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Sample records for potentiokinetic reactivation method

  1. NDE evaluation of the intergranular corrosion susceptibility of a 2205 duplex stainless steel using thermoelectric power and double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, N.; Carreón, H.; Ruiz, A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a nondestructive technique to assess rapidly and with confidence the degree of sensitization (DOS) in duplex stainless steel (DSS). In this investigation, we present the use of thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements as nondestructive method for the determination of DOS in isothermally aged 2205 DSS at 700°C for different aging times. The DOS of the aged samples was first established by performing the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test. The microstructural evolution was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental results indicate that TEP coefficient is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by thermal aging and can be used to monitor IGC sensitization of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

  2. Detection of radiation-induced changes in electrochemical properties of austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized specimens and the single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation method

    SciTech Connect

    Inazumi, T.; Bell, G.E.C.; Kenik, E.A.; Kiuchi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of miniaturized (TEM) specimens can provide reliable data comparable to data obtained with larger specimens. Significant changes in electrochemical properties (increased reactivation current and Flade potential) were detected for PCA and type 316 stainless steels irradiated at 200--420[degrees]C up to 7--9 dpa. Irradiations in the FFTF Materials Open Test Assembly and in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor are reported on. 45 figs., 5 tabs., 52 refs.

  3. Detection of radiation-induced changes in electrochemical properties of austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized specimens and the single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation method

    SciTech Connect

    Inazumi, T.; Bell, G.E.C.; Kenik, E.A.; Kiuchi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of miniaturized (TEM) specimens can provide reliable data comparable to data obtained with larger specimens. Significant changes in electrochemical properties (increased reactivation current and Flade potential) were detected for PCA and type 316 stainless steels irradiated at 200--420{degrees}C up to 7--9 dpa. Irradiations in the FFTF Materials Open Test Assembly and in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor are reported on. 45 figs., 5 tabs., 52 refs.

  4. Sensitization behavior of alloy 800H as characterized by the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Edgemon, G.L.; Marek, M. ); Wilson, D.F. ); Bell, G.E.C. )

    1994-12-01

    The need for a nondestructive test to evaluate levels of sensitization in alloy 800H (UNS N08810) led to modification of the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test technique previously developed for type 304 (UNS S30400) stainless steel (SS). Results of testing on alloy 800H specimens aged at temperatures between 450 C and 700 C for 0 h to 5,000 h indicated that sensitized materials exhibited a peak in measured current density resulting from activation of grain boundaries at [minus]30 mV[sub SCE] in addition to a general surface activation peak at [minus]150 mV[sub SCE]. Unsensitized material exhibited only the general surface activation peak. It was shown that methods of data analysis previously used for type 304 SS utilizing the integrated area under the reactivation curve cannot be applied to alloy 800H because of the dual peak nature of the EPR curve. Instead, i[sub pn] (current density normalized to grain boundary area at a specimen potential of [minus]30 mV[sub SCE]) must be used. A i[sub pn] value > [approximately] 1.6 [times] 10[sup 4] [mu]A/cm[sup 2] of grain boundary area corresponded to complete grain encirclement and grain boundary ditching. Using this criterion and the aging conditions investigated, a time-temperature sensitization profile was generated for alloy 800H.

  5. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  6. Evaluation by the Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation Test of Aged Ferritic Stainless Steel Intergranular Corrosion Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Braham, C.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental design method was used to determine the effect of factors that significantly affect the response of the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test in controlling the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of UNS S43000 (AISI 430) ferritic stainless steel. The test response is expressed in terms of the reactivation/activation current ratio ( I r / I a pct). Test results analysed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method show that the molarity of the H2SO4 electrolyte and the potential scanning rate have a more significant effect on the DL-EPR test response than the temperature and the depassivator agent concentration. On the basis of these results, a study was conducted in order to determine the optimal operating conditions of the test as a nondestructive technique for evaluating IGC resistance of ferritic stainless steel components. Three different heat treatments are considered in this study: solution annealing (nonsensitized), aging during 3 hours at 773 K (500 °C) (slightly sensitized), and aging during 2 hours at 873 K (600 °C) (highly sensitized). The aim is to find the operating conditions that simultaneously ensure the selectivity of the attack (intergranular and chromium depleted zone) and are able to detect the effect of low dechromization. It is found that a potential scanning rate of 2.5 mV/s in an electrolyte composed of H2SO4 3 M solution without depassivator, at a temperature around 293 K (20 °C), is the optimal operating condition for the DL-EPR test. Using this condition, it is possible to assess the degree of sensitization (DOS) to the IGC of products manufactured in ferritic stainless steels rapidly, reliably, and quantitatively. A time-temperature-start of sensitization (TTS) diagram for the UNS S43000 (France Inox, Villepinte, France) stainless steel was obtained with acceptable accuracy by this method when the IGC sensitization criterion was set to I r / I a > 1 pct. This diagram is in

  7. Sensitization phenomena on aged SAF 2205 duplex stainless steel and their control using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, E.; Benedetti, B. de; Maizza, G.; Rosalbino, F. . Dept. of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering)

    1999-06-01

    Microstructural changes and resulting properties were studied for SAF 2205 (UNS S31803) austeno-ferritic stainless steel (SS) aged between 700 C and 900 C for up to 2 weeks and then water-quenched. Quantitative metallography coupled with x-ray diffraction techniques were adopted to follow ferrite ([alpha]) transformation with subsequent formation of secondary austenite ([gamma][sub 2]) and sigma ([sigma]) phase. The kinetic model of a transformation was interpreted in the form of an Avrami-type expression. The electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test was used to evaluate the degree of sensitization of the aged specimens. Results were compared with results from the corrosion test in boiling nitric acid (HNO[sub 3]). Influences of the transformation of ferrite into austenite, sigma phase, and of other microstructural variations such as chromium nitride (Cr[sub 2]N) precipitation on stability of the passive film were shown. The susceptibility to intergranular corrosion phenomena was caused by chromium depletion caused by sigma phase precipitation, while chromium nitrides appeared less harmful. Results were expressed as an isocharge line diagram that allowed concise identification of sensitization and desensitization ranges.

  8. Predicting susceptibility of alloy 600 to intergranular stress corrosion cracking using a modified electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, M.K.; Kwon, H.S.; Lee, J.H.

    1995-06-01

    Modified double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) tests were applied to evaluate the degree of sensitization (DOS) for alloy 600 aged at 700 C. Results of the modified DL-EPR test were compared to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibilities determined in deaerated 0.01 M sodium tetrathionate under deformation at a constant strain rate of 0.93 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}/s. By analyzing the effects of solution concentration, temperature, and scan rate on the electrochemical response in the EPR tests and the morphologies, the optimal modified DL-EPR test condition for alloy 600 was obtained in 0.01 M sulfuric acid + 10 ppm potassium thiocyanate at 25 C and at a scan rate of 0.5 mV/s. The standard DL-EPR test, performed under conditions of 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.01 M KCNS at 30 C and a scan rate of 1.67 mV/s, provided very poor discriminating power for various DOS of alloy 600 because general and pitting corrosion occurred, in addition to intergranular corrosion. The modified test, however, was highly discriminating because of its highly selective corrosion attack at grain boundaries. IGSCC occurred in samples of alloy 600 aged for < 20 h, and susceptibility to IGSCC{sub s} increased with decreasing aging times up to 1 h, showing maximum IGSCC{sub s} in the sample aged for 1 h. IGSCC{sub s} for the alloy was found to be associated closely with the chromium-depleted profile across grain boundaries. The deeper and narrower chromium-depleted zone produced greater IGSCC{sub s}. It was demonstrated that DOS measured by the modified DL-EPR test was correlated more closely with IGSCC{sub s} than was DOS measured by the standard EPR test. This correlation resulted from the fact that the modified EPR test selectively attacked the more deeply chromium-depleted regions in comparison to the standard EPR test.

  9. Reactive Power Compensation Method Considering Minimum Effective Reactive Power Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yiyu; Zhang, Kai; Pu, Zhang; Li, Xuenan; Zuo, Xianghong; Zhen, Jiao; Sudan, Teng

    2017-05-01

    According to the calculation model of minimum generator reactive power reserve of power system voltage stability under the premise of the guarantee, the reactive power management system with reactive power compensation combined generator, the formation of a multi-objective optimization problem, propose a reactive power reserve is considered the minimum generator reactive power compensation optimization method. This method through the improvement of the objective function and constraint conditions, when the system load growth, relying solely on reactive power generation system can not meet the requirement of safe operation, increase the reactive power reserve to solve the problem of minimum generator reactive power compensation in the case of load node.

  10. Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2008-08-05

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  11. Use of the double-loop reactivation test to measure sensitization in aged and welded pH 13-8 Mo martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, W.R.; Cieslak, M.J.; Hills, C.R.

    1987-01-08

    Electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) testing provides quantitative detection of small degrees of sensitization. We have used double-loop (DL-EPR) testing, a method which has been characterized for use on austenitic stainless steels, to measure sensitization resulting from aging or from welding of PH 13-8 Mo martensitic stainless steel. Aging at either 500/sup 0/C or 620/sup 0/C results in an increase of the reactivation current density. The 500/sup 0/C treatment promotes preferential susceptibility to corrosion along prior austenite grain boundaries, and the 620/sup 0/C treatment promotes preferential susceptibility along martensite interlath boundaries. A narrow band in the heat-affected zone of autogenous weldments also undergoes localized corrosion during the reactivation scan. Increased reactivation current density is likely caused by classic Cr-depletion resulting from carbide precipitation.

  12. Method For Reactivating Solid Catalysts Used For Alklation Reactions

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  13. Method for reactivating solid catalysts used in alkylation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2003-06-17

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  14. PDF methods for turbulent reactive flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on computation of turbulent combustion, governing equations, closure problem, PDF modeling of turbulent reactive flows, validation cases, current projects, and collaboration with industry and technology transfer.

  15. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2000-07-01

    This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

  16. Development and first applications of an OH reactivity instrument based on the Comparative Reactivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, S.; Michoud, V.; Hansen, R. F.; Leonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Stevens, P. S.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Fittschen, C. M.; Zannoni, N.; Gros, V.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Sinha, V.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere is important to address fundamental issues related to both air quality and climate change. However, recent measurements of total OH reactivity have highlighted an incomplete understanding of the hydroxyl radical (OH) budget, the main oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. This context has led to the development of several techniques for measuring total OH reactivity to better constrain atmospheric chemistry. This presentation will review the development of an OH reactivity instrument developed at Mines Douai, France. This instrument, based on the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM), has been carefully characterized in the laboratory and has been compared to other OH reactivity instruments during two different field campaigns. These studies will be summarized to show that CRM instruments can perform reliable measurements in urban and remote areas providing that a few measurement artefacts are well characterized and accounted for during field campaigns.

  17. The Comparative Reactivity Method - a new tool to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Williams, J.; Crowley, J. N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-12-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals play a vital role in maintaining the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. To understand variations in OH radicals both source and sink terms must be understood. Currently the overall sink term, or the total atmospheric reactivity to OH, is poorly constrained. Here, we present a new on-line method to directly measure the total OH reactivity (i.e.~total loss rate of OH radicals) in a sampled air mass. In this method, a reactive molecule (X), not normally present in air, is passed through a glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced in the glass reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing VOCs and other OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the ambient air allows the air reactivity to be determined. In our existing set up, X is pyrrole and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. The present dynamic range for ambient air reactivity is about 6 to 300 s-1. The system has been tested and calibrated with different single and mixed hydrocarbon standards showing excellent linearity and accountability with the reactivity of the standards. Field tests in the tropical rainforest of Suriname (~53 s-1) and the urban atmosphere of Mainz (~10 s-1) Germany, show the promise of the new method and indicate that a significant fraction of OH reactive species in the tropical forests is likely missed by current measurements. Suggestions for improvements to the technique and future applications are discussed.

  18. A Multi-domain Spectral Method for Supersonic Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Don, Wai-Sun; Gottlieb, David; Jung, Jae-Hun; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper has a dual purpose: it presents a multidomain Chebyshev method for the solution of the two-dimensional reactive compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and it reports the results of the application of this code to the numerical simulations of high Mach number reactive flows in recessed cavity. The computational method utilizes newly derived interface boundary conditions as well as an adaptive filtering technique to stabilize the computations. The results of the simulations are relevant to recessed cavity flameholders.

  19. Evaluation of Methods to Predict Reactivity of Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2011-06-20

    Several methods have appeared in the literature for predicting reactivity on metallic surfaces and on the surface of metallic nanoparticles. All of these methods have some relationship to the concept of frontier molecular orbital theory. The d-band theory of Hammer and Nørskov is perhaps the most widely used predictor of reactivity on metallic surfaces, and it has been successfully applied in many cases. Use of the Fukui function and the condensed Fukui function is well established in organic chemistry, but has not been so widely applied in predicting the reactivity of metallic nanoclusters. In this article, we will evaluate the usefulness of the condensed Fukui function in predicting the reactivity of a family of cubo-octahedral gold nanoparticles and make comparison with the d-band method.

  20. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-05-18

    A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

  1. The Comparative Reactivity Method - a new tool to measure total OH Reactivity in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Williams, J.; Crowley, J. N.; Lelieveld, J.

    2008-04-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals play a vital role in maintaining the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. To understand variations in OH radicals both source and sink terms must be understood. Currently the overall sink term, or the total atmospheric reactivity to OH, is poorly constrained. Here, we present a new on-line method to directly measure the total OH reactivity (i.e.~total loss rate of OH radicals) in a sampled air mass. In this method, a reactive molecule (X), not normally present in air, is passed through a glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced in the glass reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing VOCs and other OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the ambient air allows the air reactivity to be determined. In our existing set up, X is pyrrole and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. The present dynamic range for ambient air reactivity is about 6 to 300 s-1, with an overall maximum uncertainty of 25% above 8 s-1 and up to 50% between 6-8 s-1. The system has been tested and calibrated with different single and mixed hydrocarbon standards showing excellent linearity and accountability with the reactivity of the standards. Potential interferences such as high NO in ambient air, varying relative humidity and photolysis of pyrrole within the setup have also been investigated. While interferences due changing humidity and photolysis of pyrrole are easily overcome by ensuring that humidity in the set up does not change drastically and the photolytic loss of pyrrole is measured and taken into account, respectively, NO>10 ppb in ambient air remains a significant interference for the current configuration of the instrument. Field tests in the tropical rainforest of Suriname (~53 s

  2. Quantification of Hydroxyl Radical reactivity in the urban environment using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Rikesh; Monks, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals play an important role in 'cleansing' the atmosphere of many pollutants such as, NOx, CH4 and various VOCs, through oxidation. To measure the reactivity of OH, both the sinks and sources of OH need to be quantified, and currently the overall sinks of OH seem not to be fully constrained. In order to measure the total rate loss of OH in an ambient air sample, all OH reactive species must be considered and their concentrations and reaction rate coefficients with OH known. Using the method pioneered by Sinha and Williams at the Max Plank Institute Mainz, the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) which directly quantifies total OH reactivity in ambient air without the need to consider the concentrations of individual species within the sample that can react with OH, has been developed and applied in a urban setting. The CRM measures the concentration of a reactive species that is present only in low concentrations in ambient air, in this case pyrrole, flowing through a reaction vessel and detected using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). The poster will show a newly developed and tested PTR-TOF-MS system for CRM. The correction regime will be detailed to account for the influence of the varying humidity between ambient air and clean air on the pyrrole signal. Further, examination of the sensitivity dependence of the PTR-MS as a function of relative humidity and H3O+(H2O) (m/z=37) cluster ion allows the correction for the humidity variation, between the clean humid air entering the reaction vessel and ambient air will be shown. NO, present within ambient air, is also a potential interference and can cause recycling of OH, resulting in an overestimation of OH reactivity. Tests have been conducted on the effects of varying NO concentrations on OH reactivity and a correction factor determined for application to data when sampling ambient air. Finally, field tests in the urban environment at the University of Leicester will be shown

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

    1982-09-07

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  4. Environmentally stable reactive alloy powders and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for making powder from a metallic melt by atomizing the melt to form droplets and reacting the droplets downstream of the atomizing location with a reactive gas. The droplets are reacted with the gas at a temperature where a solidified exterior surface is formed thereon and where a protective refractory barrier layer (reaction layer) is formed whose penetration into the droplets is limited by the presence of the solidified surface so as to avoid selective reduction of key reactive alloys needed to achieve desired powder end use properties. The barrier layer protects the reactive powder particles from environmental constituents such as air and water in the liquid or vapor form during subsequent fabrication of the powder to end-use shapes and during use in the intended service environment. 7 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David M.; Lindquist, Lloyd O.

