnostic format. While membership from each specialty showed support, there was variation by specialty in enthusiasm regarding proposed changes. The initial results of this survey influenced the deliberations underlying the 2016 WHO classification of tumors of the central nervous system.

  16. Aberrant expression of epithelial and neuroendocrine markers in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma: a potentially serious diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Armita; Gown, Allen M; Baird, Geoffrey S; Hicks, M John; Folpe, Andrew L

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma may be extremely difficult to distinguish from other primitive round cell neoplasms without ancillary immunohistochemistry and/or genetic study. Particularly in adults and in the head and neck locations, the differential diagnosis of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma includes small cell carcinoma and neuroepithelial tumors, such as esthesioneuroblastoma. We have recently seen cases of genetically confirmed alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, which were misdiagnosed owing to expression of cytokeratins and neuroendocrine markers. We studied a large group of well-characterized alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas for expression of such markers. Forty-four alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas (18 genetically confirmed) were retrieved from our archives and immunostained for wide-spectrum cytokeratin (OSCAR), low molecular weight cytokeratin (Cam5.2), synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and CD56 using commercially available antibodies. Cases were scored as 'negative', 'rare' (<5% positive cells), '1+' (5-25%), '2+' (26-50%) and '3+' (>51%). The tumors occurred in 23 males and 21 females at a mean age of 18 years (range, <1-64 years), and involved many sites. Fifty percent of cases (22 of 44) expressed wide-spectrum cytokeratin, and scored almost equally as rare, 1+, and 2+, but rarely 3+. Cam5.2 was positive in 52% (14 of 27). Forty-three percent of cases (16 of 37) expressed at least one of the specific neuroendocrine markers, 32% (12 of 37) expressed synaptophysin, 22% (eight of 36) expressed chromogranin A, and 11% expressed both. Expression of synaptophysin and chromogranin A was typically confined to rare cells but could be more widespread. Thirty-two percent of cases (12 of 37) expressed the wide-spectrum cytokeratin and at least one of the neuroendocrine markers, and 8% (three of 36) expressed cytokeratin and both neuroendocrine markers. CD56 expression was nearly ubiquitous. Aberrant expression of epithelial and neuroendocrine markers is relatively common in alveolar

  17. Immunohistochemical study of hepatocyte, cholangiocyte and stem cell markers of hepatocellular carcinoma: the second report: relationship with tumor size and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Arisa; Kondo, Fukuo; Sano, Keiji; Inoue, Masafumi; Fujii, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Masaji; Watanabe, Masato; Soejima, Yurie; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Tokairin, Takuo; Saito, Koji; Sasajima, Yuko; Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Uozaki, Hiroshi; Fukusato, Toshio

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether ordinary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) show positivity of stem/progenitor cell markers and cholangiocyte markers during the process of tumor progression. Ninety-four HCC lesions no larger than 8 cm from 94 patients were immuno-histochemically studied using two hepatocyte markers (Hep par 1 and α-fetoprotein), five cholangiocyte markers (cytokeratin CK7, CK19, Muc1, epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen) and three hepatic stem/progenitor cell markers (CD56, c-Kit and EpCAM). The tumors were classified into three groups by tumor size: S1, < 2.0 cm; S2, 2.0-5.0 cm; S3, 5.0-8.0 cm. The tumors were also classified according to tumor differentiation: well, moderately and poorly differentiated. The relationship between the positive ratios of these markers, tumor size and tumor differentiation was examined. The positive ratios of cholangiocyte markers tended to be higher in larger sized and more poorly differentiated tumors (except for CK7). The positive ratios of stem/progenitor cell markers tended to be higher in larger sized and more poorly differentiated tumors (except for c-Kit). Ordinary HCC can acquire the characteristic of positivity of cholangiocyte and stem/progenitor cell markers during the process of tumor progression. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  18. Quantitative Assessment of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using CD68 Marker: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Bagul, Neeta; Roy, Souparna; Ganjre, Anjali; Meher, Aishwarya; Singh, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers in India. Clear evidence regarding inflammation being an etiological factor of cancer was found only in the last few decades. A major inflammatory component in the tumor tissue is Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs). The CD68 antibody is a marker for staining TAMs. Aim The aim of this study is to quantify the macrophage count in healthy oral mucosa and OSCC and comparing TAMs in different histopathological grades of OSCC immunohistochemically. Materials and Methods Thirty archival specimens of OSCC patients and 10 healthy biopsy samples were collected. Immunohistochemical staining was done using a CD68 marker. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test. Results Comparing CD68 expression in various study groups showed a significant difference (p=0.000). The pair-wise analysis showed different grades of OSCC, which differed significantly for CD68 expression from the normal oral mucosa. Conclusion The most significant cells present in tumor stroma are TAMs, which remain in close proximity to neoplastic cells and interact with them via several chemical mediators, which may serve to increase the invasiveness of the malignant epithelium. Dense infiltration of TAMs adjacent to tumor cells and islands vividly implies their role in tumor progression. PMID:27190959

  19. Levels of certain tumor markers as differential factors between bilharzial and non-biharzial bladder cancer among Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective Bladder cancer is the commonest type of malignant tumors as a result of schistosomaisis which is a major healthy problem in many subtropical developing countries. The aim of this study is to comparatively elucidate the underlying biochemical tumor markers in schistosomal bladder cancer versus non-schistosomal bladder cancer when compared to normal healthy ones. Methods This work was performed on tissue specimens from total 25 patients and serum samples from total 30 patients versus ten healthy individuals served as control. The investigated parameters in serum are: xanthine oxidase (XO), fructosamine, lactate dehydrogense (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total proteins, essential and non- essential amino acids profile, hydroxyproline, total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In addition, the current investigation also extended to study some markers in tumor bladder tissues including, pyruvate kinase enzyme (PK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Results Results showed that biharzial bladder cancer patients recored more significant elevation in serum XO, fructosamine, LDH, AST, ALT, hydroxyproline, IgE and TNF-α than in bladder cancer patients when compared to control ones. While, in tissues there were significant increase in PK, LDH, AST & ALT activities of schistosomal bladder cancer than in bladder cancer as compared to control healthy patients. Conclusions It could be concluded that, bilharzial and non-bilharzial bladder cancer showed distinct biochemical profile of tumor development and progression which can be taken into consideration in diagnosis of bladder cancer. PMID:21473769

  20. IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL MARKERS OF THE SUN'S GIANT CONVECTIVE SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Leamon, Robert J.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2014-04-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are analyzed using a diagnostic known as the magnetic range of influence (MRoI). The MRoI is a measure of the length over which a photospheric magnetogram is balanced and so its application gives the user a sense of the connective length scales in the outer solar atmosphere. The MRoI maps and histograms inferred from the SDO/HMI magnetograms primarily exhibit four scales: a scale of a few megameters that can be associated with granulation, a scale of a few tens of megameters that can be associated with super-granulation, a scale of many hundreds to thousands of megameters that can be associated with coronal holes and active regions, and a hitherto unnoticed scale that ranges from 100 to 250 Mm. We infer that this final scale is an imprint of the (rotationally driven) giant convective scale on photospheric magnetism. This scale appears in MRoI maps as well-defined, spatially distributed concentrations that we have dubbed ''g-nodes''. Furthermore, using coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on SDO, we see that the vicinity of these g-nodes appears to be a preferred location for the formation of extreme-ultraviolet (and likely X-Ray) brightpoints. These observations and straightforward diagnostics offer the potential of a near real-time mapping of the Sun's largest convective scale, a scale that possibly reaches to the very bottom of the convective zone.

  1. High Infiltration of Polarized CD163+ Tumor-Associated Macrophages Correlates with Aberrant Expressions of CSCs Markers, and Predicts Prognosis in Patients with Recurrent Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-jie; Zhou, Zhi-hua; Guo, Ming; Yang, Liu-qing; Xu, Yuan-yuan; Pang, Tao-hong; Gao, Shan-ting; Xu, Xin-yun; Sun, Qi; Feng, Min; Wang, Hao; Lu, Chun-lei; Wu, Guo-zhong; Guan, Wen-xian; Xu, Gui-fang

    2017-01-01

    Background: As the most predominant tumor-infiltrating immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are associated with poor outcome in multiple solid cancers and play important roles in cancer progression. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may account for metastasis and recurrence after cancer therapy. However, the association between TAMs and CSCs is not clarified in gastric cancer (GC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of TAMs on CSCs in GC and find out the risk factors to predict recurrence and prognosis. Material and methods: This study included consecutive 236 patients with histologically confirmed primary GC. TAMs marker CD163 and CSCs-related proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in GC tissues and their prognostic values were all investigated. Results: High expression of CD163+ TAMs was found in patents with aggressive characteristics, especially for patents with recurrence. There existed a significant correlation between high expression of CD163 and CSCs-related markers in GC tissues. In patients with recurrence, high-expression of CD163 TAMs was an independent worse prognostic factor. Conclusion: High infiltration of TAMs was related to aggressive behavior, associated with aberrant expression of CSC markers, and an independent worse prognostic factor in GC. Targeting TAMs may be a potential treatment strategy for GC, including patients with recurrence. PMID:28261336

  2. WE-AB-303-03: A Scheme for Real-Time, Marker-Less and Low-Dose Tumor Tracking Using Scattering Imaging: Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H; Medin, P; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In-treatment tumor localization is critical for the management of tumor motion in lung cancer radiotherapy. Conventional tumor-tracking methods using a kV or MV x-ray projection has limited contrast. To facilitate real-time, marker-less and low-dose in-treatment image tumor tracking, we propose a novel scheme using Compton scatter imaging. This study reports Monte Carlo (MC) simulations on this scheme for the purpose of proof-of-principle. Methods: A slit x-ray beam along the patient superior-inferior (SI) direction is directed to the patient, intersecting the patient lung at a 2D plane containing majority part of the tumor motion trajectory. X-ray photons are scattered due to Compton effect from this plane, which are spatially collimated by, e.g., a pinhole, on one side of the plane and then captured by a detector behind it. The captured image, after correcting for x-ray attenuation and scatter angle variation, reflects the electron density, which allows visualization of the instantaneous anatomy on this plane. We performed MC studies on a phantom and a patient case for the initial test of this proposed method. Results: In the phantom case, the contrast-resolution calculated using tumor/lung as foreground/background for kV fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, and scattering image were 0.0625, 0.6993, and 0.5290, respectively. In the patient case, tumor motion can be clearly observed in the scatter images. Compared to fluoroscopy, scattering imaging also significantly reduced imaging dose because of its narrower beam design. Conclusion: MC simulation studies demonstrated the potential of the proposed scheme in terms of capturing the instantaneous anatomy of a patient on a 2D plane. Clear visualization of the tumor will probably facilitate ‘marker-less’ and ‘real-time’ tumor tracking with low imaging dose. NIH (1R01CA154747-01, 1R21CA178787-01A1 and 1R21EB017978-01A1)

  3. Evaluation of Lumipulse® G1200 for the measurement of six tumor markers: Comparison with AIA® 2000.

    PubMed

    de Rancher, Marie-Aude Robert; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste; Maquart, François-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean Claude; Ramont, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Tumor marker assays are daily practiced, for screening and follow up of cancers. Interassay precision is an important parameter for the interpretation of the kinetics of the markers, in order to conclude to the efficiency or failure of treatment. The aim of this study was to compare two automated Immunoassay analyzers, Lumipulse® G1200 and AIA® 2000. Both analyzers used an immunoassay system but with different antibodies. Six tumor markers commonly used were studied: AFP, PSA, CA 19-9, CA 15-3, CA 125 and CEA. 253 samples have been collected over a period of one month and analyzed by both analyzers. Regression of Passing-Badblock and Bland-Altman diagram were used to analyze the results for AFP (n=36), PSA (n=39), CA-125 (n=40), CA 15-3 (n=40), CA 19-9 (n=46) and CEA (n=52) were performed. Analytical performances of Lumipulse® G1200 highlighted the good inter-run and intra-run precision of the analyzer. We obtained a good correlation coefficient between Lumipulse G1200® and AIA 2000®, >0.96 for most markers except CA 19-9 which provided a correlation coefficient significantly lower than that obtained with other markers. The concordance for all markers was >94% except for CA 19-9 (83.7%). This study showed a good correlation between the two analyzers and, therefore, a transfer from one analyzer to the other is possible for the different markers studied. However, we found here the classical difficulty to transfer this type of analysis, due to the absence of method standardization. This difficulty was particularly illustrated by CA19-9.

  4. Synthetic-fuel plants: potential tumor risks to public health.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, P D; Morris, S C; Fischer, H; Thode, H C; Hamilton, L D

    1985-09-01

    This article quantifies potential public health risks from tumor-producing pollutants emitted from two synthetic-fuel plants (direct liquefaction--Exxon Donor Solvent: and indirect liquefaction--Lurgi Fischer-Tropsch) located at a representative site in the eastern United States. In these analyses gaseous and aqueous waste streams were characterized; exposures via inhalation, terrestrial and aquatic food chains, and drinking water supplies were modeled. Analysis suggested that emissions of "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons," "aromatic amines," "neutral N, O, S heterocyclics," "nitriles," and "other trace elements" pose the largest quantifiable risks to public health. Data and analysis for these pollutant categories should be refined to more accurately match compound-specific estimated exposure levels with tumorigenic potency estimates. Before these results are used for regulatory purposes, more detailed analysis for selected pollutant classes are needed, and more sophisticated aquatic exposure models must be developed. Also, differences in geographic scales among the environmental transport models used need to be rectified.

