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Sample records for potential vorticity mixing

  1. On the Potential Vorticity Dynamics of Tropical Instability Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Thomas, L. N.; Thompson, L.; Darr, D.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical Instability Vortices (TIVs) in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific contain numerous energetic submesoscale features (sharp fronts and vortices) that can have a significant influence on the broader scale circulation by driving lateral mixing and vertical exchange between the ocean surface and interior. We use a set of nested high-resolution simulations of the Equatorial Pacific, with a finest grid size of 3km, to show that the spatial and temporal distribution of the Ertel potential vorticity (PV), which determines the balanced dynamics of the TIVs, is influenced by submesoscale processes. The TIV cores are characterized by vortically low PV water: the relative vorticity is anticyclonic with magnitude similar to the local Coriolis parameter. A study of the variation of PV and other scalars along Lagrangian fluid parcel tracks entering the TIVs shows that the low PV water in their cores is a mix of Equatorial Undercurrent water and North Equatorial Counter Current water. As these water masses enter the TIVs, Lagrangian changes in temperature, salinity, and PV occur that are largest near the submesoscale fronts in the cold cusps on the western flanks of the vortices. The leading order force balance at these fronts is geostrophy with a secondary contribution from the centrifugal force. However, frontogenetic and frontolytic strain disrupt the geostrophic balance and drive vertical motions and subduction. These results emphasize the role of submesoscale processes in altering the properties and transport of water masses in the Equatorial Pacific, with implications for the large-scale circulation.(Bottom) Model SST and temperature-PV diagram for Lagrangian floats inside a TIV. (Top) Model SST and temperature-PV diagram for the same Lagrangian floats 75 days earlier. The floats are shaded with latitude. Water from the Equatorial Undercurrent and the North Equatorial Counter Current combine experiencing significant Lagrangian changes in temperature and PV to form the

  2. Plane mixing layer vortical structure kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the current project was to experimentally investigate the structure and dynamics of the streamwise vorticity in a plane mixing layer. The first part of this research program was intended to clarify whether the observed decrease in mean streamwise vorticity in the far-field of mixing layers is due primarily to the 'smearing' caused by vortex meander or to diffusion. Two-point velocity correlation measurements have been used to show that there is little spanwise meander of the large-scale streamwise vortical structure. The correlation measurements also indicate a large degree of transverse meander of the streamwise vorticity which is not surprising since the streamwise vorticity exists in the inclined braid region between the spanwise vortex core regions. The streamwise convection of the braid region thereby introduces an apparent transverse meander into measurements using stationary probes. These results corroborated with estimated secondary velocity profiles in which the streamwise vorticity produces a signature which was tracked in time.

  3. Friction and mixing effects on potential vorticity for bottom current crossing a marine strait: an application to the Sicily Channel (central Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcini, F.; Salusti, E.

    2014-11-01

    We discuss here the evolution of vorticity and potential vorticity (PV) for a bottom current crossing a marine channel in shallow-water approximation, focusing on the effect of friction and mixing. We argue that bottom current vorticity is prone to significant sign changes and oscillations due to topographic effects when, in particular, the current flows over the sill of a channel. These vorticity variations are, however, modulated by frictional effects due to seafloor roughness and morphology. Such behavior is also reflected in the PV spatial evolution, which shows an abrupt peak around the sill region. Our theoretical findings are discussed by means of in situ hydrographic data related to the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water, i.e., a dense, bottom water vein that flows northwestward, along the Sicily Channel (Mediterranean Sea). Indeed, the narrow sill of this channel implies that friction and entrainment need to be considered. Small tidal effects in the Sicily Channel allow for a steady theoretical approach. Our diagnoses on vorticity and PV allow us to obtain general insights about the effect of mixing and friction on the pathway and internal structure of bottom-trapped currents flowing through channels and straits, and to discuss spatial variability of the frictional coefficient. Our approach significantly differs from other PV-constant approaches previously used in studying the dynamics of bottom currents flowing through rotating channels.

  4. Friction and mixing effects on potential vorticity for bottom current crossing a marine strait: an application to the Sicily Channel (central Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcini, F.; Salusti, E.

    2015-05-01

    We discuss here the evolution of vorticity and potential vorticity (PV) for a bottom current crossing a marine channel in shallow-water approximation, focusing on the effect of friction and mixing. The purpose of this research is indeed to investigate the role of friction and vertical entrainment on vorticity and PV spatial evolution in channels or straits when along-channel morphology variations are significant. To pursue this investigation, we pose the vorticity and PV equations for a homogeneous bottom water vein and we calculate these two quantities as an integral form. Our theoretical findings are considered in the context of in situ hydrographic data related to the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water (EMDW), i.e., a dense, bottom water vein that flows northwestward, along the Sicily Channel (Mediterranean Sea). Indeed, the narrow sill of this channel implies that friction and entrainment need to be considered. Small tidal effects in the Sicily Channel allow for a steady theoretical approach. We argue that bottom current vorticity is prone to significant sign changes and oscillations due to topographic effects when, in particular, the current flows over the sill of a channel. These vorticity variations are, however, modulated by frictional effects due to seafloor roughness and morphology. Such behavior is also reflected in the PV spatial evolution, which shows an abrupt peak around the sill region. Our diagnoses on vorticity and PV allow us to obtain general insights about the effect of mixing and friction on the pathway and internal structure of bottom-trapped currents flowing through channels and straits, and to discuss spatial variability of the frictional coefficient. Our approach significantly differs from other PV-constant approaches previously used in studying the dynamics of bottom currents flowing through rotating channels.

  5. Two applications of potential vorticity thinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Walter A.

    1987-01-01

    The phenomena of dissipative destabilization of external Rossby waves and the acceleration of the zonal mean jet during baroclinic life cycles are described in terms of potential vorticity. The main principle of the potential temperature variations at rigid boundaries have the same effect on the interior flow as do sheets of potential vorticity located just within the boundaries. It is noted that the potential vorticity theory is useful for understanding the dynamical behavior of meterological phenomena.

  6. Mixing and Vorticity Structure in Stratified Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalena Matulka, Anna; Redondo, Jose M.

    2010-05-01

    Several series of experiments in stratified and in rotating/stratified decaying flows after a grid is used to stir the two layer stable fluid brine and fresh water set up. (Matulka 2009). We measure by comparing the gained potential energy with the available kinetic energy AKE, the relative efficiency of mixing. The experiments in stratified rotating flows with grid driven turbulence were both periodic (quasi stationary) and non-monotonic (decaying) forcing(Matulka et al. 2008). A complex Parameter Space Using Ri, Ro, Re is used to compare field, experimental and numerical observations on the mixing structure and Topology(Redondo 2004, Redondo et al 1996) of the Stratified Rotating Flows. The horizontal spectra changes appreciable with slopes from 1.1 to 5, but relevant to dispersion, vorticity and local circulation, not only the spectral slope is important, but also the initial topology and forcing of the AKE (in Elliptical, vortex core regions ) or in hyperbolic regions dominated by shear). Using multi-fractal geometry as well, we can establish now a theoretical pattern for the turbulence behavior that is reflected in the different descriptors (volume fraction, velocity and vorticity and thus obtain a certain classification relating D3 and the sum (integral) of the different fractal dimensions D2 for different levels of scalar (volume fraction intensity or temperature). Vorticity evolution is smoother and different than that of scalar or tracer density. The correlation between the local Ri and the fractal dimension detected from energy or entropy is good. Using multi-fractal geometry we can also establish certain regions of higher local activity used to establish the geometry of the turbulence mixing, that needs to be studied in detail when interpreting the complex balance between the direct 3D Kolmogorov type cascade and the Inverse 2D Kraichnan type cascade. A large collection of SAR images obtained from three European coastal areas (Gade and Redondo 1999

  7. An eddy closure for potential vorticity

    SciTech Connect

    Ringler, Todd D

    2009-01-01

    The Gent-McWilliams (GM) parameterization is extended to include a direct influence in the momentum equation. The extension is carried out in two stages; an analysis of the inviscid system is followed by an analysis of the viscous system. In the inviscid analysis the momentum equation is modified such that potential vorticity is conserved along particle trajectories following a transport velocity that includes the Bolus velocity in a manner exactly analogous to the continuity and tracer equations. In addition (and in contrast to traditional GM closures), the new formulation of the inviscid momentum equation results in a conservative exchange between potential and kinetic forms of energy. The inviscid form of the eddy closure conserves total energy to within an error proportional to the time derivative of the Bolus velocity. The hypothesis that the viscous term in the momentum equation should give rise to potential vorticity being diffused along isopycnals in a manner analogous to other tracers is examined in detail. While the form of the momentum closure that follows from a strict adherence to this hypothesis is not immediately interpretable within the constructs of traditional momentum closures, three approximations to this hypothesis results in a form of dissipation that is consistent with traditional Laplacian diffusion. The first two approximations are that relative vorticity, not potential vorticity, is diffused along isopyncals and that the flow is in approximate geostrophic balance. An additional approximation to the Jacobian term is required when the dissipation coefficient varies in space. More importantly, the critique of this hypothesis results in the conclusion that the viscosity parameter in the momentum equation should be identical to the tradition GM closure parameter {Kappa}. Overall, we deem the viscous form of the eddy closure for potential vorticity as a viable closure for use in ocean circulation models.

  8. On calculating the potential vorticity flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-03-15

    We discuss and compare different approaches to calculating the dynamics of anisotropic flow structure formation in quasi two-dimensional turbulence based on potential vorticity (PV) transport in real space. The general structure of the PV flux in the relaxation processes is deduced non-perturbatively. The transport coefficients of the PV flux are then systematically calculated using perturbation theory. We develop two non-perturbative relaxation models: the first is a mean field theory for the dynamics of minimum enstrophy relaxation based on the requirement that the mean flux of PV dissipates total potential enstrophy but conserves total fluid kinetic energy. The results show that the structure of PV flux has the form of a sum of a positive definite hyper-viscous and a negative or positive viscous flux of PV. Turbulence spreading is shown to be related to PV mixing via the link of turbulence energy flux to PV flux. In the relaxed state, the ratio of the PV gradient to zonal flow velocity is homogenized. This homogenized quantity sets a constraint on the amplitudes of PV and zonal flow in the relaxed state. The second relaxation model is derived from symmetry principles alone. The form of PV flux contains a nonlinear convective term in addition to viscous and hyper-viscous terms. For both cases, the transport coefficients are calculated using perturbation theory. For a broad turbulence spectrum, a modulational calculation of the PV flux gives both a negative viscosity and a positive hyper-viscosity. For a narrow turbulence spectrum, the result of a parametric instability analysis shows that PV transport is also convective. In both relaxation and perturbative analyses, it is shown that turbulent PV transport is sensitive to flow structure, and the transport coefficients are nonlinear functions of flow shear.

  9. Poloidal rotation and its relation to the potential vorticity flux

    SciTech Connect

    McDevitt, C. J.; Diamond, P. H.; Guercan, Oe. D.; Hahm, T. S.

    2010-11-15

    A kinetic generalization of a Taylor identity appropriate to a strongly magnetized plasma is derived. This relation provides an explicit link between the radial mixing of a four-dimensional (4D) gyrocenter fluid and the poloidal Reynolds stress. This kinetic analog of a Taylor identity is subsequently utilized to link the turbulent transport of poloidal momentum to the mixing of potential vorticity. A quasilinear calculation of the flux of potential vorticity is carried out, yielding diffusive, turbulent equipartition, and thermoelectric convective components. Self-consistency is enforced via the quasineutrality relation, revealing that for the case of a stationary small amplitude wave population, deviations from neoclassical predictions of poloidal rotation can be closely linked to the growth/damping profiles of the underlying drift wave microturbulence.

  10. Optical vortices in six-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Matt M.; Williams, Mathew D.; Andrews, David L.

    2014-02-01

    Optical vortex light engendered with integer units of orbital angular momentum (OAM) may be involved in frequency upconversion. Second harmonic generation is usually forbidden in isotropic media due to parity constraints, but it becomes allowed by six-wave mixing. Here, we present a rigorous quantum analysis for the case of a Laguerre-Gaussian input beam comprising photons endowed with a single unit of OAM. Such a process gives rise to the novel entanglement of orbital momentum in two emergent photons; it transpires that the mechanism delivers a harmonic output whose polarization is essentially parallel to the incident radiation. This investigation ascertains the character of the emission, both under forward propagation and back-reflection geometries, and identifies in detail the form of distribution in the entangled total orbital momentum. A distinctive conical spread, originating from the entangled distribution in the emission pair, affords a potential means to determine the individual angular momenta.

  11. Targeted mixing in an array of alternating vortices.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, R; Benzekri, T; Chandre, C; Leoncini, X; Vittot, M

    2007-10-01

    Transport and mixing properties of passive particles advected by an array of vortices are investigated. Starting from the integrable case, it is shown that a special class of perturbations allows one to preserve separatrices which act as effective transport barriers, while triggering chaotic advection. In this setting, mixing within the two dynamical barriers is enhanced while long range transport is prevented. A numerical analysis of mixing properties depending on parameter values is performed; regions for which optimal mixing is achieved are proposed. Robustness of the targeted mixing properties regarding errors in the applied perturbation are considered, as well as slip/no-slip and/or boundary conditions for the flow.

  12. Potential vorticity patterns in Mediterranean hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laviola, Sante; Marcello Miglietta, M.; Cerrai, Diego; Cattani, Elsa; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Two new variables have been introduced to better identify the potential vorticity (PV) anomalies due to the intrusion of dry stratospheric air from those induced by the diabatic latent heating. This new approach has been applied to the analysis of three Mediterranean tropical-like cyclones characterized by heavy precipitation patterns. Model simulations show that the interaction between an upper level PV streamer, located on the left exit of a jet stream and a middle-low level PV anomaly, induced by the convection development around the low level vortex, plays a key role in the intensification of cyclones in all cases. These anomalies, despite their strong mutual interaction, do not form a fully developed PV tower. In the mature stage, the shape of the upper level PV anomaly around the cyclone is different for each case and appears somehow dependent on the lifetime of the vortex. A first comparison with satellite-derived products seems to confirm the initial results from model simulations.

  13. The fate of stratospheric potential vorticity cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portmann, Raphael; Crezee, Bas; Quinting, Julian; Wernli, Heini

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric cutoffs of potential vorticity (PV) frequently form through non-linear breaking of Rossby waves in mid-latitudes. Through destabilisation of the tropospheric layers beneath, they can trigger convection. Alternatively, through their induced horizontal advection they can produce intense precipitation events near topography and in regions with a background baroclinicity. PV cutoff lifecycles show high variability: their lifetime ranges between 1 and more than 10 days and the end of the lifecycle can occur through diabatic decay - leading to stratosphere-troposphere exchange - or re-absorption by the polar stratospheric reservoir. The relative frequency of these two processes is however unclear, as is the quantitative link between cutoffs and convective and large-scale precipitation. Two case studies are performed by using ECMWF analysis data, backward trajectories and radio soundings to look in detail at the processes involved in the diabatic decay. It is found that latent heating in convective updrafts - and the associated cross-isentropic transport of low PV air - largely explains the diabatic decay of the cutoffs. Using a tracking algorithm we produce an ERA-Interim cutoff climatology that provides information about the statistics of the cutoff lifetime and the relative frequency of stratospheric re-absorption versus diabatic decay. In addition, we track atmospheric stability and total column water beneath the cutoffs in order to investigate why certain cutoffs decay faster than others. The results contribute to a better understanding of the lifecycle of PV cutoffs and a particular process of stratosphere-troposphere exchange.

  14. Potential Vorticity and Ozone in Martian Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. A.; Lewis, S. R.; Patel, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    The link between potential vorticity, a dynamical tracer, and ozone is explored for the first time in the polar regions of Mars using a global climate model. Preliminary results and potential applications are discussed.

  15. The treatment of convected vortices in compressible potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhoff, J.; Ramachandran, K.; Suryanarayanan, K.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for incorporating line vortices into the three dimensional compressible potential flow equation. A modified Biot-Savart law is used to compute a vortical velocity field, which is added to the gradient of the potential to form a total velocity. A rapidly converging approximate factorization (AFZ) scheme is then used to compute a potential such that the modified potential flow equation as well as the appropriate boundary conditions, based on total velocity, are satisfied. As part of a coupled iteration procedure, the positions of the line vortices are computed so that they convect with the total flow. The method is used to compute the field due to a single line vortex convecting past a wing. This represents an approximation of the effect of a canard or other lifting surface ahead of the wing, which sheds a tip vortex. It is seen that the flow field is substantially modified by the passage of the vortex. Unlike Euler equation schemes, which are also used to compute these flows, the solutions exhibit no numerical diffusion: The convected vortices retain their initial upstream width. Euler solutions, on the other hand, involve a vorticity which is numerically convected in an Eulerian frame and, unless extensive adaptive grid refinement is used they result in vortices with spread as they convect. Also, the potential flow method requires approximately two orders of magnitude less computing time and much less computer storage than the Euler methods.

  16. Measurements of the streamwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1992-01-01

    The 3D structure of a plane two-stream mixing layer of velocity ratio 0.6 and originating from laminar initial boundary layers was investigated through direct measurements made in a specially constructed mixing-layer wind tunnel. The main objective of the study was to establish quantitatively the presence and the role of the secondary streamwise vortex structure (of the kind that has been shown in past flow visualization investigations to ride among the primary spanwise vortices) in the development of a plane turbulent mixing layer at relatively high Reynolds numbers. Results indicate that the instability leading to the formation of streamwise vortices is initially amplified just downstream of the first spanwise roll-up. The streamwise vortices, which first appear in clusters containing vorticity of both signs, realign further downstream to form counterrotating pairs. Due to the amalgamation of like-sign vortices, the streamwise vortex spacing increases in a stepwise fashion.

  17. Self-Similar 2d Euler Solutions with Mixed-Sign Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elling, Volker

    2016-11-01

    We construct a class of self-similar 2d incompressible Euler solutions that have initial vorticity of mixed sign. The boundaries between regions of positive and negative vorticity form algebraic spirals, similar to the Kaden spiral and as opposed to Prandtl's logarithmic vortex spirals. Also unlike the Prandtl case, spirals are not initially present.

  18. Hidden vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating double-well potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Linghua; Xiong Hongwei; Wu Biao

    2010-11-15

    We study vortex formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating double-well potential. In addition to the ordinary quantized vortices and elusive ghost vortices, 'hidden' vortices are found distributed along the central barrier. These hidden vortices are invisible like ghost vortices but carry angular momentum. Moreover, their core size is not given by the healing length, but is strongly influenced by the external potential. We find that the Feynman rule can be well satisfied only after including the hidden vortices. There is no critical rotation frequency for the formation of hidden vortices while there is one for the formation of ordinary visible vortices. Hidden vortices can be revealed in the free expansion of Bose-Einstein condensates. In addition, the hidden vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate can appear in other external potentials, such as a rotating anisotropic toroidal trap.

  19. Potential vorticity of the south polar vortex of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garate-Lopez, I.; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; García Muñoz, A.

    2016-04-01

    Venus' atmosphere shows highly variable warm vortices over both of the planet's poles. The nature of the mechanism behind their formation and properties is still unknown. Potential vorticity is a conserved quantity when advective processes dominate over friction and diabatic heating and is a quantity frequently used to model balanced flows. As a step toward understanding the vortices' dynamics, we present maps of Ertel's potential vorticity (EPV) at Venus' south polar region. We analyze three configurations of the south polar vortex at the upper cloud level (P ~ 240 mbar; z ~ 58 km), based on our previous analyses of cloud motions and thermal structure from data acquired by the Visual and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer instrument on board Venus Express. Additionally, we tentatively estimate EPV at the lower cloud level (P ~ 2200 mbar; z ~ 43 km), based on our previous wind measurements and on static stability data from Pioneer Venus and the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) model. Values of EPV are on the order of 10-6 and 10-8 K m2 kg-1 s-1 at the upper and lower cloud levels, respectively, being 3 times larger than the estimated errors. The morphology observed in EPV maps is mainly determined by the structures of the vertical component of the relative vorticity. This is in contrast to the vortex's morphology observed in 3.8 or 5 µm images which are related to the thermal structure of the atmosphere at the cloud top. Some of the EPV maps point to a weak ringed structure in the upper cloud, while a more homogenous EPV field is found in the lower cloud.

  20. Potential Vorticity Dynamics and Models of Zonal Flow Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Chun

    We describe the general theory of anisotropic flow formation in quasi two- dimensional turbulence from the perspective on the potential vorticity (PV) trans- port in real space. The aim is to calculate the vorticity or PV flux. In Chapter 2, the general structure of PV flux is deduced non-perturbatively using two relaxation models: the first is a mean field theory for the dynamics of minimum enstrophy relaxation based on the requirement that the mean flux of PV dissipates total po- tential enstrophy but conserves total fluid kinetic energy. The analyses show that the structure of PV flux has the form of a sum of a positive definite hyper-viscous and a negative or positive viscous flux of PV. Turbulence spreading is shown to be related to PV mixing via the link of turbulence energy flux to PV flux. In the relaxed state, the ratio of the PV gradient to zonal flow velocity is homogenized. This structure of the relaxed state is consistent with PV staircases. The homog- enized quantity sets a constraint on the amplitudes of PV and zonal flow in the relaxed state. The second relaxation model is derived from a joint reflection symmetry principle, which constrains the PV flux driven by the deviation from the self- organized state. The form of PV flux contains a nonlinear convective term in addition to viscous and hyper-viscous terms. The nonlinear convective term, how- ever, can be viewed as a generalized diffusion, on account of the gradient-dependent ballistic transport in avalanche-like systems. For both cases, the detailed transport coefficients can be calculated using perturbation theory in Chapter 3. For a broad turbulence spectrum, a modula- tional calculation of the PV flux gives both a negative viscosity and a positive hyper-viscosity. For a narrow turbulence spectrum, the result of a parametric in- stability analysis shows that PV transport is also convective. In both relaxation and perturbative analyses, it is shown that turbulent PV transport is sensitive to

  1. The Potential Vorticity Budget of Multi-Scale MJO Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, A.; Biello, J. A.; Majda, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zhang and Ling (J. Atmos. Sci. 2012) performed a comprehensive analysis of the potential vorticity budget of the Madden-Julian Oscillation throughout its initiation and evolution. Biello and Majda have used the Intraseasonal Planetary Equatorial Synoptic-Scale Dynamics (IPESD) framework of Majda and Klein (J. Atmos. Sci. 2003) to create kinematic models of the MJO which distinguish MJO events forced by large-scale heating from MJO events forced by the upscale fluxes of momentum and temperature from the synoptic scales. In the present study, the results of Zhang and Ling provide a benchmark for comparing the different multi-scale MJO models. In particular, a potential vorticity budget can be obtained in the multiscale framework, and the advection, in-scale generation and upscale transfer of PV are considered.

  2. Conservation properties and potential systems of vorticity-type equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cheviakov, Alexei F.

    2014-03-15

    Partial differential equations of the form divN=0, N{sub t}+curl M=0 involving two vector functions in R{sup 3} depending on t, x, y, z appear in different physical contexts, including the vorticity formulation of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, and Maxwell's equations. It is shown that these equations possess an infinite family of local divergence-type conservation laws involving arbitrary functions of space and time. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the equations of interest have a rather special structure of a lower-degree (degree two) conservation law in R{sup 4}(t,x,y,z). The corresponding potential system has a clear physical meaning. For the Maxwell's equations, it gives rise to the scalar electric and the vector magnetic potentials; for the vorticity equations of fluid dynamics, the potentialization inverts the curl operator to yield the fluid dynamics equations in primitive variables; for MHD equations, the potential equations yield a generalization of the Galas-Bogoyavlenskij potential that describes magnetic surfaces of ideal MHD equilibria. The lower-degree conservation law is further shown to yield curl-type conservation laws and determined potential equations in certain lower-dimensional settings. Examples of new nonlocal conservation laws, including an infinite family of nonlocal material conservation laws of ideal time-dependent MHD equations in 2+1 dimensions, are presented.

  3. Structure and dynamics of an Alpine potential-vorticity banner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schär, Christoph; Sprenger, Michael; Lüthi, Daniel; Jiang, Qingfang; Smith, Ronald B.; Benoit, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A detailed analysis is undertaken of the primary Alpine shear zone that occurred on 1 October 1999 during the Mesoscale Alpine Programme. This shear zone emanates from the south-western Alpine tip in north-westerly flow conditions, develops in response to the Alpine-scale flow splitting, and separates the northerly mistral wind to the south-west of the Alps from the quasi-stagnant air within the Alpine wake. The study is based on in situ flightlevel and dropsonde data from two research aircraft. The data are used for the construction of an objective analysis in a cross-section perpendicular to the shear zone, and for diagnostic computations of the potential-vorticity (PV) flux between vertically stacked flight legs. The observed flow structure is compared with simulation results of the Swiss Model and the non-hydrostatic Canadian Mesoscale Compressible Community Model (MC2), operating at horizontal resolutions of 14 and 3 km, respectively. Immediately downstream of the topography, the observed shear zone has a surprisingly quasi-steady structure that becomes evident provided a slow westward migration is accounted for. Further downstream, the shear zone shows increased signs of transience. Near the surface, it has an overall width of ~150 km, but narrows to about 25 km near the top of the mistral inversion at a height of ~2 km. Detailed analysis shows that the shear zone has a complex substructure consisting of at least three positive and three negative PV filaments. These shear lines are characterized by a pronounced vertical coherence in the mixed layer and throughout most of the inversion layer. One of the banners is also evident in low-level tracer constituents. Diagnostic computations of the PV flux along the banners using the generalized Bernoulli theorem reveal that most of the associated PV flux is due to vertically oriented vorticity within the inversion layer. Within the shear zone, there is a spanwise circulation of appreciable strength. It consists of a

  4. Is the isentropic surface always impermeable to the potential vorticity substance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Chanh Q.; Zhang, Da-Lin

    2012-01-01

    The impermeability of isentropic surfaces by the potential vorticity substance (PVS) has often been used to help understand the generation of potential vorticity in the presence of diabatic heating and friction. In this study, we examined singularities of isentropic surfaces that may develop in the presence of diabatic heating and the fictitious movements of the isentropic surfaces that are involved in deriving the PVS impermeability theorem. Our results show that such singularities could occur in the upper troposphere as a result of intense convective-scale motion, at the cloud top due to radiative cooling, or within the well-mixed boundary layer. These locally ill-defined conditions allow PVS to penetrate across an isentropic surface. We conclude that the PVS impermeability theorem is generally valid for the stably stratified atmosphere in the absence of diabatic heating.

  5. Evolution of streamwise vortices and generation of small-scale motion in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygaard, K. J.; Glezer, A.

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigates the evolution of streamwise vortices in a plane mixing layer and their role in the generation of small-scale 3D motion in a closed-return water facility. Spanwise-periodic streamwise vortices are excited by a time-harmonic wavetrain with spanwise-periodic amplitude variations synthesized by a mosaic of 32 surface film heaters flush-mounted on the low partition. The onset of streamwise vortices is accompanied by significant distortion in the transverse distribution of the streamwise velocity component. The presence of inflexion points, absent in corresponding velocity distributions of the unforced flow, suggests the formation of locally unstable regions of large shear in which broadband perturbations already present in the base flow undergo rapid amplification, followed by breakdown to small-scale motion. The cores of the primary vortices are significantly altered as a result of spanwise nonuniform excitation. The 3D features of the streamwise vortices and their interaction with the base flow are inferred from surfaces or rms velocity fluctuations and an approximation to cross-stream vorticity using 3D single component velocity data.

  6. Supersonic mixing enhancement by vorticity for high-speed propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, Gary S.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a three year study on vortex enhancement of supersonic mixing are discussed. Recent interests in compressible mixing has spurred research in the field of high speed shear layers. It was established that shear layer growth diminishes with increasing convective Mach number; this Mach number is the relative Mach number of the large scale structures in the shear layer with respect to the Mach numbers on either side of the shear layer. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of swirl on compressible mixing rates. Previously analytical and experimental results seem to indicate that swirling flow may significantly modify the shear layer, in some cases resulting in enhanced mixing. Previous studies of the effect of swirl on compressible mixing were incomplete since the amount of swirl in the flowfield was not quantified. This study was undertaken to conclusively determine the effect of swirl on supersonic mixing, including the quantification of the swirl. Preliminary results indicate that the swirl modestly enhances the mixing rates.

  7. Vorticity-production mechanisms in shock/mixing-layer interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritarelli, R. C.; Kleiser, L.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate analytically the importance of different vorticity-production mechanisms contributing to the shock-induced vorticity caused by the interaction of a steady oblique shock wave with a steady, planar, supersonic, laminar mixing layer. The inviscid analysis is performed under the condition of a supersonic post-shock flow, which guarantees that the shock refraction remains regular. Special attention is paid to the vorticity production induced by a change in shock strength along the shock. Our analysis subdivides the total vorticity production into its contributions due to bulk or volumetric compression, pre-shock density gradients and variable shock strength. The latter is the only contribution dependent on the shock-wave curvature. The magnitudes of these contributions are analysed for two limiting cases, i.e., the interaction of an oblique shock wave with a constant-density shear layer and the interaction with a constant-velocity mixing layer with density gradients only. Possible implications for shock/mixing-layer interactions occurring in scramjet combustors are briefly discussed.

  8. Behavior of streamwise rib vortices in a three-dimensional mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, J. M.; Bulbeck, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    The structure and behavior of a streamwise rib vortex in a direct numerical simulation of a time-developing three-dimensional incompressible plane mixing layer is examined. Where the rib vortex is being stretched, the vorticity vector is primarily directed in the vortex axial direction and the radial and azimuthal velocity distribution is similar to that of a Burger's vortex. In the region where the vortex stretching is negative, there is a change in the local topology of the vortex. The axial flow is decelerated and a negative azimuthal component of vorticity is induced. These features are characteristic of vortex breakdown. The temporal evolution of the rib vortex is similar to the evolution of an axisymmetric vortex in the early stages of vortex breakdown. The effect of vortex breakdown on other parts of the flow is, however, not as significant as the interaction between the rib vortex and other vortices.

  9. Transverse forces on vortices in superfluids in a periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper analyzes the transverse forces (the Magnus and the Lorentz forces) on vortices in superfluids put into periodic potentials at T =0 . The case of weak potential and the tight-binding limit described by the Bose-Hubbard model were addressed. The analysis was based on the balance of true momentum and quasimomentum. A special attention was paid to the superfluid close to the superfluid-insulator transition. In this area of the phase diagram the theory predicts the particle-hole symmetry line where the Magnus force changes sign with respect to that expected from the sign of velocity circulation. Our analysis has shown that the magnitude of the Magnus force is a continuous function at crossing the particle-hole symmetry line. This challenges the theory connecting the magnitude of the Magnus force with topological Chern numbers and predicting a jump at crossing this line. Disagreement is explained by the role of intrinsic pinning and guided vortex motion ignored in the topological approach. It is one more evidence that in general topological arguments are not sufficient for derivation of equations of vortex motion.

  10. Tropical plumes due to potential vorticity intrusions over Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhya, M.; Sridharan, S.; Indira Devi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Four cases of potential vorticity (PV) intrusion events over Indian sector (March 2009, April 2010, April 2010 and March 2014) which lead to the generation of tropical plumes (TP) are presented. The PV intrusions are identified from the threshold value of ERA (European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) Reanalysis)-interim PV at 350 K isentropic level greater than 1.4 potential vorticity unit (PVU) (1 PVU = 10- 6 Km2kg- 1 s- 1) at 13.5°N. These PV intrusions trigger convection to the east, which is identified from the low (< 270 K) infrared brightness temperature. It is noted that the spatial extent of convection is large in these cases and is similar to the TP structures commonly present over eastern Pacific and Atlantic sectors during northern winter. The Meteosat IR imagery also confirms the occurrence of tropical plumes over Indian sector. The TPs play a major role in the transport of moisture from lower latitudes to higher latitudes. The ERA-interim specific humidity averaged for 200-300 hPa shows large scale moisture transport from lower to higher latitudes tracking the plume structure. Apart from these, interannual and seasonal variations of the occurrence of TP in connection with the PV intrusion events over Indian sector for the years 2000-2014 are presented. It is found that the number of occurrence of TP is more during February-April and all the PV intrusions do not lead to the TP structures. The life time of majority of TP over Indian sector is found to be 1-2 days and all the TP are not precipitative. Unlike reported earlier, the PV intrusions having broad trough are also leading to TP over Indian sector, whereas the PV intrusions having narrow trough (less than 3° longitude band) do not lead to TP. Besides, the occurrence of TP does not relate to even the depth of penetration of PV trough. It is demonstrated that the occurrence of TP is due to the poleward advection associated with the PV intrusion.

  11. Ertel potential vorticity versus Bernoulli streamfunction in earth's extratropical atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Dowling, T. E.; Bradley, M. E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the correlation of Ertel potential vorticity, Q, with Bernoulli streamfunction, B, on potential-temperature surfaces, θ, in Earth's atmosphere poleward of ±30° latitude. For input, we use the 1979-2010 CMAM30-SD specified-dynamics data set. We fit the model Q=Q0exp⁡>[-λ0>(B-B0>)>] separately in the midlatitude >[30°,60°>) and polar >[60°,90°>] regions, and nondimensionalize the slope parameter as λ̂0≡>(NH>¯>)2λ0. In the troposphere, the peak of λ̂0 is approximately 2-3 in winter and 3-4 in summer in both regions. In the stratosphere during winter, both λ̂0|midlat and λ̂0|polar hover around unity. In spring and fall, λ̂0|polar continues to hover near unity, but λ̂0|midlat rises by a factor of two, with its maximum located at θ˜700 to 900 K. In summer, the polar value drops to |λ̂0|polar≪1, while the midlatitude value swings negative to λ̂0|midlat˜-2 to -3. In the mesosphere, λ̂0 exhibits incessant fluctuations with values that usually fall within the range 0 to 1. The results support the paradigm |λ̂0|≪1 for dynamically active regions primarily in the vicinity of θ˜3000-4000 K (˜ 62-72 km) in the mesosphere, whereas except in summer, we get the simple result that the monthly climate-averaged profile, <λ̂0>, in the polar regions is nearly unity across the entire stratosphere. During extended recoveries following SSWs, the midlatitude vertical profile develops a peak near 2000 K that descends over the course of a few weeks, alongside the descent of the elevated stratopause in the polar region.

  12. Zero potential vorticity envelopes for the zonal-mean velocity of the Venus/Titan atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M.; del Genio, A. D.; Zhou, W.

    1994-03-01

    The diagnostic analysis of numerical simulations of the Venus/Titan wind regime reveals an overlooked constraint upon the latitudinal structure of their zonal-mean angular momentum. The numerical experiments, as well as the limited planetary observations, are approximately consistent with the hypothesis that within the latitudes bounded by the wind maxima the total Ertel potential vorticity associated with the zonal-mean motion is approximately well mixed with respect to the neutral equatorial value for a stable circulation. The implied latitudinal profile of angular momentum is of the form M equal to or less than Me(cos lambda)2/Ri, where lambda is the latitude and Ri the local Richardson number, generally intermediate between the two extremes of uniform angular momentum (Ri approaches infinity) and uniform angular velocity (Ri = 1). The full range of angular momentum profile variation appears to be realized within the observed meridional - vertical structure of the Venus atmosphere, at least crudely approaching the implied relationship between stratification and zonal velocity there. While not itself indicative of a particular eddy mechanism or specific to atmospheric superrotation, the zero potential vorticity (ZPV) constraint represents a limiting bound for the eddy - mean flow adjustment of a neutrally stable baroclinic circulation and may be usefully applied to the diagnostic analysis of future remote sounding and in situ measurements from planetary spacecraft.

  13. Potential Vorticity Evolution in the Co-orbital Region of Embedded Protoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, J.

    2004-04-01

    This thesis presents two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk simulations with embedded protoplanets, emphasizing the non-linear dynamics in the co-orbital region. In particular, it demonstrates how a protoplanetary disk responds to embedded low mass planets at the inviscid limit. Since the potential vorticity (PV) flow is not conserved, due to the spiral shocks and possibly boundary layer effects emanating from the planet, the PV profile develops inflection points which eventually render the flow unstable. Vortices are produced in association with the potential vorticity minima. Born in the separatrix region, these vortices experience close encounters with the planet, consequently exerting strong torques on the planet. The existence of these vortices, if confirmed, have important implications on planetary migration rates. The formation of vortices is discussed in more detail and a key parameter is found which depends solely on planet mass and sound speed. With this key parameter, one can predict the disk evolution, PV growth rates, and threshold conditions for forming vortices in the co-orbital region. An analytical estimate for the change of PV due to shocks is compared to the actual change in PV in the hydrodynamic simulations. They match well except in the inner region where vortices form. In addition, extensive resolution tests were carried out but uncertainties remain about the physics of this particular region.

  14. Diabatic modification of potential vorticity in extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagnon, J.

    2012-12-01

    Representation of diabatic processes and their impact on extratropical cyclones is a likely source of skill degradation in operational numerical weather prediction systems. This investigation examines the source, structure, and magnitude of diabatic potential vorticity (PV) anomalies generated by small-scale and parameterized processes in both mesoscale and global model simulations of extratropical cyclones in the North Atlantic. Simulations of several cold season extratropical storms have been performed using the Met Office Unified Model. Several cases simulated were drawn from the DIAbatic influences on Mesoscale structures in ExTratropical cyclones (DIAMET) observational campaign during which the National Environmental Research Council (NERC) Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAE-146 aircraft was deployed. The influence of specific modelled processes was quantified using a set of tracers, each of which represents a history of the PV contributed by a specific segment of the model (e.g., boundary-layer scheme, cloud microphysics, convection scheme , radiation, etc.). This presentation will highlight several differences and similarities in high and low resolution simulations. For example, in high resolution simulations, tropopause folds are sharpened by a tripolar PV anomaly arising from the convection, boundary-layer, and microphysics schemes; this structure is not present in coarser global model simulations. However, a dipole of PV straddling the tropopause is diagnosed in both coarse- and fine-resolution simulations. The PV dipole, which is strongly influenced by long-wave radiative cooling, increases the gradient of PV near the tropopause and therefore modifies the characteristics Rossby wave propagation and moist baroclinic wave growth.

  15. Diabatic modification of potential vorticity in a north Atlantic cyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagnon, J.; Gray, S.; Methven, J.

    2012-04-01

    Heating and cooling due to moist processes in extratropical cyclones introduce local anomalies of potential vorticity (PV). On the mesoscale, diabatically-induced flow anomalies can influence the evolution of mesoscale precipitation structures. If distributed over a large portion of the cyclone, the modified PV can also influence the evolution of the synoptic-scale wave pattern, thus effecting events downstream. The moist processes contributing to modification of PV are typically parameterized in numerical weather prediction models. The purpose of this paper is to examine the structure and origin of diabatic PV near the level of the tropopause in a north Atlantic cyclone. A mature cyclone with a warm conveyor belt and a tropopause fold that was located northwest of the UK on 20 October 2008 was simulated using the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) in a global domain (with ~40km horizontal grid spacing in midlatitudes) and in a limited-area domain (with 12 km horizontal grid spacing). A set of Lagrangian PV tracers were integrated online. Each tracer accumulated and advected sources of PV from a specific modelled process (e.g., convection scheme, long-wave radiation, boundary-layer scheme, cloud microphysics). A key finding of this work is that diabatic PV was minimised along the 2 pvu tropopause. A dipole of diabatic PV straddled the tropopause with an increase (decrease) in PV above (beneath) the elevation of the tropopause. The positive diabatic PV above the tropopause was contributed primarily by long-wave radiative cooling, and the negative PV beneath the tropopause was contributed by the convection and large-scale cloud schemes. The practical and theoretical implications of the increased gradient of PV at the tropopause level will be discussed.

  16. Jupiter's zonal winds: are they bands of homogenized potential vorticity organized as a monotonic staircase?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Philip S; Shetty, Sushil

    2011-02-28

    The east-west striped pattern of clouds in Jupiter's weather layer is accompanied by a zonal flow containing 12 eastward-going jet streams alternating in latitude with westward-going jet streams. Based on theory, simulation and observations of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere, it is conjectured that Jupiter's weather layer is made of bands of constant potential vorticity (PV), where the interfaces between bands are at the latitudes of the maxima of the eastward-going jet streams. It is speculated that the mixing of PV on Jupiter is analogous to the mixing of salt in the ocean by the Phillips effect, which causes the salt density to form a monotonic 'staircase'. It is hypothesized that the PV in Jupiter's weather layer is also a staircase, decreasing from north to south. PV is a function of vorticity, as well as parameters with unknown values, e.g. the vertical stratification and the zonal flow beneath the observable weather layer. Therefore, these hypotheses cannot be tested directly. Using an atmospheric model that contains these unknown parameters, we solved the inverse problem and found values of the unknown parameters (and their uncertainties) that best fit Jovian observations. The unknown parameters influence how the zonal flow interacts with large vortices, e.g. the Great Red Spot (GRS; the largest and longest-lived Jovian vortex, centred at 23° S) and the Oval BA (the second largest vortex, centred at 33° S). Although we found that the PV distribution is approximately piecewise-constant and that the peaks of the eastward-going jet streams are at the latitudes of PV interfaces, there is also a PV interface at 20° S, where there is a westward-going jet stream. We find that the zonal PV is not a monotonic staircase due to the 'backwards' interface at 20° S. We show that this backwards interface is necessary to make the GRS nearly round, and that without that interface, the Red Spot would be highly elongated in the east-west direction and probably unstable.

  17. Jupiter's zonal winds: are they bands of homogenized potential vorticity organized as a monotonic staircase?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Philip S; Shetty, Sushil

    2011-02-28

    The east-west striped pattern of clouds in Jupiter's weather layer is accompanied by a zonal flow containing 12 eastward-going jet streams alternating in latitude with westward-going jet streams. Based on theory, simulation and observations of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere, it is conjectured that Jupiter's weather layer is made of bands of constant potential vorticity (PV), where the interfaces between bands are at the latitudes of the maxima of the eastward-going jet streams. It is speculated that the mixing of PV on Jupiter is analogous to the mixing of salt in the ocean by the Phillips effect, which causes the salt density to form a monotonic 'staircase'. It is hypothesized that the PV in Jupiter's weather layer is also a staircase, decreasing from north to south. PV is a function of vorticity, as well as parameters with unknown values, e.g. the vertical stratification and the zonal flow beneath the observable weather layer. Therefore, these hypotheses cannot be tested directly. Using an atmospheric model that contains these unknown parameters, we solved the inverse problem and found values of the unknown parameters (and their uncertainties) that best fit Jovian observations. The unknown parameters influence how the zonal flow interacts with large vortices, e.g. the Great Red Spot (GRS; the largest and longest-lived Jovian vortex, centred at 23° S) and the Oval BA (the second largest vortex, centred at 33° S). Although we found that the PV distribution is approximately piecewise-constant and that the peaks of the eastward-going jet streams are at the latitudes of PV interfaces, there is also a PV interface at 20° S, where there is a westward-going jet stream. We find that the zonal PV is not a monotonic staircase due to the 'backwards' interface at 20° S. We show that this backwards interface is necessary to make the GRS nearly round, and that without that interface, the Red Spot would be highly elongated in the east-west direction and probably unstable

  18. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude of the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.

  19. Creating orbiting vorticity vectors in magnetic particle suspensions through field symmetry transitions–a route to multi-axis mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-11-09

    It has recently been reported that two types of triaxial electric or magnetic fields can drive vorticity in dielectric or magnetic particle suspensions, respectively. The first type-symmetry -- breaking rational fields -- consists of three mutually orthogonal fields, two alternating and one dc, and the second type -- rational triads -- consists of three mutually orthogonal alternating fields. In each case it can be shown through experiment and theory that the fluid vorticity vector is parallel to one of the three field components. For any given set of field frequencies this axis is invariant, but the sign and magnitude ofmore » the vorticity (at constant field strength) can be controlled by the phase angles of the alternating components and, at least for some symmetry-breaking rational fields, the direction of the dc field. In short, the locus of possible vorticity vectors is a 1-d set that is symmetric about zero and is along a field direction. In this paper we show that continuous, 3-d control of the vorticity vector is possible by progressively transitioning the field symmetry by applying a dc bias along one of the principal axes. Such biased rational triads are a combination of symmetry-breaking rational fields and rational triads. A surprising aspect of these transitions is that the locus of possible vorticity vectors for any given field bias is extremely complex, encompassing all three spatial dimensions. As a result, the evolution of a vorticity vector as the dc bias is increased is complex, with large components occurring along unexpected directions. More remarkable are the elaborate vorticity vector orbits that occur when one or more of the field frequencies are detuned. As a result, these orbits provide the basis for highly effective mixing strategies wherein the vorticity axis periodically explores a range of orientations and magnitudes.« less

  20. An equivalent potential vorticity theory applied to the analysis and prediction of severe storm dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, D. A.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    Potential vorticity theory is developed in a description of an equivalent potential temperature topography, and a new theory suited to the description of scale interaction is elaborated. Macroscale triggering of ageostrophic flow fields at the mesoscale, in turn leading to release of convective instability along narrow zones at the microscale, is examined. Correlation of appreciable decrease in potential vorticity with such phenomena as cumulonimbi, tornados, and duststorms is examined. The relevance of a multiscale energy-momentum cascade in numerical prediction of severe mesoscale and microscale phenomena from radiosonde data is reviewed. Hypotheses for mesoscale dynamics are constructed.

  1. The development of a mixing layer under the action of weak streamwise vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Mathew, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The action of weak, streamwise vortices on a plane, incompressible, steady mixing layer is examined in the large Reynolds number limit. The outer, inviscid region is bounded by a vortex sheet to which the viscous region is confined. It is shown that the local linear analysis becomes invalid at streamwise distances O(epsilon sup -1), where (epsilon much less than 1) is the crossflow amplitude, and a new nonlinear analysis is constructed for this region. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear problem show that the vortex sheet undergoes an O(1) change in position and that the solution is ultimately terminated by a breakdown in the numerical procedure. The corresponding viscous layer shows downstream thickening, but appears to remain well behaved up to the terminal location.

  2. The development of a mixing layer under the action of weak streamwise vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Mathew, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The action of weak, streamwise vortices on a plane, incompressible, steady mixing layer is examined in the large Reynolds-number limit. The outer, inviscid region is bounded by a vortex sheet to which the viscous region is confined. It is shown that the local linear analysis becomes invalid at streamwise distances O(epsilon(sup -1)), where epsilon is much less than 1 is the cross flow amplitude, and a new nonlinear analysis is constructed for this region. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear problem show that the vortex sheet undergoes an O(1) change in position and that the solution is ultimately terminated by the appearance of a singularity. The corresponding viscous layer shows downstream thickening, but appears to remain well behaved up to the singular location.

  3. Experiments on the enhancement of compressible mixing via streamwise vorticity. II - Vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, J. W.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of streamwise vorticity on compressible axisymmetric mixing layers is examined using vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics analysis. Experimental results indicate that the particles faithfully represent the dynamics of the turbulent swirling flow. A comparison of the previously determined mixing layer growth rates with the present vortex strength data reveals that the increase of turbulent mixing up to 60 percent scales with the degree of swirl. The mixing enhancement appears to be independent of the compressibility level of the mixing layer.

  4. Far field velocity potential induced by a rapidly decaying vorticity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Rupert; Ting, LU

    1990-01-01

    The velocity field induced by a vorticity distribution decaying rapidly in the distance from the origin is investigated. It is shown that the sum of vector potentials for the velocity field can be expressed as a linear combination of Mn values, where Mn denotes the number of linearly independent vector functions of nth order. It is then shown that only the linear combinations 2n + 1 of these Mn vector functions contribute to the far field velocity which is irrotational, and that the corresponding scalar potential is then represented by a linear combination of 2n + 1 spherical harmonics of nth order whose coefficients are linear combinations of nth moments of vorticity.

  5. Synergy dynamics of vortices and solitons in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate excited by an oscillating potential

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Kazuya; Tsubota, Makoto

    2010-10-15

    The hydrodynamics of quantized vortices and solitons in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate excited by an oscillating potential are studied by numerically solving the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The oscillating potential keeps nucleating vortex dipoles, whose impulses alternately change their direction synchronously with the oscillation of the potential. This leads to synergy dynamics of vortices and solitons in quantum fluids.

  6. Subtropical Potential Vorticity Intrusion Drives Increasing Tropospheric Ozone over the Tropical Central Pacific.

    PubMed

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Graf, Hans-F; Lan, Xiaoqing; Gong, Hainan; Nath, Reshmita; Hu, Kaiming; Wang, Lin

    2016-02-12

    Drawn from multiple reanalysis datasets, an increasing trend and westward shift in the number of Potential Vorticity intrusion events over the Pacific are evident. The increased frequency can be linked to a long-term trend in upper tropospheric equatorial westerly wind and subtropical jets during boreal winter to spring. These may be resulting from anomalous warming and cooling over the western Pacific warm pool and the tropical eastern Pacific, respectively. The intrusions brought dry and ozone rich air of stratospheric origin deep into the tropics. In the tropical upper troposphere, interannual ozone variability is mainly related to convection associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Zonal mean stratospheric overturning circulation organizes the transport of ozone rich air poleward and downward to the high and midlatitudes leading there to higher ozone concentration. In addition to these well described mechanisms, we observe a long-term increasing trend in ozone flux over the northern hemispheric outer tropical (10-25°N) central Pacific that results from equatorward transport and downward mixing from the midlatitude upper troposphere and lower stratosphere during PV intrusions. This increase in tropospheric ozone flux over the Pacific Ocean may affect the radiative processes and changes the budget of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals.

  7. Subtropical Potential Vorticity Intrusion Drives Increasing Tropospheric Ozone over the Tropical Central Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Graf, Hans-F.; Lan, Xiaoqing; Gong, Hainan; Nath, Reshmita; Hu, Kaiming; Wang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    Drawn from multiple reanalysis datasets, an increasing trend and westward shift in the number of Potential Vorticity intrusion events over the Pacific are evident. The increased frequency can be linked to a long-term trend in upper tropospheric equatorial westerly wind and subtropical jets during boreal winter to spring. These may be resulting from anomalous warming and cooling over the western Pacific warm pool and the tropical eastern Pacific, respectively. The intrusions brought dry and ozone rich air of stratospheric origin deep into the tropics. In the tropical upper troposphere, interannual ozone variability is mainly related to convection associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Zonal mean stratospheric overturning circulation organizes the transport of ozone rich air poleward and downward to the high and midlatitudes leading there to higher ozone concentration. In addition to these well described mechanisms, we observe a long-term increasing trend in ozone flux over the northern hemispheric outer tropical (10-25°N) central Pacific that results from equatorward transport and downward mixing from the midlatitude upper troposphere and lower stratosphere during PV intrusions. This increase in tropospheric ozone flux over the Pacific Ocean may affect the radiative processes and changes the budget of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals.

  8. Subtropical Potential Vorticity Intrusion Drives Increasing Tropospheric Ozone over the Tropical Central Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Graf, Hans-F.; Lan, Xiaoqing; Gong, Hainan; Nath, Reshmita; Hu, Kaiming; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Drawn from multiple reanalysis datasets, an increasing trend and westward shift in the number of Potential Vorticity intrusion events over the Pacific are evident. The increased frequency can be linked to a long-term trend in upper tropospheric equatorial westerly wind and subtropical jets during boreal winter to spring. These may be resulting from anomalous warming and cooling over the western Pacific warm pool and the tropical eastern Pacific, respectively. The intrusions brought dry and ozone rich air of stratospheric origin deep into the tropics. In the tropical upper troposphere, interannual ozone variability is mainly related to convection associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Zonal mean stratospheric overturning circulation organizes the transport of ozone rich air poleward and downward to the high and midlatitudes leading there to higher ozone concentration. In addition to these well described mechanisms, we observe a long-term increasing trend in ozone flux over the northern hemispheric outer tropical (10–25°N) central Pacific that results from equatorward transport and downward mixing from the midlatitude upper troposphere and lower stratosphere during PV intrusions. This increase in tropospheric ozone flux over the Pacific Ocean may affect the radiative processes and changes the budget of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals. PMID:26868836

  9. A potential vorticity-based determination of the transport barrier in the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeger, F.; Gottschling, C.; Griessbach, S.; Grooß, J.-U.; Guenther, G.; Konopka, P.; Müller, R.; Riese, M.; Stroh, F.; Tao, M.; Ungermann, J.; Vogel, B.; von Hobe, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Asian summer monsoon provides an important pathway of tropospheric source gases and pollution into the lower stratosphere. This transport is characterized by deep convection and steady upwelling, combined with confinement inside a large-scale anticyclonic circulation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). In this paper, we show that a barrier to horizontal transport along the 380 K isentrope in the monsoon anticyclone can be determined from a local maximum in the gradient of potential vorticity (PV), following methods developed for the polar vortex (e.g., Nash et al., 1996). The monsoon anticyclone is dynamically highly variable and the maximum in the PV gradient is weak, such that additional constraints are needed (e.g., time averaging). Nevertheless, PV contours in the monsoon anticyclone agree well with contours of trace gas mixing ratios (CO, O3) and mean age from model simulations with a Lagrangian chemistry transport model (CLaMS) and satellite observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument. Hence, the PV-based transport barrier reflects the separation between air inside the core of the anticyclone and the background atmosphere well. For the summer season 2011 we find an average PV value of 3.6 PVU for the transport barrier in the anticyclone on the 380 K isentrope.

  10. Subtropical Potential Vorticity Intrusion Drives Increasing Tropospheric Ozone over the Tropical Central Pacific.

    PubMed

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Graf, Hans-F; Lan, Xiaoqing; Gong, Hainan; Nath, Reshmita; Hu, Kaiming; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Drawn from multiple reanalysis datasets, an increasing trend and westward shift in the number of Potential Vorticity intrusion events over the Pacific are evident. The increased frequency can be linked to a long-term trend in upper tropospheric equatorial westerly wind and subtropical jets during boreal winter to spring. These may be resulting from anomalous warming and cooling over the western Pacific warm pool and the tropical eastern Pacific, respectively. The intrusions brought dry and ozone rich air of stratospheric origin deep into the tropics. In the tropical upper troposphere, interannual ozone variability is mainly related to convection associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Zonal mean stratospheric overturning circulation organizes the transport of ozone rich air poleward and downward to the high and midlatitudes leading there to higher ozone concentration. In addition to these well described mechanisms, we observe a long-term increasing trend in ozone flux over the northern hemispheric outer tropical (10-25°N) central Pacific that results from equatorward transport and downward mixing from the midlatitude upper troposphere and lower stratosphere during PV intrusions. This increase in tropospheric ozone flux over the Pacific Ocean may affect the radiative processes and changes the budget of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals. PMID:26868836

  11. Tropical upper tropospheric ozone enhancements due to potential vorticity intrusions over Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhya, M.; Sridharan, S.; Indira Devi, M.; Gadhavi, H.

    2015-09-01

    Influence of potential vorticity (PV) intrusions at 13.5°N over and near Indian sector (50°E-90°E) on tropical upper tropospheric ozone mixing ratio (OMR) variations is demonstrated based on two case studies. Increase of ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasting) reanalysis (ERA)-interim OMR in the upper troposphere (200-500 hPa) is observed during the intrusion events consistently in both cases. The OMR also shows similar tongue like structure as PV and it even follows the spatial shift of the PV tongue. In addition, the enhancements in the upper tropospheric OMR during the intrusion events are confirmed using microwave limb sounder (MLS) ozone data at 216 hPa. It is suggested that the existence of strong downdrafts, associated with the ageostrophic circulation due to jet stream, which is inferred from longitude-height cross-section of ERA-interim vertical velocity could bring the ozone further down, though high PV tongue remains only at higher level (above 400 hPa). The importance of these results lies in demonstrating the role of PV intrusion events on the enhancement of tropical upper tropospheric ozone over Indian sector, where the impact of the PV intrusions is not well understood when compared to that over Pacific and Atlantic sectors.

  12. Degenerate four-wave mixing of optical vortices assisted by self-phase and cross-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleshkov, G.; Hansinger, P.; Garanovich, I. L.; Skryabin, D.; Neshev, D. N.; Dreischuh, A.; Paulus, G. G.

    2010-10-01

    We study theoretically the non-phase-matched degenerate four-wave mixing of type ωs = 2ω1 ωω2 , involving beams carrying two-dimensional spatial phase dislocations in the form of singly-charged optical vortices (OVs). Accompanying third-order nonlinear processes in the non-resonant nonlinear medium (NLM), which are accounted for, are self- and cross-phase modulation. In the case of pump OV beams with identical topological charges the model predicts the generation of signal beams carrying OVs of the same charge. If the pump beams carry OVs with opposite charges, the generated signals are predicted to carry triply charged vortices which, in the case of a nonnegligible initial free-space propagation from the plane of vortex generation to the NLM, decay inside the NLM into three singly-charged vortices with highly overlapping cores.

  13. Turbulent Helicity and Potential Vorticity in Lower 25 meters of Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprov, B.; Koprov, V.; Kurganskiy, M. V.; Chkhetiani, O.

    2015-12-01

    The measuring procedure developed and results obtained as related to turbulent flux of vorticity and to covariation <ωiGj> between vorticity and temperature gradient Gi=∂T/∂xi.The sum of the diagonal element of this matrix in Boussinesq approximation is proportional to potential vorticity. The main instrument used was set of 4 acoustical anemometer-termometer Gill as situated in the corners of rectangular tetrahedron. It was placed at the top of mast of variable height (3.5-25m).The base distance between sensors was equal to 0.7 m. The measurements were carried out of total duration near 100 hours both in stable and unstable stratification (at the Tsimlyansk Scientific Station in a uniform area of virgin steppe 700 x 650 m, August 2014). The correlation-covariation matrix was calculated between 10 parameters: ui,ωj,Gk,T. It turned out that sum of horizontal components of helicity has negative sign, but for the vertical helicity - positive. As a rule the absolute value of correlation coefficients related to all terms of the sum uiωi do not exceed 0.1. Correlations related to all other elements of turbulent flux of vorticity are few times more (in absolute value). The cospectra related to turbulent flux of vorticity and to all other mentioned above variables have been calculated in the frequency band of 10-3-10 Hz. The maximal contribution into integral covariations supplies frequency band around 10-1 Hz. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (Project No 14-27-00134).

  14. Relation between the meridional distribution of potential vorticity and the Lagrangian mean circulation in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Masaki; Damtp

    1999-10-01

    The meridional distribution of potential vorticity (PV) in the troposphere is examined in terms of the Lagrangian transport by using an idealistic general circulation model. A zonally uniform forcing and uniform boundary conditions are applied to the model to particularly examine the PV structure in the mid-latitudes and the subtropics. Trajectories of air parcels released from each grid point of the model and Lagrangian changes in PV are calculated for a period of 60days. Values of PV of each parcel are changing along the Lagrangian motions due to the diabatic effect, the frictional effect and the mixing effect which has smaller scales than those resolvable in the model. Both diabatic and frictional effects are dominant in the lower layers, and the mixing effect is larger in the other regions. It is found that the zonal mean PV changes have different characteristics between the "Underworld" in which isentropes intersect the ground and the "Middleworld" in which isentropes are above the ground and intersect the tropopause. In the Underworld, the zonal mean PV changes are determined by the equatorial flow in the lower layers. In particular, the PV changes are negative in the lower layers of the low- and the mid-latitudes. (The sign of PV tendency is for the northern hemisphere. The southern hemispheric tendency is opposite as in the followings.) This negative tendency is due to the diabatic effect near the surface. In the Middleworld, there remain positive and negative tendency regions, which are resulted from the isentropic mixing. In general, if a parcel moves poleward in the mid-latitudes, the value of PV increases, whereas the value of PV decreases if a parcel moves equatorward. The sign of the Lagrangian mean change in PV corresponds to whether the Lagrangian mean motions cross the PV contours equatorward or poleward in the meridional plane. In particular, the contour of no change in PV has a similar shape to that of meridional distribution of PV in the mid

  15. A potential vorticity-based index for the East Asian winter monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenyu; Wang, Bin; Wright, Jonathon S.

    2016-08-01

    A novel dynamically based index that reflects the strength of the regional potential vorticity (PV) intrusion on the 300 K isentropic surface is proposed as a reliable measure of East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) intensity. The index captures essential aspects of the EAWM, including its climatic influences on East Asia, its continuous weakening trend since the 1980s, and its close relationships with the Siberian high, Arctic Oscillation, and El Niño. The use of a potential vorticity framework enables the definition of a new metric called continuous PV intrusion duration (CPVID), which can be used to monitor and explain wintertime weather extremes like the extreme snowfall event that occurred in south China during January 2008. The CPVID of March is comparable to that of December, indicating that data from this month should be included in estimates of the strength of the EAWM.

  16. DC to AC converter on Abrikosov vortices in a washboard pinning potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklovskij, Valerij A.; Dobrovolskiy, Oleksandr V.

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of Abrikosov vortices in a cosine dc-biased washboard pinning potential at nonzero temperature is theoretically investigated. The problem is treated relying upon the exact solution of the Langevin equation for non-interacting vortices by using the Fokker-Planck method combined with the scalar continued fractions technique. The time variation of the local mean vortex velocity v(t) is calculated. The time voltage E(t) ~ v(t) is predicted to oscillate with a dc current-dependent frequency and a tunable pulse shape. Formulas for v(t) are discussed as functions of dc transport current and temperature, in a wide range of the corresponding dimensionless parameters. The derived expressions can be adapted for a number of physical applications utilizing the overdamped motion of a Brownian particle in a tilted cosine potential, e.g., the resistively shunted Josephson junction model.