    1985-01-01

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and non-invasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. No external neutron-emitting interrogation source or fissile material is used and no scanning is required, although if a profile is desired scanning can be used. As in active assays, here both reactivity and content of fissionable material can be measured. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly. The return flux is altered by changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  6. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  7. Method for treating reactive metals in a vacuum furnace

    DOEpatents

    Hulsey, W.J.

    1975-10-28

    The invention is directed to a method for reducing the contamination of reactive metal melts in vacuum furnaces due to the presence of residual gaseous contaminants in the furnace atmosphere. This reduction is achieved by injecting a stream of inert gas directly over the metal confined in a substantially closed crucible with the flow of the gas being sufficient to establish a pressure differential between the interior of the crucible and the furnace atmosphere.

  8. Parallel computation of multigroup reactivity coefficient using iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susmikanti, Mike; Dewayatna, Winter

    2013-09-01

    One of the research activities to support the commercial radioisotope production program is a safety research target irradiation FPM (Fission Product Molybdenum). FPM targets form a tube made of stainless steel in which the nuclear degrees of superimposed high-enriched uranium. FPM irradiation tube is intended to obtain fission. The fission material widely used in the form of kits in the world of nuclear medicine. Irradiation FPM tube reactor core would interfere with performance. One of the disorders comes from changes in flux or reactivity. It is necessary to study a method for calculating safety terrace ongoing configuration changes during the life of the reactor, making the code faster became an absolute necessity. Neutron safety margin for the research reactor can be reused without modification to the calculation of the reactivity of the reactor, so that is an advantage of using perturbation method. The criticality and flux in multigroup diffusion model was calculate at various irradiation positions in some uranium content. This model has a complex computation. Several parallel algorithms with iterative method have been developed for the sparse and big matrix solution. The Black-Red Gauss Seidel Iteration and the power iteration parallel method can be used to solve multigroup diffusion equation system and calculated the criticality and reactivity coeficient. This research was developed code for reactivity calculation which used one of safety analysis with parallel processing. It can be done more quickly and efficiently by utilizing the parallel processing in the multicore computer. This code was applied for the safety limits calculation of irradiated targets FPM with increment Uranium.

  9. Parallel computation of multigroup reactivity coefficient using iterative method

    SciTech Connect

    Susmikanti, Mike; Dewayatna, Winter

    2013-09-09

    One of the research activities to support the commercial radioisotope production program is a safety research target irradiation FPM (Fission Product Molybdenum). FPM targets form a tube made of stainless steel in which the nuclear degrees of superimposed high-enriched uranium. FPM irradiation tube is intended to obtain fission. The fission material widely used in the form of kits in the world of nuclear medicine. Irradiation FPM tube reactor core would interfere with performance. One of the disorders comes from changes in flux or reactivity. It is necessary to study a method for calculating safety terrace ongoing configuration changes during the life of the reactor, making the code faster became an absolute necessity. Neutron safety margin for the research reactor can be reused without modification to the calculation of the reactivity of the reactor, so that is an advantage of using perturbation method. The criticality and flux in multigroup diffusion model was calculate at various irradiation positions in some uranium content. This model has a complex computation. Several parallel algorithms with iterative method have been developed for the sparse and big matrix solution. The Black-Red Gauss Seidel Iteration and the power iteration parallel method can be used to solve multigroup diffusion equation system and calculated the criticality and reactivity coeficient. This research was developed code for reactivity calculation which used one of safety analysis with parallel processing. It can be done more quickly and efficiently by utilizing the parallel processing in the multicore computer. This code was applied for the safety limits calculation of irradiated targets FPM with increment Uranium.

  10. Treatment of reactive interfaces in pore-scale reactive transport with the phase-field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Di Palma, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The two major challenges for continuum reactive transport models are the treatment of interfaces between different phases (multi-fluids like DNAPL-water, or solid-fluid) and the ability to model transient chemical gradients at the pore-scale. Pore-scale models allow us to deal naturally with chemical gradients at the discrete scale and they generally consider interfaces as boundary conditions that satisfy a local, but modified, mass balance equation. In other word grains do not take part in the mass balance of chemical species besides providing a boundary condition for the fluid. For instance, heterogeneous reactions at solid-fluid boundaries are framed as a balance between incoming chemical flux and reactions. Due to complex topology of interfaces in natural porous media, the treatment of heterogeneous reactions depends on the orientation of the interface and therefore requires a special care. It can become complicated and tedious especially when interfaces are allowed to evolve with time. Approaches such as the enthalpy method, which was developed for solving moving interfaces during melting processes, offer the advantage of a treatment that is independent of the shape of the moving interface. Similar methods have been used for modeling multiphase flows with diffuse interface successfully. Here, we expand on these approaches and introduce a phase-field approach to introduce heterogeneous reactions in single and multiphase reactive flows at the pore-scale. Mass conservation is solved in each phase and we introduce interface conditions as a source/sink term in the conservation equation rather than a boundary condition. The advantages are that the method becomes independent of the (time-dependent) topology of the interface and automatically enforces local mass conservation between the different constituents of the domain. We show validations of the model and applications to multispecies reactive transport, isotope fractionation during calcite growth and finally

  11. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  12. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  13. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Gary L.

    1988-08-16

    A method for preparing highly hydrogen-reactive surfaces on metals which normally require substantial heating, high pressures, or an extended induction period, which involves pretreatment of said surfaces with either a non-oxidizing acid or hydrogen gas to form a hydrogen-bearing coating on said surfaces, and subsequently heating said coated metal in the absence of moisture and oxygen for a period sufficient to decompose said coating and cooling said metal to room temperature. Surfaces so treated will react almost instantaneously with hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The method is particularly applicable to uranium, thorium, and lanthanide metals.

  14. Reactivity measurements using the Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    The zero count probability method (also called Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method, after its inventors) is a method for measuring the reactivity in nuclear reactors, being a competitor of the [more well-known in the West] Feynman-alpha Method and the Rossi-alpha Method. The modus operandi of this method is using the detector channels where there was no counting at all in order to calculate reactor parameters. In deep subcriticality few models have been tested and this work tries out the Zolotukhin-Mogilner Method in one of such scenarios: measurements will be made in environments below -3,5 k pcm in the zero-potency water-moderated reactor IPEN/MB-01 which is fuelled by UO{sub 2} enriched by 4.3%. These extremely low reactivity environments are required because the chance of no counts on the detector must be significant: otherwise, the method would demand a large time of acquisition of data. Besides that, the method is very simple and straightforward. One of the advantages of this method is that it needs very little data reduction, since the essential data is directly given by the measuring apparatus. The detection will be in charge of modern BF{sub 3} detectors. It will be assumed that, in these deep subcritical systems, the function K{sub eff} = f(N-Nkp) has a linear portion in its first part, resulting of the decomposition of it in a Taylor series. The value of alpha is related to the reactivity ρ with linear dependency. The results will be compared with recent studies of the two main methods described above. Presented for the first time in the 60's, this tool has seen little use in the west hemisphere. This work shows its use in the measurements of the nuclear reactor IPEN/MB-01, as well as the code developed for its employment. It will be the first time this method is used in the south hemisphere. (authors)

  15. Analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus Reactivation in Explant Reveals a Method-Dependent Difference in Measured Timing of Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Doll, Jessica R; Sawtell, Nancy M

    2017-08-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is widespread in the human population. Following orofacial infection, HSV establishes latency in innervating sensory neurons, primarily located in the trigeminal ganglia. A central feature of HSV pathogenesis is the ability to periodically reactivate in those neurons and be transported back to the body surface. Both transmission and disease, such as keratitis, encephalitis, and neurodegeneration, have been linked to reactivation. Despite invaluable insights obtained from model systems, interactions between viral and host functions that regulate reactivation are still incompletely understood. Various assays are used for measuring reactivation in animal models, but there have been limited comparisons between methods and the accuracy of detecting the timing of reactivation and the corresponding amount of infectious virus produced in the ganglia per reactivation event. Here, we directly compare two approaches for measuring reactivation in latently infected explanted ganglia by sampling media from the explanted cultures or by homogenization of the ganglia and compare the results to viral protein expression in the whole ganglia. We show that infectious virus detection by direct homogenization of explanted ganglia correlates with viral protein expression, but detection of infectious virus in medium samples from explanted cultures does not occur until extensive spread of virus is observed in the ganglia. The medium-sampling method is therefore not reflective of the initial timing of reactivation, and the additional variables influencing spread of virus in the ganglia should be considered when interpreting results obtained using this method.IMPORTANCE The development of treatments to prevent and/or treat HSV infection rely upon understanding viral and host factors that influence reactivation. Progress is dependent on experimental methods that accurately measure the frequency and timing of reactivation in latently infected neurons. In

  16. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, L. |; Siegrist, B.; Vesper, S.

    1997-12-31

    Many contaminated areas consist of a source area and a plume. In the source area, the contaminant moves vertically downward from a release point through the vadose zone to an underlying saturated region. Where contaminants are organic liquids, NAPL may accumulate on the water table, or it may continue to migrate downward through the saturated region. Early developments of permeable barrier technology have focused on intercepting horizontally moving plumes with vertical structures, such as trenches, filled with reactive material capable of immobilizing or degrading dissolved contaminants. This focus resulted in part from a need to economically treat the potentially large volumes of contaminated water in a plume, and in part from the availability of construction technology to create the vertical structures that could house reactive compounds. Contaminant source areas, however, have thus far remained largely excluded from the application of permeable barrier technology. One reason for this is the lack of conventional construction methods for creating suitable horizontal structures that would place reactive materials in the path of downward-moving contaminants. Methods of hydraulic fracturing have been widely used to create flat-lying to gently dipping layers of granular material in unconsolidated sediments. Most applications thus far have involved filling fractures with coarse-grained sand to create permeable layers that will increase the discharge of wells recovering contaminated water or vapor. However, it is possible to fill fractures with other compounds that alter the chemical composition of the subsurface. One early application involved development and field testing micro-encapsulated sodium percarbonate, a solid compound that releases oxygen and can create aerobic conditions suitable for biodegradation in the subsurface for several months.

  17. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  18. Method of measuring reactive acoustic power density in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1985-09-03

    A method for determining reactive acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, an apparatus for conducting the method, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas. 5 figs.

  19. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, L. |; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T.

    1997-12-31

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

  20. Methods for Detection of Mitochondrial and Cellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondrial and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in both physiological and pathological processes. Different ROS, such as superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite (ONOO•−), stimulate distinct cell-signaling pathways and lead to diverse outcomes depending on their amount and subcellular localization. A variety of methods have been developed for ROS detection; however, many of these methods are not specific, do not allow subcellular localization, and can produce artifacts. In this review, we will critically analyze ROS detection and present advantages and the shortcomings of several available methods. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new fluorescent probes, electron-spin resonance approaches, and immunoassays have been developed. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and subcellular resolution for ROS detection. Critical Issues: Although new methods for HPLC superoxide detection, application of fluorescent boronate-containing probes, use of cell-targeted hydroxylamine spin probes, and immunospin trapping have been available for several years, there has been lack of translation of these into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. Future Directions: Additional studies to translate these new technologies from the test tube to physiological applications are needed and could lead to a wider application of these approaches to study mitochondrial and cellular ROS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 372–382. PMID:22978713

  1. Case-based reactive navigation: a method for on-line selection and adaptation of reactive robotic control parameters.

    PubMed

    Ram, A; Arkin, R C; Moorman, K; Clark, R J

    1997-01-01

    We present a new line of research investigating on-line adaptive reactive control mechanisms for autonomous intelligent agents. We discuss a case-based method for dynamic selection and modification of behavior assemblages for a navigational system. The case-based reasoning module is designed as an addition to a traditional reactive control system, and provides more flexible performance in novel environments without extensive high level reasoning that would otherwise slow the system down. The method is implemented in the ACBARR (case-based reactive robotic) system and evaluated through empirical simulation of the system on several different environments, including "box canyon" environments known to be problematic for reactive control systems in general.

  2. Grinding methods to enhance the reactivity of olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Cathy A.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, Gilbert E.; O'Connor, William K.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) conducted studies of mechanical activation by conventional and ultrafine grinding techniques to enhance olivine reactivity in mineral carbonation reactions. Activated olivine is one of several solid feed materials used at ARC in reactions with carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. This paper compares grinding techniques via energy demand data and product characteristics, including particle size distributions, surface areas, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) XRD analyses, and particle morphology by SEM analyses. Reactivity was calculated by percent conversion to carbonate in subsequent carbonation tests. Particle size reduction has the greatest impact on reactivity, and wet grinding is more energy efficient than dry grinding. Large additional inputs of energy to increase surface area or reduce crystallinity do not result in proportional improvements in reactivity.

  3. METHOD OF ALLOYING REACTIVE METALS WITH ALUMINUM OR BERYLLIUM

    DOEpatents

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1957-10-15

    A halide of one or more of the reactive metals, neptunium, cerium and americium, is mixed with aluminum or beryllium. The mass is heated at 700 to 1200 deg C, while maintaining a substantial vacuum of above 10/sup -3/ mm of mercury or better, until the halide of the reactive metal is reduced and the metal itself alloys with the reducing metal. The reaction proceeds efficiently due to the volatilization of the halides of the reducing metal, aluminum or beryllium.