  5. Tumor markers for diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jie-Xian; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Ting; Tian, Bao-Guo; Du, Li-Li; Zhao, Xian-Wen; Han, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the value of combined detection of serum CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS for the clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer and to analyze the efficacy of these tumor markers (TMs) in evaluating curative effects and prognosis. A total of 573 patients with upper GIT cancer between January 2004 and December 2007 were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were examined preoperatively and every 3 months postoperatively by ELISA. The sensitivity of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were 26.8%, 36.2%, 42.9%, 2.84%, 25.4%, 34.6%, 34.2% and 30.9%, respectively. The combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 had higher sensitivity and specificity in gastric cancer (GC) and cardiac cancer, while CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC was the best combination of diagnosis for esophageal cancer (EC). Elevation of preoperative CEA, CA19-9 and CA24-2, SCC and CA72-4 was significantly associated with pathological types (p<0.05) and TNM staging (p<0.05). Correlation analysis showed that CA24-2 was significantly correlated with CA19-9 (r=0.810, p<0.001). The levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC decreased obviously 3 months after operations. When metastasis and recurrence occurred, the levels of TMs significantly increased. On multivariate analysis, high preoperative CA72-4, CA24-2 and SCC served as prognostic factors for cardiac carcinoma, GC and EC, respectively. combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC proved to be the most economic and practical strategy in diagnosis of EC; CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 proved to be a better evaluation indicator for cardiac cancer and GC. CEA and CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC, examined postoperatively during follow-up, were useful to find early tumor recurrence and metastasis, and evaluate prognosis. AFP, TPA and TPS have no significant value in diagnosis of patients with upper GIT cancer.

  6. Microfluidic, marker-free isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood samples

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Nezihi Murat; Spuhler, Philipp S; Fachin, Fabio; Lim, Eugene J; Pai, Vincent; Ozkumur, Emre; Martel, Joseph M; Kojic, Nikola; Smith, Kyle; Chen, Pin-i; Yang, Jennifer; Hwang, Henry; Morgan, Bailey; Trautwein, Julie; Barber, Thomas A; Stott, Shannon L; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Kapur, Ravi; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The ability to isolate and analyze rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has the potential to further our understanding of cancer metastasis and enhance the care of cancer patients. In this protocol, we describe the procedure for isolating rare CTCs from blood samples by using tumor antigen–independent microfluidic CTC-iChip technology. The CTC-iChip uses deterministic lateral displacement, inertial focusing and magnetophoresis to sort up to 107 cells/s. By using two-stage magnetophoresis and depletion antibodies against leukocytes, we achieve 3.8-log depletion of white blood cells and a 97% yield of rare cells with a sample processing rate of 8 ml of whole blood/h. The CTC-iChip is compatible with standard cytopathological and RNA-based characterization methods. This protocol describes device production, assembly, blood sample preparation, system setup and the CTC isolation process. Sorting 8 ml of blood sample requires 2 h including setup time, and chip production requires 2–5 d. PMID:24577360

  7. Microfluidic, marker-free isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Nezihi Murat; Spuhler, Philipp S; Fachin, Fabio; Lim, Eugene J; Pai, Vincent; Ozkumur, Emre; Martel, Joseph M; Kojic, Nikola; Smith, Kyle; Chen, Pin-i; Yang, Jennifer; Hwang, Henry; Morgan, Bailey; Trautwein, Julie; Barber, Thomas A; Stott, Shannon L; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Kapur, Ravi; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-03-01

    The ability to isolate and analyze rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has the potential to further our understanding of cancer metastasis and enhance the care of cancer patients. In this protocol, we describe the procedure for isolating rare CTCs from blood samples by using tumor antigen-independent microfluidic CTC-iChip technology. The CTC-iChip uses deterministic lateral displacement, inertial focusing and magnetophoresis to sort up to 10⁷ cells/s. By using two-stage magnetophoresis and depletion antibodies against leukocytes, we achieve 3.8-log depletion of white blood cells and a 97% yield of rare cells with a sample processing rate of 8 ml of whole blood/h. The CTC-iChip is compatible with standard cytopathological and RNA-based characterization methods. This protocol describes device production, assembly, blood sample preparation, system setup and the CTC isolation process. Sorting 8 ml of blood sample requires 2 h including setup time, and chip production requires 2-5 d.

  8. Label-free detection of tumor markers in a colon carcinoma tumor progression model by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Rück, Angelika; Udart, Martin; Hauser, Carmen; Dürr, Christine; Kriebel, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Living colon carcinoma cells were investigated by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. An in vitro model of tumor progression was established. Evaluation of data sets by cluster analysis reveals that lipid bodies might be a valuable diagnostic parameter for early carcinogenesis.

  9. Interfractional Positional Variability of Fiducial Markers and Primary Tumors in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer During Audiovisual Biofeedback Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Nicholas O.; Shepherd, Wes; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate implanted markers as a surrogate for tumor-based setup during image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy with audiovisual biofeedback. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were implanted bronchoscopically with gold coils. Markers, tumor, and a reference bony structure (vertebra) were contoured for all 10 phases of the four-dimensional respiration-correlated fan-beam computed tomography and weekly four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Results: The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-tumor centroid displacements were 2/3, 2/2, and 3/3 mm in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) directions, respectively. The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/3, and 2/3 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. The systematic/random tumor-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/4, and 4/4 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. All displacements changed significantly over time (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although marker-based image guidance may decrease the risk for geometric miss compared with bony anatomy-based positioning, the observed displacements between markers and tumor centroids indicate the need for repeated soft tissue imaging, particularly in situations with large tumor volume change and large initial marker-to-tumor centroid distance.

  10. Canine mast cell tumors: correlation of apoptosis and proliferation markers with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Scase, Timothy J; Edwards, David; Miller, Jodi; Henley, William; Smith, Ken; Blunden, Anthony; Murphy, Sue

    2006-01-01

    The Patnaik histologic grading system is commonly used to predict the behavior of cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) in dogs, but it is less useful for grade 2 MCTs because they exhibit considerable variation in biological behavior. In this retrospective study, immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and survivin and a standardized argyrophilic staining of nucleolar organizer regions (AgNOR) protocol were performed on 121 archived paraffin-embedded specimens of canine cutaneous MCTs, for which clinical follow-up data were available. Cox regression models indicated that the Ki-67 score (hazard ratio, 1.92; P < .001) and mean AgNOR score (hazard ratio, 2.57; P < .001) were significantly associated with Patnaik grade and survival time. A binary Ki-67 variable (cutoff point Ki-67 score = 1.8) was a significant predictor of survival for dogs with grade 2 MCTs. The estimated 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival probabilities for dogs with grade 2 MCTs and Ki-67 scores less than 1.8 were 0.92, 0.86, and 0.77, respectively (SEs, 0.08, 0.14, and 0.23, respectively; median not estimable). The corresponding survival probabilities for dogs with grade 2 MCTs and Ki-67 scores higher than 1.8 were 0.43, 0.21, and 0.21, respectively (SEs, 0.19, 0.18, and 0.18, respectively; median survival time, 395 days). No significant association was identified between survival and survivin score or PCNA score. This study shows that both mean AgNOR score and Ki-67 score are prognostic markers for canine MCTs. The Ki-67 score can be used to divide Patnaik grade 2 MCTs into 2 groups with markedly different expected survival times.

  11. Decline in Antigenicity of Tumor Markers by Storage Time Using Pathology Sections Cut From Tissue Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Blows, Fiona M; Ali, Hamid R; Dawson, Sarah-J; Le Quesne, John; Provenzano, Elena; Caldas, Carlos; Pharoah, Paul D P

    2016-03-01

    Sectioning a whole tissue microarrray (TMA block) and storing the sections maximizes the number of sections obtained, but may impair the antigenicity of the stored sections. We have investigated the impact of TMA section storage on antigenicity. First, we reexamined existing TMA data to determine whether antigenicity in stored sections changes over time. Component scores for each marker, based on cellular compartment of staining and score-type, were evaluated separately. Residual components scores adjusted for grade, tumor size, and node positivity, were regressed on the number of days storage to evaluate the effect of storage time. Storage time ranged from 2 to 1897 days, and the mean change in antigenicity per year ranged from -0.88 (95% confidence interval, -1.11 to -0.65) to 0.035 (95% confidence interval, 0.016-0.054). Further analysis showed no significant improvement in the fit of survival models if storage time adjusted scores were included in the models rather than unadjusted scores. We then compared 3 ways of processing TMA sections after cutting-immediate staining, staining after 1 year, and staining after 1 year coated in wax-on the immunohistochemistry results for: progesterone receptor, a routinely used, robust antibody, and MKI67, which is generally considered less robust. The progesterone receptor scores for stored sections were similar to those for unstored sections, whereas the MKI67 scores for stored sections were substantially different to those for unstored sections. Wax coating made little difference to the results. Biomarker antigenicity shows a small decline over time that is unlikely to have an important effect on studies of prognostic biomarkers.

  12. Simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers with a rapid and sensitive multicolor quantum dots based immunochromatographic test strip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunying; Hou, Fei; Ma, Yicai

    2015-06-15

    A novel multicolor quantum dots (QDs) based immunochromatographic test strip (ICTS) was developed for simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers, by utilizing alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as models. The immunosensor could realize simultaneous quantitative detection of tumor markers with only one test line and one control line on the nitrocellulose membrane (NC membrane) due to the introduction of multicolor QDs. In this method, a mixture of mouse anti-AFP McAb and mouse anti-CEA McAb was coated on NC membrane as test line and goat anti-mouse IgG antibody was coated as control line. Anti-AFP McAb-QDs546 conjugates and anti-CEA McAb-QDs620 conjugates were mixed and applied to the conjugate pad. Simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers was achieved by detecting the fluorescence intensity of captured QDs labels on test line and control line using a test strip reader. Under the optimum conditions, AFP and CEA could be detected as low as 3 ng/mL and 2 ng/mL in 15 min with a sample volume of 80 μL, and no obvious cross-reactivity was observed. The immunosensor was validated with 130 clinical samples and in which it exhibited high sensitivity (93% for AFP and 87% for CEA) and specificity (94% for AFP and 97% for CEA). The immunosensor also demonstrated high recoveries (87.5-113% for AFP and 90-97.3% for CEA) and low relative standard deviations (RSDs) (2.8-6.2% for AFP and 4.9-9.6% for CEA) when testing spiked human serum. This novel multicolor QDs based ICTS provides an easy and rapid, simultaneous quantitative detecting strategy for point-of-care testing of tumor markers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical significance of serum tumor markers for gastric cancer: a systematic review of literature by the Task Force of the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Noie, Tamaki; Ohashi, Manabu; Oba, Koji; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the clinical significance of serum tumor markers, particularly CEA, CA19-9, and CA72-4, in patients with gastric cancer. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE with the keywords "gastric cancer" and "tumor marker," to select 4,925 relevant reports published before the end of November 2012. A total of 187 publications contained data for CEA and CA19-9, and 19 publications contained data related to all three tumor markers. The positive rates were 21.1 % for CEA, 27.8 % for CA19-9, and 30.0 % for CA72-4. These three markers were significantly associated with tumor stage and patient survival. Serum markers are not useful for early cancer, but they are useful for detecting recurrence and distant metastasis, predicting patient survival, and monitoring after surgery. Tumor marker monitoring may be useful for patients after surgery because the positive conversion of tumor markers usually occurs 2-3 months before imaging abnormalities. Among other tumor markers, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is useful for detecting and predicting liver metastases. Moreover, CA125 and sialyl Tn antigens (STN) are useful for detecting peritoneal metastases. Although no prospective trial has yet been completed to evaluate the clinical significance of these serum markers, this literature survey suggests that combinations of CEA, CA19-9, and CA72-4 are the most effective ways for staging before surgery or chemotherapy. In particular, monitoring tumor markers that were elevated before surgery or chemotherapy could be useful for detection of recurrence or evaluation of the response.

  14. Is CRX protein a useful marker in differential diagnosis of tumors of the pineal region?

    PubMed

    Manila, Antonelli; Mariangela, Novello; Libero, Lauriola; Francesca, Gianno; Romana, Buttarelli Francesca; Felice, Giangaspero

    2014-01-01

    The cone-rod homeobox (CRX) is a gene that belongs to the member of the orthodenticle homeobox (Otx) family, with important function in development and differentiation of retinal and pineal cells. Moreover, CRX appears to be specifically expressed in pineal tumors and retinoblastomas. We performed an immunohistochemical study on 91 pediatric and adult central nervous system tumors, plus 2 normal brain samples. Our results demonstrated that CRX is expressed not only in pineal parenchymal tumors and retinoblastoma, but also in a some medulloblastomas and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors. None of the glial tumors screened were positive for CRX. In conclusion, CRX could be useful in surgical neuropathology for the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumors, in particular to discriminate pineal tumors from glial tumors.