  17. The mesoscale balance and imbalance and the corresponding potential vorticity inversion from the view of helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shouting; Zhou, Feifan; Zuo, Qunjie

    2016-06-01

    The static balance and the geostrophic balance are the common balances in meteorology. All the synoptic systems and most of the mesoscale systems satisfy the above two balances. However, due to the strong convection and non-geostrophic feature, many mesoscale systems usually present as static imbalance, and the quasi-geostrophic approximation is no longer attainable. This paper tried to find out a kind of balance that exists for mesoscale convective system. To do this, the concrete mathematics definitions for balance and imbalance equations were defined. Then, it is proposed that the new balance equation should include the divergence, vorticity, and vertical motion simultaneously, and the helicity equation was a good choice for the basis. Finally, the mesoscale balance and imbalance equations were constructed, as well as a new balance model that was based on the helicity, horizontal divergence, vertical vorticity, continuity, and thermal dynamic equations under same approximations. Moreover, the corresponding potential vorticity (PV) inversion technique was introduced. It was pointed out that by using the PV conservation and the potential temperature conservation, the flows of the mesoscale balance model can be deduced, and their comparison with the real fields would give the degree of the imbalance.

  18. On the relation of 6.7-micron water vapour features to isentropic distributions of potential vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Stanford, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Currently available isentropic maps of potential vorticity (IPV maps) are of low resolution. In this note, the possibility of using 6.7-micron satellite-derived water vapor measurements to obtain higher resolution information about IPV distributions is examined. While attempts to related the two data sets analytically have so far proved unsuccessful, a qualitative comparison shows very similar features in both. The results obtained here suggest that, over limited areas, it may be possible to use 6.7-micron brightness temperatures to obtain approximate contours for water vapor mixing ratio on a particular isentropic surface in the upper troposphere. For areas free of high clouds, these contours are expected to parallel the IPV contours on this surface. In a case study, the resulting map exhibits dramatically increased horizontal resolution compared with present IPV maps, detailing an intriguing upper-tropospheric feature at subsynoptic scales.

  19. Madden-Julian Oscillation: Its potential vorticity vs. Gill-model interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chidong; Ling, Jian

    2013-04-01

    The challenge of understanding and predicting the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) motivated a major international field campaign over the tropical Indian Ocean to study convective initiation of the MJO (CINDY/DYNAMO, October 2012 - March 2013). An introduction to this field campaign, its data collection and preliminary results is given in Session AS1.9. In this talk, connections between field observations, especially diabatic heating, and large-scale dynamics of the MJO are discussed. The Gill-model solutions have been commonly used to interpret the dynamic structure of the MJO. The zonal wind anomalies east of the MJO convection center are generally described as the Kelvin wave component of the MJO and the low-level (high-level) cyclonic (anticyclonic) circulations as the equatorial Rossby wave component. A potential vorticity (PV) analysis indicates that such interpretation of the MJO in terms of the Kelvin and Rossby waves are not always accurate and can be misleading. The circulation pattern of the MJO is distinct from those of the Kelvin and Rossby waves and other types of non-MJO convective activities. It is suggested that large-scale convective organization in a certain way that allows PV generation of the MJO is a key to MJO dynamics. Two processes dominate PV generation of the MJO. One is MJO self-sustainment, which involves diabatic heating of the MJO and planetary vorticity. Another represents stochastic processes contributed from diabatic heating and vorticity unrelated to the MJO and other equatorial waves.

  20. Formation of intrathermocline eddies at ocean fronts by wind-driven destruction of potential vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Leif N.

    2008-08-01

    A mechanism for the generation of intrathermocline eddies (ITEs) at wind-forced fronts is examined using a high resolution numerical simulation. Favorable conditions for ITE formation result at fronts forced by "down-front" winds, i.e. winds blowing in the direction of the frontal jet. Down-front winds exert frictional forces that reduce the potential vorticity (PV) within the surface boundary in the frontal outcrop, providing a source for the low-PV water that is the materia prima of ITEs. Meandering of the front drives vertical motions that subduct the low-PV water into the pycnocline, pooling it into the coherent anticyclonic vortex of a submesoscale ITE. As the fluid is subducted along the outcropping frontal isopycnal, the low-PV water, which at the surface is associated with strongly baroclinic flow, re-expresses itself as water with nearly zero absolute vorticity. This generation of strong anticyclonic vorticity results from the tilting of the horizontal vorticity of the frontal jet, not from vortex squashing. During the formation of the ITE, high-PV water from the pycnocline is upwelled alongside the subducting low-PV surface water. The positive correlation between the ITE's velocity and PV fields results in an upward, along-isopycnal eddy PV flux that scales with the surface frictional PV flux driven by the wind. The relationship between the eddy and wind-induced frictional PV flux is nonlocal in time, as the eddy PV flux persists long after the wind forcing is shut off. The ITE's PV flux affects the large-scale flow by driving an eddy-induced transport or bolus velocity down the outcropping isopycnal layer with a magnitude that scales with the Ekman velocity.

  1. Multi-platform observation of submesoscale vortices formed by deep vertical mixing: characterization and role for the general circulation of the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, Anthony; Testor, Pierre; Mortier, Laurent; Houpert, Loïc

    2015-04-01

    Since 2010, an intense effort in the collection of in-situ observations has been carried out in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea thanks to gliders, regular cruises and a highly instrumented mooring line. This integrated observing system enabled a year-to-year monitoring of the deep water formation that occurred in the Gulf of Lions area during the 4 consecutive winters of the study period (2010-2013). Vortical structures remnant of wintertime deep vertical mixing events were regularly sampled by different platforms. They are isolated Submesoscale Coherent Vortices (SCVs) characterized by a small radius (~5km), strong depth-intensified azimutal velocities (~10-15cm/s) with a weaker surface signature, high Rossby (~0.5) and Burger (~1) numbers. Anticyclones are found to transport mode and newly formed deep waters resulting from vertical mixing characterized by intermediate (~300-500m) to deep (~2000m) mixing. Cyclones are characterized by a weakly stratified core of newly formed Western Mediterranean Deep Waters (or Dense Shelf Waters that cascaded from the shelf of the Gulf of Lions in 2012) extending from ~500-1000m depth to the bottom (~2300m). The formation of the cyclones might be favoured by bottom-reaching convection or cascading events reaching the abyssal plain. This study confirms the prominent role anticyclonic SCVs and shed light into the role of cyclonic SCVs in the spreading of newly formed deep waters out of an open-ocean deep convection area. They could also potentially impact vertical mixing during the the following winter through a local preconditioning effect.

  2. Vorticity and velocity measurements in a 2:1 mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, J. F.; Haw, R. C.

    A transverse vorticity measurement in a two stream shear layer are reported. These are compared with the similar results from a nine-wire probe that was used in the same flow field and a four-spot LDA technique from a similar flow field. Basic agreement is found between these different measuring techniques. A rational influence of probe size on the observed rms omega(z) value is observed.

  3. On the appearance of a system of ring vortices in the mixing layer of axially symmetric turbulent jets under acoustic action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimshtein, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    The shadow visualization method is applied to study the process of loss of stability of the mixing layer of a subsonic axially symmetric turbulent jet under longitudinal internal action of saw-tooth sound waves of finite amplitude. Such action leads to the formation of a system of ring vortices in the mixing layer at the frequency of its intrinsic instability. The interaction of the vortices can be accompanied by sound emission. A similar phenomenon is also observed in turbulent jets for small supercritical pressure fluctuations on a nozzle.

  4. Western Pacific Tropospheric Ozone and Potential Vorticity: Implications for Asian Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Newell, Reginald E.; Davis, Douglas D.; Liu, Shaw C.

    1997-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (03) cross sections measured with lidar from a DC-8 aircraft over the western Pacific correspond closely with potential vorticity (PV). Both are transported from the middle latitude stratosphere, although this is not the only source of 03, and both have sinks in the tropical boundary layer. 03 and PV are good indicators of photochemical and transport process interactions. In summer, some Asian pollution, raised by convection to the upper troposphere, passes southward into the tropics and to the Southern Hemisphere. In winter, subsidence keeps the pollution at low altitudes where it moves over the ocean towards the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), with photochemical destruction and secondary pollutant generation occurring en route. Convection raises this modified air to the upper troposphere, where some re may enter the stratosphere. Thus winter Asian pollution may at have a smaller direct influence on the global atmosphere than it would if injected at other longitudes and seasons.

  5. Polar stratospheric cloud processed air and potential vorticity in the Northern Hemisphere lower stratosphere at mid-latitudes during winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuck, A. F.; Davies, T.; Hovde, S. J.; Noguer-Alba, M.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Murphy, D. M.; Proffitt, M. H.; Margitan, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    The present study compares small-scale (less than 100 km) features in ER-2 measurements of ClO, O3, H2O, N2O, and NO(y) outside the lower stratospheric Arctic vortex of 1988-1989 with features on potential vorticity maps from ECMWF. The potential vorticity maps are obtained from T106 analyses and forecasts. Some of the plots were truncated to lower resolution (T63 or T42) which smooths out the finer-scale structure. Comparison of these lower resolution plots shows how much detail is lost by excessive smoothing. It is also evident that the forecast plots lose fine-scale structure due to dissipation in the model resulting mainly from horizontal diffusion. It is concluded that blobs of air on the maps at latitudes between the vortex edge and 25 deg N having potential vorticities characteristic of the vortex did indeed originate from the vortex, but that the real atmosphere is more sharply differentiated than the meteorological analyses, implying that the potential vorticity maps underestimate the amount of peeled-off material.

  6. High resolution numerical study of the Algiers 2001 flash flood: sensitivity to the upper-level potential vorticity anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argence, S.; Lambert, D.; Richard, E.; Söhne, N.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Crépin, F.; Arbogast, P.

    2006-03-01

    From 9 to 11 November 2001, intense cyclogenesis affected the northern coasts of Africa and more particularly the densely populated city of Algiers. During the morning of 10 November, more than 130 mm of precipitation was recorded at Bouzareah and resulted in mudslides which devastated the Bab-el-Oued district. This disaster caused more than 700 casualties and catastrophic damage. Like many other heavy rainstorms in the western Mediterranean, this event was associated with the presence of an upper-level trough materialized by a deep stratospheric intrusion and characterized by high potential vorticity values. In this study, the impact of this synoptic structure on the localization and intensity of the precipitation which affected Algiers is investigated using a potential vorticity (PV) inversion method coupled for the first time with the French non-hydrostatic MESO-NH model. A set of perturbed synoptic environments was designed by slightly modifying the extent and the intensity of the coherent potential vorticity structures in the operational ARPEGE analysis. It is shown that such modifications may have a strong impact on the fine-scale precipitation forecast in the Algiers region, thereby demonstrating the fundamental role played by the potential vorticity anomaly during this exceptional meteorological event.

  7. Invertability of ozone stratospheric column measurements by means of potential vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbern, H.; Baier, F.

    2003-04-01

    Vertical ozone profile information for the stratosphere is not only necessary for chemistry transport models (CTMs) but today also regarded as beneficial for the radiative transport calculation in weather forecast models. However, mostly only column density data of ozone from satellite retrievals are readily available for assimilation in real time. Nevertheless, in large areas of the stratosphere correlations between ozone concentrations and potential vorticity (PV) exist, which can be exploited for profile estimates. In total the following sources of information at disposal in close real time: begin{enumerate} total ozone columns, potential vorticity for each geolocated GOME column, useful in the middle and lower stratosphere (except in a small latitude belt at the equator), and (potentially a priori information of CTM ozone column profile forecasts.) Detailed error covariances are established by 1996 SAGE profile retrievals obtained from DFD-DFD. Using these as system learning data in combination with given PV values, ROSE-CTM model profiles and inferred ozone columns, a statistical profile model can be developed. The retrieval model is a combination of stochastic models, based on the regression coefficients linking PV and ozone, and an algebraic model, exploiting the ozone column information. As statistical models, three approaches were tested: levelwise monovariate regression, levelwise multivariate regressions, and full Givens rotation. The mathematical procedure required is the general inversion of an ill-posed heteroscedatic problem. Depending on access to and quality of the ROSE-CTM model simulated ozone profiles, two different algorithms are pertinent: If the model simulations are not available or inferior to a recently available reference data set, a "optimal filtering" (or "stochastic inverse") algorithm is used. In contrast, for model simulations of useful quality, the Bayesian "Maximum A Posteriori" estimator (MAP) has been applied. Generally, the PV

  8. Temporal development of the correlation between ozone and potential vorticity in the Arctic in the winters of 1988/1989, 1989/1990, and 1990/1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Bjorn; Vondergathen, Peter; Braathen, Geir O.; Fabian, Rolf; Jorgensen, Torben S.; Kyro, Esko; Neuber, Roland; Rummukainen, Markku

    1994-01-01

    Ozone sonde data of the winters 1988/89, 1989/90, and 1990/91 from a group of Arctic stations are used in this study. The ozone mixing ratio on several isentropic surfaces is correlated to the potential vorticity (P). The P is based on the initialized analysis data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Similar investigations were made by Lait et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 17, 521-524, March Supplement 1990) for the AASE campaign (January and February 1989), showing how the ozone mixing ratio varies with the distance to the edge of the vortex. Their findings are confirmed and extended to the following two winters. Furthermore we have studied the temporal development of the P-ozone correlations during these winters in order to recognize any chemical ozone depletion.

  9. Isentropic tracking of lower-stratospheric potential vorticity anomalies: A 10-year winter climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kew, S.; Sprenger, M.

    2009-04-01

    Isentropic charts exhibit many mesoscale potential vorticity (PV) maxima in the weak background PV field of the lowermost stratosphere. Such PV anomalies are known to act as precursors to cyclogenesis when in the vicinity of the tropopause. A feature-tracking tool is developed and applied to ten consecutive winters of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Reanalysis (ERA-40) to establish the general characteristics and life cycle of these anomalies and thus shed light on an earlier phase of cyclogenesis. The tool identifies the anomalies as local maxima, whose amplitudes are defined with respect to the surrounding local background PV. The isentropic wind field is used to advect structures forward to the next time step, thus predicting their subsequent position and form. A tracking is enabled when there is a satisfactory overlap between the predicted and observed structures. The routine detects the merger and splitting of PV entities as well as their genesis and lysis. The 10-year climatology reveals that the anomalies are frequently located near high topography in a quasi-annular band at about 70 °N, can be long-lived (days to weeks) and their core PV is typically 2 PV units above that of their local surroundings. Clear life cycles in along-track composites of amplitude, PV, shape (isotropy) and velocity indicate that the anomalies have their own distinctive dynamics. The tracking methodology is being adapted for cyclone tracking to take part in the Intercomparison of Mid-Latitudinal Storm Diagnostics (IMILAST) project.

  10. Dynamic variability of the Asian monsoon anticyclone observed in potential vorticity and correlations with tracer distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, H.; Randel, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Asian summer monsoon is associated with strong upward transport of tropospheric source gases and isolation of air within the upper tropospheric anticyclone, with a high degree of dynamical variability. Here we study the anticyclone in terms of potential vorticity (PV) as derived from reanalysis data. The strength of the anticyclone, as measured by low PV area, varies on subseasonal time scales (periods of 30-40 days), driven by variability in convection. The convective forcing of low PV areas is associated with heating in the middle troposphere and divergent motion in the upper troposphere, and we find that upper level divergence is a good predictor of the anticyclone strength. Low PV air is often observed to propagate from the forcing region to the west, and occasionally to the east. Carbon monoxide (CO) measured by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder is used to study the covariability of chemical tracers with the anticyclone strength and location. Concentrations of CO maximize within the upper tropospheric anticyclone, and enhanced CO is well correlated with the spatial distribution of low PV. Time variations of CO concentrations in the upper troposphere (around 360 K) are not strongly correlated with anticyclone strength, probably because CO transport also involves coupling with surface CO sources (unlike PV). Temporal correlations with PV are stronger for CO at higher levels (380-400 K), suggesting that advective upward transport is important for tracer evolution at these levels.

  11. The relevance of individual microphysical processes for potential vorticity anomalies in extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crezee, Bas; Joos, Hanna; Wernli, Heini

    2016-04-01

    Extratropical cyclones have a large impact on daily weather through their accompanying strong winds and precipitation. The latent heating and cooling associated with microphysical processes like condensation, freezing and melting, sublimation and evaporation leads to the formation of distinct cloud diabatic potential vorticity (CDPV) anomalies. Positive low-level CDPV anomalies - which typically are formed along the fronts and close to the cyclone center - have been shown to interact with upper-level PV anomalies thereby potentially enhancing storm intensification. Here a novel method is applied, which calculates backward trajectories from the mature storm stage, integrates cloud diabatic PV changes due to microphysical processes, and constructs a CDPV budget for each individual anomaly. Thereby we quantify the contributions of, e.g., cloud condensation, depositional growth of snow and melting of snow to the individual anomalies and in turn to the near-surface circulation. First, we apply this method to an idealized mid-latitude cyclone. The formation of the relatively small low-level negative CDPV anomalies is dominated each by one specific process, depending on their location relative to the front. For the large positive PV anomaly we find that the strongest contributions are from in-cloud condensation and below-cloud snow melting and rain evaporation. Although contributions of in-cloud depositional growth of ice are rather small, they cover a very large area and are therefore dynamically significant, i.e., they produce a fairly large-scale but low-amplitude anomaly. In addition the results from the idealized simulations are compared to a wintertime cyclone. It will be discussed how well the method works for real cyclones and how closely the results agree with those from the idealized channel model experiment.

  12. Impacts of cloud-induced mass forcing on the development of moist potential vorticity anomaly during torrential rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shouting; Zhou, Yushu; Cui, Xiaopeng; Dai, Guoping

    2004-12-01

    The impacts of cloud-induced mass forcing on the development of the moist potential vorticity (MPV) anomaly associated with torrential rains are investigated by using NCEP/NCAR 1° × 1° data. The MPV tendency equation with the cloud-induced mass forcing is derived, and applied to the torrential rain event over the Changjiang River-Huaihe River Valleys during 26 30 June 1999. The result shows that positive anomalies are located mainly between 850 hPa and 500 hPa, while the maximum MPV, maximum positive tendency of the MPV, and maximum surface rainfall are nearly collocated. The cloud-induced mass forcing contributes to the positive tendency of the moist potential vorticity anomaly. The results indicate that the MPV may be used to track the propagation of rain systems for operational applications.

  13. A numerical analysis of a deep Mediterranean lee cyclone: sensitivity to mesoscale potential vorticity anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, K.; Ivančan-Picek, B.

    2009-03-01

    A 12-15 November 2004 cyclone on the lee side of the Atlas Mountains and the related occurrence of severe bora along the eastern Adriatic coast are numerically analyzed using the MM5 mesoscale model. Motivated by the fact that sub-synoptic scales are more sensitive to initialization errors and dominate forecast error growth, this study is designed in order to assess the sensitivity of the mesoscale forecast to the intensity of mesoscale potential vorticity (PV) anomalies. Five sensitivity simulations are performed after subtracting the selected anomalies from the initial conditions, allowing for the analysis of the cyclone intensity and track, and additionally, the associated severe bora in the Adriatic. The results of the ensemble show that the cyclone is highly sensitive to the exact details of the upper-level dynamic forcing. The spread of cyclone intensities is the greatest in the mature phase of the cyclone lifecycle, due to different cyclone advection speeds towards the Mediterranean. However, the cyclone tracks diffluence appears to be the greatest during the cyclone movement out of the Atlas lee, prior to the mature stage of cyclone development, most likely due to the predominant upper-level steering control and its influence on the thermal anomaly creation in the mountain lee. Furthermore, it is quantitatively shown that the southern Adriatic bora is more sensitive to cyclone presence in the Mediterranean then bora in the northern Adriatic, due to unequal influence of the cyclone on the cross-mountain pressure gradient formation. The orographically induced pressure perturbation is strongly correlated with bora in the northern and to a lesser extent in the southern Adriatic, implying the existence of additional controlling mechanisms to bora in the southern part of the basin. In addition, it is shown that the bora intensity in the southern Adriatic is highly sensitive to the precise sub-synoptic pressure distribution in the cyclone itself, indicating a

  14. A potential vorticity perspective on the motion of a mid-latitude winter storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, G.; Arbogast, P.; Lapeyre, G.; Maynard, K.

    2012-06-01

    The motion of mid-latitude surface cyclones relative to the jet streams is of particular interest because of the commonly observed strong and rapid deepening they undergo when they cross the upper-level jet axis. The purpose of the present study is to validate a recent theory that may explain this motion which is a generalization of the so-called beta drift in the mid-latitude baroclinic context. According to this theory, the key parameter controlling the movement of a surface cyclone across the mean tropospheric jet is the vertically averaged potential vorticity (PV) gradient associated with the jet. To test this theoretical result, numerical sensitivity experiments are performed using the Météo-France global operational forecast model ARPEGE-IFS for the particular case of the storm Xynthia (26-28 February 2010). The control forecast, starting from the operational analysis almost 2 days before the storm hit France, represents the trajectory of the storm quite well, together with the deepening during the crossing of the upper-level jet axis. A PV-inversion tool is used to modify the vertically averaged PV gradient of the initial state. As expected from the theory, when the PV gradient is intensified, there is a quicker displacement of the surface cyclone toward the jet axis and the jet-crossing phase occurs earlier than in the control forecast. The opposite occurs for a reduced PV gradient. The interpretation is that an enhanced PV gradient reinforces the dipolar PV anomaly located at upper levels which, in turn, advects the surface cyclone faster towards the jet axis.

  15. Central European tornado environments as viewed from a potential vorticity and Lagrangian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Michael A.; Sprenger, Michael; Moore, Richard W.

    2011-07-01

    ECMWF analysis data in conjunction with infrared satellite imagery and surface weather analyses from the German Weather Service are used to investigate 15 significant central European tornadoes (F2 intensity on the Fujita scale) that occurred in 2005 and 2006. The primary goals of the work are to: (i) determine the typical synoptic and mesoscale environments that are conducive to European tornadogenesis; (ii) compare and contrast the said environments with those found in the central United States (US), with a specific focus on severe storm predictors; and (iii) elucidate a methodology for the real-time forecasting of these destructive storms that, in addition to the use of severe storm predictors, leans heavily on the potential vorticity (PV) and Lagrangian frameworks of analysis. With the caveats that there is significant case-to-case variability and the sample size is relatively small, the results illustrate that most European tornadoes form close to (within 200 km of) a distinct upper-level PV anomaly and a majority under the cyclonic side of an upper-level jet streak. Lower-level forcing, in the form of surface fronts, is also found to be present in a number of cases. With regards to severe storm predictors (convective available potential energy, storm-relative helicity and the energy helicity index), this study confirms the earlier findings that, while representative values for European tornadic environments are substantially lower than their US counterparts, they do provide useful predictive information in that their values tend to be markedly higher than the local, monthly climatology. A subsequent Lagrangian analysis that isolates the coherent air streams present in US and European tornadoes provides significant insight into the discrepancies in both the synoptic environments and the absolute magnitude of the severe storm predictors. Backward trajectories launched from the tornado genesis time and position, illustrate that low-level flow blocking by the

  16. A Nonlinear Multigrid Solver for an Atmospheric General Circulation Model Based on Semi-Implicit Semi-Lagrangian Advection of Potential Vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, S.; Ruge, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This work represents a part of a project to develop an atmospheric general circulation model based on the semi-Lagrangian advection of potential vorticity (PC) with divergence as the companion prognostic variable.

  17. Formation and dynamics of vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate with a moving impenetrable disk-shaped potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Ping; Dong, Biao; Wang, Lin-Xue; Xie, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-10-01

    We consider a quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate with a moving impenetrable disk-shaped potential. By performing direct numerical simulations, we investigate the formation and dynamics of the vortices in the wake as a function of the moving velocity and the radius of the potential. For moderate moving velocity, we observe the formation of a bound vortex pair in the wake of the potential. Its shedding period and associated patterns depend on the radius of the potential, showing V-shaped, periodic, or complex wakes. More interestingly, at high velocity both the vortex pair and vortex dipole can be formed simultaneously. Furthermore, the activation time for vortex formation is investigated for different velocities. We also give an experimental protocol to observe these phenomena in future experiments.

  18. Diabatic potential vorticity sources in numerically simulated North Atlantic cyclones: Sensitivity to model configuration and impacts on storm evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagnon, Jeffrey; Gray, Suzanne; Methven, John

    2010-05-01

    Representation of diabatic process and their impact on evolving extratropical cyclones is a possible source of skill degradation in operational numerical weather prediction systems. For example, global model forecasts exhibit a tendency to simulate troughs that are insufficiently sharp along their downstream side --- a bias which may be due to underestimation of negative potential vorticity anomalies (PV) at tropopause level at the end of warm conveyor belts. This investigation examines the source, structure, and magnitude of diabatic potential vorticity (PV) anomalies generated by small-scale and parameterized processes in mesoscale and global model simulations of developing midlatitude cyclones in the North Atlantic. Simulations of several storms that occurred during the autumn months of 2008 and 2009 were performed using the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM). Total PV sources and sinks were partitioned among the contributions from the various segments of the model including the boundary layer scheme, cloud microphysics, diffusion, the convection scheme , radiation, and others. Preliminary results demonstrate that the diabatic PV generated by the model's convection scheme is of smaller magnitude in global model simulations than in limited-area simulations at higher resolution. Ongoing analysis includes the evaluation of model simulations against data collected from a pilot observational campaign conducted from the UK during November 2009.

  19. Velocity and potential vorticity fields measured by altimetric imaging velocimetry in the rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Y. D.; Rhines, P. B.; Lindahl, E. G.

    2009-12-01

    An optical method of altimetric imaging velocimetry (AIV) for measuring the slope of the surface elevation in the rotating fluid with free surface is described. This method allows one to obtain the major dynamical fields in the fluid layer including velocity, vorticity and surface elevation. When used in combination with the Optical Thickness method the AIV can be used to render the full dynamical characteristics of a two-layer flow. Both methods allow one to achieve very high spatial resolution by rendering a velocity vector in each pixel of the image. An example of the two-layer source-driven flow on a γ-plane (also called polar β-plane) is offered to demonstrate the application of these methods. This “β-plume’ is a gyre-like response to a point source of fluid, including intense jets, eddies and Rossby waves.

  20. Mixed potentials in radiative stellar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirukkanesh, S.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2010-07-01

    We study the behavior of a radiating star when the interior expanding, shearing fluid particles are traveling in geodesic motion. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain new classes of exact solutions in terms of elementary functions without assuming a separable form for the gravitational potentials or initially fixing the temporal evolution of the model unlike earlier treatments. A systematic approach enables us to write the junction condition as a Riccati equation which under particular conditions may be transformed into a separable equation. New classes of solutions are generated which allow for mixed spatial and temporal dependence in the metric functions. We regain particular models found previously from our general classes of solutions.

  1. Diagnosis of Short Range Forecast Errors Using Piecewise Inversion of Potential Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinker, E.

    Under the assumption of balanced flow dynamics the evolution of atmospheric sy stems such as cyclones are investigated in the single parameter environment of poten- tial vorticity (PV). Based on the property of invertibility, it is then possible to calculate the distribution of the balanced flow from a knowledge o f the 3-dimensional distribu- tion of Ertel's PV. The diagnosis of atmospheric model errors has to take into account the effects of all di- abatic and adiabatic processes. The difficulty of a comprehensive di agnostic approach arises from the fact that different processes produce tenden cies for different model parameters. A diabatic process may produce tendencies for temperature alone (like radiation); other processes may produce tendencie s for momentum, temperature and humidity (like vertical diffusion or cumulus c onvection). However, a one-parameter diagnosis has been achieved by combining temperature and momentum increments to appropriate increments of Ertel's PV. The advantage of using PV in the frame work of quasi-balanced dynamics is that the flow associated with diabatic PV perturbations can be obtained from the p iecewise in- version technique. The method provides a basis to identify atmosphe ric developments that are noticeably influenced by diabatic processes. For the diagnosis of ECMWF short range forecast tendencies and ultimately for an esti mate of model errors, a di- agnostic system has been set up that calculates the flow perturbations associated with all diabatic and adiabatic processes.

  2. Rotary-wing aerodynamics. Volume 1: Basic theories of rotor aerodynamics with application to helicopters. [momentum, vortices, and potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepniewski, W. Z.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of rotary-wing aircraft in general is defined. The energy effectiveness of helicopters is compared with that of other static thrust generators in hover, as well as with various air and ground vehicles in forward translation. The most important aspects of rotor-blade dynamics and rotor control are reviewed. The simple physicomathematical model of the rotor offered by the momentum theory is introduced and its usefulness and limitations are assessed. The combined blade-element and momentum theory approach, which provides greater accuracy in performance predictions, is described as well as the vortex theory which models a rotor blade by means of a vortex filament or vorticity surface. The application of the velocity and acceleration potential theory to the determination of flow fields around three dimensional, non-rotating bodies as well as to rotor aerodynamic problems is described. Airfoil sections suitable for rotors are also considered.

  3. Relaminarization under stationary vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenthal, Robert

    2005-11-01

    Flow visualization reveals that a turbulent boundary layer is relaminarized when stationary streamwise vortices are introduced. Following a suggestion of Balle, the vortices are stabilized by large streamwise ``Karman'' grooves in a wavy wall. In a water tunnel, upstream vortex generators place a large streamwise vortex in the middle of each groove, at the stationary point where Prandtl's vortex force vanishes. According to a theory by Cotel, the wall fluxes of a turbulent boundary layer should decline to laminar values under such ``persistent'' vortices. The observed relaminarization is consistent with this theory and with previous measurements of heat transfer by Touel and Balle. However, the structure of the transverse flow resembles the cats-eye pattern of a temporal shear layer rather than the anticipated von Karman wake. The cats-eye pattern corresponds to the forced shear layers of Oster-Wygnanski and Roberts, who found that the Reynolds stresses and mixing rate also decline to laminar values.

  4. Analysis of isentropic potential vorticities for the relationship between stratospheric polar vortex and the cooling process in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the relationships between stratospheric polar vortex anomalies and cooling events in eastern China using isentropic reanalysis data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Daily mean data from 2000 to 2011 are used to explore the effective stratospheric signals. First, diagnoses of the 2009/2010 winter show that after the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) of the Atlantic-East Asian (AEA) pattern, the stratospheric high isentropic potential vorticity(IPV) center derived from the split polar vortex will move to the northeast of the Eurasian continent. The air mass, accompanied by some southward and eastward movements and characterized by high IPV values, will be stretched vertically, leading to apparent reinforcements of the positive vorticity and the development of a cold vortex system in the troposphere. The northerly wind on the western side of the cold vortex can transport cold air southward and downward, resulting in this distinct cooling process in eastern China. Secondly, the Empirical Orthogonal Function analyses of IPV anomalies on the 430 K isentropic surface during 2000-2011 winters indicate that the IPV distribution and time series of the first mode are able to represent the polar vortex variation features, which significantly influence cold-air activity in eastern China, especially in the AEA-type SSW winter. When the time series increases significantly, the polar vortex will be split and the high-IPV center will move to the northeast of the Eurasian continent with downward and southward developments, inducing obvious cooling in eastern China. Moreover, all the four times SSW events of AEA pattern from 2000 to 2011 are reflected in the first time series, and after the strong polar vortex disturbances, cooling processes of different intensities are observed in eastern China. The cooling can sustain at least one week. For this reason the first time series can be used as an available index of polar vortex oscillation and has

  5. Constructing Synoptic Maps of Stratospheric Column Ozone from HALOE, SAGE and Balloonsonde Data Using Potential Vorticity Isentropic Coordinate Transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, Stacey M.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Morris, Gary A.; Long, Craig; Zhou, Shuntai; Miller, Alvin J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study we utilize potential vorticity - isentropic (PVI) coordinate transformations as a means of combining ozone data from different sources to construct daily, synthetic three-dimensional ozone fields. This methodology has been used successfully to reconstruct ozone maps in particular regions from aircraft data over the period of the aircraft campaign. We expand this method to create high-resolution daily global maps of profile ozone data, particularly in the lower stratosphere, where high-resolution ozone data are sparse. Ozone climatologies in PVI-space are constructed from satellite-based SAGE II and UARS/HALOE data, both of which-use solar occultation techniques to make high vertical resolution ozone profile measurements, but with low spatial resolution. A climatology from ground-based balloonsonde data is also created. The climatologies are used to establish the relationship between ozone and dynamical variability, which is defined by the potential vorticity (in the form of equivalent latitude) and potential temperature fields. Once a PVI climatology has been created from data taken by one or more instruments, high-resolution daily profile ozone field estimates are constructed based solely on the PVI fields, which are available on a daily basis from NCEP analysis. These profile ozone maps could be used for a variety of applications, including use in conjunction with total ozone maps to create a daily tropospheric ozone product, as input to forecast models, or as a tool for validating independent ozone measurements when correlative data are not available. This technique is limited to regions where the ozone is a long-term tracer and the flow is adiabatic. We evaluate the internal consistency of the technique by transforming the ozone back to physical space and comparing to the original profiles. Biases in the long-term average of the differences are used to identify regions where the technique is consistently introducing errors. Initial results show

  6. What Causes Mars' Annular Polar Vortices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toigo, A. D.; Waugh, D. W.; Guzewich, S. D.

    2016-09-01

    Martian polar vortices exhibit annuli of high potential vorticity, unlike the Earth, likely due to the effect of latent heating of carbon dioxide condensation in polar regions, which does not occur for Earth's most abundant atmospheric species.

  7. Longitudinal vortices beneath breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepf, H. M.; Cowen, E. A.; Kimmel, S. J.; Monismith, S. G.

    1995-08-01

    The formation of longitudinal vortices has been observed in a wavy channel flow and appears to be linked to spilling breaking and/or to vertical vorticity generated by a wave instability at the wave maker. Both conditions were present when the wave slope, ak exceeded 0.25. The wave instability produced velocity jets beneath and just downstream of the plunger that could provide the initial perturbation for the CL2 instability mechanism (Faller and Caponi, 1978). The breaker activity could also contribute to the CL2 production mechanism by eliminating the negative, stabilizing shear observed within the wave maker wake and by providing seed perturbations to the vorticity field. As the cells evolved downstream, they were maintained through interaction with the bottom boundary layer. When the vortices were present, both vertical mixing and turbulent kinetic energy were enhanced. Despite some differences in scale these results suggest that Langmuir circulation may produce similar changes in the mixed layer.

  8. A successful resimulation of the 7-8 January 2005 winter storm through initial potential vorticity modification in sensitive regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røsting, B.; Kristjánsson, J. E.

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we present an example of the benefit that can be achieved from carefully designed manual modification of a numerical weather prediction analysis. The case to be investigated is the severe winter storm of 7-8 January 2005, affecting the North Sea and southern Scandinavia. Modifications of potential vorticity (PV) fields according to features in water vapour (WV) images are combined with information from singular vectors (SV) in an attempt to improve the initial state over data sparse regions west of the British Isles. The apparent mismatch between features in the WV image and the upper level PV anomalies in the numerical analysis is corrected, mainly at levels indicated as sensitive by the fastest growing SVs, in order to maximize the impact on the simulation. Model reruns, based on the inverted corrected PV fields, were then performed. The manual correction of PV fields led to a substantial improvement of the simulations of the storm. The PV modifications were carried out by a digital analysis system, implemented at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute. This system allows the PV modifications to be done interactively within an operational time limit.

  9. Tracers of diabatic changes in potential temperature and potential vorticity: Integral interpretation in terms of net heating and circulation and applications to model consistency across resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Alvarado, Oscar; Gray, Suzanne; Methven, John

    2016-04-01

    Diabatic processes in the atmosphere can be characterised by the changes they produce on potential temperature (θ) and potential vorticity (PV) following an air parcel. Diabatic tracers of θ and PV track the changes undergone by those two variables due to the action of diabatic processes in a Lagrangian frame by splitting θ and PV into components that are materially conserved and components that are diabatically generated. Since diabatic tracers are subject to advection by the three-dimensional wind field, they are useful tools for the investigation of the interaction of diabatic processes with the atmospheric flow and the impact of diabatic processes on the evolution of the atmosphere. In this contribution, we present a novel integral interpretation of diabatic tracers over suitably defined control volumes, which depend on the weather system under consideration. Using two contrasting extratropical cyclones as examples, it is shown that θ tracers can be used to assess and systematically compare the cross-isentropic mass transport around each cyclone, which is related to the amount and distribution of heat produced during each cyclone's development. PV tracers are related to circulation and area-average isentropic vorticity through the application of Stoke's theorem. Using the impermeability theorem for PV, which states there can be no PV flux across isentropic surfaces, it is also shown that cross-isentropic motion within the control volumes does not directly influence circulation. Instead, the influence of diabatic processes on the circulation crucially depends on the balance between the fluxes along isentropic surfaces of the materially-conserved and diabatically-generated PV components across the lateral boundaries of the control volumes. Finally, the application of the integral interpretation of diabatic tracers for the assessment of model consistency across different model resolutions is discussed.

  10. Vorticity generation by contoured wall injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.; Marble, Frank E.; Zukoski, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    A class of contoured wall fuel injectors was designed to enable shock-enhancement of hypervelocity mixing for supersonic combustion ramjet applications. Previous studies of these geometries left unresolved questions concerning the relative importance of various axial vorticity sources in mixing the injectant with the freestream. The present study is a numerical simulation of two generic fuel injectors which is aimed at elucidating the relative roles of axial vorticity sources including: baroclinic torque through shock-impingement, cross-stream shear, turning of boundary layer vorticity, shock curvature, and diffusive flux. Both the magnitude of the circulation, and the location of vorticity with respect to the mixing interface were considered. Baroclinic torque and cross-stream shear were found to be most important in convectively mixing the injectant with the freestream, with the former providing for deposition of vorticity directly on the fuel/air interface.

  11. Vorticity generation by contoured wall injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waitz, I.A.; Marble, F.E.; Zukoski, E.E. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1992-07-01

    A class of contoured wall fuel injectors was designed to enable shock-enhancement of hypervelocity mixing for supersonic combustion ramjet applications. Previous studies of these geometries left unresolved questions concerning the relative importance of various axial vorticity sources in mixing the injectant with the freestream. The present study is a numerical simulation of two generic fuel injectors which is aimed at elucidating the relative roles of axial vorticity sources including: baroclinic torque through shock-impingement, cross-stream shear, turning of boundary layer vorticity, shock curvature, and diffusive flux. Both the magnitude of the circulation, and the location of vorticity with respect to the mixing interface were considered. Baroclinic torque and cross-stream shear were found to be most important in convectively mixing the injectant with the freestream, with the former providing for deposition of vorticity directly on the fuel/air interface. 19 refs.

  12. A potential vorticity perspective on the motion of mid-latitude surface cyclones: the example of the winter storm Xynthia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Gwendal; Arbogast, Philippe; Lapeyre, Guillaume; Maynard, Karine

    2013-04-01

    Mid-latitude surface cyclones are commonly observed to move across the mean flow from the equator to the pole and to undergo a strong and rapid deepening when they cross the axis of the large-scale jet stream. The purpose of the present study is to validate a recent theory that may explain this cross-jet motion which is a generalization of the so-called beta drift in the mid-latitude baroclinic context. According to this theory, the key parameter controlling the movement of a surface cyclone across the mean tropospheric jet is the vertical-average potential vorticity (PV) gradient associated with the jet. To test this theoretical result, numerical sensitivity experiments are performed using the Météo-France global operational forecast model ARPEGE-IFS for the particular case of the storm Xynthia (26-28 February 2010). The control forecast, starting from the operational analysis almost 2 days before the storm hit France, represents the trajectory of the storm quite well, together with the deepening during the crossing of the large-scale upper-level jet axis. A PV-inversion tool is used to modify the vertical-average PV gradient at the initial time. As expected from the theory, when the PV gradient is intensified, there is a quicker displacement of the surface cyclone toward the jet axis and the jet-crossing phase occurs earlier than in the control forecast. The opposite occurs for a reduced PV gradient. A dynamical interpretation is provided in terms of upper-levels PV anomalies generated by Rossby wave radiation.

  13. Layer-wise attribution of vertical motion and the influence of potential-vorticity anomalies on synoptic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, M. A. G.; Thorpe, A. J.; Browning, K. A.

    2003-04-01

    A methodology is presented for attributing vertical motion to potential vorticity (PV) in a explicit manner using the quasi-geostrophic omega equation. The methodology is then used to determine the contribution individual PV anomalies make to the synoptic development. It is shown how the total vertical motion may be decomposed into self-generating and interaction terms. The former correspond to vertical motion that arises from one PV region alone, whilst each of the interaction terms represent vertical motion due to the interaction of two different regions of PV. The method is applied to a number of cyclones studied in the Fronts and Atlantic Storm-Tracks Experiment in order to determine the dynamical role of individual PV regions in cyclogenesis. For purposes of comparison, cyclones were chosen to be representative of the types (A, B and C) of an extended Petterssen-Smebye scheme devised by Deveson, Browning and Hewson. In terms of our new PV method, the Type A and B cyclones exhibit only subtle differences, with the upper-level layer of PV playing a larger role in the case of the Type B cyclone. A much larger difference is apparent between the Type A and B cyclones on the one hand, and the Type C cyclone on the other: in the Type C cyclone, the upper-level PV self-generating term plays an important role, whereas in the Type A and B cases the influence of the upper-level PV is largely restricted to the interaction terms. In all of the cases, the vertical motion attributable to the interaction between the low-level PV and boundary thermal gradient was found to be large. Hence, from the viewpoint of instantaneous attribution, we conclude that the low-level PV is always important.

  14. Boundary-layer turbulence modeling and vorticity dynamics: I. A kangaroo-process mixing model of boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; van den Brink, A. Maassen

    A nonlocal turbulence transport theory is presented by means of a novel analysis of the Reynolds stress, inter alia involving the construct of a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. An analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) and a nonlinear scaling relation (mapping the path space onto the boundary layer) lead to an integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities, which represents fully-developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The underlying near-wall behavior (i.e. for y +→0) of fluctuating velocities fully agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ, with ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit. For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ≈0.58. The significance of ɛ as a turbulence Cantor set dimension (in the logarithmic profile region, i.e. for y +→∞) is discussed.

  15. Inclusion of potential vorticity uncertainties into a hydrometeorological forecasting chain: application to a medium size basin of Mediterranean Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amengual, A.; Romero, R.; Vich, M.; Alonso, S.

    2009-06-01

    The improvement of the short- and mid-range numerical runoff forecasts over the flood-prone Spanish Mediterranean area is a challenging issue. This work analyses four intense precipitation events which produced floods of different magnitude over the Llobregat river basin, a medium size catchment located in Catalonia, north-eastern Spain. One of them was a devasting flash flood - known as the "Montserrat" event - which produced 5 fatalities and material losses estimated at about 65 million euros. The characterization of the Llobregat basin's hydrological response to these floods is first assessed by using rain-gauge data and the Hydrologic Engineering Center's Hydrological Modeling System (HEC-HMS) runoff model. In second place, the non-hydrostatic fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5) is nested within the ECMWF large-scale forecast fields in a set of 54 h period simulations to provide quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) for each hydrometeorological episode. The hydrological model is forced with these QPFs to evaluate the reliability of the resulting discharge forecasts, while an ensemble prediction system (EPS) based on perturbed atmospheric initial and boundary conditions has been designed to test the value of a probabilistic strategy versus the previous deterministic approach. Specifically, a Potential Vorticity (PV) Inversion technique has been used to perturb the MM5 model initial and boundary states (i.e. ECMWF forecast fields). For that purpose, a PV error climatology has been previously derived in order to introduce realistic PV perturbations in the EPS. Results show the benefits of using a probabilistic approach in those cases where the deterministic QPF presents significant deficiencies over the Llobregat river basin in terms of the rainfall amounts, timing and localization. These deficiences in precipitation fields have a major impact on flood forecasts. Our ensemble strategy has been found useful to reduce the

  16. Inclusion of potential vorticity uncertainties into a hydrometeorological forecasting chain: application to a medium size basin of Mediterranean Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amengual, A.; Romero, R.; Vich, M.; Alonso, S.

    2009-01-01

    The improvement of the short- and mid-range numerical runoff forecasts over the flood-prone Spanish Mediterranean area is a challenging issue. This work analyses four intense precipitation events which produced floods of different magnitude over the Llobregat river basin, a medium size catchment located in Catalonia, north-eastern Spain. One of them was a devasting flash flood - known as the "Montserrat" event - which produced 5 fatalities and material losses estimated at about 65 million euros. The characterization of the Llobregat basin's hydrological response to these floods is first assessed by using rain-gauge data and the Hydrologic Engineering Center's Hydrological Modeling System (HEC-HMS) runoff model. In second place, the non-hydrostatic fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5) is nested within the ECMWF large-scale forecast fields in a set of 54 h period simulations to provide quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) for each hydrometeorological episode. The hydrological model is forced with these QPFs to evaluate the reliability of the resulting discharge forecasts, while an ensemble prediction system (EPS) based on perturbed atmospheric initial and boundary conditions has been designed to test the value of a probabilistic strategy versus the previous deterministic approach. Specifically, a Potential Vorticity (PV) Inversion technique has been used to perturb the MM5 model initial and boundary states (i.e. ECMWF forecast fields). For that purpose, a PV error climatology has been previously derived in order to introduce realistic PV perturbations in the EPS. Results show the benefits of using a probabilistic approach in those cases where the deterministic QPF presents significant deficiencies over the Llobregat river basin in terms of the rainfall amounts, timing and localization. These deficiences in precipitation fields have a major impact on flood forecasts. Our ensemble strategy has been found useful to reduce the

  17. Dynamical Response to the QBO in the Northern Winter Stratosphere: Signatures in Wave Forcing and Eddy Fluxes of Potential Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, I. P.; Lu, H.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), a quasi-periodic oscillation of the stratospheric equatorial zonal wind between easterlies and westerlies, is known to affect the stratospheric circulation and transfer anomalies downward into the troposphere via a modulation of the winter polar vortex. However, the exact mechanism(s) governing this remain unclear. In this study, wave-mean-flow interactions associated with this effect, the so-called Holton-Tan effect (HTE), are studied using the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. Significant evidence of the HTE in isentropic coordinates is found, with a weaker and warmer polar vortex present when the lower stratospheric QBO is in its easterly phase (QBOe). For the first time, we quantify the QBO modulation of wave propagation, wave-mean-flow interaction and wave decay/growth via a calculation of potential vorticity (PV)-based measures, the zonal-mean momentum budget and up/down-gradient eddy PV fluxes. Stratosphere-troposphere coupling is also investigated with particular focus on the effect of the tropospheric subtropical jet on QBO modulation of the wave activity. In the subtropical to midlatitude lower stratosphere, QBOe is associated with an enhanced upward flux of wave activity across the tropopause, and corresponding wave convergence and wave growth, which leads to a stronger zonal-mean Brewer-Dobson Circulation and consequently a warmer polar region. In the middle stratosphere, QBOe is associated with increased poleward wave propagation, leading to enhanced wave convergence and in-situ wave growth at high latitudes and contributing to the weaker polar vortex. In agreement with recent studies, our results suggest that the critical-line effect cannot fully account for the wave anomalies associated with the HTE. Instead, it is suggestive of a new, additional mechanism that hinges on the QBO-induced meridional circulation effect on the latitudinal positioning of the subtropical jet. Under QBOe, the QBO-induced meridional

  18. Evaluating Precipitation, Latent Heat Release and Potential Vorticity in Extratropical Cyclones in a High Resolution Climate Model using Reanalysis and Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawcroft, M.; Hodges, K.; Shaffrey, L.; Dacre, H.; Forbes, R.; Stein, T. H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate models must be capable of adequately simulating the processes that drive extratropical cyclones if they are to realistically represent their evolution and propagation. One such process which models need to capture is the magnitude and location of latent heat release within cyclones. Precipitation is closely related to column integrated latent heating, but both the magnitude and the (horizontal and vertical) location of the latent heat release in the context of the relative vorticity structure in a cyclone is important as the potential vorticity generation is determined by both of these factors. Here, an evaluation of precipitation and latent heat release in a climate model (HiGEM) is presented. The model is evaluated against a range of remote sensing data and global reanalyses (ERA-Interim) using an innovative storm compositing technique. Many studies compare models to reanalysis, but at the scale of individual weather systems, the latent heat release in global reanalyses may not be strongly constrained by the observations. Remote sensing data that measures processes associated with latent heat release is therefore employed to extend this work. Forward modelled radiances from the model and reanalysis are created using an offline simulator (COSP: CFMIP Offline Simulator Package) to provide fields that can be directly compared to remote sensing data from ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) and CloudSat, in addition to direct comparison of the model and reanalysis data to the GPCP (Global Precipitation Climatology Project) dataset. The potential vorticity structure and evolution of composite extratropical cyclones is then compared in HiGEM and ERA-Interim, with starkly divergent results, which are related to differences in latent heating.

  19. LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observation of traveling planetary waves and potential vorticity advection in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    Eastward and westward traveling waves were observed by the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) during the northern winter 1978-1979. Eastward waves were prevalent in early winter and were involved in a minor Canadian warming in December 1978. A large westward traveling wave, as described by previous authors, was observed in January 1979 during a series of minor warmings. By comparing these two events, it is shown that in both cases the superposition of traveling and quasi-stationary waves led to constructive interference that was responsible for the warmings. However, there was significant asymmetry between eastward and westward traveling components. A local Eulerian analysis of potential vorticity (PV) transport indicates that adiabatic, geostrophic advection by the resolvable scales of motion explains qualitatively (but not quantitatively) the observed potential vorticity tendencies in the LIMS Northern Hemisphere winter. In particular, calculated advection explains the eastward rotation of the main vortex, intrusion of low PV air into the polar cap, and formation of high PV filaments at the vortex periphery.

  20. First Generation College Student Leadership Potential: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojan-Clark, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods research compared the leadership potential of traditionally aged first generation college students to that of college students whose parents are college educated. A college education provides advantages to those who can obtain it (Baum & Payea, 2004; Black Issues in Higher Education, 2005; Education and the Value of Knowledge,…

  1. Composite vortices in nonlinear circular waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leykam, Daniel; Malomed, Boris; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2013-04-01

    It is known that, in continuous media, composite solitons with hidden vorticity, which are built of two mutually symmetric vortical components whose total angular momentum is zero, may be stable while their counterparts with explicit vorticity and nonzero total angular momentum are unstable. In this work, we demonstrate that the opposite occurs in discrete media: hidden vortex states in relatively small ring chains become unstable with the increase of the total power, while explicit vortices are stable, provided that the corresponding scalar vortex state is also stable. There are also stable mixed states, in which the components are vortices with different topological charges. Additionally, degeneracies in families of composite vortex modes lead to the existence of long-lived breather states which can exhibit vortex-charge flipping in one or both components.

  2. A factor involved in efficient breakdown of supersonic streamwise vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiejima, Toshihiko

    2015-03-01

    Spatially developing processes in supersonic streamwise vortices were numerically simulated at Mach number 5.0. The vortex evolution largely depended on the azimuthal vorticity thickness of the vortices, which governs the negative helicity profile. Large vorticity thickness greatly enhanced the centrifugal instability, with consequent development of perturbations with competing wavenumbers outside the vortex core. During the transition process, supersonic streamwise vortices could generate large-scale spiral structures and a number of hairpin like vortices. Remarkably, the transition caused a dramatic increase in the total fluctuation energy of hypersonic flows, because the negative helicity profile destabilizes the flows due to helicity instability. Unstable growth might also relate to the correlation length between the axial and azimuthal vorticities of the streamwise vortices. The knowledge gained in this study is important for realizing effective fuel-oxidizer mixing in supersonic combustion engines.

  3. Waves and vortices in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouquet, Annick; Herbert, Corentin; Marino, Raffaele; Rosenberg, Duane

    2015-04-01

    of forcing mechanisms at different scales is not warranted. These flows consist of a superposition of slanted layers together with localized patches of strong turbulence leading to vertical mixing. The prevalence of wave modes over the slow vortical modes at large scales, and the role of the nonlinear part of potential vorticity relative to its linear part will be examined as a function of N/f and a variety of scaling laws will be discussed.

  4. The alkaline zinc electrode as a mixed potential system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Cathodic and anodic processes for the alkaline zinc electrode in 0.01 molar zincate electrolyte (9 molar hydroxide) were investigated. Cyclic voltammograms and current-voltage curves were obtained by supplying pulses through a potentiostat to a zinc rotating disk electrode. The data are interpreted by treating the system as one with a mixed potential; the processes are termed The zincate and corrosion reactions. The relative proportions of the two processes vary with the supplied potential. For the cathodic region, the cathodic corrosion process predominates at higher potentials while both processes occur simultaneously at a lower potential (i.e., 50 mV). For the anodic region, the anodic zincate process predominates at higher potentials while the anodic corrosion process is dominant at lower potential (i.e., 50 mV) if H2 is present.

  5. The potential for free and mixed convection in sedimentary basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raffensperger, J.P.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    1999-01-01

    Free thermal convection and mixed convection are considered as potential mechanisms for mass and heat transport in sedimentary basins. Mixed convection occurs when horizontal flows (forced convection) are superimposed on thermally driven flows. In cross section, mixed convection is characterized by convection cells that migrate laterally in the direction of forced convective flow. Two-dimensional finite-element simulations of variable-density groundwater flow and heat transport in a horizontal porous layer were performed to determine critical mean Rayleigh numbers for the onset of free convection, using both isothermal and semi-conductive boundaries. Additional simulations imposed a varying lateral fluid flux on the free-convection pattern. Results from these experiments indicate that forced convection becomes dominant, completely eliminating buoyancy-driven circulation, when the total forced-convection fluid flux exceeds the total flux possible due to free convection. Calculations of the thermal rock alteration index (RAI=q????T) delineate the patterns of potential diagenesis produced by fluid movement through temperature gradients. Free convection produces a distinct pattern of alternating positive and negative RAIs, whereas mixed convection produces a simpler layering of positive and negative values and in general less diagenetic alteration. ?? Springer-Verlag.

  6. Dynamical contibution of Mean Potential Vorticity pseudo-observations derived from MetOp/GOME2 Ozone data into weather forecast, a Mediterranean High Precipitation Event study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbii, Siham; Zazoui, Mimoun; Semane, Noureddine

    2015-04-01

    In the absence of observations covering the upper troposphere - lower stratophere, headquarters of several disturbances, and knowing that satellites are uniquely capable of providing uniform data coverage globally, a methodology is followed [1] to convert Total Column Ozone, observed by MetOp/GOME2, into pseudo-observations of Mean Potential Vorticity (MPV). The aim is to study the dynamical impact of Ozone data in the prediction of a Mediterranean Heavy Precipitation Event observed during 28-29 September 2012 in the context of HYMEX1. This study builds on a previously described methodology [2] that generates numerical weather prediction model initial conditions from ozone data. Indeed, the assimilation of MPV in a 3D-var framework is based on a linear regression between observed Ozone and vertical integrated Ertel PV. The latter is calculated using dynamical fields from the moroccan operational limited area model ALADIN-MAROC according to [3]: δθ fp p0 -R δU δV P V = - gξaδp- g-R-(p )Cp [(δp-)2 + (δp-)2] (1) Where ξa is the vertical component of the absolute vorticity, U and V the horizontal wind components, θ the potential temperature, R gas constant, Cp specific heat at constant pressure, p the pressure, p0 a reference pressure, g the gravity and f is the Coriolis parameter. The MPV is estimated using the following expression: --1--∫ P2 M PV = P1 - P2 P P V.δp 1 (2) With P1 = 500hPa and P2 = 100hPa In the present study, the linear regression is performed over September 2012 with a correlation coefficient of 0.8265 and is described as follows: M P V = 5.314610- 2 *O3 - 13.445 (3) where O3 and MPV are given in Dobson Unit (DU) and PVU (1 PV U = 10-6 m2 K kg-1 s-1), respectively. It is found that the ozone-influenced upper-level initializing fields affect the precipitation forecast, as diagnosed by a comparison with the ECMWF model. References [1] S. Sbii, N. Semane, Y. Michel, P. Arbogast and M. Zazoui (2012). Using METOP/GOME-2 data and MSG ozone

  7. Vortex dynamics studies in supersonic flow: Merging of co-rotating streamwise vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, L.; Vergine, F.; Crisanti, M.

    2014-04-01

    For air-breathing propulsion systems intended for flight at very high Mach numbers, combustion is carried out at supersonic velocities and the process is mixing limited. Substantial increase in mixing rates can be obtained by fuel injection strategies centered on generating selected modes of supersonic, streamwise vortex interactions. Despite the recognized importance, and potential of the role of streamwise vortices for supersonic mixing enhancement, only few fundamental studies on their dynamics and interactions have been conducted, leaving the field largely unexplored. A reduced order model that allows the dynamics of complex, interacting, supersonic vortical structures to be investigated, is presented in this work. The prediction of the evolution of mutually interacting streamwise vortices represents an enabling element for the initiation of an effective, systematic experimental study of selected cases of interest, and is an important step toward the design of new fuel injection strategies for supersonic combustors. The case presented in this work is centered on a merging process of co-rotating vortices, and the subsequent evolution of a system composed of two counter-rotating vortex pairs. This interaction was studied, initially, with the proposed model, and was chosen for the peculiarity of the resulting morphology of the vorticity field. These results were used to design an experimental investigation with the intent to target the same specific complex flow physics. The experiment revealed the same peculiar features encountered in the simulation.

  8. Interatomic potentials for mixed oxide and advanced nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Walle, Axel van de; Jeon, Byoungseon; Groenbech-Jensen, Niels

    2011-03-01

    We extend our recently developed interatomic potentials for UO{sub 2} to the fuel system (U,Pu,Np)O{sub 2}. We do so by fitting against an extensive database of ab initio results as well as to experimental measurements. The applicability of these interactions to a variety of mixed environments beyond the fitting domain is also assessed. The employed formalism makes these potentials applicable across all interatomic distances without the need for any ambiguous splining to the well-established short-range Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark universal pair potential. We therefore expect these to be reliable potentials for carrying out damage simulations (and molecular dynamics simulations in general) in nuclear fuels of varying compositions for all relevant atomic collision energies.

  9. Commercial aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerz, Thomas; Holzäpfel, Frank; Darracq, Denis

    2002-04-01

    This paper discusses the problem of wake vortices shed by commercial aircraft. It presents a consolidated European view on the current status of knowledge of the nature and characteristics of aircraft wakes and of technical and operational procedures of minimizing and predicting the vortex strength and avoiding wake encounters. Methodological aspects of data evaluation and interpretation, like the description of wake ages, the characterization of wake vortices, and the proper evaluation of wake data from measurement and simulation, are addressed in the first part. In the second part an inventory of our knowledge is given on vortex characterization and control, prediction and monitoring of vortex decay, vortex detection and warning, vortex encounter models, and wake-vortex safety assessment. Each section is concluded by a list of questions and required actions which may help to guide further research activities. The primary objective of the joint international efforts in wake-vortex research is to avoid potentially hazardous wake encounters for aircraft. Shortened aircraft separations under appropriate meteorological conditions, whilst keeping or even increasing the safety level, is the ultimate goal. Reduced time delays on the tactical side and increased airport capacities on the strategic side will be the benefits of these ambitious ventures for the air transportation industry and services.

  10. Radiolysis Model Formulation for Integration with the Mixed Potential Model

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2014-07-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste. Within the UFDC, the components for a general system model of the degradation and subsequent transport of UNF is being developed to analyze the performance of disposal options [Sassani et al., 2012]. Two model components of the near-field part of the problem are the ANL Mixed Potential Model and the PNNL Radiolysis Model. This report is in response to the desire to integrate the two models as outlined in [Buck, E.C, J.L. Jerden, W.L. Ebert, R.S. Wittman, (2013) “Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation,” FCRD-UFD-2013-000290, M3FT-PN0806058

  11. Vortices in a rotating two-component Bose–Einstein condensate with tunable interactions and harmonic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Du, Zhi-Jing; Tan, Ren-Bing; Dong, Rui-Fang; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2014-07-15

    We consider a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations modeling a rotating two-component Bose–Einstein condensate with tunable interactions and harmonic potential, with emphasis on the structure of vortex states by varying the strength of inter-component interaction, rotational frequency, and the aspect ratio of the harmonic potential. Our results show that the inter-component interaction greatly enhances the effect of rotation. For the case of isotropic harmonic potential and small inter-component interaction, the initial vortex structure remains unchanged. As the ratio of inter- to intra-component interactions increases, each component undergoes a transition from a vortex lattice (vortex line) in an isotropic (anisotropic) harmonic potential to an alternatively arranged stripe pattern, and eventually to the interwoven “serpentine” vortex sheets. Moreover, in the case of anisotropic harmonic potential the system can develop to a rotating droplet structure. -- Highlights: •Different vortex structures are obtained within the full parameter space. •Effects of system parameters on the ground state structure are discussed. •Phase transition between different vortex structures is also examined. •Present one possible way to obtain the rotating droplet structure. •Provide many possibilities to manipulate vortex in two-component BEC.

  12. Half-quantum vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineev, V. P.

    2013-10-01

    Unlike to superfluid 4He the superfluid 3He-A support the existence of vortices with half-quantum of circulation as well as single quantum vortices. The singular single quanta vortices as well as nonsingular vortices with 2 quanta of circulation have been revealed in rotating 3He-A. However, the half-quantum vortices in open geometry always possess an extra energy due to spin-orbit coupling leading to formation of domain wall at distances larger than dipole length ˜10-3 cm from the vortex axis. Fortunately the same magnetic dipole-dipole interaction does not prevent the existence of half-quantum vortices in the polar phase of superfluid 3He recently discovered in peculiar porous media "nematically ordered" aerogel. Here we discuss this exotic possibility. The discoveries of half-quantum vortices in triplet pairing superconductor Sr2RuO4 as well in the exciton-polariton condensates are the other parts of the story about half-quantum vortices also described in the paper.