  4. Grinding methods to enhance the reactivity of olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Cathy A.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, Gilbert E.; O'Connor, William K.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) conducted studies of mechanical activation by conventional and ultra-fine grinding techniques to enhance olivine reactivity in mineral carbonation reactions. Activated olivine is one of several solid feed materials used at ARC in reactions with carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. This paper compares grinding techniques via energy demand data and product characteristics, including particle size distributions, surface areas, full width at half maximum (FWHM) XRD analyses, and particle morphology by SEM analyses. Reactivity was gauged by percent conversion to carbonate in subsequent carbonation tests.

  5. AN EXAMINATION OF METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENTS OF REACTIVE GASEOUS MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE. (R825245)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive gaseous Hg (RGHg), usually assumed to be HgCl2, may
    dominate the total Hg depositional flux due to its higher surface reactivity and
    water solubility. Three methods are currently used for RGHg sampling:
    multi-stage filter packs, refluxing mist c...

  6. Non-reactive and reactive trace gas fluxes: Simultaneous measurements with ground based and vertically integrating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, J.-C.; Rummel, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Foken, T.; Meixner, F. X.

    2009-04-01

    The footprint area, i.e. the source region of a flux measured at a certain location, increases with increasing height above ground of the flux measurements. For non-reactive trace gases and horizontally homogeneous terrain (particularly with respect to deposition and emission processes), an increase in height should not alter the actual measured flux (constant flux layer assumption). For reactive trace gases, with chemical life times of about 30 s - 300 s, chemical production and loss processes within the measuring layer lead to vertical flux divergence. The magnitude of the flux divergence can be determined directly by comparing fluxes of reactive trace gases being affected by chemistry with fluxes of the same species being not altered by chemistry. In August 2006, the field experiment LIBRETTO (LIndenBerg REacTive Trace gas prOfiles) was carried out in cooperation with the German Meteorological Service (DWD) at the field site of the Richard Aßmann Observatory in Lindenberg. At a 99 m mast, profiles of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction were measured. The mast is equipped with an elevator, where sensors for trace gases (CO2, H2O, O3), air temperature and relative humidity have been installed. During the experiment, the elevator system was run continuously, providing scanned profiles of trace gas concentrations from 2 m to 99 m a.g.l. of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) approx. every 10 minutes. Between 0.15 m and 2.0 m, concentration differences of the trace gases CO2, H2O, O3, NO and NO2 were measured. Applying the modified Bowen ration (MBR) method to the measured concentration differences and directly measured sensible heat flux (eddy covariance data from DWD) yields surface fluxes of the trace gases. Integral fluxes of CO2, O3 and sensible heat were computed simultaneously by applying the nocturnal boundary layer budget method to the scanned elevator profiles. A direct comparison showed little deviations between the two methods

  7. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  8. Synthesis of Alumina Thin Films Using Reactive Magnetron Sputtering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angarita, G.; Palacio, C.; Trujillo, M.; Arroyave, M.

    2017-06-01

    Alumina (Al2O3) thin films were deposited on Si (100) by Magnetron Sputtering in reactive conditions between an aluminium target and oxygen 99.99% pure. The plasma was formed employing Argon with an R.F power of 100 W, the dwelling time was 3 hours. 4 samples were produced with temperatures between 350 and 400 ºC in the substrate by using an oxygen flow of 2 and 8 sccm, the remaining parameters of the process were fixed. The coatings and substrates were characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) in order to compare their properties before and after deposition. The films thicknesses were between 47 and 70 nm. The results show that at high oxygen flow the alumina structure prevails in the coatings while at lower oxygen flow only aluminum is deposited in the coatings. It was shown that the temperature increases grain size and roughness while decreasing the thicknesses of the coatings.

  9. Detailed characterization of a Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements: experiments vs. modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Vincent; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    The Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main daytime oxidant in the troposphere, leading to the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the formation of harmful pollutants such as ozone (O3) and Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). While OH plays a key role in tropospheric chemistry, recent studies have highlighted that there are still uncertainties associated with the OH budget, i.e the identification of sources and sinks and the quantification of production and loss rates of this radical. It has been demonstrated that ambient measurements of the total OH loss rate (also called total OH reactivity) can be used to identify and reduce these uncertainties. In this context, the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM), developed by Sinha et al. (ACP, 2008), is a promising technique to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air and has already been used during several field campaigns. This technique relies on monitoring competitive reactions of OH with ambient trace gases and a reference compound (pyrrole) in a sampling reactor to derive ambient OH reactivity. However, this technique requires a complex data processing chain that has yet to be carefully investigated in the laboratory. In this study, we present a detailed characterization of a CRM instrument developed at Mines Douai, France. Experiments have been performed to investigate the dependence of the CRM response on humidity, ambient NOx levels, and the pyrrole-to-OH ratio inside the sampling reactor. Box modelling of the chemistry occurring in the reactor has also been performed to assess our theoretical understanding of the CRM measurement. This work shows that the CRM response is sensitive to both humidity and NOx, which can be accounted for during data processing using parameterizations depending on the pyrrole-to-OH ratio. The agreement observed between laboratory studies and model results suggests a good understanding of the chemistry occurring in the sampling reactor and gives confidence in the CRM

  10. Cross-React: a new structural bioinformatics method for predicting allergen cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Negi, Surendra S; Braun, Werner

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of cross-reactivity between allergenic proteins plays an important role to understand how the immune system recognizes different antigen proteins. Allergen proteins are known to cross-react if their sequence comparison shows a high sequence identity which also implies that the proteins have a similar 3D fold. In such cases, linear sequence alignment methods are frequently used to predict cross-reactivity between allergenic proteins. However, the prediction of cross-reactivity between distantly related allergens continues to be a challenging task. To overcome this problem, we developed a new structure-based computational method, Cross-React, to predict cross-reactivity between allergenic proteins available in the Structural Database of Allergens (SDAP). Our method is based on the hypothesis that we can find surface patches on 3D structures of potential allergens with amino acid compositions similar to an epitope in a known allergen. We applied the Cross-React method to a diverse set of seven allergens, and successfully identified several cross-reactive allergens with high to moderate sequence identity which have also been experimentally shown to cross-react. Based on these findings, we suggest that Cross-React can be used as a predictive tool to assess protein allergenicity and cross-reactivity. : Cross-React is available at: http://curie.utmb.edu/Cross-React.html. ssnegi@utmb.edu.

  11. Chemical Safety Alert: Identifying Chemical Reactivity Hazards Preliminary Screening Method

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduces small-to-medium-sized facilities to a method developed by Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS), based on a series of twelve yes-or-no questions to help determine hazards in warehousing, repackaging, blending, mixing, and processing.

  12. Method of making a ceramic with preferential oxygen reactive layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming an article. The method comprises forming a silicon-based substrate that is oxidizable by reaction with an oxidant to form at least one gaseous product and applying an intermediate layer/coating onto the substrate, wherein the intermediate layer/coating is oxidizable to a nongaseous product by reaction with the oxidant in preference to reaction of the silicon-containing substrate with the oxidant.

  13. High Order Accuracy Methods for Supersonic Reactive Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-25

    bubble interactions [12], the supersonic cavity flows [11], and etc. The difficulty of implement - ing the spectral method to these complex fluid...enhance the convergence properties of the approximation via a filter function σ(η) [30] with the following properties σ(η)= σ(−η), σ(±1) = 0, σ(0)= 1, σ... implementation of the Hybrid method depends on the ability to obtain accurate information on the smoothness of a function . In this work, we employ the Multi

  14. Cold Pad-Batch dyeing method for cotton fabric dyeing with reactive dyes using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Memon, Muhammad Hanif; Khatri, Awais; Tanwari, Anwaruddin

    2011-11-01

    Reactive dyes are vastly used in dyeing and printing of cotton fibre. These dyes have a distinctive reactive nature due to active groups which form covalent bonds with -OH groups of cotton through substitution and/or addition mechanism. Among many methods used for dyeing cotton with reactive dyes, the Cold Pad Batch (CPB) method is relatively more environment friendly due to high dye fixation and non requirement of thermal energy. The dyed fabric production rate is low due to requirement of at least twelve hours batching time for dye fixation. The proposed CPB method for dyeing cotton involves ultrasonic energy resulting into a one third decrease in batching time. The dyeing of cotton fibre was carried out with CI reactive red 195 and CI reactive black 5 by conventional and ultrasonic (US) method. The study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy not only shortens the batching time but the alkalis concentrations can considerably be reduced. In this case, the colour strength (K/S) and dye fixation (%F) also enhances without any adverse effect on colour fastness of the dyed fabric. The appearance of dyed fibre surface using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed relative straightening of fibre convolutions and significant swelling of the fibre upon ultrasonic application. The total colour difference values ΔE (CMC) for the proposed method, were found within close proximity to the conventionally dyed sample.

  15. ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-10-01

    Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

  16. Methods and apparatuses for reagent delivery, reactive barrier formation, and pest control

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler [Pasco, WA; Kaplan, Daniel I [Aiken, SC; Last, George [Richland, WA

    2002-07-09

    A reagent delivery method includes positioning reagent delivery tubes in contact with soil. The tubes can include a wall that is permeable to a soil-modifying reagent. The method further includes supplying the reagent in the tubes, diffusing the reagent through the permeable wall and into the soil, and chemically modifying a selected component of the soil using the reagent. The tubes can be in subsurface contact with soil, including groundwater, and can be placed with directional drilling equipment independent of groundwater well casings. The soil-modifying reagent includes a variety of gases, liquids, colloids, and adsorbents that may be reactive or non-reactive with soil components. The method may be used inter alia to form reactive barriers, control pests, and enhance soil nutrients for microbes and plants.

  17. Intercomparison of two comparative reactivity method instruments inf the Mediterranean basin during summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannoni, N.; Dusanter, S.; Gros, V.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Michoud, V.; Sinha, V.; Locoge, N.; Bonsang, B.

    2015-09-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays a key role in the atmosphere, as it initiates most of the oxidation processes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and can ultimately lead to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). There are still uncertainties associated with the OH budget assessed using current models of atmospheric chemistry and direct measurements of OH sources and sinks have proved to be valuable tools to improve our understanding of the OH chemistry. The total first order loss rate of OH, or total OH reactivity, can be directly measured using three different methods, such as the following: total OH loss rate measurement, laser-induced pump and probe technique and comparative reactivity method. Observations of total OH reactivity are usually coupled to individual measurements of reactive compounds in the gas phase, which are used to calculate the OH reactivity. Studies using the three methods have highlighted that a significant fraction of OH reactivity is often not explained by individually measured reactive compounds and could be associated to unmeasured or unknown chemical species. Therefore accurate and reproducible measurements of OH reactivity are required. The comparative reactivity method (CRM) has demonstrated to be an advantageous technique with an extensive range of applications, and for this reason it has been adopted by several research groups since its development. However, this method also requires careful corrections to derive ambient OH reactivity. Herein we present an intercomparison exercise of two CRM instruments, CRM-LSCE (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement) and CRM-MD (Mines Douai), conducted during July 2013 at the Mediterranean site of Ersa, Cape Corsica, France. The intercomparison exercise included tests to assess the corrections needed by the two instruments to process the raw data sets as well as OH reactivity observations. The observation was divided in three parts: 2 days of plant

  18. Quantum mechanical algebraic variational methods for inelastic and reactive molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Haug, Kenneth; Zhao, Meishan; Truhlar, Donald G.; Sun, Yan

    1988-01-01

    The quantum mechanical problem of reactive or nonreactive scattering of atoms and molecules is formulated in terms of square-integrable basis sets with variational expressions for the reactance matrix. Several formulations involving expansions of the wave function (the Schwinger variational principle) or amplitude density (a generalization of the Newton variational principle), single-channel or multichannel distortion potentials, and primitive or contracted basis functions are presented and tested. The test results, for inelastic and reactive atom-diatom collisions, suggest that the methods may be useful for a variety of collision calculations and may allow the accurate quantal treatment of systems for which other available methods would be prohibitively expensive.

  19. Quantum mechanical algebraic variational methods for inelastic and reactive molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Haug, Kenneth; Zhao, Meishan; Truhlar, Donald G.; Sun, Yan

    1988-01-01

    The quantum mechanical problem of reactive or nonreactive scattering of atoms and molecules is formulated in terms of square-integrable basis sets with variational expressions for the reactance matrix. Several formulations involving expansions of the wave function (the Schwinger variational principle) or amplitude density (a generalization of the Newton variational principle), single-channel or multichannel distortion potentials, and primitive or contracted basis functions are presented and tested. The test results, for inelastic and reactive atom-diatom collisions, suggest that the methods may be useful for a variety of collision calculations and may allow the accurate quantal treatment of systems for which other available methods would be prohibitively expensive.

  20. Using the reactive dye method to covalently attach antibacterial compounds to cotton.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The antibacterial compounds used were sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. A version of the reactive dye method was used to react these two compounds chemically with the cotton fiber molecule. The two compounds were activated and then covalently bonded to cotton fabric, either separately or together...

  1. Interest of the non linear fitting method for reactivity assessment using flux transient experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Jammes, C.

    2006-07-01

    Flux transient measurements, meaning rod drop or source jerk experiments, are useful to estimate subcritical core reactivity or control rod worth. Among numerous analysis methods, the most widely used is the so called 'inverse kinetics' method (IK). Based on the inversion of the counting rates, this method gives very good results when counting rates are high. When assessing far subcritical levels with low counting rates, it appears that results are biased and very imprecise. In order to overcome those problems in the case of measurements performed in the framework of the first phase of the RACE-T program, we used a non linear fitting method (NF) to analyse transient experiments. In this paper, we present the NF method reactivity estimator and study its behaviour, in terms of bias and uncertainties, on simulated transients. Then, RACE-T results on experimental source jerk measurements, obtained using IK and NF, are compared and discussed. (authors)

  2. Catalytic and reactive polypeptides and methods for their preparation and use

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic and reactive polypeptides include a binding site specific for a reactant or reactive intermediate involved in a chemical reaction of interest. The polypeptides further include at least one active functionality proximate the binding site, where the active functionality is capable of catalyzing or chemically participating in the chemical reaction in such a way that the reaction rate is enhanced. Methods for preparing the catalytic peptides include chemical synthesis, site-directed mutagenesis of antibody and enzyme genes, covalent attachment of the functionalities through particular amino acid side chains, and the like.

  3. Intercomparison of two Comparative Reactivity Method instruments in the Mediterranean basin during summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannoni, Nora; Dusanter, Sebastien; Gros, Valerie; Sarda Esteve, Roland; Michoud, Vincent; Sinha, Vinayak; Bonsang, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    The Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) has been widely adopted in recent field studies to measure the total OH reactivity of ambient air, showing a good applicability and fast response. In a CRM experiment, the competition for hydroxyl radicals between pyrrole, the reagent molecule, and trace gases in ambient air is monitored in a glass reactor coupled to a Proton Transfer Reaction- Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Modulations of pyrrole concentration when successively sampling ambient air and zero air are used to compute the total ambient OH reactivity. Here, we present the results of one of the first field intercomparisons of two CRM instruments built in different laboratories, and deployed at a remote site in the Mediterranean basin, under the framework of the project ChArMEx (Chemistry of Aerosols in a Mediterranean Experiment). To assess the performance of the two systems we ran tests with gas standards and adopted the same data processing, including: corrections for RH changes, kinetic regime and dilution in the reactor. The two CRMs measured continuously side by side during five days, sampling ambient air (OH reactivity < 5 s-1) and air from a plant enclosure (OH reactivity up to 300 s-1). We will present an intercomparison of these results and discuss the differences observed between the two instruments.