  15. A multiplexed marker-based algorithm for diagnosis of carcinoma of unknown primary using circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaohai; Dicker, David T.; Holder, Sheldon L.; Lim, Bora; Harouaka, Ramdane; Zheng, Si-Yang; Drabick, Joseph J.; Lamparella, Nicholas E.; Truica, Cristina I.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time, single-cell multiplex immunophenotyping of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hypothesized to inform diagnosis of tissue of origin in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP). In 20 to 50% of CUP patients, the primary site remains unidentified, presenting a challenge for clinicians in diagnosis and treatment. We developed a post-CellSearch CTC assay using multiplexed Q-dot or DyLight conjugated antibodies with the goal of detecting multiple markers in single cells within a CTC population. We adapted our approach to size-based CTC enrichment protocols for capturing CTCs and subsequent immunofluorescence (IF) using a minimal set of markers to predict the primary sites for common metastatic tumors. The carcinomas are characterized with cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20), thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), estrogen receptor (ER) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA. IF has been optimized in cultured tumor cells with individual antibodies, then with conjugated antibodies to form a multiplex antibody set. With IF, we evaluated antibodies specific to these 5 markers in lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer cell lines and blood from metastatic prostate and breast cancer patients. This advanced technology provides a noninvasive, diagnostic blood test as an adjunct to routine tissue biopsy. Its further implementation requires prospective clinical testing. PMID:26695546

  16. Correlation of ultrasound contrast agent derived blood flow parameters with immunohistochemical angiogenesis markers in murine xenograft tumor models.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Wilson, Christian C; Ro, Raymond J; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Chiou, See-Ying; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-09-01

    In this study we used temporal analysis of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) estimate blood flow dynamics and demonstrate their improved correlation to angiogenesis markers relative to previously reported, non-temporal fractional vascularity estimates. Breast tumor (NMU) or glioma (C6) cells were implanted in either the abdomen or thigh of 144 rats. After 6, 8 or 10 days, rats received a bolus UCA injection of Optison (GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ; 0.4 ml/kg) during power Doppler imaging (PDI), harmonic imaging (HI), and microflow imaging (MFI) using an Aplio ultrasound scanner with 7.5 MHz linear array (Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA). Time-intensity curves of contrast wash-in were constructed on a pixel-by-pixel basis and averaged to calculate maximum intensity, time to peak, perfusion, and time integrated intensity (TII). Tumors were then stained for four immunohistochemical markers (bFGF, CD31, COX-2, and VEGF). Correlations between temporal parameters and the angiogenesis markers were investigated for each imaging mode. Effects of tumor model and implant location on these correlations were also investigated. Significant correlation over the entire dataset was only observed between TII and VEGF for all three imaging modes (R=-0.35, -0.54, -0.32 for PDI, HI and MFI, respectively; p<0.0001). Tumor type and location affected these correlations, with the strongest correlation of TII to VEGF found to be with implanted C6 cells (R=-0.43, -0.54, -0.52 for PDI, HI and MFI, respectively; p<0.0002). While UCA-derived temporal blood flow parameters were found to correlate strongly with VEGF expression, these correlations were also found to be influenced by both tumor type and implant location. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cyst fluid NB/70K concentration and leukocyte esterase: two new markers for differentiating pancreatic serous tumors from pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Yong, W H; Southern, J F; Pins, M R; Warshaw, A L; Compton, C C; Lewandrowski, K B

    1995-05-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas include inflammatory pseudocysts, serous cystadenomas, and mucinous tumors, some of which are malignant. Preoperative clinical and radiological parameters are unreliable and may result in incorrect diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Cyst fluid analysis for cytology, viscosity, carcino-embryonic antigen, CA 72-4, and CA 15-3 will distinguish mucinous from nonmucinous lesions and usually help in determining malignancy. Currently, there is no reliable method to differentiate inflammatory pseudocysts from serous cystadenomas. This distinction is important because the treatment of these two lesions is different; pseudocysts are either observed or drained, whereas serous tumors are usually resected. The tumor marker NB/70K was measured in aspirated cyst fluid from 13 inflammatory pseudocysts and 11 serous cystadenomas by a commercial immunoassay. Leukocyte esterase was measured using Chemstrip SG urine test strips and amylase and lipase on a routine chemistry analyzer. The cyst fluid NB/70K concentration was significantly higher in pseudocysts (mean, 555 U/ml; range, 42-1,926 U/ml) than in serous cystadenomas (mean, 12 U/ml; range 0-130 U/ml) and this difference was significant (p < 0.0002). Leukocyte esterase was detected in 7 of 11 pseudocysts but was absent in 10 of 10 serous tumors (p = 0.002). Amylase and lipase values were generally higher in pseudocysts but these markers were unreliable due to marked outliers. Cyst fluid NB/70K and leukocyte esterase are promising markers to help differentiate pseudocysts from serous tumors on percutaneous aspirates. When combined with previously reported cyst fluid parameters (amylase, lipase, cytology, and amylase isoenzymes), these two cystic lesions can be reliably distinguished.

  18. Lycopersicon esculentum lectin: an effective and versatile endothelial marker of normal and tumoral blood vessels in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, S; Frigerio, S; Gelati, M; Salmaggi, A; Vitellaro-Zuccarello, L

    2004-01-01

    The binding of Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEA) to the vascular endothelium was studied in the central nervous system of rat, mouse and guinea pig at different developmental ages, and in a gliosarcoma model. Our observations showed that LEA consistently stained the entire vascular tree in the spinal cord and in the brain of all animal species at all developmental ages investigated. In the tumor model, the staining of the vascular network was very reproducible, enabled an easy identification of vascular profiles and displayed a higher efficiency when compared to two other commonly used vascular marker (EHS laminin and PECAM-1). Moreover, our results showed that LEA staining was comparable in both vibratome and paraffin sections and could be easily combined with other markers in double labeling experiments. These observations indicate that LEA staining may represent an effective and versatile endothelial marker for the study of the vasculature of the central nervous system in different animal species and experimental conditions.

  19. Mutations in p53 as potential molecular markers for human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Runnebaum, I.B.; Nagarajan, M.; Bowman, M.; Soto, D.; Sukumar, S. )

    1991-12-01

    Based on the high incidence of loss of heterozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p in the vicinity of the p53 locus in human breast tumors. The authors investigated the frequency and effects of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene in mammary neoplasia. They examined the p53 gene in 20 breast cancer cell lines and 59 primary breast tumors. Northern blot analysis, immunoprecipitation, and nucleotide sequencing analysis revealed aberrant mRNA expression, over-expression of protein, and point mutations in the p53 gene in 50% of the cell line tested. A multiplex PCR assay was developed to search for deletions in the p53 genomic locus. Multiplex PCR of genomic DNA showed that up to 36% of primary tumors contained aberrations in the p53 locus. Mutations in exons 5-9 of the p53 gene were found in 10 out of 59 (17%) of the primary tumors studied by single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. They conclude that, compared to amplification of HER2/NEU, MYC, or INT2 oncogene loci, p53 gene mutations and deletions are the most frequently observed genetic change in breast cancer related to a single gene. Correlated to disease status, p53 gene mutations could prove to be a valuable marker for diagnosis and/or prognosis of breast neoplasia.

  20. An investigation of the potential of DIP-STR markers for DNA mixture analyses.

    PubMed

    Cereda, G; Biedermann, A; Hall, D; Taroni, F

    2014-07-01

    The genetic characterization of unbalanced mixed stains remains an important area where improvement is imperative. In fact, using the standard tools of forensic DNA profiling (i.e., STR markers), the profile of the minor contributor in mixed DNA stains cannot be successfully detected if its quantitative share of DNA is less than 10% of the mixed trace. This is due to the fact that the major contributor's profile "masks" that of the minor contributor. Besides known remedies to this problem, such as Y-STR analysis, a new compound genetic marker that consists of a Deletion/Insertion Polymorphism (DIP) linked to a Short Tandem Repeat (STR) polymorphism, has recently been developed and proposed. These novel markers are called DIP-STR markers. This paper compares, from a statistical and forensic perspective, the potential usefulness of these novel DIP-STR markers (i) with traditional STR markers in cases of moderately unbalanced mixtures, and (ii) with Y-STR markers in cases of female-male mixtures. This is done through a comparison of the distribution of 100,000 likelihood ratio values obtained using each method on simulated mixtures. This procedure is performed assuming, in turn, the prosecution's and the defence's point of view.

  1. A method of surface marker location optimization for tumor motion estimation in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Bo Park, Justin C.; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Accurately localizing lung tumor localization is essential for high-precision radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Since direct monitoring of tumor motion is not always achievable due to the limitation of imaging modalities for treatment guidance, placement of fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to act as a surrogate for tumor position prediction is a practical alternative for tracking lung tumor motion during SBRT treatments. In this work, the authors propose an innovative and robust model to solve the multimarker position optimization problem. The model is able to overcome the major drawbacks of the sparse optimization approach (SOA) model. Methods: The principle-component-analysis (PCA) method was employed as the framework to build the authors’ statistical prediction model. The method can be divided into two stages. The first stage is to build the surrogate tumor matrix and calculate its eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. The second stage is to determine the “best represented” columns of the eigenvector matrix obtained from stage one and subsequently acquire the optimal marker positions as well as numbers. Using 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and breath hold CT imaging data, the PCA method was compared to the SOA method with respect to calculation time, average prediction accuracy, prediction stability, noise resistance, marker position consistency, and marker distribution. Results: The PCA and SOA methods which were both tested were on all 11 patients for a total of 130 cases including 4DCT and breath-hold CT scenarios. The maximum calculation time for the PCA method was less than 1 s with 64 752 surface points, whereas the average calculation time for the SOA method was over 12 min with 400 surface points. Overall, the tumor center position prediction errors were comparable between the two methods, and all were less than 1.5 mm. However, for the extreme scenarios (breath hold), the

  2. Multiplexed sandwich immunoassays using flow-injection electrochemiluminescence with designed substrate spatial-resolved technique for detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Weiyan; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Wang, Shaowei; Yu, Jinghua; Li, Nianqiang; Song, Xianrang

    2013-03-15

    Convenient sensor array for simultaneous multi-analyte testing was increasingly needed in clinical diagnosis. A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor array for the sequential detection of multiple tumor markers was developed by site-selectively immobilizing multiple antigens on different electrodes. Disposable indium tin oxide (ITO) glass array was employed as detection platform. With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, the amount of carbon dots coated silica (SiO(2)@C-dots) labeled antibodies increased with the increment of antigens in the samples. The ECL signal from different immunosensors was collected in turn by a photomultiplier (PMT) with the aid of a home-made potential transformer equiped with a home-made multiplexed-switch. Using carcino embryonic antigen (CEA), prostate specific antigen (PSA) and α-fetoprotein (α-AFP) as model analytes, the proposed immunoassay exhibited excellent precision and sensitivity. For all three analytes, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for six times detection were lower than 7.1% and the detection limits were in the range of 0.003-0.006 ng mL(-1). The results for real sample analysis demonstrated that the newly constructed immunosensor array provided a rapid, simple, simultaneous multi-analyte immunoassay with high throughput, cost-effective and sufficiently low detection limits for clinical applications. Importantly, the novel individually addressable immunosensor array for multi-analyte immunoassay by introducing the ECL readout mechanism with the aid of the home-made potential transformer and multiplexed-switch could be a useful supplement to commercial assay methods in clinical chemistry.

  3. Small renal masses: The molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirina, L. V.; Usynin, Y. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Yurmazov, Z. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Pikalova, L. V.

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of molecular mechanisms of tumor cell behavior in small renal masses is required to achieve the better cancer survival. The aim of the study is to find molecular markers associated with outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less. A homogenous group of 20 patients T1N0M0-1 (mean age 57.6 ± 2.2 years) with kidney cancer was selected for the present analysis. The content of transcription and growth factors was determined by ELISA. The levels of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway components were measured by Western blotting analysis. The molecular markers associated with unfavorable outcome of patients with kidney tumors 7 cm or less were high levels of NF-kB p50, NF-kB p65, HIF-1, HIF-2, VEGF and CAIX. AKT activation with PTEN loss also correlated with the unfavorable outcome of kidney cancer patients with tumor size 7 cm or less. It is observed that the biological features of kidney cancer could predict the outcome of patients.

  4. HEXIM1 as a Robust Pharmacodynamic Marker for Monitoring Target Engagement of BET Family Bromodomain Inhibitors in Tumors and Surrogate Tissues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoyu; Huang, Xiaoli; Uziel, Tamar; Hessler, Paul; Albert, Daniel H; Roberts-Rapp, Lisa A; McDaniel, Keith F; Kati, Warren M; Shen, Yu

    2017-02-01

    An increasing number of BET family protein inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials. It has been reported that attempts of monitoring target engagement of the BET bromodomain inhibitor OTX015 using literature-described putative pharmacodynamic markers, such as c-Myc, BRD2, etc., failed to detect pharmacodynamic marker responses in AML patients treated at active dose and those with clinical responses. Here, we report the identification and characterization of HEXIM1 and other genes as robust pharmacodynamic markers for BET inhibitors. Global gene expression profiling studies were carried out using cancer cells and surrogate tissues, such as whole blood and skin, to identify genes that are modulated by BET family proteins. Candidate markers were further characterized for concentration- and time-dependent responses to the BET inhibitor ABBV-075 in vitro and in vivo HEXIM1 was found to be the only gene that exhibited robust and consistent modulation by BET inhibitors across multiple cancer indications and surrogate tissues. Markers such as SERPINI1, ZCCHC24, and ZMYND8 were modulated by ABBV-075 and other BET inhibitors across cancer cell lines and xenograft tumors but not in blood and skin. Significant downregulation of c-Myc, a well-publicized target of BET inhibitors, was largely restricted to hematologic cancer cell lines. Incorporating well-characterized pharmacodynamic markers, such as HEXIM1 and other genes described here, can provide a better understanding of potential efficacy and toxicity associated with inhibiting BET family proteins and informs early clinical decisions on BET inhibitor development programs. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 388-96. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/regucalcin (RGN) expression decreases with aging, acute liver injuries and tumors in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Terai, Shuji; Hirose, Yoshikazu; Takami, Taro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Zebrafish SMP30/RGN mRNA expression decreases with aging. {yields} Decreased expression was observed in liver tumors as compared to the surrounding area. {yields} SMP30/RGN is important for liver proliferation and tumorigenesis. -- Abstract: Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/regucalcin (RGN) is known to be related to aging, hepatocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis. However, expression and function of non-mammalian SMP30/RGN is poorly understood. We found that zebrafish SMP30/RGN mRNA expression decreases with aging, partial hepatectomy and thioacetamide-induced acute liver injury. SMP30/RGN expression was also greatly decreased in a zebrafish liver cell line. In addition, we induced liver tumors in adult zebrafish by administering diethylnitrosamine. Decreased expression was observed in foci, hepatocellular carcinomas, cholangiocellular carcinomas and mixed tumors as compared to the surrounding area. We thus showed the importance of SMP30/RGN in liver proliferation and tumorigenesis.