  13. Vortices and turbulence in trapped atomic condensates

    PubMed Central

    White, Angela C.; Anderson, Brian P.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than a decade of experiments generating and studying the physics of quantized vortices in atomic gas Bose–Einstein condensates, research is beginning to focus on the roles of vortices in quantum turbulence, as well as other measures of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. Such research directions have the potential to uncover new insights into quantum turbulence, vortices, and superfluidity and also explore the similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence in entirely new settings. Here we present a critical assessment of theoretical and experimental studies in this emerging field of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. PMID:24704880

  14. On relation between scalar interfaces and vorticity in inviscid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, O. N.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2013-11-01

    A great variety of applications like pollutant mixing in the atmosphere, mixing of reactants in combustion highlight the importance of passive scalar dynamics in fluid flows. The other dynamically important variable in the study of fluid flow is the vorticity. Vorticity though, unlike a passive scalar, does affect the fluid motion. The dynamics of scalar (linear) and vorticity (non-linear) are governed by the equations which inherently have different characteristics. This paper addresses the question of the faithfulness of representation of vorticity by scalar marker and the motivation for this comes from the experiment of Head and Bandyopadhyay (1981) which showed the existence of coherent vortices by using smoke flow visualization in a turbulent boundary layer. We will show analytically in regions where the molecular diffusion effects are negligible, the vorticity and scalar gradients are orthogonal to each other. The iso- surface of scalar follows the vorticity in an inviscid situation. Also, we will demonstrate that in the case of unsteady burgers vortex and vortex shedding behind a finite circular cylinder, the scalar gradient is orthogonal to vorticity and inner product of vorticity and scalar gradients is zero in regions away from the wall.

  15. Development and Interaction of Artificially Generated Hairpin Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; McKenna, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    The development and interaction of hairpin vortices are examined and categorized to better understand their role in fully turbulent boundary layers. Hairpin vortices are generated within an otherwise laminar boundary layer using a free surface water channel. Direct injection is the primary generation method and the behavior of the vortices is first examined using flow visualization. Hydrogen bubble wire is combined with dye injection to help clarify the role of the vorticity in the fluid immediately surrounding the hairpin vortex. PIV data is also used to classify the development and maturity of the vortices for a range of free stream and injection conditions. The interactions of two hairpin vortices of varying maturity are characterized to investigate the potential mechanisms for the formation of hairpin packets beyond autogeneration. Finally, the behavior of hairpin vortices generated with a new technique that uses a transient hemispherical protrusion is also examined. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1040236.

  16. Crossflow vorticity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A crossflow vorticity sensor for the detection of crossflow vorticity characteristics is described. The sensor is comprised of crossflow sensors which are noninvasively adhered to a swept wing laminar surface either singularly, in multi-element strips, in polar patterns, or in orthogonal patterns. These crossflow sensors are comprised of hot-film sensor elements which operate as a constant temperature anemometer circuit to detect heat transfer rate changes. Accordingly, crossflow vorticity characteristics are determined via cross-correlation. In addition, the crossflow sensors have a thickness which does not exceed a maximum value h in order to avoid contamination of downstream crossflow sensors.

  17. The distribution of vorticity in a large vortical motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the distribution of vorticity in the large scale vortical motions which are found in free shear layers was undertaken. Using hot-wire anemometry, both quasi-instantaneous and phase averaged transverse vorticity were acquired. These results appear to indicate that the transverse vorticity in a large scale vortical motion is distributed in a marble cake manner and not in laminated sheets spooled up into a coil or helical spring. Also, levels of vorticity were found to vary by as much as an order of magnitude in these concentrated vortical cores.

  18. Effect of YSZ sintering temperature on mixed potential sensor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, Praveen K; Brosha, Eric L; Rangachary, Mukundan; Garzon, Fernando H; Nelson, Mark A; Toracco, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the influence of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sintering temperature on a Pt/YSZ/La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CrO{sub 3} mixed potential sensor performance is reported. The sintering temperature of YSZ was varied from 1000 to 1200 C. Mercury porosity measurements were performed to estimate the porosity and tortuosity of the YSZ sample as a function of sintering temperature. Further, the surface area of YSZ was computed by the BET method. After YSZ characterization, the unbiased and biased sensor response was recorded. The 1000 C sintered YSZ sample was taken as the reference for comparison purposes. Experimental results indicated a 30% reduction in porosity for the 1200 C sintered YSZ sample, accounting for a 14-fold increase in the sensor response rise time. In addition, for the same sample, a 13-fold increase in sensitivity was observed upon exposure to propylene (100 ppm), associated with a 76% reduction in surface area. The slow response time of the sensor with YSZ sintered at higher temperatures has been attributed to higher tortuosity (delay in gas permeation to the three phase interface). Whereas, reduced heterogeneous catalysis induced by lower surface area accounts for the rise in sensitivity levels. The optimum YSZ sintering temperature was found to lie between 1100 and 1150 C.

  19. Numerical study of vorticity-enhanced heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Alben, Silas

    2013-11-01

    Vortices produced by vibrated reeds and flapping foils can improve heat transfer efficiency in electronic hardware. Vortices enhance forced convection by boundary layer separation and thermal mixing in the bulk flow. In this work, we modeled and simulated the fluid flow and temperature in a 2-D channel flow with vortices injected at the upstream boundary. We classified four types of vortex streets depending on the Reynolds number and vortices' strengths and spacings, and studied the different vortex dynamics in each situation. We then used Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) to study the effect of the vortices on mixing and determined how the Nusselt number and Coefficients of performance vary with flow parameters and Peclet numbers.

  20. Representing the effects of stratosphere-troposphere exchange on 3-D O3 distributions in chemistry transport models using a potential vorticity-based parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jia; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Hogrefe, Christian; Wang, Jiandong; Gan, Chuen-Meei; Sarwar, Golam; Wong, David C.; McKeen, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Downward transport of ozone (O3) from the stratosphere can be a significant contributor to tropospheric O3 background levels. However, this process often is not well represented in current regional models. In this study, we develop a seasonally and spatially varying potential vorticity (PV)-based function to parameterize upper tropospheric and/or lower stratospheric (UTLS) O3 in a chemistry transport model. This dynamic O3-PV function is developed based on 21-year ozonesonde records from World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre (WOUDC) with corresponding PV values from a 21-year Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulation across the Northern Hemisphere from 1990 to 2010. The result suggests strong spatial and seasonal variations of O3 / PV ratios which exhibits large values in the upper layers and in high-latitude regions, with highest values in spring and the lowest values in autumn over an annual cycle. The newly developed O3 / PV function was then applied in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for an annual simulation of the year 2006. The simulated UTLS O3 agrees much better with observations in both magnitude and seasonality after the implementation of the new parameterization. Considerable impacts on surface O3 model performance were found in the comparison with observations from three observational networks, i.e., EMEP, CASTNET and WDCGG. With the new parameterization, the negative bias in spring is reduced from -20 to -15 % in the reference case to -9 to -1 %, while the positive bias in autumn is increased from 1 to 15 % in the reference case to 5 to 22 %. Therefore, the downward transport of O3 from upper layers has large impacts on surface concentration and needs to be properly represented in regional models.

  1. Oligomer and mixed-metal compounds potential multielectron transfer catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rillema, D.P.

    1992-03-30

    Projects related to the design and characterization of multimetallic complexes has proceeded forward with a number of achievements. First, photoprocesses in hydrogel matrices lead to the conclusion that cationic metallochromophores could be ion exchanged into a hydrogel matrix ({kappa}-carageenan) and substantial photocurrents could be generated. Second, X-ray structures of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Ru(bpz){sub 3}{sup 2+}, where bpy is 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, bpm is 2,2{prime}-bipyrimidine and bpz is 2,2{prime}-bipyrizine, were obtained and revealed similar Ru-N bond distances in each complex even though their {sigma}-donor and {pi}-acceptor character differ markedly. The structure parameters are expected to provide theoreticians with the information needed to probe the electronic character of the molecular systems and provide us with direction in our synthetic strategies. Third, a copper(I) complex was synthesized with a dimeric-ethane-bridged, 1,10-phenanthroline ligand that resulted in isolation of a bimetallic species. The copper(I) complex did luminesce weakly, suggesting that the dimer possesses potential electron transfer capability. Fourth, the photophysical properties of (Re(CO){sub 4}(L-L)){sup +}, where L-L = heterocyclic diimine ligands, and Pt(bph)X{sub 2}, where bph = the dianion of biphenyl and X = CH{sub 3}CN, py or ethylendiamine, displayed luminescence at high energy and underwent excited-state electron transfer. Such high energy emitters provide high driving forces for undergoing excited-state electron transfer. Fifth, both energy and electron transfer were observed in mixed-metal complexes bridged by 1,2-bis(2,2{prime}-bipyridyl-4{prime}-yl) ethane.

  2. Mixed Potentials: Experimental Illustrations of an Important Concept in Practical Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, G. P.; Ritchie, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a largely experimental approach to the concept of mixed potentials, pointing out the close parallel that exists between equilibrium potentials. Describes several important examples of mixed potentials, providing current-voltage and polarization curves and half reactions as examples. Includes a discussion of corrosion reactions and…

  3. Energy and vorticity decay in Haloclines and Thermoclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Matulka, Annia M.; Peco, Cristian

    2010-05-01

    Experiments at different Reynolds numbers on the vertical and horizontal mixing structure and efficiency of mixing across a thermocline or halocline are used to investigate the decay of the turbulence [1-3]. Vertical and horizontal grids are used to mix an initialy sharp density interface (mostly made up with brine). Visualization methods are used to derive the velocity and vorticity horizontal fields and density probes allow to evaluate mixing. The vortex behavior is analyzed in detail as well as the process of energy decay and the transfer from kinetic to potential energy.By using the multi-fractal "Box counting Algorithm" [1] on the kinetic energy and vorticity fields and a suitable non dimensional Damkholer type of decay time, based on the local dissipation in the experiments that model ocean haloclines and surface ROFI, it is possible to relate certain patterns to physical processes similar to those in the ocean as in[4]. Diffusion, Spectral variations, Intermittency and higher order estimations of local mixing are presented as functions of the Richardson number and these predictions are compared with practical ocean flows and pollution situations[5]. [1] Redondo J.M. and Garzon G."Multifractal structure and intermittency in Rayleigh-Taylor Driven Fronts". Ed. S. Dalziel www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/iwpctm9/proceedings/IWPCTM9/Papers/Programme.htm. 2004. [2] Redondo, J.M. and Cantalapiedra I.R. "Mixing in Horizontally Heterogeneous Flows". Jour. Flow Turbulence and Combustion. 51. 217-222. 1993. [3] Castilla R, Redondo J.M., Gamez P.J., Babiano A. "Coherent vortices and Lagrangian Dynamics in 2D Turbulence". Non-Linear Processes in Geophysics 14. 139-151. 2007. [4] Bezerra,M.O. M. Diez, C. Medeiros, A. Rodriguez, E. Bahia., A. Sanchez-Arcilla and J.M. Redondo. "Study on the influence of waves on coastal diffusion using image analysis". Jour. Flow Turbulence and Combustion 59,.191-204. 1998. [5] Peco, C. "Mixing in the Thermocline and Halocline Ms". Thesis, ETSECCPB

  4. Up-sliding Slantwise Vorticity Development and the complete vorticity equation with mass forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaopeng; Gao, Shouting; Wu, Guoxiong

    2003-09-01

    The moist potential vorticity (MPV) equation is derived from complete atmospheric equations including the effect of mass forcing, with which the theory of Up-sliding Slantwise Vorticity Development (USVD) is proposed based on the theory of Slantwise Vorticity Development (SVD). When an air parcel slides up along a slantwise isentropic surface, its vertical component of relative vorticity will develop, and the steeper the isentropic surface is, the more violent the development will be. From the definition of MPV and the MPV equation produced here in, a complete vorticity equation is then put forward with mass forcing, which explicitly includes the effects of both internal forcings, such as variations of stability, baroclinicity, and vertical shear of horizontal wind, and external forcings, such as diabatic heating, friction, and mass forcing. When isentropic surfaces are flat, the complete vorticity equation matches its traditional counterpart. The physical interpretations of some of the items which are included in the complete vorticity equation but not in the traditional one are studied with a simplified model of the Changjiang-Huaihe Meiyu front. A 60-h simulation is then performed to reproduce a torrential rain event in the Changjiang-Huaihe region and the output of the model is studied qualitatively based on the theory of USVD. The result shows that the conditions of the theory of USVD are easily satisfied immediately in front of mesoscale rainstorms in the downwind direction, that is, the theory of USVD is important to the development and movement of these kinds of systems.

  5. Vortices wiggled and dragged

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles

    2008-01-01

    When a sufficiently strong magnetic field is applied to a superconductor, some of the field can pierce it through the generation of magnetic vortices, each of which contains a quantized amount of magnetic flux. Although the superconducting state of the material outside each vortex is maintained (and destroyed within each vortex), the interaction of vortices with a current passing through the material can cause them to move, dissipating energy and thereby generating a source of electrical resistance. The ability to manipulate an individual superconducting vortex represents a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of vortices and the superconductors that support them. It could also lead to the development of a new class of fluxon-based electronics.

  6. Circling optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupel, M.; Weiss, C. O.

    1995-05-01

    Using a photorefractive oscillator, we show experimental optical patterns whose principal features are optical vortices moving around an optical axis on circles. These patterns can be interpreted as simultaneous emission of helical fields with high-charge phase singularities and other rotationally symmetric fields. Patterns with up to nine circling vortices are shown, as well as patterns with two concentric ``wheels'' of vortices. Mode locking in these rotating patterns corresponds to a stopping of the rotation. An intermediate case between free rotation and locking, in which the pattern ``jumps'' between certain angular positions, is demonstrated, showing that phase locking of these modes, which is not possible for an isotropic resonator, can come about by small anisotropies.

  7. Do vortices entangle?

    PubMed

    Olson Reichhardt, C J; Hastings, M B

    2004-04-16

    We propose an experiment for directly constructing and locally probing topologically entangled states of superconducting vortices which can be performed with present-day technology. Calculations using an elastic string vortex model indicate that as the pitch (the winding angle divided by the vertical distance) increases, the vortices approach each other. At values of the pitch higher than a maximum value the entangled state becomes unstable to collapse via a singularity of the model. We provide predicted experimental signatures for both vortex entanglement and vortex cutting. The local probe we propose can also be used to explore a wide range of other quantities.

  8. Do Vortices Entangle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Hastings, M. B.

    2004-04-01

    We propose an experiment for directly constructing and locally probing topologically entangled states of superconducting vortices which can be performed with present-day technology. Calculations using an elastic string vortex model indicate that as the pitch (the winding angle divided by the vertical distance) increases, the vortices approach each other. At values of the pitch higher than a maximum value the entangled state becomes unstable to collapse via a singularity of the model. We provide predicted experimental signatures for both vortex entanglement and vortex cutting. The local probe we propose can also be used to explore a wide range of other quantities.

  9. Making sound vortices by metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Liping; Qiu, Chunyin; Lu, Jiuyang; Tang, Kun; Jia, Han; Ke, Manzhu; Peng, Shasha; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-08-01

    Based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle, a metasurface structure is designed to generate a sound vortex beam in airborne environment. The metasurface is constructed by a thin planar plate perforated with a circular array of deep subwavelength resonators with desired phase and amplitude responses. The metasurface approach in making sound vortices is validated well by full-wave simulations and experimental measurements. Potential applications of such artificial spiral beams can be anticipated, as exemplified experimentally by the torque effect exerting on an absorbing disk.

  10. Separating Internal Waves and Vortical Structure in the Open Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauffenburger, N. E.; Sanford, T. B.; Lien, R.

    2012-12-01

    Deviating from past oceanographic surveys, a new, powerful array of profiling floats has been deployed for three weeks in the Sargasso Sea to monitor the evolving sub-mesoscale field. Using 18-20 EM-APEX floats, profiling to 100 m depth simultaneously, velocity (U and V), temperature, salinity and microstructure measurements (χ) were made on horizontal scales between 100 m and 10 km. This strategy provided a 3-D snapshot of the physical properties every half hour, which significantly reduces temporal aliasing. Area-averaged relative vorticity, vortex stretching, non-linear twisting, horizontal divergence and Ertel's potential vorticity have been computed and projected onto isopycnal surfaces. Since vortical modes carry Ertel's potential vorticity (and internal waves do not), this is a useful step in understanding the energetic contribution of vortical motions to the background internal wave field on small scales. In addition, the temporal material conservation law of Ertel's potential vorticity will be tested for the first time by determining the advection of the floats' measurements relative to the motion of the water parcels and by computing the horizontal gradients of the potential vorticity signal. The three deployments provide data to analyze the interaction of inertial waves, vortical processes and barotropic tides in and out of active frontogenesis.

  11. Potential for bioremediating using constructed mixed microbial mats

    SciTech Connect

    Goodroad, L.; Bender, J.; Phillips, P.; Gould, J.; Saha, G.; Rodriguez-Eaton, S.; Vatcharapijarn, Y.; Lee, R.; Word, J.

    1994-12-31

    Microbial mats are natural heterotrophic and autotrophic communities dominated by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). They are self-organized laminated structures annealed tightly together by slimy secretions from various Microbial components. The surface slime of the mats effectively immobilizes the ecosystem to a variety of substrates, thereby stabilizing the most efficient internal microbial structure. Constructed microbial mats can be generated rapidly by enriching a water surface with ensiled grass clippings. These constructed mats are durable, tolerant to a variety of toxins and resilient under changing environmental conditions. The mats can he designed for specific tasks by inoculating the cyanobacteria/silage with selected microorganisms. Mats constructed with specific microbial components have been developed for various bioremediation applications: removal of metals, organic degradation, treatment of mixed contaminants, biological treatment ponds, and soil remediation. Constructed mats offer a broad range of mechanisms related to the sequestration of heavy metals, the biodegradation of recalcitrant organic compounds, and the remediation of mixed organic/inorganic contaminants such as TCE and carbofuran with heavy metals.

  12. Linear phase distribution of acoustical vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lu; Zheng, Haixiang; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2014-07-14

    Linear phase distribution of phase-coded acoustical vortices was theoretically investigated based on the radiation theory of point source, and then confirmed by experimental measurements. With the proposed criterion of positive phase slope, the possibility of constructing linear circular phase distributions is demonstrated to be determined by source parameters. Improved phase linearity can be achieved at larger source number, lower frequency, smaller vortex radius, and/or longer axial distance. Good agreements are observed between numerical simulations and measurement results for circular phase distributions. The favorable results confirm the feasibility of precise phase control for acoustical vortices and suggest potential applications in particle manipulation.

  13. Toward modeling wingtip vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, O.

    1993-01-01

    Wingtip vortices are generated by lifting airfoils; their salient features are compactness and relatively slow rate of decay. The principal motivation for studying the far field evolution of wingtip vortices is the need to understand and predict the extent of the vortex influence during aircraft take-off or landing. On submarines a wingtip vortex ingested into a propeller can be a source of undesirable noise. The main objectives of this research are (1) to establish theoretical understanding of the principal mechanisms that govern the later (diffusive) stages of a turbulent vortex, (2) to develop a turbulence closure model representing the basic physical mechanisms that control the vortex diffusive stage, and further (3) to investigate coupling between the near and far field evolutions; in other words, to study the effect of initial conditions on the vortex lifetime and the ultimate state.

  14. Vorticity in analog gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose-Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  15. A potentially fatal mix of herpes in zoos.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Alex D; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Ho, Simon Y W; Szentiks, Claudia A; Nikolin, Veljko M; Ma, Guanggang; Damiani, Armando; East, Marion L; Lawrenz, Arne; Hofer, Heribert; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-09-25

    Pathogens often have a limited host range, but some can opportunistically jump to new species. Anthropogenic activities that mix reservoir species with novel, hence susceptible, species can provide opportunities for pathogens to spread beyond their normal host range. Furthermore, rapid evolution can produce new pathogens by mechanisms such as genetic recombination. Zoos unintentionally provide pathogens with a high diversity of species from different continents and habitats assembled within a confined space. Institutions alert to the problem of pathogen spread to unexpected hosts can monitor the emergence of pathogens and take preventative measures. However, asymptomatic infections can result in the causative pathogens remaining undetected in their reservoir host. Furthermore, pathogen spread to unexpected hosts may remain undiagnosed if the outcome of infection is limited, as in the case of compromised fertility, or if more severe outcomes are restricted to less charismatic species that prompt only limited investigation. We illustrate this problem here with a recombinant zebra herpesvirus infecting charismatic species including zoo polar bears over at least four years. The virus may cause fatal encephalitis and infects at least five mammalian orders, apparently without requiring direct contact with infected animals.

  16. Axisymmetric Vortices with Swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcrat, A.

    2007-11-01

    This talk is concerned with finding solutions of the Euler equations by solving elliptic boundary value problems for the Bragg-Hawthorne equation L u= -urr -(1/r)ur - = r^2f (u) + h(u). Theoretical results have been given for previously (Elcrat and Miller, Differential and Integral Equations 16(4) 2003, 949-968) for problems with swirl and general classes of profile functions f, h by iterating Lu(n+1)= rf(u)n)) + h(u(n)), and showing u(n) converges montonically to a solution. The solutions obtained depend on the initial guess, which can be thought of as prescribing level sets of the vortex. When a computational program was attempted these monotone iterations turned out to be numerically unstable, and a stable computation was acheived by fixing the moment of the cross section of a vortex in the merideanal plane. (This generalizes previous computational results in Elcrat, Fornberg and Miller, JFM 433 2001, (315-328) We obtain famillies of vortices related to vortex rings with swirl, Moffatt's generalization of Hill's vortex and tubes of vorticity with swirl wrapped around the symmetry axis. The vortices are embedded in either an irrotational flow or a flow with shear, and we deal with the transition form no swirl in the vortex to flow with only swirl, a Beltrami flow.

  17. Mixing parameters of neutral beauty mesons from the Coulomb plus power potential (CPPν)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Bhavin; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2009-11-01

    The investigation of mixing parameters in neutral B meson systems provides an important testing ground for standard model flavour dynamics. The spectroscopic parameters deduced from the potential model are used to calculate the pseudoscalar decay constant and mixing parameters of the B and Bs mesons.

  18. Vortices in spatially inhomogeneous superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Daniel E.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2004-12-01

    We study vortices in a radially inhomogeneous superfluid, as realized by a trapped degenerate Bose gas in a uniaxially symmetric potential. We show that, in contrast to a homogeneous superfluid, an off-axis vortex corresponds to an anisotropic superflow whose profile strongly depends on the distance to the trap axis. One consequence of this superflow anisotropy is vortex precession about the trap axis in the absence of an imposed rotation. In the complementary regime of a finite prescribed rotation, we compute the minimum-energy vortex density, showing that in the rapid-rotation limit it is extremely uniform, despite a strongly inhomogeneous (nearly) Thomas-Fermi condensate density ρs(r) . The weak radially dependent contribution [∝∇2lnρs(r)] to the vortex distribution, that vanishes with the number of vortices Nv as 1/Nv , arises from the interplay between vortex quantum discreteness (namely their inability to faithfully support the imposed rigid-body rotation) and the inhomogeneous superfluid density. This leads to an enhancement of the vortex density at the center of a typical concave trap, a prediction that is in quantitative agreement with recent experiments. One striking consequence of the inhomogeneous vortex distribution is an azimuthally directed, radially shearing superflow.

  19. Potential of fire extinguisher powder as a filler in bituminous mixes.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Filippo Giammaria; Moro, Antonino; Ammendola, Rachele

    2010-01-15

    Fire extinguishers must be maintained at regular intervals and many problems arise when fire-resistant dry powders need replacement. We analyze the potential of fire extinguisher powder (termed REP) as a filler in bituminous mixes. REP and REP-admixed bituminous mixes were subjected to chemical analysis, and the mechanical properties and environmental performances of the mixes were tested. Mixes with different REP contents were prepared. Mechanical performance was adequate and environmental compatibility was achieved. Practical applications and perspectives in rehabilitation, maintenance, and research are outlined.

  20. Martian polar vortices: Comparison of reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, D. W.; Toigo, A. D.; Guzewich, S. D.; Greybush, S. J.; Wilson, R. J.; Montabone, L.

    2016-09-01

    The structure and evolution of the Martian polar vortices is examined using two recently available reanalysis systems: version 1.0 of the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) and a preliminary version of the Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS). There is quantitative agreement between the reanalyses in the lower atmosphere, where Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data are assimilated, but there are differences at higher altitudes reflecting differences in the free-running general circulation model simulations used in the two reanalyses. The reanalyses show similar potential vorticity (PV) structure of the vortices: There is near-uniform small PV equatorward of the core of the westerly jet, steep meridional PV gradients on the polar side of the jet core, and a maximum of PV located off of the pole. In maps of 30 sol mean PV, there is a near-continuous elliptical ring of high PV with roughly constant shape and longitudinal orientation from fall to spring. However, the shape and orientation of the vortex varies on daily time scales, and there is not a continuous ring of PV but rather a series of smaller scale coherent regions of high PV. The PV structure of the Martian polar vortices is, as has been reported before, very different from that of Earth's stratospheric polar vortices, but there are similarities with Earth's tropospheric vortices which also occur at the edge of the Hadley Cell, and have near-uniform small PV equatorward of the jet, and a large increase of PV poleward of the jet due to increased stratification.

  1. Interaction of Atmospheric Plasma Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.; Artekha, S. N.; Erokhin, N. S.; Mikhailovskaya, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric electric fields, connected with the ionization of particles and plasma processes, occur in the fields of pressure gradients of mosaic mesh topology. Atmospheric aerosol particles play a significant role in the vortex generation. The Coriolis force and the motion of charged particles in the geomagnetic field lead to gyrotropy of the atmosphere and ionosphere. Occurrence of plasma vortices is stochastically determined for such an inhomogeneous gyrotropic medium. The geomagnetic field influences the change of structures of inhomogeneous media in the process of excitation of plasma vortices and their interaction. If colliding vortices are centered on the one geomagnetic line, the merge of vortices and the generation of a joint powerful vortex are possible. If a collision of vortices with centers at different geomagnetic field lines occurs, then the emergence of areas of heating and jet streams and the generation of new vortices are possible.

  2. Cosmological perturbations: Vorticity, isocurvature and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, I review some recent, interlinked, work undertaken using cosmological perturbation theory — a powerful technique for modeling inhomogeneities in the universe. The common theme which underpins these pieces of work is the presence of nonadiabatic pressure, or entropy, perturbations. After a brief introduction covering the standard techniques of describing inhomogeneities in both Newtonian and relativistic cosmology, I discuss the generation of vorticity. As in classical fluid mechanics, vorticity is not present in linearized perturbation theory (unless included as an initial condition). Allowing for entropy perturbations, and working to second order in perturbation theory, I show that vorticity is generated, even in the absence of vector perturbations, by purely scalar perturbations, the source term being quadratic in the gradients of first order energy density and isocurvature, or nonadiabatic pressure perturbations. This generalizes Crocco's theorem to a cosmological setting. I then introduce isocurvature perturbations in different models, focusing on the entropy perturbation in standard, concordance cosmology, and in inflationary models involving two scalar fields. As the final topic, I investigate magnetic fields, which are a potential observational consequence of vorticity in the early universe. I briefly review some recent work on including magnetic fields in perturbation theory in a consistent way. I show, using solely analytical techniques, that magnetic fields can be generated by higher order perturbations, albeit too small to provide the entire primordial seed field, in agreement with some numerical studies. I close this paper with a summary and some potential extensions of this work.

  3. A numerical study of vorticity-enhanced heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Alben, Silas

    2012-11-01

    The Glezer lab at Georgia Tech has found that vorticity produced by vibrated reeds can improve heat transfer in electronic hardware. Vortices enhance forced convection by boundary layer separation and thermal mixing in the bulk flow. In this work, we simulate the heat transfer process in a 3-dimensional plate-fin heat sink. We propose a simplified model by considering flow and temperature in a 2-D channel, and extend the model to the third dimension using a 1-D heat fin model. We simulate periodically steady-state solutions. We determine how the global Nusselt number is increased, depending on the vortices' strengths and spacings, in the parameter space of Reynolds and Peclet numbers. We find a surprising spatial oscillation of the local Nusselt number due to the vortices. Support from NSF-DMS grant 1022619 is acknowledged.

  4. A Convective Vorticity Vector Associated With Tropical Convection: A 2D Cloud-Resolving Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Shou-Ting; Ping, Fan; Li, Xiao-Fan; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Although dry/moist potential vorticity is a useful physical quantity for meteorological analysis, it cannot be applied to the analysis of 2D simulations. A convective vorticity vector (CVV) is introduced in this study to analyze 2D cloud-resolving simulation data associated with 2D tropical convection. The cloud model is forced by the vertical velocity, zonal wind, horizontal advection, and sea surface temperature obtained from the TOGA COARE, and is integrated for a selected 10-day period. The CVV has zonal and vertical components in the 2D x-z frame. Analysis of zonally-averaged and mass-integrated quantities shows that the correlation coefficient between the vertical component of the CVV and the sum of the cloud hydrometeor mixing ratios is 0.81, whereas the correlation coefficient between the zonal component and the sum of the mixing ratios is only 0.18. This indicates that the vertical component of the CVV is closely associated with tropical convection. The tendency equation for the vertical component of the CVV is derived and the zonally-averaged and mass-integrated tendency budgets are analyzed. The tendency of the vertical component of the CVV is determined by the interaction between the vorticity and the zonal gradient of cloud heating. The results demonstrate that the vertical component of the CVV is a cloud-linked parameter and can be used to study tropical convection.

  5. Interaction of ultrasound with vortices in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sonin, E.B.

    1996-04-01

    The theory of ultrasound in the mixed state of type-II superconductors is suggested which takes into account the Magnus force on vortices, the anti-Magnus force on ions, and diamagnetism of the mixed state. The acoustic Faraday effect (rotation of polarization of the transverse ultrasonic wave propagating along vortices) is linear in the Magnus force in any regime of the flux flow for wavelengths now used in the ultrasound experiments. Therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, the Faraday effect should be looked for only in clean superconductors with a strong Magnus force. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Defining and Computing Vortices Objectively from the Vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, George; Hadjighasem, Alireza; Farazmand, Mohammad; Huhn, Florian

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the notion of rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices as tubular material surfaces in which fluid elements complete equal bulk material rotation relative to the mean rotation of the fluid. We find that initial positions of such tubes coincide with tubular level surfaces of the Lagrangian-Averaged Vorticity Deviation (LAVD), the trajectory integral of the normed difference of the vorticity from its spatial mean. LAVD-based vortices turn out to be objective, i.e., invariant under time-dependent rotations and translations of the reference frame. In the limit of vanishing Rossby numbers in geostrophic flows, cyclonic LAVD vortex centers can be proven to coincide with the observed attractors for light particles. A similar result holds for heavy particles in anticyclonic LAVD vortices. We also discuss a relationship between rotationally coherent Lagrangian vortices and their instantaneous Eulerian counterparts. The latter are formed by tubular surfaces of equal material rotation rate, objectively measured by the Instantaneous Vorticity Deviation (IVD). We show how the LAVD and the IVD detect rotationally coherent Lagrangian and Eulerian vortices objectively in analytic flow models and numerical flow data.

  7. Control of Flap Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  8. Open circuit (mixed) potential changes upon contact between different inert electrodes-size and kinetic effects.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hui; Zhou, Hongjun; Percival, Stephen J; Zhang, Bo; Fan, Fu-Ren F; Bard, Allen J

    2013-01-15

    We investigate the principle of the open circuit potential (OCP) change upon a particle collision event based on mixed potential theory and confirmed by a mimic experiment in which we studied the changes in the OCP when two different electrodes (Pt and Au) are brought into contact in a solution that contains some irreversible redox couples. A micrometer-sized Au ultramicroelectrode, when connected in parallel to a Pt micro- or nanoelectrode, showed clearly measurable OCP changes whose magnitude matches well with that predicted by a simplified mixed potential theory for a pair of different electrode materials. On the basis of the study, each electrode establishes a different mixed potential involving two or more half reactions that have different heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics at different electrodes and the OCP changes are very sensitive to the relative ratio of the rate constant of the individual half reaction at different materials.

  9. Temporal evolution of vorticity staircases in randomly strained two-dimensional vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, M. R.

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of a Gaussian vortex subject to a weak-external-random n-fold multipolar strain field is examined using fully nonlinear simulations. The simulations show that at large Reynolds numbers, fine scale steps form at the periphery of the vortex, before merging, generally leaving one large step, which acts as a barrier between the vorticity within the coherent core and the surrounding, well mixed, "surf zone." It is shown for n = 2 that the width and the number of fine scale steps which initially form at the periphery of the vortex is dependent on the strain parameters, but that the range of radial values for which steps initially occur is only dependent on n and the amplitude of the strain field. A criteria is developed which can predict this range of radial values using the linear stability results of Le Dizès ["Non-axisymmetric vortices in two-dimensional flows," J. Fluid Mech. 406, 175 (2000)]. This criteria is based upon the perturbation vorticity needing to be larger than some fraction of the vorticity gradient to flatten the vortex profile. For n = 3 and 4, the radial step range is again predicted, and it is observed that for these higher wavenumbers the long lasting steps are narrower than the n = 2 case. For n = 4 the steps which form are so narrow that they do not persist very long before they are destroyed by the strain field and viscosity.

  10. Stability of streamwise vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, M. K.; Grosch, C. E.; Ash, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of some theoretical and computational studies of the stability of streamwise vortices is given. The local induction model and classical hydrodynamic vortex stability theories are discussed in some detail. The importance of the three-dimensionality of the mean velocity profile to the results of stability calculations is discussed briefly. The mean velocity profile is provided by employing the similarity solution of Donaldson and Sullivan. The global method of Bridges and Morris was chosen for the spatial stability calculations for the nonlinear eigenvalue problem. In order to test the numerical method, a second order accurate central difference scheme was used to obtain the coefficient matrices. It was shown that a second order finite difference method lacks the required accuracy for global eigenvalue calculations. Finally the problem was formulated using spectral methods and a truncated Chebyshev series.

  11. Resonant magnetic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Decanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine

    2003-04-01

    By using the complex angular momentum method, we provide a semiclassical analysis of electron scattering by a magnetic vortex of Aharonov-Bohm type. Regge poles of the S matrix are associated with surface waves orbiting around the vortex and supported by a magnetic field discontinuity. Rapid variations of sharp characteristic shapes can be observed on scattering cross sections. They correspond to quasibound states which are Breit-Wigner-type resonances associated with surface waves and which can be considered as quantum analogues of acoustic whispering-gallery modes. Such a resonant magnetic vortex could provide a different kind of artificial atom while the semiclassical approach developed here could be profitably extended in various areas of the physics of vortices.

  12. The Vortex Dynamics of Tropical Instability Waves and their Impacts on Equatorial Mixing in a Regional Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Thomas, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical instability waves (TIWs) and vortices (TIVs) in the equatorial Pacific exhibit energetic horizontal and vertical circulation characterized by regions of high Rossby number and low Richardson number. Their strong anticyclonic vorticity and vertical shear can influence the broader-scale circulation by driving lateral mixing and vertical exchange. Here we present recent modeling work aimed at understanding the vorticity and potential vorticity dynamics of TIWs and TIVs and their implications for mixing at the Equator. The anticyclonic vorticity of TIVs mixes Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) water with North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC) water within TIV cores, driving an equatorward heat flux that affects the SST budget in the cold tongue. Using Lagrangian vorticity analyses, we show that part of this anticyclonic vorticity is formed through vortex tilting of the horizontal vorticity associated with the vertical shear in the upper EUC. In turn, recent observations have shown that TIWs modulate vertical mixing in the upper EUC. We examine the vortex dynamics of this process and show that TIW induced strain can drive increases in the EUC vertical shear through horizontal vortex stretching, contributing to an increase in vertical mixing. Calculations using a simple 1D model of mixing in the EUC driven by periodic TIW strain indicate that TIWs may increase the turbulent heat flux by up to 30%, with the magnitude of the increase being sensitive to the parameterization for shear driven turbulent diffusion. These results emphasize the role of submesoscale physics in the equatorial region, which are active when both the Rossby and Richardson numbers are O(1).

  13. Evolution of Imposed Vortices Over Concave Surfaces in Hypervelocity Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, William; Austin, Joanna

    2012-11-01

    Steamwise oriented vortices in the boundary layer of a hypersonic flow have the potential to affect heat transfer and skin friction significantly. These effects can be exacerbated by the addition of extra strain rates associated with concave surface curvature. Vortices can either occur naturally (in the form of Goertler vortices), or be introduced by some form of mechanical distortion (such as a protuberance). In this work we experimentally investigate the effect of concave surface curvature on the propagation of imposed vortices. These experiments are carried out in the Hypervelocity Expansion Tube at the University of Illinois. This facility is capable of generating flows with high enthalpies (4-9MJ/kg) and Mach numbers (3-7). Using a novel, fast-response pressure sensitive paint we are able to observe the development of vortices which are induced using diamond-shaped vortex generators. Models with varying amount of surface curvature (encompassing Goertler numbers between 10-22) are used to investigate the dynamics of vortex propagation and interaction. Our results show that the vortices remain attached and of constant strength for 10-12cm (80 boundary layer thicknesses) along the curved surfaces, while on flat plates the vortices are no longer apparent within 6 cm downstream.

  14. Baroclinic Vortices in Rotating Stratified Shearing Flows: Cyclones, Anticyclones, and Zombie Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram

    infer the height and internal stratification of some astrophysical and geophysical vortices because direct measurements of their vertical structures are difficult. In Chapter 3, we show numerically and experimentally that localized suction in rotating continuously stratified flows produces three-dimensional baroclinic cyclones. As expected from Chapter 2, the interiors of these cyclones are super-stratified. Suction, modeled as a small spherical sink in the simulations, creates an anisotropic flow toward the sink with directional dependence changing with the ratio of the Coriolis parameter to the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. Around the sink, this flow generates cyclonic vorticity and deflects isopycnals so that the interior of the cyclone becomes super-stratified. The super-stratified region is visualized in the companion experiments that we helped to design and analyze using the synthetic schlieren technique. Once the suction stops, the cyclones decay due to viscous dissipation in the simulations and experiments. The numerical results show that the vertical velocity of viscously decaying cyclones flows away from the cyclone's midplane, while the radial velocity flows toward the cyclone's center. This observation is explained based on the cyclo-geostrophic balance. This vertical velocity mixes the flow inside and outside of cyclone and reduces the super-stratification. We speculate that the predominance of anticyclones in geophysical and astrophysical flows is due to the fact that anticyclones require sub-stratification, which occurs naturally by mixing, while cyclones require super-stratification. In Chapter 4, we show that a previously unknown instability creates space-filling lattices of 3D turbulent baroclinic vortices in linearly-stable, rotating, stratified shear flows. The instability starts from a newly discovered family of easily-excited critical layers. This new family, named the baroclinic critical layer, has singular vertical velocities; the traditional family

  15. Motion of multiple helical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2015-11-01

    In 1912 Joukowsky deduced that in an unbounded ideal fluid a set of helical vortices--when these are equal, coaxial and symmetrically arranged--would translate and rotate steadily while the vortices preserve their form and relative position. Each vortex is an infinite tube whose cross-section is circular (with radius a) and whose centerline is a helix of pitch L and radius R. The motion is thus determined by three non-dimensional parameters only: the number of vortices N, the vortex radius α = a / R and the vortex pitch τ = L / 2 πR . Here, we express the linear and angular velocities of the vortices as the sum of the mutually induced velocities found by Okulov (2004) and the self-induced velocities found by Velasco Fuentes (2015). We verified that our results are accurate over the whole range of values of the vortices' pitch and radius by numerically computing the vortex motion with two smoothed versions of the Biot-Savart law. It was found that the translation velocity U grows with the number of vortices (N) but decreases as the vortices' radius and pitch (a and τ, respectively) increase; in contrast, the rotation velocity Ω grows with N and a but has a local minimum around τ = 1 for fixed values of N and a.

  16. On Multiple-Layered Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to find ways to make vortex flow fields decompose more quickly, photographs and observations are presented of vortex flow fields that indicate the presence of multiple layers of fluid rotating about a common axis. A survey of the literature indicates that multiple-layered vortices form in waterspouts, tornadoes and lift-generated vortices of aircraft. An explanation for the appearance of multiple-layered structures in vortices is suggested. The observations and data presented are intended to improve the understanding of the formation and persistence of vortex flow fields.

  17. A unified potential-based cohesive model of mixed-mode fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Roesler, Jeffery R.

    2009-06-01

    A generalized potential-based constitutive model for mixed-mode cohesive fracture is presented in conjunction with physical parameters such as fracture energy, cohesive strength and shape of cohesive interactions. It characterizes different fracture energies in each fracture mode, and can be applied to various material failure behavior (e.g. quasi-brittle). The unified potential leads to both intrinsic (with initial slope indicators to control elastic behavior) and extrinsic cohesive zone models. Path dependence of work-of-separation is investigated with respect to proportional and non-proportional paths—this investigation demonstrates consistency of the cohesive constitutive model. The potential-based model is verified by simulating a mixed-mode bending test. The actual potential is named PPR (Park-Paulino-Roesler), after the first initials of the authors' last names.

  18. On sharp vorticity gradients in elongating baroclinic eddies and their stabilization with a solid-body rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutyrin, Georgi G.

    2016-06-01

    Wide compensated vortices are not able to remain circular in idealized two-layer models unless the ocean depth is assumed to be unrealistically large. Small perturbations on both cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies grow slower if a middle layer with uniform potential vorticity (PV) is added, owing to a weakening of the vertical coupling between the upper and lower layers and a reduction of the PV gradient in the deep layer. Numerical simulations show that the nonlinear development of the most unstable elliptical mode causes self-elongation of the upper vortex core and splitting of the deep PV anomaly into two corotating parts. The emerging tripolar flow pattern in the lower layer results in self-intensification of the fluid rotation in the water column around the vortex center. Further vortex evolution depends on the model parameters and initial conditions, which limits predictability owing to multiple equilibrium attractors existing in the dynamical system. The vortex core strips thin filaments, which roll up into submesoscale vortices to result in substantial mixing at the vortex periphery. Stirring and damping of vorticity by bottom friction are found to be essential for subsequent vortex stabilization. The development of sharp PV gradients leads to nearly solid-body rotation inside the vortex core and formation of transport barriers at the vortex periphery. These processes have important implications for understanding the longevity of real-ocean eddies.

  19. Four-wave mixing microscopy: a high potential nonlinear imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmke, Tobias; Knebl, Andreas; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present non-resonant four-wave mixing microscopy as an additional contrast mechanism in nonlinear microscopy. The setup for this technique was based on a commercially available multiphoton microscope setup equipped with a titanium:sapphire-laser and an optical parametric oscillator as light sources. Fundamental system characteristics with respect to the spatio-temporal pulse overlap and the influence of aberrations on the process are presented. Experiments regarding the directionality of the four-wave mixing signal performed on fresh porcine meat showed an average ratio of the backward to forward signal mean intensity of 0.16 +/- 0.01. Nevertheless, structural information is comparable for both detection modalities. This highlights the potential of four-wave mixing microscopy for in vivo applications. Furthermore, results on porcine meat show the additional contrast generated by four-wave mixing. In summary, the results show a great potential of non-resonant four-wave mixing microscopy as label-free imaging modality in the biomedical sciences.

  20. Two-particle vortices in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnoi, Mikhail; Downing, Charles

    We show that a pair of two-dimensional massless Dirac-Weyl fermions can form a bound state independently on the sign of the inter-particle interaction potential, as long as this potential decays at large distances faster than Kepler's inverse distance law. The coupling occurs only at the Dirac point, when the charge carriers lose their chirality. These bipartite states must have a non-zero internal angular momentum, meaning that they only exist as stationary vortices. This leads to the emergence of a new type of energetically-favorable quasiparticles: double-charged zero-energy vortices. Their bosonic nature allows condensation and gives rise to Majorana physics without invoking a superconductor. The presence of dark-matter-like silent immobile vortices explains a range of poorly understood experiments in gated graphene structures at low doping. This work was supported by EU H2020 RISE project CoExAN, EU FP7 ITN NOTEDEV and FP7 IRSES project InterNoM.

  1. Comparing the dynamics of skyrmions and superconducting vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Lin, S. Z.; Ray, D.; Reichhardt, C.

    2014-08-01

    Vortices in type-II superconductors have attracted enormous attention as ideal systems in which to study nonequilibrium collective phenomena, since the self-ordering of the vortices competes with quenched disorder and thermal effects. Dynamic effects found in vortex systems include depinning, nonequilibrium phase transitions, creep, structural order-disorder transitions, and melting. Understanding vortex dynamics is also important for applications of superconductors which require the vortices either to remain pinned or to move in a controlled fashion. Recently, topological defects called skyrmions have been realized experimentally in chiral magnets. Here we highlight similarities and differences between skyrmion dynamics and vortex dynamics. Many of the previous ideas and experimental setups that have been applied to superconducting vortices can also be used to study skyrmions. We also discuss some of the differences between the two systems, such as the potentially large contribution of the Magnus force in the skyrmion system that can dramatically alter the dynamics and transport properties.

  2. Computation of streamwise vorticity in a compressible flow of a winglet nozzle-based COIL device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Gaurav; Dawar, A. L.; Subbarao, P. M. V.; Endo, M.

    2008-02-01

    Chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) is a high-power laser with potential applications in both military as well as in the industry. COIL is the only chemical laser based on electronic transition with a wavelength of 1.315 μm, which falls in the near-infrared (IR) range. Thus, COIL beam can also be transported via optical fibers for remote applications such as dismantling of nuclear reactors. The efficiency of a supersonic COIL is essentially a function of mixing specially in systems employing cross-stream injection of the secondary lasing ( I2) flow in supersonic regime into the primary pumping (O 21Δ g) flow. Streamwise vorticity has been proven to be among the most effective manner of enhancing mixing and has been utilized in jet engines for thrust augmentation, noise reduction, supersonic combustion, etc. Therefore, a computational study of the generation of streamwise vorticity in the supersonic flow field of a COIL device employing a winglet nozzle with various delta wing angles of 5°, 10°, and 22.5° has been carried out. The study predicts a typical Mach number of approximately 1.75 for all the winglet geometries. The analysis also confirms that the winglet geometry doubles up both as a nozzle and as a vortex generator. The region of maximum turbulence and fully developed streamwise vortices is observed to occur close to the exit, at x/ λ of 0.5, of the winglets making it the most suitable region for secondary flow injection for achieving efficient mixing. The predicted length scale of the scalloped mixer formed by the winglet nozzle is 4 λ. Also, the winglet nozzle with 10° lobe angle is most suitable from the point of view of mixing developing cross-stream velocity of 120 m/s with acceptable pressure drop of 0.7 Torr. The winglet geometry with 5° lobe angle is associated with a low cross-stream velocity of 60 m/s, whereas the one with 22.5° lobe angle is associated with a large static and total pressure drop of 1.87 and 9.37 Torr, respectively

  3. Vortical susceptibility of finite-density QCD matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristova, A.; Frenklakh, D.; Gorsky, A.; Kharzeev, D.

    2016-10-01

    The susceptibility of finite-density QCD matter to vorticity is introduced, as an analog of magnetic susceptibility. It describes the spin polarization of quarks and antiquarks in finite-density QCD matter induced by rotation. We estimate this quantity in the chirally broken phase using the mixed gauge-gravity anomaly at finite baryon density. It is proposed that the vortical susceptibility of QCD matter is responsible for the polarization of Λ and overline{Λ} hyperons observed recently in heavy ion collisions at RHIC by the STAR collaboration.

  4. Baroclinic Vortices in Rotating Stratified Shearing Flows: Cyclones, Anticyclones, and Zombie Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram

    infer the height and internal stratification of some astrophysical and geophysical vortices because direct measurements of their vertical structures are difficult. In Chapter 3, we show numerically and experimentally that localized suction in rotating continuously stratified flows produces three-dimensional baroclinic cyclones. As expected from Chapter 2, the interiors of these cyclones are super-stratified. Suction, modeled as a small spherical sink in the simulations, creates an anisotropic flow toward the sink with directional dependence changing with the ratio of the Coriolis parameter to the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. Around the sink, this flow generates cyclonic vorticity and deflects isopycnals so that the interior of the cyclone becomes super-stratified. The super-stratified region is visualized in the companion experiments that we helped to design and analyze using the synthetic schlieren technique. Once the suction stops, the cyclones decay due to viscous dissipation in the simulations and experiments. The numerical results show that the vertical velocity of viscously decaying cyclones flows away from the cyclone's midplane, while the radial velocity flows toward the cyclone's center. This observation is explained based on the cyclo-geostrophic balance. This vertical velocity mixes the flow inside and outside of cyclone and reduces the super-stratification. We speculate that the predominance of anticyclones in geophysical and astrophysical flows is due to the fact that anticyclones require sub-stratification, which occurs naturally by mixing, while cyclones require super-stratification. In Chapter 4, we show that a previously unknown instability creates space-filling lattices of 3D turbulent baroclinic vortices in linearly-stable, rotating, stratified shear flows. The instability starts from a newly discovered family of easily-excited critical layers. This new family, named the baroclinic critical layer, has singular vertical velocities; the traditional family

  5. Managing Flap Vortices via Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management by means of boundary layer separation control. Passive control was achieved using a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressures, was used to predict vortex characteristics based on inviscid rollup relations and vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over either outboard or inboard edge vortices while producing small lift and moment excursions. Unsteady surface pressures indicated that dynamic separation and attachment control can be exploited to perturb vortices at wavelengths shorter than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  6. On the actual cathode mixed potential in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, M.; Bisello, A.; Baricci, A.; Rabissi, C.; Brightman, E.; Hinds, G.; Casalegno, A.

    2016-09-01

    Methanol crossover is one of the most critical issues hindering commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells since it leads to waste of fuel and significantly affects cathode potential, forming a so-called mixed potential. Unfortunately, due to the sluggish anode kinetics, it is not possible to obtain a reliable estimation of cathode potential by simply measuring the cell voltage. In this work we address this limitation, quantifying the mixed potential by means of innovative open circuit voltage (OCV) tests with a methanol-hydrogen mixture fed to the anode. Over a wide range of operating conditions, the resulting cathode overpotential is between 250 and 430 mV and is strongly influenced by methanol crossover. We show using combined experimental and modelling analysis of cathode impedance that the methanol oxidation at the cathode mainly follows an electrochemical pathway. Finally, reference electrode measurements at both cathode inlet and outlet provide a local measurement of cathode potential, confirming the reliability of the innovative OCV tests and permitting the evaluation of cathode potential up to typical operating current. At 0.25 A cm-2 the operating cathode potential is around 0.85 V and the Ohmic drop through the catalyst layer is almost 50 mV, which is comparable to that in the membrane.

  7. Effect of Trapping on Vortices in Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, H.; Shah, H. A.; Tsintsadze, N. L.

    2008-09-01

    Microscopic trapping of electrons is considered in one- and two-dimensional potential wells (shallow and deep) and its effect on vortex formation is investigated by deriving modified Hasegawa Mima (HM) equations. Inhomogenieties in the number density and magnetic field are taken into account. The modified HM equations are analysed by considering bounce frequencies of the trapped particles. Solitary vortices are obtained via Kortweg deVries (KdV) type of equations and both exact and Sagdeev potential solutions are obtained. In general it is observed that trapping produces stronger non-linearities and this leads to the modification of the original HM equation.

  8. Electrokinetic mixing at high zeta potentials: ionic size effects on cross stream diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian Yazdi, Alireza; Sadeghi, Arman; Saidi, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-03-15

    The electrokinetic phenomena at high zeta potentials may show several unique features which are not normally observed. One of these features is the ionic size (steric) effect associated with the solutions of high ionic concentration. In the present work, attention is given to the influences of finite ionic size on the cross stream diffusion process in an electrokinetically actuated Y-shaped micromixer. The method consists of a finite difference based numerical approach for non-uniform grid which is applied to the dimensionless form of the governing equations, including the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The results reveal that, neglecting the ionic size at high zeta potentials gives rise to the overestimation of the mixing length, because the steric effects retard liquid flow, thereby enhancing the mixing efficiency. The importance of steric effects is found to be more intense for channels of smaller width to height ratio. It is also observed that, in sharp contrast to the conditions that the ions are treated as point charges, increasing the zeta potential improves the cross stream diffusion when incorporating the ionic size. Moreover, increasing the EDL thickness decreases the mixing length, whereas the opposite is true for the channel aspect ratio. PMID:25514643

  9. How rotational vortices enhance transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffani, D.; Rognon, P.; Metzger, B.; Einav, I.

    2013-09-01

    Inspired by recent observations of granular flow, we examine how rotational vortices contribute to heat or mass transfer enhancement in a fluid. We use a tracer method to simulate both diffusion and advection in systems of differing intrinsic diffusivities D0, vortex sizes R, vortex rotation frequencies f, and vortex lifetimes ℓ. The results reveal that these systems exhibit an effective diffusive behavior, characterized by an effective diffusivity Deff. A striking finding is the existence of two regimes, dichotomised by the Péclet number Pe = R2f/D0. When the Péclet number is less than one, there is no transfer enhancement, Deff = D0. For higher values, vortices produce some transfer enhancement with a corresponding power law Deff/D0 ≈ Pen. The power n ranges from a lower bound of 0.5 for stationary vortices of lifetime infinity, to an upper bound of 1 for vortices of lifetimes shorter than half a rotation. This difference is attributed to two different internal mechanisms involving the coupling of diffusion and advection. These results could provide new insights on the transfer properties of fluid systems comprising rotational vortices, such as granular materials, suspensions, foams, and emulsions, as well as low Reynolds number stirred flows.

  10. Filamentation with nonlinear Bessel vortices.

    PubMed

    Jukna, V; Milián, C; Xie, C; Itina, T; Dudley, J; Courvoisier, F; Couairon, A

    2014-10-20

    We present a new type of ring-shaped filaments featured by stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions to the laser beam propagation equation. Two different regimes are identified by direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear propagation of axicon focused Gaussian beams carrying helicity in a Kerr medium with multiphoton absorption: the stable nonlinear propagation regime corresponds to a slow beam reshaping into one of the stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions, called nonlinear Bessel vortices. The region of existence of nonlinear Bessel vortices is found semi-analytically. The influence of the Kerr nonlinearity and nonlinear losses on the beam shape is presented. Direct numerical simulations highlight the role of attractors played by nonlinear Bessel vortices in the stable propagation regime. Large input powers or small cone angles lead to the unstable propagation regime where nonlinear Bessel vortices break up into an helical multiple filament pattern or a more irregular structure. Nonlinear Bessel vortices are shown to be sufficiently intense to generate a ring-shaped filamentary ionized channel in the medium which is foreseen as opening the way to novel applications in laser material processing of transparent dielectrics. PMID:25401574

  11. Computational simulations of vorticity enhanced diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, Erik L.

    1999-11-01

    Computer simulations are used to investigate a phenomenon of vorticity enhanced diffusion (VED), a net transport and mixing of a passive scalar across a prescribed vortex flow field driven by a background gradient in the scalar quantity. The central issue under study here is the increase in scalar flux down the gradient and across the vortex field. The numerical scheme uses cylindrical coordinates centered with the vortex flow which allows an exact advective solution and 1D or 2D diffusion using simple numerical methods. In the results, the ratio of transport across a localized vortex region in the presence of the vortex flow over that expected for diffusion alone is evaluated as a measure of VED. This ratio is seen to increase dramatically while the absolute flux across the vortex decreases slowly as the diffusion coefficient is decreased. Similar results are found and compared for varying diffusion coefficient, D, or vortex rotation time, τv, for a constant background gradient in the transported scalar vs an interface in the transported quantity, and for vortex flow fields constant in time vs flow which evolves in time from an initial state and with a Schmidt number of order unity. A simple analysis shows that for a small diffusion coefficient, the flux ratio measure of VED scales as the vortex radius over the thickness for mass diffusion in a viscous shear layer within the vortex characterized by (Dτv)1/2. The phenomenon is linear as investigated here and suggests that a significant enhancement of mixing in fluids may be a relatively simple linear process. Discussion touches on how this vorticity enhanced diffusion may be related to mixing in nonlinear turbulent flows.

  12. Mixed cropping has the potential to enhance flood tolerance of drought-adapted grain crops.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Morio; Awala, Simon K; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Kawato, Yoshimasa; Fujioka, Yuichiro; Yamane, Koji; Wada, Kaede C

    2016-03-15

    Recently, the occurrences of extreme flooding and drought, often in the same areas, have increased due to climate change. Wetland plant species are known to oxygenate their rhizospheres by releasing oxygen (O2) from their roots. We tested the hypothesis that wetland species could help upland species under flood conditions; that is, O2 released from the wetland crop roots would ameliorate rhizosphere O2-deficient stress and hence facilitate upland crop root function. Flooding tolerance of upland-adapted staple crops-pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mix-cropped with rice (Oryza spp.) was investigated in glasshouse and laboratory. We found a phenomenon that strengthens the flood tolerance of upland crops when two species-one wetland and one drought tolerant-were grown using the mixed cropping technique that results in close tangling of their root systems. This technique improved the photosynthetic and transpiration rates of upland crops subjected to flood stress (O2-deficient nutrient culture). Shoot relative growth rates during the flooding period (24 days) tended to be higher under mixed cropping compared with single cropping. Radial oxygen loss from the wetland crop roots might be contributed to the phenomenon observed. Mixed cropping of wet and dryland crops is a new concept that has the potential to overcome flood stress under variable environmental conditions. PMID:26803216

  13. Potential performance of pillared inorgano- organo bentonite for soil mix technology permeable reactive barrier (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abunada, Z. M.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2013-12-01

    Modified bentonite has gained more interest for their effect in contaminant removal and environmental protection. This study is investigating the use of three different modified inorgano-organo bentonite (IOB) in soil mixing permeable reactive barrier. IOB were prepared using pillaring agents and quaternary ammonium cations (QAC) with different loading ratios. The permeabilities of compacted specimens containing IOB with two different soil types (sandy and gravelly soil) were measured for site contaminated groundwater, pure water and TEX compounds to study the potential of soil mix permeable reactive barrier (PRB). The soil permeability decreased by 1-2 order of magnitude once mixed with IOB. It also decreased by about 100 in case of TEX compound and site groundwater. The IOB was tested to remove Toluene, Ethyl-benzene, and o-Xylene (TEX) compound from model contaminated water in both batch and column test. Physical characteristics such as pore volume, porosity and specific structure in addition to level of surfactant loading were determined. Materials removal efficiency varied due to the surfactant loading, soil type and contaminant molecular weight. Sorption isotherm showed that the adsorbates preference increased in the order of T>E>X in all IOB types. Maximum TEX compound sorptive capacity varied also due to soil type with the highest was 86.89% 93.19% and 90.2% for T,E,X respectively on sandy soil. Key words: Inorgano-organo bentonite, permeability, reactive barrier, soil mix, sorption

  14. Superconducting vortices in semilocal models.

    PubMed

    Forgács, Péter; Reuillon, Sébastien; Volkov, Mikhail S

    2006-02-01

    It is shown that the SU(2) semilocal model--the Abelian Higgs model with two complex scalars--admits a new class of stationary, straight string solutions carrying a persistent current and having finite energy per unit length. In the plane orthogonal to their direction they correspond to a nontrivial deformation of the embedded Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) vortices by the current flowing through them. The new solutions bifurcate with the ANO vortices in the limit of vanishing current. They can be either static or stationary. In the stationary case, the relative phase of the two scalars rotates at constant velocity, giving rise to an electric field and angular momentum, while the energy remains finite. The new static vortex solutions have lower energy than the ANO vortices and could be of considerable importance in various physical systems (from condensed matter to cosmic strings).

  15. Superconducting Vortices in Semilocal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Reuillon, Sébastien; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2006-02-01

    It is shown that the SU(2) semilocal model—the Abelian Higgs model with two complex scalars—admits a new class of stationary, straight string solutions carrying a persistent current and having finite energy per unit length. In the plane orthogonal to their direction they correspond to a nontrivial deformation of the embedded Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) vortices by the current flowing through them. The new solutions bifurcate with the ANO vortices in the limit of vanishing current. They can be either static or stationary. In the stationary case, the relative phase of the two scalars rotates at constant velocity, giving rise to an electric field and angular momentum, while the energy remains finite. The new static vortex solutions have lower energy than the ANO vortices and could be of considerable importance in various physical systems (from condensed matter to cosmic strings).

  16. Hairpin Vortices: Autogeneration and Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Maharjan, Rijan; Sanders, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The regeneration of hairpin vortices is examined in a free-surface water channel where vortices are artificially generated by means of injection in a laminar boundary layer. The process is visualized with dye and hydrogen bubble-wire techniques. The strength of an isolated hairpin required to begin the autogeneration process is established by means of PIV measurements on the symmetry plane. Because hairpins are in close proximity in a fully-turbulent boundary layer, two hairpins are generated at different streamwise locations and allowed to interact at different stages of development. The relative position, strength and maturity of the interacting hairpins that generate secondary vortices are examined. The morphology of the generation process and of the resulting secondary hairpin for both the isolated and interacting cases are discussed and compared to previous work. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1040236.

  17. Spinning gas clouds - without vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffet, B.

    2000-06-01

    Ovsiannikov and Dyson have considered an ordinary differential reduction of the gas-dynamical equations for an ideal gas which is adiabatically expanding and rotating. Gaffet has shown, based on its Painlevé property, the complete integrability of that ellipsoidal gas cloud model, when there is neither rotation nor vorticity and the gas is monatomic (γ = 5/3), and has conjectured that the integrability might persist in more general cases including rotation. In this paper we show that the presence of vorticity in general destroys the integrability property, but the conjecture is otherwise verified, under the simplifying assumption of rotation around a fixed axis. In a future work we hope to extend the present result to Dyson's most general spinning gas cloud without vorticity.

  18. Superconducting vortices in semilocal models.

    PubMed

    Forgács, Péter; Reuillon, Sébastien; Volkov, Mikhail S

    2006-02-01

    It is shown that the SU(2) semilocal model--the Abelian Higgs model with two complex scalars--admits a new class of stationary, straight string solutions carrying a persistent current and having finite energy per unit length. In the plane orthogonal to their direction they correspond to a nontrivial deformation of the embedded Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) vortices by the current flowing through them. The new solutions bifurcate with the ANO vortices in the limit of vanishing current. They can be either static or stationary. In the stationary case, the relative phase of the two scalars rotates at constant velocity, giving rise to an electric field and angular momentum, while the energy remains finite. The new static vortex solutions have lower energy than the ANO vortices and could be of considerable importance in various physical systems (from condensed matter to cosmic strings). PMID:16486806

  19. Bounded solutions of fermions in the background of mixed vector-scalar inversely linear potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Antonio S. de . E-mail: castro@feg.unesp.br

    2005-04-01

    The problem of a fermion subject to a general mixing of vector and scalar potentials in a two-dimensional world is mapped into a Sturm-Liouville problem. Isolated bounded solutions are also searched. For the specific case of an inversely linear potential, which gives rise to an effective Kratzer potential in the Sturm-Liouville problem, exact bounded solutions are found in closed form. The case of a pure scalar potential with their isolated zero-energy solutions, already analyzed in a previous work, is obtained as a particular case. The behavior of the upper and lower components of the Dirac spinor is discussed in detail and some unusual results are revealed. The nonrelativistic limit of our results adds a new support to the conclusion that even-parity solutions to the nonrelativistic one-dimensional hydrogen atom do not exist.