  4. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  5. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-06-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  6. Application of a data assimilation method via an ensemble Kalman filter to reactive urea hydrolysis transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Juxiu Tong; Bill X. Hu; Hai Huang; Luanjin Guo; Jinzhong Yang

    2014-03-01

    With growing importance of water resources in the world, remediations of anthropogenic contaminations due to reactive solute transport become even more important. A good understanding of reactive rate parameters such as kinetic parameters is the key to accurately predicting reactive solute transport processes and designing corresponding remediation schemes. For modeling reactive solute transport, it is very difficult to estimate chemical reaction rate parameters due to complex processes of chemical reactions and limited available data. To find a method to get the reactive rate parameters for the reactive urea hydrolysis transport modeling and obtain more accurate prediction for the chemical concentrations, we developed a data assimilation method based on an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method to calibrate reactive rate parameters for modeling urea hydrolysis transport in a synthetic one-dimensional column at laboratory scale and to update modeling prediction. We applied a constrained EnKF method to pose constraints to the updated reactive rate parameters and the predicted solute concentrations based on their physical meanings after the data assimilation calibration. From the study results we concluded that we could efficiently improve the chemical reactive rate parameters with the data assimilation method via the EnKF, and at the same time we could improve solute concentration prediction. The more data we assimilated, the more accurate the reactive rate parameters and concentration prediction. The filter divergence problem was also solved in this study.

  7. Synthesis of oxidized guar gum by dry method and its application in reactive dye printing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Honghong; Liu, Mingzhu; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Dapeng; Gao, Chunmei; Ni, Boli; Chen, Jiucun

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare oxidized guar gum with a simple dry method, basing on guar gum, hydrogen peroxide and a small amount of solvent. To obtain a product with suitable viscosity for reactive dye printing, the effects of various factors such as the amount of oxidant and solvent, reaction temperature and time were studied with respect to the viscosity of reaction products. The product was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The hydrated rate of guar gum and oxidized guar gum was estimated through measuring the required time when their solutions (1%, w/v) reached the maximum viscosity. The effects of the salt concentration and pH on viscosity of the resultant product were studied. The mixed paste containing oxidized guar gum and carboxymethyl starch was prepared and its viscosity was determined by the viscometer. The rheological property of the mixed paste was appraised by the printing viscosity index. In addition, the applied effect of mixed paste in reactive dye printing was examined by assessing the fabric stiffness, color yield and sharp edge to the printed image in comparison with sodium alginate. And the results indicated that the mixed paste could partially replace sodium alginate as thickener in reactive dye printing. The study also showed that the method was low cost and eco-friendly and the product would have an extensive application in reactive dye printing.

  8. Method of extruding and packaging a thin sample of reactive material including forming the extrusion die

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Edward F.; Peterson, Leroy L.

    1985-01-01

    This invention teaches a method of cutting a narrow slot in an extrusion die with an electrical discharge machine by first drilling spaced holes at the ends of where the slot will be, whereby the oil can flow through the holes and slot to flush the material eroded away as the slot is being cut. The invention further teaches a method of extruding a very thin ribbon of solid highly reactive material such as lithium or sodium through the die in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, argon or the like as in a glovebox. The invention further teaches a method of stamping out sample discs from the ribbon and of packaging each disc by sandwiching it between two aluminum sheets and cold welding the sheets together along an annular seam beyond the outer periphery of the disc. This provides a sample of high purity reactive material that can have a long shelf life.

  9. Method of extruding and packaging a thin sample of reactive material, including forming the extrusion die

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, E.F.; Peterson, L.L.

    1981-11-30

    This invention teaches a method of cutting a narrow slot in an extrusion die with an electrical discharge machine by first drilling spaced holes at the ends of where the slot will be, whereby the oil can flow through the holes and slot to flush the material eroded away as the slot is being cut. The invention further teaches a method of extruding a very thin ribbon of solid highly reactive material such as lithium or sodium through the die in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, argon, or the like as in a glovebox. The invention further teaches a method of stamping out sample discs from the ribbon and of packaging each disc by sandwiching it between two aluminum sheets and cold welding the sheets together along an annular seam beyond the outer periphery of the disc. This provides a sample of high purity reactive material that can have a long shelf life.

  10. Computational methods for multiphase equilibrium and kinetics calculations for geochemical and reactive transport applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Allan; Saar, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Computational methods for geochemical and reactive transport modeling are essential for the understanding of many natural and industrial processes. Most of these processes involve several phases and components, and quite often requires chemical equilibrium and kinetics calculations. We present an overview of novel methods for multiphase equilibrium calculations, based on both the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) approach and on the solution of the law of mass-action (LMA) equations. We also employ kinetics calculations, assuming partial equilibrium (e.g., fluid species in equilibrium while minerals are in disequilibrium) using automatic time stepping to improve simulation efficiency and robustness. These methods are developed specifically for applications that are computationally expensive, such as reactive transport simulations. We show how efficient the new methods are, compared to other algorithms, and how easy it is to use them for geochemical modeling via a simple script language. All methods are available in Reaktoro, a unified open-source framework for modeling chemically reactive systems, which we also briefly describe.

  11. Evaluation of the furosine and homoarginine methods for determining reactive lysine in rumen-undegraded protein.

    PubMed

    Boucher, S E; Pedersen, C; Stein, H H; Schwab, C G

    2009-08-01

    Three samples of soybean meal (SBM), 3 samples of expeller SBM (SoyPlus, West Central Cooperative, Ralston, IA), 5 samples of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), and 5 samples of fish meal were used to evaluate the furosine and homoarginine procedures to estimate reactive Lys in the rumen-undegraded protein fraction (RUP-Lys). One sample each of SBM, expeller SBM, and DDGS were subjected to additional heat treatment in the lab to ensure there was a wide range in reactive RUP-Lys content among the samples. Furosine is a secondary product of the initial stages of the Maillard reaction and can be used to calculate blocked Lys. Homoarginine is formed via the reaction of reactive Lys with O-methylisourea and can be used to calculate the concentration of reactive Lys. In previous experiments, each sample was ruminally incubated in situ for 16 h, and standardized RUP-Lys digestibility of the samples was determined in cecectomized roosters. All rumen-undegraded residue (RUR) samples were analyzed for furosine and Lys; however, only 9 of the 16 samples contained furosine, and only the 4 unheated DDGS samples contained appreciable amounts of furosine. Blocked RUP-Lys was calculated from the furosine and Lys concentrations of the RUR. Both the intact feed and RUR samples were evaluated using the homoarginine method. All samples were incubated with an O-methylisourea/BaOH solution for 72 h and analyzed for Lys and homoarginine concentrations. Reactive Lys concentrations of the intact feeds and RUR were calculated. Results of the experiment indicate that blocked RUP-Lys determined via the furosine method was negatively correlated with standardized RUP-Lys digestibility, and reactive RUP-Lys determined via the guanidination method was positively correlated with standardized RUP-Lys digestibility. Reactive Lys concentrations of the intact samples were also highly correlated with RUP-Lys digestibility. In conclusion, the furosine assay is useful in predicting RUP

  12. Evaluation of an offline method for the analysis of atmospheric reactive gaseous mercury and particulate mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutter, A.P.; Hanford, K.L.; Zwers, J.T.; Perillo-Nicholas, A. L.; Schauer, J.J.; Olson, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) and particulate mercury (PHg) were collected in Milwaukee, WI, between April 2004 and May 2005, and in Riverside, CA, between July 25 and August 7, 2005 using sorbent and filter substrates. The substrates were analyzed for mercury by thermal desorption analysis (TDA) using a purpose-built instrument. Results from this offline-TDA method were compared with measurements using a real-time atmospheric mercury analyzer. RGM measurements made with the offline-TDA agreed well with a commercial real-time method. However, the offline TDA reported PHg concentrations 2.7 times higher than the real-time method, indicating evaporative losses might be occurring from the real-time instrument during sample collection. TDA combined with reactive mercury collection on filter and absorbent substrates was cheap, relatively easy to use, did not introduce biases due to a semicontinuous sample collection strategy, and had a dynamic range appropriate for use in rural and urban locations. The results of this study demonstrate that offline-TDA is a feasible method for collecting reactive mercury concentrations in a large network of filter-based samplers. Copyright 2008 Air & Waste Management Association.

  13. Apparatus and method for atmospheric pressure reactive atom plasma processing for shaping of damage free surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Carr; Jeffrey W.

    2009-03-31

    Fabrication apparatus and methods are disclosed for shaping and finishing difficult materials with no subsurface damage. The apparatus and methods use an atmospheric pressure mixed gas plasma discharge as a sub-aperture polisher of, for example, fused silica and single crystal silicon, silicon carbide and other materials. In one example, workpiece material is removed at the atomic level through reaction with fluorine atoms. In this example, these reactive species are produced by a noble gas plasma from trace constituent fluorocarbons or other fluorine containing gases added to the host argon matrix. The products of the reaction are gas phase compounds that flow from the surface of the workpiece, exposing fresh material to the etchant without condensation and redeposition on the newly created surface. The discharge provides a stable and predictable distribution of reactive species permitting the generation of a predetermined surface by translating the plasma across the workpiece along a calculated path.

  14. Criminal investigations: pupil pharmacological reactivity as method for assessing time since death is fallacious.

    PubMed

    Orrico, Marco; Melotti, Roberto; Mantovani, Anna; Avesani, Barbara; De Marco, Roberto; De Leo, Domenico

    2008-12-01

    Determination of the time since death in the early postmortem period is one of the most critical issues to be faced by criminal investigators. One of the techniques is the evaluation of the pupil pharmacological reactivity. In the present work, we aim at identifying whether an objective and single method, based on pharmacological pupil reaction, is feasible or not. Between 2002 and 2003 calendar years, we observed 309 bodies, whose eyes have been each instilled apart, within 26 hours since death, with either a myotic substance or a mydriatic solution. Our results show that the real effectiveness of pupil pharmacological reactivity as method for assessing the time since death in early postmortem period is not only questionable but even highly misleading if not replaced by alternative objective physiological tests and appropriate professional judgments by the investigators.

  15. Aging Degradation of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Probed by Electrochemical Method and Impact Toughness Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Das, Goutam; Mahato, B.; Singh, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    The present study discriminates the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in stainless steel welds by double loop electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation method and correlates it with the degradation in toughness property. The welds produced with different heat inputs were aged up to 10,000 hours at 673 K to 723 K (400 to 450 °C) and evaluated subsequently for the degree of sensitization (DOS) and impact toughness. The DOS values obtained were attributed to the spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G-phase. Study shows that the DOS correlates well with the impact toughness of the 304LN weld. Prolonged aging at 673 K and 723 K (400 °C and 450 °C) increased the DOS values while the impact toughness was decreased. The weld fabricated at 1 kJ/mm of heat input, produced higher DOS, compared to that at 3 kJ/mm. The geometrical location along the weld is shown to influence the DOS; higher values were obtained at the root than at the topside of the weld. Vermicular and columnar microstructure, in addition to the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation, observed in the root side of the weld appear risky for the impact toughness.

  16. Aging Degradation of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Probed by Electrochemical Method and Impact Toughness Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Das, Goutam; Mahato, B.; Singh, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    The present study discriminates the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in stainless steel welds by double loop electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation method and correlates it with the degradation in toughness property. The welds produced with different heat inputs were aged up to 10,000 hours at 673 K to 723 K (400 to 450 °C) and evaluated subsequently for the degree of sensitization (DOS) and impact toughness. The DOS values obtained were attributed to the spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G-phase. Study shows that the DOS correlates well with the impact toughness of the 304LN weld. Prolonged aging at 673 K and 723 K (400 °C and 450 °C) increased the DOS values while the impact toughness was decreased. The weld fabricated at 1 kJ/mm of heat input, produced higher DOS, compared to that at 3 kJ/mm. The geometrical location along the weld is shown to influence the DOS; higher values were obtained at the root than at the topside of the weld. Vermicular and columnar microstructure, in addition to the spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation, observed in the root side of the weld appear risky for the impact toughness.

  17. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  18. Novel dual-mode immunomagnetic method for studying reactivation of nerve agent-inhibited butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Abney, Carter W; Knaack, Jennifer L S; Ali, Ahmed A I; Johnson, Rudolph C

    2013-05-20

    A novel immunomagnetic method has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of organophosphorus nerve agent (OPNA) adducts to butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and free OPNAs in serum. This new approach, deemed dual-mode immunomagnetic analysis (Dual-Mode IMA), combines immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and immunomagnetic scavenging (IMSc) and has been used to measure the effectiveness of cholinesterase reactivators on OPNA-inhibited BuChE in serum. BuChE inhibited by the nerve agent VX, uninhibited BuChE, and unbound VX were measured up to 1 h after the addition of oxime reactivators pralidoxime (2-PAM) and obidoxime. IMS experiments consisted of extracting BuChE and VX-BuChE serum adducts using antibutyrylcholinesterase monoclonal antibodies conjugated to protein-G ferromagnetic particles. In a parallel set of experiments using IMSc, BuChE-coated magnetic beads were used to extract free VX from protein-depleted serum. Adducts from both IMS and IMSc were analyzed using a published IMS liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (IMS-LC-MS/MS) protocol, which has also been demonstrated with other OPNAs. By applying this Dual-Mode IMA approach, 2-PAM was observed to be more potent than obidoxime in reactivating VX-adducted BuChE. VX-BuChE peptide concentrations initially measured at 19.7 ± 0.7 ng/mL decreased over 1 h to 10.6 ± 0.6 ng/mL when reactivated with 2-PAM and 14.4 ± 1.2 ng/mL when reactivated with obidoxime. These experiments also show that previously published IMS-LC-MS/MS analyses are compatible with serum treated with oximes. Dual-Mode IMA is the first immunoaffinity method developed for the simultaneous measurement of OPNA adducted BuChE, unadducted BuChE, and free nerve agent in serum and is a promising new tool for studying reactivator effectiveness on cholinesterases inhibited by nerve agents.