  6. JMJD2B as a potential diagnostic immunohistochemical marker for hepatocellular carcinoma: a tissue microarray-based study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Liang-In; Huang, Yen-Chi; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Yueh-Min; Tzeng, Tsai-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine JMJD2B expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and elucidate relationships between various expression patterns and clinicopathological parameters of HCC patients. Immunohistochemical techniques were performed to detect JMJD2B expression in a tissue microarray from patients with breast, cerebrum, colon, esophagus, kidney, liver, lung, prostate, stomach, and uterus cancers. We performed immunohistochemical staining of a multiple tissue array to examine the expression profile of JMJD2B. Our results demonstrate that JMJD2B protein levels were upregulated in malignant human tumors, including breast, colon, liver, and lung. Immunohistochemistry staining examination of liver tumor tissue microarray revealed that the expression of JMJD2B is significant according to the histological grade and TNM stage of liver tumor. Moreover, JMJD2B was also correlated with Ki-67 expression in HCC samples. These results reveal that JMJD2B is dramatically upregulated in HCC, making it a potential diagnostic marker for the further development of HCC treatment therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo potential of recombinant granulysin against human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wasaby, Sameer; de Miguel, Diego; Aporta, Adriana; Naval, Javier; Conde, Blanca; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Anel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    9 kDa granulysin is a protein present in the granules of human CTL and NK cells, with cytolytic activity against microbes and tumors. Previous work from our group demonstrated that this granulysin isoform induced apoptosis in vitro on hematological tumor cells and on primary tumor cells from B-CLL patients. In the present work, recombinant 9 kDa granulysin was used as an anti-tumoral agent to study its in vivo effect on tumor development in athymic “nude” mice models bearing human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 or multiple myeloma NCI-H929–derived xenografts. Granulysin prevented the in vivo development of detectable MDA-MB-231-derived tumors. In addition, recombinant granulysin was able to completely eradicate NCI-H929-derived tumors. All granulysin-treated tumors exhibited signs of apoptosis induction and an increased NK cell infiltration inside the tumor tissue comparing to control ones. Moreover, no in vivo deleterious effects of the recombinant 9 kDa granulysin doses used in this study were observed on the skin or on the internal organs of the animals. In conclusion, granulysin was able to inhibit the progression of MDA-MB-231-derived xenografts and also to eradicate multiple myeloma NCI-H929-derived xenografts. This work opens the door to the initiation of preclinical and possibly clinical studies for the use of 9 kDa granulysin as a new anti-tumoral treatment. PMID:26405603

  8. Cancer vaccines: harnessing the potential of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Although the presence of cancer suggests failure of the immune system to protect against development of tumors, the possibility that immunity can be redirected and focused to generate an anti-tumor response offers great translational possibility. The key to this is identifying antigens likely to be present in any given tumor and functionally critical to tumor survival and growth. Such tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are varied and optimally should be absent from normal tissue. Of particular interest are TAAs associated with the tumor stroma, as immunity directed against the stroma may restrict the ability of the tumor to grow and metastasize. Important to directing the immune system toward an effect anti-tumor response is the understanding of how TAAs are processed and how the tumor is able to evade immune elimination. The process of immunoediting happens in response to the selective pressure that the immune system places upon tumor cell populations and allows for emergence of tumor cells capable of escaping immune destruction. Efforts to harness the immune system for clinical application has been aided by vaccines based on purified recombinant protein or nucleic acid TAAs. For example, a vaccine for canine melanoma has been developed and approved based on immunization with DNA components of tyrosinase, a glycoprotein essential to melanin synthesis. The performance of cancer vaccines has been aided in some cases when supplemented with immunostimulatory molecules such as interleukin 2 or a novel extracellular matrix vaccine adjuvant. Vaccines with the broadest menu of antigenic targets may be those most likely to succeed against cancer. For this reason, tissue vaccines produced from harvested tumor material may offer significant benefit. With several cancer vaccines on the veterinary and human markets, efforts to understand basic tumor immunology are soon to yield great dividends.

  9. False positive tumor markers: elevation in patients with breast cancer on FAC-type chemotherapy and correlation with the development of hand-foot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tyshler, L B; Longton, G M; Ellis, G K; Livingston, R B

    1996-01-01

    Breast cancer patients on dose-intensive chemotherapy often have elevated tumor markers during the course of treatment. Our objective was to estimate the incidence of a "false positive" tumor marker screen and to determine whether hand-foot epithelial damage was correlated. Data from 53 patients with high risk primary breast cancer who had undergone adjuvant or neoadjuvant 5FU-containing chemotherapy (FAC or FAC plus G-CSF) for 3 to 12 months were reviewed. The relationship between tumor marker elevation and disease recurrence, regimen intensity, and the occurrence of hand-foot syndrome was examined. Thirty-three of the 53 patients had elevated tumor markers in the absence of recurrent disease. The false positive rate was higher in patients who underwent FAC plus G-CSF chemotherapy than in patients who underwent FAC chemotherapy (92% vs 55%, p = .01). A false positive marker screen was associated with the occurrence of hand-foot syndrome even when the effect of regimen was accounted for by stratification (p = .01). Tumor marker screening of breast cancer patients on this type of adjuvant chemotherapy has poor specificity for recurrent malignancy. These data suggest tumor marker elevation may be an indicator of epithelial toxicity during chemotherapy, manifested clinically as hand-foot syndrome.

  10. The effects of tumor location on diagnostic criteria for canine malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) and the markers for distinction between canine MPNSTs and canine perivascular wall tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Uchida, K; Nakayama, H

    2014-07-01

    Canine malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) occur not only in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) but also in soft tissue and various organs (non-PNS). The most important diagnostic criterion is proof of peripheral nerve sheath origin. This is difficult in non-PNS MPNSTs, and its differential diagnosis is challenging. Canine perivascular wall tumors (PWTs) also commonly arise in soft tissue. Their histopathological features are quite similar to those of canine MPNSTs, making their differential diagnosis challenging. To elucidate whether the morphological features are applicable to diagnose non-PNS MPNSTs and to demonstrate useful markers for distinction between canine MPNSTs and PWTs, the authors examined 30 canine MPNSTs and 31 PWTs immunohistochemically for S100, nestin, NGFR, Olig2, claudin-1, CD57, PRX, α-SMA, desmin, and calponin. Among canine MPNSTs, the PNS tumors displayed significantly higher S100 and Olig2 expression than the non-PNS tumors. The expression levels of the other markers did not differ significantly, suggesting that the same morphological diagnostic criteria are applicable regardless of their location. The PWT cells displayed significantly weaker immunoreactivity than MPNSTs to markers used except α-SMA and desmin. Cluster analysis sorted most canine MPNSTs and PWTs into 2 distinctly different clusters, whereas 3 MPNSTs and 6 PWTs were assigned to the opposing cluster. These 3 MPNSTs were negative for almost all markers, while these 6 PWTs were positive for only neuronal markers. In particular, NGFR and Olig2 were almost negative in the rest of PWT cases. These findings suggest that NGFR and Olig2 are useful to distinguish these 2 tumors.

  11. Large proportion of low frequency microsatellite-instability and loss of heterozygosity in pheochromocytoma and endocrine tumors detected with an extended marker panel.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Susan; Haack, Birgit; Zdichavsky, Marty; Mlinar, Tanja; Kienzle, Christine; Bock, Thomas; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kroeber, Stefan-Martin; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2008-04-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PCC) is a usually benign tumor originated in the majority of patients from the adrenal medulla. Regarding sporadic forms of PCC, mechanisms of pathogenesis are largely unknown. Recently, microsatellite-instability (MSI) was discussed as genetic factor contributing to PCC development. Since microsatellite markers used for MSI detection have only been recommended for colorectal carcinoma (CRC), we established an extended marker set for MSI detection in PCC. Twenty-two PCC patients were analyzed applying 11 microsatellite markers. Our marker set comprised the reference panel for CRC and six additional markers, which have already been described to detect MSI in tumors other than CRC. Moreover, 23 endocrine tumors with gastrointestinal origin were examined in order to test the applicability of this marker panel. Microsatellite-instability was detected in 41% of PCCs. Twenty-seven percent showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events affecting different chromosomal regions. Among the 23 patients with endocrine tumors, only three (one pancreatic endocrine tumor, one duodenal neuro-endocrine tumor, one hepatic metastasis of a primary tumor with unknown origin) demonstrated MSI. The extended microsatellite panel is qualified to detect MSI in PCC. Nine percent of MSI-positive cases would have not been noticed by the use of the reference panel alone. PCCs are characterized by low frequency MSI pointing to failures in factors involved in DNA replication.

  12. Naïve CD8+ T cell derived tumor-specific cytotoxic effectors as a potential remedy for overcoming TGF-β immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Kim, Therasa; Song, Sang Yun; Park, Somang; Cho, Hyang Hee; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Hee-Ok; Cho, Jae-Ho; Yang, Deok-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Despite of the potential implications for cancer immunotherapy, conventional approaches using in vitro expanded CD8+ T cells have suboptimal outcomes, mostly due to loss of functionality from cellular exhaustion. We therefore investigated the phenotypic and functional differences among in vitro activated CD8+ T cells of three different sources, namely naïve (NTeff), memory (MTeff) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILeff) from human and mice, to better understand mechanisms behind potent effector functions and potential for overcoming current limitations. In line with the greater proliferation activity and longer telomere lengths of NTeff populations, cells of naïve origin exhibited significantly less amounts of T cell exhaustion markers than those of MTeff and TILeff, and moreover, acquired distinct expression patterns of memory-promoting transcription factors, T-bet and Eomes, induced in a rapid and sustainable manner. NTeff cells appeared to have lower expression of Foxp1 and were refractory to apoptosis upon TGF-β conditioning, implying better survival potential and resistance to tumor-induced immune suppression. Of CD8+ T cell pools activated to tumor-specific CTLs, naïve cell generated effectors possessed the most potent cytotoxic activity, validating implications for use in rational design of adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27306834

  13. Potential use of radiolabelled porphyrins for tumor scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Thaller, R.A.; Lyster, D.M.; Dolphin, D.

    1983-01-01

    Fe-TMPI, Fe-TCP and protohemins showed high initial uptake using tissue culture techniques with mouse tumor cells (P815). However, the tumor uptake in the in vivo model was poor. Of the radionuclides investigated, iron labelled to TMPI demonstrated the best uptake by tumor in vitro. As has been previously demonstrated, the unnatural meso-arylporphyrin derivatives showed better uptake than did naturally occurring porphyrins and their derivatives.

  14. Identification of vascular breast tumor markers by laser capture microdissection and label-free LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jennifer J; Tremblay, Tammy-Lynn; Pen, Ally; Li, Jie; Robotham, Anna C; Lenferink, Anne E G; Wang, Edwin; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen; Kelly, John F

    2011-05-06

    Blood vessels in tumors frequently show abnormal characteristics, such as tortuous morphology or leakiness, but very little is known about protein expression in tumor vessels. In this study, we have used laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate microvessels from clinical samples of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), the most common form of malignant breast cancer, and from patient-matched adjacent nonmalignant tissue. This approach eliminates many of the problems associated with the heterogeneity of clinical tumor tissues by controlling for differences in protein expression between both individual patients and different cell types. Proteins from the microvessels were trypsinized and the resulting peptides were quantified by a label-free nanoLC-MS method. A total of 86 proteins were identified that are overexpressed in tumor vessels relative to vessels isolated from the adjacent nonmalignant tissue. These proteins include well-known breast tumor markers such as Periostin and Tenascin C but also proteins with lesser-known or emerging roles in breast cancer and tumor angiogenesis (i.e., Serpin H1, Clic-1, and Transgelin 2). We also identified 40 proteins that were relatively under-expressed in IDC tumor vessels, including several components of the basement membrane whose lower expression could be responsible for weakening tumor vessels. Lastly, we show that a subset of 29 proteins, derived from our list of differentially expressed proteins, is able to predict survival in three publicly available clinical breast cancer microarray data sets, which suggests that this subset of proteins likely plays a functional role in cancer progression and outcome.