  20. Theoretical studies in mesoscale jets and vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radko, Timour

    1997-11-01

    Mesoscale vortices in the mid-ocean are known to move large distances without loss of coherence, preserving their speed and (usually westward) direction. Still open are the questions of how an eddy is able to preserve its structure during many turnaround times and what is the role in this process of the specific perturbations of the circular basic state. To investigate the effect of the rectilinear motion of the isolated eddies, we construct several analytical steady state models and examine the realizability in time of those solutions using the initial-value numerical calculations. To gain a preliminary understanding of the process, we first consider the barotropic f-plane model. It is demonstrated using linearized (about the circular basic state) calculations that for almost any eddy with compact basic velocity we can find a small amplitude disturbance of the first azimuthal harmonic (m=1 mode) that results in the rectilinear motion of an eddy. If such a disturbance is sufficiently small, the vortex can propagate many diameters away from its origin, as shown by a weak non-linear theory. This conclusion is confirmed by the spectral calculations using the full two dimensional vorticity equation. A more realistic representation of the ocean eddies is given by the equivalent-barotropic model, which includes effects of the passive lower layer and the ambient potential vorticity gradient (the beta-effect). Analytical theory is developed to construct a wide class of stable quasi-monopolar vortecies propagating in the westward direction with the supercritical (U<{-}beta Rsbsp{d}{2}) velocities. A remarkable similarity is found between the structure of the solutions in barotropic and equivalent-barotropic models for all values of the propagation velocity. The numerical spectral calculations, initiated by our analytical solutions, indicate that the (supercritical) vortices initially move with the predicted velocity, but later slow down to the speed of the long planetary

  1. Vortices in Spatially Inhomogeneous Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Daniel E.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2004-03-01

    Trapped degenerate Bose gases exhibit superfluidity with spatially nonuniform superfluid density. We study the vortex distribution in such rotating nonuniform superfluids, focusing particularly on deviations from a uniform distribution corresponding to an average rigid-body rotation. The origin of such deviations is the discrete way in which vortices impart angular momentum to the superfluid. This effect favors highest vortex density in regions where the superfluid density is most uniform, i.e., at the center of a trap, while tending to decrease the overall number of vortices. Supported by NSF DMR-0321848 and the Packard Foundation.

  2. Interaction of half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Minoru; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Nitta, Muneto; Takeuchi, Hiromitsu; Tsubota, Makoto

    2011-06-15

    We study the asymptotic interaction between two half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. When two vortices in different components are placed at distance 2R, the leading order of the force between them is found to be (lnR/{xi}-1/2)/R{sup 3}, in contrast to 1/R between vortices placed in the same component. We derive it analytically using the Abrikosov ansatz and the profile functions of the vortices, confirmed numerically with the Gross-Pitaevskii model. We also find that the short-range cutoff of the intervortex potential linearly depends on the healing length.

  3. Review of LLNL Mixed Waste Streams for the Application of Potential Waste Reduction Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Belue, A; Fischer, R P

    2007-01-08

    In July 2004, LLNL adopted the International Standard ISO 14001 as a Work Smart Standard in lieu of DOE Order 450.1. In support of this new requirement the Director issued a new environmental policy that was documented in Section 3.0 of Document 1.2, ''ES&H Policies of LLNL'', in the ES&H Manual. In recent years the Environmental Management System (EMS) process has become formalized as LLNL adopted ISO 14001 as part of the contract under which the laboratory is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE). On May 9, 2005, LLNL revised its Integrated Safety Management System Description to enhance existing environmental requirements to meet ISO 14001. Effective October 1, 2005, each new project or activity is required to be evaluated from an environmental aspect, particularly if a potential exists for significant environmental impacts. Authorizing organizations are required to consider the management of all environmental aspects, the applicable regulatory requirements, and reasonable actions that can be taken to reduce negative environmental impacts. During 2006, LLNL has worked to implement the corrective actions addressing the deficiencies identified in the DOE/LSO audit. LLNL has begun to update the present EMS to meet the requirements of ISO 14001:2004. The EMS commits LLNL--and each employee--to responsible stewardship of all the environmental resources in our care. The generation of mixed radioactive waste was identified as a significant environmental aspect. Mixed waste for the purposes of this report is defined as waste materials containing both hazardous chemical and radioactive constituents. Significant environmental aspects require that an Environmental Management Plan (EMP) be developed. The objective of the EMP developed for mixed waste (EMP-005) is to evaluate options for reducing the amount of mixed waste generated. This document presents the findings of the evaluation of mixed waste generated at LLNL and a proposed plan for reduction.

  4. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  5. Detecting single-trial EEG evoked potential using a wavelet domain linear mixed model: application to error potentials classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinnato, J.; Roubaud, M.-C.; Burle, B.; Torrésani, B.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The main goal of this work is to develop a model for multisensor signals, such as magnetoencephalography or electroencephalography (EEG) signals that account for inter-trial variability, suitable for corresponding binary classification problems. An important constraint is that the model be simple enough to handle small size and unbalanced datasets, as often encountered in BCI-type experiments. Approach. The method involves the linear mixed effects statistical model, wavelet transform, and spatial filtering, and aims at the characterization of localized discriminant features in multisensor signals. After discrete wavelet transform and spatial filtering, a projection onto the relevant wavelet and spatial channels subspaces is used for dimension reduction. The projected signals are then decomposed as the sum of a signal of interest (i.e., discriminant) and background noise, using a very simple Gaussian linear mixed model. Main results. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, the corresponding parameter estimation problem is simplified. Robust estimates of class-covariance matrices are obtained from small sample sizes and an effective Bayes plug-in classifier is derived. The approach is applied to the detection of error potentials in multichannel EEG data in a very unbalanced situation (detection of rare events). Classification results prove the relevance of the proposed approach in such a context. Significance. The combination of the linear mixed model, wavelet transform and spatial filtering for EEG classification is, to the best of our knowledge, an original approach, which is proven to be effective. This paper improves upon earlier results on similar problems, and the three main ingredients all play an important role.

  6. Stationary states of fermions in a sign potential with a mixed vector–scalar coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Castilho, W.M. Castro, A.S. de

    2014-01-15

    The scattering of a fermion in the background of a sign potential is considered with a general mixing of vector and scalar Lorentz structures with the scalar coupling stronger than or equal to the vector coupling under the Sturm–Liouville perspective. When the vector coupling and the scalar coupling have different magnitudes, an isolated solution shows that the fermion under a strong potential can be trapped in a highly localized region without manifestation of Klein’s paradox. It is also shown that the lonely bound-state solution disappears asymptotically as one approaches the conditions for the realization of spin and pseudospin symmetries. -- Highlights: •Scattering of fermions in a sign potential assessed under a Sturm–Liouville perspective. •An isolated bounded solution. •No pair production despite the high localization. •No bounded solution under exact spin and pseudospin symmetries.

  7. Stochastic Vorticity and Associated Filtering Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Amirdjanova, A.; Kallianpur, G.

    2002-12-19

    The focus of this work is on a two-dimensional stochastic vorticity equation for an incompressible homogeneous viscous fluid. We consider a signed measure-valued stochastic partial differential equation for a vorticity process based on the Skorohod-Ito evolution of a system of N randomly moving point vortices. A nonlinear filtering problem associated with the evolution of the vorticity is considered and a corresponding Fujisaki-Kallianpur-Kunita stochastic differential equation for the optimal filter is derived.

  8. Combustor with multistage internal vortices

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Yu; Harrington, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    A fluidized bed combustor is provided with a multistage arrangement of vortex generators in the freeboard area. The vortex generators are provided by nozzle means which extend into the interior of the freeboard for forming vortices within the freeboard areas to enhance the combustion of particulate material entrained in product gases ascending into the freeboard from the fluidized bed. Each of the nozzles are radially inwardly spaced from the combustor walls defining the freeboard to provide for the formation of an essentially vortex-free, vertically extending annulus about the vortices whereby the particulate material centrifuged from the vortices against the inner walls of the combustor is returned through the annulus to the fluidized bed. By adjusting the vortex pattern within the freeboard, a significant portion of the full cross-sectional area of the freeboard except for the peripheral annulus can be contacted with the turbulent vortical flow for removing the particulate material from the gaseous products and also for enhancing the combustion thereof within the freeboard. 2 figs.

  9. Combustor with multistage internal vortices

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.; Harrington, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor is provided with a multistage arrangement of vortex generators in the freeboard area. The vortex generators are provided by nozzle means which extend into the interior of the freeboard for forming vortices within the freeboard area to enhance the combustion of particulate material entrained in product gases ascending into the freeboard from the fluidized bed. Each of the nozzles are radially inwardly spaced from the combustor walls defining the freeboard to provide for the formation of an essentially vortex-free, vertically extending annulus about the vortices whereby the particulate material centrifuged from the vortices against the inner walls of the combustor is returned through the annulus to the fluidized bed. By adjusting the vortex pattern within the freeboard, a significant portion of the full cross-sectional area of the freeboard except for the peripheral annulus can be contacted with the turbulent vortical flow for removing the particulate material from the gaseous products and also for enhancing the combustion thereof within the freeboard.

  10. Mixed variational potentials and inherent symmetries of the Cahn-Hilliard theory of diffusive phase separation.

    PubMed

    Miehe, C; Hildebrand, F E; Böger, L

    2014-04-01

    This work shows that the Cahn-Hilliard theory of diffusive phase separation is related to an intrinsic mixed variational principle that determines the rate of concentration and the chemical potential. The principle characterizes a canonically compact model structure, where the two balances involved for the species content and microforce appear as the Euler equations of a variational statement. The existence of the variational principle underlines an inherent symmetry in the two-field representation of the Cahn-Hilliard theory. This can be exploited in the numerical implementation by the construction of time- and space-discrete incremental potentials, which fully determine the update problems of typical time-stepping procedures. The mixed variational principles provide the most fundamental approach to the finite-element solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation based on low-order basis functions, leading to monolithic symmetric algebraic systems of iterative update procedures based on a linearization of the nonlinear problem. They induce in a natural format the choice of symmetric solvers for Newton-type iterative updates, providing a speed-up and reduction of data storage when compared with non-symmetric implementations. In this sense, the potentials developed are believed to be fundamental ingredients to a deeper understanding of the Cahn-Hilliard theory. PMID:24711722

  11. Mixed variational potentials and inherent symmetries of the Cahn-Hilliard theory of diffusive phase separation.

    PubMed

    Miehe, C; Hildebrand, F E; Böger, L

    2014-04-01

    This work shows that the Cahn-Hilliard theory of diffusive phase separation is related to an intrinsic mixed variational principle that determines the rate of concentration and the chemical potential. The principle characterizes a canonically compact model structure, where the two balances involved for the species content and microforce appear as the Euler equations of a variational statement. The existence of the variational principle underlines an inherent symmetry in the two-field representation of the Cahn-Hilliard theory. This can be exploited in the numerical implementation by the construction of time- and space-discrete incremental potentials, which fully determine the update problems of typical time-stepping procedures. The mixed variational principles provide the most fundamental approach to the finite-element solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation based on low-order basis functions, leading to monolithic symmetric algebraic systems of iterative update procedures based on a linearization of the nonlinear problem. They induce in a natural format the choice of symmetric solvers for Newton-type iterative updates, providing a speed-up and reduction of data storage when compared with non-symmetric implementations. In this sense, the potentials developed are believed to be fundamental ingredients to a deeper understanding of the Cahn-Hilliard theory.

  12. Mixed variational potentials and inherent symmetries of the Cahn–Hilliard theory of diffusive phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Miehe, C.; Hildebrand, F. E.; Böger, L.

    2014-01-01

    This work shows that the Cahn–Hilliard theory of diffusive phase separation is related to an intrinsic mixed variational principle that determines the rate of concentration and the chemical potential. The principle characterizes a canonically compact model structure, where the two balances involved for the species content and microforce appear as the Euler equations of a variational statement. The existence of the variational principle underlines an inherent symmetry in the two-field representation of the Cahn–Hilliard theory. This can be exploited in the numerical implementation by the construction of time- and space-discrete incremental potentials, which fully determine the update problems of typical time-stepping procedures. The mixed variational principles provide the most fundamental approach to the finite-element solution of the Cahn–Hilliard equation based on low-order basis functions, leading to monolithic symmetric algebraic systems of iterative update procedures based on a linearization of the nonlinear problem. They induce in a natural format the choice of symmetric solvers for Newton-type iterative updates, providing a speed-up and reduction of data storage when compared with non-symmetric implementations. In this sense, the potentials developed are believed to be fundamental ingredients to a deeper understanding of the Cahn–Hilliard theory. PMID:24711722

  13. Biodiesel production potential of mixed microalgal culture grown in domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Soydemir, Gulfem; Keris-Sen, Ulker Diler; Sen, Unal; Gurol, Mirat D

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a mixed microalgal culture grown in secondarily treated domestic wastewater effluent was investigated for biodiesel production using in situ transesterification method with conventional heating. The total lipid content of the mixed culture was found as 26.2% ± 0.6 by weight of dry biomass, and 74% of the lipids were contributed by total glycerides. In situ transesterification with conventional heating process under acidic conditions produced higher biodiesel yield with chloroform as the co-solvent (82.1% ± 3.9) compared to hexane (55.3% ± 3.9) under the same reaction conditions. The gas chromatography analysis showed that FAME composition was mainly composed of palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acid methyl esters., and thus the mixed microalgal culture fed by domestic wastewaters has had comparable biodiesel conversion yields and FAME composition to mono-culture and pure cultures fed by synthetic culture media. Hence, this study showed that secondarily treated domestic wastewater could potentially be a suitable and sustainable medium for microalgae grown to be used as biodiesel feedstock.

  14. Oxidative potential of smoke from burning wood and mixed biomass fuels.

    PubMed

    Kurmi, O P; Dunster, C; Ayres, J G; Kelly, F J

    2013-10-01

    More than half the world's population still rely on burning biomass fuels to heat and light their homes and cook food. Household air pollution, a common component of which is inhalable particulate matter (PM), emitted from biomass burning is associated with increased vulnerability to respiratory infection and an enhanced risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the light of an emerging hypothesis linking chronic PM exposure during childhood and increased vulnerability to respiratory diseases in adulthood, in a chain of events involving oxidative stress, reduced immunity and subsequent infection, the aim of this study was to characterise the oxidative potential (OP) of PM collected during the burning of wood and mixed biomass, whilst cooking food in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Our assessments were based on the capacity of the particles to deplete the physiologically relevant antioxidants from a validated, synthetic respiratory tract lining fluid (RTLF). Incubation of mixed biomass and wood smoke particles suspensions with the synthetic RTLF for 4 h resulted in a mean loss of ascorbate of 64.76 ± 16.83% and 83.37 ± 14.12% at 50 μg/ml, respectively. Reduced glutathione was depleted by 49.29 ± 15.22% in mixed biomass and 65.33 ± 13.01% in wood smoke particles under the same conditions. Co-incubation with the transition metal chelator diethylenetriaminepentaacetate did not inhibit the rate of ascorbate oxidation, indicating a negligible contribution by redox-active metals in these samples. The capacity of biomass smoke particles to elicit oxidative stress certainly has the potential to contribute towards negative health impacts associated with traditional domestic fuels in the developing world. PMID:23926954

  15. Scattering and bound states of fermions in a mixed vector–scalar smooth step potential

    SciTech Connect

    Castilho, W.M. Castro, A.S. de

    2014-07-15

    The scattering of a fermion in the background of a smooth step potential is considered with a general mixing of vector and scalar Lorentz structures with the scalar coupling stronger than or equal to the vector coupling. Charge-conjugation and chiral-conjugation transformations are discussed and it is shown that a finite set of intrinsically relativistic bound-state solutions appears as poles of the transmission amplitude. It is also shown that those bound solutions disappear asymptotically as one approaches the conditions for the realization of the so-called spin and pseudospin symmetries in a four-dimensional space–time. - Highlights: • Scattering and bound states of fermions in a kink-like potential. • No pair production despite the high localization. • No bounded solution under exact spin and pseudospin symmetries.

  16. Scattering and bound states of spinless particles in a mixed vector-scalar smooth step potential

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.G.; Castro, A.S. de

    2009-11-15

    Scattering and bound states for a spinless particle in the background of a kink-like smooth step potential, added with a scalar uniform background, are considered with a general mixing of vector and scalar Lorentz structures. The problem is mapped into the Schroedinger-like equation with an effective Rosen-Morse potential. It is shown that the scalar uniform background present subtle and trick effects for the scattering states and reveals itself a high-handed element for formation of bound states. In that process, it is shown that the problem of solving a differential equation for the eigenenergies is transmuted into the simpler and more efficient problem of solving an irrational algebraic equation.

  17. Three-dimensional evolution of large-scale vortices in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jun-hong; Shen, Chi-bing; Wang, Qian-cheng

    2015-12-01

    The supersonic large-scale vortices generated by a streamwise vortex generator were investigated experimentally using the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, with the emphasis on the entrainment and mixing characteristics in supersonic mixing layer. The spanwise coherent structures originated from the K-H instability grew up along with the vortex pairing process, which are able to exist in far field downstream of trailing edge. The large-scale streamwise vortex shed from the generator plays a major role in entraining the surrounding fluid from both sides of interface into mixing zone. Meanwhile, through the interaction with spanwise vortices, the streamwise vortex breaks up into the small-scale structures for molecular mixing. Moreover, the T-shaped structures and secondary K-H vortices are shown to be the usual topological structures in small-scale turbulence transport.

  18. Phase singularity of surface plasmon polaritons generated by optical vortices.

    PubMed

    Tan, P S; Yuan, G H; Wang, Q; Zhang, N; Zhang, D H; Yuan, X-C

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate an experimental result that shows the phase singularity of surface plasmon waves generated by the direct transform of optical vortices at normal incidence focused on a structureless metal surface. The near-field two-dimensional intensity distribution near the focal plane is experimentally examined by using near-field scanning optical microscopy and shows a good agreement with the finite-difference time-domain simulation result. The experimental realization demonstrates a potential of the proposed excitation scheme to be reconfigured locally with advantages over structures milled into optically thick metallic films for plasmonics applications involving plasmonic vortices. PMID:21847236

  19. Mechanical Control of Individual Superconducting Vortices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating individual vortices in a deterministic way is challenging; ideally, manipulation should be effective, local, and tunable in strength and location. Here, we show that vortices respond to local mechanical stress applied in the vicinity of the vortex. We utilized this interaction to move individual vortices in thin superconducting films via local mechanical contact without magnetic field or current. We used a scanning superconducting quantum interference device to image vortices and to apply local vertical stress with the tip of our sensor. Vortices were attracted to the contact point, relocated, and were stable at their new location. We show that vortices move only after contact and that more effective manipulation is achieved with stronger force and longer contact time. Mechanical manipulation of vortices provides a local view of the interaction between strain and nanomagnetic objects as well as controllable, effective, and reproducible manipulation technique. PMID:26836018

  20. Derivation of baroclinic Ertel—Rossby invariant-based thermally-coupled vorticity equation in moist flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuai; Gao, Shou-Ting

    2014-11-01

    For the potential vorticity (PV) invariant, there is a PV-based complete-form vorticity equation, which we use heuristically in the present paper to answer the following question: for the Ertel—Rossby invariant (ERI), is there a corresponding vorticity tendency equation? Such an ERI-based thermally-coupled vorticity equation is derived and discussed in detail in this study. From the obtained new vorticity equation, the vertical vorticity change is constrained by the vertical velocity term, the term associated with the slope of the generalized momentum surface, the term related to the horizontal vorticity change, and the baroclinic or solenoid term. It explicitly includes both the dynamical and thermodynamic factors' influence on the vorticity change. For the ERI itself, besides the traditional PV term, the ERI also includes the moisture factor, which is excluded in dry ERI, and the term related to the gradients of pressure, kinetic energy, and potential energy that reflects the fast-manifold property. Therefore, it is more complete to describe the fast motions off the slow manifold for severe weather than the PV term. These advantages are naturally handed on and inherited by the ERI-based thermally-coupled vorticity equation. Then the ERI-based thermally-coupled vorticity equation is further transformed and compared with the traditional vorticity equation. The main difference between the two equations is the term which describes the contribution of the solenoid term to the vertical vorticity development. In a barotropic flow, the solenoid term disappears, then the ERI-based thermally-coupled vorticity equation can regress to the traditional vorticity equation.

  1. Vortical flow past a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattner, Trent; Chong, Min; Joubert, Peter

    2000-11-01

    Vortical flow past a sphere in a constant diameter pipe was studied experimentally in a guide vane apparatus similar to those used in fundamental experimental studies of vortex breakdown. The initial effect of swirl was to shorten the downstream separation bubble. For a small range of the swirl intensity, an almost stagnant upstream separation bubble formed. As the swirl intensity was increased, the bubble became unstable and an unsteady spiral formed. At high swirl intensity there was a mean recirculation region which penetrated far upstream while the flow on the downstream hemisphere was attached. Measurements of the velocity field were obtained using laser Doppler velocimetry. Analysis of these results suggests that the onset of upstream separation is associated with the formation of a negative azimuthal vorticity component which slows the axial flow near the axis of symmetry. This is consistent with inviscid distortion of the vortex filaments in the diverging flow approaching the sphere.

  2. The Stabilisation Potential of Individual and Mixed Assemblages of Natural Bacteria and Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Lubarsky, Helen V.; Hubas, Cédric; Chocholek, Melanie; Larson, Fredrik; Manz, Werner; Paterson, David M.; Gerbersdorf, Sabine U.

    2010-01-01

    It is recognized that microorganisms inhabiting natural sediments significantly mediate the erosive response of the bed (“ecosystem engineers”) through the secretion of naturally adhesive organic material (EPS: extracellular polymeric substances). However, little is known about the individual engineering capability of the main biofilm components (heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic microalgae) in terms of their individual contribution to the EPS pool and their relative functional contribution to substratum stabilisation. This paper investigates the engineering effects on a non-cohesive test bed as the surface was colonised by natural benthic assemblages (prokaryotic, eukaryotic and mixed cultures) of bacteria and microalgae. MagPI (Magnetic Particle Induction) and CSM (Cohesive Strength Meter) respectively determined the adhesive capacity and the cohesive strength of the culture surface. Stabilisation was significantly higher for the bacterial assemblages (up to a factor of 2) than for axenic microalgal assemblages. The EPS concentration and the EPS composition (carbohydrates and proteins) were both important in determining stabilisation. The peak of engineering effect was significantly greater in the mixed assemblage as compared to the bacterial (x 1.2) and axenic diatom (x 1.7) cultures. The possibility of synergistic effects between the bacterial and algal cultures in terms of stability was examined and rejected although the concentration of EPS did show a synergistic elevation in mixed culture. The rapid development and overall stabilisation potential of the various assemblages was impressive (x 7.5 and ×9.5, for MagPI and CSM, respectively, as compared to controls). We confirmed the important role of heterotrophic bacteria in “biostabilisation” and highlighted the interactions between autotrophic and heterotrophic biofilm consortia. This information contributes to the conceptual understanding of the microbial sediment engineering that represents an

  3. Breathers on quantized superfluid vortices.

    PubMed

    Salman, Hayder

    2013-10-18

    We consider the propagation of breathers along a quantized superfluid vortex. Using the correspondence between the local induction approximation (LIA) and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we identify a set of initial conditions corresponding to breather solutions of vortex motion governed by the LIA. These initial conditions, which give rise to a long-wavelength modulational instability, result in the emergence of large amplitude perturbations that are localized in both space and time. The emergent structures on the vortex filament are analogous to loop solitons but arise from the dual action of bending and twisting of the vortex. Although the breather solutions we study are exact solutions of the LIA equations, we demonstrate through full numerical simulations that their key emergent attributes carry over to vortex dynamics governed by the Biot-Savart law and to quantized vortices described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The breather excitations can lead to self-reconnections, a mechanism that can play an important role within the crossover range of scales in superfluid turbulence. Moreover, the observation of breather solutions on vortices in a field model suggests that these solutions are expected to arise in a wide range of other physical contexts from classical vortices to cosmological strings. PMID:24182275

  4. Breathers on Quantized Superfluid Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Hayder

    2013-10-01

    We consider the propagation of breathers along a quantized superfluid vortex. Using the correspondence between the local induction approximation (LIA) and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we identify a set of initial conditions corresponding to breather solutions of vortex motion governed by the LIA. These initial conditions, which give rise to a long-wavelength modulational instability, result in the emergence of large amplitude perturbations that are localized in both space and time. The emergent structures on the vortex filament are analogous to loop solitons but arise from the dual action of bending and twisting of the vortex. Although the breather solutions we study are exact solutions of the LIA equations, we demonstrate through full numerical simulations that their key emergent attributes carry over to vortex dynamics governed by the Biot-Savart law and to quantized vortices described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The breather excitations can lead to self-reconnections, a mechanism that can play an important role within the crossover range of scales in superfluid turbulence. Moreover, the observation of breather solutions on vortices in a field model suggests that these solutions are expected to arise in a wide range of other physical contexts from classical vortices to cosmological strings.

  5. Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Jerden, James L.; Ebert, William L.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2013-08-30

    The primary purpose of this report is to describe the strategy for coupling three process level models to produce an integrated Used Fuel Degradation Model (FDM). The FDM, which is based on fundamental chemical and physical principals, provides direct calculation of radionuclide source terms for use in repository performance assessments. The G-value for H2O2 production (Gcond) to be used in the Mixed Potential Model (MPM) (H2O2 is the only radiolytic product presently included but others will be added as appropriate) needs to account for intermediate spur reactions. The effects of these intermediate reactions on [H2O2] are accounted for in the Radiolysis Model (RM). This report details methods for applying RM calculations that encompass the effects of these fast interactions on [H2O2] as the solution composition evolves during successive MPM iterations and then represent the steady-state [H2O2] in terms of an “effective instantaneous or conditional” generation value (Gcond). It is anticipated that the value of Gcond will change slowly as the reaction progresses through several iterations of the MPM as changes in the nature of fuel surface occur. The Gcond values will be calculated with the RM either after several iterations or when concentrations of key reactants reach threshold values determined from previous sensitivity runs. Sensitivity runs with RM indicate significant changes in G-value can occur over narrow composition ranges. The objective of the mixed potential model (MPM) is to calculate the used fuel degradation rates for a wide range of disposal environments to provide the source term radionuclide release rates for generic repository concepts. The fuel degradation rate is calculated for chemical and oxidative dissolution mechanisms using mixed potential theory to account for all relevant redox reactions at the fuel surface, including those involving oxidants produced by solution radiolysis and provided by the radiolysis model (RM). The RM calculates

  6. Potential of mixed microalgae to harness biodiesel from ecological water-bodies with simultaneous treatment.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Venkata; Devi, M Prathima; Mohanakrishna, G; Amarnath, N; Babu, M Lenin; Sarma, P N

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel as an eco-friendly fuel is gaining much acceptance in recent years. This communication provides an overview on the possibility of using mixed microalgae existing in ecological water-bodies for harnessing biodiesel. Microalgal cultures from five water-bodies are cultivated in domestic wastewater in open-ponds and the harvested algal-biomass was processed through acid-catalyzed transesterification. Experiments evidenced the potential of using mixed microalgae for harnessing biodiesel. Presence of palmitic acid (C16:0) in higher fraction and physical properties of algal oil correlated well with the biodiesel properties. Functional characteristics of water-bodies showed to influence both species diversity and lipid accumulation. Microalgae from stagnant water-bodies receiving domestic discharges documented higher lipid accumulation. Algal-oil showed to consist 33 types of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids having wide food and fuel characteristics. Simultaneous wastewater treatment was also noticed due to the syntrophic association in the water-body microenvironment. Diversity studies visualized the composition of algae species known to accumulate higher lipids.

  7. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: 'Evaporation' of a flavor-mixed particle from a gravitational potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that a stable particle with flavor mixing, confined in a gravitational potential can gradually and irreversibly escape—or 'evaporate'—from it. This effect is due to mass eigenstate conversions which occur in interactions (scattering) of mass states with other particles even when the energy exchange between them is vanishing. The evaporation and conversion are quantum effects not related to flavor oscillations, particle decay, quantum tunneling or other well-known processes. Apart from their profound academic interest, these effects should have tremendous implications for cosmology, e.g., (1) the cosmic neutrino background distortion is predicted and (2) the softening of central cusps in dark matter halos and smearing out or destruction of dwarf halos were suggested.

  8. Mixing Enhancement in a Lobed Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.; Majamaki, A. J.; Lam, I. T.; Delabroy, O.; Karagozian, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Smith, O. I.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the non-reactive mixing processes associated with a lobed fuel injector in a coflowing air stream is presented. The lobed fuel injector is a device which generates streamwise vorticity, producing high strain rates which can enhance the mixing of reactants while delaying ignition in a controlled manner. The lobed injectors examined in the present study consist of two corrugated plates between which a fuel surrogate, CO2, is injected into coflowing air. Acetone is seeded in the CO2 supply as a fuel marker. Comparison of two alternative lobed injector geometries is made with a straight fuel injector to determine net differences in mixing and strain fields due to streamwise vorticity generation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the seeded acetone yields two-dimensional images of the scalar concentration field at various downstream locations, from which local mixing and scalar dissipation rates are computed. It is found that the lobed injector geometry can enhance molecular mixing and create a highly strained flowfield, and that the strain rates generated by scalar energy dissipation can potentially delay ignition in a reacting flowfield.

  9. Internal and vorticity waves in decaying stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulka, A.; Cano, D.

    2009-04-01

    Most predictive models fail when forcing at the Rossby deformation Radius is important and a large range of scales have to be taken into account. When mixing of reactants or pollutants has to be accounted, the range of scales spans from hundreds of Kilometers to the Bachelor or Kolmogorov sub milimiter scales. We present some theoretical arguments to describe the flow in terms of the three dimensional vorticity equations, using a lengthscale related to the vorticity (or enstrophy ) transport. Effect of intermittent eddies and non-homogeneity of diffusion are also key issues in the environment because both stratification and rotation body forces are important and cause anisotropy/non-homogeneity. These problems need further theoretical, numerical and observational work and one approach is to try to maximize the relevant geometrical information in order to understand and therefore predict these complex environmental dispersive flows. The importance of the study of turbulence structure and its relevance in diffusion of contaminants in environmental flows is clear when we see the effect of environmental disasters such as the Prestige oil spill or the Chernobil radioactive cloud spread in the atmosphere. A series of Experiments have been performed on a strongly stratified two layer fluid consisting of Brine in the bottom and freshwater above in a 1 square meter tank. The evolution of the vortices after the passage of a grid is video recorded and Particle tracking is applied on small pliolite particles floating at the interface. The combination of internal waves and vertical vorticity produces two separate time scales that may produce resonances. The vorticity is seen to oscilate in a complex way, where the frecuency decreases with time.

  10. Fully alternating, triaxial electric or magnetic fields offer new routes to fluid vorticity

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle J.

    2014-10-31

    Noncontact methods of generating strong fluid vorticity are important to problems involving heat and mass transfer, fluid mixing, active wetting, and droplet transport. Furthermore, because zero or even negative shear viscosities can be induced, vorticity can greatly extend the control range of the smart fluids used in magnetorheological devices. In recent work we have shown that a particular class of ac/ac/dc triaxial fields (so-called symmetry-breaking rational fields) can create strong vorticity in magnetic particle suspensions and have presented a theory of the vorticity that is based on the symmetry of the 2-d Lissajous trajectories of the field and its converse.more » In this paper we demonstrate that there are three countably infinite sets of fully alternating ac/ac/ac triaxial fields whose frequencies form rational triads that have the symmetry required to drive fluid vorticity. The symmetry of the 3-d Lissajous trajectories of the field and its converse can be derived and from this the direction of the vorticity axis can be predicted, as can the dependence of the sign of the vorticity on the phase relations between the three field components. Experimental results are presented that validate the symmetry theory. These discoveries significantly broaden the class of triaxial fields that can be exploited to produce strong noncontact flow.« less

  11. Fully alternating, triaxial electric or magnetic fields offer new routes to fluid vorticity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle J.

    2014-10-31

    Noncontact methods of generating strong fluid vorticity are important to problems involving heat and mass transfer, fluid mixing, active wetting, and droplet transport. Furthermore, because zero or even negative shear viscosities can be induced, vorticity can greatly extend the control range of the smart fluids used in magnetorheological devices. In recent work we have shown that a particular class of ac/ac/dc triaxial fields (so-called symmetry-breaking rational fields) can create strong vorticity in magnetic particle suspensions and have presented a theory of the vorticity that is based on the symmetry of the 2-d Lissajous trajectories of the field and its converse. In this paper we demonstrate that there are three countably infinite sets of fully alternating ac/ac/ac triaxial fields whose frequencies form rational triads that have the symmetry required to drive fluid vorticity. The symmetry of the 3-d Lissajous trajectories of the field and its converse can be derived and from this the direction of the vorticity axis can be predicted, as can the dependence of the sign of the vorticity on the phase relations between the three field components. Experimental results are presented that validate the symmetry theory. These discoveries significantly broaden the class of triaxial fields that can be exploited to produce strong noncontact flow.

  12. Topographic vorticity generation, submesoscale instability and vortex street formation in the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gula, J.; Molemaker, M. J.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    Meanders and eddies are routinely observed in the Gulf Stream along the South Atlantic Bight. We analyze here the instability processes that lead to the formation of submesoscale eddies on the cyclonic side of the Gulf Stream at the exit of the Florida Straits using very high resolution realistic simulations. The positive relative vorticity and potential vorticity on the cyclonic side of the Gulf Stream are strongly intensified in the Straits due to topographic drag along the continental slope. The bottom drag amplifies the cyclonic shear by generating large positive vertical vorticity values within the sloped turbulent bottom boundary layer. Downstream from the Straits the current becomes unstable to horizontal shear instability, rolls up, and forms a street of submesoscale vortices. The vortices expand as they propagate northward along the shelf, where they can generate large vertical displacements and enhance cross-shelf exchanges.

  13. Vortical sources of aerodynamic force and moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the aerodynamic force and moment can be expressed in terms of vorticity distribution (and entropy variation for compressible flow) on near wake plane, or in terms of boundary vorticity flux on the body surface. Thus the vortical sources of lift and drag are clearly identified, which is the real physical basis of optimal aerodynamic design. Moreover, these sources are highly compact, hence allowing one to concentrate on key local regions of the configuration, which have dominating effect to the lift and drag. A detail knowledge of the vortical low requires measuring or calculating the vorticity and dilatation field, which is however still a challenging task. Nevertheless, this type of formulation has some unique advantages; and how to set up a well-posed problem, in particular how to establish vorticity-dilatation boundary conditions, is addressed.

  14. Controlled vortical flow on delta wings through unsteady leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Roberts, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The vortical flow over a delta wing contributes an important part of the lift - the so called nonlinear lift. Controlling this vortical flow with its favorable influence would enhance aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack. Several previous studies have shown that control of the vortical flow field is possible through the use of blowing jets. The present experimental research studies vortical flow control by applying a new blowing scheme to the rounded leading edge of a delta wing; this blowing scheme is called Tangential Leading Edge Blowing (TLEB). Vortical flow response both to steady blowing and to unsteady blowing is investigated. It is found that TLEB can redevelop stable, strong vortices even in the post-stall angle of attack regime. Analysis of the steady data shows that the effect of leading edge blowing can be interpreted as an effective change in angle of attack. The examination of the fundamental time scales for vortical flow re-organization after the application of blowing for different initial states of the flow field is studied. Different time scales for flow re-organization are shown to depend upon the effective angle of attack. A faster response time can be achieved at angles of attack beyond stall by a suitable choice of the initial blowing momentum strength. Consequently, TLEB shows the potential of controlling the vortical flow over a wide range of angles of attack; i.e., in both for pre-stall and post-stall conditions.

  15. Vortices in dust clouds under microgravity: A simple explanation.

    PubMed

    Goedheer, W J; Akdim, M R

    2003-10-01

    Clouds of dust particles in radio frequency discharges often show a periodic vortexlike motion, especially near the edges of the electrodes or near the tip of an electrostatic probe. These vortices often last as long as the discharge is powered. In a previous paper we have followed a small number of individual dust particles in a discharge under microgravity conditions, moving under the influence of forces computed by means of a self-consistent two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and interacting via a screened Coulomb potential. The resulting motion showed the vortexlike rotation. In this paper we discuss this phenomenon in more detail, using a simplified model with harmonic forces, but extending the simulations to three dimensions. Stable vortices are observed, which show a more chaotic behavior than in the two-dimensional situation. Particles frequently jump up and down between two counterrotating vortices. The generation of the vortices can be ascribed to a nonzero rotation of the net global force vector field, which is the sum of the ion drag force, the electric force, and the thermophoretic force in case of the experiments. Comparison of experimental data with simulations using a model potential may open a way to unravel the forces inside a cloud of dust particles.

  16. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  17. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  18. Novel assay to measure the plasmid mobilizing potential of mixed microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Klümper, Uli; Droumpali, Ariadni; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Mobilizable plasmids lack necessary genes for complete conjugation and are therefore non-self-transmissible. Instead, they rely on the conjugation system of conjugal plasmids to be horizontally transferred to new recipients. While community permissiveness, the fraction of a mixed microbial community that can receive self-transmissible conjugal plasmids, has been studied, the intrinsic ability of a community to mobilize plasmids that lack conjugation systems is unexplored. Here, we present a novel framework and experimental method to estimate the mobilization potential of mixed communities. We compare the transfer frequency of a mobilizable plasmid to that of a mobilizing and conjugal plasmid measured for a model strain and for the assayed community. With Pseudomonas putida carrying the gfp-tagged mobilizable IncQ plasmid RSF1010 as donor strain, we conducted solid surface mating experiments with either a P. putida strain carrying the mobilizing IncP-1α plasmid RP4 or a model bacterial community that was extracted from the inner walls of a domestic shower conduit. Additionally, we estimated the permissiveness of the same community for RP4 using P. putida as donor strain. The permissiveness of the model community for RP4 [at 1.16 × 10-4 transconjugants per recipient (T/R)] was similar to that previously measured for soil microbial communities. RSF1010 was mobilized by the model community at a frequency of 1.16 × 10-5 T/R, only one order of magnitude lower than its permissiveness to RP4. This mobilization frequency is unexpectedly high considering that (i) mobilization requires the presence of mobilizing conjugal plasmids within the permissive fraction of the recipients; (ii) in pure culture experiments with P. putida retromobilization of RSF1010 through RP4 only took place in approximately half of the donors receiving the conjugal plasmid in the first step. Further work is needed to establish how plasmid mobilization potential varies within and across microbial

  19. Moduli Space of Non-Abelian Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Minoru; Isozumi, Youichi; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke

    2006-04-01

    We completely determine the moduli space MN,k of k vortices in U(N) gauge theory with N Higgs fields in the fundamental representation. Its open subset for separated vortices is found as the symmetric product (C×CPN-1)k/Sk. Orbifold singularities of this space correspond to coincident vortices and are resolved resulting in a smooth moduli manifold. The relation to Kähler quotient construction is discussed.

  20. Decolorization potential of mixed microbial consortia for reactive and disperse textile dyestuffs.

    PubMed

    Asgher, Muhammad; Bhatti, H N; Shah, S A H; Asad, M Javaid; Legge, R L

    2007-06-01

    Four different aerobic mixed consortia collected from basins of wastewater streams coming out of dying plants of Crescent Textile (CT), Sitara Textile (ST), Chenab Fabrics (CF) and Noor Fatima Textile (NF), Faisalabad, Pakistan were applied for decolorization of Drimarene Orange K-GL, Drimarene Brilliant Red K-4BL, Foron Yellow SE4G and Foron Blue RDGLN for 10 days using the shake flask technique. CT culture showed the best decolorization potential on all dyestuffs followed by ST, NF and CF, respectively. CT could completely decolorize all dyes within 3-5 days. ST cultures showed effective decolorization potential on Foron Yellow SE4G and Drimarene Brilliant Red K-4BL but complete color removal was achieved after 4 and 7 days, respectively. NF culture showed 100% decolorization efficiencies on Foron Yellow SE4G and Foron Blue RDGLN but it took comparatively longer time periods (5-7 days). Where as, the NF culture had decolorized only 40% and 50% of Drimarene orange and red, respectively, after 10 days. CF caused complete decolorization of Foron Blue RDGLN and Drimarene Brilliant Red K-4BL after 4 and 8 days, respectively but it showed poor performance on other two dyes.

  1. Proliferative potential in benign mixed salivary gland tumors and its value in primary and recurrent neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kazanceva, Anna; Groma, Valerie; Smane, Liene; Kornevs, Egils; Teibe, Uldis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Mixed salivary gland tumors are characterized by a marked diversity in the cell proliferation. It course in the stromal component, and, especially in recurrent neoplasms, is not completely understood. This study evaluated cell proliferative potential, its value and the clinical course of primary and recurrent salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas (PA). MATERIALS AND METHODS. 322 benign salivary gland tumors were used in this study. The cell proliferation was estimated by Ki-67 expression levels. RESULTS. Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed a wide range of spectra; in the epithelial and stromal type of PA the cell proliferation had the value from 0.07±0.03 (95% CI 0.01-0.14) to 4.81±0.60 (95% CI 3.61-6.02) and from 0 to 0.79±0.11 (95% CI 0.57-1.00), respectively. The Ki-67 value was higher in recurrent tumors compared with primary, and the mean number of Ki-67-positive cells per visual microscopic field constituted 2.14±1.60 (95% CI 1.47-2.47) comparing with 1.43 (95% CI 0.97-1.55) revealed in primary tumors. CONCLUSION. Cell proliferation values correlate with a recurrence of neoplasm, and elevation of proliferation potential in the stromal component of recurrent PA is indicative of clinical course change for the worse.

  2. Separation vortices and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Anders; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2010-03-01

    In this paper examples are given of the importance of flow separation for fluid patterns at moderate Reynolds numbers—both in the stationary and in the time-dependent domain. In the case of circular hydraulic jumps, it has been shown recently that it is possible to generalise the Prandtl-Kármán-Pohlhausen approach to stationary boundary layers with free surfaces going through separation, and thus obtain a quantitative theory of the simplest type of hydraulic jump, where a single separation vortex is present outside the jump. A second type of jump, where an additional roller appears at the surface, cannot be captured by this approach and has not been given an adequate theoretical description. Such a model is needed to describe “polygonal” hydraulic jumps, which occur by spontaneous symmetry breaking of the latter state. Time-dependent separation is of importance in the formation of sand ripples under oscillatory flow, where the separation vortices become very strong. In this case no simple theory exists for the determination of the location and strengths of separation vortices over a wavy bottom of arbitrary profile. We have, however, recently suggested an amplitude equation describing the long-time evolution of the sand ripple pattern, which has the surprising features that it breaks the local sand conservation and has long-range interaction, features that can be underpinned by experiments. Very similar vortex dynamics takes place around oscillating structures such as wings and fins. Here, we present results for the vortex patterns behind a flapping foil in a flowing soap film, which shows the interaction and competition between the vortices shed from the round leading edge (like the von Kármán vortex street) and those created at the sharp trailing edge.

  3. Mix design and pollution control potential of pervious concrete with non-compliant waste fly ash.

    PubMed

    Soto-Pérez, Linoshka; Hwang, Sangchul

    2016-07-01

    Pervious concrete mix was optimized for the maximum compressive strength and the desired permeability at 7 mm/s with varying percentages of water-to-binder (W/B), fly ash-to-binder (FA/B), nano-iron oxide-to-binder (NI/B) and water reducer-to-binder (WR/B). The mass ratio of coarse aggregates in sizes of 4.75-9.5 mm to the binder was fixed at 4:1. Waste FA used in the study was not compliant with a standard specification for use as a mineral admixture in concrete. One optimum pervious concrete (Opt A) targeting high volume FA utilization had a 28-day compressive strength of 22.8 MPa and a permeability of 5.6 mm/s with a mix design at 36% W/B, 35% FA/B, 6% NI/B and 1.2% WR/B. The other (Opt B) targeting a less use of admixtures had a 28-day compressive strength and a permeability of 21.4 MPa and 7.6 mm/s, respectively, at 32% W/B, 10% FA/B, 0.5% NI/B and 0.8% WR/B. During 10 loads at a 2-h contact time each, the Opt A and Opt B achieved the average fecal coliform removals of 72.4% and 77.9% and phosphorus removals of 49.8% and 40.5%, respectively. Therefore, non-compliant waste FA could be utilized for a cleaner production of pervious concrete possessing a greater structural strength and compatible hydrological property and pollution control potential, compared to the ordinary pervious concrete.

  4. Sound Generation by Aircraft Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Wang, Frank Y.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides an extensive analysis of potential wake vortex noise sources that might be utilized to aid in their tracking. Several possible mechanisms of aircraft vortex sound generation are examined on the basis of discrete vortex dynamic models and characteristic acoustic signatures calculated by application of vortex sound theory. It is shown that the most robust mechanisms result in very low frequency infrasound. An instability of the vortex core structure is discussed and shown to be a possible mechanism for generating higher frequency sound bordering the audible frequency range. However, the frequencies produced are still low and cannot explain the reasonably high-pitched sound that has occasionally been observed experimentally. Since the robust mechanisms appear to generate only very low frequency sound, infrasonic tracking of the vortices may be warranted.

  5. Dynamic Assembly of Magnetic Colloidal Vortices.

    PubMed

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Kokot, Gašper; Osterman, Natan; Snezhko, Alexey; Vilfan, Andrej; Babič, Dušan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-05-24

    Magnetic colloids in external time-dependent fields are subject to complex induced many-body interactions governing their self-assembly into a variety of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium structures such as chains, networks, suspended membranes, and colloidal foams. Here, we report experiments, simulations, and theory probing the dynamic assembly of superparamagnetic colloids in precessing external magnetic fields. Within a range of field frequencies, we observe dynamic large-scale structures such as ordered phases composed of precessing chains, ribbons, and rotating fluidic vortices. We show that the structure formation is inherently coupled to the buildup of torque, which originates from internal relaxation of induced dipoles and from transient correlations among the particles as a result of short-lived chain formation. We discuss in detail the physical properties of the vortex phase and demonstrate its potential in particle-coating applications. PMID:27128501

  6. Propagation of magnetic vortices using nanocontacts as tunable attractors.

    PubMed

    Manfrini, M; Kim, Joo-Von; Petit-Watelot, S; Van Roy, W; Lagae, L; Chappert, C; Devolder, T

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic vortices in thin films are in-plane spiral spin configurations with a core in which the magnetization twists out of the film plane. Vortices result from the competition between atomic-scale exchange forces and long-range dipolar interactions. They are often the ground state of magnetic dots, and have applications in medicine, microwave generation and information storage. The compact nature of the vortex core, which is 10-20 nm wide, makes it a suitable probe of magnetism at the nanoscale. However, thus far the positioning of a vortex has been possible only in confined structures, which prevents its transport over large distances. Here we show that vortices can be propagated in an unconstrained system that comprises electrical nanocontacts (NCs). The NCs are used as tunable vortex attractors in a manner that resembles the propelling of space craft with gravitational slingshots. By passing current from the NCs to a ferromagnetic film, circulating magnetic fields are generated, which nucleate the vortex and create a potential well for it. The current becomes spin polarized in the film, and thereby drives the vortex into gyration through spin-transfer torques. The vortex can be guided from one NC to another by tuning attractive strengths of the NCs. We anticipate that NC networks may be used as multiterminal sources of vortices and spin waves (as well as heat, spin and charge flows) to sense the fundamental interactions between physical objects and fluxes of the next-generation spintronic devices. PMID:24336405

  7. Thin film mixed potential nitrogen oxide sensor development for stationary reciprocating engine applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, E. L.; Mukundan, R.; Lujan, R.; Garzon, F. H.

    2004-01-01

    Mixed potential sensors using thin film Mg-doped LaCrO{sub 3} working electrodes, Pt counter electrodes, and thin film YSZ electrolytes on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystalline substrates were prepared and studied at 600 and 650 C in 10.4% O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} balance and in air atmospheres for NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, and hydrocarbon responses. The lanthanum chromite-based sensors showed preferential sensitivity to NO{sub 2} with cross sensitivity to CO and nonmethane hydrocarbons such as C{sub 3}H{sub 6} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}. In contrast, sensors with spinel NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} working electrodes show minimal sensitivity to NO{sub 2}. The use of a heated Pt black pre-catalyst upstream to the sensor was demonstrated and the use of this pre-catalyst effectively removed the CO and hydrocarbon response however more work needs to be done to understand the NO/NO{sub 2} chemistry post catalyst. Studies conducted for up to 800 hrs at 600 C show minimal aging in these devices.

  8. Mixed zirconia calcium phosphate coatings for dental implants: tailoring coating stability and bioactivity potential.

    PubMed

    Pardun, Karoline; Treccani, Laura; Volkmann, Eike; Streckbein, Philipp; Heiss, Christian; Li Destri, Giovanni; Marletta, Giovanni; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-03-01

    Enhanced coating stability and adhesion are essential for long-term success of orthopedic and dental implants. In this study, the effect of coating composition on mechanical, physico-chemical and biological properties of coated zirconia specimens is investigated. Zirconia discs and dental screw implants are coated using the wet powder spraying (WPS) technique. The coatings are obtained by mixing yttria-stabilized zirconia (TZ) and hydroxyapatite (HA) in various ratios while a pure HA coating served as reference material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profilometer analysis confirm a similar coating morphology and roughness for all studied coatings, whereas the coating stability can be tailored with composition and is probed by insertion and dissections experiments in bovine bone with coated zirconia screw implants. An increasing content of calcium phosphate (CP) resulted in a decrease of mechanical and chemical stability, while the bioactivity increased in simulated body fluid (SBF). In vitro experiments with human osteoblast cells (HOB) revealed that the cells grew well on all samples but are affected by dissolution behavior of the studied coatings. This work demonstrates the overall good mechanical strength, the excellent interfacial bonding and the bioactivity potential of coatings with higher TZ contents, which provide a highly interesting coating for dental implants. PMID:25579931

  9. [Changes in redox potentials during transitional processes in pure and mixed cultures of Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens].

    PubMed

    Oktiabr'skiĭ, O N; Zelenin, E N; Smirnova, G V

    1984-01-01

    There were studied transitional processes accompanying the beginning of growth under glucose addition and stopping of growth under glucose exhaustion in pure and mixed aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens. Continued record of Eh, pH, and CO2 showed that these processes sharply differ from each other in their character in pure and mixed cultures, it is particularly related to the changes of the redox potential. There is no characteristic change in the redox potential in pure culture of E. coli at growth termination in the case when S. marcescens cells are present in the culture.

  10. Convective and moist vorticity vectors associated with tropical oceanic convection: A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shouting; Li, Xiaofan; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Shie, Chung-Lin; Lang, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The relationships between cloud hydrometeors and convective/moist vorticity vectors are investigated using hourly data from a three-dimensional, 5-day cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). Vertical components of convective and moist vorticity vectors are highly correlated with cloud hydrometeors. The vertical components represent the interaction between horizontal vorticity and horizontal moist potential temperature/specific humidity gradient. The vertical components of convective and moist vorticity vectors can be used to study tropical oceanic convection in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional frameworks.

  11. On generating counter-rotating streamwise vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winoto, S. H.; Mitsudharmadi, H.; Budiman, A. C.; Hasheminejad, S. M.; Nadesan, T.; Tandiono; Low, H. T.; Lee, T. S.

    2015-09-01

    Counter-rotating streamwise vortices are known to enhance the heat transfer rate from a surface and also to improve the aerodynamic performance of an aerofoil. In this paper, some methods to generate such counter-rotating vortices using different methods or physical conditions will be briefly considered and discussed.

  12. Nonquasineutral electron vortices in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. R.; Richardson, A. S.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2014-11-15

    Electron vortices are observed in the numerical simulation of current carrying plasmas on fast time scales where the ion motion can be ignored. In plasmas with nonuniform density n, vortices drift in the B × ∇n direction with a speed that is on the order of the Hall speed. This provides a mechanism for magnetic field penetration into a plasma. Here, we consider strong vortices with rotation speeds V{sub ϕ} close to the speed of light c where the vortex size δ is on the order of the magnetic Debye length λ{sub B}=|B|/4πen and the vortex is thus nonquasineutral. Drifting vortices are typically studied using the electron magnetohydrodynamic model (EMHD), which ignores the displacement current and assumes quasineutrality. However, these assumptions are not strictly valid for drifting vortices when δ ≈ λ{sub B}. In this paper, 2D electron vortices in nonuniform plasmas are studied for the first time using a fully electromagnetic, collisionless fluid code. Relatively large amplitude oscillations with periods that correspond to high frequency extraordinary modes are observed in the average drift speed. The drift speed W is calculated by averaging the electron velocity field over the vorticity. Interestingly, the time-averaged W from these simulations matches very well with W from the much simpler EMHD simulations even for strong vortices with order unity charge density separation.

  13. Flute vortices in nonuniform magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.Y.; Shukla, P.K.; Varma, R.K.

    1985-09-01

    Localized double vortices associated with the flute modes are shown to exist. Special emphasis is given to the effect of the convective variation of the fluid magnetic moment. It is shown that the latter effect considerably modifies the existence regions of the vortices.

  14. Vortices in normal part of proximity system

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.

    2015-05-26

    It is shown that the order parameter Δ induced in the normal part of superconductor-normal-superconductor proximity system is modulated in the magnetic field differently from vortices in bulk superconductors. Whereas Δ turns zero at vortex centers, the magnetic structure of these vortices differs from that of Abrikosov's.

  15. Comparison of three different methods of perturbing the potential vorticity field in mesoscale forecasts of Mediterranean heavy precipitation events: PV-gradient, PV-adjoint and PV-satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vich, M.; Romero, R.; Richard, E.; Arbogast, P.; Maynard, K.

    2010-09-01

    Heavy precipitation events occur regularly in the western Mediterranean region. These events often have a high impact on the society due to economic and personal losses. The improvement of the mesoscale numerical forecasts of these events can be used to prevent or minimize their impact on the society. In previous studies, two ensemble prediction systems (EPSs) based on perturbing the model initial and boundary conditions were developed and tested for a collection of high-impact MEDEX cyclonic episodes. These EPSs perturb the initial and boundary potential vorticity (PV) field through a PV inversion algorithm. This technique ensures modifications of all the meteorological fields without compromising the mass-wind balance. One EPS introduces the perturbations along the zones of the three-dimensional PV structure presenting the local most intense values and gradients of the field (a semi-objective choice, PV-gradient), while the other perturbs the PV field over the MM5 adjoint model calculated sensitivity zones (an objective method, PV-adjoint). The PV perturbations are set from a PV error climatology (PVEC) that characterizes typical PV errors in the ECMWF forecasts, both in intensity and displacement. This intensity and displacement perturbation of the PV field is chosen randomly, while its location is given by the perturbation zones defined in each ensemble generation method. Encouraged by the good results obtained by these two EPSs that perturb the PV field, a new approach based on a manual perturbation of the PV field has been tested and compared with the previous results. This technique uses the satellite water vapor (WV) observations to guide the correction of initial PV structures. The correction of the PV field intents to improve the match between the PV distribution and the WV image, taking advantage of the relation between dark and bright features of WV images and PV anomalies, under some assumptions. Afterwards, the PV inversion algorithm is applied to run

  16. Relative equilibria of vortices in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Palmore, J I

    1982-01-01

    An old problem of the evolution of finitely many interacting point vortices in the plane is shown to be amenable to investigation by critical point theory in a way that is identical to the study of the planar n-body problem of celestial mechanics. For any choice of positive circulations of the vortices it is shown by critical point theory applied to Kirchhoff's function that there are many relative equilibria configurations. Each of these configurations gives rise to a stationary configuration of the vortices in a suitably chosen rotating coordinate system. A sharp lower bound on the number of stationary vortex configurations for the problem of point vortices interacting in the plane is given. The problem of point vortices in a circular disk is defined and it is shown that these estimates hold for stationary configurations of small size. PMID:16593155

  17. Relative equilibria of vortices in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Palmore, J I

    1982-01-01

    An old problem of the evolution of finitely many interacting point vortices in the plane is shown to be amenable to investigation by critical point theory in a way that is identical to the study of the planar n-body problem of celestial mechanics. For any choice of positive circulations of the vortices it is shown by critical point theory applied to Kirchhoff's function that there are many relative equilibria configurations. Each of these configurations gives rise to a stationary configuration of the vortices in a suitably chosen rotating coordinate system. A sharp lower bound on the number of stationary vortex configurations for the problem of point vortices interacting in the plane is given. The problem of point vortices in a circular disk is defined and it is shown that these estimates hold for stationary configurations of small size.

  18. Reconstruction of Propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz Vortices at Mercury's Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Torbjoern; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Blomberg, Lars G.; Cumnock, Judy A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje

    2011-01-01

    A series of quasi-periodic magnetopause crossings were recorded by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its third flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, likely caused by a train of propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices. We here revisit the observations to study the internal structure of the waves. Exploiting MESSENGER s rapid traversal of the magnetopause, we show that the observations permit a reconstruction of the structure of a rolled-up KH vortex directly from the spacecraft s magnetic field measurements. The derived geometry is consistent with all large-scale fluctuations in the magnetic field data, establishes the non-linear nature of the waves, and shows their vortex-like structure. In several of the wave passages, a reduction in magnetic field strength is observed in the middle of the wave, which is characteristic of rolled-up vortices and is related to the increase in magnetic pressure required to balance the centrifugal force on the plasma in the outer regions of a vortex, previously reported in computer simulations. As the KH wave starts to roll up, the reconstructed geometry suggests that the vortices develop two gradual transition regions in the magnetic field, possibly related to the mixing of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma, situated at the leading edges from the perspectives of both the magnetosphere and the magnetosheath.

  19. Wind turbine response to parameter variation of analytic inflow vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, M. Maureen; Robinson, Michael C.; Balas, Mark J.

    2006-05-01

    As larger wind turbines are placed on taller towers, rotors frequently operate in atmospheric conditions that support organized, coherent turbulent structures. It is hypothesized that these structures have a detrimental impact on the blade fatigue life experienced by the wind turbine. These structures are extremely difficult to identify with sophisticated anemometry such as ultrasonic anemometers. This study was performed to identify the vortex characteristics that contribute to high-amplitude cyclic blade loads, assuming that these vortices exist under certain atmospheric conditions. This study does not attempt to demonstrate the existence of these coherent turbulent structures. In order to ascertain the idealized worst-case scenario for vortical inflow structures impinging on a wind turbine rotor, we created a simple, analytic vortex model. The Rankine vortex model assumes that the vortex core undergoes solid body rotation to avoid a singularity at the vortex centre and is surrounded by a two-dimensional potential flow field. Using the wind turbine as a sensor and the FAST wind turbine dynamics code with limited degrees of freedom, we determined the aerodynamic loads imparted to the wind turbine by the vortex structure. We varied the size, strength, rotational direction, plane of rotation, and location of the vortex over a wide range of operating parameters. We identified the vortex conformation with the most significant effect on the blade root bending moment cyclic amplitude. Vortices with radii on the scale of the rotor diameter or smaller caused blade root bending moment cyclic amplitudes that contribute to high damage density. The rotational orientation, clockwise or counter-clockwise, produces little difference in the bending moment response. Vortices in the XZ plane produce bending moment amplitudes significantly greater than vortices in the YZ plane. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Received: 9 April 2004; Revised: 14 March 2005; Accepted: 19

  20. Vorticity and upscaled dispersion in 3D heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dato, Mariaines; Chiogna, Gabriele; de Barros, Felipe; Bellin, Alberto; Fiori, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    Modeling flow in porous media is relevant for many environmental, energy and industrial applications. From an environmental perspective, the relevance of porous media flow becomes evident in subsurface hydrology. In general, flow in natural porous media is creeping, yet the large variability in the hydraulic conductivity values encountered in natural aquifers leads to highly heterogeneous flow fields. This natural variability in the conductivity field will affect both dilution rates of chemical species and reactive mixing. A physical consequence of this heterogeneity is also the presence of a various localized kinematical features such as straining, shearing and vorticity in aquifers, which will influence the shape of solute clouds and its fate and transport. This work aims in fundamentally characterizing the vorticity field in spatially heterogeneous flow fields as a function of their statistical properties in order to analyze the impact on transport processes. In our study, three-dimensional porous formations are constructed with an ensemble of N independent, non-overlapping spheroidal inclusions submerged into an homogeneous matrix, of conductivity K0. The inclusions are randomly located in a domain of volume W and are fully characterized by the geometry of spheroid (oblate or prolate), their conductivity K (random and drawn from a given probability density function fκ), the centroid location ¯x, the axes ratio e, the orientation of the rotational axis (α1,α2) and the volume w. Under the assumption of diluted medium, the flow problem is solved analitically by means of only two parameters: the conductivity contrast κ = K/K0 and the volume fraction n = Nw/W . Through the variation of these parameters of the problem, it is possible to approximate the structure of natural heterogeneous porous media. Using a random distribution of the orientation of the inclusions, we create media defined by the same global anisotropy f = Iz/Ix but different micro

  1. Can symmetry transitions of complex fields enable 3-d control of fluid vorticity?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-08-01

    Methods of inducing vigorous noncontact fluid flow are important to technologies involving heat and mass transfer and fluid mixing, since they eliminate the need for moving parts, pipes and seals, all of which compromise system reliability. Unfortunately, traditional noncontact flow methods are few, and have limitations of their own. We have discovered two classes of fields that can induce fluid vorticity without requiring either gravity or a thermal gradient. The first class we call Symmetry-Breaking Rational Fields. These are triaxial fields comprised of three orthogonal components, two ac and one dc. The second class is Rational Triad Fields, which differ in that all three components are alternating. In this report we quantify the induced vorticity for a wide variety of fields and consider symmetry transitions between these field types. These transitions give rise to orbiting vorticity vectors, a technology for non-contact, non-stationary fluid mixing.