  19. Photo-Electrochemical Treatment of Reactive Dyes in Wastewater and Reuse of the Effluent: Method Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Mireia; López-Grimau, Víctor; Gutiérrez-Bouzán, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the efficiency of a photo-electrochemical method to remove color in textile dyeing effluents is discussed. The decolorization of a synthetic effluent containing a bi-functional reactive dye was carried out by applying an electrochemical treatment at different intensities (2 A, 5 A and 10 A), followed by ultraviolet irradiation. The combination of both treatments was optimized. The final percentage of effluent decolorization, the reduction of halogenated organic volatile compound and the total organic carbon removal were the determinant factors in the selection of the best treatment conditions. The optimized method was applied to the treatment of nine simulated dyeing effluents prepared with different reactive dyes in order to compare the behavior of mono, bi, and tri-reactive dyes. Finally, the nine treated effluents were reused in new dyeing processes and the color differences (DECMC (2:1)) with respect to a reference were evaluated. The influence of the effluent organic matter removal on the color differences was also studied. The reuse of the treated effluents provides satisfactory dyeing results, and an important reduction in water consumption and salt discharge is achieved. PMID:28788251

  20. Photo-Electrochemical Treatment of Reactive Dyes in Wastewater and Reuse of the Effluent: Method Optimization.

    PubMed

    Sala, Mireia; López-Grimau, Víctor; Gutiérrez-Bouzán, Carmen

    2014-11-14

    In this work, the efficiency of a photo-electrochemical method to remove color in textile dyeing effluents is discussed. The decolorization of a synthetic effluent containing a bi-functional reactive dye was carried out by applying an electrochemical treatment at different intensities (2 A, 5 A and 10 A), followed by ultraviolet irradiation. The combination of both treatments was optimized. The final percentage of effluent decolorization, the reduction of halogenated organic volatile compound and the total organic carbon removal were the determinant factors in the selection of the best treatment conditions. The optimized method was applied to the treatment of nine simulated dyeing effluents prepared with different reactive dyes in order to compare the behavior of mono, bi, and tri-reactive dyes. Finally, the nine treated effluents were reused in new dyeing processes and the color differences (DECMC (2:1)) with respect to a reference were evaluated. The influence of the effluent organic matter removal on the color differences was also studied. The reuse of the treated effluents provides satisfactory dyeing results, and an important reduction in water consumption and salt discharge is achieved.

  1. Reactivity to a Spouse's Interpersonal Suffering in Late Life Marriage: A Mixed-Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Hannah-Rose; Levy, Becca R.; Keene, Danya E.; Monin, Joan K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine how older adult spouses react to their partners' interpersonal suffering. Method Spouses of individuals with musculoskeletal pain were recorded describing their partners' suffering while their blood pressure (BP) was monitored. After the account, spouses described their distress. Speeches were transcribed and analyzed with Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software and coded for interpersonal content. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted with interpersonal content variables predicting BP and distress. Exploratory qualitative analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti to explore mechanisms behind quantitative results. Results Describing partners' suffering as interpersonal and using social (family) words were associated with higher systolic BP reactivity. Husbands were more likely to describe partners' suffering as interpersonal. Qualitative results suggested shared stressors and bereavement-related distress as potential mechanisms for heightened reactivity to interpersonal suffering. Discussion Spouses' interpersonal suffering may negatively affect both men and women's cardiovascular health, and older husbands may be particularly affected. PMID:25659746

  2. Catalytic and reactive polypeptides and methods for their preparation and use

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic and reactive polypeptides include a binding site specific for a reactant or reactive intermediate involved in a chemical reaction of interest. The polypeptides further include at least one active functionality proximate the binding site, where the active functionality is capable of catalyzing or chemically participating in the chemical reaction in such a way that the reaction rate is enhanced. Methods for preparing the catalytic peptides include chemical synthesis, site-directed mutagenesis of antibody and enzyme genes, covalent attachment of the functionalities through particular amino acid side chains, and the like. This invention was made with Government support under Grant Contract No. AI-24695, awarded by the Department of health and Human Services, and under Grant Contract No. N 00014-87-K-0256, awarded by the Office of Naval Research. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  3. A Simple Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances in Fried Fast Foods.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Fareed

    2016-01-01

    A simple and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) as a marker for lipid peroxidation in fried fast foods. The method uses the reaction of malondialdehyde (MDA) and TBA in the glacial acetic acid medium. The method was precise, sensitive, and highly reproducible for quantitative determination of TBARS. The precision of extractions and analytical procedure was very high as compared to the reported methods. The method was used to determine the TBARS contents in the fried fast foods such as Shami kebab, samosa, fried bread, and potato chips. Shami kebab, samosa, and potato chips have higher amount of TBARS in glacial acetic acid-water extraction system than their corresponding pure glacial acetic acid and vice versa in fried bread samples. The method can successfully be used for the determination of TBARS in other food matrices, especially in quality control of food industries.

  4. Systems and methods for reactive distillation with recirculation of light components

    SciTech Connect

    Stickney, Michael J.; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    2011-07-26

    Systems and methods for producing gas-to-liquids products using reactive distillation are provided. The method for producing gas-to-liquids products can include reacting a feedstock in a column having a distillation zone and a reaction zone to provide a bottoms stream and an overhead stream. A first portion of the overhead stream can be recycled to the column at the top of the reaction zone and second portion of the overhead stream can be recycled to the column at the bottom of the reaction zone.

  5. A simplified method for determining reactive rate parameters for reaction ignition and growth in explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.J.

    1996-07-01

    A simplified method for determining the reactive rate parameters for the ignition and growth model is presented. This simplified ignition and growth (SIG) method consists of only two adjustable parameters, the ignition (I) and growth (G) rate constants. The parameters are determined by iterating these variables in DYNA2D hydrocode simulations of the failure diameter and the gap test sensitivity until the experimental values are reproduced. Examples of four widely different explosives were evaluated using the SIG model. The observed embedded gauge stress-time profiles for these explosives are compared to those calculated by the SIG equation and the results are described.

  6. GUINEVERE experiment: Kinetic analysis of some reactivity measurement methods by deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, G.; Burgio, N.; Carta, M.; Peluso, V.; Fabrizio, V.; Ricci, L.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE experiment (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) is an experimental program in support of the ADS technology presently carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol (Belgium). In the experiment a modified lay-out of the original thermal VENUS critical facility is coupled to an accelerator, built by the French body CNRS in Grenoble, working in both continuous and pulsed mode and delivering 14 MeV neutrons by bombardment of deuterons on a tritium-target. The modified lay-out of the facility consists of a fast subcritical core made of 30% U-235 enriched metallic Uranium in a lead matrix. Several off-line and on-line reactivity measurement techniques will be investigated during the experimental campaign. This report is focused on the simulation by deterministic (ERANOS French code) and Monte Carlo (MCNPX US code) calculations of three reactivity measurement techniques, Slope ({alpha}-fitting), Area-ratio and Source-jerk, applied to a GUINEVERE subcritical configuration (namely SC1). The inferred reactivity, in dollar units, by the Area-ratio method shows an overall agreement between the two deterministic and Monte Carlo computational approaches, whereas the MCNPX Source-jerk results are affected by large uncertainties and allow only partial conclusions about the comparison. Finally, no particular spatial dependence of the results is observed in the case of the GUINEVERE SC1 subcritical configuration. (authors)

  7. Catalytic and reactive polypeptides and methods for their preparation and use

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic and reactive polypeptides include a binding site specific for a reactant or reactive intermediate involved in a chemical reaction of interest. The polypeptides further include at least one active functionality proximate the bi.

  8. Estimation of reactive surface area using a combined method of laboratory analyses and digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin; Kong, Xiang-Zhao; Saar, Martin O.

    2017-04-01

    Fluid-rock interactions play an important role in the engineering processes such as chemical stimulation of enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture, utilization, and storage. However, these interactions highly depend on the accessible reactive surface area of the minerals that are generally poorly constrained for natural geologic samples. In particular, quantifying surface area of each reacting mineral within whole rock samples is challenging due to the heterogeneous distribution of minerals and pore space. In this study, detailed laboratory analyses were performed on sandstone samples from deep geothermal sites in Lithuania. We measure specific surface area of whole rock samples using a gas adsorption method (so-called B.E.T.) with N2 at a temperature of 77.3K. We also quantify their porosity and pore size distribution by a Helium gas pycnometer and a Hg porosimetry, respectively. Rock compositions are determined by a combination of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and quantitative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), which are later geometrically mapped on images of two-dimensional SEM- Backscattered electrons (BSE) with a resolution of 1.2 μm and three-dimensional micro-CT with a resolution of 10.3 μm to produce a digital mineral map for further constraining the accessibility of reactive minerals. Moreover, we attempt to link the whole rock porosity, pore size distribution, and B.E.T. specific surface area with the digital mineral maps. We anticipate these necessary analyses to provide in-depth understanding of fluid sample chemistry from later hydrothermal reactive flow-through experiments on whole rock samples at elevated pressure and temperature.

  9. Organic/inorganic nanocomposites, methods of making, and uses as a permeable reactive barrier

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Stewart, Frederick F.

    2007-05-15

    Nanocomposite materials having a composition including an inorganic constituent, a preformed organic polymer constituent, and a metal ion sequestration constituent are disclosed. The nanocomposites are characterized by being single phase, substantially homogeneous materials wherein the preformed polymer constituent and the inorganic constituent form an interpenetrating network with each other. The inorganic constituent may be an inorganic oxide, such as silicon dioxide, formed by the in situ catalyzed condensation of an inorganic precursor in the presence of the solvated polymer and metal ion sequestration constituent. The polymer constituent may be any hydrophilic polymer capable of forming a type I nanocomposite such as, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and combinations thereof. Nanocomposite materials of the present invention may be used as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate contaminated groundwater. Methods for making nanocomposite materials, PRB systems, and methods of treating groundwater are also disclosed.

  10. COD and color removal of reactive orange 16 dye solution by electrochemical oxidation and adsorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Zuhailie; Ahmad, Wan Yaacob Wan; Yusop, Muhammad Rahimi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2015-09-01

    Degradation of Reactive Orange 16 (RO16) dye was investigated using electrochemical oxidation and adsorption (batch method) using mixture of coconut trunk charcoal-graphite-tin-polyvinyl chloride(PVC). In batch studies for adsorbents pellet and powder form of the charcoal mixture were used. RO16 was chosen as the model dye because of its high resistance towards conventional treatment methods. NaCl and RO16 concentration, treatment duration, weight of electrode and adsorbent and volume of solution were kept constant for both methods. The effectiveness of the treatments were compared and evaluated by percentage of RO16 decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and results indicated that electrochemical oxidation method ables to decolorized RO16 dye up to 98.5% after 20 minutes electrolysis time while pellet and powder in batch method only removed 17.1 and 33.6% of RO16 color respectively. However, only 45.6% of COD can be removed using electrochemical oxidation method while pellet and powder in batch method removed 47.8 and 49.6% of COD respectively. The decolorization and COD removal of RO16 was determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometer (by the changes of absorption spectrum intensity of azo chromophore (-N=N-) at λ=388 and 492.50 nm and Hach spectrophotometer respectively. FTIR was used to determine functional groups present in the coconut trunk charcoal.

  11. Stochastic and deterministic methods for the calculation of small-sample reactivity experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gruel, A.; Leconte, P.

    2011-07-01

    Several calculations methods for the analysis of small-sample reactivity experiments are presented, as their main advantages and drawbacks. A numerical benchmark has been defined for this study consisting in a regular lattice of UO{sub 2} fuel pins, in which the central one is successively poisoned with isotopes of interest (actinides, absorbers, ...). A first method, based on a forward calculation ('eigenvalues difference method'), is presented, using either a deterministic or a stochastic calculation code. A first perturbative method studied is based on the 'Exact Perturbation Theory' (EPT) implemented in the deterministic code APOLLO2.8, and gives consistent results against forward calculations. A second perturbative method, the 'correlated sampling method', implemented in the stochastic calculation code TRIPOLI4.7 is tested. It should be use carefully as it is generally validated against small atomic density changes, but can be useful for conception studies. An 'hybrid method', based on the EPT formalism, using both Monte Carlo and deterministic results is tested, and shows reliable results. (authors)

  12. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON AND SULFUR PRECIPITATING WITHIN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a wall of porous reactive material placed in the path of a dissolved contaminant plume for the purpose of removing contaminants from ground water. Chemical processes within these reactive materials remove both inorganic and organic contamina...

  13. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON AND SULFUR PRECIPITATING WITHIN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a wall of porous reactive material placed in the path of a dissolved contaminant plume for the purpose of removing contaminants from ground water. Chemical processes within these reactive materials remove both inorganic and organic contamina...

  14. Structure-dependent reactivity of Criegee intermediates studied with spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Jr-Min Lin, Jim; Chao, Wen

    2017-08-25

    Criegee intermediates are very reactive carbonyl oxides that are formed in reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons with ozone (ozonolysis). Recently, Criegee intermediates have gained significant attention since a new preparation method has been reported in 2012, which employs the reaction of iodoalkyl radical with molecular oxygen: for instance, CH2I + O2 → CH2OO + I. This new synthesis route can produce Criegee intermediates with a high number density, which allows direct detection of the Criegee intermediate via various spectroscopic tools, including vacuum UV photoionization mass spectrometry, absorption and action spectroscopy in the UV and IR regions, and microwave spectroscopy. Criegee intermediates have been thought to play important roles in atmospheric chemistry, such as in OH radical formation as well as oxidation of atmospheric gases such as SO2, NO2, volatile organic compounds, organic and inorganic acids, and even water. These reactions are relevant to acid rain and aerosol formation. Kinetics data including rate coefficients, product yields and their temperature and pressure dependences are important for understanding and modeling relevant atmospheric chemistry. In fundamental physical chemistry, Criegee intermediates have unique and interesting features, which have been partially revealed through spectroscopic, kinetic, and dynamic investigations. Although previous review articles have discussed Criegee intermediates, new data and knowledge on Criegee intermediates are still being accumulated. In this tutorial review, we have focused on structure-dependent reactivity of Criegee intermediates and various spectroscopic tools that have been utilized to probe the kinetics of Criegee intermediates.

  15. Studies on degradation of reactive textile dyes solution by electrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Kariyajjanavar, Prakash; Jogttappa, Narayana; Nayaka, Yanjerappa Arthoba

    2011-06-15

    The indirect electrochemical degradation of industrial effluents has become an attractive method in recent years. This paper deals with the electrochemical degradation of Novacron Deep Red C-D (NDRCD) and Novacron Orange C-RN (NOCRN) reactive azo dyes from aqueous solution using graphite carbon electrodes. The results indicated that initial pH, current density and supporting electrolytes were played an important role in the degradation of dyes. Electrochemical behavior of reactive azo dyes has been studied with cyclic voltammetry in acidic medium using pencil graphite as working electrode. The potentials selected for the two dyes were in the range +1.0 to -0.4V and +0.5 to -0.2V, respectively. The CV, UV-Vis and chemical oxygen demand (COD) studies were selected to evaluate the degradation efficiency. The maximum colour removal efficiency of 99% and 97% and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 88% and 82% could be achieved for CDRCD and COCRN, respectively at 7 g L(-1) of NaCl concentration. The LC-MS study revealed the degradation of both the dyes and confirmed that the azo groups and aromatic rings were destroyed. The results revealed the suitability of the present process for the effective degradation of dye effluents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Validation of an immunoturbidimetric method for determination of porcine serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Saco, Yolanda; Fraile, Lorenzo; Giménez, Mercè; Canalias, Francesca; Bassols, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Measurement of porcine C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum is an important tool for monitoring health and welfare in pigs. In this study, an immunoturbidimetric method from Olympus System Reagent (OSR 6147) used to measure human CRP in serum that employ a human traceable calibrator has been evaluated in porcine serum samples. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision were lower than that obtained with the porcine-specific commercially available ELISA. The expected difference in serum CRP between healthy and non-healthy pigs was detected. CRP values measured by the immunoturbidimetric method showed a good correlation with those obtained by ELISA, although differences in absolute CRP values were observed. When an in-house porcine standard was used a better agreement was obtained. In conclusion, the immunoturbidimetric method of Olympus can be used with porcine samples. The easier use of this method should facilitate the implementation of CRP serum determination for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in swine medicine. The results emphasize the need to establish species-specific standard and methods to decrease inter-laboratory discrepancies.