  15. Comparison of the value of PCNA and Ki-67 as markers of cell proliferation in ameloblastic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Mori-Estevez, Ana D.; Sánchez-Acuña, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare among PCNAand Ki-67 as the most reliable immunohistochemical marker for evaluating cell proliferation in ameloblastic tumors. Study Design: Observational, retrospective, and descriptive study of a large series of ameloblastic tumors, composed of 161 ameloblastomas and four ameloblastic carcinomas, to determine and compare PCNA and Ki-67 expression using immunohistochemistry techniques. Results: When analyzing Ki-67 positivity, the desmoplastic ameloblastoma demonstrated a significantly lower proliferation rate (1.9%) compared with the solid/multicystic and unicystic ameloblastomas and ameloblastic carcinomas (p<0.05), whereas the ameloblastic carcinomas displayed a significantly higher rate compared with all of the other ameloblastomas (48.7%) (p<0.05). When analyzing cell proliferation with PCNA, we found significant differences only between the ameloblastic carcinomas (93.3%) and the desmoplastic ameloblastomas (p<0.05). When differences between the immunopositivity for PCNA and Ki-67 were compared, the percentages were higher for PCNA in all types of ameloblastomas and ameloblastic carcinomas. In all cases, the percentages were greater than 80%, whereas the immunopositivity for Ki-67 was significantly lower; for example, the ameloblastic carcinoma expressed the highest positivity and only reached 48.7%, compared to 93.3% when we used PCNA. Conclusions: In the present study, when we used the proliferation cell marker Ki-67, the percentages of positivity were more specific and varied among the different types of ameloblastomas, suggesting that Ki-67 is a more specific marker for the proliferation of ameloblastic tumor cells. Key words:Ameloblastomas, ameloblastic carcinoma, PCNA, Ki-67, cell proliferation markers. PMID:23229269

  16. Changes in the tumor marker concentration in female patients with hyper-, eu-, and hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Matsubara, F

    1989-12-01

    The levels of 6 circulating tumor markers were evaluated in a total of 131 female subjects with altered thyroid states; 36 normal subjects, 46 hyperthyroid patients with Graves' disease, and 49 primary hypothyroid patients. The mean CEA concentration was observed to be significantly higher (p less than 0.02) in hypothyroid patients than in normal and hyperthyroid patients (1.1 +/- 0.1 ng/ml, 0.8 +/- 0.1 ng/ml and 0.8 +/- 0.1 ng/ml, respectively). Similarly, the mean serum CA 125 concentration in hypothyroid patients was higher (p less than 0.02) than in normal and hyperthyroid patients (13.0 +/- 2.6 U/ml, 7.6 +/- 1.1 U/ml and 5.5 +/- 0.8 U/ml, respectively), and the mean serum CA 15-3 concentration in hypothyroid patients was significantly higher than in normal subjects (p less than 0.01) and hyperthyroid patients (p less than 0.001) (16.2 +/- 0.9 U/ml, 13.9 +/- 0.6 U/ml and 10.6 +/- 0.5 U/ml, respectively). No statistical difference was found in mean CA 19-9 in the three subject groups. AFP in the hypothyroid patients (3.6 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) than in normal subjects (2.6 +/- 0.2 ng/ml) and hyperthyroid patients (1.7 +/- 0.2 ng/ml) (p less than 0.01). On the other hand, serum ferritin was low in the hypothyroid patients (65.9 8.0 ng/ml) and significantly increased (69.1 +/- 9.0 ng/ml) (p less than 0.02) with the normalization of thyroid function. In hyperthyroidism, serum ferritin (70.2 +/- 7.0 ng/ml) was significantly higher than in the hypothyroid patients (p less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Evaluation of Tumor Shape Variability in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Over the Course of Radiation Therapy Using Implanted Gold Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Kranen, Simon Robert van; Beek, Suzanne van; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Herk, Marcel van; Brekel, Michiel Wilhelmus Maria van den; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Rasch, Coenraad Robert Nico

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies tumor shape variability in head-and-neck cancer patients during radiation therapy using implanted markers. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with oropharyngeal tumors treated with (chemo)radiation were included. Helical gold markers (0.35 Multiplication-Sign 2 mm, 3-10/patient, average 6) were implanted around the tumor. Markers were identified on planning computed tomography (CT) and daily cone beam CT (CBCT). After bony anatomy registration, the daily vector length on CBCT in reference to the planning CT and daily marker movement perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) surface at planning CT (d{sub normal}) of each marker were analyzed. Time trends were assessed with linear regression of the {sub markers}. In 2 patients, 2 markers were implanted in normal tissue to evaluate migration by measuring intermarker distances. Results: Marker implantation was feasible without complications. Three-dimensional vectors (4827 measurements, mean 0.23 cm, interquartile ratio 0.24 cm) were highest in base of tongue sublocalization (P<.001) and bulky tumors (vectors exceeded 0.5 cm in 5.7% [0-20 mL], 12.0% [21-40 mL], and 21.7% [{>=}41 mL], respectively [P<.001] of measurements). The measured inward time trend in 11/27 patients correlated with the visual observed marker pattern. In patients with an outward trend (5/27) or no trend (11/27), visual observation showed predominantly an inhomogeneous pattern. Remarkably, in 6 patients, outward marker movement was observed in the posterior pharyngeal wall. The difference in distance between normal tissue markers (1 SD) was 0.05-0.06 cm without time trend, indicating that implanted markers did not migrate. Conclusions: During head-and-neck radiation therapy, normal tissue markers remained stable. Changes in position of tumor markers depended on sublocalization and tumor volume. Large differences in marker patterns between patients as well as within patients were observed

  18. Clinical use of serum TRA-1-60 as tumor marker in patients with germ cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Lajer, Henrik; Daugaard, Gedske; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Skakkebaek, Niels Erik

    2002-07-10

    TRA-1-60 antigen has been related to the presence of embryonal germ cell carcinoma (EC) and carcinoma in situ. Our study further investigated the clinical efficacy of TRA-1-60 as a serum tumor marker for germ cell cancer in the testis. Three groups of patients with germ cell tumors were included: Group 1, 34 patients with disseminated disease (24 nonseminomatous germ cell tumors [NSGCT] and 10 seminomatous germ cell tumors [SGCT]); this group of patients were followed during the course of chemotherapy with measurements of TRA-1-60, HCG and AFP; Group 2, 28 patients with Stage I NSGCT (22 with embryonal carcinoma [EC]-component and 6 without EC-component, median follow-up 15 months); and Group 3, 40 patients with Stage I pure SGCT (median follow-up 15 months). Seventy-eight percent of patients with disseminated EC-positive NSGCT had increased levels of TRA-1-60 before chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, levels of TRA-1-60 had dropped significantly (p < 0.01). Levels of TRA-1-60 did not normalize in 15% of NSGCT and 30% of SGCT patients after chemotherapy. This was not associated with recurrent disease. Approximately one-third of patients with Stage I NSGCT had increased values of TRA-1-60 during follow-up without having a relapse. Contrary to earlier reports TRA-1-60 is not at present useful as a tumor marker in patients with germ cell tumors. Although detecting a few early relapses the rate of false positive elevations in the tumor marker makes it unreliable in the clinical setting. Our study did confirm that elevated levels of TRA-1-60 were present in approximately 80% of patients with disseminated EC-positive NSGCT before start of chemotherapy and chemotherapy induced a significant decrease in levels of TRA-1-60. Thus, the TRA-1-60 antigen might still prove clinically useful provided that the reliability of the assay can be increased. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. SIRT1 induces tumor invasion by targeting epithelial mesenchymal transition-related pathway and is a prognostic marker in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Min-Sun; Hyun, Chang Lim; Park, In Ae; Kim, Ji Young; Chung, Yul Ri; Im, Seock-Ah; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Ryu, Han Suk

    2016-04-01

    Absence of therapeutic targets poses a critical hurdle in improving prognosis for patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We evaluated interaction between SIRT1 and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated proteins as well as the role of combined protein expression as a predictor of lymph node metastasis and clinical outcome in TNBC through in vivo and vitro studies. Three hundred nineteen patients diagnosed with TNBC were chosen, immunohistochemical staining for SIRT1 and EMT-related markers' expression was performed on tissue microarrays, and in vitro experiments with each of the three human TNBC cell lines were carried out. The cohort was reclassified according to the use of adjuvant chemotherapy, tumor size, and AJCC stage to analyze the prognostic role of SIRT1 and EMT-related proteins' expression considering different therapeutic modalities and AJCC stages. Combination of four proteins including SIRT1 and three EMT-related proteins was revealed to be a statistically significant independent predictor of lymph node metastasis in the tumor size cohort as well as in the total patient population. Upon Cox regression analysis, increased expression level of the combined proteins correlated with decreased disease-free survival in the total patients as well as those who received adjuvant chemotherapy and those who had early stage breast cancer. In additional in vitro experiments, inhibition of SIRT1 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed tumor invasion in three different TNBC cell lines, and altered expression levels of EMT-related proteins following SIRT1 gene inhibition were identified on western blotting and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis; on the other hand, no change in expression levels of the cell cycle-related factors was observed. Our analysis showed the potential role of SIRT1 in association with EMT-related factors on tumor invasion, metastasis, and disease-free survival in TNBC, SIRT1, and

  20. Structural chromosomal aberrations as potential risk markers in incident cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vodenkova, Sona; Polivkova, Zdenka; Musak, Ludovit; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Zoubkova, Hana; Sytarova, Sylvie; Kavcova, Elena; Halasova, Erika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Jiraskova, Katerina; Svoboda, Miroslav; Ambrus, Miloslav; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological prospective studies have shown that increased chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes may predict cancer risk. Here, we report CAs in newly diagnosed 101 colorectal, 87 lung and 158 breast cancer patients and corresponding healthy controls. Strong differences in distributions of aberrant cells (ACs), CAs, chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs) and chromosome-type aberrations (CSAs) were observed in lung and breast cancer patients as compared to healthy controls. In colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, only CTAs were significantly elevated. Binary logistic regression, adjusted for main confounders, indicates that all the analysed cytogenetic parameters along with smoking were significantly associated with breast and lung cancer risks. Significant differences in terminal deletions between breast cancer patients and corresponding female controls were recorded (0.39 vs. 0.18; P ≤ 0.05). We did not find any association of CAs with TNM (tumor nodus metastasis) stages or histopathological grade in either cancer type. CAs were neither associated with additional tumor characteristics-invasivity, ductal and lobular character, estrogene/progesterone receptors in breast tumors nor with non-small/small cell and bronchogenic/pulmonary types of lung tumors. Our study demonstrates that CAs serve as a predictive marker for breast and lung cancer, whereas only CTAs were elevated in incident CRC patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Oncofetal protein, IMP-3, a potential marker for prediction of postoperative peritoneal dissemination in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kaoru; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yurika; Takiguchi, Shuji; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Miyata, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the expression of insulin-like growth factor-II messenger RNA (mRNA)-binding protein-3 (IMP-3) and its clinical significance in gastric cancers, as well the prognostic value of its expression in the peritoneal lavage fluid after surgery. IMP-3 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in 96 primary gastric tumors. IMP-3 mRNA expression in peritoneal lavage fluid obtained at laparotomy was determine by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Positive staining for IMP-3 was observed in 74% (71/96) of the tumors. IMP-3 expression in gastric tumors correlated significantly with worst overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analyses identified pathological N stage and IMP-3 expression as significant independent prognostic factors for disease-free survival. Eight (28%) of 36 peritoneal lavage samples were cytologically negative but positive for IMP-3 mRNA expression by RT-PCR. The OS of patients with IMP-3-positive peritoneal lavage was significantly worse than of those with negative expression. IMP-3 expression in primary gastric tumors was an independent poor prognostic factor. IMP-3 mRNA expression in peritoneal lavage fluid was a predictor of recurrence after surgery in gastric cancer and a marker of poor prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Quantification of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; de Jong, Rianne; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is an important geometrical uncertainty in esophageal cancer radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify this motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Twenty esophageal cancer patients underwent endoscopy-guided marker implantation in the tumor volume and 4DCT acquisition. The 4DCT data were sorted into 10 breathing phases and the end-of-inhalation phase was selected as reference. We quantified for each visible marker (n=60) the motion in each phase and derived the peak-to-peak motion magnitude throughout the breathing cycle. The motion was quantified and analyzed for four different regions and in three orthogonal directions. The median(interquartile range) of the peak-to-peak magnitudes of the respiration-induced marker motion (left-right/anterior-posterior/cranial-caudal) was 1.5(0.5)/1.6(0.5)/2.9(1.4) mm for the proximal esophagus (n=6), 1.5(1.4)/1.4(1.3)/3.7(2.6) mm for the middle esophagus (n=12), 2.6(1.3)/3.3(1.8)/5.4(2.9) mm for the distal esophagus (n=25), and 3.7(2.1)/5.3(1.8)/8.2(3.1) mm for the proximal stomach (n=17). The variations in the results between the three directions, four regions, and patients suggest the need of individualized region-dependent anisotropic internal margins. Therefore, we recommend using markers with 4DCT to patient-specifically adapt the internal target volume (ITV). Without 4DCT, 3DCTs at the end-of-inhalation and end-of-exhalation phases could be alternatively applied for ITV individualization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Complement component 7 (C7), a potential tumor suppressor, is correlated with tumor progression and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaodan; Chen, Kaiyan; Zhang, Nan; Jin, Jiaoyue; Wu, Junzhou; Feng, Jianguo; Yu, Herbert; Jin, Hongchuan; Su, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study found copy number variation of chromosome fragment 5p13.1-13.3 might involve in the progression of ovarian cancer. In the current study, the alteration was validated and complement component 7 (C7), located on 5p13.1, was identified. To further explore the clinical value of C7 in tumors, 156 malignant, 22 borderline, 33 benign and 24 normal ovarian tissues, as well as 173 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues along with corresponding adjacent and normal tissues from the tissue bank of Zhejiang Cancer Hospital were collected. The expression of C7 was analyzed using reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction. As a result, the C7 expression displayed a gradual downward trend in normal, benign, borderline and malignant ovarian tissues, and the decreased expression of C7 was correlative to poor differentiation in patients with ovarian cancer. Interestingly, a similar change of expression of C7 was found in normal, adjacent and malignant tissues in patients with NSCLC, and low expression of C7 was associated with worse grade and advanced clinical stage. Both results from this cohort and the public database indicated that NSCLC patients with low expression of C7 had a worse outcome. Furthermore, multivariate cox regression analysis showed NSCLC patients with low C7 had a 3.09 or 5.65-fold higher risk for relapse or death than those with high C7 respectively, suggesting C7 was an independent prognostic predictor for prognoses of patients with NSCLC. Additionally, overexpression of C7 inhibited colony formation of NSCLC cells, which hints C7 might be a potential tumor suppressor. PMID:27852032

  4. Tumor markers in the early detection of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients: CA 125, CYFRA 21-1, HER2 shed antigen, LDH and CRP in combination with CEA and CA 15-3.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Dorit; Blankenburg, Irene; Nagel, Dorothea; Heinemann, Volker; Stieber, Petra