  2. Electroweak Vortices and Gauge Equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowell, Samuel W.; Törnkvist, Ola

    Vortex configurations in the electroweak gauge theory are investigated. Two gauge-inequivalent solutions of the field equations, the Z and W vortices, have previously been found. They correspond to embeddings of the Abelian Nielsen-Olesen vortex solution into a U(1) subgroup of SU(2)×U(1). It is shown here that any electroweak vortex solution can be mapped into a solution of the same energy with a vanishing upper component of the Higgs field. The correspondence is a gauge equivalence for all vortex solutions except those for which the winding numbers of the upper and lower Higgs components add to zero. This class of solutions, which includes the W vortex, corresponds to a singular solution in the one-component gauge. The results, combined with numerical investigations, provide an argument against the existence of other vortex solutions in the gauge-Higgs sector of the Standard Model.

  3. Ferroelectric vortices from atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaiche, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    In 2004, the use of a first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian led to the prediction of a novel structure in zero-dimensional ferroelectrics, in which the electric dipoles organize themselves to form a vortex. Such structure exhibits the so-called spontaneous toroidal moment, rather than the spontaneous polarization, as its order parameter. Subsequently, various original phenomena, all related to vortices, were predicted in ferroelectric nanostructures. Examples of such phenomena are: (i) the existence of a new order parameter, denoted as the hypertoroidal moment, that is associated with many complex dipolar structures (such as double-vortex states); (ii) the possible control of single and double vortex states by electric fields, via the formation of original intermediate states [4-8]; (iii) the discovery of a new class of quantum materials (denoted as incipient ferrotoroidics), for which zero-point vibrations wash out the vortex state and yield a complex local structure; (iv) the existence of chiral patterns of oxygen octahedral tiltings that originate from the coupling of these tiltings with the ferroelectric vortices. The purpose of this talk is to discuss some of these striking phenomena, as well as, to reveal others (if time allows). These studies are done in collaboration with A.R. Akbarzadeh, H. Fu, I. Kornev, I. Naumov, I. Ponomareva, S. Prosandeev, Wei Ren and D. Sichuga. These works are supported by the NSF grants DMR 0701558 and DMR-0080054 (C-SPIN), DOE grant DE-SC0002220, and ONR grants N00014-08-1-0915 and N00014-07-1-0825 (DURIP).

  4. Transition from slow Abrikosov to fast moving Josephson vortices in iron pnictide superconductors.

    PubMed

    Moll, Philip J W; Balicas, Luis; Geshkenbein, Vadim; Blatter, Gianni; Karpinski, Janusz; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D; Batlogg, Bertram

    2013-02-01

    Iron pnictides are layered high T(c) superconductors with moderate material anisotropy and thus Abrikosov vortices are expected in the mixed state. Yet, we have discovered a distinct change in the nature of the vortices from Abrikosov-like to Josephson-like in the pnictide superconductor SmFeAs(O,F) with T(c)~48-50 K on cooling below a temperature T*~41-42 K, despite its moderate electronic anisotropy γ~4-6. This transition is hallmarked by a sharp drop in the critical current and accordingly a jump in the flux-flow voltage in a magnetic field precisely aligned along the FeAs layers, indicative of highly mobile vortices. T* coincides well with the temperature where the coherence length ξ(c) perpendicular to the layers matches half of the FeAs-layer spacing. For fields slightly out-of-plane (> 0.1°- 0.15°) the vortices are completely immobilized as well-pinned Abrikosov segments are introduced when the vortex crosses the FeAs layers. We interpret these findings as a transition from well-pinned, slow moving Abrikosov vortices at high temperatures to weakly pinned, fast flowing Josephson vortices at low temperatures. This vortex dynamics could become technologically relevant as superconducting applications will always operate deep in the Josephson regime.

  5. Generation and Growth of Single Hairpin Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Haidari, Ahmad

    The behavior of selectively generated single hairpin vortices are examined within a laminar boundary layer environment over a range of Reynolds numbers, the hairpin vortices are experimentally generated by means of controlled fluid injection from a streamwise slot. Flow visualization using both dye and hydrogen bubble wire is employed in conjunction with hot film anemometry to investigate the growth characteristics and evolution of these single hairpin vortices. Qualitatively, it is established that hairpin vortices form by local destabilization at the interface between the low-speed fluid introduced through the slot and the higher speed boundary layer flow. Kinematical considerations of the hairpin vortex are established. It is observed that a hairpin vortex generally displays visualization and velocity signatures characteristic of those observed for a turbulent boundary layer. Hydrogen-bubble wire visualization results specifically indicate that hairpin vortices generate two purely turbulent-like flow patterns. The first is a low-speed streak pattern developing immediately adjacent to the surface due to surface interaction by the counter -rotating legs of the hairpin vortex; the second pattern is a turbulent pocket-like pattern farther removed from the surface. It is determined from the visualization data that hairpin vortices manifest the necessary flow characteristics which give rise to the regenerative and sustained process required for maintenance of turbulence. The regeneration and the growth process takes place through the formation of similar hairpin-like vortices by one of two means. The first is an inviscid lateral propagation of the initial disturbance which gives rise to outboard (subsidiary), vortices which cause the lateral spreading of the structure. A more complicated and eruptive process occurs by means of viscous-inviscid interactions which give rise to trailing vortices (secondary), which cause the streamwise elongation of the disturbance. A

  6. Criterion for Identifying Vortices in High-Pressure Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Okong'o, Nora

    2007-01-01

    A study of four previously published computational criteria for identifying vortices in high-pressure flows has led to the selection of one of them as the best. This development can be expected to contribute to understanding of high-pressure flows, which occur in diverse settings, including diesel, gas turbine, and rocket engines and the atmospheres of Jupiter and other large gaseous planets. Information on the atmospheres of gaseous planets consists mainly of visual and thermal images of the flows over the planets. Also, validation of recently proposed computational models of high-pressure flows entails comparison with measurements, which are mainly of visual nature. Heretofore, the interpretation of images of high-pressure flows to identify vortices has been based on experience with low-pressure flows. However, high-pressure flows have features distinct from those of low-pressure flows, particularly in regions of high pressure gradient magnitude caused by dynamic turbulent effects and by thermodynamic mixing of chemical species. Therefore, interpretations based on low-pressure behavior may lead to misidentification of vortices and other flow structures in high-pressure flows. The study reported here was performed in recognition of the need for one or more quantitative criteria for identifying coherent flow structures - especially vortices - from previously generated flow-field data, to complement or supersede the determination of flow structures by visual inspection of instantaneous fields or flow animations. The focus in the study was on correlating visible images of flow features with various quantities computed from flow-field data.

  7. Response of a chemically reacting layer to streamwise vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W.

    1989-01-01

    A series of Direct Numerical Simulations of a temporally evolving shear layer subject to both harmonic (2D) and streamwise (3D) forcing were performed. The interaction and coupling of these various 2D and 3D modes is shown to significantly alter the development of the flow. The scale of the 3D modes is quite important to the coupling process with greatly enhanced mixing and product formation resulting from 3D modes that are rapidly amplified by the spanwise vorticity. In general, the longer wavelength 3D modes are found to be highly efficient at increasing the momentum transport while the shorter wavelengths increase mass transport.

  8. Mixing dynamics and pattern formation around flow stagnation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We study the mixing of two reactive fluids in the presence of convective instabilities. Such system is characterized by the formation of unique porosity patterns and mixing dynamics linked to the evolution of vortices and stagnation points. Around them, the fluid-fluid interface is stretched and compressed, which enhances mixing and triggers chemical reactions, and the system can be analyzed using fluid deformation model. We consider velocity fields generated by a double gyre synthetic velocity field and Rayleigh-Bénard and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The different flow structures can be visualized by the strain rate and the finite time Lyapunov exponents. We show that the mixing enhancement given by the scalar dissipation rate is controlled by the equilibrium between interface compression and diffusion, which depends on the velocity field configuration. Furthermore, we establish a quantitative relation between the mixing rate and the evolution of the potential energy of the fluid when convection is driven by density instabilities.

  9. Visualization of Mixing and Combustion in TNT Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Ferguson, R E; Oppenheim, A K; Seizew, M R

    2001-03-26

    Numerical simulations are used to visualize the mixing and combustion induced by explosions of spherical and cylindrical TNT charges. Evolution of the exothermic energy is controlled by mixing (vorticity), which is strongly influenced by wave reflections from confining walls.

  10. Aerodynamic control of fighter aircraft by manipulation of forebody vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, Gerald N.; Ng, T. Terry

    1991-01-01

    Methods of enhancing aircraft controllability and maneuverability at high angles of attack by manipulating the forebody vortices are discussed. Pneumatic control methods including jet blowing, slot blowing, and suction, and mechanical control methods using forebody and nose tip strakes are reviewed. The potential of various control devices in controlling the forebody flow, and thus, providing controlled yawing moments at high angles of attack are illustrated using wind tunnel results from a generic fighter and water tunnel results from an F/A-18.

  11. Storm-driven Mixing and Potential Impact on the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiayan; Comiso, Josefino; Walsh, David; Krishfield, Richard; Honjo, Susumu; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the ocean, atmosphere, and ice made by Ice-Ocean Environmental Buoys (IOEBs) indicate that mixing events reaching the depth of the halocline have occurred in various regions in the Arctic Ocean. Our analysis suggests that these mixing events were mechanically forced by intense storms moving across the buoy sites. In this study, we analyzed these mixing events in the context of storm developments that occurred in the Beaufort Sea and in the general area just north of Fram Strait, two areas with quite different hydrographic structures. The Beaufort Sea is strongly influenced by inflow of Pacific water through Bering Strait, while the area north of Fram Strait is directly affected by the inflow of warm and salty North Atlantic water. Our analyses of the basin-wide evolution of the surface pressure and geostrophic wind fields indicate that the characteristics of the storms could be very different. The buoy-observed mixing occurred only in the spring and winter seasons when the stratification was relatively weak. This indicates the importance of stratification, although the mixing itself was mechanically driven. We also analyze the distribution of storms, both the long-term climatology as well as the patterns for each year in the last two decades. The frequency of storms is also shown to be correlated- (but not strongly) to Arctic Oscillation indices. This study indicates that the formation of new ice that leads to brine rejection is unlikely the mechanism that results in the type of mixing that could overturn the halocline. On the other hand, synoptic-scale storms can force mixing deep enough to the halocline and thermocline layer. Despite a very stable stratification associated with the Arctic halocline, the warm subsurface thermocline water is not always insulated from the mixed layer.

  12. The spontaneous emergence of coherent vortices and alternating hot-and-cold latitude bands in an idealized GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, J.; Vallis, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of the atmospheric flow on giant planets using a primitive equation dry GCM show that long-lived coherent vortices can spontaneously emerge and they play an important role in creating alternating hot-and-cold latitude bands, which correlate with the jets. The GCM uses idealized Held-Suarez physics: the forcing is a linear relaxation of temperature field to a prescribed temperature profile, which decreases monotonically poleward and represents differential radiation; the dissipation is a linear damping of momentum near the surface. The vortices have very distinct vertical structures. For anticyclonic vortices, they have warm cores near the surface and cold cores near the upper atmosphere, caused by a strong downdraft in anticyclones. The cyclonic vortices are the reverse as the anticyclones, but they are weaker in agreement with the preference for anticyclones in shallow water models. The anticyclonic and cyclonic vortices have different preferred latitude bands, organizing themselves into having the same sign of vorticity as the jets. The anticyclonic vortices prefer the 'zones' (jets with anticyclonic wind shear) and therefore make the 'zones' warmer than the surrounding 'belts' (jets with cyclonic wind shear) near the surface. Energy spectrum analysis shows that the large vortices are driven by inverse energy cascade from smaller vortices, and these large vortices are converting eddy kinetic energy into potential energy. This tendency is also observed for shallow water decaying turbulence and we provide it an explanation based on the invariants of the shallow water system. Additional simulations using a more comprehensive GCM with parameters relevant for Jupiter show similar behavior. Typical instantaneous temperature field near the surface (975 mb) together with wind field at upper atmosphere (250 mb) . Only wind vector at the place where the magnitude of relative vorticity is larger than 10e(-5)/s is shown. The color of the wind

  13. Characteristic modes and evolution processes of shear-layer vortices in an elevated transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Lan, Jen

    2005-03-01

    Characteristics and evolution processes of the traveling coherent flow structure in the shear layer of an elevated round jet in crossflow are studied experimentally in an open-loop wind tunnel. Streak pictures of the smoke flow patterns illuminated by the laser-light sheet in the median and horizontal planes are recorded with a high speed digital camera. Time histories of the instantaneous velocity of the vortical flows in the shear layer are digitized by a hot-wire anemometer through a high-speed data acquisition system. By analyzing the streak pictures of the smoke flow visualization, five characteristic flow structures, mixing-layer type vortices, backward-rolling vortices, forward-rolling vortices, swing-induced mushroom vortices, and jet-type vortices, are identified in the shear layer evolving from the up-wind edge of the jet exit. The behaviors and mechanisms of the vortical flow structure in the bent shear layer are prominently distinct in different flow regimes. The frequency characteristics, Strouhal number, power-spectrum density functions, autocorrelation coefficient, as well as the time and length scales of the coherent structure and the Lagrangian integral scales are obtained by processing the measured instantaneous velocity data. The Strouhal number is found to decay exponentially with the increase of the jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratio. The autocorrelation coefficients provide the information for calculating the statistical time scales of the coherent structure and the integral time scales of turbulence fluctuations. The corresponding length scales of the vortical structure and the integral length scales of turbulence in the shear layer are therefore obtained and discussed.

  14. Merging of co-rotating vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerretelli, C.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2001-11-01

    We present results from an experimental study on the interaction of two co-rotating trailing vortices. The flow is generated by towing a biplane wing system through a tank of water. The vortex dynamics, as a function of the Reynolds number (Re), are analyzed by means of DPIV. We find that vortex merging is essentially a 3-stage process. Initially, the vortices undergo a diffusive growth until the cores reach a critical size. This diffusion process can be either viscous (when Re < 530) or turbulent (when Re > 530). The second (convective) stage in vortex merging, involves a breaking of the initial symmetry of the vorticity field. At this point, the convective stage occurs, with a strong deformation of the vortex cores which start moving towards each other. The decomposition of the vorticity and velocity fields into symmetric and antisymmetric components shows that the antisymmetric vorticity pushes the vortices together, and causes the phenomenon of merging. The merging velocity can be measured from the antisymmetric velocity field, and agrees very well with direct measurement of the rate at which the centroids approach each other. The third stage of vortex merger is again a diffusive stage, whereby the final merging of the two vortices into one axisymmetric structure is achieved only by diffusion.

  15. Surface potential distribution of a LaAlO3 film on mixed termination SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yun Hyeong; Cho, Jin Hyung

    2016-09-01

    Scanning probe microscope (SPM) is used to investigate the morphology and the electric properties of the surface, as well as the interface, of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) films. To establish the physical properties of the heteroepitaxial oxide interface, we characterized single- and mixed-termination of the STO substrates by using nanoscopic measurements of the electric and the structural properties, as well as the LAO film grown on the mixed-terminated STO substrates. In the case of the LAO film grown on the low-miscut STO substrate, the surface potential only showed a difference at the step edge while the LAO film on the high-miscut STO substrate showed a considerable change in the surface potential distribution at the region in which step bunching has occurred. In the poling experiment, a significant rise in the surface potential difference is observed after writing of the DC bias.

  16. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress. PMID:20189854

  17. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  18. Vortices in magnetically coupled superconducting layered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, Roman G.; Kogan, Vladimir G.; Clem, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Pancake vortices in stacks of thin superconducting films or layers are considered. It is stressed that in the absence of Josephson coupling topological restrictions upon possible configurations of vortices are removed and various examples of structures forbidden in bulk superconductors are given. In particular, it is shown that vortices may skip surface layers in samples of less than a certain size R{sub c} which might be macroscopic. The Josephson coupling suppresses R{sub c} estimates. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Hollow vortices in weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikas; Crowdy, Darren

    2015-11-01

    In a two-dimensional, inviscid and steady fluid flow, hollow vortices are bounded regions of constant pressure with non-zero circulation. It is known that for an infinite row of incompressible hollow vortices, analytical solutions for the flow field and the shape of the hollow vortex boundary can be obtained using conformal mapping methods. In this talk, we show how to derive analytical expressions for a weakly compressible hollow vortex row. This is done by introducing a new method based on the Imai-Lamla formula. We will also touch upon how to extend these results to a von-Karman street of hollow vortices.

  20. Doing Interdisciplinary Mixed Methods Health Care Research: Working the Boundaries, Tensions, and Synergistic Potential of Team-Based Research.

    PubMed

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2016-04-01

    Current trends in health care research point to a shift from disciplinary models to interdisciplinary team-based mixed methods inquiry designs. This keynote address discusses the problems and prospects of creating vibrant mixed methods health care interdisciplinary research teams that can harness their potential synergy that holds the promise of addressing complex health care issues. We examine the range of factors and issues these types of research teams need to consider to facilitate efficient interdisciplinary mixed methods team-based research. It is argued that concepts such as disciplinary comfort zones, a lack of attention to team dynamics, and low levels of reflexivity among interdisciplinary team members can inhibit the effectiveness of a research team. This keynote suggests a set of effective strategies to address the issues that emanate from the new field of research inquiry known as team science as well as lessons learned from tapping into research on organizational dynamics.

  1. Atmospheric Vortices near Guadalupe Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These MISR images from June 11, 2000 (Terra orbit 2569) demonstrate a turbulent atmospheric flow pattern known as the von Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is named after aerodynamicist Theodore von Karman, who theoretically derived the conditions under which it occurs. The alternating double row of vortices can form in the wake of an obstacle, in this instance the eastern Pacific island of Guadalupe. The rugged terrain of this volcanic Mexican island reaches a maximum elevation of 1.3 kilometers. The island is about 35 kilometers long and is located 260 kilometers west of Baja California.

    The vortex pattern is made visible by the marine stratocumulus clouds around Guadalupe Island. The upper image is a color view obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. North is toward the left. The orientation of the vortex street indicates that the wind direction is from lower left to upper right (northwest to southeast). The areas within the vortex centers tend to be clear because the rotating motions induce a vertical wind component that can break up the cloud deck.

    The lower view is a stereo picture generated from data acquired by MISR's fore- and aft-viewing 70-degree cameras. A 3-D effect is obtained by viewing the image with red/blue glasses and placing the red filter over your left eye. Note how the downwelling atmospheric motion (change in elevation from high to low) is accompanied by a clearing in the center of the first vortex. As the vortices propagate downstream, their rotational velocities weaken. As a consequence, the induced vertical motion and cloud-clearing effect weakens as well.

    Theodore von Karman was a Professor of Aeronautics at Caltech and Director of Caltech's Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory from 1930-1949. He was one of the principal founders of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra

  2. The Potential Side Effects of Case-Mix Reimbursement on Clinical Data Bases and Physician Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Simborg, Donald W.

    1981-01-01

    Current pressures to utilize a case complexity or case-mix measure of hospital output for reimbursement purposes has two sources: a) the need to control hospital costs by relating amount of resource use to clinical conditions and b) the perceived inequity of ambulatory care reimbursement limitations. Although these pressures may be relieved by a case-mix hospital output measure, certain side effects may occur. The hospital clinical data base as reflected in the discharge abstract system will become more accurate although biased toward more costly case-mix categories. It will also be more complete, particularly with respect to surgical and other procedures. Physician behavior may change in three ways: a) actual diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making, b) the manner in which patient problems are represented in the information system, and c) admitting decision criteria.

  3. Edge tunneling of vortices in superconducting thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Iengo, R. |; Jug, G. |

    1996-11-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of the decay of a supercurrent due to the zero-temperature quantum tunneling of vortices from the edge in a thin superconducting film in the absence of an external magnetic field. An explicit formula is derived for the tunneling rate of vortices, which are subject to the Magnus force induced by the supercurrent, through the Coulomb-like potential barrier binding them to the film{close_quote}s edge. Our approach ensues from the nonrelativistic version of a Schwinger-type calculation for the decay of the two-dimensional vacuum previously employed for describing vortex-antivortex pair nucleation in the bulk of the sample. In the dissipation-dominated limit, our explicit edge-tunneling formula yields numerical estimates which are compared with those obtained for bulk nucleation to show that both mechanisms are possible for the decay of a supercurrent. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Polarization of massive fermions in a vortical fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ren-hong; Pang, Long-gang; Wang, Qun; Wang, Xin-nian

    2016-08-01

    Fermions become polarized in a vortical fluid due to spin-vorticity coupling. Such a polarization can be calculated from the Wigner function in a quantum kinetic approach. By extending previous results for chiral fermions, we derive the Wigner function for massive fermions up to next-to-leading order in spatial gradient expansion. The polarization density of fermions can be calculated from the axial vector component of the Wigner function and is found to be proportional to the local vorticity ω . The polarizations per particle for fermions and antifermions decrease with the chemical potential and increase with energy (mass). Both quantities approach the asymptotic value ℏ ω /4 in the large energy (mass) limit. The polarization per particle for fermions is always smaller than that for antifermions, whose ratio of fermions to antifermions also decreases with the chemical potential. The polarization per particle on the Cooper-Frye freeze-out hypersurface can also be formulated and is consistent with the previous result of Becattini et al.

  5. Vorticity matching in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, David C.

    1991-12-01

    Recent experiments have rekindled interest in high Reynolds number flows using superfluid helium. In a continuing series of experiments, the flow of helium II through various devices (smooth pipes, corrugated pipes, valves, venturies, turbine flowmeters, and coanda flowmeters for example) was investigated. In all cases, the measured values (typically, mass flow rates and pressure drops) were found to be well described by classical relations for high Reynolds flows. This is unexpected since helium II consists of two interpenetrating fluids; one fluid with nonzero viscosity (the normal fluid) and one with zero viscosity (the superfluid). Only the normal fluid component should directly obey classical relations. Since the experiments listed above only measure the external behavior of the flow (i.e., pressure drops over devices), there is a great deal of room for interpretation of their results. One possible interpretation is that in turbulent flows the normal fluid and the superfluid velocity fields are somehow 'locked' together, presumably by the mutual friction force between the superfluid vortex filaments and the normal fluid. We refer to this locking together of the two fluids as 'vorticity matching.'

  6. Combustion enhancement by axial vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Schadow, K. C.; Parr, T. P.; Parr, D. M.; Wilson, K. J.

    1987-06-01

    A tapered slot jet was studied experimentally in nonreacting and reacting tests using hot-wire anemometry, water-tunnel flow visualization, and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). The tapered slot jet is a modified elliptic jet which has a conical contraction leading to its outlet. The added contraction changes the entire flow field. The jet spread in the major axis plane is larger than in the minor axis plane, which is the opposite behavior of an elliptic jet. Consequently, no axes switching, typical to an elliptic jet, is observed. The turbulence amplification in the jet core is higher than in circular and elliptic jets. The different behavior is attributed to the change in flow direction, inside the nozzle, from the conical section to the slot outlet. During this transition, the flow acquires angular momentum thereby generating axial vorticity. The influence of the contraction angle and the outlet aspect ratio were investigated. The effect of the augmented turbulence on reactive flow was tested in a premixed flame. The combustion rate was augmented in both the core and edges of the flame relative to a circular burner.

  7. Tornadoes and other atmospheric vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The growth of random vortices in an atmosphere with buoyant instability and vertical wind shear is studied along with the velocities in a single gravity-driven vortex; a frictionless adiabatic model which is supported by laboratory experiments is first considered. The effects of axial drag, heat transfer, and precipitation-induced downdrafts are then calculated. Heat transfer and axial drag tend to have stabilizing effects; they reduce the downdrafts of updrafts due to buoyancy. It is found that downdrafts or tornadic magnitude might occur in negatively-buoyant columns. The radial-inflow velocity required to maintain a given maximum tangential velocity in a tornado is determined by using a turbulent vortex model. Conditions under which radial-inflow velocities become sufficiently large to produce tangential velocities of tornadic magnitude are determined. The radial velocities in the outer regions, as well as the tangential velocities in the inner regions may be large enough to cause damage. The surface boundary layer, which is a region where large radial inflows can occur, is studied, and the thickness of the radial-inflow friction layer is estimated. A tornado model which involves a rotating parent cloud, as well as buoyancy and precipitation effects, is discussed.

  8. The Born-Infeld vortices induced from a generalized Higgs mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaosen

    2016-04-01

    We construct self-dual Born-Infeld vortices induced from a generalized Higgs mechanism. Two specific models of the theory are of focused interest where the Higgs potential is either of a |φ|4- or |φ|6-type. For the |φ|4-model, we obtain a sharp existence and uniqueness theorem for doubly periodic and planar vortices. For doubly periodic solutions, a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence is explicitly derived in terms of the vortex number, the Born-Infeld parameter, and the size of the periodic lattice domain. For the |φ|6-model, we show that both topological and non-topological vortices are present. This new phenomenon distinguishes the model from the classical Born-Infeld-Higgs theory studied earlier in the literature. A series of results regarding doubly periodic, topological, and non-topological vortices in the |φ|6-model are also established.

  9. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    SciTech Connect

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  10. Chemical potential of oxygen in (U, Pu) mixed oxide with Pu/(U+Pu) = 0.46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Rimpi; Chandramouli, V.; Anthonysamy, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical potential of oxygen in (U,Pu) mixed oxide with Pu/(U + Pu) = 0.46 was measured for the first time using H2/H2O gas equilibration combined with solid electrolyte EMF technique at 1073, 1273 and 1473 K covering an oxygen potential range of -525 to -325 kJ mol-1. The effect of oxygen potential on the oxygen to metal ratio was determined. Increase in oxygen potential increases the O/M. In this study the minimum O/M obtained was 1.985 below which reduction was not possible. Partial molar enthalpy ΔHbar O2 and entropy ΔSbar O2 of oxygen were calculated from the oxygen potential data. The values of -752.36 kJ mol-1 and 0.25 kJ mol-1 were obtained for ΔHbar O2 and ΔSbar O2 respectively.

  11. Lidar measurements of the atmospheric entrainment zone and the potential temperature jump across the top of the mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Lidar data of the atmospheric entrainment zone from six days of clear air convection obtained in central Illinois during July 1979 are presented. A new method to measure the potential temperature jump across the entrainment zone based on only one temperature sounding and continuous lidar measurements of the mixed layer height is developed. An almost linear dependence is found between the normalized entrainment rate and the normalized thickness of the entrainment zone.

  12. Opioids potentiate electrical transmission at mixed synapses on the Mauthner cell

    PubMed Central

    Cachope, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptors were shown to modulate a variety of cellular processes in the vertebrate central nervous system, including synaptic transmission. While the effects of opioid receptors on chemically mediated transmission have been extensively investigated, little is known of their actions on gap junction-mediated electrical synapses. Here we report that pharmacological activation of mu-opioid receptors led to a long-term enhancement of electrical (and glutamatergic) transmission at identifiable mixed synapses on the goldfish Mauthner cells. The effect also required activation of both dopamine D1/5 receptors and postsynaptic cAMP-dependent protein kinase A, suggesting that opioid-evoked actions are mediated indirectly via the release of dopamine from varicosities known to be located in the vicinity of the synaptic contacts. Moreover, inhibitory inputs situated in the immediate vicinity of these excitatory synapses on the lateral dendrite of the Mauthner cell were not affected by activation of mu-opioid receptors, indicating that their actions are restricted to electrical and glutamatergic transmissions co-existing at mixed contacts. Thus, as their chemical counterparts, electrical synapses can be a target for the modulatory actions of the opioid system. Because gap junctions at these mixed synapses are formed by fish homologs of the neuronal connexin 36, which is widespread in mammalian brain, it is likely that this regulatory property applies to electrical synapses elsewhere as well. PMID:26019311

  13. Internally mixed sulfate and organic particles as potential ice nuclei in the tropical tropopause region.

    PubMed

    Wise, Matthew E; Baustian, Kelly J; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-04-13

    Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropical tropopause region and play a major role in the Earth's climate. Any changes to cirrus abundance due to natural or anthropogenic influences must be considered to evaluate future climate change. The detailed impact of cirrus clouds on climate depends on ice particle number, size, morphology, and composition. These properties depend in turn on the nucleation mechanism of the ice particles. Although it is often assumed that ice nucleates via a homogeneous mechanism, recent work points to the possibility that heterogeneous ice nucleation is important in the tropical tropopause region. However, there are very few studies of depositional ice nucleation on the complex types of particles likely to be found in this region of the atmosphere. Here, we use a unique method to probe depositional ice nucleation on internally mixed ammonium sulfate/palmitic acid particles, namely optical microscopy coupled with Raman microscopy. The deliquescence and efflorescence phase transitions of the mixed particles were first studied to gain insight into whether the particles are likely to be liquid or solid in the tropical tropopause region. The ice nucleating ability of the particles was then measured under typical upper tropospheric conditions. It was found that coating the particles with insoluble palmitic acid had little effect on the deliquescence, efflorescence, or ice nucleating ability of ammonium sulfate. Additional experiments involving Raman mapping provide new insights into how the composition and morphology of mixed particles impact their ability to nucleate ice.

  14. Some exact BPS solutions for exotic vortices and monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadhan, Handhika S.

    2016-07-01

    We present several analytical solutions of BPS vortices and monopoles in the generalized Abelian Maxwell-Higgs and Yang-Mills-Higgs theories, respectively. These models have recently been extensively studied and several exact solutions have already been obtained in [1,2]. In each theory, the dynamics is controlled by the additional two positive scalar-field-dependent functions, f (| ϕ |) and w (| ϕ |). For the case of vortices, we work in the ordinary symmetry-breaking Higgs potential, while for the case of monopoles we have the ordinary condition of the Prasad-Sommerfield limit. Our results generalize the exact solutions found previously. We also present solutions for BPS vortices with higher winding number. These solutions suffer from the condition that w (| ϕ |) has negative value at some finite range of r, but we argue that since it satisfies the weaker positive-value conditions then the corresponding energy density is still positive-definite and, thus, they are acceptable BPS solutions.

  15. The effect of crossflow on Taylor vortices: A model problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, S. R.; Bassom, Andrew P.

    1993-01-01

    A number of practically relevant problems involving the impulsive motion or the rapid rotation of bodies immersed in fluid are susceptible to vortex-like instability modes. Depending upon the configuration of any particular problem the stability properties of any high-wavenumber vortices can take on one of two distinct forms. One of these is akin to the structure of Gortler vortices in boundary layer flows while the other is similar to the situation for classical Taylor vortices. Both the Gortler and Taylor problems have been extensively studied when crossflow effects are excluded from the underlying base flows. Recently, studies were made concerning the influence of crossflow on Gortler modes and a linearized stability analysis is used to examine crossflow properties for the Taylor mode. This work allows us to identify the most unstable vortex as the crossflow component increases and it is shown how, like the Gortler case, only a very small crossflow component is required in order to completely stabilize the flow. Our investigation forms the basis for an extension to the nonlinear problem and is of potential applicability to a range of pertinent flows.

  16. Mechanics of Individual, Isolated Vortices in a Cuprate Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Auslaender, M.

    2010-05-25

    Superconductors often contain quantized microscopic whirlpools of electrons, called vortices, that can be modeled as one-dimensional elastic objects. Vortices are a diverse playground for condensed matter because of the interplay between thermal fluctuations, vortex-vortex interactions, and the interaction of the vortex core with the three-dimensional disorder landscape. While vortex matter has been studied extensively, the static and dynamic properties of an individual vortex have not. Here we employ magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to image and manipulate individual vortices in detwinned, single crystal YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.991} (YBCO), directly measuring the interaction of a moving vortex with the local disorder potential. We find an unexpected and dramatic enhancement of the response of a vortex to pulling when we wiggle it transversely. In addition, we find enhanced vortex pinning anisotropy that suggests clustering of oxygen vacancies in our sample and demonstrates the power of MFM to probe vortex structure and microscopic defects that cause pinning.

  17. Rotating structures and vortices in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Rotating structures are present in a number of low temperature EXB devices such as Hall thrusters, magnetrons, Penning discharges etc...Some aspects of the physics of these rotating instabilities are specific to low temperature plasmas because of the relatively large collisionality, the role of ionization, and the fact that ions are often non-magnetized. On the basis of fully kinetic simulations (Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions) we describe the formation of a rotating instability associated with an ionization front (``rotating spoke'') and driven by a cross-field current in a self-sustained cylindrical magnetron discharge at gas pressure on the order of 1 Pa. The rotating spoke is a strong double layer (electrostatic sheath) moving towards the higher potential region at a velocity close to the critical ionization velocity, a concept proposed by Alfvén in the context of the formation of the solar system. The mechanisms of cross-field electron transport induced by this instability are analyzed. At lower pressure (<0.01 Pa) the plasma of a magnetron discharge is non-neutral and the simulations predict the formation of electron vortices rotating in the azimuthal direction and resulting from the diocotron instability. The properties of these vortices are specific since they form in a self-sustained discharge where ionization (and losses at the ends of the plasma column) play an essential role in contrast with the electron vortices in pure electron plasmas. We discuss and analyze the mechanisms leading to the generation, dynamics and merging of these self-sustained electron vortices, and to the periodic ejection of fast electrons at the column ends (consistent with previous experimental observations).

  18. Gaseous Vortices in Barred Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Martin N.; Hunter, James H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    During the course of examining many two-dimensional, as well as a smaller sample of three-dimensional, models of gas flows in barred spiral galaxies, we have been impressed by the ubiquitous presence fo vortex pairs, oriented roughly perpendicular to their bars, with one vortex on each side. The vortices are obvious only when viewed in the bar frame, and the centers of their velocity fields usually are near Lagrangian points L(sub 4,5). In all models that we have studied, the vortices form on essentially the same time scale as that for the development of gaseous spiral arms, typically two bar rotations. Usually the corotation radius, r(sub c), lies slightly beyond the end of the bar. Depending upon the mass distributions of the various components, gas spirals either into, or out of, the vortices: In the former case, the vortices become regions of high density, whereas the opposite is true if the gas spirals out of a vortex. The models described in this paper have low-density vortices, as do most of the models we have studied. Moreover, usually the vortex centers lie approximately within +/- 15 deg of L(sub 4,5). In the stellar dynamic limit, when pressure and viscous forces are absent, short-period orbits exist, centered on L(sub 4,5). These orbits need not cross and therefore their morphology is that of gas streamlines, that is, vortices. We believe that the gas vortices in our models are hydrodynamic analogues of closed, short-period, libration orbits centered on L(sub 4,5).

  19. On the Unexpected Longevity of the Great Red Spot, Oceanic Eddies, and other Baroclinic Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Marcus, Philip

    2013-11-01

    Vortices in the ocean and atmosphere dissipate via various mechanisms such as wave emission, turbulence, and thermal radiation. However, these vortices are observed to live much longer than the time scales of the dissipation processes. Here we model these processes as either Rayleigh drag or Newtonian cooling with time scale τ, and use simulations of the 3D non-hydrostatic Boussinesq equations. Our results show that vortices in fact do NOT decay at the imposed time scale τ they decay much slower, sometimes by a factor of 100. The slow decay is due to a meridional circulation, which converts the potential energy to the kinetic energy and vice versa and slows down the decay. In the presence of horizontal shear, the circulation can extract the shear energy and further energize the vortex. We explain the existence of the meridional circulation, the slow decay, and the resulting cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry using the numerical results, a physical model, and simplified equations. Our results suggest that the observed longevity of some vortices can be explained without a forcing mechanism. For very long-lived vortices, such as the Great Red Spot, our results imply that much weaker forcing, compared to what originally thought, is needed to maintain the vortices.

  20. The Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent Field of N Interacting Vortices in the Zero Viscosity Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, Richard; Green, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    We present an analysis of the Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field of interacting vortices in the potential flow limit. This work is based on an inviscid approximation, but develops a useful tool that will aid in the effort of understanding the interactions of vortices and turbulence in viscous fluids. The FTLE field of N interacting vortices is computed numerically in two dimensions in different physical scenarios: i) orbiting one another with no initial velocities, ii) approaching each other given an initial velocity and iii) as periodically produced behind a circular cylinder. For situation ii) we expand on the cases where the approach velocities of the vortices are less than or greater than a critical capture velocity, that is, the velocity necessary to escape a captured orbit between co-rotating vortices. We focus on the evolution and interaction of the Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) in these scenarios to determine if there is a way to anticipate the character of vortex interaction by the initial structure of the LCS. Additional remarks will be made on the extrapolation of observations to a large number of interacting vortices (large N). This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0210.

  1. The role of vorticity fluxes in the dynamics of the Zapiola Anticyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Denis L.; Fu, Lee-Lueng

    2008-11-01

    The Argentine Basin in the South Atlantic Ocean is one of the most energetic regions in the ocean with complicated dynamics, which plays an important role in the global climate. A number of observations have discovered an intense anticyclonic gyre of barotropic circulation around the Zapiola Rise in the center of the basin. Theoretical studies have shown that the Zapiola Anticyclone represents an eddy-driven flow controlled by bottom friction. Recent advances in high-resolution global-ocean data syntheses, performed using NASA supercomputing facilities, provide realistic simulations of the circulation and the variability in the Argentine Basin. Using these simulations and satellite altimeter observations, we analyzed the vorticity balance of the Zapiola Anticyclone. Our results suggest the dominance of vorticity fluxes and the advection of the potential vorticity over a nonuniform bottom topography in determining the variability of the gyre, while the impact of the local wind stress is small. The divergence of the relative vorticity anomaly advection by eddies is found to be the most important contributor to the relative vorticity flux divergence influencing the variability of the Zapiola Anticyclone. Our results demonstrate that the relative vorticity influencing the variability of the anticyclone is mainly advected from the south where the northern branch of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at the Subpolar Front is located.

  2. Initial Circulation and Peak Vorticity Behavior of Vortices Shed from Airfoil Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.; Biesiadny, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An extensive parametric study of vortices shed from airfoil vortex generators has been conducted to determine the dependence of initial vortex circulation and peak vorticity on elements of the airfoil geometry and impinging flow conditions. These elements include the airfoil angle of attack, chord length, span, aspect ratio, local boundary layer thickness, and free stream Mach number. In addition, the influence of airfoil-to-airfoil spacing on the circulation and peak vorticity has been examined for pairs of co-rotating and counter-rotating vortices. The vortex generators were symmetric airfoils having a NACA-0012 cross-sectional profile. These airfoils were mounted either in isolation, or in pairs, on the surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio was about 17 percent. The circulation and peak vorticity data were derived from cross-plane velocity measurements acquired with a seven-hole probe at one chord-length downstream of the airfoil trailing edge location. The circulation is observed to be proportional to the free-stream Mach number, the angle-of-attack, and the span-to-boundary layer thickness ratio. With these parameters held constant, the circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio. The peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to the free-stream Mach number, the airfoil angle-of-attack, and the span-to-boundary layer thickness ratio. Unlike circulation, however, the peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at an aspect ratio of about 2.0 before falling off again at higher values of aspect ratio. Co-rotating vortices shed from closely spaced pairs of airfoils have values of circulation and peak vorticity under those values found for vortices shed from isolated airfoils of the same geometry. Conversely, counter-rotating vortices show enhanced values of circulation and peak vorticity when compared to values

  3. Oligonuclear ferrocene amides: mixed-valent peptides and potential redox-switchable foldamers.

    PubMed

    Siebler, Daniel; Linseis, Michael; Gasi, Teuta; Carrella, Luca M; Winter, Rainer F; Förster, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2011-04-11

    Trinuclear ferrocene tris-amides were synthesized from an Fmoc- or Boc-protected ferrocene amino acid, and hydrogen-bonded zigzag conformations were determined by NMR spectroscopy, molecular modelling, and X-ray diffraction. In these ordered secondary structures orientation of the individual amide dipole moments approximately in the same direction results in a macrodipole moment similar to that of α-helices composed of α-amino acids. Unlike ordinary α-amino acids, the building blocks in these ferrocene amides with defined secondary structure can be sequentially oxidized to mono-, di-, and trications. Singly and doubly charged mixed-valent cations were probed experimentally by Vis/NIR, paramagnetic ¹H NMR and Mössbauer spectroscopy and investigated theoretically by DFT calculations. According to the appearance of intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) bands in solution, the ferrocene/ferrocenium amides are described as Robin-Day class II mixed-valent systems. Mössbauer spectroscopy indicates trapped valences in the solid state. The secondary structure of trinuclear ferrocene tris-amides remains intact (coiled form) upon oxidation to mono- and dications according to DFT calculations, while oxidation to the trication should break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and unfold the ferrocene peptide (uncoiled form).

  4. Enhancing the hydrolysis and methane production potential of mixed food waste by an effective enzymatic pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Esra Uçkun; Trzcinski, Antoine P; Liu, Yu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a fungal mash rich in hydrolytic enzymes was produced by solid state fermentation (SSF) of waste cake in a simple and efficient manner and was further applied for high-efficiency hydrolysis of mixed food wastes (FW). The enzymatic pretreatment of FW with this fungal mash resulted in 89.1 g/L glucose, 2.4 g/L free amino nitrogen, 165 g/L soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and 64% reduction in volatile solids within 24h. The biomethane yield and production rate from FW pretreated with the fungal mash were found to be respectively about 2.3 and 3.5-times higher than without pretreatment. After anaerobic digestion of pretreated FW, a volatile solids removal of 80.4±3.5% was achieved. The pretreatment of mixed FW with the fungal mash produced in this study is a promising option for enhancing anaerobic digestion of FW in terms of energy recovery and volume reduction.

  5. Assessment of the potential suitability of southwest Brooklyn incinerator residue in asphaltic-concrete mixes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chesner, W.H.; Collins, R.J.; Fung, T.

    1988-02-01

    The results of a one-year incinerator residue sampling program at the Southwest Brooklyn Incinerator in New York City are reported. The program was designed to characterize the physical properties of incinerator residue. Asphalt mixes were prepared using blends of sampled incinerator residue with conventional aggregate, to determine the suitability of using incinerator residue in asphaltic concrete for road paving applications. The results of the investigation are compared with those of previous studies. Engineering and processing requirements are presented for converting residue into a usable aggregate material. Capital costs, operating costs, potential revenues and net annual costs are provided for a full-scale residue processing facility at the Southwest Brooklyn Incinerator. Environmental issues associated with residue recycling are identified and discussed. Recommendations are provided for additional laboratory work and field applications needed to demonstrate the use of residue in asphalt mixes.

  6. Measurements of Supersonic Wing Tip Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Michael K.; Kalkhoran, Iraj M.; Benston, James

    1994-01-01

    An experimental survey of supersonic wing tip vortices has been conducted at Mach 2.5 using small performed 2.25 chords down-stream of a semi-span rectangular wing at angle of attack of 5 and 10 degrees. The main objective of the experiments was to determine the Mach number, flow angularity and total pressure distribution in the core region of supersonic wing tip vortices. A secondary aim was to demonstrate the feasibility of using cone probes calibrated with a numerical flow solver to measure flow characteristics at supersonic speeds. Results showed that the numerically generated calibration curves can be used for 4-hole cone probes, but were not sufficiently accurate for conventional 5-hole probes due to nose bluntness effects. Combination of 4-hole cone probe measurements with independent pitot pressure measurements indicated a significant Mach number and total pressure deficit in the core regions of supersonic wing tip vortices, combined with an asymmetric 'Burger like' swirl distribution.

  7. Vorticity, defects and correlations in active turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a numerical investigation of a continuum model of an active nematic, concentrating on the regime of active turbulence. Results are presented for the effect of three parameters, activity, elastic constant and rotational diffusion constant, on the order parameter and flow fields. Defects and distortions in the director field act as sources of vorticity, and thus vorticity is strongly correlated to the director field. In particular, the characteristic length of decay of vorticity and order parameter correlations is controlled by the defect density. By contrast, the decay of velocity correlations is determined by a balance between activity and dissipation. We highlight the role of microscopic flow generation mechanisms in determining the flow patterns and characteristic scales of active turbulence and contrast the behaviour of extensile and contractile active nematics. PMID:25332382

  8. Droplet Vorticity Alignment in Model Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migler, Kalman

    2000-03-01

    The shear induced deformation of polymeric droplets in an immiscible polymeric matrix is studied using a transparent rotating plate-plate device. We consider the case where the viscosity ratio of the two phases is near unity, but the elasticity ratio of the droplet to the matrix is of order 10^2. This is achieved by using a matrix of PDMS and a droplet of a PIB based Boger fluid. In the limit of weak shear and small droplets, the droplet alignment is along the shear direction, whereas for strong shear and large droplets, the alignment is along the vorticity direction. There is a range of conditions for which alignment can be along either axis. For droplets aligned along the vorticity axis, the distribution of aspect ratios is broad. The transformation from flow alignment to vorticity alignment upon commencement of shear flow has been observed and correlates with the time scale for development of normal forces in the Boger fluid.

  9. Possible dust devils - Vortices on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Lucich, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of local vortices, and dust devils, on Mars as observed by Viking Landers 1 and 2. It is found that these vortices are most common during Martian spring and summer, as occurs on earth. Seven of the vortices involve wind speeds that may raise dust from the Martian surface. There is no indication that these possible dust devils contribute to the planet-wide spread of major dust storms. However, it appears that they may help in maintaining the atmospheric dust content. The data indicate that there is no preference in rotation direction, at least to core diameters of 300 m (corresponding to a region of influence of about 3 km diameter).

  10. Vorticity and Divergence in the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Noyes, Robert W.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Title, Alan M.

    1995-07-01

    We have studied an outstanding sequence of continuum images of the solar granulation from Pic du Midi Observatory. We have calculated the horizontal vector flow field using a correlation tracking algorithm, and from this determined three scalar fields: the vertical component of the curl, the horizontal divergence, and the horizontal flow speed. The divergence field has substantially longer coherence time and more power than does the curl field. Statistically, curl is better correlated with regions of negative divergence that is, the vertical vorticity is higher in downflow regions, suggesting excess vorticity in intergranular lanes. The average value of the divergence is largest (i.e., outflow is largest) where the horizontal speed is large; we associate these regions with exploding granules. A numerical simulation of general convection also shows similar statistical differences between curl and divergence. Some individual small bright points in the granulation pattern show large local vorticities.

  11. A Note on Trapping Moving Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Hsiao C.

    2000-01-01

    The topic of stationary configurations of point vortices, also known as vortex equilibrium, has received considerable attention in recent years. By observing numerical results, it is found that a "counterpart" of this system also exists, in which moving vortices may be "trapped" by an inlet-like device to form a stationary pattern with no translational motion. After an intuitive explanation for the process, vortex trajectory maps based on numerical results are presented. These maps exhibit two stationary points under the present conditions, which are the focal points of vortex trajectories. A vortex upstream of these points, if within a certain offset range, will move towards these points spontaneously and be captured there. This proposed device is also capable of trapping spinning vortex pairs and triads. It is possible to impose a uniform stream at infinity, as long as the flow field is still dominated by the moving vortices.

  12. Moduli of Vortices and Grassmann Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Indranil; Romão, Nuno M.

    2013-05-01

    We use the framework of Quot schemes to give a novel description of the moduli spaces of stable n-pairs, also interpreted as gauged vortices on a closed Riemann surface Σ with target {Mat_{r × n}({C})}, where n ≥ r. We then show that these moduli spaces embed canonically into certain Grassmann manifolds, and thus obtain natural Kähler metrics of Fubini-Study type. These spaces are smooth at least in the local case r = n. For abelian local vortices we prove that, if a certain "quantization" condition is satisfied, the embedding can be chosen in such a way that the induced Fubini-Study structure realizes the Kähler class of the usual L 2 metric of gauged vortices.

  13. Vorticity and divergence in the solar photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, YI; Noyes, Robert W.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Title, Alan M.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied an outstanding sequence of continuum images of the solar granulation from Pic du Midi Observatory. We have calculated the horizontal vector flow field using a correlation tracking algorithm, and from this determined three scalar field: the vertical component of the curl; the horizontal divergence; and the horizontal flow speed. The divergence field has substantially longer coherence time and more power than does the curl field. Statistically, curl is better correlated with regions of negative divergence - that is, the vertical vorticity is higher in downflow regions, suggesting excess vorticity in intergranular lanes. The average value of the divergence is largest (i.e., outflow is largest) where the horizontal speed is large; we associate these regions with exploding granules. A numerical simulation of general convection also shows similar statistical differences between curl and divergence. Some individual small bright points in the granulation pattern show large local vorticities.

  14. Identification of vortices in complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, P.; Balachandar, S.; Adrian, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Dating back to Leonardo da Vinci's famous sketches of vortices in turbulent flows, fluid dynamicists for over five centuries have continued to visualize and interpret complex flows in terms of motion of vortices. Nevertheless, much debate surrounds the question of how to unambiguously define vortices in complex flows. This debate has resulted in the availability of many vortex identification criteria---mathematical statements of what constitutes a vortex. Here we review the popularly used local or point- wise vortex identification criteria. Based on local flow kinematics, we describe a unified framework to interpret the similarities and differences in the usage of these criteria. We discuss the limitations on the applicability of these criteria when there is a significant component of vortex interactions. Finally, we provide guidelines for applying these criteria to geophysical flows.

  15. Characterization of reconnecting vortices in superfluid helium

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Gregory P.; Paoletti, Matthew S.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    When two vortices cross, each of them breaks into two parts and exchanges part of itself for part of the other. This process, called vortex reconnection, occurs in classical and superfluids, and in magnetized plasmas and superconductors. We present the first experimental observations of reconnection between quantized vortices in superfluid helium. We do so by imaging micrometer-sized solid hydrogen particles trapped on quantized vortex cores and by inferring the occurrence of reconnection from the motions of groups of recoiling particles. We show that the distance separating particles on the just-reconnected vortex lines grows as a power law in time. The average value of the scaling exponent is approximately ½, consistent with the self-similar evolution of the vortices. PMID:18768790

  16. Aerodynamics and vortical structures in hovering fruitflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2015-03-01

    We measure the wing kinematics and morphological parameters of seven freely hovering fruitflies and numerically compute the flows of the flapping wings. The computed mean lift approximately equals to the measured weight and the mean horizontal force is approximately zero, validating the computational model. Because of the very small relative velocity of the wing, the mean lift coefficient required to support the weight is rather large, around 1.8, and the Reynolds number of the wing is low, around 100. How such a large lift is produced at such a low Reynolds number is explained by combining the wing motion data, the computed vortical structures, and the theory of vorticity dynamics. It has been shown that two unsteady mechanisms are responsible for the high lift. One is referred as to "fast pitching-up rotation": at the start of an up- or downstroke when the wing has very small speed, it fast pitches down to a small angle of attack, and then, when its speed is higher, it fast pitches up to the angle it normally uses. When the wing pitches up while moving forward, large vorticity is produced and sheds at the trailing edge, and vorticity of opposite sign is produced near the leading edge and on the upper surface, resulting in a large time rate of change of the first moment of vorticity (or fluid impulse), hence a large aerodynamic force. The other is the well known "delayed stall" mechanism: in the mid-portion of the up- or downstroke the wing moves at large angle of attack (about 45 deg) and the leading-edge-vortex (LEV) moves with the wing; thus, the vortex ring, formed by the LEV, the tip vortices, and the starting vortex, expands in size continuously, producing a large time rate of change of fluid impulse or a large aerodynamic force.

  17. Hypotriglyceridemic potential of fermented mixed tea made with third-crop green tea leaves and camellia (Camellia japonica) leaves in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Shizuka; Ohmachi, Kazuhiro; Miyata, Yuji; Tanaka, Takashi; Kubayasi, Takashi; Nagata, Yasuo; Tanaka, Kazunari

    2013-06-19

    Fermented mixed tea made with third-crop green tea leaves and camellia leaves by a tea-rolling process has been developed. The objective of this study was to investigate hypotriglyceridemic potential of the mixed tea in rats. The mixed tea contained theasinensins and theaflavins. Rats fed the mixed tea extract at the level of 1% exerted significantly lower body weight and adipose tissue weight compared to animals fed third-crop green tea or camellia tea extract alone for 4 weeks. Serum and hepatic triglyceride was significantly and dose-dependently decreased by the mixed tea. This decrease was associated with lowered lipogenic enzyme activities in the liver. Furthermore, an oral administration of 4 or 8% of the mixed tea extract followed by fat emulsion suppressed the increment of serum triglyceride level. These results suggest that the mixed tea has hypotriglyceridemic action, partially via delaying triglyceride absorption in the small intestine and repressing hepatic lipogenic enzymes.

  18. Vorticity Confinement Applied to Turbulent Wing Tip Vortices for Wake-Integral Drag Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Kristopher; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    In the current study the vorticity confinement (VC) approach was applied to tip vortices shed by edges of stationary wings in order to predict induced drag by far-field integration in Trefftz plane. The VC parameter was evaluated first by application to convection of vortices in 2-D uniform flow and then to tip vortices shed in 3-D simulation of finite-aspect ratio rectangular wing in subsonic flight. Dependence of VC parameter on the flight Mach number and the angle of attack was evaluated. The aerodynamic drag results with application of VC to prevent numerical diffusion are much closer to analytic lifting line theory compared to integration over surface of wing while the viscous profile drag is more accurately evaluated by surface integration. To apply VC to viscous and turbulent flows, it is shown that VC does not affect the physical rate of dissipation of vortices in viscous/turbulent flows at time scales corresponding to convection of vortices from the wing to Trefftz plane of integration. To account for turbulent effects on tip vortices, VC was applied in combination with Spalart-Allmaras, k- ɛ, and six Reynolds stresses models of turbulence. The results are compared to experiments to validate the physical dissipation of tip vortex. This research was supported by The Dayton Area Graduate Studies Institute (DAGSI) and US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) grants in 2009-2013, US Army Research Office (ARO) in 2012-2013 and ASEE/AFRL summer faculty grant.

  19. Jet Nozzle Having Centerbody for Enhanced Exit Area Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M. (Inventor); Gilinsky, Mikhail M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A nozzle arrangement includes a nozzle and a centerbody. The longitudinal axis of the centerbody is coaxially aligned with the nozzle. The centerbody has a free end portion shaped to create vortices in exhaust exiting the exit area. The vortices enhance mixing action in the exhaust and reduce exhaust noise while augmenting thrust.

  20. Lattices of quantized vortices in polariton superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulier, Thomas; Cancellieri, Emiliano; Sangouard, Nicolas D.; Hivet, Romain; Glorieux, Quentin; Giacobino, Élisabeth; Bramati, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    In this review, we will focus on the description of the recent studies conducted in the quest for the observation of lattices of quantized vortices in resonantly injected polariton superfluids. In particular, we will show how the implementation of optical traps for polaritons allows for the realization of vortex-antivortex lattices in confined geometries and how the development of a flexible method to inject a controlled orbital angular momentum (OAM) in such systems results in the observation of patterns of same-sign vortices.

  1. Noise from two-dimensional vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, N. D.; Stockman, N. O.

    1972-01-01

    The fluctuating flow in an idealized model of a turbulent shear layer composed of many discrete vortices is analyzed. Computer solutions reveal irregular motions which are similar in many respects to observed flows in turbulent three-dimensional layers. The model is further simplified to a pair of equal co-rotating vortices and the noise generation is analyzed in terms of equivalent quadrupole oscillations. Results of the analysis in a uniform medium are consistent with Lighthill's results. New results are obtained for the effects of mean velocity gradients, compressibility, temperature inhomogenities, and gradients of the mean Mach number.

  2. Spatially-partitioned many-body vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiman, S.; Alon, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    A vortex in Bose-Einstein condensates is a localized object which looks much like a tiny tornado storm. It is well described by mean-field theory. In the present work we go beyond the current paradigm and introduce many-body vortices. These are made of spatially- partitioned clouds, carry definite total angular momentum, and are fragmented rather than condensed objects which can only be described beyond mean-field theory. A phase diagram based on a mean-field model assists in predicting the parameters where many-body vortices occur. Implications are briefly discussed.

  3. Vortices and the related principles of hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1921-01-01

    Here, conceptions concerning vortices are illustrated by the simplest possible examples. Mathematical formulas and similar means of presentation, which, for the most part, do not help the understanding of persons not versed therein, have been avoided as much as possible. Instead, the author has endeavored to demonstrate the phenomena by means of simple geometrical and mechanical illustrations. For the sake of clarity, the author chiefly considers currents in one plane only, a situation that can be readily represented by diagrams. Some of the peculiarities of vortices in three dimensional flow are briefly discussed.

  4. A phloem-sap feeder mixes phloem and xylem sap to regulate osmotic potential.

    PubMed

    Pompon, Julien; Quiring, Dan; Goyer, Claudia; Giordanengo, Philippe; Pelletier, Yvan

    2011-09-01

    Phloem-sap feeders (Hemiptera) occasionally consume the dilute sap of xylem, a behaviour that has previously been associated with replenishing water balance following dehydration. However, a recent study reported that non-dehydrated aphids ingested xylem sap. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the consumption of xylem sap, which has a low osmolality, is a general response to osmotic stresses other than dehydration. Alate aphids were subjected to different treatments and subsequently transferred onto a plant, where electrical penetration graph (EPG) was used to estimate durations of passive phloem sap consumption and active sucking of xylem sap. The proportion of time aphids fed on xylem sap (i.e., time spent feeding on xylem sap/total time spent feeding on phloem plus xylem sap) was used as a proxy of the solute concentration of the uptake. The proportion of time alate aphids fed on xylem sap increased: (1) with the time spent imbibing an artificial diet containing a solution of sucrose, which is highly concentrated in phloem sap and is mainly responsible for the high osmotic potential of phloem sap; (2) with the osmotic potential of the artificial diet, when osmotic potential excess was not related to sucrose concentration; and (3) when aphids were deprived of primary symbionts, a condition previously shown to lead to a higher haemolymph osmotic potential. All our results converge to support the hypothesis that xylem sap consumption contributes to the regulation of the osmotic potential in phloem-sap feeders.

  5. Application of commercial sensor manufacturing methods for NOx/NH3 mixed potential sensors for emissions control

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Nelson, Mark A; Sekhar, Praveen; Williamson, Todd; Garzon, Fernando H

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research effort is to develop a low cost on-board Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x})/Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) sensor that can not only be used for emissions control but has the potential to improve efficiency through better monitoring of the combustion process and feedback control in both vehicle and stationary systems. Over the past decade, Los AJamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed a unique class of electrochemical gas sensors for the detection of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, hydrogen and nitrogen oxides. These sensors are based on the mixed-potential phenomenon and are a modification of the existing automotive lambda (oxygen) sensor and have the potential to meet the stringent sensitivity, selectivity and stability requirements of an on-board emissions/engine control sensor system. The current state of the art LANL technology is based on the stabilization of the electrochemical interfaces and relies on an externally heated, hand-made, tape cast device. We are now poised to apply our patented sensing principles in a mass production sensor platform that is more suitable for real world engine-out testing such as on dynamometers for vehicle applications and for exhaust-out testing in heavy boilers/SCR systems in power plants. In this present work, our goal is to advance towards commercialization of this technology by packaging the unique LANL sensor design in a standard automotive sensor-type platform. This work is being performed with the help of a leading US technical ceramics firm, utilizing commercial manufacturing techniques. Initial tape cast platforms with screen printed metal oxide and Pt sensor electrodes have shown promising results but also clearly show the need for us to optimize the electrode and electrolyte compositions/morphologies and interfaces of these devices in order to demonstrate a sensitive, selective, and stable NO{sub x} sensor. Our previous methods and routes to preparing stable and reproducible mixed potential sensors

  6. A simple hydrodynamic model of tornado-like vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Based on similarity arguments, a simple fluid dynamic model of tornado-like vortices is offered that, with account for "vortex breakdown" at a certain height above the ground, relates the maximal azimuthal velocity in the vortex, reachable near the ground surface, to the convective available potential energy (CAPE) stored in the environmental atmosphere under pre-tornado conditions. The relative proportion of the helicity (kinetic energy) destruction (dissipation) in the "vortex breakdown" zone and, accordingly, within the surface boundary layer beneath the vortex is evaluated. These considerations form the basis of the dynamic-statistical analysis of the relationship between the tornado intensity and the CAPE budget in the surrounding atmosphere.

  7. Wake sorting, selective predation and biogenic mixing: potential reasons for high turbulence in fish schools.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jay

    2013-01-01

    There has been debate about animals' contribution to ocean circulation, called biomixing, or biogenic mixing. The energy input of schooling fish is significant but the eddies may be too small; so energy is dissipated as heat before impacting oceanic structure. I suggest that high turbulence caused by some very large aggregations of small animals has an important impact via a more direct ecosystem feedback process than overall ocean circulation. In the model presented here, large schools exhibit cooperative behavior and act like giant sieves grading zooplankton through individual swimmer's wakes, which focus the best prey in predictable positions. Following schoolers exploit these patterns. Then schools leave, in their wakes, chaotic turbulence enhancing growth of the smaller zooplankton and phytoplankton which has been graded out by the school. The result is a different community structure of plankton than would exist without such biomixing. Changes to plankton abundance and community structure on oceanic scales over the past century are correlated to overfishing and are consistent with this concept. PMID:23825796

  8. Spectroscopy and high-spin structure of 210Fr: Isomerism and potential evidence for configuration mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margerin, V.; Lane, G. J.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Palalani, N.; Smith, M. L.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of 210Fr has been established up to an excitation energy of ˜5.5 MeV and spins of ˜25 ℏ , via time-correlated γ -ray spectroscopy and using the 197Au(18O,5 n )210Fr reaction with pulsed beams at an energy of 97 MeV. A significantly different level scheme has been obtained compared to previous publications. Several isomers are reported here, including a Jπ=(23) +,τ =686 (9 ) -ns state at 4417 keV and a 10-, 29.8(11)-ns state at 1113 keV. The former isomer has been associated with the π (h9/2 3i13/2 2) ν (p1/2 -2f5/2 -1) configuration and decays via proposed E 3 transitions with strengths of 8.4(3) and 21.2(8) W.u. There are only very few known cases of a high-spin isomer decaying via two parallel E 3 transitions. Indeed, this is not seen in other Fr nuclei, and consequently these strengths differ from related decays in the neighboring isotopes. However, by examining the systematics of E 3 transitions in trans-lead nuclei, we suggest that the weaker of the two transitions decays to a mixed 20- state. Systematics of the 10- isomer are also discussed. Comparisons are made between the observed spectrum of states and those predicted from semiempirical shell-model calculations.