  17. Method for atmospheric pressure reactive atom plasma processing for surface modification

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Jeffrey W.

    2009-09-22

    Reactive atom plasma processing can be used to shape, polish, planarize and clean the surfaces of difficult materials with minimal subsurface damage. The apparatus and methods use a plasma torch, such as a conventional ICP torch. The workpiece and plasma torch are moved with respect to each other, whether by translating and/or rotating the workpiece, the plasma, or both. The plasma discharge from the torch can be used to shape, planarize, polish, and/or clean the surface of the workpiece, as well as to thin the workpiece. The processing may cause minimal or no damage to the workpiece underneath the surface, and may involve removing material from the surface of the workpiece.

  18. Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system

    DOEpatents

    Kong, P.C.

    1997-05-06

    A method is described for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap there between. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition. 6 figs.

  19. Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.

    1997-01-01

    A method for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap therebetween. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition.

  20. Oxidation of glycosaminoglycans by free radicals and reactive oxidative species: A review of investigative methods.

    PubMed

    Parsons, B J

    2015-05-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, in particular hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM plays a key role in the regulation of cellular behaviour and alterations to it can modulate both the development of human diseases as well as controlling normal biochemical processes such as cell signalling and pro-inflammatory responses. For these reasons, in vitro fragmentation studies of glycosaminoglycans by free radicals and oxidative species are seen to be relevant to the understanding of in vivo studies of damage to the ECM. A wide range of investigative techniques have therefore been applied to gain insights into the relative fragmentation effects of several reactive oxidative species with the ultimate goal of determining mechanisms of fragmentation at the molecular level. These methods are reviewed here.

  1. An EEGLAB plugin to analyze individual EEG alpha rhythms using the "channel reactivity-based method".

    PubMed

    Goljahani, A; Bisiacchi, P; Sparacino, G

    2014-03-01

    A recent paper [1] proposed a new technique, termed the channel reactivity-based method (CRB), for characterizing EEG alpha rhythms using individual (IAFs) and channel (CAFs) alpha frequencies. These frequencies were obtained by identifying the frequencies at which the power of the alpha rhythms decreases. In the present study, we present a graphical interactive toolbox that can be plugged into the popular open source environment EEGLAB, making it easy to use CRB. In particular, we illustrate the major functionalities of the software and discuss the advantages of this toolbox for common EEG investigations. The CRB analysis plugin, along with extended documentation and the sample dataset utilized in this study, is freely available on the web at http://bio.dei.unipd.it/crb/.

  2. Nanoscale and macroscale aluminum nitride deposition via reactive magnetron sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanghai

    The growth of group III nitrides is receiving a great deal of attention due to their potential as materials for optoelectronic devices in the blue to ultraviolet spectral range. This dissertation is primarily focused on deposition of aluminum nitride thin films on both nanofibers and macroscale silicon substrates via reactive magnetron sputtering. The objectives include investigating the feasibility of coating nanofibers to prepare high quality (smooth and crystalline) nanotubes, nanofiber hetero structures and using buffer layers to improve the quality of macroscale AlN thin films. To satisfy the need of nanoscale semiconductor materials, deposition of AlN on poly (meta-phenylene isophthalamide) MPD-I nano-fiber (template) was investigated via reactive magnetron sputtering. The electrospun high-temperature nanofibers with uniform dimensions were heated up to 300°C or higher. The coatings on the fibers were continuous and their morphology and crystal structure (either hexagonal wurtzite structure or cubic zinc-blende structure) were controlled by changing the deposition conditions. After removing the fiber core with organic solvent or by pyrolysis, AlN nanotubes (hollow structures) with inner diameter of 50--100 nm were achieved. As the nanoscale building blocks, nanoscale semiconductor heterostructures with modulated composition can facilitate the generation of devices with various functions. In this work, SiO2-AlN core-shell nanofiber heterostructures with SiO2 core and AlN shell were created by electro-spinning and reactive magnetron sputtering methods. Also the AlN coating (shell) was designed with different morphologies and crystalline properties by controlling the deposition conditions. The critical operating parameters for the formation of different morphologies of AlN shells were investigated. In practice, AlN thin film materials are still widely used for microelectronic and optoelectronic devices. To investigate and develop semiconducting AlN films, the

  3. Detailed characterizations of the new Mines Douai comparative reactivity method instrument via laboratory experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, V.; Hansen, R. F.; Locoge, N.; Stevens, P. S.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-08-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is an important oxidant in the troposphere, which controls the lifetime of most air quality- and climate-related trace gases. However, there are still uncertainties concerning its atmospheric budget, and integrated measurements of OH sinks have been valuable to improve this aspect. Among the analytical tools used for measuring total OH reactivity in ambient air, the comparative reactivity method (CRM) is spreading rapidly in the atmospheric community. However, measurement artifacts have been highlighted for this technique, and additional work is needed to fully characterize them. In this study, we present the new Mines Douai CRM instrument, with an emphasis on the corrections that need to be applied to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity. Measurement artifacts identified in the literature have been investigated, including (1) a correction for a change in relative humidity between the measurement steps leading to different OH levels, (2) the formation of spurious OH in the sampling reactor when hydroperoxy radicals (HO2) react with nitrogen monoxide (NO), (3) not operating the CRM under pseudo-first-order kinetics, and (4) the dilution of ambient air inside the reactor. The dependences of these artifacts on various measurable parameters, such as the pyrrole-to-OH ratio and the bimolecular reaction rate constants of ambient trace gases with OH, have also been studied. Based on these observations, parameterizations are proposed to correct ambient OH reactivity measurements. On average, corrections of 5.2 ± 3.2, 9.2 ± 15.7, and 8.5 ± 5.8 s-1 were respectively observed for (1), (2) and (3) during a field campaign performed in Dunkirk, France (summer 2014). Numerical simulations have been performed using a box model to check whether experimental observations mentioned above are consistent with our understanding of the chemistry occurring in the CRM reactor. Two different chemical mechanisms have been shown to reproduce the magnitude

  4. In situ simple method for measuring size and density of nanoparticles in reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kita, Makoto; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Watanabe, Yukio

    2006-04-15

    A laser-light-scattering (LLS) method for measuring the size and density of nanoparticles generated in reactive plasmas has been developed. The size and density of the nanoparticles are determined from their thermal coagulation that takes place after turning off the discharge. The measurable size and density range of the LLS method is n{sub p} x 10{sup 13} (m{sup -3/2})xd{sub p}{sup -5/2}L{sup -2}n{sub g}{sup -1}, where n{sub p}, d{sub p}, L, and n{sub g} are the density, size, and diffusion length of the nanoparticles, and the density of a background gas, respectively. The method has been demonstrated by measurement of the size and density of nanoparticles formed by the radio-frequency discharge of dimethyldimethoxysilane Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(OCH{sub 3}){sub 2} diluted with Ar. Using a simple optical setup for the LLS measurement, nanoparticles are detected down to {approx_equal}1 nm in size when they are generated at a density of {approx_equal}10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The developed method is widely applicable to other systems in which thermal coagulation takes place.

  5. Dissolved reactive manganese at pelagic redoxclines (part I): A method for determination based on field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnetger, Bernhard; Dellwig, Olaf

    2012-02-01

    Experiments with water samples from the redoxclines of the Black Sea and the Baltic Sea identified a fraction of dissolved Mn which is completely oxidised to solid MnOx within less than 48 h at laboratory conditions. Disproportionation of this dissolved reactive Mn (dMnreact) into Mn (II) and Mn (IV) did not occur. Our data suggest that bacteria using oxygen are responsible for the fast oxidation of dMnreact. The operational definition of dMnreact is a Mn phase that passes a 0.45 μm filter, but can be separated from remaining dissolved Mn (II) by filtration 48 h after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The application of this method to water samples from the redoxcline of the Black Sea reveals dMnreact profiles comparable to published Mn (III) profiles analysed by polarography thus identifying Mn (III) as the dominating constituent of dMnreact. As the degree of autocatalytic oxidation of dissolved Mn (II) by readily produced MnOx and microbial Mn (II) oxidation within the applied oxidation period is unknown, dMnreact is at least a semi-quantitative measure of dissolved Mn (III). Furthermore, the present method helps to assess the full potential for oxidation of dissolved Mn within aquatic ecosystems. This method has the advantage that sample preparation can be easily done on site, followed by analysis of dissolved Mn by conventional methods.

  6. Peptide reactivity assay using spectrophotometric method for high-throughput screening of skin sensitization potential of chemical haptens.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun Hyeok; An, Susun; Shin, Kyeho; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2013-02-01

    Haptens must react with cellular proteins to be recognized by antigen presenting cells. Therefore, monitoring reactivity of chemicals with peptide/protein has been considered an in vitro skin sensitization testing method. The reactivity of peptides with chemicals (peptide reactivity) has usually been monitored by chromatographic methods like HPLC or LC/MS, which are robust tools for monitoring common chemical reactions but are rather expensive and time consuming. Here, we examined the possibility of using spectrophotometric methods to monitor peptide reactivity. Two synthetic peptides, Ac-RWAACAA and Ac-RWAAKAA, were reacted with 48 chemicals (34 sensitizers and 14 non-sensitizers). Peptide reactivity was measured by monitoring unreacted peptides with UV-Vis spectrophotometer using 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid as a detection reagent for the free thiol group of cysteine-containing peptide or fluorometer using fluorescamine™ as a detection reagent for the free amine group of lysine-containing peptide. Chemicals were categorized as sensitizers when they induced more than 10% depletion of cysteine-containing peptide or 20% depletion of lysine-containing peptide. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of this method were 82.4%, 85.7%, and 83.3%, respectively. These results demonstrate that spectrophotometric methods can be easy, fast, and high-throughput screening tools for the prediction of the skin sensitization potential of chemical haptens.

  7. Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores.

    PubMed

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Svensson, Anders; Kristensen, Magnus Elleskov L; Tibuleac, Catalin; Bigler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for all living organisms. Phosphorus is often present in nature as the soluble phosphate ion PO4(3-) and has biological, terrestrial, and marine emission sources. Thus PO4(3-) detected in ice cores has the potential to be an important tracer for biological activity in the past. In this study a continuous and highly sensitive absorption method for detection of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in ice cores has been developed using a molybdate reagent and a 2-m liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC). DRP is the soluble form of the nutrient phosphorus, which reacts with molybdate. The method was optimized to meet the low concentrations of DRP in Greenland ice, with a depth resolution of approximately 2 cm and an analytical uncertainty of 1.1 nM (0.1 ppb) PO4(3-). The method has been applied to segments of a shallow firn core from Northeast Greenland, indicating a mean concentration level of 2.74 nM (0.26 ppb) PO4(3-) for the period 1930-2005 with a standard deviation of 1.37 nM (0.13 ppb) PO4(3-) and values reaching as high as 10.52 nM (1 ppb) PO4(3-). Similar levels were detected for the period 1771-1823. Based on impurity abundances, dust and biogenic particles were found to be the most likely sources of DRP deposited in Northeast Greenland.

  8. Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume Method for Advection-Diffusion Equations Subject to Heterogeneous Reactive Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2016-10-13

    We present a hybrid scheme for the coupling of macro and microscale continuum models for reactive contaminant transport in fractured and porous media. The transport model considered is the advection-dispersion equation, subject to linear heterogeneous reactive boundary conditions. The Multiscale Finite Volume method (MsFV) is employed to define an approximation to the microscale concentration field defined in terms of macroscopic or \\emph{global} degrees of freedom, together with local interpolator and corrector functions capturing microscopic spatial variability. The macroscopic mass balance relations for the MsFV global degrees of freedom are coupled with the macroscopic model, resulting in a global problem for the simultaneous time-stepping of all macroscopic degrees of freedom throughout the domain. In order to perform the hybrid coupling, the micro and macroscale models are applied over overlapping subdomains of the simulation domain, with the overlap denoted as the handshake subdomain $\\Omega^{hs}$, over which continuity of concentration and transport fluxes between models is enforced. Continuity of concentration is enforced by posing a restriction relation between models over $\\Omega^{hs}$. Continuity of fluxes is enforced by prolongating the macroscopic model fluxes across the boundary of $\\Omega^{hs}$ to microscopic resolution. The microscopic interpolator and corrector functions are solutions to local microscopic advection-diffusion problems decoupled from the global degrees of freedom and from each other by virtue of the MsFV decoupling ansatz. The error introduced by the decoupling ansatz is reduced iteratively by the preconditioned GMRES algorithm, with the hybrid MsFV operator serving as the preconditioner.

  9. Hybrid finite-volume/transported PDF method for the simulation of turbulent reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Venkatramanan

    A novel computational scheme is formulated for simulating turbulent reactive flows in complex geometries with detailed chemical kinetics. A Probability Density Function (PDF) based method that handles the scalar transport equation is coupled with an existing Finite Volume (FV) Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver. The PDF formulation leads to closed chemical source terms and facilitates the use of detailed chemical mechanisms without approximations. The particle-based PDF scheme is modified to handle complex geometries and grid structures. Grid-independent particle evolution schemes that scale linearly with the problem size are implemented in the Monte-Carlo PDF solver. A novel algorithm, in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) is employed to ensure tractability of complex chemistry involving a multitude of species. Several non-reacting test cases are performed to ascertain the efficiency and accuracy of the method. Simulation results from a turbulent jet-diffusion flame case are compared against experimental data. The effect of micromixing model, turbulence model and reaction scheme on flame predictions are discussed extensively. Finally, the method is used to analyze the Dow Chlorination Reactor. Detailed kinetics involving 37 species and 158 reactions as well as a reduced form with 16 species and 21 reactions are used. The effect of inlet configuration on reactor behavior and product distribution is analyzed. Plant-scale reactors exhibit quenching phenomena that cannot be reproduced by conventional simulation methods. The FV-PDF method predicts quenching accurately and provides insight into the dynamics of the reactor near extinction. The accuracy of the fractional time-stepping technique in discussed in the context of apparent multiple-steady states observed in a non-premixed feed configuration of the chlorination reactor.