    2016-10-01

    Kinetics of CA 15-3 and CEA have a high specificity in the early detection of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). However, this high specificity is associated with a lack of sensitivity. To decrease the number of false negative patients, the additional diagnostic potential of an extended panel of biomarkers was evaluated. This analysis was performed as part of a large follow-up study (1998-2010) evaluating 813 patients with a median follow-up of 63months. After primary therapy, all patients underwent tumor marker monitoring for CEA and CA 15-3 at 6-week intervals. A reproducible previously defined increase (≥100%) based on the individual baseline value of each patient was considered as a strong indicator of MBC. For the present analysis, we retrospectively evaluated 1011 blood samples from 95 patients. Forty-seven of these had metastatic disease for the first time at the time of this evaluation, while the remaining 48 patients showed no evidence of disease. The sera of these patients were additionally assessed for the following parameters: cancer antigen (CA) 125, cytokeratin-19 soluble fragment (CYFRA 21-1), HER2 shed antigen, lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). 26 of 47 patients with MBC showed a reproducible tumor marker increase of at least CEA and/or CA 15-3 (55.3%, true-positive). The remaining 21 patients with MBC showed no increase in CEA or CA 15-3 (44.7%, false negative, FN). By combining all markers mentioned above, 41 of 47 patients with MBC showed a reproducible marker increase with a sensitivity of 87.2% and specificity of 100%. This retrospective analysis indicates that a panel of biomarkers can increase the sensitivity of the CA 15-3/CEA combination without loss of specificity. The combined use is therefore helpful for early detection of MBC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between clinicopathological features and expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in spontaneous canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kota; Yoshida, Saori; Choisunirachon, Nan; Saito, Tomochika; Matsumoto, Kaori; Saeki, Kohei; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    It is known that epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to the acquisition of malignant property in human cancers. However, the role of EMT in canine tumors remains to be elucidated. To evaluate the correlation between expression levels of protein markers involved in EMT and clinicopathological characteristics in canine mammary gland tumors, immunohistochemistry using antibodies against ZO-1, E-cadherin, vimentin, N-cadherin and fibronectin was performed on 119 clinical tissue samples. Consequently, loss of ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and gain of vimentin and N-cadherin were more frequently observed in malignant tumors than in benign tumors. However, there was no correlation among expression of these molecules. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified that loss of E-cadherin independently had a low one-year survival rate (adjusted odds ratio: 2.3, P=0.02). These results suggested that EMT might relate to acquisition of malignancy, and additionally, E-cadherin was strongly correlated with malignant behavior in canine mammary gland tumors.

  6. ING4 suppresses tumor angiogenesis and functions as a prognostic marker in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Pingfu; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Yafei; Wang, Weimin; Sun, Guixiang; Xu, Lichun; Zhou, Jianwei; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    ING4, a potential tumor suppressor, is implicated in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, cell migration and angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the clinical value of ING4 and its impact on angiogenesis in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we found that ING4 expression was significantly reduced in CRC tissues versus paired normal colon tissues. Moreover, low ING4 expression was significantly associated with increased lymph node metastasis, advanced TNM stage and poor overall survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that ING4 expression was an independent favourable prognostic factor for CRC (hazard ratio = 0.45, P = 0.001). In addition, we found that ING4 strongly inhibited CRC angiogenesis by suppressing Sp1 expression and transcriptional activity through ubiquitin degradation and down-regulating the expressions of Sp1 downstream pro-angiogenic genes, MMP-2 and COX-2. Moreover, ING4 might inhibit phosphorylation activity of cyclin/CDK2 complexes to trigger Sp1 degradation by inducing p21 expression in despite of p53 status. Our findings imply that reduced ING4 expression in CRC resulted in increased angiogenesis and contributed to CRC metastasis and poor prognosis. Restoration of ING4 may be a novel strategy for the treatment of metastatic CRC. PMID:27806345

  7. CD271 is a functional and targetable marker of tumor-initiating cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Sauca, Oihana; Chung, Man Ki; Shin, June Ho; Karamboulas, Christina; Kwok, Shirley; Jung, Young Ho; Oakley, Richard; Tysome, James R.; Farnebo, Lovisa O.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Sirjani, Davud; Divi, Vasu; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Tomeh, Chafeek; Nichols, Anthony; Le, Quynh T.; Colevas, A. A. Dimitrios; Kong, Christina S.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lewis, James S.; Ailles, Laurie E.; Sunwoo, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) are best characterized by their surface expression of CD44. Although there is great interest in identifying strategies to target this population, no marker of these cells has been found to be functionally active. Here, we examined the expression of the purported marker of normal human oral epithelial stem cells, CD271. We show that CD271 expression is restricted to a subset of the CD44+ cells. Using xenograft assays, we show that the CD44+CD271+ subpopulation contains the most tumorigenic cells. Loss of CD271 function results in a block in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and a profound negative impact on the capacity of these cells to initiate tumor formation in vivo. Incubation with recombinant NGF results in enhanced phosphorylation of Erk, providing additional evidence that CD271 is functionally active. Finally, incubation of SCCHN cells with antibody to CD271 results in decreased Erk phosphorylation and decreased tumor formation in vivo. Thus, our data are the first to demonstrate that CD271 more specifically identifies the TIC subpopulation within the CD44+ compartment in SCCHN and that this receptor is a functionally active and targetable molecule. PMID:25149537

  8. Podoplanin is a novel myoepithelial cell marker in pleomorphic adenoma and other salivary gland tumors with myoepithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Essa, Ahmed; Abé, Tatsuya; Babkair, Hamzah Ali; Ahsan, Md Shahidul; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    The expression of podoplanin, one of the representative immunohistochemical markers for lymphatic endothelium, is upregulated in various kinds of cancers. Based on our previous studies, we have developed a hypothesis that podoplanin plays a role in cell adhesion via its association with extracellular matrix (ECM). Since salivary pleomorphic adenoma is histologically characterized by its ECM-enriched stroma, we firstly wanted to explore the expression modes of podoplanin in pleomorphic adenoma and related salivary tumors by immunohistochemistry. In normal salivary gland, podoplanin was specifically localized in myoepithelial cells, which were also positively labeled by antibodies against P63, of the intercalated duct as well as acini. In pleomorphic adenoma, podoplanin was colocalized with P63 and CD44 in basal cells of glandular structures as well as in stellate/spindle cells in myxochondroid matrices, where perlecan and hyaluronic acid were enriched. The expression of podoplanin was confirmed at both protein and mRNA levels in pleomorphic adenoma cell systems (SM-AP1 and SM-AP4) by using immunofluorescence, western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Podoplanin was localized on the cell border as well as in the external periphery of the cells. Moreover, podoplanin expression was also confirmed in tumor cells with myoepithelial differentiation in myoepithelioma and intraductal papilloma. The results indicate that podoplanin can be regarded as a novel myoepithelial marker in salivary gland tumors and suggest that podoplanin's communication with ECM molecules is essential to phenotypic differentiation to myoepithelial cells.

  9. New perspective on molecular markers as promising therapeutic targets in germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chieffi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most frequent solid malignant tumors in men 20–40 years of age and the most frequent cause of death from solid tumors in this age group. TGCTs comprise two major histologic groups: seminomas and non-seminomas germ cell tumors (NSGCTs). NSGCTs can be further divided into embryonal carcinoma, Teratoma, yolk sac tumor, and choriocarcinoma. Seminomas and NSGCTs present significant differences in clinical features, therapy, and prognosis, and both show characteristics of the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs). Many discovered biomarkers including HMGA1, GPR30, Aurora-B, estrogen receptor β, and others have given further advantages to discriminate between histological subgroups and could represent useful therapeutic targets. PMID:27195201

  10. Non-Invasive Markers of Tumor Growth, Metastases, and Sensitivity to Anti- Neoplastic Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Days_post tumor 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 Days_post tumor implant Tu m or v ol um e (m m 3) 3 6 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 9 10 2 DH...growth curve Tumor volume Vs Months_post tumor 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 5.5 6 6.5 7 7.5 8 8.5 9 9.5 10 Months_Post tumor implant Tu m or v ol...REFERENCES: 1. Hoffman U, Brix G, Knopp MV et al. Pharmacokinetic mapping of the breast: A new method for dynamic MR mammography. Magn Reson

  11. Oxystressed tumor microenvironment potentiates epithelial to mesenchymal transition and alters cellular bioenergetics towards cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Sridaran, Dhivya; Ramamoorthi, Ganesan; MahaboobKhan, Rasool; Kumpati, Premkumar

    2016-10-01

    During tumorigenesis, cancer cells generate complex, unresolved interactions with the surrounding oxystressed cellular milieu called tumor microenvironment (TM) that favors spread of cancer to other body parts. This dissemination of cancer cells from the primary tumor site is the main clinical challenge in cancer treatment. In addition, the significance of enhanced oxidative stress in TM during cancer progression still remains elusive. Thus, the present study was performed to investigate the molecular and cytoskeletal alterations in breast cancer cells associated with oxystressed TM that potentiates metastasis. Our results showed that depending on the extent of oxidative stress in TM, cancer cells exhibited enhanced migration and survival with reduction of chemosensitivity. Corresponding ultrastructural analysis showed radical cytoskeletal modifications that reorganize cell-cell interactions fostering transition of epithelial cells to mesenchymal morphology (EMT) marking metastasis, which was reversed upon antioxidant treatment. Decreased E-cadherin and increased vimentin, Twist1/2 expression corroborated the initiation of EMT in oxystressed TM-influenced cells. Further evaluation of cellular energetics demonstrated significant metabolic reprogramming with inclination towards glucose or external glutamine from TM as energy source depending on the breast cancer cell type. These observations prove the elemental role of oxystressed TM in cancer progression, initiating EMT and metabolic reprogramming. Further cell-type specific metabolomic analysis would unravel the alternate mechanisms in cancer progression for effective therapeutic intervention. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of the study and proposed mechanism of oxystressed TM influenced cancer progression. Cancer cells exhibit a close association with tumor microenvironment (TM), and oxystressed TM enhances cancer cell migration and survival and reduces chemosensitivity. Oxystressed TM induces dynamic

  12. Potential coeliac disease markers and autoimmunity in olmesartan induced enteropathy: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Maria; Temiño, Rocío; Carrasco, Anna; Batista, Lissette; Del Val, Adolfo; Blé, Michel; Santaolaria, Santos; Molina-Infante, Javier; Soriano, Germán; Agudo, Sandra; Zabana, Yamile; Andújar, Xavier; Aceituno, Montserrat; Ribes, Josepa; Madridejos, Rosa; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    (1) Assess the population-based incidence of severe olmesartan-associated enteropathy. (2) To describe patients of the Spanish registry. (3) Evaluate markers of potential coeliac disease and associated autoimmunity. Crude incidence rates in the area of Terrassa (Catalonia) were calculated. Clinical characteristics of patients in the Spanish registry were collected. Duodenal lymphocyte subpopulations and anti-TG2 IgA deposits were assessed in a subset of patients. Annual incidence rates (2011-2014) ranged from 0 to 22 cases per 10(4) treated patients. Twenty patients were included in the Spanish registry. Nineteen (95%) exhibited villous atrophy and 16 (80%) had severe enteropathy. Lupus-like disease occurred during olmesartan treatment in 3 patients. HLA-DQ2/DQ8 was positive in 64%. Markers of potential coeliac disease were present in 4 out of 8 patients (positive anti-TG2 deposits and/or increased CD3+gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes and reduced CD3-). Histopathological changes and clinical manifestations including autoimmune disorders improved after olmesartan discontinuation but not after gluten-free diet, irrespective of the presence or absence of coeliac markers. Incidence of severe olmesartan-associated enteropathy was low. Autoimmune phenomena were present in a subset of cases and reversed after olmesartan removal. A genetic coeliac disease background and the presence of potential coeliac markers might uncover predisposing factors. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. DNMTs as potential therapeutic targets in high-risk pediatric embryonal brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sin-Chan, Patrick; Huang, Annie

    2014-10-01

    Malignant brain tumors, which are the leading cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in children, span a wide spectrum of diseases with distinct clinical phenotypes but may share remarkably similar morphologic features. Until recently, few molecular markers of childhood brain tumors have been identified, which has limited therapeutic advances. Recent global genomic studies have enabled robust molecular classification of childhood brain tumors and the identification and consolidation of rare, seemingly disparate clinical entities. It is now increasingly evident that deregulation of epigenetic processes contributes substantially to heterogeneity in tumor phenotypes and comprise significant drivers of cancer initiation and progression. Specifically, DNA hypermethylation and silencing of critical tumor suppressor genes by DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) has emerged as an important and fundamental mechanism in brain tumor pathogenesis. These observations have been underscored by the recent discovery of TTYH1-C19MC gene fusions in an aggressive pediatric embryonal brain tumor, which results in deregulation and increased expression of a neural-specific DNMT3B isoform in C19MC-associated brain tumors. Our observations that pharmacological inhibitors of DNMTs and histone deacetylases significantly inhibit growth of cells derived from C19MC-associated tumors indicate targeting of epigenomic modifiers as a novel therapeutic approach for these highly treatment-resistant tumors.