  9. Wake sorting, selective predation and biogenic mixing: potential reasons for high turbulence in fish schools.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jay

    2013-01-01

    There has been debate about animals' contribution to ocean circulation, called biomixing, or biogenic mixing. The energy input of schooling fish is significant but the eddies may be too small; so energy is dissipated as heat before impacting oceanic structure. I suggest that high turbulence caused by some very large aggregations of small animals has an important impact via a more direct ecosystem feedback process than overall ocean circulation. In the model presented here, large schools exhibit cooperative behavior and act like giant sieves grading zooplankton through individual swimmer's wakes, which focus the best prey in predictable positions. Following schoolers exploit these patterns. Then schools leave, in their wakes, chaotic turbulence enhancing growth of the smaller zooplankton and phytoplankton which has been graded out by the school. The result is a different community structure of plankton than would exist without such biomixing. Changes to plankton abundance and community structure on oceanic scales over the past century are correlated to overfishing and are consistent with this concept.

  10. Dynamics of two discrete vortices with different circulations composed of pure electron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Soga, Yukihiro; Mihara, Yasuhiro; Park, Youngsoo

    2015-06-29

    Two-dimensional dynamics of two vortex strings with different circulations were experimentally observed. The strings were composed of pure electron plasmas and were confined in a Malmberg–Penning trap. When one of the two vortices trapped in a conventional potential well had weak circulation, the orbits of the two vortices contradicted the point vortex theory. This disagreement stems from an unavoidable external electric field that exerts a different additional E × B drift velocity on each vortex. We resolved the discrepancy between observation and theory by applying a stepwise potential to the end electrodes, which produced a less non-ideal electric field.

  11. Potential human pathogenic bacteria in a mixed urban watershed as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, A Mark; Leddy, Menu; Murinda, Shelton E

    2013-01-01

    Current microbial source tracking (MST) methods for water depend on testing for fecal indicator bacterial counts or specific marker gene sequences to identify fecal contamination where potential human pathogenic bacteria could be present. In this study, we applied 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing to identify bacterial pathogen DNA sequences, including those not traditionally monitored by MST and correlated their abundances to specific sources of contamination such as urban runoff and agricultural runoff from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), recreation park area, waste-water treatment plants, and natural sites with little or no human activities. Samples for pyrosequencing were surface water, and sediment collected from 19 sites. A total of 12,959 16S rRNA gene sequences with average length of ≤400 bp were obtained, and were assigned to corresponding taxonomic ranks using ribosomal database project (RDP), Classifier and Greengenes databases. The percent of total potential pathogens were highest in urban runoff water (7.94%), agricultural runoff sediment (6.52%), and Prado Park sediment (6.00%), respectively. Although the numbers of DNA sequence tags from pyrosequencing were very high for the natural site, corresponding percent potential pathogens were very low (3.78-4.08%). Most of the potential pathogenic bacterial sequences identified were from three major phyla, namely, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The use of deep sequencing may provide improved and faster methods for the identification of pathogen sources in most watersheds so that better risk assessment methods may be developed to enhance public health.

  12. Evolution of a barotropic shear layer into elliptical vortices.

    PubMed

    Guha, Anirban; Rahmani, Mona; Lawrence, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    When a barotropic shear layer becomes unstable, it produces the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). The nonlinear manifestation of the KHI is usually in the form of spiral billows. However, a piecewise linear shear layer produces a different type of KHI characterized by elliptical vortices of constant vorticity connected via thin braids. Using direct numerical simulation and contour dynamics, we show that the interaction between two counterpropagating vorticity waves is solely responsible for this KHI formation. We investigate the oscillation of the vorticity wave amplitude, the rotation and nutation of the elliptical vortex, and straining of the braids. Our analysis also provides a possible explanation for the formation and evolution of elliptical vortices appearing in geophysical and astrophysical flows, e.g., meddies, stratospheric polar vortices, Jovian vortices, Neptune's Great Dark Spot, and coherent vortices in the wind belts of Uranus. PMID:23410439

  13. Evolution of a barotropic shear layer into elliptical vortices.

    PubMed

    Guha, Anirban; Rahmani, Mona; Lawrence, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    When a barotropic shear layer becomes unstable, it produces the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). The nonlinear manifestation of the KHI is usually in the form of spiral billows. However, a piecewise linear shear layer produces a different type of KHI characterized by elliptical vortices of constant vorticity connected via thin braids. Using direct numerical simulation and contour dynamics, we show that the interaction between two counterpropagating vorticity waves is solely responsible for this KHI formation. We investigate the oscillation of the vorticity wave amplitude, the rotation and nutation of the elliptical vortex, and straining of the braids. Our analysis also provides a possible explanation for the formation and evolution of elliptical vortices appearing in geophysical and astrophysical flows, e.g., meddies, stratospheric polar vortices, Jovian vortices, Neptune's Great Dark Spot, and coherent vortices in the wind belts of Uranus.

  14. Cystic nephroma/mixed epithelial stromal tumor: a benign neoplasm with potential for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda L; Abern, Michael; Garzon, Steven; Setty, Suman

    2015-05-01

    Cystic nephroma (CN) is a rare, benign, renal neoplasm composed of epithelial and stromal elements. Only about 200 cases have been reported since 1892 and recurrence has rarely been observed. We report a 32-year-old Hispanic woman, with a history of a right, complex cystic, renal mass treated by robotic decortication 2 years ago, who presented with flank pain, hematuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection. A magnetic resonance imaging study showed a 3.4-cm multicystic lesion with thickened septa and enhancement at the right kidney. The partial nephrectomy specimen revealed a well-circumscribed, multicystic tumor abutting the renal pelvis, with thick septa and smooth walls, filled with clear fluid. Microscopic examination showed variably sized cysts lined by cuboidal epithelium with focal hobnailing, without significant cytologic atypia and mitosis. The epithelial lining was positive for CK19, high molecular weight cytokeratin, and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase suggesting a primitive tubular epithelial phenotype. Primitive glomeruli-like structures were also present. The ovarian-like stroma was condensed around the cysts and was variably cellular with areas of muscle differentiation and thick-walled vessels. The stroma was positive for desmin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and CD10. We suggest that CN represents a variable mixture of epithelial and stromal elements, immature glomerular, tubular, muscle, and vascular elements, which may be present in variable proportions creating a spectrum of lesions previously described as CN and mixed epithelial and stromal tumors (MEST). This case emphasizes that CN/MEST clinically/radiologically mimics other cystic renal neoplasms, especially cystic renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma, necessitating histopathological examination and immunohistochemial studies for definitive diagnosis. Additionally, CN has the tendency to recur when not completely excised initially. PMID:25525149

  15. Potential Human Pathogenic Bacteria in a Mixed Urban Watershed as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, A. Mark; Leddy, Menu; Murinda, Shelton E.

    2013-01-01

    Current microbial source tracking (MST) methods for water depend on testing for fecal indicator bacterial counts or specific marker gene sequences to identify fecal contamination where potential human pathogenic bacteria could be present. In this study, we applied 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing to identify bacterial pathogen DNA sequences, including those not traditionally monitored by MST and correlated their abundances to specific sources of contamination such as urban runoff and agricultural runoff from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), recreation park area, waste-water treatment plants, and natural sites with little or no human activities. Samples for pyrosequencing were surface water, and sediment collected from 19 sites. A total of 12,959 16S rRNA gene sequences with average length of ≤400 bp were obtained, and were assigned to corresponding taxonomic ranks using ribosomal database project (RDP), Classifier and Greengenes databases. The percent of total potential pathogens were highest in urban runoff water (7.94%), agricultural runoff sediment (6.52%), and Prado Park sediment (6.00%), respectively. Although the numbers of DNA sequence tags from pyrosequencing were very high for the natural site, corresponding percent potential pathogens were very low (3.78–4.08%). Most of the potential pathogenic bacterial sequences identified were from three major phyla, namely, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The use of deep sequencing may provide improved and faster methods for the identification of pathogen sources in most watersheds so that better risk assessment methods may be developed to enhance public health. PMID:24278139

  16. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzell, Marta C.; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J.; Stack, Andrew G.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-11-03

    We report that the amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10–5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g–1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g–1) had a negative rise potential (₋31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to ₋6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. In conclusion, these results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.

  17. Effect of Strong Acid Functional Groups on Electrode Rise Potential in Capacitive Mixing by Double Layer Expansion

    DOE PAGES

    Hatzell, Marta C.; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J.; Stack, Andrew G.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-11-03

    We report that the amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10–5) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g–1) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in themore » LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g–1) had a negative rise potential (₋31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to ₋6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. In conclusion, these results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons.« less

  18. Effect of strong acid functional groups on electrode rise potential in capacitive mixing by double layer expansion.

    PubMed

    Hatzell, Marta C; Raju, Muralikrishna; Watson, Valerie J; Stack, Andrew G; van Duin, Adri C T; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-12-01

    The amount of salinity-gradient energy that can be obtained through capacitive mixing based on double layer expansion depends on the extent the electric double layer (EDL) is altered in a low salt concentration (LC) electrolyte (e.g., river water). We show that the electrode-rise potential, which is a measure of the EDL perturbation process, was significantly (P = 10(–5)) correlated to the concentration of strong acid surface functional groups using five types of activated carbon. Electrodes with the lowest concentration of strong acids (0.05 mmol g(–1)) had a positive rise potential of 59 ± 4 mV in the LC solution, whereas the carbon with the highest concentration (0.36 mmol g(–1)) had a negative rise potential (−31 ± 5 mV). Chemical oxidation of a carbon (YP50) using nitric acid decreased the electrode rise potential from 46 ± 2 mV (unaltered) to −6 ± 0.5 mV (oxidized), producing a whole cell potential (53 ± 1.7 mV) that was 4.4 times larger than that obtained with identical electrode materials (from 12 ± 1 mV). Changes in the EDL were linked to the behavior of specific ions in a LC solution using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The EDL expanded in the LC solution when a carbon surface (pristine graphene) lacked strong acid functional groups, producing a positive-rise potential at the electrode. In contrast, the EDL was compressed for an oxidized surface (graphene oxide), producing a negative-rise electrode potential. These results established the linkage between rise potentials and specific surface functional groups (strong acids) and demonstrated on a molecular scale changes in the EDL using oxidized or pristine carbons. PMID:25365360

  19. Cyclones and attractive streaming generated by acoustical vortices.

    PubMed

    Riaud, Antoine; Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bou Matar, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Acoustical and optical vortices have attracted great interest due to their ability to capture and manipulate particles with the use of radiation pressure. Here we show that acoustical vortices can also induce axial vortical flow reminiscent of cyclones, whose topology can be controlled by adjusting the properties of the acoustical beam. In confined geometry, the phase singularity enables generating "attractive streaming" with the flow directed toward the transducer. This opens perspectives for contactless vortical flow control.

  20. Vorticity interaction effects on blunt bodies. [hypersonic viscous shock layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Wilcox, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the viscous shock layer equations governing laminar and turbulent flows of a perfect gas and radiating and nonradiating mixtures of perfect gases in chemical equilibrium are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cones and hyperboloids. Turbulent properties are described in terms of the classical mixing length. Results are compared with boundary layer and inviscid flowfield solutions; agreement with inviscid flowfield data is satisfactory. Agreement with boundary layer solutions is good except in regions of strong vorticity interaction; in these flow regions, the viscous shock layer solutions appear to be more satisfactory than the boundary layer solutions. Boundary conditions suitable for hypersonic viscous shock layers are devised for an advanced turbulence theory.

  1. Excitation of vortices using linear and nonlinear magnetostatic waves.

    PubMed

    Boardman, A D; Rapoport, Yu G; Grimalsky, V V; Ivanov, B A; Koshevaya, S V; Velasco, L; Zaspel, C E

    2005-02-01

    It is shown that stationary vortex structures can be excited in a ferrite film, in the important centimeter and millimeter wavelength ranges. It is shown that both linear and nonlinear structures can be excited using a three-beam interaction created with circular antennas. These give rise to a special phase distribution created by linear and nonlinear mixing. An interesting set of three clockwise rotating vortices joined by one counter-rotating one presents itself in the linear regime: a scenario that is only qualitatively changed by the onset of nonlinearity. It is pointed out that control of the vortex structure, through parametric coupling, based upon a microwave resonator, is possible and that there are many interesting possibilities for applications.

  2. Crosswind Shear Gradient Affect on Wake Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric simulations with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are used to explore the influence of crosswind shear on aircraft wake vortices. Previous studies based on field measurements, laboratory experiments, as well as LES, have shown that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, i.e. the second vertical derivative of the environmental crosswind, can influence wake vortex transport. The presence of nonlinear vertical shear of the crosswind velocity can reduce the descent rate, causing a wake vortex pair to tilt and change in its lateral separation. The LES parametric studies confirm that the vertical gradient of crosswind shear does influence vortex trajectories. The parametric results also show that vortex decay from the effects of shear are complex since the crosswind shear, along with the vertical gradient of crosswind shear, can affect whether the lateral separation between wake vortices is increased or decreased. If the separation is decreased, the vortex linking time is decreased, and a more rapid decay of wake vortex circulation occurs. If the separation is increased, the time to link is increased, and at least one of the vortices of the vortex pair may have a longer life time than in the case without shear. In some cases, the wake vortices may never link.

  3. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  4. Potential of compost mixed with tuff and pozzolana in site restoration.

    PubMed

    Sbaffoni, Silvia; Boni, Maria Rosaria; Vaccari, Mentore

    2015-05-01

    The present research is aimed at evaluating the potential of mixtures made of different percentages of compost (10%, 20% and 30% by volume) and inorganic waste from extraction activities (tuff and pozzolana) for site restorations. The materials alone and the mixtures were characterised from a geotechnical point of view, in order to determine the optimal percentage to be used. In particular, the oedometric test and the direct shear test were performed. Also the environmental quality of the materials was investigated through chemical characterisation and a leaching test. In addition, a lab-scale seeding test was carried out to assess the potential phytotoxicity of the mixture. Finally, at the end of the experimentation the accumulation of heavy metals in the plants was determined and the plants+artificial soil system underwent a shear stress test. The presence of compost in the percentages tested did not reduce the mechanical performances of the inorganic residues, guaranteeing good resistance and stability. In fact, the response to oedometric compression, the compression coefficient and the internal friction angle of the mixtures were quite similar to those obtained for tuff and pozzolana alone. The mixtures selected as optimal from a mechanical point of view (30% by volume of compost and 70% by volume of tuff/pozzolana), did not represent a potential hazard for the environment due to the low content and negligible leachability of heavy metals. In addition, such mixtures can provide a good substrate for revegetation thanks to the high content of organic matter and the absence of phytotoxic effects in the conditions tested.

  5. Potential of compost mixed with tuff and pozzolana in site restoration.

    PubMed

    Sbaffoni, Silvia; Boni, Maria Rosaria; Vaccari, Mentore

    2015-05-01

    The present research is aimed at evaluating the potential of mixtures made of different percentages of compost (10%, 20% and 30% by volume) and inorganic waste from extraction activities (tuff and pozzolana) for site restorations. The materials alone and the mixtures were characterised from a geotechnical point of view, in order to determine the optimal percentage to be used. In particular, the oedometric test and the direct shear test were performed. Also the environmental quality of the materials was investigated through chemical characterisation and a leaching test. In addition, a lab-scale seeding test was carried out to assess the potential phytotoxicity of the mixture. Finally, at the end of the experimentation the accumulation of heavy metals in the plants was determined and the plants+artificial soil system underwent a shear stress test. The presence of compost in the percentages tested did not reduce the mechanical performances of the inorganic residues, guaranteeing good resistance and stability. In fact, the response to oedometric compression, the compression coefficient and the internal friction angle of the mixtures were quite similar to those obtained for tuff and pozzolana alone. The mixtures selected as optimal from a mechanical point of view (30% by volume of compost and 70% by volume of tuff/pozzolana), did not represent a potential hazard for the environment due to the low content and negligible leachability of heavy metals. In addition, such mixtures can provide a good substrate for revegetation thanks to the high content of organic matter and the absence of phytotoxic effects in the conditions tested. PMID:25708405

  6. General guidelines for medically screening mixed population groups potentially exposed to nerve or vesicant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Munro, N.B.; Sidell, F.R.; Leffingwell, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    A number of state and local planners have requested guidance on screening protocols and have expressed interest in sampling body fluids from exposed or potentially exposed individuals as a means of estimating agent dose. These guidelines have been developed to provide a clear statement that could be used by state and local emergency response personnel in the event of a nerve or vesicant agent incident resulting in off-post contamination; maximum protection from harm is the goal. The assumption is that any population group so exposed would be heterogeneous for age, gender, reproductive status, and state of health.

  7. Probing Pseudospin-mixing Potential in Graphene/Boron Nitride Moire Superlattice by Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhiwen; Jin, Chenhao; Yang, Wei; Ju, Long; Horng, Jason; Zhang, Guangyu; Wang, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Graphene/boron nitride (BN) Moire superlattice, where the slow superlattice period is superimposed on a fast B-N oscillation, provides an attractive approach to engineer the electron pseudospin in graphene that goes beyond an electrostatic. Here we perform micro-infrared spectroscopy on graphene/BN superlattice, and find that the BN substrate effect in the context of pseudo-spin is much richer than an electrostatic potential. We further show that the BN substrate effect can be modified through electrostatic gating.

  8. Controlled Manipulation of Individual Vortices in a Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Straver, E.W.J.

    2010-04-05

    We report controlled local manipulation of single vortices by low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) in a thin film of superconducting Nb. We are able to position the vortices in arbitrary configurations and to measure the distribution of local depinning forces. This technique opens up new possibilities for the characterization and use of vortices in superconductors.

  9. Anderson Localization for Schrödinger Operators on with Strongly Mixing Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgain, Jean; Schlag, Wilhelm

    In this paper we show that for a.e. x∈[ 0,2 π) the operators defined on as and with Dirichlet condition ψ- 1= 0, have pure point spectrum in with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions where δ > 0 and are small. As it is a simple consequence of known techniques that for small λ one has [- 2 +δ, 2-δ]⊂ spectrum (H(x)) for a.e.x∈[ 0, 2 π), we thus established Anderson localization on the spectrum up to the edges and the center. More general potentials than cosine can be treated, but only those energies with nonzero spectral density are allowed. Finally, we prove the same result for operators on the whole line with potential , where A:?2-->?2 is a hyperbolic toral automorphism, F∈C1(?2), ∫F= 0, and λ small. The basis for our analysis is an asymptotic formula for the Lyapunov exponent for λ--> 0 by Figotin-Pastur, and generalized by Chulaevski-Spencer. We combine this asymptotic expansion with certain martingale large deviation estimates in order to apply the methods developed by Bourgain and Goldstein in the quasi-periodic case.

  10. Bilinear relative equilibria of identical point vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref, Hassan; Beelen, Peter; Brøns, Morten

    2011-11-01

    A new class of bilinear relative equilibria of identical point vortices in which the vortices are constrained to be on two perpendicular lines, taken to be the x- and y-axes of a cartesian coordinate system, is introduced and studied. In general we have m vortices on the y-axis and n on the x- axis. We define generating polynomials q (z) and p (z) , respectively, for each set of vortices. A second order, linear ODE for p (z) given q (z) is derived. Several results relating the general solution of the ODE to relative equilibrium configurations are established. Our strongest result, obtained using Sturm's comparison theorem, is that if p (z) satisfies the ODE for a given q (z) with its imaginary zeros symmetric relative to the x-axis, then it must have at least n - m + 2 simple, real zeros. For m = 2 this provides a complete characterization of all zeros, and we study this case in some detail. In particular, we show that given q (z) =z2 +η2 , where η is real, there is a unique p (z) of degree n, and a unique value of η2 =An , such that the zeros of q (z) and p (z) form a relative equilibrium of n + 2 point vortices. We show that An ~2/3 n +1/2 , as n --> ∞ , where the coefficient of n is determined analytically, the next order term numerically. Supported in part by the Danish National Research Foundation through a Niels Bohr visiting professorship.

  11. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-09-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order ~20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  12. Communication: Physical origins of ionization potential shifts in mixed carboxylic acids and water complexes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quanli; Tang, Zhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Yang, Zhijun; Trindle, Carl O; Knee, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    The ionization potential (IP) of the aromatic alpha hydroxy carboxylic acid, 9-hydroxy-9-fluorene carboxylic acid (9HFCA), is shifted by complexation with hydrogen bonding ligands such as water and formic acid. Generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis decomposes the intermolecular binding energies into a frozen energy term, polarization, correlation, and/or dispersion energy terms, as well as terms of geometric relaxation and zero point energy. We observe that in each dimer the attractive polarization always increases upon ionization, enhancing binding in the cation and shifting the IP toward the red. For 9HFCA-H2O, a substantial decrease of the repulsive frozen energy in cation further shifts the IP toward red. For 9HFCA-HCOOH, the increase of the frozen energy actually occurs in the cation and shifts the IP toward blue. Consistent with the experimental measurements, our analysis provides new, non-intuitive perspectives on multiple hydrogen bonds interactions in carboxylic acids and water complexes.

  13. Vicarious Group-Based Rejection: Creating a Potentially Dangerous Mix of Humiliation, Powerlessness, and Anger

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Tinka M.; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; Veenstra, René; Lindenberg, Siegwart

    2014-01-01

    Rejection can convey that one is seen as inferior and not worth bothering with. Is it possible for people to feel vicariously rejected in this sense and have reactions that are similar to those following personal rejection, such as feeling humiliated, powerless, and angry? A study on personal rejection was followed by two main studies on vicarious group-based rejection. It was found that merely observing rejection of ingroup members can trigger feelings of humiliation that are equally intense as those experienced in response to personal rejection. Moreover, given that the rejection is explicit, vicariously experienced feelings of humiliation can be accompanied by powerlessness and anger. Potentially, this combination of emotions could be an important source of offensive action against rejecters. PMID:24759901

  14. Communication: Physical origins of ionization potential shifts in mixed carboxylic acids and water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Quanli; Tang, Zhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Yang, Zhijun; Trindle, Carl O.; Knee, Joseph L.

    2016-08-01

    The ionization potential (IP) of the aromatic alpha hydroxy carboxylic acid, 9-hydroxy-9-fluorene carboxylic acid (9HFCA), is shifted by complexation with hydrogen bonding ligands such as water and formic acid. Generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis decomposes the intermolecular binding energies into a frozen energy term, polarization, correlation, and/or dispersion energy terms, as well as terms of geometric relaxation and zero point energy. We observe that in each dimer the attractive polarization always increases upon ionization, enhancing binding in the cation and shifting the IP toward the red. For 9HFCA—H2O, a substantial decrease of the repulsive frozen energy in cation further shifts the IP toward red. For 9HFCA—HCOOH, the increase of the frozen energy actually occurs in the cation and shifts the IP toward blue. Consistent with the experimental measurements, our analysis provides new, non-intuitive perspectives on multiple hydrogen bonds interactions in carboxylic acids and water complexes.

  15. Phase mixing due to the Galactic potential: steps in the position and velocity distributions of popped star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candlish, G. N.; Smith, R.; Fellhauer, M.; Gibson, B. K.; Kroupa, P.; Assmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    As star clusters are expected to form with low star formation efficiencies, the gas in the cluster is expelled quickly and early in their development: the star cluster `pops'. This leads to an unbound stellar system, evolving in the Galactic potential. Previous N-body simulations have demonstrated the existence of a stepped number density distribution of cluster stars after popping, both in vertical position and vertical velocity, with a passing resemblance to a Christmas tree. Using numerical and analytical methods, we investigate the source of this structure, which arises due to the phase mixing of the out-of-equilibrium stellar system, determined entirely by the background analytic potential. Considering only the vertical motions, we construct a theoretical model to describe the time evolution of the phase space distribution of stars in a Miyamoto-Nagai disc potential and a full Milky Way-type potential comprising bulge, halo and disc components, which is then compared with N-body simulations. Using our theoretical model, we investigate the possible observational signatures and the feasibility of detection.

  16. Prematurity and Low Birth Weight as Potential Mediators of Higher Stillbirth Risk in Mixed Black/White Race Couples

    PubMed Central

    DeMonner, Sonya M.; Lantz, Paula M.; Hayward, Rodney A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective Although births of multiracial and multiethnic infants are becoming more common in the United States, little is known about birth outcomes and risks for adverse events. We evaluated risk of fetal death for mixed race couples compared with same race couples and examined the role of prematurity and low birth weight as potential mediating risk factors. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the 1998–2002 California Birth Cohort to evaluate the odds of fetal death, low birth weight, and prematurity for couples with a mother and father who were categorized as either being of same or different racial groups. Risk of prematurity (birth prior to 37 weeks gestation) and low birth weight (<2500 g) were also tested to see if the model could explain variations among groups. Results The analysis included approximately 1.6 million live births and 1749 stillbirths. In the unadjusted model, compared with two white parents, black/black and black/white couples had a significantly higher risk of fetal death. When all demographic, social, biological, genetic, congenital, and procedural risk factors except gestational age and birth weight were included, the odds ratios (OR) were all still significant. Black/black couples had the highest level of risk (OR 2.11, CI 1.77-2.51), followed by black mother/white father couples (OR 2.01, CI 1.16-3.48), and white mother/black father couples (OR 1.84, CI 1.33-2.54). Virtually all of the higher risk of fetal death was explainable by higher rates of low birth weight and prematurity. Conclusions Mixed race black and white couples face higher odds of prematurity and low birth weight, which appear to contribute to the substantially higher demonstrated risk for stillbirth. There are likely additional unmeasured factors that influence birth outcomes for mixed race couples. PMID:20235877

  17. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, J. John Soundar Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe

    2013-11-15

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  18. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John Soundar Jerome, J.; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Zaleski, Stephane; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2013-11-01

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks-up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave-just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown-up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event.

  19. Vortices catapult droplets in atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerome, J. John Soundar; Marty, Sylvain; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Zaleski, Stéphane; Hoepffner, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    A droplet ejection mechanism in planar two-phase mixing layers is examined. Any disturbance on the gas-liquid interface grows into a Kelvin-Helmholtz wave, and the wave crest forms a thin liquid film that flaps as the wave grows downstream. Increasing the gas speed, it is observed that the film breaks up into droplets which are eventually thrown into the gas stream at large angles. In a flow where most of the momentum is in the horizontal direction, it is surprising to observe these large ejection angles. Our experiments and simulations show that a recirculation region grows downstream of the wave and leads to vortex shedding similar to the wake of a backward-facing step. The ejection mechanism results from the interaction between the liquid film and the vortex shedding sequence: a recirculation zone appears in the wake of the wave and a liquid film emerges from the wave crest; the recirculation region detaches into a vortex and the gas flow over the wave momentarily reattaches due to the departure of the vortex; this reattached flow pushes the liquid film down; by now, a new recirculation vortex is being created in the wake of the wave—just where the liquid film is now located; the liquid film is blown up from below by the newly formed recirculation vortex in a manner similar to a bag-breakup event; the resulting droplets are catapulted by the recirculation vortex.

  20. Borneo Vortices: A case study and its relation to climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braesicke, P.; Ooi, S. H.; Samah, A. A.

    2012-04-01

    Borneo vortices (BVs) develop over the South China Sea and are main drivers for the formation of deep convection and heavy rainfall in East Malaysia. We present a case study of a cold-surge-induced BV during January 2010 in which the export of potential energy lead to a strengthening of the subtropical jet. Potential vorticity (PV) and water vapour analyses confirm a significant impact of the BV on upper tropospheric composition. Dry, high PV air is found far below 100 hPa in the vicinty of the vortex. Using a PV threshold analysis of ERA-Interim data we construct a climatological composite of similar events and characterise the thermal, dynamical and composition structure of a 'typical' BV. We note the preferential formation of BVs during ENSO cold conditions and show that two effects contribute to the formation of the dry upper layer above a BV: Air is vertically transported upwards in the BV whilst precipitating and the large scale flow in which the BV is embedded advect dry, ozone rich air from the equatorial TTL over the BV. Thus the occurence frequency of BVs is important for the regional variability of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric composition.

  1. Finite-temperature vortices in a rotating Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimin, S. N.; Tempere, J.; Verhelst, N.; Milošević, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Vortices and vortex arrays have been used as a hallmark of superfluidity in rotated, ultracold Fermi gases. These superfluids can be described in terms of an effective field theory for a macroscopic wave function representing the field of condensed pairs, analogous to the Ginzburg-Landau theory for superconductors. Here we establish how rotation modifies this effective field theory, by rederiving it starting from the action of Fermi gas in the rotating frame of reference. The rotation leads to the appearance of an effective vector potential, and the coupling strength of this vector potential to the macroscopic wave function depends on the interaction strength between the fermions, due to a renormalization of the pair effective mass in the effective field theory. The mass renormalization derived here is in agreement with results of functional renormalization-group theory. In the extreme Bose-Einstein condensate regime, the pair effective mass tends to twice the fermion mass, in agreement with the physical picture of a weakly interacting Bose gas of molecular pairs. Then we use our macroscopic-wave-function description to study vortices and the critical rotation frequencies to form them. Equilibrium vortex state diagrams are derived and they are in good agreement with available results of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory and with experimental data.

  2. Communication: Physical origins of ionization potential shifts in mixed carboxylic acids and water complexes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quanli; Tang, Zhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Yang, Zhijun; Trindle, Carl O; Knee, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    The ionization potential (IP) of the aromatic alpha hydroxy carboxylic acid, 9-hydroxy-9-fluorene carboxylic acid (9HFCA), is shifted by complexation with hydrogen bonding ligands such as water and formic acid. Generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis decomposes the intermolecular binding energies into a frozen energy term, polarization, correlation, and/or dispersion energy terms, as well as terms of geometric relaxation and zero point energy. We observe that in each dimer the attractive polarization always increases upon ionization, enhancing binding in the cation and shifting the IP toward the red. For 9HFCA-H2O, a substantial decrease of the repulsive frozen energy in cation further shifts the IP toward red. For 9HFCA-HCOOH, the increase of the frozen energy actually occurs in the cation and shifts the IP toward blue. Consistent with the experimental measurements, our analysis provides new, non-intuitive perspectives on multiple hydrogen bonds interactions in carboxylic acids and water complexes. PMID:27497532

  3. Assessment of mixed fleet potential for space station launch and assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deryder, L. J. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Reductions in expected STS flight rates of the Space Shuttle since the 51-L accident raise concerns about the ability of available launch capacity to meet both payload-to-orbit and crew rotation requirements for the Space Station. In addition, it is believed that some phases of Station build-up could be expedited using unmanned launch systems with significantly greater lift capacity than the STS. Examined is the potential use of expendable launch vehicles (ELVs), yet-to-be-developed unmanned shuttle-derived vehicles (SDVs), and international launch vehicles for meeting overall launch requirements to meet Space Station program objectives as defined by the 1986 Critical Evaluation Task Force (CETF). The study concludes that use of non-STS transportation can help meet several important program objectives as well as reduce the total number of STS flights. It also finds, however, that reduction of Space Station-dedicated STS flights below 8 per year forces a reduction in Station crew size assuming the CETF 90 day crew stay time baseline and seriously impairs scientific utilization of the Station.

  4. Ozone distribution and phytotoxic potential in mixed conifer forests of the San Bernardino Mountains, southern California.

    PubMed

    Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael; Schilling, Susan; Fraczek, Witold; Alexander, Diane

    2008-10-01

    In the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California, ozone (O(3)) concentrations have been elevated since the 1950s with peaks reaching 600 ppb and summer seasonal averages >100 ppb in the 1970s. During that period increased mortality of ponderosa and Jeffrey pines occurred. Between the late 1970s and late1990s, O(3) concentrations decreased with peaks approximately 180 ppb and approximately 60 ppb seasonal averages. However, since the late 1990s concentrations have not changed. Monitoring during summers of 2002-2006 showed that O(3) concentrations (2-week averages) for individual years were much higher in western sites (58-69 ppb) than eastern sites (44-50 ppb). Potential O(3) phytotoxicity measured as various exposure indices was very high, reaching SUM00 - 173.5 ppmh, SUM60 - 112.7 ppmh, W126 - 98.3 ppmh, and AOT40 - 75 ppmh, representing the highest values reported for mountain areas in North America and Europe. PMID:18359541

  5. Vorticity and symplecticity in multi-symplectic, Lagrangian gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Anco, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    The Lagrangian, multi-dimensional, ideal, compressible gas dynamic equations are written in a multi-symplectic form, in which the Lagrangian fluid labels, m i (the Lagrangian mass coordinates) and time t are the independent variables, and in which the Eulerian position of the fluid element {x}={x}({m},t) and the entropy S=S({m},t) are the dependent variables. Constraints in the variational principle are incorporated by means of Lagrange multipliers. The constraints are: the entropy advection equation S t = 0, the Lagrangian map equation {{x}}t={u} where {u} is the fluid velocity, and the mass continuity equation which has the form J=τ where J={det}({x}{ij}) is the Jacobian of the Lagrangian map in which {x}{ij}=\\partial {x}i/\\partial {m}j and τ =1/ρ is the specific volume of the gas. The internal energy per unit volume of the gas \\varepsilon =\\varepsilon (ρ ,S) corresponds to a non-barotropic gas. The Lagrangian is used to define multi-momenta, and to develop de Donder-Weyl Hamiltonian equations. The de Donder-Weyl equations are cast in a multi-symplectic form. The pullback conservation laws and the symplecticity conservation laws are obtained. One class of symplecticity conservation laws give rise to vorticity and potential vorticity type conservation laws, and another class of symplecticity laws are related to derivatives of the Lagrangian energy conservation law with respect to the Lagrangian mass coordinates m i . We show that the vorticity-symplecticity laws can be derived by a Lie dragging method, and also by using Noether’s second theorem and a fluid relabelling symmetry which is a divergence symmetry of the action. We obtain the Cartan-Poincaré form describing the equations and we discuss a set of differential forms representing the equation system.

  6. Active Management of Flap-Edge Trailing Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Vey, Stefan; Paschereit, Oliver C.; Meyer, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The vortex hazard produced by large airliners and increasingly larger airliners entering service, combined with projected rapid increases in the demand for air transportation, is expected to act as a major impediment to increased air traffic capacity. Significant reduction in the vortex hazard is possible, however, by employing active vortex alleviation techniques that reduce the wake severity by dynamically modifying its vortex characteristics, providing that the techniques do not degrade performance or compromise safety and ride quality. With this as background, a series of experiments were performed, initially at NASA Langley Research Center and subsequently at the Berlin University of Technology in collaboration with the German Aerospace Center. The investigations demonstrated the basic mechanism for managing trailing vortices using retrofitted devices that are decoupled from conventional control surfaces. The basic premise for managing vortices advanced here is rooted in the erstwhile forgotten hypothesis of Albert Betz, as extended and verified ingeniously by Coleman duPont Donaldson and his collaborators. Using these devices, vortices may be perturbed at arbitrarily long wavelengths down to wavelengths less than a typical airliner wingspan and the oscillatory loads on the wings, and hence the vehicle, are small. Significant flexibility in the specific device has been demonstrated using local passive and active separation control as well as local circulation control via Gurney flaps. The method is now in a position to be tested in a wind tunnel with a longer test section on a scaled airliner configuration. Alternatively, the method can be tested directly in a towing tank, on a model aircraft, a light aircraft or a full-scale airliner. The authors believed that this method will have significant appeal from an industry perspective due to its retrofit potential with little to no impact on cruise (devices tucked away in the cove or retracted); low operating power

  7. Measuring vortical flows in the solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfellner, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This thesis focuses on observations of the effects of rotation on solar convection at the length scales of supergranulation and larger (>30 Mm). Rotation drives vortical flows through the Coriolis force and causes anisotropic velocity correlations that are believed to influence the large-scale solar dynamics. We obtain horizontal flows using photospheric Doppler velocity and continuum intensity images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft via the techniques of time-distance helioseismology (TD) and local correlation tracking (LCT) of granules. In time-distance helioseismology, the local vertical vorticity can be measured by taking the difference between wave travel times measured in the anti-clockwise and clockwise directions along a closed contour. The agreement between the TD and LCT methods is excellent up to ±60° latitude, provided that a center-to-limb correction is applied. Averaging over longitude, one finds that there is a small but significant correlation between the horizontal divergence and the vertical vorticity component of supergranular flows away from the solar equator. By comparison to a noise model, we find that the TD technique can be used to probe the vertical vorticity of flows on spatial scales larger than about 15 Mm, thus including supergranules and also giant cells. We also find that the vertical vorticity signal is much easier to measure using SDO/HMI observations than previous observations. The impact of the Sun's rotation on supergranulation is studied in detail by making spatial maps of the vertical vorticity of the flows associated with the average supergranule. The average supergranule is constructed by co-aligning thousands of individual supergranules in a given latitude band. For the first time, we are able to spatially resolve vorticity associated with inflows and outflow regions. In the northern hemisphere, outflows are on average associated with a clockwise

  8. Potential-based and non-potential-based cohesive zone formulations under mixed-mode separation and over-closure-Part II: Finite element applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máirtín, Éamonn Ó.; Parry, Guillaume; Beltz, Glenn E.; McGarry, J. Patrick

    2014-02-01

    This paper, the second of two parts, presents three novel finite element case studies to demonstrate the importance of normal-tangential coupling in cohesive zone models (CZMs) for the prediction of mixed-mode interface debonding. Specifically, four new CZMs proposed in Part I of this study are implemented, namely the potential-based MP model and the non-potential-based NP1, NP2 and SMC models. For comparison, simulations are also performed for the well established potential-based Xu-Needleman (XN) model and the non-potential-based model of van den Bosch, Schreurs and Geers (BSG model). Case study 1: Debonding and rebonding of a biological cell from a cyclically deforming silicone substrate is simulated when the mode II work of separation is higher than the mode I work of separation at the cell-substrate interface. An active formulation for the contractility and remodelling of the cell cytoskeleton is implemented. It is demonstrated that when the XN potential function is used at the cell-substrate interface repulsive normal tractions are computed, preventing rebonding of significant regions of the cell to the substrate. In contrast, the proposed MP potential function at the cell-substrate interface results in negligible repulsive normal tractions, allowing for the prediction of experimentally observed patterns of cell cytoskeletal remodelling. Case study 2: Buckling of a coating from the compressive surface of a stent is simulated. It is demonstrated that during expansion of the stent the coating is initially compressed into the stent surface, while simultaneously undergoing tangential (shear) tractions at the coating-stent interface. It is demonstrated that when either the proposed NP1 or NP2 model is implemented at the stent-coating interface mixed-mode over-closure is correctly penalised. Further expansion of the stent results in the prediction of significant buckling of the coating from the stent surface, as observed experimentally. In contrast, the BSG model

  9. Two-dimensional symbiotic solitons and vortices in binary condensates with attractive cross-species interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xuekai; Driben, Rodislav; Malomed, Boris A.; Meier, Torsten; Schumacher, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    We consider a two-dimensional (2D) two-component spinor system with cubic attraction between the components and intra-species self-repulsion, which may be realized in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as in a quasi-equilibrium condensate of microcavity polaritons. Including a 2D spatially periodic potential, which is necessary for the stabilization of the system against the critical collapse, we use detailed numerical calculations and an analytical variational approximation (VA) to predict the existence and stability of several types of 2D symbiotic solitons in the spinor system. Stability ranges are found for symmetric and asymmetric symbiotic fundamental solitons and vortices, including hidden-vorticity (HV) modes, with opposite vorticities in the two components. The VA produces exceptionally accurate predictions for the fundamental solitons and vortices. The fundamental solitons, both symmetric and asymmetric ones, are completely stable, in either case when they exist as gap solitons or regular ones. The symmetric and asymmetric vortices are stable if the inter-component attraction is stronger than the intra-species repulsion, while the HV modes have their stability region in the opposite case.

  10. Two-dimensional symbiotic solitons and vortices in binary condensates with attractive cross-species interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuekai; Driben, Rodislav; Malomed, Boris A.; Meier, Torsten; Schumacher, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional (2D) two-component spinor system with cubic attraction between the components and intra-species self-repulsion, which may be realized in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as in a quasi-equilibrium condensate of microcavity polaritons. Including a 2D spatially periodic potential, which is necessary for the stabilization of the system against the critical collapse, we use detailed numerical calculations and an analytical variational approximation (VA) to predict the existence and stability of several types of 2D symbiotic solitons in the spinor system. Stability ranges are found for symmetric and asymmetric symbiotic fundamental solitons and vortices, including hidden-vorticity (HV) modes, with opposite vorticities in the two components. The VA produces exceptionally accurate predictions for the fundamental solitons and vortices. The fundamental solitons, both symmetric and asymmetric ones, are completely stable, in either case when they exist as gap solitons or regular ones. The symmetric and asymmetric vortices are stable if the inter-component attraction is stronger than the intra-species repulsion, while the HV modes have their stability region in the opposite case. PMID:27703235

  11. Diurnal and seasonal carbon sequestration potential of seven broadleaved species in a mixed deciduous forest in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Soumyajit; Bala, Sanjay; Mazumdar, Asis

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the study was to measure annual carbon sequestration rate of mixed deciduous forest by measuring that of seven young broadleaved tree species (6 years age) as well as selection of better carbon sequestered plant species for future plantation. The diurnal net assimilation rate of Carbon dioxide (CO2) at leaf level was measured with LI-6400 Portable Photosynthesis System at daytime on seasonal basis in a man-made forest at Budge Budge (N 22°28‧ E 88°08‧) of South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, INDIA. Net assimilation rate of carbon at canopy level was calculated by measuring Leaf Area Index with LAI-2200 and using analytical model with non-rectangular hyperbolic light response curve. The average net assimilation rate of CO2 at leaf level was found maximum in Albizzia lebbek (8.13 μmol m-2 s-1) and that of canopy level in Eucalyptus spp. (4.851 g h-1). The minimum was found for Swietenia mahagoni (1.058 g h-1). The annual carbon sequestration rate of the mixed forest in natural condition was estimated 6.01 t ha-1 year-1 by consolidating the potential of all seven species.

  12. Vortical versus skyrmionic states in mesoscopic p -wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Becerra, V.; Sardella, E.; Peeters, F. M.; Milošević, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the superconducting states that arise as a consequence of mesoscopic confinement and a multicomponent order parameter in the Ginzburg-Landau model for p -wave superconductivity. Conventional vortices, but also half-quantum vortices and skyrmions, are found as the applied magnetic field and the anisotropy parameters of the Fermi surface are varied. The solutions are well differentiated by a topological charge that for skyrmions is given by the Hopf invariant and for vortices by the circulation of the superconducting velocity. We revealed several unique states combining vortices and skyrmions, their possible reconfiguration with varied magnetic field, as well as temporal and field-induced transitions between vortical and skyrmionic states.

  13. Recovering the vorticity of a light beam after scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salla, Gangi Reddy Perumangattu, Chithrabhanu; Anwar, Ali; Prabhakar, Shashi; Singh, Ravindra P.

    2015-07-13

    We generate optical vortices and scatter them through a rough surface. However, the scattered light passing through a lens shows the same vorticity when probed at the Fourier plane. The vorticity is measured using a nonseparable state of polarization and orbital angular momentum of light as it cannot be confirmed by the standard interferometric technique. The observed vorticity is found to be independent of the amount of scattered light collected. Therefore, vortices can be used as information carriers even in the presence of scattering media. The experimental results are well supported by the theoretical results.

  14. Electron Irradiation and Thermal Processing of Mixed-ices of Potential Relevance to Jupiter Trojan Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Brown, Michael E.; Hodyss, Robert; Blacksberg, Jordana; Eiler, John M.; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In this work we explore the chemistry that occurs during the irradiation of ice mixtures on planetary surfaces, with the goal of linking the presence of specific chemical compounds to their formation locations in the solar system and subsequent processing by later migration inward. We focus on the outer solar system and the chemical differences for ice mixtures inside and outside the stability line for H2S. We perform a set of experiments to explore the hypothesis advanced by Wong & Brown that links the color bimodality in Jupiter's Trojans to the presence of H2S in the surface of their precursors. Non-thermal (10 keV electron irradiation) and thermally driven chemistry of CH3OH-NH3-H2O (“without H2S”) and H2S-CH3OH-NH3-H2O (“with H2S”) ices were examined. Mid-IR analyses of ice and mass spectrometry monitoring of the volatiles released during heating show a rich chemistry in both of the ice mixtures. The “with H2S” mixture experiment shows a rapid consumption of H2S molecules and production of OCS molecules after a few hours of irradiation. The heating of the irradiated “with H2S” mixture to temperatures above 120 K leads to the appearance of new infrared bands that we provisionally assign to SO2and CS. We show that radiolysis products are stable under the temperature and irradiation conditions of Jupiter Trojan asteroids. This makes them suitable target molecules for potential future missions as well as telescope observations with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also suggest the consideration of sulfur chemistry in the theoretical modeling aimed at understanding the chemical composition of Trojans and KOBs.

  15. Vorticity deposition, structure generation and the approach to self-similarity in colliding blast wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.; Fox, T. E.; Pasley, J.; Symes, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    When strong shocks interact with transverse density gradients, it is well known that vorticity deposition occurs. When two non-planar blast waves interact, a strong shock will propagate through the internal structure of each blast wave where the shock encounters such density gradients. There is therefore the potential for the resulting vorticity to produce pronounced density structures long after the passage of these shocks. If the two blast waves have evolved to the self-similar (Sedov) phase this is not a likely prospect, but for blast waves at a relatively early stage of their evolution this remains possible. We show, using 2D numerical simulations, that the interactions of two 'marginally young' blast waves can lead to strong vorticity deposition which leads to the generation of a strong protrusion and vortex ring as mass is driven into the internal structure of the weaker blast wave.

  16. Stability of Solitary Waves and Vortices in a 2D Nonlinear Dirac Model.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G; Saxena, Avadh; Comech, Andrew; Lan, Ruomeng

    2016-05-27

    We explore a prototypical two-dimensional massive model of the nonlinear Dirac type and examine its solitary wave and vortex solutions. In addition to identifying the stationary states, we provide a systematic spectral stability analysis, illustrating the potential of spinor solutions to be neutrally stable in a wide parametric interval of frequencies. Solutions of higher vorticity are generically unstable and split into lower charge vortices in a way that preserves the total vorticity. These conclusions are found not to be restricted to the case of cubic two-dimensional nonlinearities but are found to be extended to the case of quintic nonlinearity, as well as to that of three spatial dimensions. Our results also reveal nontrivial differences with respect to the better understood nonrelativistic analogue of the model, namely the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. PMID:27284659

  17. Intensity of vortices: from soap bubbles to hurricanes

    PubMed Central

    Meuel, T.; Xiong, Y. L.; Fischer, P.; Bruneau, C. H.; Bessafi, M.; Kellay, H.

    2013-01-01

    By using a half soap bubble heated from below, we obtain large isolated single vortices whose properties as well as their intensity are measured under different conditions. By studying the effects of rotation of the bubble on the vortex properties, we found that rotation favors vortices near the pole. Rotation also inhibits long life time vortices. The velocity and vorticity profiles of the vortices obtained are well described by a Gaussian vortex. Besides, the intensity of these vortices can be followed over long time spans revealing periods of intensification accompanied by trochoidal motion of the vortex center, features which are reminiscent of the behavior of tropical cyclones. An analysis of this intensification period suggests a simple relation valid for both the vortices observed here and for tropical cyclones. PMID:24336410

  18. Intensity of vortices: from soap bubbles to hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Meuel, T; Xiong, Y L; Fischer, P; Bruneau, C H; Bessafi, M; Kellay, H

    2013-01-01

    By using a half soap bubble heated from below, we obtain large isolated single vortices whose properties as well as their intensity are measured under different conditions. By studying the effects of rotation of the bubble on the vortex properties, we found that rotation favors vortices near the pole. Rotation also inhibits long life time vortices. The velocity and vorticity profiles of the vortices obtained are well described by a Gaussian vortex. Besides, the intensity of these vortices can be followed over long time spans revealing periods of intensification accompanied by trochoidal motion of the vortex center, features which are reminiscent of the behavior of tropical cyclones. An analysis of this intensification period suggests a simple relation valid for both the vortices observed here and for tropical cyclones. PMID:24336410

  19. Intensity of vortices: from soap bubbles to hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Meuel, T; Xiong, Y L; Fischer, P; Bruneau, C H; Bessafi, M; Kellay, H

    2013-01-01

    By using a half soap bubble heated from below, we obtain large isolated single vortices whose properties as well as their intensity are measured under different conditions. By studying the effects of rotation of the bubble on the vortex properties, we found that rotation favors vortices near the pole. Rotation also inhibits long life time vortices. The velocity and vorticity profiles of the vortices obtained are well described by a Gaussian vortex. Besides, the intensity of these vortices can be followed over long time spans revealing periods of intensification accompanied by trochoidal motion of the vortex center, features which are reminiscent of the behavior of tropical cyclones. An analysis of this intensification period suggests a simple relation valid for both the vortices observed here and for tropical cyclones.

  20. Three-Centimeter Doppler Radar Observations of Wingtip-Generated Wake Vortices in Clear Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Robert E.; Mudukutore, Ashok; Wissel, Vicki L. H.; Myers, Theodore

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a high risk, high pay-off experiment with the objective of detecting, for the first time, the presence of aircraft wake vortices in clear air using X-band Doppler radar. Field experiments were conducted in January 1995 at the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) to demonstrate the capability of the 9.33 GHz (I=3 cm) radar, which was assembled using an existing nine-meter parabolic antenna reflector at VVTT and the receiver/transmitter from the NASA Airborne Windshear Radar-Program. A C-130-aircraft, equipped with wingtip smoke generators, created visually marked wake vortices, which were recorded by video cameras. A C-band radar also observed the wake vortices during detection attempts with the X-band radar. Rawinsonde data was used to calculate vertical soundings of wake vortex decay time, cross aircraft bearing wind speed, and water vapor mixing ratio for aircraft passes over the radar measurement range. This experiment was a pathfinder in predicting, in real time, the location and persistence of C-130 vortices, and in setting the flight path of the aircraft to optimize X-band radar measurement of the wake vortex core in real time. This experiment was conducted in support of the NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS).

  1. Hybrid helicity and magneto-vorticity flux conservation in superdense npe-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, G.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, it is shown that the magnetic helicity dissipation per unit volume, coupled with the longitudinal conductivity, causes enhancement of the kinematic rotation of the electric (and magnetic) lines if the npe-plasma vorticity vector aligns with the electric (or the magnetic) field. In the case of a rigidly rotating npe-plasma under the influence of a strong magnetic field, the electric lines are rotating faster than the magnetic lines. It is deduced that the orthogonality of the electric and magnetic fields is an essential condition for the conduction current to remain finite in the limit of infinite electric conductivity of the npe-plasma. In this case, the magnetic field is not frozen into the npe-plasma, but the magnetic flux in the magnetic tube is conserved. The hybrid helicity is conserved if the "magneto-vorticity" vector is tangent to the level surfaces of constant entropy per baryon. The "magneto-vorticity" lines are rotating on the level surfaces of constant entropy per baryon due to the electromagnetic energy flow in the direction of the npe-plasma vorticity and the chemical potential variation locked with the kinematic rotation of the npe-plasma flow lines. In the case of an isentropic npe-plasma flow, there exists a family of timelike 2-surfaces spanned by the "magneto-vorticity" lines and the npe-plasma flow lines. In this case, the electric field is normal to such a family of timelike 2-surfaces. Maxwell like equations satisfied by "magneto-vorticity" bivector field are solved in axially symmetric stationary case. It is shown that the npe-plasma is in differential rotation in such a way that its each plasma shell (i.e., plasma surface spanned by "magneto-vorticity" lines) is rotating differentially without continually winding up "magneto-vorticity" lines frozen into the npe-plasma. It is also found that gravitational isorotation and Ferraro's law of isorotation are intimately connected to each other because of coexistence of both the

  2. Emergent vortices in populations of colloidal rollers.

    PubMed

    Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Das, Debasish; Savoie, Charles; Chikkadi, Vijayakumar; Shitara, Kyohei; Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Peruani, Fernando; Saintillan, David; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Coherent vortical motion has been reported in a wide variety of populations including living organisms (bacteria, fishes, human crowds) and synthetic active matter (shaken grains, mixtures of biopolymers), yet a unified description of the formation and structure of this pattern remains lacking. Here we report the self-organization of motile colloids into a macroscopic steadily rotating vortex. Combining physical experiments and numerical simulations, we elucidate this collective behaviour. We demonstrate that the emergent-vortex structure lives on the verge of a phase separation, and single out the very constituents responsible for this state of polar active matter. Building on this observation, we establish a continuum theory and lay out a strong foundation for the description of vortical collective motion in a broad class of motile populations constrained by geometrical boundaries. PMID:26088835

  3. Emergent vortices in populations of colloidal rollers

    PubMed Central

    Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Das, Debasish; Savoie, Charles; Chikkadi, Vijayakumar; Shitara, Kyohei; Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Peruani, Fernando; Saintillan, David; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Coherent vortical motion has been reported in a wide variety of populations including living organisms (bacteria, fishes, human crowds) and synthetic active matter (shaken grains, mixtures of biopolymers), yet a unified description of the formation and structure of this pattern remains lacking. Here we report the self-organization of motile colloids into a macroscopic steadily rotating vortex. Combining physical experiments and numerical simulations, we elucidate this collective behaviour. We demonstrate that the emergent-vortex structure lives on the verge of a phase separation, and single out the very constituents responsible for this state of polar active matter. Building on this observation, we establish a continuum theory and lay out a strong foundation for the description of vortical collective motion in a broad class of motile populations constrained by geometrical boundaries. PMID:26088835

  4. Numerical prediction of flow in slender vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyna, Luis G.; Menne, Stefan

    1988-01-01

    The slender vortex approximation was investigated using the Navier-Stokes equations written in cylindrical coordinates. It is shown that, for free vortices without external pressure gradient, the breakdown length is proportional to the Reynolds number. For free vortices with adverse pressure gradients, the breakdown length is inversely proportional to the value of its gradient. For low Reynolds numbers, the predictions of the simplified system agreed well with the ones obtained from solutions of the full Navier-Stokes equations, whereas for high Reynolds numbers, the flow became quite sensitive to pressure fluctuations; it was found that the failure of the slender vortex equations corresponded to the critical condition as identified by Benjamin (1962) for inviscid flows. The predictions obtained from the approximating system were compared with available experimental results. For low swirl, a good agreement was obtained; for high swirl, on the other hand, upstream effects on the pressure gradient produced by the breakdown bubble caused poor agreement.

  5. Dynamics and nucleation of vorticity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Jose Arruda De Oliveira

    1997-11-01

    This thesis contains numerical studies on vortex dynamics and on quantum nucleation of vorticity in superfluids at zero temperature. In both cases the superfluid was described by the Gross-Pitaevskii model. In the first part of the thesis, the vortex mass problem is analyzed by a numerical integration of the condensate equation of motion, the nonlinear Schrodinger equation. We were able to extract, from the observed vortex dynamics in a time-dependent superflow, the frequency dependence of the vortex effective mass. In the second part, the problem of quantum nucleation of vorticity in superflows past obstacles, in both one and two dimensions, is studied by the application of the bounce formalism of Coleman (12) to the coherent state action of the Gross-Pitaevskii model. We obtained bounce solutions and tunneling rates by directly solving the field equations for the condensate in imaginary time.

  6. Motion of vortices outside a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulu, Serdar; Yilmaz, Oguz

    2010-12-01

    The problem of motion of the vortices around an oscillating cylinder in the presence of a uniform flow is considered. The Hamiltonian for vortex motion for the case with no uniform flow and stationary cylinder is constructed, reduced, and constant Hamiltonian (energy) curves are plotted when the system is shown to be integrable according to Liouville. By adding uniform flow to the system and by allowing the cylinder to vibrate, we model the natural vibration of the cylinder in the flow field, which has applications in ocean engineering involving tethers or pipelines in a flow field. We conclude that in the chaotic case forces on the cylinder may be considerably larger than those on the integrable case depending on the initial positions of vortices and that complex phenomena such as chaotic capture and escape occur when the initial positions lie in a certain region.

  7. Numerical Investigations of Reconnection of Quantized Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorai, Cecilia; Fisher, Michael E.; Lathrop, Daniel P.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Kerr, Robert M.

    2011-11-01

    Reconnection of quantized vortices in superfluid helium was conjectured by Feynman in 1955, and first observed experimentally by Bewley et al. (PNAS 105, 13708, 2007). The nature of this phenomenon is quantum mechanical, involving atomically thin vortex cores. At the same time, this phenomenon influences the large scale dynamics, since a tangle of vortices can change topology through reconnection and evolve in time. Numerically, the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation allows detailed predictions of vortex reconnection as first shown by Koplik and Levine (1993). We have undertaken further calculations to characterize the dynamics of isolated reconnection events. Initial conditions have been analyzed carefully, different geometries have been considered and a new approach has been proposed. This approach consists in using the diffusion equation associated to the GP equation to set minimum energy initial vortex profiles. The underlying questions we wish to answer are the universality of vortex reconnection and its effect on energy dissipation to the phonon field.

  8. Shear-Layer Effects on Trailing Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Z. C.; Baek, K.

    1998-01-01

    Crosswind shear can influence the trailing vortex trajectories significantly, according to both field measurement and numerical simulations. Point vortex models are used in this paper to study the fluid dynamic mechanism in the interactions between trailing vortex pair and shear layers. It has been shown that the shear-layer deformation causes the vortex descent history difference in the two vortices of the vortex pair. When a shear layer is below the vortex pair with the same sign as the left vortex, the right vortex descends less than the left vortex. When the same shear layer is above the vortex pair, the right vortex descends more. The descent altitudes of the two vortices are the same when they go through a constant, non-deformed shear layer. Those trends are in agreement with Navier-Stokes simulations.

  9. Electric generation of vortices in polariton superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flayac, H.; Pavlovic, G.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2012-02-01

    We have theoretically demonstrated the on-demand electric generation of vortices in an exciton-polariton superfluid. Electric pulses applied to a horseshoe-shaped metallic mesa, deposited on top of the microcavity, generate a noncylindrically symmetric solitonic wave in the system. Breakdown of its wave front at focal points leads to the formation of vortex-antivortex pairs, which subsequently propagate in the superfluid. The trajectory of these vortex dipoles can be controlled by applying a voltage to additional electrodes. They can be confined within channels formed by metallic stripes and unbound by a wedged mesa giving birth to grey solitons. Finally, single static vortices can be generated using a single metallic plate configuration.

  10. Generation of optical vortices by fractional derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preda, L.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new method of vortex generation using two-dimensional fractional derivative. The characteristics of vortices obtained using this method from Gaussian and Hermite-Gauss distributions are presented. Changing the parameters of fractional derivative such as the fractional order, r, and the direction, θ, the positions of the vortex centers can be changed. The method can be used to design a filter for vortex generation. The analysis of an experimental vortex pattern using fractional derivative is also demonstrated.

  11. Vorticity, Stokes' Theorem and the Gauss's Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Vorticity is a property of the flow of any fluid and moving fluids acquire properties that allow an engineer to describe that particular flow in greater detail. It is important to recognize that mere motion alone does not guarantee that the air or any fluid has vorticity. Vorticity is one of four important quantities that define the kinematic properties of any fluid flow. The Navier-Stokes equations are the foundation of fluid mechanics, and Stokes' theorem is used in nearly every branch of mechanics as well as electromagnetics. Stokes' Theorem also plays a vital role in many secondary theorems such as those pertaining to vorticity and circulation. However, the divergence theorem is a mathematical statement of the physical fact that, in the absence of the creation or destruction of matter, the density within a region of space can change only by having it flow into, or away from the region through its boundary. This is also known as Gauss's Theorem. It should also be noted that there are many useful extensions of Gauss's Theorem, including the extension to include surfaces of discontinuity in V. Mathematically expressed, Stokes' theorem can be expressed by considering a surface S having a bounding curve C. Here, V is any sufficiently smooth vector field defined on the surface and its bounding curve C. Integral (Surface) [(DEL X V)] . dS = Integral (Contour) [V . dx] In this paper, the author outlines and stresses the importance of studying and teaching these mathematical techniques while developing a course in Hydrology and Fluid Mechanics. References Arfken, G. "Gauss's Theorem." 1.11 in Mathematical Methods for Physicists, 3rd ed. Orlando, FL: Academic Press, pp. 57-61, 1985. Morse, P. M. and Feshbach, H. "Gauss's Theorem." In Methods of Theoretical Physics, Part I. New York: McGraw-Hill, pp. 37-38, 1953. Eric W. Weisstein. "Divergence Theorem." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/DivergenceTheorem.html

  12. Admissible upstream conditions for slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Krause, E.; Menne, S.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of the compressibility on the flow in slender vortices is being studied. The dependence of the breakdown of the slender-vortex approximation on the upstream conditions is demonstrated for various Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. Compatibility conditions, which have to be satisfied if the vortex is to remain slender, are discussed in detail. The general discussions are supplemented by several sample calculations.

  13. Vortices in rotating superfluid 3He.

    PubMed

    Lounasmaa, O V; Thuneberg, E

    1999-07-01

    In this review we first present an introduction to 3He and to the ROTA collaboration under which most of the knowledge on vortices in superfluid 3He has been obtained. In the physics part, we start from the exceptional properties of helium at millikelvin temperatures. The dilemma of rotating superfluids is presented. In 4He and in 3He-B the problem is solved by nucleating an array of singular vortex lines. Their experimental detection in 3He by NMR is described next. The vortex cores in 3He-B have two different structures, both of which have spontaneously broken symmetry. A spin-mass vortex has been identified as well. This object is characterized by a flow of spins around the vortex line, in addition to the usual mass current. A great variety of vortices exist in the A phase of 3He; they are either singular or continuous, and their structure can be a line or a sheet or fill the whole liquid. Altogether seven different types of vortices have been detected in 3He by NMR. We also describe briefly other experimental methods that have been used by ROTA scientists in studying vortices in 3He and some important results thus obtained. Finally, we discuss the possible applications of experiments and theory of 3He to particle physics and cosmology. In particular, we report on experiments where superfluid 3He-B was heated locally by absorption of single neutrons. The resulting events can be used to test theoretical models of the Big Bang at the beginning of our universe.