  10. Deposition of titanium nitride layers by electric arc - Reactive plasma spraying method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Pascu, Doru Romulus

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a ceramic material which possesses high mechanical properties, being often used in order to cover cutting tools, thus increasing their lifetime, and also for covering components which are working in corrosive environments. The paper presents the experimental results on deposition of titanium nitride coatings by a new combined method (reactive plasma spraying and electric arc thermal spraying). In this way the advantages of each method in part are combined, obtaining improved quality coatings in the same time achieving high productivity. Commercially pure titanium wire and C45 steel as substrate were used for experiments. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposited coatings are composed of titanium nitride (TiN, Ti2N) and small amounts of Ti3O. The microstructure of the deposited layers, investigated both by optical and scanning electron microscopy, shows that the coatings are dense, compact, without cracks and with low porosity. Vickers microhardness of the coatings presents maximum values of 912 HV0.1. The corrosion tests in 3%NaCl solution show that the deposited layers have a high corrosion resistance compared to unalloyed steel substrate.

  11. Microstructural evolution and response to double-loop reactivation testing of heat-treated pH 13-8 Mo martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, W.R.; Cieslak, M.J.; Hills, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test was used to investigate the intergranular and interlath corrosion susceptibility of pH 13-8 Mo as a function of heat treatment. Degree of sensitization was measured to the ratio of the peak current on a reverse (reactivation) scan to that on the forward anodic scan. Corrosion morphology was characterized by SEM, and microstructure by AEM. PH 13-8 Mo in the as-received condition was not sensitized. Precipitation-strengthening to the H925 temper caused susceptibility to intergranular corrosion, and averaging at H1150 caused susceptibility to interlath corrosion. Corrosion susceptibility was most likely caused by a classic Cr-depletion mechanism. 4 refs., 3 figs. (CS)

  12. Implementation of reverse flotation method to reduce reactive and non-reactive silica in bauxite ore from West Kalimantan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulandari, Winny; Purwasasmita, Mubiar; Sanwani, Edy; Pixelina, Adinda Asri; Maulidan, Agus

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a study that implements reverse flotation method to separate silica from West Kalimantan bauxite ores. The study is aimed to find the good process condition to obtain low-silica bauxite as the feed for the Bayer process. The experiments were carried out in a 1 L of flotation cell tank. Dodecylamine was used as the collector, starch as the depressant, and MIBC as the frother. The varied parameters were solid content to solution (15-30% w/w), and pH (6 - 10). The results of XRF of products show that in all reverse flotation experiments, the ratio of alumina to silica (Al/Si) are increased from 7 up to 14. The increase of solid percentage in the flotation gives a good result for Al/Si ratio as well as alumina and silica recovery in concentrate, with 30% w/w solid percentage to solution increases Al/Si ratio to 14.38, with silica recovery of 20%. The good separation with variation of depressants is obtained with depressant concentration of 400 g/ton bauxite, with Al/Si ratio in concentrate 15 and ratio in tailing 7. For the pH variation, the good condition is obtained at pH 8, while for collector concentration, the good condition is obtained at 200 g/ton bauxite. XRD analysis of the feed indicates that bauxite ore consists of gibbsite, diaspore, kaolinite, halloysite, quartz, boehmite, hematite and rutile. It is found that the concentrate has similar minerals, but halloysite became very minor or classified as a trace.

  13. Two-Relaxation-Time Lattice Boltzmann Method and its Application to Advective-Diffusive-Reactive Transport

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Zhifeng; Yang, Xiaofan; Li, Siliang; ...

    2017-09-05

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) based on single-relaxation-time (SRT) or multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operators is widely used in simulating flow and transport phenomena. The LBM based on two-relaxation-time (TRT) collision operators possesses strengths from the SRT and MRT LBMs, such as its simple implementation and good numerical stability, although tedious mathematical derivations and presentations of the TRT LBM hinder its application to a broad range of flow and transport phenomena. This paper describes the TRT LBM clearly and provides a pseudocode for easy implementation. Various transport phenomena were simulated using the TRT LBM to illustrate its applications in subsurface environments.more » These phenomena include advection-diffusion in uniform flow, Taylor dispersion in a pipe, solute transport in a packed column, reactive transport in uniform flow, and bacterial chemotaxis in porous media. Finally, the TRT LBM demonstrated good numerical performance in terms of accuracy and stability in predicting these transport phenomena. Therefore, the TRT LBM is a powerful tool to simulate various geophysical and biogeochemical processes in subsurface environments.« less

  14. Chemical introduction of reactive thiols into a viral nanoscaffold: a method that avoids virus aggregation.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Nicole F; Evans, David J; Lomonossoff, George P

    2007-07-09

    The use of viral nanoparticles (VNPs) as building blocks for material fabrication has received particular attention in recent years. In earlier studies we showed the applicability of native gel electrophoresis in an agarose matrix as a useful method for the characterization of chemically modified VNPs. Here, we extend these studies and analyze the observed band pattern of intact Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) VNPs in agarose gels and show the applicability of native agarose gels for monitoring interparticle linkage of thiol-containing CPMV mutant particles. In addition, we report a protocol that allows the introduction of acetate-protected thiols to CPMV by means of a chemical reaction (rather than genetic modification). The advantage of this approach is that, by incorporating protected thiol groups, the formation of disulfide bonds leading to interparticle linkage is prevented. The resulting thiol-modified CPMV-SH(n) particles are stable, and following deprotection, the introduced thiols are reactive and can be labeled with thiol-selective reagents. They therefore provide a useful additional building block in the CPMV toolbox.

  15. A probabilistic method for evaluating reactivity feedbacks and its application to EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    The probability that reactivity feedbacks fail to prevent damage is computed by propagating data and modeling uncertainties through transient calculations, with these uncertainties being constrained by experimental evidence. Screening processes are used to identify the most important parameters and accident initiators. The response surface method is used to facilitate the error propagation and a Monte Carlo rejection technique is used to force the parameter variations to be consistent with the observed distribution of experimental quantities. The reliability of the failure probability estimates is evaluated. This process is applied to ATWS events in the PRA for the EBR-II reactor. The loss-of-normal-power (LONP), loss-of-flow and transient overpower accidents without scram were found to warrant detailed analysis and a complete analysis has been made for the first of these. Six parameters are primarily responsible for the LONP outcome variations. The conditional probability of minor core damage from LONP without scram is 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}2}. The uncertainty in this estimate is a factor of 2. This damage estimate would be an order of magnitude higher if experimental information about feedbacks in EBR-II was not used. the conditional probability of major core damage from LONP without scram is <10{sup {minus}6}. 20 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Review of UV spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrophoretic methods for the cholinesterase reactivating antidote pralidoxime (2-PAM).

    PubMed

    John, Harald; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Pralidoxime (2-PAM) belongs to the class of monopyridinium oximes with reactivating potency on cholinesterases inhibited by phosphylating organophosphorus compounds (OPC), for example, pesticides and nerve agents. 2-PAM represents an established antidote for the therapy of anticholinesterase poisoning since the late 1950s. Quite high therapeutic concentrations in human plasma (about 13 µg/ml) lead to concentrations in urine being about 100 times higher allowing the use of less sensitive analytical techniques that were used especially in the early years after 2-PAM was introduced. In this time (mid-1950s until the end of the 1970s) 2-PAM was most often analyzed by either paper chromatography or simple UV spectroscopic techniques omitting any sample separation step. These methods were displaced completely after the establishment of column liquid chromatography in the early 1980s. Since then, diverse techniques including cation exchange, size-exclusion, reversed-phase, and ligand-exchange chromatography have been introduced. Today, the most popular method for 2-PAM quantification is ion pair chromatography often combined with UV detection representing more than 50% of all column chromatographic procedures published. Furthermore, electrophoretic approaches by paper and capillary zone electrophoresis have been successfully used but are seldom applied. This review provides a commentary and exhaustive summary of analytical techniques applied to detect 2-PAM in pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples to characterize stability and pharmacokinetics as well as decomposition and biotransformation products. Separation techniques as well as diverse detectors are discussed in appropriate detail allowing comparison of individual preferences and limitations. In addition, novel data on mass spectrometric fragmentation of 2-PAM are provided.

  17. New chemical-DSMC method in numerical simulation of axisymmetric rarefied reactive flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, Ramin; Kamali Moghadam, Ramin; Mani, Mahmoud

    2017-04-01

    The modified quantum kinetic (MQK) chemical reaction model introduced by Zakeri et al. is developed for applicable cases in axisymmetric reactive rarefied gas flows using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Although, the MQK chemical model uses some modifications in the quantum kinetic (QK) method, it also employs the general soft sphere collision model and Stockmayer potential function to properly select the collision pairs in the DSMC algorithm and capture both the attraction and repulsion intermolecular forces in rarefied gas flows. For assessment of the presented model in the simulation of more complex and applicable reacting flows, first, the air dissociation is studied in a single cell for equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The MQK results agree well with the analytical and experimental data and they accurately predict the characteristics of the rarefied flowfield with chemical reaction. To investigate accuracy of the MQK chemical model in the simulation of the axisymmetric flow, air dissociation is also assessed in an axial hypersonic flow around two geometries, the sphere as a benchmark case and the blunt body (STS-2) as an applicable test case. The computed results including the transient, rotational and vibrational temperatures, species concentration in the stagnation line, and also the heat flux and pressure coefficient on the surface are compared with those of the other chemical methods like the QK and total collision energy (TCE) models and available analytical and experimental data. Generally, the MQK chemical model properly simulates the chemical reactions and predicts flowfield characteristics more accurate rather than the typical QK model. Although in some cases, results of the MQK approaches match with those of the TCE method, the main point is that the MQK does not need any experimental data or unrealistic assumption of specular boundary condition as used in the TCE method. Another advantage of the MQK model is the

  18. An easy method for the determination of active concentrations of cholinesterase reactivators in blood samples: Application to the efficacy assessment of non quaternary reactivators compared to HI-6 and pralidoxime in VX-poisoned mice.

    PubMed

    Calas, André-Guilhem; Dias, José; Rousseau, Catherine; Arboléas, Mélanie; Touvrey-Loiodice, Mélanie; Mercey, Guillaume; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Nachon, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents, like VX, are highly toxic due to their strong inhibition potency against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). AChE inhibited by VX can be reactivated using powerful nucleophilic molecules, most commonly oximes, which are one major component of the emergency treatment in case of nerve agent intoxication. We present here a comparative in vivo study on Swiss mice of four reactivators: HI-6, pralidoxime and two uncharged derivatives of 3-hydroxy-2-pyridinaldoxime that should more easily cross the blood-brain barrier and display a significant central nervous system activity. The reactivability kinetic profile of the oximes is established following intraperitoneal injection in healthy mice, using an original and fast enzymatic method based on the reactivation potential of oxime-containing plasma samples. HI-6 displays the highest reactivation potential whatever the conditions, followed by pralidoxime and the two non quaternary reactivators at the dose of 50 mg/kg bw. But these three last reactivators display equivalent reactivation potential at the same dose of 100 μmol/kg bw. Maximal reactivation potential closely correlates to surviving test results of VX intoxicated mice.

  19. 3D-QSPR Method of Computational Technique Applied on Red Reactive Dyes by Using CoMFA Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Uzma; Rashid, Sitara; Ali, S. Ishrat; Parveen, Rasheeda; Zaheer-ul-Haq; Ambreen, Nida; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Perveen, Shahnaz; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose fiber is a tremendous natural resource that has broad application in various productions including the textile industry. The dyes, which are commonly used for cellulose printing, are “reactive dyes” because of their high wet fastness and brilliant colors. The interaction of various dyes with the cellulose fiber depends upon the physiochemical properties that are governed by specific features of the dye molecule. The binding pattern of the reactive dye with cellulose fiber is called the ligand-receptor concept. In the current study, the three dimensional quantitative structure property relationship (3D-QSPR) technique was applied to understand the red reactive dyes interactions with the cellulose by the Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) method. This method was successfully utilized to predict a reliable model. The predicted model gives satisfactory statistical results and in the light of these, it was further analyzed. Additionally, the graphical outcomes (contour maps) help us to understand the modification pattern and to correlate the structural changes with respect to the absorptivity. Furthermore, the final selected model has potential to assist in understanding the charachteristics of the external test set. The study could be helpful to design new reactive dyes with better affinity and selectivity for the cellulose fiber. PMID:22272108

  20. 3D-QSPR method of computational technique applied on red reactive dyes by using CoMFA strategy.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Uzma; Rashid, Sitara; Ali, S Ishrat; Parveen, Rasheeda; Zaheer-Ul-Haq; Ambreen, Nida; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Perveen, Shahnaz; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose fiber is a tremendous natural resource that has broad application in various productions including the textile industry. The dyes, which are commonly used for cellulose printing, are "reactive dyes" because of their high wet fastness and brilliant colors. The interaction of various dyes with the cellulose fiber depends upon the physiochemical properties that are governed by specific features of the dye molecule. The binding pattern of the reactive dye with cellulose fiber is called the ligand-receptor concept. In the current study, the three dimensional quantitative structure property relationship (3D-QSPR) technique was applied to understand the red reactive dyes interactions with the cellulose by the Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) method. This method was successfully utilized to predict a reliable model. The predicted model gives satisfactory statistical results and in the light of these, it was further analyzed. Additionally, the graphical outcomes (contour maps) help us to understand the modification pattern and to correlate the structural changes with respect to the absorptivity. Furthermore, the final selected model has potential to assist in understanding the characteristics of the external test set. The study could be helpful to design new reactive dyes with better affinity and selectivity for the cellulose fiber.

  1. Development and application of a sampling method for the determination of reactive halogen species in volcanic gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Liotta, Marcello; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2017-08-29

    Volcanoes release large amounts of reactive trace gases including sulfur and halogen-containing species into the atmosphere. The knowledge of halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes can deliver information about subsurface processes and is relevant for the understanding of the impact of volcanoes on atmospheric chemistry. In this study, a gas diffusion denuder sampling method using 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB)-coated glass tubes for the in situ derivatization of reactive halogen species (RHS) was characterized by a series of laboratory experiments. The coating proved to be applicable to collect selectively gaseous bromine species with oxidation states (OS) of +1 or 0 (such as Br2, BrCl, HOBr, BrO, and BrONO2) while being unreactive to HBr (OS -1). The reaction of 1,3,5-TMB with reactive bromine species forms 1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB-other halogens give corresponding derivatives. Solvent elution of the derivatives followed by analysis with GC-MS results in absolute detection limits of a few nanograms for Br2, Cl2, and I2. In 2015, the technique was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna (Italy) measuring reactive bromine mixing ratios between 0.8 and 7.0 ppbv. Total bromine mixing ratios between 4.7 and 27.5 ppbv were derived from alkaline trap samples, simultaneously taken by a Raschig tube and analyzed with IC and ICP-MS. This leads to the first results of the reactive bromine contribution to total bromine in volcanic emissions, spanning over a range between 12% (±1) and 36% (±2). Our finding is in an agreement with previous model studies, which imply values <44% for plume ages <1 min, which is consistent with the assumed plume age at the sampling sites. Graphical abstract Illustration of the measurement procedure for the determination of reactive halogen species in volcanic plumes.