  14. Characterization of phenotype markers and neuronotoxic potential of polarised primary microglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chhor, Vibol; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Oré, Marie-Virgine; Celador, Idoia Lara; Josserand, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Jacotot, Etienne; Hagberg, Henrik; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2013-01-01

    Microglia mediate multiple facets of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype is an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy but a comprehensive study of classical and more novel microglial phenotypic markers in vitro is lacking. The aim of this study was to outline the temporal expression of a battery of phenotype markers from polarised microglia to generate an in vitro tool for screening the immunomodulatory potential of novel compounds. We characterised expression of thirty-one macrophage/microglial phenotype markers in primary microglia over time (4, 12, 36, and 72 h), using RT-qPCR or multiplex protein assay. Firstly, we selected Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the strongest M1–M2 polarising stimuli, from six stimuli tested. At each time point, markers useful to identify that microglia were M1 included iNOS, Cox-2 and IL-6 and a loss of M2a markers. Markers useful for quantifying M2b-immunomodulatory microglia included, increased IL-1RA and SOCS3 and for M2a-repair and regeneration, included increased arginase-1, and a loss of the M1 and M2b markers were discriminatory. Additional markers were regulated at fewer time points, but are still likely important to monitor when assessing the immunomodulatory potential of novel therapies. Further, to facilitate identification of how novel immunomodulatory treatments alter the functional affects of microglia, we characterised how the soluble products from polarised microglia affected the type and rate of neuronal death; M1/2b induced increasing and M2a-induced decreasing neuronal loss. We also assessed any effects of prior activation state, to provide a way to identify how a novel compound may alter phenotype depending on the stage of injury/insult progression. We identified generally that a prior M1/2b reduced the ability of microglia to switch to

  15. Combination of miR-21 with Circulating Tumor Cells Markers Improve Diagnostic Specificity of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Xiaoming; Shen, Hongyan; Deng, Rong; Xue, Kecheng

    2015-09-01

    Circulating miR-21 is upregulated in breast cancer. However, correlation of miR-21 expression with clinic pathologic characteristics remains questionable. In this study, we investigate whether combination of circulation miR-21 with circulating tumor cells (CTCs) marker (EpCAM, MUS1, HER2) could improve diagnostic specificity of metastatic breast cancer. Total 223 breast cancer patients were included. 89 % patients were associated with upregulation of miR-21 compared with health control. 20 % patients were detected for CTCs marker positive. For higher specificity purpose, triple marker positive samples were selected as true CTCs positive, which only occupied 59.5 % of total metastatic breast cancer patients. Specificity of detection of CTCs was 96.7 %. Furthermore, 59.5 % metastatic breast cancer patients were shown both abnormal miR-21 and true CTCs positive according to distribution of true CTCs positive and abnormal miR-21; Combination of miR-21 and CTCs was increased specificity of metastatic detection to 100 %. Our findings suggested that combination of miR-21 with CTCs marker could be used for better diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer in the future.

  16. The Simultaneous Elevation of Oxidative Stress Markers and Wilms' Tumor 1 Gene during the Progression of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Naomi; Hasunuma, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Matsuzawa, Yasuo; Iwashita, Youichi; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Yokota, Hiromitsu

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is closely related to iron overload in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and induces DNA damage. We evaluated the oxidative stress markers derivatives of reactive oxidative metabolites (dROM) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) during azacitidine treatment in an MDS patient. Simultaneous with an increase in the expression of Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) gene in the peripheral blood, the serum dROM level was elevated, and this increase was observed earlier than the increases in ferritin and 8-OHdG. Throughout the clinical course, dROM and 8-OHdG correlated significantly with WT1 and with ferritin, suggesting that changes in the oxidative stress marker levels reflect not only iron overload but also disease progression of MDS. PMID:27980269

  17. Blocking heme oxygenase-1 by zinc protoporphyrin reduces tumor hypoxia-mediated VEGF release and inhibits tumor angiogenesis as a potential therapeutic agent against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chun-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Yang, Hao-Jhih; Chang, Chun-Chao; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Chang, Jungshan; Ho, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-28

    Hypoxia in tumor niche is one of important factors to start regeneration of blood vessels, leading to increase survival, proliferation, and invasion in cancer cells. Under hypoxia microenvironment, furthermore, steadily increased hypoxia-inducible factor -1α (HIF-1α) is observed, and can increase vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and promote angiogenesis. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, is potential to inhibit tumor proliferation and progression. However, the mechanism of ZnPP in inhibition of tumor is not completely clear. We hypothesize that ZnPP may modulate HIF-1α through inhibiting HO-1, and then inhibit angiogenesis and tumor progression. This study aimed to dissect the mechanism of ZnPP in tumor suppression. We observed the amount of VEGF was increased in the sera of the colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (n = 34, p < 0.05). Furthermore, increased VEGF expression was also measured in colorectal cancer cells, HCT-15, culturing under mimicking hypoxic condition. It suggested that hypoxia induced VEGF production from cancer cells. VEGF production was significantly reduced from HCT-15 cells after exposure to HIF-1α inhibitor KC7F2, suggesting that HIF-1α regulated VEGF production. Moreover, we observed that the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP inhibited the expressions of HIF-1α and VEGF coupled with cell proliferations of HCT-15 cells, suggesting that ZnPP blocked HIF-1α expression, and then inhibited the consequent VEGF production. In the xenograft model, we also observed that the animals exposed to ZnPP displayed much smaller tumor nodules and less degree of angiogenesis with decreased expression of the angiogenesis marker, αvβ3 integrin, compared to that in normal control. This study demonstrated that VEGF level in serum was elevated in the patients with CRC. The HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, possessed the properties of anti-tumor agent by decreasing HIF-1α levels, blocking VEGF production, impairing tumor

  18. Prognostic impact of normalization of serum tumor markers following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Sudo, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Yasushi; Kondo, Naru; Nakagawa, Naoya; Okada, Kenjiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2017-04-01

    The survival benefit of neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma has been reported recently. However, prognostic factors for this strategy have not been clearly elucidated. The aim of this study was to clarify prognostic factors for patients with borderline resectable pancreatic carcinoma who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Medical records of 66 patients with pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact who intended to undergo tumor resection following neoadjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Prognostic factors were investigated by analyzing the clinicopathological factors with univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Gemcitabine plus S-1 was generally used as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The objective response rate was 24%, and normalization of serum tumor markers following neoadjuvant chemotherapy was achieved in 29 patients (44%). Of the 66 patients, 60 patients underwent tumor resection and the remaining six patients did not due to distant metastases following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For all 66 patients, overall 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 87.8, 54.5, and 20.5%, respectively (median survival time, 27.1 months) and multivariate analysis revealed that normalization of serum tumor markers was found to be an independent prognostic factor of better overall survival (P = 0.023). Moreover, for 60 patients who undergo tumor resection, normalization of serum tumor markers (P = 0.005) was independently associated with better overall survival by multivariate analysis. Patients with pancreatic carcinoma with arterial contact who undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy and experience normalization of serum tumor markers thereafter may be good candidates for tumor resection.

  19. Naphthalocyanine-complexes as potential photosensitizers for PDT of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopova, Maria; Woehrle, Dieter; Mantareva, Vanya; Mueller, Silke

    1999-07-01

    In the present paper information about the synthesis and results on the pharmacokinetic and experimental photodynamic therapy (PDT) of naphthalocyanines are given. The photodynamic activity of differently substituted zinc(II)- and silicon(IV)-naphthalocyanines using liposomes or Cremophor EL as drug-delivery systems is shown on different tumor models. For the evaluation of the phototherapeutic effect different assessment criteria were used, including light and electron microscope observations. The main conclusions which can be arrived at on the basis of our findings are the following: silicon(IV)-naphthalocyanine seems to be not a very effective tumor sensitizer, especially in the treatment o pigmented melanoma, while zinc(II)-naphthalocyanines appear to be very promising for PDT of tumors. Their selective targeting and slow clearance from tumor tissue, fast clearance from skin and pronounced phototherapeutic effect on different tumor models and especially at melanotic tumors, even after application of low drug doses, make this group of photosensitizers very attractive for successful PDT of cancer.

  20. Optimum location of external markers using feature selection algorithms for real-time tumor tracking in external-beam radiotherapy: a virtual phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nankali, Saber; Torshabi, Ahmad Esmaili; Miandoab, Payam Samadi; Baghizadeh, Amin

    2016-01-08

    In external-beam radiotherapy, using external markers is one of the most reliable tools to predict tumor position, in clinical applications. The main challenge in this approach is tumor motion tracking with highest accuracy that depends heavily on external markers location, and this issue is the objective of this study. Four commercially available feature selection algorithms entitled 1) Correlation-based Feature Selection, 2) Classifier, 3) Principal Components, and 4) Relief were proposed to find optimum location of external markers in combination with two "Genetic" and "Ranker" searching procedures. The performance of these algorithms has been evaluated using four-dimensional extended cardiac-torso anthropomorphic phantom. Six tumors in lung, three tumors in liver, and 49 points on the thorax surface were taken into account to simulate internal and external motions, respectively. The root mean square error of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) as prediction model was considered as metric for quantitatively evaluating the performance of proposed feature selection algorithms. To do this, the thorax surface region was divided into nine smaller segments and predefined tumors motion was predicted by ANFIS using external motion data of given markers at each small segment, separately. Our comparative results showed that all feature selection algorithms can reasonably select specific external markers from those segments where the root mean square error of the ANFIS model is minimum. Moreover, the performance accuracy of proposed feature selection algorithms was compared, separately. For this, each tumor motion was predicted using motion data of those external markers selected by each feature selection algorithm. Duncan statistical test, followed by F-test, on final results reflected that all proposed feature selection algorithms have the same performance accuracy for lung tumors. But for liver tumors, a correlation-based feature selection algorithm, in

  1. Tumor-related markers in histologically normal margins correlate with locally recurrent oral squamous cell carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhong; Chen, Si; Chen, Xinming; Zhang, Cuicui; Liang, Xueyi

    2016-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is characterized by a high rate of local recurrence (LR) even when the surgical margins are considered histopathologically 'normal'. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between early tumor-related markers detected in histologically normal margins (HNM) and LR as well as disease-free survival in OSCC. The loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of markers on 9p21 (D9s1747, RPS6, D9s162) and 17p13 (TP53) and the immunostaining results of the corresponding mutant P53, P14, P15, and P16 proteins were assessed and correlated with LR and disease-free survival in 71 OSCC patients who had HNM. Fifteen of 71 patients with HNM developed LR. The presence of the following molecular markers in surgical margins was significantly correlated with the development of LR: LOH on chromosome 9p21 (D9s1747 + RPS6 + D9s162), any LOH, P16, and P53 (chi-square test, P < 0.05). The presence of TP53 LOH, 9p21 LOH, any LOH, P15, P16, P53, P16 + D9s1747, and P53 + TP53 had a significant effect on LR (Kaplan-Meier analysis, P < 0.05). P16 + D9s1747 was the most predictive factor using multivariate Cox analyses. Detection of tumor-related markers in histologically 'normal' resection margins may be a useful method for assessing LR in OSCC patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. 18F-FLT PET as a surrogate marker of drug efficacy during mTOR inhibition by everolimus in a preclinical cisplatin-resistant ovarian tumor model.

    PubMed

    Aide, Nicolas; Kinross, Kathryn; Cullinane, Carleen; Roselt, Peter; Waldeck, Kelly; Neels, Oliver; Dorow, Donna; McArthur, Grant; Hicks, Rodney J

    2010-10-01

    Targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a potential means of overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer patients. Because mTOR inhibition affects cell proliferation, we aimed to study whether 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) PET could be useful for monitoring early response to treatment with mTOR inhibitors in an animal model of cisplatin-resistant ovarian tumor. BALB/c nude mice bearing subcutaneous human SKOV3 ovarian cancer xenografts were treated with either the mTOR inhibitor everolimus (5 mg/kg) or vehicle, and (18)F-FLT PET was performed at baseline, day 2, and day 7 of treatment. (18)F-FLT uptake was evaluated by calculation of mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) corrected for partial-volume effect. Ex vivo immunohistochemistry studies were performed on separate cohorts of mice treated as above and sacrificed at the same time points as for the PET studies. The ex vivo analysis included bromodeoxyuridine incorporation as a marker of cell proliferation, and phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 as a downstream marker of mTOR activation. During the treatment period, no significant change in tumor (18)F-FLT uptake was observed in the vehicle group, whereas in everolimus-treated mice, (18)F-FLT SUVmean decreased by 33% (P = 0.003) at day 2 and 66% (P < 0.001) at day 7, compared with baseline. Notably, the reduction of (18)F-FLT uptake observed at day 2 in the everolimus group preceded changes in tumor volume, and a significant difference in (18)F-FLT uptake was observed between vehicle and drug-treated tumors at both day 2 (P = 0.0008) and day 7 (P = 0.01). In ex vivo studies, everolimus treatment resulted in a 98% reduction in phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 immunostaining at day 2 (P = 0.02) and 91% reduction at day 7 (P = 0.003), compared with the vehicle group. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was reduced by 65% at day 2 (not significant) and by 41% at day 7 (P = 0.02) in drug versus vehicle groups

  3. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lohmueller, Jason J.; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M.; Tucker, Meghan A.; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M.; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D.; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1+ target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  4. New Mechanisms of Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Promoting Tumor Progression: Recent Research Advances and Potential Targets for Tumor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Shulin; Hou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The majority of basic and clinical studies have shown a protumor function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which represent a large proportion of matrix cells. TAMs promote tumorigenesis, and their number is related to the malignancy degree and poor prognosis of many kinds of tumors. Macrophage plasticity makes it possible to change the tumor microenvironment and remodel antitumor immunity during cancer immunotherapy. Increasing numbers of studies have revealed the effects of TAMs on the tumor microenvironment, for example, via promotion of tumor growth and tumorigenesis and through an increase in the number of cancer stem cells or via facilitation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and metastasis. Investigators also proposed tumor-immunological treatments targeting TAMs by inhibiting TAM recruitment and differentiation, by regulating TAM polarization, and by blocking factors and pathways associated with the protumor function of TAMs. This comprehensive review presents recent research on TAMs in relation to prediction of poor outcomes, remodeling of the tumor immune microenvironment, and immunological targeted therapies. PMID:27975071

  5. Caveolin-1 and cancer metabolism in the tumor microenvironment: markers, models, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sotgia, Federica; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Pavlides, Stephanos; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Caveolins are a family of membrane-bound scaffolding proteins that compartmentalize and negatively regulate signal transduction. Recent studies have implicated a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression in the pathogenesis of human cancers. Loss of Cav-1 expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts results in an activated tumor microenvironment, thereby driving early tumor recurrence, metastasis, and poor clinical outcome in breast and prostate cancers. We describe various paracrine signaling mechanism(s) by which the loss of stromal Cav-1 promotes tumor progression, including fibrosis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and the metabolic/catabolic reprogramming of cancer-associated fibroblast, to fuel the growth of adjacent tumor cells. It appears that oxidative stress is the root cause of initiation of the loss of stromal Cav-1 via autophagy, which provides further impetus for the use of antioxidants in anticancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the functional role of Cav-1 in epithelial cancer cells.