  14. Anomalous Energetics and Dynamics of Moving Vortices.

    PubMed

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    2015-12-11

    Motivated by the general problem of moving topological defects in an otherwise ordered state and specifically, by the anomalous dynamics observed in vortex-antivortex annihilation and coarsening experiments in freely suspended smectic-C films, I study the deformation, energetics, and dynamics of moving vortices in an overdamped XY model and show that their properties are significantly and qualitatively modified by the motion. PMID:26705656

  15. Anomalous Energetics and Dynamics of Moving Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the general problem of moving topological defects in an otherwise ordered state and specifically, by the anomalous dynamics observed in vortex-antivortex annihilation and coarsening experiments in freely suspended smectic-C films, I study the deformation, energetics, and dynamics of moving vortices in an overdamped X Y model and show that their properties are significantly and qualitatively modified by the motion.

  16. Anomalous energetics and dynamics of moving vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    Motivated by the general problem of moving topological defects in an otherwise ordered state and specifically, by the anomalous dynamics observed in vortex-antivortex annihilation and coarsening experiments in freely-suspended smectic-C films, I study the deformation, energetics and dynamics of moving vortices in an overdamped xy-model and show that their properties are significantly and qualitatively modified by the motion. Supported by NSF through DMR-1001240, MRSEC DMR-0820579, and by Simons Investigator award from Simons Foundation.

  17. Chiral Self-Gravitating Cosmic Vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu.P.

    2005-06-01

    In the framework of general relativity, an exact axisymmetric (vortex) solution of the equations of motion is obtained for the SU(2) symmetric sigma model. This solution is characterized by the topological charge (winding number) and angular deficit. In the linearized approximation, the Lyapunov stability of vortices is proved and the deflection angle of a light ray in the gravitational field of the vortex (gravitational lens effect) is calculated.

  18. Surface Signature of Subsurface-Intensified Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, D.; Carton, X. J.; Chapron, B.; Bashmachnikov, I.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean at mesoscale (20-200 km) and submesoscale (0.5-20km) is highly populated by vortices. These recirculating structures are more energetic than the mean flow, they trap water masses from their origin areas and advect them across the ocean, with consequent impact on the 3D distribution of heat and tracers. Mesoscale and submesoscale structures characterize the ocean dynamics both at the sea surface and at intrathermocline depths (0-1500m), and are presently investigated by means of model outputs, in-situ and satellite (surface) data, the latest being the only way to get high resolution and synoptic observations at planetary scale (e.g., thermal-band observations, future altimetric observations given by the SWOT satellite mission). The scientific question arising from this context is related to the role of the ocean surface for inferring informations on mesoscale and submesoscale vortices at depth. This study has also been motivated by the recent detection of subsurface eddies east of the Arabian Peninsula (PHYSINDIEN experiment - 2011).Using analytical models in the frame of the QG theory, we could describe the theoretical altimetric signature of non-drifting and of drifting subsurface eddies. Numerical experiments, using both coupled QG-SQG and primitive equations models, allowed us to investigate the surface expression of intrathermocline eddies interacting with baroclinic currents or evolving under planetary beta-effect. The eddy characteristics (radius, depth, thickness, velocity) were varied, to represent various oceanic examples (Meddies, Swoddies, Reddies, Peddies, Leddies). Idealized simulations with the ROMS model, confirming theoretical estimates, showed that drifting subsurface-intensified vortices can induce dipolar sea level anomalies, up to 3 cm. This result, compatibly with future SWOT measurement accuracies (about 2 cm), is a first step towards systematic and synoptic detection of subsurface vortices.

  19. Vortices in rotating superfluid 3He.

    PubMed

    Lounasmaa, O V; Thuneberg, E

    1999-07-01

    In this review we first present an introduction to 3He and to the ROTA collaboration under which most of the knowledge on vortices in superfluid 3He has been obtained. In the physics part, we start from the exceptional properties of helium at millikelvin temperatures. The dilemma of rotating superfluids is presented. In 4He and in 3He-B the problem is solved by nucleating an array of singular vortex lines. Their experimental detection in 3He by NMR is described next. The vortex cores in 3He-B have two different structures, both of which have spontaneously broken symmetry. A spin-mass vortex has been identified as well. This object is characterized by a flow of spins around the vortex line, in addition to the usual mass current. A great variety of vortices exist in the A phase of 3He; they are either singular or continuous, and their structure can be a line or a sheet or fill the whole liquid. Altogether seven different types of vortices have been detected in 3He by NMR. We also describe briefly other experimental methods that have been used by ROTA scientists in studying vortices in 3He and some important results thus obtained. Finally, we discuss the possible applications of experiments and theory of 3He to particle physics and cosmology. In particular, we report on experiments where superfluid 3He-B was heated locally by absorption of single neutrons. The resulting events can be used to test theoretical models of the Big Bang at the beginning of our universe. PMID:10393895

  20. Model flocks in a steady vortical flow.

    PubMed

    Baggaley, A W

    2015-05-01

    We modify the standard Vicsek model to clearly distinguish between intrinsic noise due to imperfect alignment between organisms and extrinsic noise due to fluid motion. We then consider the effect of a steady vortical flow, the Taylor-Green vortex, on the dynamics of the flock, for various flow speeds, with a fixed intrinsic particle speed. We pay particular attention to the morphology of the flow, and quantify its filamentarity. Strikingly, above a critical flow speed there is a pronounced increase in the filamentarity of the flock, when compared to the zero-flow case. This is due to the fact that particles appear confined to areas of low vorticity; a familiar phenomena, commonly seen in the clustering of inertial particles in vortical flows. Hence, the cooperative motion of the particles gives them an effective inertia, which is seen to have a profound effect on the morphology of the flock, in the presence of external fluid motion. Finally, we investigate the angle between the flow and the particles direction of movement and find it follows a power-law distribution. PMID:26066260

  1. Thermally Activated Decay of Magnetic Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Jacob; Grombacher, Denys; Fortin, David; Davis, John; Freeman, Mark

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally probe thermally activated decay of magnetic vortices, by observing annihilations within an array of Ni80Fe20 discs through hysteresis measurements. Specifically, the statistics of vortex annihilation are mapped as a function of the magnitude of, and the dwell time at, the peak fields applied during hysteresis scans. Magnetic vortices in micro- and nano-scale thin film ferromagnetic elements exhibit interesting and complex behavior. Demagnetization interactions make understanding processes like the annihilation of a vortex during magnetic switching challenging. Recent work has shown that the annihilation process can take place over an extended period of timefootnotetextZ. Liu, R.D. Sydora and M.R. Freeman, PRB 77, 174410 (2008). implying that there is a characteristic decay process, likely thermally governed. Through application of an Arrhenius model we extract information about the energy barrier preventing decay, and hence information about the energetic contributions of the demagnetization effects. We anticipate that this information will be useful in extending analytical models of magnetic vortices.

  2. Long term changes in the polar vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2015-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented.

  3. Merging of co-rotating trailing vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerretelli, C.; Leweke, T.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    1999-11-01

    The merging of co-rotating vortices is an important physical phenomenon in aerodynamics as well as in fundamental turbulent flows. Merging plays a role in the aerodynamics of airplane wing wakes, where it can accelerate the development of the Crow instability (Crouch 1997). Although vortex merger has been extensively studied, most numerical investigations concern the case of the two dimensional inviscid interactions. On the other hand, the dynamics of three dimensional viscous vortices, which spin around each other in an helical path, is not yet fully understood, and this is the focus of the present experimental investigation. Previous work by Chen, Jacob and Savas (1999) shows that merging of co-rotating vortices, from a flapped wing, occurs at approximately 0.8 of an orbit period after formation, independently of the circulation Reynolds number Re_Γ. In the present work, merging is studied by using a biplane wing system, as well as the DPIV technique. In our investigation, we find that the time taken for merging, measured in orbit periods, is a function not only of the experimental geometry, but is also a function of the circulation Reynolds number.

  4. Self-Similar Compressible Free Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonEllenrieder, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lie group methods are used to find both exact and numerical similarity solutions for compressible perturbations to all incompressible, two-dimensional, axisymmetric vortex reference flow. The reference flow vorticity satisfies an eigenvalue problem for which the solutions are a set of two-dimensional, self-similar, incompressible vortices. These solutions are augmented by deriving a conserved quantity for each eigenvalue, and identifying a Lie group which leaves the reference flow equations invariant. The partial differential equations governing the compressible perturbations to these reference flows are also invariant under the action of the same group. The similarity variables found with this group are used to determine the decay rates of the velocities and thermodynamic variables in the self-similar flows, and to reduce the governing partial differential equations to a set of ordinary differential equations. The ODE's are solved analytically and numerically for a Taylor vortex reference flow, and numerically for an Oseen vortex reference flow. The solutions are used to examine the dependencies of the temperature, density, entropy, dissipation and radial velocity on the Prandtl number. Also, experimental data on compressible free vortex flow are compared to the analytical results, the evolution of vortices from initial states which are not self-similar is discussed, and the energy transfer in a slightly-compressible vortex is considered.

  5. Energy Harvesting of a Flapping Airfoil in a Vortical Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Charlie; Wei, Zhenglun

    2014-11-01

    We study the response of a two-dimensional flapping airfoil in the wake downstream of an oscillating D-shape cylinder. The airfoil has either heaving or pitching motions. The leading edge vortex (LEV) and trailing edge vortex (TEV) of the airfoil play important roles in energy harvesting. Two major interaction modes between the airfoil and incoming vortices, the suppressing mode and the reinforcing mode, are identified. However, distinctions exist between the heaving and pitching motion in terms of their contributions to the interaction modes and the efficiency of the energy extraction. A potential theory and the related fluid dynamics analysis are developed to analytically demonstrate that the topology of the incoming vortices corresponding to the airfoil is the primary factor that determines the interaction modes. Finally, the trade-off between the input and the output is discussed. It is found that appropriate operational parameters for the heaving motion are preferable in order to preserve acceptable input power for energy harvesters, while appropriate parameters for the pitching motion are essential to achieve decent output power.

  6. Numerical solution of periodic vortical flows about a thin airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.; Atassi, Hafiz M.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for computing periodic, three-dimensional, vortical flows around isolated airfoils. The unsteady velocity is split into a vortical component which is a known function of the upstream flow conditions and the Lagrangian coordinates of the mean flow, and an irrotational field whose potential satisfies a nonconstant-coefficient, inhomogeneous, convective wave equation. Solutions for thin airfoils at zero degrees incidence to the mean flow are presented in this paper. Using an elliptic coordinate transformation, the computational domain is transformed into a rectangle. The Sommerfeld radiation condition is applied to the unsteady pressure on the grid line corresponding to the far field boundary. The results are compared with a Possio solver, and it is shown that for maximum accuracy the grid should depend on both the Mach number and reduced frequency. Finally, in order to assess the range of validity of the classical thin airfoil approximation, results for airfoils with zero thickness are compared with results for airfoils with small thickness.

  7. Numerical Investigation of Synthetic Buoyancy-Induced Columnar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaya, Nicholas; Stogner, Roy; Moser, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Much of the solar energy incident on the Earth's surface is absorbed into the ground, which in turn heats the air layer above the surface. This buoyant air layer contains considerable gravitational potential energy. The energy can drive the formation of columnar vortices (``Dust-Devils'') which arise naturally in the atmosphere. These ``Dust-Devils'' occur over a wide range of scales in many different locations across the Earth, as well as on Mars. A new energy harvesting approach makes use of this ubiquitous process by creating and anchoring the vortices artificially and extracting energy from them. In this talk we explore the characteristics of these vorticies through numerical simulation. Computational models of the turning vane system used to generate the vortex have been developed. We will discuss the formulation of these models and their validation against available experimental measurements. We will also describe the use of these simulations to optimize the turning vane configuration to maximize the power extraction, as well as serving as a vehicle to probe the dynamics of the underlying physical processes. Finally, this talk will conclude with comparisons between the synthetic vorticies and the naturally occurring phenomena. This work supported by the Department of Energy [ARPA-E] under Award Number [DE-FOA-0000670].

  8. Management of Vortices Trailing Flapped Wings via Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management via separation control. Passive control was achieved by means of a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressure ports, was used to predict vortex characteristics by means of inviscid rollup relations. Furthermore, vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over both outboard and inboard edge vortices while producing negligible lift excursions. Dynamic separation and attachment control was found to be an effective means for dynamically perturbing the vortex from arbitrarily long wavelengths down to wavelengths less than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  9. Optical Response of Mixed Molybdenum Dichalcogenides for Solar Cell Applications Using the Modified Becke-Johnson Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Ushma; Joshi, Ritu; Kothari, D. C.; Tiwari, Harpal; Venugopalan, K.

    2016-03-01

    Energy bands and density of states (DOS) of mixed molybdenum dichalcogenides like MoS2, MoSeS, MoSe2, MoTe2, MoTeS, and MoTe0.5S1.5 are reported for the first time using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential within full potential-linearised augmented plane wave technique. From the partial DOS, a strong hybridisation between the Mo-d and chalcogen-p states is observed below the Fermi energy EF. In addition, the dielectric constants, absorption coefficients, and refractivity spectra of these compounds have also been deduced. The integrated absorption coefficients derived from the frequency-dependent absorption spectra within the energy range of 0-4.5 eV show a possibility of using molybdenum dichalcogenides, particularly MoTe0.5S1.5, in solar cell applications. Birefringence and degree of anisotropy are also discussed using the data on refractivity and imaginary components of the dielectric constant.

  10. A Study of the Role of Filamentary PV Mixing on the Sharpness of the Extratropical Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, S. M.; Geller, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Birner's work (2006) showed that the extratropical tropopause is extremely sharp when the mean tropopause structure is plotted using the tropopause altitude as the reference level. Wirth suggested that this sharpness is largely control by the upper tropospheric relative vorticity. It has been suggested that this effect, while important, is not sufficient to explain the observed extratropical tropopause sharpness, and that radiative processes provide the needed additional sharpening. Furthermore, there are large annual and latitudinal variations in this tropopause sharpness, but the reasons for these remain unexplained. By analysis of observations and modeling, we suggest that dry baroclinic mixing is sufficient to explain the extratropical tropopause sharpness and its latitudinal and annual variations. We revisit some earlier work by Son and Polvani (2007), who showed that in their dry idealized global model, the tropopause sharpness depended more on horizontal resolution than on vertical resolution, but they gave no explanation. Our work has reproduced these resolution-dependent results, and we have sought to explain these results by a series of diagnostics. Our results suggest that while the Wirth control by upper tropospheric relative vorticity is true on synoptic time scales, the climatological control is much more related to the downward flux of potential vorticity by baroclinic mixing, with heat fluxes playing a lesser role. Our results suggest that baroclinic mixing of potential vorticity is the cause of the observed climatological extratropical tropopause sharpness, and that the resolution dependence of this sharpness is a result of more vigorous baroclinic activity for higher horizontal resolutions as well as the greater resolution of filamentary mixing of potential vorticity. Also, we suggest that the annual variation of the extratropical tropopause sharpness follows the annual migration of the latitude of the jet stream. Birner (2006, J. of Geophys. Res

  11. Instability of surface lenticular vortices: results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, Noé; Paci, Alexandre; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2016-04-01

    We examine the instability of lenticular vortices -- or lenses -- in a stratified rotating fluid. The simplest configuration is one in which the lenses overlay a deep layer and have a free surface, and this can be studied using a two-layer rotating shallow water model. We report results from laboratory experiments and high-resolution direct numerical simulations of the destabilization of vortices with constant potential vorticity, and compare these to a linear stability analysis. The stability properties of the system are governed by two parameters: the typical upper-layer potential vorticity and the size (depth) of the vortex. Good agreement is found between analytical, numerical and experimental results for the growth rate and wavenumber of the instability. The nonlinear saturation of the instability is associated with conversion from potential to kinetic energy and weak emission of gravity waves, giving rise to the formation of coherent vortex multipoles with trapped waves. The impact of flow in the lower layer is examined. In particular, it is shown that the growth rate can be strongly affected and the instability can be suppressed for certain types of weak co-rotating flow.

  12. Acid Mine Drainage Passive Remediation: Potential Use of Alkaline Clay, Optimal Mixing Ratio and Long Term Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, F.; Liang, X.; Wen, Y.; Perone, H.

    2015-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is one of the most adverse environmental problems of the mine industry. Surface water and ground water affected by this pollution are characterized by their acidity and the high content of sulfates and heavy metals. In this study, alkaline clay, an industrial waste with a high pH, which is utilized in the alumina refining process, was used as the remediation material to inhibit pyrite oxidation. Through a series of batch and column experiments, complemented with field measurements and geochemical modeling, three important issues associated with this passive and auto sustainable acid mine drainage remediation method were investigated: 1) the potential use of alkaline clay as an AMD remediation material, 2) the adequate alkaline clay/coal refuse mixing ratio (AC/CR) to ensure pH values near to neutral conditions, and, 3) the prediction of long term impacts, in terms of the trends of the main parameters involved in this process such as pH, concentrations of sulfate, iron and other dissolved contaminants. Both field measurements and the samples used for the experiments came from a coal waste site located in Mather, Pennsylvania. Alkaline clay proved to be an effective remediation material for AMD. It was found that 10% AC/CR is an adequate mixing ratio (i.e. the upper limit), which has been also indicated by field measurements. The concentrations of some contaminants such as iron, manganese or sulfate are significantly reduced with the remediation approach, compared to those representative concentrations found in mine tailings. Moreover, results suggest a very reliable long-term stability of the remediation (i.e. neutral pH conditions are maintained), thus enhancing the generation of iron precipitates that could produce pyrite grain coating and hardpan (i.e. cemented layer) on the surface. These processes also made the amended layer less porous, thus increasing water retention and hindering oxygen diffusion.

  13. Large Deviation Statistics of Vorticity Stretching in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    A key feature of 3D fluid turbulence is the stretching/re-alignment of vorticity by the action of the strain-rate. It is shown using the cumulant-generating function that cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence behaves statistically like a sum of i.i.d. variables. The Cramer function for vorticity stretching is computed from the JHTDB isotropic DNS (Reλ = 430) and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain-rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramer functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of largest FTLE. A model Fokker-Planck equation is constructed by approximating the viscous destruction of vorticity with a deterministic non-linear relaxation law matching conditional statistics, while the fluctuations in vorticity stretching are modelled by stochastic noise matching the statistics encoded in the Cramer function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude PDF, with good agreement for the exponent but significant error (30-40%) in the pre-factor. Supported by NSF Graduate Fellowship (DGE-1232825) and NSF Grant CMMI-0941530.

  14. Surfzone vorticity in the presence of extreme bathymetric variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.

    2014-12-01

    Surfzone vorticity was measured at Duck, NC using a novel 5-m diameter vorticity sensor deployed in 1.75 m water depth. During the 4-week deployment the initially alongshore uniform bathymetry developed 200-m long mega-cusps with alongshore vertical changes of 1.5 m or more. When waves were small and the vorticity sensor was seaward of the surfzone, vorticity variance and mean vorticity varied with the tidally modulated water depth, consistent with a net seaward flux of surfzone-generated vorticity. Vorticity variance increased with incident wave heights up to 2-m. However, vorticity variance remained relatively constant for incident wave heights above 2-m, and suggests that eddy energy may become saturated in the inner surfzone during large wave events. In the presence of mega-cusps the mean vorticity (shear) is often large and generated by bathymetrically controlled rip currents, while vorticity variance remains strongly correlated with the incident wave height. Funded by NSF, ASD(R&E), and WHOI Coastal Ocean Institute.

  15. Diagnosing Potentially Preventable Hospitalisations (DaPPHne): protocol for a mixed-methods data-linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Passey, Megan E; Longman, Jo M; Johnston, Jennifer J; Jorm, Louisa; Ewald, Dan; Morgan, Geoff G; Rolfe, Margaret; Chalker, Bronwyn

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rates of potentially preventable hospitalisations (PPH) are used as a proxy measure of effectiveness of, or access to community-based health services. The validity of PPH as an indicator in Australia has not been confirmed. Available evidence suggests that patient-related, clinician-related and systems-related factors are associated with PPH, with differences between rural and metropolitan settings. Furthermore, the proportion of PPHs which are actually preventable is unknown. The Diagnosing Potentially Preventable Hospitalisations study will determine the proportion of PPHs for chronic conditions that are deemed preventable and identify potentially modifiable factors driving these, in order to develop effective interventions to reduce admissions and improve measures of health system performance. Methods and analysis This mixed methods data linkage study of approximately 1000 eligible patients with chronic PPH admissions to one metropolitan and two regional hospitals over 12 months will combine data from multiple sources to assess the: extent of preventability of chronic PPH admissions; validity of the Preventability Assessment Tool (PAT) in identifying preventable admissions; factors contributing to chronic PPH admissions. Data collected from patients (quantitative and qualitative methods), their general practitioners, hospital clinicians and hospital records, will be linked with routinely collected New South Wales (NSW) Admitted Patient Data Collection, the NSW Registry of Births, Death and Marriages death registration and Australian Bureau of Statistics mortality data. The validity of the PAT will be assessed by determining concordance between clinician assessment and that of a ‘gold standard’ panel. Multivariable logistic regression will identify the main predictor variables of admissions deemed preventable, using study-specific and linked data. Ethics and dissemination The NSW Population and Health Services Research Ethics Committee granted

  16. The structure and stability of transport and mixing barriers in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Blundell, J. R.; Hughes, C. W.; Mazloff, M.; Shuckburgh, E.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-04-01

    As well as transporting water large distances between ocean basins, the ACC also regulates transport and mixing across its flow. Understanding the spatial and temporal variations in transport behaviour is highly relevant for modelling and predicting the global Meridional Overturning Circulation, the spread of heat content anomalies to or from Antarctica and the transport of dissolved carbon dioxide by the ocean. Both the multiple jet structure of the ACC and its intermittent mixing inhibition are locally describable by a zonally-uniform model of potential vorticity dynamics, called the Potential Vorticity Staircase, used to explain temporally-intermittent mixing across the atmospheric ozone hole boundary and the persistence of jets on Jupiter. In a previous study, we found support for the zonally-inhomogeneous Southern Ocean analogue of the PV Staircase, and that the PV structure changes downstream of major features of seafloor topography. Here, we test the details of the PV Staircase model in the Southern Ocean using over 600 years of eddy-resolving experiments with the Q-GCM, OFES and SOSE models. We develop tools based on kernel density estimation to identify the staircase structure in the isopycnic potential vorticity. Under present-day and increased eastward wind stress experiments, we determine the relationship of the structure and its stability to mesoscale eddy intensity, measures of transport and mixing, mean flow and seafloor topography. From the multi-decadal ensemble of wind stress trend experiments we find evidence of 'eddy saturation': minimal response in the zonal transport with respect to increasing wind stress. There is a relationship between the strength of the wind stress and of the eddies, and hence substantial changes to the multiple jet structure, as expected from the PV Staircase. However, this relationship is complicated by regional variations in seafloor topography and by internal variability.

  17. Instabilities of pancake vortices modelled by rotating ellipsoids in a stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Patrice

    2012-11-01

    It is now well known that oceans contain very energetic vortices with a long lifetime. However, it is still unclear how these vortices destabilise and how much energy and mixing they can provide at different scales. We investigate here the destabilisation of an axisymmetric vortex in a stratified and non-rotating environment. The vortex is modeled by a rotating ellipsoid with various diameters and heights. The flow is visualised by shadowgraph, synthetic schlieren and Particle Image Velocimetry. Two types of instabilities have been observed, one being located on the side of the ellipsoid and the other being located at the top and bottom. The first instability is linked to the radiative instability, which is well known in the case of a rotating cylinder, and which emits internal waves with an azimuthal wave number equal to 1. The second instability generates an axisymmetric layering pattern which is reminiscent of the double diffusive instability (between angular momentum and density), observed and described theoretically in a rotating environment. This second instability might be responsible for the layering pattern found above oceanic vortices, which probably leads to a large localised mixing. ANR Grant OLA.

  18. Vortical and turbulent structure of a lobed mixer free shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, D. C.; Bennett, J. C., Jr.

    1994-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the vortical and turbulent structure in a free shear layer downstream of a lobed mixer has been conducted. Pulsed-laser flow visualization with smoke and three-dimensional velocity measurements with hot-film anemometry were obtained for a lobed-mixer configuration and a baseline, planar configuration. Laminar and turbulent initial boundary-layer conditions were documented for both cases. The main result of this investigation is that a new vortex structure was confirmed to exist for the lobed mixer in addition to the well-known streamwise vortex array, consistent with the work of Manning. The normal vortex (due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) sheds periodically from the convoluted trailing edge of the lobed mixer and plays a major part in the enhanced mixing process in combination with the streamwise vorticity. The streamwise vorticity deforms the normal vortex into a pinched-off structure that is unstable and creates intense small-scale turbulence and mixing.

  19. Numerical studies of the margin of vortices with decaying cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, G. C.; Ting, L.

    1986-01-01

    The merging of vortices to a single one is a canonical incompressible viscous flow problem. The merging process begins when the core sizes or the vortices are comparable to their distances and ends when the contour lines of constant vorticity lines are circularized around one center. Approximate solutions to this problem are constructed by adapting the asymptotic solutions for distinct vortices. For the early stage of merging, the next-order terms in the asymptotic solutions are added to the leading term. For the later stage of merging, the vorticity distribution is reinitialized by vortices with overlapping core structures guided by the 'rule of merging' and the velocity of the 'vortex centers' are then defined by a minimum principle. To show the accuracy of the approximate solution, it is compared with the finite-difference solution.

  20. Zombie Vortices: Angular Momentum Transport and Planetesimal Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Joseph; Marcus, Philip; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Lecoanet, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Zombie vortices may fill the dead zones of protoplanetary disks, where they may play important roles in star and planet formation. We will investigate this new, purely hydrodynamic instability and explore the conditions necessary to resurrect the dead zone and fill it with large amplitude vortices that may transport angular momentum and allow mass to accrete onto the protostar. One unresolved issue is whether angular momentum transport is mediated via asymmetries in the vortices, vortex-vortex interactions, or acoustic waves launched by the vortices. Vortices may also play a crucial role in the formation of planetesimals, the building blocks of planets. It is still an open question how grains grow to kilometer-size. We will investigate the interactions of dust with vortices generated via our new hydrodynamic instability, and bridge the gap between micron-sized grains and kilometer-sized planetesimals. Supported by NSF AST-1010052.

  1. Effects of calcination temperature and acid-base properties on mixed potential ammonia sensors modified by metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Satsuma, Atsushi; Katagiri, Makoto; Kakimoto, Shiro; Sugaya, Satoshi; Shimizu, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Mixed potential sensors were fabriated using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as a solid electrolyte and a mixture of Au and various metal oxides as a sensing electrode. The effects of calcination temperature ranging from 600 to 1,000 °C and acid-base properties of the metal oxides on the sensing properties were examined. The selective sensing of ammonia was achieved by modification of the sensing electrode using MoO(3), Bi(2)O(3) and V(2)O(5), while the use of WO(3,) Nb(2)O(5) and MgO was not effective. The melting points of the former group were below 820 °C, while those of the latter group were higher than 1,000 °C. Among the former group, the selective sensing of ammonia was strongly dependent on the calcination temperature, which was optimum around melting point of the corresponding metal oxides. The good spreading of the metal oxides on the electrode is suggested to be one of the important factors. In the former group, the relative response of ammonia to propene was in the order of MoO(3) > Bi(2)O(3) > V(2)O(5), which agreed well with the acidity of the metal oxides. The importance of the acidic properties of metal oxides for ammonia sensing was clarified.

  2. An exposure assessment of radionuclide emissions associated with potential mixed-low level waste disposal facilities at fifteen DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Socolof, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    A screening method was developed to compare the doses received via the atmospheric pathway at 15 potential DOE MLLW (mixed low-level waste) sites. Permissible waste concentrations were back calculated using the radioactivity NESHAP (National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) in 40 FR 61 (DOE Order 5820.2A performance objective). Site-specific soil and meteorological data were used to determine permissible waste concentrations (PORK). For a particular radionuclide, perks for each site do not vary by more than one order of magnitude. perks of {sup 14}C are about six orders of magnitude more restrictive than perks of {sup 3}H because of differences in liquid/vapor partitioning, decay, and exposure dose. When comparing results from the atmospheric pathway to the water and intruder pathways, {sup 14}C disposal concentrations were limited by the atmospheric pathway for most arid sites; for {sup 3}H, the atmospheric pathway was not limiting at any of the sites. Results of this performance evaluation process are to be used for planning for siting of disposal facilities.

  3. Effects of Calcination Temperature and Acid-Base Properties on Mixed Potential Ammonia Sensors Modified by Metal Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Satsuma, Atsushi; Katagiri, Makoto; Kakimoto, Shiro; Sugaya, Satoshi; Shimizu, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Mixed potential sensors were fabriated using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as a solid electrolyte and a mixture of Au and various metal oxides as a sensing electrode. The effects of calcination temperature ranging from 600 to 1,000 °C and acid-base properties of the metal oxides on the sensing properties were examined. The selective sensing of ammonia was achieved by modification of the sensing electrode using MoO3, Bi2O3 and V2O5, while the use of WO3, Nb2O5 and MgO was not effective. The melting points of the former group were below 820 °C, while those of the latter group were higher than 1,000 °C. Among the former group, the selective sensing of ammonia was strongly dependent on the calcination temperature, which was optimum around melting point of the corresponding metal oxides. The good spreading of the metal oxides on the electrode is suggested to be one of the important factors. In the former group, the relative response of ammonia to propene was in the order of MoO3 > Bi2O3 > V2O5, which agreed well with the acidity of the metal oxides. The importance of the acidic properties of metal oxides for ammonia sensing was clarified. PMID:22319402

  4. X-ray phase vortices: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Paterson, David; McNulty, Ian; Hayes, Jason P.

    2004-08-01

    We review the current work on x-ray phase vortices. We explain the role of an x-ray vortex in phase recovery and speculate on its possible applications in other fields of x-ray optical research. We present our theoretical understanding of the structure of phase vortices and test these predictions against experiment. We present experimental observations of phase vortices with charge greater than 3 and observe that their propagation appears to be consistent with our theoretical models.

  5. Self-assembled or mixed peptide amphiphile micelles from Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins as potential immunomodulatory treatment.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Antonella; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Tesauro, Diego; Galdiero, Marilena; Finamore, Emiliana; Martora, Francesca; Mansi, Rosalba; Ringhieri, Paola; Morelli, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The use of micelle aggregates formed from peptide amphiphiles (PAs) as potential synthetic self-adjuvant vaccines to treat Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection are reported here. The PAs were based on epitopes gB409-505 and gD301-309, selected from HSV envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and glycoprotein D (gD), that had their N-terminus modified with hydrophobic moieties containing two C18 hydrocarbon chains. Pure and mixed micelles of gB and/or gD peptide epitopes were easily prepared after starting with the synthesis of corresponding PAs by solid phase methods. Structural characterization of the aggregates confirmed that they were sufficiently stable and compatible with in vivo use: critical micelle concentration values around 4.0 ⋅ 10(-7) mol ⋅ Kg(-1); hydrodynamic radii (RH) between 50-80 nm, and a zeta potential (ζ) around - 40 mV were found for all aggregates. The in vitro results indicate that both peptide epitopes and micelles, at 10 μM, triggered U937 and RAW 264.7 cells to release appreciable levels of cytokines. In particular, interleukin (IL)-23-, IL-6-, IL-8- or macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2-, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-release increased considerably when cells were treated with the gB-micelles or gD-micelles compared with the production of the same cytokines when the stimulus was the single gB or gD peptide. PMID:24855352

  6. Matter in the form of toroidal electromagnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    2015-09-01

    The creation of charged elementary particles from neutral photons is explained as a conversion process of electromagnetic (EM) energy from linear to circular motion at the speed of light into two localized, toroidal shaped vortices of trapped EM energy that resist change of motion, perceptible as particles with inertia and hence mass. The photon can be represented as a superposition of left and right circular polarized transverse electric fields of opposite polarity originating from a common zero potential axis, the optical axis of the photon. If these components are separated by interaction with a strong field (nucleon) they would curl up into two electromagnetic vortices (EMV) due to longitudinal magnetic field components forming toroids. These vortices are perceptible as opposite charged elementary particles e+/- . These spinning toroids generate extended oscillating fields that interact with stationary field oscillations. The velocity-dependent frequency differences cause beat signals equivalent to matter waves, leading to interference. The extended fields entangled with every particle explain wave particle duality issues. Spin and magnetic moment are the natural outcome of these gyrating particles. As the energy and hence mass of the electron increases with acceleration so does its size shrink proportional to its reduced wavelength. The artificial weak and strong nuclear forces can be easily explained as different manifestations of the intermediate EM forces. The unstable neutron consists of a proton surrounded by a contracted and captured electron. The associated radial EM forces represent the weak nuclear force. The deuteron consists of two axially separated protons held together by a centrally captured electron. The axial EM forces represent the strong nuclear force, providing stability for "neutrons" only within nucleons. The same principles were applied to determine the geometries of force-balanced nuclei. The alpha-particle emerges as a very compact

  7. Finite element techniques for the Navier-Stokes equations in the primitive variable formulation and the vorticity stream-function formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaisner, F.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1987-01-01

    Finite element procedures for the Navier-Stokes equations in the primitive variable formulation and the vorticity stream-function formulation have been implemented. For both formulations, streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin techniques are used for the discretization of the transport equations. The main problem associated with the vorticity stream-function formulation is the lack of boundary conditions for vorticity at solid surfaces. Here an implicit treatment of the vorticity at no-slip boundaries is incorporated in a predictor-multicorrector time integration scheme. For the primitive variable formulation, mixed finite-element approximations are used. A nine-node element and a four-node + bubble element have been implemented. The latter is shown to exhibit a checkerboard pressure mode and a numerical treatment for this spurious pressure mode is proposed. The two methods are compared from the points of view of simulating internal and external flows and the possibilities of extensions to three dimensions.

  8. Gluon propagators and center vortices in gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chernodub, M. N.; Nakagawa, Y.; Nakamura, A.; Saito, T.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    We study electric and magnetic components of the gluon propagators in quark-gluon plasma in terms of center vortices by using a quenched simulation of SU(2) lattice theory. In the Landau gauge, the magnetic components of the propagators are strongly affected in the infrared region by removal of the center vortices, while the electric components are almost unchanged by this procedure. In the Coulomb gauge, the time-time correlators, including an instantaneous interaction, also have an essential contribution from the center vortices. As a result, one finds that magnetic degrees of freedom in the infrared region couple strongly to the center vortices in the deconfinement phase.

  9. Dynamics of vortices and drift waves: a point vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Verga, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    The complex interactions of localized vortices with waves are investigated using a model of point vortices in the presence of a transverse or longitudinal wave. This simple model shows a rich dynamical behavior including oscillations of a dipole, splitting and merging of two like-circulation vortices, and chaos. The analytical and numerical results of this model have been found to predict under certain conditions, the behavior of more complex systems, such as the vortices of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, where the presence of waves strongly affects the evolution of large coherent structures.

  10. Drift waves and vortices: a dynamical point vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Verga, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Interactions of localized vortices with drift waves are investigated using a model of point vortices in the presence of a transverse or longitudinal wave. This simple model shows a rich dynamical behavior including oscillations of a dipole, splitting and merging of two like-circulation vortices, and chaos. The analytical and numerical results of this model have been found to predict under certain conditions, the behavior of more complex systems, such as the vortices of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, where the presence of waves strongly affects the evolution of large coherent structures.

  11. Observations of Electron Vorticity in the Inner Plasma Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    From a limited number of observations it appears that vorticity is a common feature in the inner plasma sheet. With the four Cluster spacecraft and the four PEACE instruments positioned in a tetrahedral configuration, for the first time it is possible to directly estimate the electron fluid vorticity in a space plasma. We show examples of electron fluid vorticity from multiple plasma sheet crossings. These include three time periods when Cluster passed through a reconnection ion diffusion region. Enhancements in vorticity are seen in association with each crossing of the ion diffusion region.

  12. Vorticity, gyroscopic precession, and spin-curvature force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei Chieh; Lee, Si Chen

    2013-02-01

    In investigating the relationship between vorticity and gyroscopic precession, we calculate the vorticity vector in Godel, Kerr, Lewis, Schwarzschild, and Minkowski metrics and find that the vorticity vector of the specific observers is the angular velocity of the gyroscopic precession. Furthermore, when space-time torsion is included, the vorticity and spin-curvature force change sign. This result is very similar to the behavior of the positive and negative helicities of quantum spin in the Stern-Gerlach force. It implies that the inclusion of torsion will lead to an analogous property of quantum spin even in classical treatment.

  13. Inviscid to turbulent transition of trailing vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the plateau region in the vortex system which trails from a lifting wing are discussed. The decay of the vortex due to viscous or turbulent shear is very slow in the plateau so that the maximum tangential speed in the vortices remains nearly constant for some distance downstream of roll-up and then begins to decrease, becoming inversely proportional to the square root of the distance downstream. Mathematical models are developed to analyze the structure of the plateau area. Solutions are obtained for both constant and variable eddy viscosity models.

  14. A geometric approach to quantum vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Vittorio; Spera, Mauro

    1989-12-01

    In this paper a geometrical description is given of the theory of quantum vortices first developed by Rasetti and Regge [Physica A 80, 217 (1975)] relying on the symplectic techniques of Marsden and Weinstein [J. Phys. D 7, 305 (1983)], and Kirillov-Kostant-Souriau geometric quantization. The RR-current algebra is interpreted as the natural Hamiltonian algebra associated to a certain coadjoint orbit of the group G=SDiff(R3), the KKS prequantization condition of which is related to the Feynman-Onsager relation. This orbit is also shown to possess a G-invariant Kaehler structure, whence, in principle, it is possible to quantize it in a natural way.

  15. Nonlinear Generation of Vorticity by Surface Waves.

    PubMed

    Filatov, S V; Parfenyev, V M; Vergeles, S S; Brazhnikov, M Yu; Levchenko, A A; Lebedev, V V

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that waves excited on a fluid surface produce local surface rotation owing to hydrodynamic nonlinearity. We examine theoretically the effect and obtain an explicit formula for the vertical vorticity in terms of the surface elevation. Our theoretical predictions are confirmed by measurements of surface motion in a cell with water where surface waves are excited by vertical and harmonic shaking the cell. The experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. We discuss physical consequences of the effect. PMID:26894714

  16. How Do Hydrodynamic Instabilities Affect 3D Transport in Geophysical Vortices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding three-dimensional (3D) transport in ocean eddies is important for processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. It is well known that geophysical vortices are subject to various hydrodynamic instabilities. Yet the influence of these instabilities on 3D material transport in vortex systems is not well investigated. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we analyze these instabilities with normal-mode method, and reproduce their characteristics via highly-resolved numerical simulations using a spectral element Navier-Stokes solver. By comparing the simulation results of stable and unstable vortices, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport through three major aspects: (i) energy transfer, (ii) overturning transport of the secondary circulation, and (iii) rates of vertical exchange and mixing. It is found that instabilities can enhance local nonlinear interactions and cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have slopes between the conventional -5/3 and -3 at inertial ranges. The cascade of a new quantity is proposed to explain these non-conventional slopes. One of our main results is the discovery of material exchange between the central vortex and satellite vortices through 3D pathways, called funnels. These funnels modify the concept of elliptic regions that can trap material when confined to 2D dynamics. Thus, we show that a family of vortices, created by the hydrodynamic instabilities of the initially unstable vortex, can still continue to operate in unity in order to complete the 3D transport in these systems. We also show that flow instabilities can double the magnitude of vertical velocity, increase the rate of vertical exchange by an order of magnitude and enhance mixing rate more than 100%.

  17. Vortical flow management for improved configuration aerodynamics: Recent experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in vortex-control applications for alleviating the adverse consequences of three dimensional separation and vortical interactions on slender body/swept wing configurations is reported. Examples include helical separation trip to alleviate the side force due to forebody vortex asymmetry; hinged strakes to avoid vortex breakdown effects; compartmentation of swept leading edge separation to delay the pitch-up instability; under wing vortex trip and vortex trip and vortex flaps for drag reduction at high lift; and an apex-flap trimmer to fully utilize the lift capability of trailing-edge flaps for take off and landing of delta wings. Experimental results on generic wind-tunnel models are presented to illustrate the vortex-management concepts involved and to indicate their potential for enhancing the subsonic aerodynamics of supersonic-cruise type vehicles.

  18. Formation of vortices in first order phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melfo, Alejandra; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    1995-07-01

    Using a toy model Langrangian we investigate the formation of vortices in first order phase transitions. The evolution and interactions of vacuum bubbles are also studied using both analytical approximations and a numerical simulation of scalar field dynamics. A long-lived bubble wall bound state is discovered and its existence is justified by using a simplified potential for the bubble wall interaction. The conditions that need to be satisfied for vortex formation by bubble collisions are also studied with particular emphasis placed on geometrical considerations. These conditions are then implemented in a Monte Carlo simulation for the study of the probability of defect formation. It is shown that the probability of vortex formation by the collision of relativistically expanding bubbles gets reduced by about 10% due to the above-mentioned geometric effects.

  19. Formation of vortices in first order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Melfo, A. |; Perivolaropoulos, L. |

    1995-07-15

    Using a toy model Langrangian we investigate the formation of vortices in first order phase transitions. The evolution and interactions of vacuum bubbles are also studied using both analytical approximations and a numerical simulation of scalar field dynamics. A long-lived bubble wall bound state is discovered and its existence is justified by using a simplified potential for the bubble wall interaction. The conditions that need to be satisfied for vortex formation by bubble collisions are also studied with particular emphasis placed on geometrical considerations. These conditions are then implemented in a Monte Carlo simulation for the study of the probability of defect formation. It is shown that the probability of vortex formation by the collision of relativistically expanding bubbles gets reduced by about 10% due to the above-mentioned geometric effects.

  20. Flow enthalpy effects on scramjet mixing and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, D. W.; Mcclinton, C. R.; Rogers, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The present analysis of the 3D characteristics of the mixing processes in a scramjet combustor gives attention to the streamwise, vorticity-driven macromixing, as well as shear-driven small-scale mixing, in both an unconfined Mach 6 airstream and a high-enthalpy (Mach-17) confined, Mach 6 airstream. The results obtained indicate that mixing is substantially lower for the high-enthalpy case. The effect of residence time on jet mixing is discussed in view of the production and decay of the axial vorticity, cross-flow velocities, and mean-flow velocities of these confined flows. The effective distance travelled by a fluid particle in the cross-flow, over the combustor length, is used to explain axial vorticity's contribution to mixing.

  1. Vorticity amplification near the stagnation point of landing gear wheels: effect of the orientation of the impinging vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Mingyao; Feltham, Graham; Ekmekci, Alis

    2014-11-01

    When oncoming streams of weak vorticity aligned with the axle axis of a two-wheel landing gear impinge near the forward stagnation point of the wheels, a mechanism for vorticity collection, growth, amplification into discrete large-scale vortices, and shedding was formerly shown to exist. In the current study, the impinging vorticity streams are perpendicular to the axle axis, i.e. in a vertical orientation as opposed to the horizontal orientation before. Experiments are conducted in a recirculating water channel using hydrogen bubble visualization and particle image velocimetry at a Reynolds number of 32,500 (based on the wheel diameter). As with the horizontal orientation, vorticity collection and amplification are observed, but the large-scale vortices thus formed are stretched around the wheel circumference in contrast to being stretched around the wheel sides, as observed for the horizontal orientation. This flow behavior varies with the impingement location of the vorticity streams across the wheel width. Maximum vorticity amplification occurs at a critical impingement location and drastically alters the flow separation along the wheel circumference. In addition, the instantaneous vortical structures are identified and tracked using a Galilean-invariant criterion.

  2. The effect of entrainment on starting vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, Giuseppe; Rival, David

    2015-11-01

    Recent work shows that vortex detachment behind accelerating plates coincides with when streamlines enclosing the starting vortex (SV) form a full saddle. In the case of a linearly accelerating plate, it can be shown that vorticity-containing mass, and thus the SV's development scale with only dimensionless towed distance, while the SV's circulation scales with the acceleration rate. This results in shear-layer instabilities whose structure is Reynold-number independent, but whose strength scale with Reynolds number. It is hypothesized that the increased strength of the instabilities promotes entrainment, which causes the formation of the full saddle and thereby detachment to occur at an earlier dimensionless towed distance. To test this hypothesis, a circular plate is linearly accelerated from rest to pinch-off with chord-based Reynolds numbers of 103, 104, and 105 at the midpoint of the motion. Planar PIV data is acquired, from which FTLE and enstrophy fields are calculated. Vortex detachment is identified from the dynamics of the FTLE saddles, while the enstrophy fields are used to calculate both the vorticity-containing mass entering from the shear layer and the mass entrained from the quiescent surroundings.

  3. Tomographic PIV Study of Hairpin Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Rossmann, Tobias

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic PIV is used in a free surface water channel to quantify the flow behavior of hairpin vortices that are artificially generated in a laminar boundary layer. Direct injection from a 32:1 aspect ratio slot at low blowing ratios (0 . 1 < BR < 0 . 2) is used to generate an isolated hairpin vortex in a thick laminar boundary layer (485 < Reδ* < 600). Due to the large dynamic range of length and velocity scales (the resulting vortices have advection velocities 5X greater than their tangential velocities), a tailored optical arrangement and specialized post processing techniques are required to fully capture the small-scale behavior and long-time development of the flow field. Hairpin generation and evolution are presented using the λ2 criterion derived from the instantaneous, three-dimensional velocity field. The insight provided by the tomographic data is also compared to the conclusions drawn from 2D PIV and passive scalar visualizations. Finally, the three-dimensional behavior of the measured velocity field is correlated with that of a simultaneously imaged, passive scalar dye that marks the boundary of the injected fluid, allowing the examination of the entrainment behavior of the hairpin. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1040236.

  4. Close relative equilibria of identical point vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirksen, Tobias; Aref, Hassan

    2011-11-01

    Via numerical solution of the classical problem of relative equilibria for identical point vortices on the unbounded plane we have found configurations that are very close to the analytically known, centered, symmetrically arranged, nested equilateral triangles. Numerical solutions of this kind were found for 3 n + 1 vortices, where n = 2 , 3 , ... , 30 . A sufficient, although apparently not necessary, condition for this phenomenon of close solutions is that the ``core'' of the configuration is marginally stable, as occurs for a central vortex surrounded by an equilateral triangle. The open, regular heptagon also has this property, and new relative equilibria close to the nested, symmetrically arranged, regular heptagons have been found. The centered regular nonagon is also marginally stable. Again, a new family of close relative equilibria has been found. The closest relative equilibrium pairs occur, however, for symmetrically nested equilateral triangles. The numerical evidence is surveyed and related recent work mentioned. A Letter in Physics of Fluids 23 (2011) 051706 is available. Supported in part by the Danish National Research Foundation through a Niels Bohr visiting professorship.

  5. Dynamics of Quantized Vortices Before Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andryushchenko, V. A.; Kondaurova, L. P.; Nemirovskii, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    The main goal of this paper is to investigate numerically the dynamics of quantized vortex loops, just before the reconnection at finite temperature, when mutual friction essentially changes the evolution of lines. Modeling is performed on the base of vortex filament method using the full Biot-Savart equation. It was discovered that the initial position of vortices and the temperature strongly affect the dependence on time of the minimum distance δ (t) between tips of two vortex loops. In particular, in some cases, the shrinking and collapse of vortex loops due to mutual friction occur earlier than the reconnection, thereby canceling the latter. However, this relationship takes a universal square-root form δ ( t) =√{( κ/2π ) ( t_{*}-t) } at distances smaller than the distances, satisfying the Schwarz reconnection criterion, when the nonlocal contribution to the Biot-Savart equation becomes about equal to the local contribution. In the "universal" stage, the nearest parts of vortices form a pyramid-like structure with angles which neither depend on the initial configuration nor on temperature.

  6. Monopoles and fractional vortices in chiral superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Volovik, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    I discuss two exotic objects that must be experimentally identified in chiral superfluids and superconductors. These are (i) the vortex with a fractional quantum number (N = 1/2 in chiral superfluids, and N = 1/2 and N = 1/4 in chiral superconductors), which plays the part of the Alice string in relativistic theories and (ii) the hedgehog in the ^l field, which is the counterpart of the Dirac magnetic monopole. These objects of different dimensions are topologically connected. They form the combined object that is called a nexus in relativistic theories. In chiral superconductors, the nexus has magnetic charge emanating radially from the hedgehog, whereas the half-quantum vortices play the part of the Dirac string. Each half-quantum vortex supplies the fractional magnetic flux to the hedgehog, representing 1/4 of the “conventional” Dirac string. I discuss the topological interaction of the superconductor's nexus with the ‘t Hooft–Polyakov magnetic monopole, which can exist in Grand Unified Theories. The monopole and the hedgehog with the same magnetic charge are topologically confined by a piece of the Abrikosov vortex. Such confinement makes the nexus a natural trap for the magnetic monopole. Other properties of half-quantum vortices and monopoles are discussed as well, including fermion zero modes. PMID:10716980

  7. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  8. Stirring a ring Bose-Einstein condensate: vortices and overall circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Noel; Edwards, Mark; Clark, Charles W.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the process whereby stirring a superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a ring-shaped potential leads to an overall circulation. We solved the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation under conditions chosen to match those of an experiment recently conducted at NIST. Briefly, 500,000 Na atoms where confined at the ring-shaped intersection of a red-detuned horizontal light sheet and a vertically propagating Laguerre-Gauss beam. Stirring was carried via a blue-detuned gaussian beam. We found that, at first, the stirring spawned a number of vortex-antivortex pairs and then stopped. These vortices displayed a complicated dynamical behavior which slowly reduced the number of vortices pairwise via annihilation and singly via diffusion into surface modes of the condensate. At the end of this dynamics, the set of vortices was replaced by an overall circulation of atoms around the ring. We present examples of this behavior, give a simple model of vortex motion and vortex-vortex interaction, and show how the production and annihilation of vortices gets turned into a overall circulation of the ring Bose-Einstein condensate. Support in part by NSF grant #1068761.

  9. Stirring a ring Bose-Einstein condensate: vortices and overall circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Noel; Edwards, Mark; Clark, Charles

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the process whereby stirring a superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a ring-shaped potential leads to an overall circulation. We solved the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation under conditions chosen to match those of an experiment recently conducted at NIST. Briefly, 500,000 Na atoms where confined at the ring-shaped intersection of a red-detuned horizontal light sheet and a vertically propagating Laguerre-Gauss beam. Stirring was carried via a blue-detuned gaussian beam. We found that, at first, the stirring spawned a number of vortex-antivortex pairs and then stopped. These vortices displayed a complicated dynamical behavior which slowly reduced the number of vortices pairwise via annihilation and singly via diffusion into surface modes of the condensate. At the end of this dynamics, the set of vortices was replaced by an overall circulation of atoms around the ring. We present examples of this behavior, give a simple model of vortex motion and vortex-vortex interaction, and show how the production and annihilation of vortices gets turned into a overall circulation of the ring Bose-Einstein condensate. Support in part by NSF grant #1068761.

  10. Creation of vortices by torque in multidimensional media with inhomogeneous defocusing nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Driben, Rodislav; Meier, Torsten; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new class of nonlinear systems was introduced, in which the self-trapping of fundamental and vortical localized modes in space of dimension D is supported by cubic self-repulsion with a strength growing as a function of the distance from the center, r, at any rate faster that rD. These systems support robust 2D and 3D modes which either do not exist or are unstable in other nonlinear systems. Here we demonstrate a possibility to create solitary vortices in this setting by applying a phase-imprinting torque to the ground state. Initially, a strong torque completely destroys the ground state. However, contrary to usual systems, where the destruction is irreversible, the present ones demonstrate a rapid restabilization and the creation of one or several shifted vortices orbiting the center. For the sake of comparison, we show analytically that, in the linear system with a 3D trapping potential, the action of a torque on the ground state is inefficient and creates only even-vorticity states with a small probability. PMID:25800140

  11. Persistent circumpolar vortices on the extrasolar giant planet HD 37605 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, J.; Laughlin, G.

    2008-06-01

    Aims: We examine the atmospheric dynamics on the extrasolar gas giant HD 37605 b (P=54.2 d). As this planet's orbit is highly eccentric (e=0.737), the intensity of stellar heating varies by a factor of 40 over the course of an orbit. We also consider the effect of cloud formation on the dynamical flows and the temperature evolution resulting from this extremely variable forcing. Methods: We employ a grid-based two-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics code to model the atmosphere of the extrasolar giant planet HD 37605 b. We use a resolution of 512 longitude gridpoints and 257 latitude gridpoints. The stellar heating is simulated using a one-layer, two-frequency, two-stream approximation to true radiative transfer. Results: This time-dependent insolation causes the formation of circumpolar vortices near both poles. These vortices appear to be stable over many orbits, and sequester a large volume of cold air, effectively shielding their interiors from the full blast of irradiation at periastron. Evolution of tracers initially placed within these vortices shows the rate of exchange of material between the interior and exterior of these vortices is small: material initially inside the vortex can be expected to remain in the vortex for ~2 P. We note that this result is contingent upon a cloudless atmosphere; the formation of clouds potentially causes a large reduction in both temperature variation and wind speed.

  12. Vortices in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates in synthetic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Zhao; Qiang, Gu

    2016-01-01

    We study the formation of vortices in a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in a synthetic magnetic field by numerically solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The formation process depends on the dipole strength, the rotating frequency, the potential geometry, and the orientation of the dipoles. We make an extensive comparison with vortices created by a rotating trap, especially focusing on the issues of the critical rotating frequency and the vortex number as a function of the rotating frequency. We observe that a higher rotating frequency is needed to generate a large number of vortices and the anisotropic interaction manifests itself as a perceptible difference in the vortex formation. Furthermore, a large dipole strength or aspect ratio also can increase the number of vortices effectively. In particular, we discuss the validity of the Feynman rule. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274039), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922002), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China.

  13. Active Vortical Flow Control for Alleviation of Twin-Tail Buffet of Generic Fighter Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheta, E. F.; Harrand, V. J.; Huttsell, L. J.

    2001-08-01

    A multidisciplinary computational investigation has been conducted to examine the feasibility of controlling the buffet problem using different active flow control methods. Tangential central blowing (TCB), tangential vortex blowing (TVB), and tangential spanwise blowing (TSB) methods were used to inject high-momentum fluid into the vortical flow of generic fighter aircraft flying at 30° angle of attack. The effect of blowing strength on the buffet responses is also investigated. The injection is aimed to strengthen the wing vortices and to delay the onset of breakdown in order to alleviate the twin-tail buffet. The results indicated that blowing directly into the core of the leading-edge vortices has more potential in controlling the buffet responses and in the reformation of unburst vortices with larger length. The TVB method produced the most favorable results with a reduction of about 43% in the buffet excitation parameter and a reduction of about 40% in the amplitude of bending deflection. This multidisciplinary investigation is conducted using the multidisciplinary computing environment (MDICE).

  14. Applying Chemical Potential and Partial Pressure Concepts to Understand the Spontaneous Mixing of Helium and Air in a Helium-Inflated Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jee-Yon Lee; Hee-Soo Yoo; Jong Sook Park; Kwang-Jin Hwang; Jin Seog Kim

    2005-01-01

    The spontaneous mixing of helium and air in a helium-inflated balloon is described in an experiment in which the partial pressure of the gases in the balloon are determined from the mole factions and the total pressure measured in the balloon. The results described provide a model for teaching concepts of partial pressure, chemical potential, and…

  15. Mixing entropy in Dean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Petru; Vyhnalek, Brian; Kaufman, Miron

    2013-03-01

    We investigate mixing in Dean flows by solving numerically the Navier-Stokes equation for a circular channel. Tracers of two chemical species are carried by the fluid. The centrifugal forces, experienced as the fluid travels along a curved trajectory, coupled with the fluid incompressibility induce cross-sectional rotating flows (Dean vortices). These transversal flows promote the mixing of the chemical species. We generate images for different cross sections along the trajectory. The mixing efficiency is evaluated using the Shannon entropy. Previously we have found, P. S. Fodor and M. Kaufman, Modern Physics Letters B 25, 1111 (2011), this measure to be useful in understanding mixing in the staggered herringbone mixer. The mixing entropy is determined as function of the Reynolds number, the angle of the cross section and the observation scale (number of bins). Quantitative comparison of the mixing in the Dean micromixer and in the staggered herringbone mixer is attempted.

  16. Numerical Capture of Wing-tip Vortex Using Vorticity Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baili; Lou, Jing; Kang, Chang Wei; Wilson, Alexander; Lundberg, Johan; Bensow, Rickard

    2012-11-01

    Tracking vortices accurately over large distances is very important in many areas of engineering, for instance flow over rotating helicopter blades, ship propeller blades and aircraft wings. However, due to the inherent numerical dissipation in the advection step of flow simulation, current Euler and RANS field solvers tend to damp these vortices too fast. One possible solution to reduce the unphysical decay of these vortices is the application of vorticity confinement methods. In this study, a vorticity confinement term is added to the momentum conservation equations which is a function of the local element size, the vorticity and the gradient of the absolute value of vorticity. The approach has been evaluated by a systematic numerical study on the tip vortex trailing from a rectangular NACA0012 half-wing. The simulated structure and development of the wing-tip vortex agree well with experiments both qualitatively and quantitatively without any adverse effects on the global flow field. It is shown that vorticity confinement can negate the effect of numerical dissipation, leading to a more or less constant vortex strength. This is an approximate method in that genuine viscous diffusion of the vortex is not modeled, but it can be appropriate for vortex dominant flows over short to medium length scales where viscous diffusion can be neglected.

  17. Towards a theory of stochastic vorticity-augmentation. [tornado model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, V. C.

    1977-01-01

    A new hypothesis to account for the formation of tornadoes is presented. An elementary one-dimensional theory is formulated for vorticity transfer between an ambient sheared wind and a transverse penetrating jet. The theory points out the relevant quantities to be determined in describing the present stochastic mode of vorticity augmentation.

  18. Vorticity amplification near the stagnation point of landing gear wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltham, G.; Ekmekci, A.

    2014-04-01

    The vicinity near the forward stagnation point of landing-gear wheels has been found to support a mechanism for oncoming streams of weak vorticity to collect, grow, and amplify into discrete large-scale vortical structures that then shed with a distinct periodicity. To the authors' knowledge, such a flow phenomenon has never been reported before for landing gear wheels, which are in essence finite (three-dimensional) cylinders. To gain further insight into this phenomenon, a detailed experimental study has been undertaken employing the hydrogen bubble visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques. A very thin platinum wire, similar to those used in hydrogen bubble visualization applications, was placed upstream of the wheel model to produce two streams of weak vorticity (with opposite sign) that convected toward the model. As the vorticity streams enter the stagnation region of the wheels, significant flow deceleration and vorticity stretching act to collect, grow, and amplify the incoming vorticity streams into large-scale vortical structures. Experiments were performed at a fixed Reynolds number, with a value of 32 500 when defined based on the diameter of the wheel and a value of 21 based on the diameter of the vorticity-generating upstream wire. First, to establish a baseline, the natural flow field (without the presence of an upstream wire) was characterized, where experimentally determined values for the stagnation boundary-layer thickness and the velocity profile along the stagnation streamline were both found to agree with the values provided in the literature for two-dimensional cylinders. Subsequently, the dynamics of vorticity collection, growth, amplification, and shedding were studied. The size, stand-off distance and the shedding frequency of the vortical structures forming near the stagnation region were all found to strongly depend on the impingement location of the inbound vorticity on the wheel. A simple relationship between the non

  19. Magnetic stabilization and vorticity in submillimeter paramagnetic liquid tubes

    PubMed Central

    Coey, J. Michael D.; Aogaki, Ryoichi; Byrne, Fiona; Stamenov, Plamen

    2009-01-01

    It is possible to suppress convection and dispersion of a paramagnetic liquid by means of a magnetic field. A tube of paramagnetic liquid can be stabilized in water along a ferromagnetic track in a vertical magnetic field, but not in a horizontal field. Conversely, an “antitube” of water can be stabilized in a paramagnetic liquid along the same track in a transverse horizontal field, but not in a vertical field. The stability arises from the interaction of the induced moment in the solution with the magnetic field gradient in the vicinity of the track. The magnetic force causes the tube of paramagnetic liquid to behave as if it were encased by an elastic membrane whose cross-section is modified by gravitational forces and Maxwell stress. Convection from the tube to its surroundings is inhibited, but not diffusion. Liquid motion within the paramagnetic tube, however, exhibits vorticity in tubes of diameter 1 mm or less—conditions where classical pipe flow would be perfectly streamline, and mixing extremely slow. The liquid tube is found to slide along the track almost without friction. Paramagnetic liquid tubes and antitubes offer appealing new prospects for mass transport, microfluidics, and electrodeposition. PMID:19416873

  20. Magnetic coupling of vortices in a two dimensional lattice.

    PubMed

    Nissen, D; Mitin, D; Klein, O; Arekapudi, S S P K; Thomas, S; Im, M-Y; Fischer, P; Albrecht, M

    2015-11-20

    We investigated the magnetization reversal of magnetic vortex structures in a two-dimensional lattice. The structures were formed by permalloy (Py) film deposition onto large arrays of self assembled spherical SiO(2)-particles with a diameter of 330 nm. We present the dependence of the nucleation and annihilation field of the vortex structures as a function of the Py layer thickness(aspect ratio) and temperature. By increasing the Py thickness up to 90 nm or alternatively by lowering the temperature the vortex structure becomes more stable as expected. However, the increase of the Py thickness results in the onset of strong exchange coupling between neighboring Py caps due to the emergence of Py bridges connecting them. In particular, we studied the influence of magnetic coupling locally by in-field scanning magne to-resistive microscopy and full-field magnetic soft x-ray microscopy, revealing a domain-like nucleation process of vortex states, which arises via domain wall propagation due to exchange coupling of the closely packed structures. By analyzing the rotation sense of the reversed areas, large connected domains are present with the same circulation sense. Furthermore, the lateral core displacements when an in-plane field is applied were investigated, revealing spatially enlarged vortex cores and a broader distribution with increasing Py layer thickness. In addition, the presence of some mixed states, vortices and c-states, is indicated for the array with the thickest Py layer. PMID:26511585

  1. Formation and early development of wingtip vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuni, Michea

    Wingtip vortices are extremely important phenomena in fluid dynamics for their negative effects in many applications. Despite the many studies on this particular flow, the current understanding is still poor in providing a form base for the design of effective tip geometry modifications and vortex control devices. A rectangular wing with squared and rounded wingtips was tested in order to identify the main mechanisms involved in the formation of the vortex on the wing and in its early development in the wake. The complementarity of a number of experimental techniques adopted, such as surface flow visualizations, wall pressure measurements, smoke visualizations and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV), gave a richer insight of the physics and the basic mechanisms of the vortex development. Furthermore, a large number of configurations were tested exploring the effects of several parameters such as wing chord, aspect ratio, wingtip geometry, angle of attack and Reynolds number. The development of the vortex along the wing showed the formation of several secondary vortices which interacted with the primary vortex generating low frequency fluctuations. The structure of the flow at this stage was analysed introducing a compact description through characteristic lines of the vortex system defined from the velocity vector field in the vicinity of the wing surface. The high spatial resolution achieved by the SPIV arrangement allowed a deeper understanding of the vortex structure in the early wake and the turbulence production and dissipation within the vortex core. The relaminarization process of the vortex core promoted by centrifugal motion was observed. The relation between vortex meandering, turbulence, secondary vortices and wake sheet was discussed. A comparison of different methods for the averaging of instantaneous planar vector fields was performed showing the effects and importance of the meandering. An axial acceleration of the flow within the vortex

  2. Streamwise vortex meander in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1993-01-01

    The present experimental study was conducted in order to determine the existence of streamwise vortex meander in a mixing layer, and if present, its significance on the measured properties. The dependence of the velocity cross-correlation on the fixed probe location was shown to be a good indicator of the stationarity of the streamwise vortex location. The cross-correlation measurements obtained here indicate that spanwise meander is negligible, although transverse apparent meander (normal to the plane of the mixing layer) was indicated. The transverse meander, exemplified by the elliptical shape of the mean streamwise vorticity contours, was expected, since the streamwise vorticity in the braid region is essentially inclined, with respect to the streamwise direction. These conclusions were supported by results of estimated spanwise profiles of the transverse velocity component. The balance of evidence suggests that the measured mean streamwise vorticity decay is representative of the decay of the vorticity rather than an artifact of meander.

  3. Vorticity is a marker of right ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fenster, Brett E; Browning, James; Schroeder, Joyce D; Schafer, Michal; Podgorski, Chris A; Smyser, Jamie; Silveira, Lori J; Buckner, J Kern; Hertzberg, Jean R

    2015-09-15

    Right ventricular diastolic dysfunction (RVDD) is an important prognostic indicator in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). RV vortex rings have been observed in healthy subjects, but their significance in RVDD is unknown. Vorticity, the local spinning motion of an element of fluid, may be a sensitive measure of RV vortex dynamics. Using four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), we investigated the relationship between right heart vorticity with echocardiographic indexes of RVDD. Thirteen (13) PAH subjects and 10 controls underwent same-day 4D flow CMR and echocardiography. RV diastolic function was assessed using trans-tricuspid valve (TV) early (E) and late (A) velocities, E/A ratio, and e' and a' tissue Doppler velocities. RV and right atrial (RA) integrated mean vorticity was calculated for E and A-wave filling periods using 4D datasets. Compared with controls, A-wave vorticity was significantly increased in RVDD subjects in both the RV [2343 (1,559-3,295) vs. 492 (267-2,649) 1/s, P = 0.028] and RA [30 (27-44) vs. 9 (5-27) 1/s, P = 0.005]. RA E vorticity was significantly decreased [13 (7-22) vs. 28 (15-31) 1/s, P = 0.038] in RVDD. E-wave vorticity correlated TV e', E-,and TV E/A (P < 0.05), and A-wave vorticity associated with both TV A and E/A (P < 0.02). RVDD is associated with alterations in E- and A-wave vorticity, and vorticity correlates with multiple echocardiographic markers of RVDD. Vorticity may be a robust noninvasive research tool for the investigation of RV fluid and tissue mechanical interactions in PAH. PMID:26254331

  4. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Perry L; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Re(λ)=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  5. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Reλ=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  6. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Perry L; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Re(λ)=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor. PMID:27078458

  7. Layering from anticyclonic vortices in a rotating stratified medium with combined salinity and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommeria, Joel; Burin, Michael; Viboud, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    We generate anticyclonic vortices by a fluid source in a rotating and uniformly stratified medium, a laboratory model of long lived vortex lenses in the ocean. Experiments are performed in the large `Coriolis' rotating platform at Grenoble, 13 m in diameter, providing previously unaccessible turbulent regimes. The other novelty is to combine temperature and salinity effects, like in `meddies', vortices formed by intrusion in the Atlantic ocean of warm and salty water from the Mediterranean Sea. For both heated an unheated cases, we observe shear driven instability at the vortex periphery, leading to the emission of material filament from a large-scale m=2 instability. Heated vortices behave much the same way but with two key additions. One, prominent at early times, is that the vortex edge appears serrated around most of its circumference in the upper part of the lens. Two, clearer for later times, a staircase density profile develops above the eddy. We explain this small scale turbulence as thermal convection in the statically unstable density profile resulting from selective vertical diffusion of temperature (while salinity is less diffusive). The resulting turbulent mixing generates horizontal intrusions at the upper part of the vortex, unlike the double-diffusive instability. This work has been funded by Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR), project `OLA'.

  8. Dumping topological charges on neighbors: ice manifolds for colloids and vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. It has been found experimentally and numerically that both colloids and vortices exhibit ice or quasi-ice manifolds. However, the frustration of colloids and vortices differs essentially from spin ice at the vertex level. We show that the effective vertex energetics of the colloidal/vortex systems is made identical to that of spin ice materials by the contribution of an emergent field associated to the topological charge of the vertex. The similarity extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, where the effect of geometric hard constraints can be subsumed into the spatial modulation of the emergent field, which mediates an entropic interaction between topological charges. There, as in spin ice materials, genuine ice manifolds enter a Coulomb phase, whereas quasi-ice manifolds posses a well defined screening length, provided by a plasma of embedded topological charges. We also show that such similarities break down in lattices of mixed coordination because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices. This opens interesting perspective for extensions beyond physics, to social and economical networks.

  9. Compressible flows with periodic vortical disturbances around lifting airfoils. Ph.D. Thesis - Notre Dame Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for solving periodic, three-dimensional, vortical flows around lifting airfoils in subsonic flow. The first-order method that is presented fully accounts for the distortion effects of the nonuniform mean flow on the convected upstream vortical disturbances. The unsteady velocity is split into a vortical component which is a known function of the upstream flow conditions and the Lagrangian coordinates of the mean flow, and an irrotational field whose potential satisfies a nonconstant-coefficient, inhomogeneous, convective wave equation. Using an elliptic coordinate transformation, the unsteady boundary value problem is solved in the frequency domain on grids which are determined as a function of the Mach number and reduced frequency. The numerical scheme is validated through extensive comparisons with known solutions to unsteady vortical flow problems. In general, it is seen that the agreement between the numerical and analytical results is very good for reduced frequencies ranging from 0 to 4, and for Mach numbers ranging from .1 to .8. Numerical results are also presented for a wide variety of flow configurations for the purpose of determining the effects of airfoil thickness, angle of attack, camber, and Mach number on the unsteady lift and moment of airfoils subjected to periodic vortical gusts. It is seen that each of these parameters can have a significant effect on the unsteady airfoil response to the incident disturbances, and that the effect depends strongly upon the reduced frequency and the dimensionality of the gust. For a one-dimensional (transverse) or two-dimensional (transverse and longitudinal) gust, the results indicate that airfoil thickness increases the unsteady lift and moment at the low reduced frequencies but decreases it at the high reduced frequencies. The results show that an increase in airfoil Mach number leads to a significant increase in the unsteady lift and moment for the low reduced frequencies, but a

  10. Numerical study of wingtip shed vorticity reduction by wing Boundary Layer Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Jose Alejandro

    Wingtip vortex reductions have been obtained by Boundary Layer Control application to an AR=1.5 rectangular wing using a NACA 0012 airfoil. If wingtip shed vorticity could be reduced significantly, then so would induced drag resulting in improved cruise fuel economy. Power savings would be even more impressive at low flight speed or in climb. A two dimensional wing produces lift without wingtip vorticity. Its bound vorticity, Gamma, equals the contour integral of the boundary layer vorticity gamma or Gamma = ∮gamma · dl. Where the upper and lower boundary layers meet at the cusped TE, their local static pressure pu=pl then the boundary layer outer edge inviscid velocity Vupper=Vlower and gammalower=-gamma upper. This explains the 2-D wing self cancellation of the upper and lower surface boundary layer vorticity when they meet upon shedding at the trailing edge. In finite wings, the presence of spanwise pressure gradients near the wing tips misaligns gammalower and gammaupper at the wingtip TE preventing the upper and lower surface boundary layers from completely canceling each other. To prevent them from generating wing tip vortices, the local boundary layers need to be captured in suction slots. Once vorticity is captured, it can be eliminated by viscous mixing prior to venting over board. The objective of this dissertation was to use a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics code (Fluent) to search for the best configuration to locate BLC suction slots to capture non-parallel boundary layer vorticity prior to shedding near the wingtips. The configuration selected for running the simulations was tested by trying to duplicate a 3D wing for which sufficient experimental and computational models by others are available. The practical case selected was done by Chow et al in the 32 x 48 in. low speed wind tunnel at the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory of NASA Ames Research Center, and computationally analyzed by Dacles-Mariani et al, and Khim and Rhee. The present

  11. Dynamics of coupled vortices in perpendicular field

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Bader, Samuel D.

    2014-02-24

    We explore the coupling mechanism of two magnetic vortices in the presence of a perpendicular bias field by pre-selecting the polarity combinations using the resonant-spin-ordering approach. First, out of the four vortex polarity combinations (two of which are degenerate), three stable core polarity states are achieved by lifting the degeneracy of one of the states. Second, the response of the stiffness constant for the vortex pair (similar polarity) in perpendicular bias is found to be asymmetric around the zero field, in contrast to the response obtained from a single vortex core. Finally, the collective response of the system for antiparallel core polarities is symmetric around zero bias. The vortex core whose polarization is opposite to the bias field dominates the response.

  12. Monitoring Wake Vortices for More Efficient Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Wake vortices are generated by all aircraft during flight. The larger the aircraft, the stronger the wake, so the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) separates aircraft to ensure wake turbulence has no effect on approaching aircraft. Currently, though, the time between planes is often larger than it needs to be for the wake to dissipate. This unnecessary gap translates into arrival and departure delays, but since the wakes are invisible, the delays are nearly inevitable. If, however, the separation between aircraft can be reduced safely, then airport capacity can be increased without the high cost of additional runways. Scientists are currently studying these patterns to identify and introduce new procedures and technologies that safely increase airport capacity. NASA, always on the cutting edge of aerospace research, has been contributing knowledge and testing to these endeavors.

  13. Geometric investigations of a vorticity model equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kolev, Boris; Preston, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    This article consists of a detailed geometric study of the one-dimensional vorticity model equation which is a particular case of the generalized Constantin-Lax-Majda equation. Wunsch showed that this equation is the Euler-Arnold equation on Diff (S1) when the latter is endowed with the right-invariant homogeneous H ˙ 1 / 2-metric. In this article we prove that the exponential map of this Riemannian metric is not Fredholm and that the sectional curvature is locally unbounded. Furthermore, we prove a Beale-Kato-Majda-type blow-up criterion, which we then use to demonstrate a link to our non-Fredholmness result. Finally, we extend a blow-up result of Castro-Córdoba to the periodic case and to a much wider class of initial conditions, using a new generalization of an inequality for Hilbert transforms due to Córdoba-Córdoba.

  14. Potential of Leguminous Cover Crops in Management of a Mixed Population of Root-knot Nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Kingsley; Gowen, Simon R.; Pembroke, Barbara; Brandenburg, Rick L.; Jordan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Root-knot nematode is an important pest in agricultural production worldwide. Crop rotation is the only management strategy in some production systems, especially for resource poor farmers in developing countries. A series of experiments was conducted in the laboratory with several leguminous cover crops to investigate their potential for managing a mixture of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, M. javanica). The root-knot nematode mixture failed to multiply on Mucuna pruriens and Crotalaria spectabilis but on Dolichos lablab the population increased more than 2- fold when inoculated with 500 and 1,000 nematodes per plant. There was no root-galling on M. pruriens and C. spectabilis but the gall rating was noted on D. lablab. Greater mortality of juvenile root-knot nematodes occurred when exposed to eluants of roots and leaves of leguminous crops than those of tomato; 48.7% of juveniles died after 72 h exposure to root eluant of C. spectabilis. The leaf eluant of D. lablab was toxic to nematodes but the root eluant was not. Thus, different parts of a botanical contain different active ingredients or different concentrations of the same active ingredient. The numbers of root-knot nematode eggs that hatched in root exudates of M. pruriens and C. spectabilis were significantly lower (20% and 26%) than in distilled water, tomato and P. vulgaris root exudates (83%, 72% and 89%) respectively. Tomato lacks nematotoxic compounds found in M. pruriens and C. spectabilis. Three months after inoculating plants with 1,000 root-knot nematode juveniles the populations in pots with M. pruriens, C. spectabilis and C. retusa had been reduced by approximately 79%, 85% and 86% respectively; compared with an increase of 262% nematodes in pots with Phaseolus vulgaris. There was significant reduction of 90% nematodes in fallow pots with no growing plant. The results from this study demonstrate that some leguminous species contain compounds that either kill root

  15. Dynamics of Giant Planet Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueshaber, Shawn R.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.

    2016-10-01

    The polar atmospheres of the giant planets have come under increasing interest since a compact, warm-core, stable, cyclonic polar vortex was discovered at each of Saturn's poles. In addition, the south pole of Neptune appears to have a similar feature, and Uranus' north pole is exhibiting activity that could indicate the formation of a polar vortex. We investigate the formation and maintenance of these giant planet polar vortices by varying several key atmospheric dynamics parameters in a forced-dissipative, 1.5-layer shallow water model. Our simulations are run using the EPIC (Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate) global circulation model, to which we have added a gamma-plane rectangular grid option appropriate for simulating polar atmospheric dynamics.In our numerical simulations, we vary the atmospheric deformation radius, planetary rotation rate, storm forcing intensity, and storm vorticity (cyclone-to-anticyclone) ratio to determine what combination of values favors the formation of a polar vortex. We find that forcing the atmosphere by injecting small-scale mass perturbations ("storms") to form either all cyclones, all anticyclones, or equal numbers of both, may all result in a cyclonic polar vortex. Additionally, we examine the role of eddy momentum convergence in the intensification and maintenance of a polar cyclone.Our simulation results are applicable to understanding all four of the solar system giant planets. In the future, we plan to expand our modeling effort with a more realistic 3D primitive equations model, also with a gamma-plane rectangular grid using EPIC. With our 3D primitive equations model, we will study how various vertical atmospheric stratification structures influence the formation and maintenance of a polar cyclone. While our shallow-water model only involves storms of a single layer, a 3D primitive equations model allows us to study how storms of finite vertical extent and at differing levels in the atmosphere may further favor

  16. Visualization of vorticity and vortices in wall-bounded turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Helgeland, Anders; Pettersson Reif, B Anders; Andreassen, Øyvind; Wasberg, Carl Erik

    2007-01-01

    This study was initiated by the scientifically interesting prospect of applying advanced visualization techniques to gain further insight into various spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulent flows. The ability to study complex kinematical and dynamical features of turbulence provides means of extracting the underlying physics of turbulent fluid motion. The objective is to analyze the use of a vorticity field line approach to study numerically generated incompressible turbulent flows. In order to study the vorticity field, we present a field line animation technique which uses a specialized particle advection and seeding strategy. Efficient analysis is achieved by decoupling the rendering stage from the preceding stages of the visualization method. This allows interactive exploration of multiple fields simultaneously, which sets the stage for a more complete analysis of the flow field. Multifield visualizations are obtained using a flexible volume rendering framework which is presented in this paper. Vorticity field lines have been employed as indicators to provide a means to identify "ejection" and "sweep" regions; two particularly important spatio-temporal events in wall-bounded turbulent flows. Their relation to the rate of turbulent kinetic energy production and viscous dissipation, respectively, have been identified. PMID:17622687

  17. Potential applications of artificial intelligence in computer-based management systems for mixed waste incinerator facility operation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, A.L.; Singh, S.P.N.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) operates a mixed waste incinerator facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, designed for the thermal treatment of incinerable liquid, sludge, and solid waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conversion and Recovery Act (RCRA). Operation of the TSCA Incinerator is highly constrained as a result of the regulatory, institutional, technical, and resource availability requirements. This presents an opportunity for applying computer technology as a technical resource for mixed waste incinerator operation to facilitate promoting and sustaining a continuous performance improvement process while demonstrating compliance. This paper describes mixed waste incinerator facility performance-oriented tasks that could be assisted by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the requirements for AI tools that would implement these algorithms in a computer-based system. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Vorticity Generation on a Flat Surface in 3D Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciola, C. M.; Piva, R.; Bassanini, P.

    1996-12-01

    Vortex methods, based on the splitting into Euler and Stokes operators, have been successfully adopted in numerical solutions of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in free-space. Here we deal with their application to flows bounded by solid walls, discussing in particular the boundary conditions for vorticity and their approximation. In two dimensions this has been accomplished by introducing a vortex sheet at the wall, determined by the local slip-velocity, as an approximation of the vorticity source. For three-dimensional flows, we analyze in the context of the Stokes substep the integral equation for the vorticity source and its connection with the creation algorithm adopted in vortex methods. The present analysis leads to a formulation which shows the connection between the exact vorticity source at the wall and the discrete vorticity creation operator adopted in the Chorin-Marsden formula. In particular, the slip velocity at the wall is identified as an approximate solution of the integral equation for the vorticity source and the corresponding error estimate is also discussed. Besides showing the consistency of this approximation, we indicate a numerical procedure which provides a wall-generation of solenoidal vorticity. This is a crucial issue for an accurate application of vortex methods to three-dimensional flows.

  19. The motion of point vortices on closed surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dritschel, D. G.; Boatto, S.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a mathematical framework for the dynamics of a set of point vortices on a class of differentiable surfaces conformal to the unit sphere. When the sum of the vortex circulations is non-zero, a compensating uniform vorticity field is required to satisfy the Gauss condition (that the integral of the Laplace–Beltrami operator must vanish). On variable Gaussian curvature surfaces, this results in self-induced vortex motion, a feature entirely absent on the plane, the sphere or the hyperboloid. We derive explicit equations of motion for vortices on surfaces of revolution and compute their solutions for a variety of surfaces. We also apply these equations to study the linear stability of a ring of vortices on any surface of revolution. On an ellipsoid of revolution, as few as two vortices can be unstable on oblate surfaces or sufficiently prolate ones. This extends known results for the plane, where seven vortices are marginally unstable (Thomson 1883 A treatise on the motion of vortex rings, pp. 94–108; Dritschel 1985 J. Fluid Mech. 157, 95–134 (doi:10.1017/S0022112088003088)), and the sphere, where four vortices may be unstable if sufficiently close to the equator (Polvani & Dritschel 1993 J. Fluid Mech. 255, 35–64 (doi:10.1017/S0022112093002381)).

  20. Determining Grain-scale Vorticity Axes from Crystallographic Orientation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Z. D.; Kruckenberg, S. C.; Davis, J. R.; Tikoff, B.

    2015-12-01

    Aggregates deformed by crystal plastic mechanisms often contain grains that exhibit crystallographic distortion (e.g., kinking, undulose extinction, subgrain development). In such grains, crystallographic orientations are typically dispersed along small circles on lower hemisphere equal-area plots. Thus, we consider that an intragranular dispersion axis represents a grain-scale axis of material rotation, and its position coincides with that of a highly localized vorticity axis. We present a new method for determining the position of a grain-scale vorticity axis from intragranular crystallographic orientation data. This method leverages a method of rotational statistics known as principal geodesic analysis to identify a single best-fit rotational axis that matches the rotational dispersion of crystallographic orientations in a deformed grain. We further demonstrate that populations of such grain-scale vorticity axes can be used to infer a preferred vorticity axis for volumes of deformed aggregates. As an example of this type of application, we calculate intragranular vorticity axes from a sample-scale selection of grains (i.e., all the grains mapped in an EBSD orientation map) and use kernel density estimation to identify a preferred, sample-scale vorticity axis. The results of our bulk analysis match the vorticity axis inferred in previous studies of rocks deformed in the same shear zones.

  1. Moving at the Speed of Potential: A Mixed-Methods Study of Accelerating Developmental Students in a California Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Paula L.

    2014-01-01

    Most developmental community college students are not completing the composition sequence successfully. This mixed-methods study examined acceleration as a way to help developmental community college students complete the composition sequence more quickly and more successfully. Acceleration is a curricular redesign that includes challenging…

  2. Upwelling Response to Hurricane Isaac in Geostrophic Oceanic Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes, B.; Shay, L. K.; Brewster, J. K.; Schuster, R.

    2013-05-01

    As a tropical cyclone (TC) moves over the ocean, the cyclonic curl of the wind stress produces a region of upwelling waters under the TC center that is compensated by downwelling waters at regions outside the center. Direct measurements conducted during hurricane Rita and recent numerical studies indicate that this is not necessarily the case when TCs move over geostrophic oceanic features, where its background relative vorticity impacts wind-driven horizontal current divergence and the upwelling velocity. Modulation of the upwelling response in these energetic oceanic regimes impacts vertical mixing across the oceanic mixed layer base, air-sea fluxes into the atmosphere, and ultimately storm intensity. As part of NOAA Intensity Forecasting Experiment, an experiment was conducted during the passage of TC Isaac over the energetic geostrophic eddy field in the Gulf of Mexico in August 2012. Expendable bathythermographs, current profilers, and conductivity-temperature-depth probes were deployed in Isaac from NOAA WP-3D aircraft during four in-storm flights to measure oceanic variability and its impact on TC-driven upwelling and surface fluxes of heat and momentum. During intensification to hurricane, the cyclonic curl of the wind stress of Isaac extended over a region of more than 300 km in diameter (4 to 5 times the radius of maximum winds). Isaac's center moved over a cold cyclonic feature, while its right and left sides moved over warm anticyclones. Contrasting upwelling and downwelling regimes developed inside the region of cyclonic curl of the wind stress. Both positive (upwelling) and negative (downwelling) vertical displacements of 40 and 60 m, respectively, were measured inside the region of cyclonic curl of the wind stress, which are between 3 to 4 times larger than predicted vertical displacements for a quiescent ocean based on scaling arguments. Oceanic mixed layer (OML) currents of 0.2 to 0.7 m s-1 were measured, which are about 50% smaller than the

  3. Vibrating membrane with discontinuities for rapid and efficient microfluidic mixing.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang Van; Coşkun, M Bulut; Şeşen, Muhsincan; Pandraud, Gregory; Neild, Adrian; Alan, Tuncay

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a novel acoustic mixer comprising of a microfabricated silicon nitride membrane with a hole etched through it. We show that the introduction of the through hole leads to extremely fast and homogeneous mixing. When the membrane is immersed in fluid and subjected to acoustic excitation, a strong streaming field in the form of vortices is generated. The vortices are always observed to centre at the hole, pointing to the critical role it has on the streaming field. We hypothesise that the hole introduces a discontinuity to the boundary conditions of the membrane, leading to strong streaming vortices. With numerical simulations, we show that the hole's presence can increase the volume force responsible for driving the streaming field by 2 orders of magnitude, thus supporting our hypothesis. We investigate the mixing performance at different Peclet numbers by varying the flow rates for various devices containing circular, square and rectangular shaped holes of different dimensions. We demonstrate rapid mixing within 3 ms mixing time (90% mixing efficiency at 60 μl min(-1) total flow rate, Peclet number equals 8333 ± 3.5%) is possible with the current designs. Finally, we examine the membrane with two circular holes which are covered by air bubbles and compare it to when the membrane is fully immersed. We find that coupling between the holes' vortices occurs only when membrane is immersed; while with the bubble membrane, the upstream hole's vortices can act as a blockage to fluid flow passing it. PMID:26381355

  4. Heat transfer enhancement using tip and junction vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Mark Cecil

    1998-10-01

    Single-phase convective heat transfer can be enhanced by modifying the heat transfer surface to passively generate streamwise vortices. The swirling flow of the vortices modifies the temperature field, thinning the thermal boundary layer and increasing surface convection. Tip vortices generated by delta wings and junction vortices generated by hemispherical protuberances were studied in laminar flat-plate and developing channel flows. Local and average convective measurements were obtained, and the structure of the vortices was studied using quantitative flow visualization and vortex strength measurements. The pressure drop penalty associated with the heat transfer enhancement was also investigated. Tip vortices generated by delta wings enhanced local convection by as much as 300% over a flat-plate boundary layer flow. Vortex strength increased with Reynolds number based on chord length, wing aspect ratio, and wing angle of attack. As the vortices were advected downstream, they decayed because of viscous interactions. In the developing channel flow, tip vortices produced a significant local heat transfer enhancement on both sides of the channel. The largest spatially averaged heat transfer enhancement was 55%; it was accompanied by a 100% increase in the pressure drop relative to the same channel flow with no delta-wing vortex generator. Junction vortices created by hemispherical surface protuberances provided local heat transfer enhancements as large as 250%. Vortex strength increased with an increasing ratio of hemisphere radius to local boundary layer thickness on a flat plate. In the developing channel flows, heat transfer enhancements were observed on both sides of the channel. The largest spatially averaged heat transfer enhancement was 50%; it was accompanied by a 90% pressure drop penalty relative to the same channel flow with no hemispherical vortex generator. This research is important in compact heat exchanger design. Enhancing heat transfer can lead to

  5. ZIRCONIA-BASED MIXED POTENTIAL CARBON MONOXIDE/HYDROCARBON SENSORS WITH LANTHANUM MAGNESIUM OXIDE, AND TERBIUM-DOPED YTTRIUM STABILIZED ZIRCONIA ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    E. L. BROSHA; R. MUKUNDAN; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    We have investigated the performance of dual metal oxide electrode mixed potential sensors in an engine-out, dynamometer environment. Sensors were fabricated by sputtering thin films of LaMnO{sub 3} and Tb-doped YSZ onto YSZ electrolyte. Au gauze held onto the metal oxide thin films with Au ink was used for current collection. The exhaust gas from a 4.8L, V8 engine operated in open loop, steady-state mode around stoichiometry at 1500 RPM and 50 Nm. The sensor showed a stable EMF response (with no hysteresis) to varying concentrations of total exhaust gas HC content. The sensor response was measured at 620 and 670 C and shows temperature behavior characteristic of mixed potential-type sensors. The results of these engine-dynamometer tests are encouraging; however, the limitations associated with Au current collection present the biggest impediment to automotive use.

  6. Kinetic study of ion-acoustic plasma vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A.; Aman-ur-Rehman; Mendonca, J. T.

    2014-09-15

    The kinetic theory of electron plasma waves with finite orbital angular momentum has recently been introduced by Mendonca. This model shows possibility of new kind of plasma waves and instabilities. We have extended the theory to ion-acoustic plasma vortices carrying orbital angular momentum. The dispersion equation is derived under paraxial approximation which exhibits a kind of linear vortices and their Landau damping. The numerical solutions are obtained and compared with analytical results which are in good agreement. The physical interpretation of the ion-acoustic plasma vortices and their Landau resonance conditions are given for typical case of Maxwellian plasmas.

  7. Stability and nesting of dissipative vortex solitons with high vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, B. N.; Aleksić, N. B.; Skarka, V.; Belić, M.

    2015-04-01

    Using the variational method extended to dissipative systems and numerical simulations, an analytical stability criterion is established allowing the determination of stability domains of parameters for vortices with high topological charge S. Parameters from these domains are used as inputs for numerical self-generation of previously unexplored coexisting stable vortex solitons with topological charge ranging from S =3 to S =20 . The nesting of low-vorticity solitons within those of higher vorticity is discovered. Such a self-organized structuring of light allows for selective dynamic nanophotonic tweezing.

  8. Origin, Evolution, and Imaging of Vortices in Atomic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, Joseph H; Sternberg, James; Ovchinnikov, Serguei Yurevich; Lee, Teck G; Schultz, David Robert

    2009-01-01

    Vortices are usually associated with systems containing large numbers of particles. Of particular topical interest though are those formed within atomic-scale wave functions and observed in macroscopic systems such as superfluids and quantum condensates. We uncover them here in one of the most fundamental quantum systems consisting of just one electron and two protons. Moreover, the results of novel simulations of the dynamics of this system reveal previously unknown mechanisms of angular momentum transfer and new ways to image atomic-scale quantized vortices at macroscopic distances. Probing of vortices and vortex-driven dynamics in quantum systems is thereby illustrated.

  9. Dynamics of circular arrangements of vorticity in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Rohith V; Ravichandran, S; Perlekar, Prasad; Govindarajan, Rama

    2016-07-01

    The merger of two like-signed vortices is a well-studied problem, but in a turbulent flow, we may often have more than two like-signed vortices interacting. We study the merger of three or more identical corotating vortices initially arranged on the vertices of a regular polygon. At low to moderate Reynolds numbers, we find an additional stage in the merger process, absent in the merger of two vortices, where an annular vortical structure is formed and is long lived. Vortex merger is slowed down significantly due to this. Such annular vortices are known at far higher Reynolds numbers in studies of tropical cyclones, which have been noticed to a break down into individual vortices. In the preannular stage, vortical structures in a viscous flow are found here to tilt and realign in a manner similar to the inviscid case, but the pronounced filaments visible in the latter are practically absent in the former. Five or fewer vortices initially elongate radially, and then reorient their long axis closer to the azimuthal direction so as to form an annulus. With six or more vortices, the initial alignment is already azimuthal. Interestingly at higher Reynolds numbers, the merger of an odd number of vortices is found to proceed very differently from that of an even number. The former process is rapid and chaotic whereas the latter proceeds more slowly via pairing events. The annular vortex takes the form of a generalized Lamb-Oseen vortex (GLO), and diffuses inward until it forms a standard Lamb-Oseen vortex. For lower Reynolds number, the numerical (fully nonlinear) evolution of the GLO vortex follows exactly the analytical evolution until merger. At higher Reynolds numbers, the annulus goes through instabilities whose nonlinear stages show a pronounced difference between even and odd mode disturbances. Here again, the odd mode causes an early collapse of the annulus via decaying turbulence into a single central vortex, whereas the even mode disturbance causes a more

  10. Dynamics of circular arrangements of vorticity in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Rohith V.; Ravichandran, S.; Perlekar, Prasad; Govindarajan, Rama

    2016-07-01

    The merger of two like-signed vortices is a well-studied problem, but in a turbulent flow, we may often have more than two like-signed vortices interacting. We study the merger of three or more identical corotating vortices initially arranged on the vertices of a regular polygon. At low to moderate Reynolds numbers, we find an additional stage in the merger process, absent in the merger of two vortices, where an annular vortical structure is formed and is long lived. Vortex merger is slowed down significantly due to this. Such annular vortices are known at far higher Reynolds numbers in studies of tropical cyclones, which have been noticed to a break down into individual vortices. In the preannular stage, vortical structures in a viscous flow are found here to tilt and realign in a manner similar to the inviscid case, but the pronounced filaments visible in the latter are practically absent in the former. Five or fewer vortices initially elongate radially, and then reorient their long axis closer to the azimuthal direction so as to form an annulus. With six or more vortices, the initial alignment is already azimuthal. Interestingly at higher Reynolds numbers, the merger of an odd number of vortices is found to proceed very differently from that of an even number. The former process is rapid and chaotic whereas the latter proceeds more slowly via pairing events. The annular vortex takes the form of a generalized Lamb-Oseen vortex (GLO), and diffuses inward until it forms a standard Lamb-Oseen vortex. For lower Reynolds number, the numerical (fully nonlinear) evolution of the GLO vortex follows exactly the analytical evolution until merger. At higher Reynolds numbers, the annulus goes through instabilities whose nonlinear stages show a pronounced difference between even and odd mode disturbances. Here again, the odd mode causes an early collapse of the annulus via decaying turbulence into a single central vortex, whereas the even mode disturbance causes a more

  11. Thermal convection and emergence of isolated vortices in soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Seychelles, F; Amarouchene, Y; Bessafi, M; Kellay, H

    2008-04-11

    A novel thermal convection cell consisting of half a soap bubble heated at the equator is introduced to study thermal convection and the movement of isolated vortices. The soap bubble, subject to stratification, develops thermal convection at its equator. A particular feature of this cell is the emergence of isolated vortices. These vortices resemble hurricanes or cyclones and similarities between our observed structures and these natural objects are found. This is brought forth through a study of the mean square displacement of these objects showing signs of superdiffusion. PMID:18518038

  12. On the propagation of vorticity in multi-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Núñez, Manuel

    2013-12-15

    The evolution of plasmas formed by several species is governed by one fluid equation for each species, all of them linked by an electromagnetic forcing and collisional terms, and the Maxwell equations. It is found that in the collisionless case, the field lines of a combination of fluid vorticity and magnetic field are transported by the flow as material points. In consequence, the vorticity propagates at the same velocity as the magnetic field. This is studied in depth for a number of simple configurations, showing that the vorticity travels at a certain fraction of the speed of light, depending on the size of the spatial mode.

  13. Thermal convection and emergence of isolated vortices in soap bubbles.

    PubMed

    Seychelles, F; Amarouchene, Y; Bessafi, M; Kellay, H

    2008-04-11

    A novel thermal convection cell consisting of half a soap bubble heated at the equator is introduced to study thermal convection and the movement of isolated vortices. The soap bubble, subject to stratification, develops thermal convection at its equator. A particular feature of this cell is the emergence of isolated vortices. These vortices resemble hurricanes or cyclones and similarities between our observed structures and these natural objects are found. This is brought forth through a study of the mean square displacement of these objects showing signs of superdiffusion.

  14. An experimental investigation of thermal mixing and combustion in supersonic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Srikrishnan, A.R.; Kurian, J.; Sriramulu, V.

    1996-12-01

    A radially lobed nozzle (petal nozzle) is being increasingly recognized as a potential candidate for promoting mixing in compressible flows. An experimental investigation has been conducted to study its effectiveness in improving thermal mixing and combustion in supersonic flow. A hot gas jet issuing supersonically from a lobed nozzle mixes with a cold supersonic jet in a circular mixing tube. The two jets issue coaxially. A detailed survey of the flow field inside the mixing duct reveals that nearly complete thermal mixing (as exemplified by the nearly uniform temperature distribution) could be achieved in a short distance when a lobed nozzle is employed. The results also indicate the presence of large-scale vortices in the flow field downstream of the lobed nozzle. Having thus created a field in which mixing is good, supersonic combustion was then attempted. Kerosene was introduced into the hot stream issuing from the lobed nozzle and it burned mainly in the mixing tube, which served as a supersonic combustor. Resulting temperature and pressure rises were measured and the supersonic combustion efficiency was found to be of the order of 60%. The performance of a conventional conical nozzle was found to be much inferior to that of the petal nozzle under identical conditions.

  15. Characterization of counter-rotating vortices past trapezoidal tabs: simulations and visualization via 3D digitized reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeongmoon; Pagan-Vazquez, Axy; Alvarado, Jorge; Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Lux, Scott; Marsh, Charles; CERL Collaboration; UIUC Collaboration; TAMU Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of the turbulence generated by passive vortex generators has been a matter of intense research due to their relevance in applications ranging from aerodynamic efficiency to turbulence mixing. The advection diffusion patterns of the induced vortical structures are heavily controlled by the topology of the vortex generators. In this study, self-sustaining counter-rotating vortex pairs (CVP) generated from a series of trapezoidal tabs have been characterized numerically and experimentally to understand the role of the tab geometries on the flow turbulence. The trapezoidal tabs were fabricated using a 3D printer and defined in terms of inclination and taper angles. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) were performed to quantify turbulence statistics and vorticity in the wake of the tabs. Flow fields were experimentally visualized via smoke technique and qualitatively compared with the numerical simulations. 3D vortices were digitally reconstructed by interpolating several 2D images taken at various spanwise planes. The role of the tabs geometry on the stability and features of the vortical structures is discussed for a Reynolds number of 2100 based on the channel depth.

  16. Mixed release of two parasitoids and a polyphagous ladybird as a potential strategy to control the tobacco whitefly Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaoling; Hu, Nana; Zhang, Fan; Ramirez-Romero, Ricardo; Desneux, Nicolas; Wang, Su; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mixed species release of parasitoids is used to suppress outbreaks of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae); however, this biocontrol may be inhibited by interspecific interactions. We investigated the effects of mixed releases of natural enemies of B. tabaci on predation rates, parasite performance and adult parasitoid emergence under greenhouse conditions. We tested the polyphagous predatory ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and two whitefly-specific parasitoids, namely Encarsia formosa and Encarsia sophia (both, Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). Harmonia axyridis exhibited the lowest rates of predation when released with each parasitoid than with both parasitoid species together and showed a significant preference for non-parasitized nymphs as prey. Both E. formosa and E. sophia parasitized more B. tabaci when released with the ladybird than when the wasps were released either alone or mixed with the other parasitoid. We also found that the presence of H. axyridis significantly reduced adult parasitoid emergence; the highest rate of adult emergence was obtained with parasitoids released alone. Our results indicate that different combinations of natural enemies can influence observed rates of predation, parasitism, and parasitoid emergence. Therefore, the combination of natural enemies to be used for a particular biological control program should depend on the specific objectives. PMID:27312174

  17. Mixed release of two parasitoids and a polyphagous ladybird as a potential strategy to control the tobacco whitefly Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoling; Hu, Nana; Zhang, Fan; Ramirez-Romero, Ricardo; Desneux, Nicolas; Wang, Su; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mixed species release of parasitoids is used to suppress outbreaks of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae); however, this biocontrol may be inhibited by interspecific interactions. We investigated the effects of mixed releases of natural enemies of B. tabaci on predation rates, parasite performance and adult parasitoid emergence under greenhouse conditions. We tested the polyphagous predatory ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and two whitefly-specific parasitoids, namely Encarsia formosa and Encarsia sophia (both, Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae). Harmonia axyridis exhibited the lowest rates of predation when released with each parasitoid than with both parasitoid species together and showed a significant preference for non-parasitized nymphs as prey. Both E. formosa and E. sophia parasitized more B. tabaci when released with the ladybird than when the wasps were released either alone or mixed with the other parasitoid. We also found that the presence of H. axyridis significantly reduced adult parasitoid emergence; the highest rate of adult emergence was obtained with parasitoids released alone. Our results indicate that different combinations of natural enemies can influence observed rates of predation, parasitism, and parasitoid emergence. Therefore, the combination of natural enemies to be used for a particular biological control program should depend on the specific objectives. PMID:27312174

  18. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    Mixing and turbulent mixing are non-equilibrium processes that occur in a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials. The processes can be natural or artificial, their characteristic scales can be astrophysical or atomistic, and energy densities can be low or high. Understanding the fundamental aspects of turbulent mixing is necessary to comprehend the dynamics of supernovae and accretion discs, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, mantle-lithosphere tectonics and volcanic eruptions, atmospheric and oceanographic flows in geophysics, and premixed and non-premixed combustion. It is crucial for the development of the methods of control in technological applications, including mixing mitigation in inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, and mixing enhancement in reactive flows, as well as material transformation under the action of high strain rates. It can improve our knowledge of realistic turbulent processes at low energy density involving walls, unsteady transport, interfaces and vortices, as well as high energy density hydrodynamics including strong shocks, explosions, blast waves and supersonic flows. A deep understanding of mixing and turbulent mixing requires one to go above and beyond canonical approaches and demands further enhancements in the quality and information capacity of experimental and numerical data sets, and in the methods of theoretical analysis of continuous dynamics and kinetics. This has the added potential then of bringing the experiment, numerical modelling, theoretical analysis and data processing to a new level of standards. At the same time, mixing and turbulent mixing being one of the most formidable and multi-faceted problems of modern physics and mathematics, is well open for a curious mind. In this article we briefly review various aspects of turbulent mixing, and present a summary of over 70 papers that were discussed at the third International Conference on 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2011, that

  19. Stereo-Video Data Reduction of Wake Vortices and Trailing Aircrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel

    1998-01-01

    This report presents stereo image theory and the corresponding image processing software developed to analyze stereo imaging data acquired for the wake-vortex hazard flight experiment conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. In this experiment, a leading Lockheed C-130 was equipped with wing-tip smokers to visualize its wing vortices, while a trailing Boeing 737 flew into the wake vortices of the leading airplane. A Rockwell OV-10A airplane, fitted with video cameras under its wings, flew at 400 to 1000 feet above and parallel to the wakes, and photographed the wake interception process for the purpose of determining the three-dimensional location of the trailing aircraft relative to the wake. The report establishes the image-processing tools developed to analyze the video flight-test data, identifies sources of potential inaccuracies, and assesses the quality of the resultant set of stereo data reduction.

  20. Probing dynamics and pinning of single vortices in superconductors at nanometer scales.

    PubMed

    Embon, L; Anahory, Y; Suhov, A; Halbertal, D; Cuppens, J; Yakovenko, A; Uri, A; Myasoedov, Y; Rappaport, M L; Huber, M E; Gurevich, A; Zeldov, E

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of quantized magnetic vortices and their pinning by materials defects determine electromagnetic properties of superconductors, particularly their ability to carry non-dissipative currents. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the complex physics of vortex matter, the behavior of vortices driven by current through a multi-scale potential of the actual materials defects is still not well understood, mostly due to the scarcity of appropriate experimental tools capable of tracing vortex trajectories on nanometer scales. Using a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference microscope we report here an investigation of controlled dynamics of vortices in lead films with sub-Angstrom spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. We measured, for the first time, the fundamental dependence of the elementary pinning force of multiple defects on the vortex displacement, revealing a far more complex behavior than has previously been recognized, including striking spring softening and broken-spring depinning, as well as spontaneous hysteretic switching between cellular vortex trajectories. Our results indicate the importance of thermal fluctuations even at 4.2 K and of the vital role of ripples in the pinning potential, giving new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation and electromagnetic response of superconductors. PMID:25564043

  1. Probing dynamics and pinning of single vortices in superconductors at nanometer scales

    PubMed Central

    Embon, L.; Anahory, Y.; Suhov, A.; Halbertal, D.; Cuppens, J.; Yakovenko, A.; Uri, A.; Myasoedov, Y.; Rappaport, M. L.; Huber, M. E.; Gurevich, A.; Zeldov, E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of quantized magnetic vortices and their pinning by materials defects determine electromagnetic properties of superconductors, particularly their ability to carry non-dissipative currents. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the complex physics of vortex matter, the behavior of vortices driven by current through a multi-scale potential of the actual materials defects is still not well understood, mostly due to the scarcity of appropriate experimental tools capable of tracing vortex trajectories on nanometer scales. Using a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference microscope we report here an investigation of controlled dynamics of vortices in lead films with sub-Angstrom spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. We measured, for the first time, the fundamental dependence of the elementary pinning force of multiple defects on the vortex displacement, revealing a far more complex behavior than has previously been recognized, including striking spring softening and broken-spring depinning, as well as spontaneous hysteretic switching between cellular vortex trajectories. Our results indicate the importance of thermal fluctuations even at 4.2 K and of the vital role of ripples in the pinning potential, giving new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation and electromagnetic response of superconductors. PMID:25564043

  2. Probing dynamics and pinning of single vortices in superconductors at nanometer scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embon, L.; Anahory, Y.; Suhov, A.; Halbertal, D.; Cuppens, J.; Yakovenko, A.; Uri, A.; Myasoedov, Y.; Rappaport, M. L.; Huber, M. E.; Gurevich, A.; Zeldov, E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of quantized magnetic vortices and their pinning by materials defects determine electromagnetic properties of superconductors, particularly their ability to carry non-dissipative currents. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the complex physics of vortex matter, the behavior of vortices driven by current through a multi-scale potential of the actual materials defects is still not well understood, mostly due to the scarcity of appropriate experimental tools capable of tracing vortex trajectories on nanometer scales. Using a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference microscope we report here an investigation of controlled dynamics of vortices in lead films with sub-Angstrom spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. We measured, for the first time, the fundamental dependence of the elementary pinning force of multiple defects on the vortex displacement, revealing a far more complex behavior than has previously been recognized, including striking spring softening and broken-spring depinning, as well as spontaneous hysteretic switching between cellular vortex trajectories. Our results indicate the importance of thermal fluctuations even at 4.2 K and of the vital role of ripples in the pinning potential, giving new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation and electromagnetic response of superconductors.

  3. The decay of longitudinal vortices shed from airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.; Reichert, Bruce A.; Foster, Jeffry D.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to examine the crossplane structure and streamwise decay of vortices shed from airfoil-type vortex generators. The vortex generators are set in a counter-rotating array spanning the full circumference of a straight pipe. The span of the vortex generators above the duct surface, h, is approximately equal to the local turbulent boundary layer thickness, delta. Measurement of three-component mean flow velocity in downstream crossplanes are used to characterize the structure of the shed vortices. Measurements in adjacent crossplanes (closely spaced along the streamwise coordinate) characterize the interaction and decay of the embedded vortices. A model constructed by the superposition of Oseen vortices is compared to the data for one test case.

  4. EFFECTS OF DUST FEEDBACK ON VORTICES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, Stephen

    2014-11-10

    We carried out two-dimensional, high-resolution simulations to study the effect of dust feedback on the evolution of vortices induced by massive planets in protoplanetary disks. Various initial dust to gas disk surface density ratios (0.001-0.01) and dust particle sizes (Stokes number 4 × 10{sup –4}-0.16) are considered. We found that while dust particles migrate inward, vortices are very effective at collecting them. When dust density becomes comparable to gas density within the vortex, a dynamical instability is excited and it alters the coherent vorticity pattern and destroys the vortex. This dust feedback effect is stronger with a higher initial dust/gas density ratio and larger dust grain. Consequently, we found that the disk vortex lifetime can be reduced up to a factor of 10. We discuss the implications of our findings on the survivability of vortices in protoplanetary disks and planet formation.

  5. Atmospheric carbon tetrachloride in rural background and industry surrounded urban areas in Northern Iberian Peninsula: Mixing ratios, trends, and potential sources.

    PubMed

    de Blas, Maite; Uria-Tellaetxe, Iratxe; Gomez, Maria Carmen; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; García, Jose Antonio; Durana, Nieves; Iza, Jon; Ramón, Jarol Derley

    2016-08-15

    Latest investigations on atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CTC) are focused on its ozone depleting potential, adverse effects on the human health, and radiative efficiency and Global Warming Potential as a greenhouse gas. CTC mixing ratios have been thoroughly studied since its restriction under the Montreal Protocol, mostly in remote areas with the aim of reporting long-term trends after its banning. The observed decrease of the CTC background mixing ratio, however, was not as strong as expected. In order to explain this behavior CTC lifetime should be adjusted by estimating the relative significance of its sinks and by identifying ongoing potential sources. Looking for possible sources, CTC was measured with high-time resolution in two sites in Northern Spain, using auto-GC systems and specifically developed acquisition and processing methodologies. The first site, Bilbao, is an urban area influenced by the surrounding industry, where measurements were performed with GC-MSD for a one-year period (2007-2008). The second site, at Valderejo Natural Park (VNP), is a rural background area where measurements were carried out with GC-FID and covering CTC data a nonsuccessive five-year period (2003-2005, 2010-2011, and 2014-2015years). Median yearly CTC mixing ratios were slightly higher in the urban area (120pptv) than in VNP (80-100pptv). CTC was reported to be well mixed in the atmosphere and no sources were noticed to impact the rural site. The observed long-term trend in VNP was in agreement with the estimated global CTC emissions. In the urban site, apart from industrial and commercial CTC sources, chlorine-bleach products used as cleaning agents were reported as promotors of indoor sources. PMID:27092418

  6. Chirp-driven giant phase space vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Pallavi; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2016-06-01

    In a collisionless, unbounded, one-dimensional plasma, modelled using periodic boundary conditions, formation of steady state phase space coherent structures or phase space vortices (PSV) is investigated. Using a high resolution one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson solver based on piecewise-parabolic advection scheme, the formation of giant PSV is addressed numerically. For an infinitesimal external drive amplitude and wavenumber k, we demonstrate the existence of a window of chirped external drive frequency that leads to the formation of giant PSV. The linear, small amplitude, external drive, when chirped, is shown to couple effectively to the plasma and increase both streaming of "untrapped" and "trapped" particle fraction. The steady state attained after the external drive is turned off and is shown to lead to a giant PSV with multiple extrema and phase velocities, with excess density fraction, defined as the deviation from the Maxwellian background, Δ n / n 0 ≃ 20 % - 25 % . It is shown that the process depends on the chirp time duration Δt. The excess density fraction Δn/n0, which contains both trapped and untrapped particle contribution, is also seen to scale with Δt, only inhibited by the gradient of the distribution in velocity space. Both single step drive and multistep chirp processes are shown to lead to steady state giant PSV, with multiple extrema due to embedded holes and clumps, long after the external drive is turned off.

  7. Non-Abelian vortices with a twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Schaposnik, Fidel A.

    2015-06-01

    Non-Abelian flux-tube (string) solutions carrying global currents are found in the bosonic sector of four-dimensional N =2 supersymmetric gauge theories. The specific model considered here possesses U(2 ) local×SU(2 ) global symmetry, with two scalar doublets in the fundamental representation of SU(2). We construct string solutions that are stationary and translationally symmetric along the x3 direction, and they are characterized by a matrix phase between the two doublets, referred to as "twist." Consequently, twisted strings have nonzero (global) charge, momentum, and in some cases even angular momentum per unit length. The planar cross section of a twisted string corresponds to a rotationally symmetric, charged non-Abelian vortex, satisfying first-order Bogomolny-type equations and second-order Gauss constraints. Interestingly, depending on the nature of the matrix phase, some of these solutions even break cylindrical symmetry in R3. Although twisted vortices have higher energy than the untwisted ones, they are expected to be linearly stable since one can keep their charge (or twist) fixed with respect to small perturbations.

  8. Control of vortical separation on conical bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourtos, Nikos J.; Roberts, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    In a variety of aeronautical applications, the flow around conical bodies at incidence is of interest. Such applications include, but are not limited to, highly maneuverable aircraft with delta wings, the aerospace plane and nose portions of spike inlets. The theoretical model used has three parts. First, the single line vortex model is used within the framework of slender body theory, to compute the outer inviscid field for specified separation lines. Next, the three dimensional boundary layer is represented by a momentum equation for the cross flow, analogous to that for a plane boundary layer; a von Karman Pohlhausen approximation is applied to solve this equation. The cross flow separation for both laminar and turbulent layers is determined by matching the pressure at the upper and lower separation points. This iterative procedure yields a unique solution for the separation lines and consequently for the position of the vortices and the vortex lift on the body. Lastly, control of separation is achieved by blowing tangentially from a slot located along a cone generator. It is found that for very small blowing coefficients, the separation can be postponed or suppressedy completely.

  9. Spiral inertial waves emitted from geophysical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2016-03-01

    By numerically simulating an initially unstable geophysical vortex, we discover for the first time a special kind of inertial waves, which are emitted in a spiral manner from the vortices; we refer to these waves as spiral inertial waves (SIWs). SIWs appear at small Rossby numbers (0.01 ≤ Ro ≤ 1) according to our parameter sweep experiments; the amplitude, wavelength and frequency of SIWs are sensitive to Rossby numbers. We extend the Lighthill-Ford radiation into inertial waves, and propose an indicator for the emission of inertial waves; this indicator may be adopted into general circulation models to parameterize inertial waves. Additionally, in our tracer releasing experiments, SIWs organize tracers into spirals, and modify the tracer's local rate of change by advecting tracers vertically. Further, the spirals of SIWs resembles some spiral features observed in the ocean and atmosphere, such as spiral ocean eddies and spiral hurricane rainbands; thus, SIWs may offer another mechanism to form spiral eddies and rainbands. Since no density anomaly is required to generate the spirals of SIWs, we infer that the density anomaly, hence the baroclinic or frontal instability, is unlikely to be the key factor in the formation of these spiral features.

  10. Nonparaxial optical vortices and Kummer laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Kotlyar, Victor V.; Nalimov, Anton G.

    2013-09-01

    Two approaches to describe nonparaxial optical vortices were considered. One approach is to use a revised Kirchhoff integral, which does not neglect the relief of an optical element. Using this integral and the finite-difference time-domain method it is shown that an optical vortex generated by a refractive spiral plate with a relief step has an asymmetric profile. The annular diffraction pattern in the vortex beam cross-section is found to be disturbed not only for the near-field diffraction but also for the middle-field diffraction, at a distance of several Fresnel lengths. Another approach is to solve the Helmholtz equation without any approximations. An analytical solution to describe propagation of a light beam in the positive direction of the optical axis was found. The complex amplitude of such a beam is found to be in direct proportion to the product of two linearly independent solutions of Kummer's differential equation. Relationships for a particular case of such beams-namely, the Hankel-Bessel (HB) beams-are deduced. The autofocusing of the HB beams is studied.

  11. Simulating living organisms with populations of point vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieder, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    The author has found that time-averaged images of small populations of point vortices can exhibit motions suggestive of the behavior of individual organisms. As an example, the author shows that collections of point vortices confined in a box and subjected to heating can generate patterns that are broadly similar to interspecies defense in certain sea anemones. It is speculated that other simple dynamical systems can be found to produce similar complex organism-like behavior.

  12. Large-Eddy Simulations of Dust Devils and Convective Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Barth, Erika; Gu, Zhaolin; Hoffmann, Fabian; Ito, Junshi; Jemmett-Smith, Bradley; Klose, Martina; Nishizawa, Seiya; Raasch, Siegfried; Rafkin, Scot; Takemi, Tetsuya; Tyler, Daniel; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In this review, we address the use of numerical computations called Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) to study dust devils, and the more general class of atmospheric phenomena they belong to (convective vortices). We describe the main elements of the LES methodology. We review the properties, statistics, and variability of dust devils and convective vortices resolved by LES in both terrestrial and Martian environments. The current challenges faced by modelers using LES for dust devils are also discussed in detail.

  13. Visualization and Quantification of Rotor Tip Vortices in Helicopter Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Holst, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an automated approach for effective extraction, visualization, and quantification of vortex core radii from the Navier-Stokes simulations of a UH-60A rotor in forward flight. We adopt a scaled Q-criterion to determine vortex regions and then perform vortex core profiling in these regions to calculate vortex core radii. This method provides an efficient way of visualizing and quantifying the blade tip vortices. Moreover, the vortices radii are displayed graphically in a plane.

  14. Large-scale Alfvén vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Scullion, E.; Fedun, V.

    2015-12-15

    The new type of large-scale vortex structures of dispersionless Alfvén waves in collisionless plasma is investigated. It is shown that Alfvén waves can propagate in the form of Alfvén vortices of finite characteristic radius and characterised by magnetic flux ropes carrying orbital angular momentum. The structure of the toroidal and radial velocity, fluid and magnetic field vorticity, the longitudinal electric current in the plane orthogonal to the external magnetic field are discussed.

  15. Large-scale Alfvén vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Horton, W.; Scullion, E.; Fedun, V.

    2015-12-01

    The new type of large-scale vortex structures of dispersionless Alfvén waves in collisionless plasma is investigated. It is shown that Alfvén waves can propagate in the form of Alfvén vortices of finite characteristic radius and characterised by magnetic flux ropes carrying orbital angular momentum. The structure of the toroidal and radial velocity, fluid and magnetic field vorticity, the longitudinal electric current in the plane orthogonal to the external magnetic field are discussed.

  16. Hybrid Manipulation of Streamwise Vorticity in a Diffuser Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissen, Abraham; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Culp, John; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The formation of streamwise vorticity concentrations by exploiting the interaction of surface-mounted passive (micro-vanes) and active (synthetic jets) flow control elements with the cross flow is investigated experimentally in a small-scale serpentine duct at high subsonic speeds (up to M = 0.6). Streamwise vortices can be a key element in the mitigation of the adverse effects on pressure recovery and distortion caused by the naturally occurring secondary flows in embedded propulsion systems with complex inlet geometries. Counter rotating and single-sense vortices are formed using conventional passive micro-vanes and active high-power synthetic jet actuators. Interaction of the flow control elements is examined through a hybrid actuation scheme whereby synthetic jet actuation augments the primary vanes' vortices resulting in dynamic enhancement of their strength. It is shown that such sub-boundary layer individual vortices can merge and evolve into duct-scale vortical structures that counteract the inherent secondary flow and mitigates global flow distortion.

  17. The structure of intense vorticity in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.; Wray, A. A.; Saffman, P. G.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the intense vorticity regions is studied in numerically simulated homogeneous, isotropic, equilibrium turbulent flow fields at four different Reynolds numbers in the range Re(sub lambda) = 36-171. In accordance with previous investigators, this vorticity is found to be organized in coherent, cylindrical or ribbon-like, vortices ('worms'). A statistical study suggests that they are just especially intense features of the background, O(omega'), vorticity. Their radii scale with the Kolmogorov microscale and their lengths with the integral scale of the flow. An interesting observation is that the Reynolds number based on the circulation of the intense vortices, gamma/nu, increases monotonically with Re(sub lambda), raising the question of the stability of the structures in the limit of Re(sub lambda) approaching infinity. One and two-dimensional statistics of vorticity and strain are presented; they are non-gaussian, and the behavior of their tails depends strongly on the Reynolds number. There is no evidence of convergence to a limiting distribution in our range of Re(sub lambda), even though the energy spectra and the energy dissipation rate show good asymptotic properties in the higher Reynolds number cases. Evidence is presented to show that worms are natural features of the flow and that they do not depend on the particular forcing scheme.

  18. Observations of ionospheric convection vortices - Signatures of momentum transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, M. A.; Clauer, C. R.; Friis-Christensen, E.; Kelly, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    Several classes of traveling vortices in the dayside ionospheric flow have been detected and tracked using the Greenland magnetometer chain. One class observed during quiet times consists of a continuous series of vortices moving generally antisunward for several hours at a time. Assuming each vortex to be the convection pattern produced by a small field aligned current moving across the ionosphere, the amount of field aligned current was found by fitting a modeled ground magnetic signature to measurements from the chain of magnetometers. The calculated field aligned current is seen to be steady for each vortex and neighboring vortices have currents of opposite sign. Low altitude DMSP observations indicate the vortices are on field lines which map to the inner edge of the low latitude boundary layer. Because the vortices are conjugate to the boundary layer, repeat in a regular fashion and travel antisunward, it is argued that this class of vortices is caused by surface waves at the magnetopause. No strong correlations between field aligned current strength and solar wind density, velocity, or Bz is found.

  19. Comparison between ionospheric convection vortices and the associated equivalent currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Benkevitch, L.; Sofko, G. J.; Koustov, A. V.

    2004-12-01

    The equivalent current pattern derived from CANOPUS, NRCAN/GSC and MACCS magnetometers has been compared with the ionospheric convection pattern observed by SuperDARN HF radars. The discrepancies between the equivalent convection (EQC) and the SuperDARN-observed convection (SDC) patterns are explained in terms of the effect of day-night photoionization conductance gradient and the coupling between field-aligned currents (FACs) and ionospheric conductances. In particular, the agreement between the EQC and SDC patterns is usually worse for a counterclockwise convection vortex than for a clockwise cell, but a consistent pattern of discrepancy for counterclockwise convection vortices has been found. We suggest that the discrepancies are due to a downward FAC-conductance coupling process. Since the counterclockwise vortices and clockwise vortices occur predominantly in the dawn and dusk sectors, respectively, in accordance with the usual 2-cell global convection pattern, the asymmetry between the EQC and SDC patterns for counterclockwise vortices and clockwise vortices would naturally lead to a dawn-dusk asymmetry as well. This is revealed by a global statistical study of the deviation of direction between the magnetic equivalent convection and the SuperDARN convection in different time sectors and latitudes. In the dawn sector, the statistical results reveal that, at lower latitudes, the EQC direction deviation is slightly counterclockwise with respect to the SDC direction, whereas the deviation is significantly clockwise at high latitudes. These deviations are consistent with the discrepancy pattern for counterclockwise convection vortices, as found in the individual vortex event studies.

  20. Quasi-steady linked vortices with chaotic streamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar; Romero Arteaga, Angelica

    2010-11-01

    We study the dynamics of two or more toroidal filamentary vortices ---i.e. thin tubular vortices coiled on an immaterial torus--- in an otherwise quiescent, ideal fluid. Assuming that the vortices are identical and equally spaced on a meridional section of the torus, the flow evolution depends on the torus aspect ratio (R), the number of vortices (N), and the vortex topology (Vp,q, where p and q are coprime integers such that the Vp,q vortex winds p times round the torus symmetry axis and q times round the torus centerline). The evolution of sets of V1,1 and V1,2 vortices was computed using the Rosenhead--Moore approximation to evaluate the velocity field and a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to advance in time. It was found that vortex sets with N<6 and R<0.15 progressed along and rotated around the torus symmetry axis in an almost steady manner while each vortex in the set approximately preserved its shape. The velocity field, observed in the comoving frame, has two stagnation points. The stream tube starting at the forward stagnation point and the stream tube ending at the backward stagnation point transversely intersect along a finite number of streamlines. The three-dimensional chaotic tangle that arises has a geometry which depends primarily on the number of vortices N.