  6. Markers of fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition demonstrate field cancerization in histologically normal tissue adjacent to breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Mai, Minh; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Vo, Phung; Butler, Kimberly S.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a field of genetically altered but histologically normal tissue extends 1 cm or more from the margins of human breast tumors. The extent, composition and biological significance of this field are only partially understood, but the molecular alterations in affected cells could provide mechanisms for limitless replicative capacity, genomic instability and a microenvironment that supports tumor initiation and progression. We demonstrate by microarray, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry a signature of differential gene expression that discriminates between patient-matched, tumor-adjacent histologically normal breast tissues located 1 cm and 5 cm from the margins of breast adenocarcinomas (TAHN-1 and TAHN-5, respectively). The signature includes genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, wound healing, fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Myofibroblasts, which are mediators of wound healing and fibrosis, and intra-lobular fibroblasts expressing MMP2, SPARC, TGF-β3, which are inducers of EMT, were both prevalent in TAHN-1 tissues, sparse in TAHN-5 tissues, and absent in normal tissues from reduction mammoplasty. Accordingly, EMT markers S100A4 and vimentin were elevated in both luminal and myoepithelial cells, and EMT markers α-smooth muscle actin and SNAIL were elevated in luminal epithelial cells of TAHN-1 tissues. These results identify cellular processes that are differentially activated between TAHN-1 and TAHN-5 breast tissues, implicate myofibroblasts as likely mediators of these processes, provide evidence that EMT is occurring in histologically normal tissues within the affected field and identify candidate biomarkers to investigate whether or how field cancerization contributes to the development of primary or recurrent breast tumors. PMID:21105047

  7. Regulators of skeletal development: a cluster analysis of 206 bone tumors reveals diagnostically useful markers.

    PubMed

    Horvai, Andrew E; Roy, Ritu; Borys, Dariusz; O'Donnell, Richard J

    2012-11-01

    The molecules Indian hedgehog (IHH), SP7 (also known as osterix), sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and TWIST1 regulate the normal differentiation of osteo- and chondrogenic cells from precursors during skeletal development and remodeling. The aberrant function of the same molecules has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone tumors. Preliminary studies suggest that antibodies against these molecules have practical, diagnostic or prognostic utility in tumors. However, a comprehensive analysis of the expression of these molecules in a large, diverse set of bone tumors has yet to be reported. The goals of this study were to compare the immunohistochemical profiles of IHH, SP7, SOX9, RUNX2 and TWIST1 among bone tumors and to determine the optimum panel for diagnostic utility. Tissue microarrays prepared from 206 undecalcified tumors (71 osteosarcomas, 26 osteoblastomas/osteoid osteomas, 50 giant cell tumors, 5 chondromyxoid fibromas and 54 chondroblastomas) were stained with antibodies to IHH, SP7, SOX9, RUNX2 and TWIST1. The stains were scored for intensity (0-3+) and distribution. The results were analyzed by cluster analysis. Optimum antibody panels for diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Analysis revealed six main clusters that corresponded well to tumor types and suggested a close relationship between the stromal cells of giant cell tumor and the osteoblasts of osteosarcoma. The expression profile of chondromyxoid fibroma and chondroblastoma also suggested related differentiation. The distribution of osteoblastomas and osteoid osteomas was more heterogeneous. RUNX2, SOX9 and TWIST1 represented the most sensitive and specific immunohistochemical panel to distinguish among these diagnoses with the limitation that no result could discriminate between chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma. IHH and SP7 did not yield additional utility.

  8. An efficient method to find potentially universal population genetic markers, applied to metazoans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the impressive growth of sequence databases, the limited availability of nuclear markers that are sufficiently polymorphic for population genetics and phylogeography and applicable across various phyla restricts many potential studies, particularly in non-model organisms. Numerous introns have invariant positions among kingdoms, providing a potential source for such markers. Unfortunately, most of the few known EPIC (Exon Primed Intron Crossing) loci are restricted to vertebrates or belong to multigenic families. Results In order to develop markers with broad applicability, we designed a bioinformatic approach aimed at avoiding multigenic families while identifying intron positions conserved across metazoan phyla. We developed a program facilitating the identification of EPIC loci which allowed slight variation in intron position. From the Homolens databases we selected 29 gene families which contained 52 promising introns for which we designed 93 primer pairs. PCR tests were performed on several ascidians, echinoderms, bivalves and cnidarians. On average, 24 different introns per genus were amplified in bilaterians. Remarkably, five of the introns successfully amplified in all of the metazoan genera tested (a dozen genera, including cnidarians). The influence of several factors on amplification success was investigated. Success rate was not related to the phylogenetic relatedness of a taxon to the groups that most influenced primer design, showing that these EPIC markers are extremely conserved in animals. Conclusions Our new method now makes it possible to (i) rapidly isolate a set of EPIC markers for any phylum, even outside the animal kingdom, and thus, (ii) compare genetic diversity at potentially homologous polymorphic loci between divergent taxa. PMID:20836842

  9. Pre-treatment double- or triple-positive tumor markers are predictive of a poor outcome for patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Hidetoshi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Kaida, Takayoshi; Arima, Kota; Higashi, Takaaki; Taki, Katsunobu; Okabe, Hirohisa; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Chikamoto, Akira; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Beppu, Toru; Baba, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) according to the number of positive tumor markers. The subjects of this study were 160 patients who underwent percutaneous and surgical RFA for HCC. Patients were divided into negative (n = 51), single- (n = 69), double- (n = 31), and triple-positive (n = 9) tumor marker groups according to the pre-treatment expression of these markers. We looked for any relationships among clinical parameters, outcomes, and tumor markers. The 3-year recurrence-free and overall survival rates of the negative, single-, double-, and triple-positive groups were 30, 19, 16, and 11 % (P = 0.02), and 94, 88, 67, and 37 % (P < 0.001), respectively. The 2-year local recurrence rates were 6.5, 0, 41.2, and 61.9 %, respectively (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that a double- or triple-positive pre-treatment tumor marker profile was independently associated with local recurrence [hazard ratio (HR) 5.48, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.44-12.33, P < 0.001] and overall survival (HR 4.21, 95 % CI 1.89-9.37, P < 0.001). RFA may not be suitable for patients with HCC who have pre-treatment expression of ≥two of these tumor markers.

  10. Unique metabolic features of pancreatic cancer stroma: relevance to the tumor compartment, prognosis, and invasive potential

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Erik S.; Balaji, Uthra; Freinkman, Elizaveta; McCue, Peter; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a dismal prognosis. The aggressiveness and therapeutic recalcitrance of this malignancy has been attributed to multiple factors including the influence of an active desmoplastic stroma. How the stromal microenvironment of PDAC contributes to the fatal nature of this disease is not well defined. In the analysis of clinical specimens, we observed diverse expression of the hypoxic marker carbonic anhydrase IX and the lactate transporter MCT4 in the stromal compartment. These stromal features were associated with the epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype in PDAC tumor cells, and with shorter patient survival. Cultured cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) derived from primary PDAC exhibited a high basal level of hypoxia inducible factor 1a (HIF1α) that was both required and sufficient to modulate the expression of MCT4. This event was associated with increased transcription and protein synthesis of HIF1α in CAFs relative to PDAC cell lines, while surprisingly the protein turnover rate was equivalent. CAFs utilized glucose predominantly for glycolytic intermediates, whereas glutamine was the preferred metabolite for the TCA cycle. Unlike PDAC cell lines, CAFs were resistant to glucose withdrawal but sensitive to glutamine depletion. Consistent with the lack of reliance on glucose, CAFs could survive the acute depletion of MCT4. In co-culture and xenograft studies CAFs stimulated the invasive potential and metastatic spread of PDAC cell lines through a mechanism dependent on HIF1α and MCT4. Together, these data indicate that stromal metabolic features influence PDAC tumor cells to promote invasiveness and metastatic potential and associate with poor outcome in patients with PDAC. PMID:27623078

  11. Pattern recognition of MRSI data shows regions of glioma growth that agree with DTI markers of brain tumor infiltration.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alan J; Fellows, G; Byrnes, T J; Opstad, K S; McIntyre, D J O; Griffiths, J R; Bell, B A; Clark, C A; Barrick, T R; Howe, F A

    2009-12-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and the majority are highly malignant, with one of the worst prognoses for patients. Gliomas are characterized by invasive growth into normal brain tissue that makes complete surgical resection and accurate radiotherapy planning extremely difficult. We have performed independent component analysis of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging data from human gliomas to segment brain tissue into tumor core, tumor infiltration, and normal brain, with confirmation by diffusion tensor imaging analysis. Our data are consistent with previous studies that compared anomalies in isotropic and anisotropic diffusion images to determine regions of potential glioma infiltration. We show that coefficients of independent components can be used to create colored images for easy visual identification of regions of infiltrative tumor growth. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  13. Differential expression of nucleostemin, a stem cell marker, and its variants in different types of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Malakootian, Mahshid; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Saberi, Hooshang; Asadi, Malek Hossein; Atlasi, Yaser; Shafaroudi, Afsaneh Malekzadeh

    2010-09-01

    Nucleostemin (NS) is implicated in the control of stem and cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we have examined the expression of NS and its spliced variants in various brain tumors. Total RNA was extracted from 59 brain tumor samples, and the expression of different NS spliced variants was measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The subcellular distribution of NS protein in brain tumors was further examined by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, to decipher the potential involvement of NS in brain tumorogenesis, its expression was knocked-down by means of RNA interference (RNAi) in two malignant glioma (U-87MG and A172), one astrocytoma (1321N1) and one medulloblastoma (DAOY) cell lines. The alterations in cell-cycle progression of the treated cells were then analyzed by flow cytometry. Our data revealed that NS and its variants are widely expressed in different types of brain tumors. Among the NS spliced variants, variant "1" and variant "3" were detected in the majority of tumor samples, whereas variant "2" was only detectable in few samples. Moreover, the intensity of the expression was correlated with the grade of the tumors (P < 0.05). Accordingly, the expression was much higher in glial tumors compared to that of meningiomas. As expected, a nucleolar/nucleoplasmic localization of NS protein was observed in the examined tumor samples. RNAi results revealed a significant reduction of NS expression along with a moderate blockade of the cell cycle in G(2)/M and S phases of NS-siRNA treated cells. All in all, our data suggest a potential role for NS in tumorogenesis of brain cancers.

  14. Diagnostic potential of tumor DNA from ovarian cyst fluid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxuan; Sundfeldt, Karin; Mateoiu, Constantina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Kurman, Robert J; Schaefer, Joy; Silliman, Natalie; Kinde, Isaac; Springer, Simeon; Foote, Michael; Kristjansdottir, Björg; James, Nathan; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Diaz, Luis A; Vogelstein, Bert

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether the mutations found in ovarian cancers could be identified in the patients' ovarian cyst fluids. Tumor-specific mutations were detectable in the cyst fluids of 19 of 23 (83%) borderline tumors, 10 of 13 (77%) type I cancers, and 18 of 18 (100%) type II cancers. In contrast, no mutations were found in the cyst fluids of 18 patients with benign tumors or non-neoplastic cysts. Though large, prospective studies are needed to demonstrate the safety and clinical utility of this approach, our results suggest that the genetic evaluation of cyst fluids might be able to inform the management of the large number of women with these lesions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15175.001 PMID:27421040

  15. Sharks: a potential source of antiangiogenic factors and tumor treatments.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung; Kim, Young

    2002-12-01

    Since angiogenesis is a key feature of tumor growth, inhibiting this process is one way to treat cancer. Cartilage is a natural source of material with strong antiangiogenic activity. This report reviews knowledge of the anticancer properties of shark cartilage and clinical information on drugs such as neovastat and squalamine. Because their entire endoskeleton is composed of cartilage, sharks are thought to be an ideal source of angiogenic and tumor growth inhibitors. Shark cartilage extract has shown antiangiogenic and antitumor activities in animals and humans. The oral administration of cartilage extract was efficacious in reducing angiogenesis. Purified antiangiogenic factors from shark cartilage, such as U-995 and neovastat (AE-941), also showed antiangiogenic and antitumor activity. AE-941 is under phase III clinical investigation. Squalamine, a low molecular weight aminosterol, showed strong antitumor activity when combined with chemotherapeutic materials. The angiogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 3 (TIMP-3) and tumor suppressor protein (snm23) genes from shark cartilage were cloned and characterized.

  16. Harnessing the potential of epigenetic therapy to target solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Nita; Easwaran, Hariharan; Baylin, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic therapies may play a prominent role in the future management of solid tumors. This possibility is based on the clinical efficacy of existing drugs in treating defined hematopoietic neoplasms, paired with promising new data from preclinical and clinical studies that examined these agents in solid tumors. We suggest that current drugs may represent a targeted therapeutic approach for reprogramming solid tum