  2. Reactive shock phenomena in condensed materials: Formulation of the problem and method of solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirguis, R.; Oran, E. S.

    1983-12-01

    A reactive shock simulation model used to study the formation and propagation of shocks and detonations in condensed phase materials is described. Two test cases are given: (1) laser initiation of a shock wave propagating through water, and (2) the development of a detonation front from a hot spot in liquid nitromethane.

  3. Principal components analysis as a de-noising method applied to laser Doppler reactive hyperemia signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, C.; Humeau, A.; Abraham, P.; L'Huillier, J. P.

    2005-08-01

    Reactive hyperemia signals obtained with laser Doppler flowmetry are currently used to diagnose peripheral arterial occlusive diseases (PAOD). De-noising of such signals could lead to improved diagnoses. For this purpose, the principal components analysis is applied to signals acquired on PAOD and healthy subjects.

  4. Development and application of a sampling method for the determination of reactive halogen species in volcanic gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Liotta, Marcello; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes are a potential large source of several reactive atmospheric trace gases including sulfur and halogen containing species. Besides the importance for atmospheric chemistry, the detailed knowledge of halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes can help to get insights into subsurface processes. In this study a gas diffusion denuder sampling method, using a 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB) coating for the derivatization of reactive halogen species (RHS), was characterized by dilution chamber experiments. The coating proved to be suitable to collect selectively gaseous bromine species with oxidation states (OS) of +1 or 0 (such as Br2, BrCl, BrO(H) and BrONO2), while being ignorant to HBr (OS -1). The reaction of 1,3,5-TMB with reactive bromine species gives 1-bromo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB) - other halogens give corresponding products. Solvent elution of the derivatized analytes and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography mass spectrometry gives detection limits of 10 ng or less for Br2, Cl2, and I2. In 2015 the method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna (Italy) giving reactive bromine mixing ratios from 0.8 ppbv to 7.0 ppbv. Total bromine mixing ratios of 4.7 ppbv to 27.5 ppbv were obtained by simultaneous alkaline trap sampling (by a Raschig-tube) followed by analysis with ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This leads to the first results of in-situ measured reactive bromine to total bromine ratios, spanning a range between 12±1 % and 36±2 %. Our finding is in an agreement with previous model studies, which imply values < 44 % for plume ages < 1 minute, which is consistent with the assumed plume age at the sampling sites.

  5. A method for determining reactive hydroxyl groups in natural fibers: application to ramie fiber and its modification.

    PubMed

    He, Liping; Li, Xinqi; Li, Wenjun; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhou, Haiye

    2012-02-01

    The hydrophilic features of natural fibers (NFs) hinder the widespread application of natural fiber/polymer composites due to the hydroxyl groups (-OH) presented in the cellulose molecule. Detecting reactive hydroxyl groups in NFs is very important for optimizing the modification process of natural fibers. This paper proposes a simple and practical methodology to measure reactive hydroxyl groups in NFs using a isocyanate group, a method we term the isocyanate group back titration (IBT) method. Application of the IBT method to ramie fiber with toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and hexadecanol indicated that the measured value of reactive hydroxyl groups was about 150 mg KOH/g, which was less than the theoretical value of hydroxyl groups in the ramie fiber being tested. The FTIR analysis revealed that the TDI and hexadecanol were grafted onto the surface of the ramie fiber, leading the modified ramie fiber to be hydrophobic. Thus, the IBT method is also useful for modifying the surface properties of NFs and improving their compatibility with polymers, and finally leading to good mechanical properties of NF/polymer composites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Implementation of an original approach on the Mines-Douai Comparative Reactivity Method (MD-CRM) instrument to identify part of the missing OH reactivity at an urban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, S.; Michoud, V.; Leonardis, T.; Riffault, V.; Zhang, S.; Locoge, N.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the large number of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) expected in the atmosphere (104-105) (Goldstein and Galbally, ES&T, 2007), exhaustive measurements of VOCs appear to be currently unfeasible using common analytical techniques. In this context, measurements of the total sink of OH, referred as total OH reactivity, can provide a critical test to assess the completeness of trace gas measurements during field campaigns. This can be done by comparing the measured total OH reactivity to values calculated from trace gas measurements. Indeed, large discrepancies are usually found between measured and calculated OH reactivity values revealing the presence of important unmeasured reactive species, which have yet to be identified. A Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) instrument has been setup at Mines Douai to allow sequential measurements of VOCs and OH reactivity using the same Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer. This approach aims at identifying unmeasured reactive VOCs based on a method proposed by Kato et al. (Atmos. Environ., 2011), taking advantage of VOC oxidations occurring in the CRM sampling reactor. MD-CRM has been deployed at an urban site in Dunkirk (France) during July 2014 to test this new approach. During this campaign, a large fraction of the OH reactivity was not explained by collocated measurements of trace gases (67% on average). In this presentation, we will first describe the approach that was implemented in the CRM instrument to identify part of the observed missing OH reactivity and we will then discuss the OH reactivity budget regarding the origin of air masses reaching the measurement site.

  7. Practical and predictive bioinformatics methods for the identification of potentially cross-reactive protein matches.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Richard E

    2006-07-01

    A bioinformatics comparison of proteins introduced into food crops through genetic engineering provides a mechanism to identify those proteins that may present an increased risk of allergic reactions for individuals with existing allergies. The goal is to identify proteins that are known to be allergens or are so similar to an allergen that they may induce allergic cross-reactions. Three comparative approaches have traditionally been used, or considered for safety evaluations. One identifies any short (6-8) amino acid segment of the protein that exactly matches a known allergen sequence. The second is an overall primary sequence comparison using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) or FASTA to find matches of greater than 35% identity over 80 amino acids. The third is based on 3-D prediction programs to identify 3-D similarities that might predict potential cross-reactivity. The utility of each of these approaches was debated in the bioinformatics workshop. The consensus agreement from the expert workshop participants was that the short-segment match (e. g., 6-8 amino acids) provides an unacceptably high rate of false positive matches and an uncertain rate of true positive matches, and was not particularly useful for an allergenicity evaluation performed in the context of comprehensive safety evaluation. There was no consensus regarding the most appropriate bioinformatics method, an acceptable scoring criteria for triggering closer examination subsequent to a positive match, or an acceptable scoring mechanism for ranking the utility of the various 3-D approaches that were discussed during the workshop. However, the general consensus was that the most practical approach at this time is to evaluate primary sequence identities to known allergens using either FASTA or BLAST. While there was good agreement that identities of greater than 35% over 80 or more amino acids (recommended by Codex in 2003) is quite conservative, the conclusion was that additional data or

  8. Thermodynamic properties of hydrogen dissociation reaction from the small system method and reactive force field ReaxFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Thuat T.; Meling, Nora; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2017-03-01

    We present thermodynamic properties of the H2 dissociation reaction by means of the Small System Method (SSM) using Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF) simulations. Thermodynamic correction factors, partial molar enthalpies and heat capacities of the reactant and product were obtained in the high temperature range; up to 30,000 K. The results obtained from the ReaxFF potential agree well with previous results obtained with a three body potential (TBP). This indicates that the popular reactive force field method can be combined well with the newly developed SSM in realistic simulations of chemical reactions. The approach may be useful in the study of heat and mass transport in combination with chemical reactions.

  9. Method and apparatus for continuously referenced analysis of reactive components in solution

    DOEpatents

    Bostick, W.D.; Denton, M.S.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1979-07-31

    A continuously referenced apparatus for measuring the concentration of a reactive chemical species in solution comprises in combination conduit means for introducing a sample solution, means for introducing one or more reactants into a sample solution, and a stream separator disposed within the conduit means for separating the sample solution into a first sample stream and a second sample stream. A reactor is disposed in fluid communication with the first sample stream. A reaction takes place between the reactants introduced and the reactive chemical species of interest, causing the consumption or production of an indicator species in the first sample stream. Measurement means such as a photometric system are disposed in communication with the first and second sample streams, and the outputs of the measurement means are compared to provide a blanked measurement of the concentration of indicator species. The apparatus is particularly suitable for measurement of isoenzymes in body tissues or fluids.

  10. Chemical Reactivation as a Method for Replacing Scuff Sanding and for Applying Stencils on Aerospace Topcoats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Abraded Paintbond SM-1 (Sur-Prep AP-1) Reactivator BMS10-127 Large Paint Area (Thick overcoat film ) (Topcoat Brand X) Stencil Lettering (Thin...overcoat film ) (Topcoat Brand Y) Not Abraded Abraded Controls: Not Abraded or Abraded Controls: Not Abraded or Abraded Low Humidity Cure: 12...solvent flash-off which may induce edge attack of maskant materials 5. Ambient dry for 30 minutes minimum • Visual gloss will go flat as it dries due

  11. Competitive labelling, a method for determining the reactivity of individual groups in proteins. The amino groups of porcine elastase

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, H.; Stevenson, K. J.; Hartley, B. S.

    1971-01-01

    1. A method is described for determining the ionization constants and reactivities of individual amino groups in proteins. The principle is that in the presence of a trace amount of radioactive label, the various reactive groups in a protein molecule will compete for the label and the amount incorporated into any one group will be determined by its nucleophilicity, pK and micro-environment. The relative amounts of label incorporated into various groups will be proportional to their second-order rate constants and by comparing these rate constants with those expected on the basis of a linear free-energy relationship obtained with a series of standard compounds, the micro-environment can be defined for a particular amino group. 2. The method consists of treating a protein and an internal standard with a limiting amount of radioactive reagent and then with an excess of unlabelled reagent to yield a chemically homogeneous but heterogeneously labelled compound. After appropriate enzymic digestion peptides containing each labelled group are isolated and their rates of reaction, relative to the internal standard, are determined from their specific radioactivities. The entire procedure is repeated at several pH values. 3. When the method was applied to the amino groups of porcine elastase by using tritiated acetic anhydride as the labelling reagent, the N-terminus was found to have pKa 9.7 and a much lower than normal reactivity. Lysine-87 and lysine-224 were found to have pKa 10.3 and normal reactivities. At pH values greater than 10.5 there are discontinuities in all the titration curves, indicating that the entire molecule is undergoing a structural reorganization. ImagesPLATE 3PLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5158490

  12. Computational methods for reactive transport modeling: An extended law of mass-action, xLMA, method for multiphase equilibrium calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Allan M. M.; Kulik, Dmitrii A.; Kosakowski, Georg; Saar, Martin O.

    2016-10-01

    We present an extended law of mass-action (xLMA) method for multiphase equilibrium calculations and apply it in the context of reactive transport modeling. This extended LMA formulation differs from its conventional counterpart in that (i) it is directly derived from the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) problem (i.e., the fundamental problem that describes the state of equilibrium of a chemical system under constant temperature and pressure); and (ii) it extends the conventional mass-action equations with Lagrange multipliers from the Gibbs energy minimization problem, which can be interpreted as stability indices of the chemical species. Accounting for these multipliers enables the method to determine all stable phases without presuming their types (e.g., aqueous, gaseous) or their presence in the equilibrium state. Therefore, the here proposed xLMA method inherits traits of Gibbs energy minimization algorithms that allow it to naturally detect the phases present in equilibrium, which can be single-component phases (e.g., pure solids or liquids) or non-ideal multi-component phases (e.g., aqueous, melts, gaseous, solid solutions, adsorption, or ion exchange). Moreover, our xLMA method requires no technique that tentatively adds or removes reactions based on phase stability indices (e.g., saturation indices for minerals), since the extended mass-action equations are valid even when their corresponding reactions involve unstable species. We successfully apply the proposed method to a reactive transport modeling problem in which we use PHREEQC and GEMS as alternative backends for the calculation of thermodynamic properties such as equilibrium constants of reactions, standard chemical potentials of species, and activity coefficients. Our tests show that our algorithm is efficient and robust for demanding applications, such as reactive transport modeling, where it converges within 1-3 iterations in most cases. The proposed xLMA method is implemented in Reaktoro, a

  13. Method to Prepare Processable Polymides with Reactive Endgroups using 1,3-Bis (3-Aminophenoxy) Benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polyimide copolymers were obtained containing 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene (APB) and other diamines and dianhydrides and terminating with the appropriate amount of reactive endcapper. The reactive endcappers studied include but should not be limited to 4-phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride (PEPA ), 3-aminophenoxy- 4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone (3-APEB), maleic anhydride (MA) and nadic anhydride (5-norbomene-2,3-dicarboxylic anhydride, NA). Homopolymers containing only other diamines and dianhydrides which are not processable under conditions described previously can be made processable by incorporating various amounts of APB, depending on the chemical structures of the diamines and dianhydrides used. By simply changing the ratio of APB to the other diamine in the polyimide backbone, a material with a unique combination of solubility, Tg, Tm, melt viscosity, toughness and elevated temperature mechanical properties can be prepared. The copolymers that result from using APB to enhance processability have a unique combination of properties that include low pressure processing (200 psi and below), long term melt stability (several hours at 300 C. for the phenylethynyl terminated polymers), high toughness, improved solvent resistance, improved adhesive properties, and improved composite mechanical properties. These copolyimides are eminently suitable as adhesives, composite matrices, moldings, films and coatings.

  14. Analytical methods for trace levels of reactive carbonyl compounds formed in lipid peroxidation systems.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, T

    2006-04-11

    Analysis of trace levels of reactive carbonyl compounds (RCCs), including formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, malonaldehyde, glyoxal, and methyl glyoxal, is extremely difficult because they are highly reactive, water soluble, and volatile. Determination of these RCCs in trace levels is important because they are major products of lipid peroxidation, which is strongly associated with various diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, aging, and atherosclerosis. This review covers the development and application of various derivatives for RCC analysis. Among the many derivatives which have been prepared, cysteamine derivatives for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde; N-hydrazine derivatives for acrolein, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and malonaldeyde; and o-phenylene diamine derivatives for glyoxal and methyl glyoxal were selected for extended discussion. The application of advanced instruments, including gas chromatograph with nitrogen-phosphorus detector (GC/NPD), mass spectrometer (MS), high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC), GC/MS, and LC/MS, to the determination of trace RCCs in various oxidized lipid samples, including fatty acids, skin lipids, beef fats, blood plasma, whole blood, and liver homogenates, is also discussed.

  15. CFD methods for the reduction of reactive gas emission from a paper laminating machine.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Andras; Jordan, Christian; Forstner, Gerhard; Altacher, Peter; Harasek, Michael

    2007-06-18

    In cooperation with the world's second largest manufacturer of beverage cartons (SIG Combibloc) for liquid foodstuffs an innovative off-take for neutralisation of reactive gas in a paper laminating machine was constructed. A great challenge during engineering work was ensuring a high concentration of the reactive gas where needed and at the same time minimising work place impact in a machine basically without housing. Preliminary 2D-models of the machine geometry proved to be insufficient in describing all the governing flow phenomena. A simplified 3D-geometry containing all important parts of the complex machinery was necessary for accurate predictions. It was found that the driving force of air movement and transport of reactive gas (which acts as an adhesive agent) from the reaction zone in the interior of the laminating machine to the outside is a boundary flow caused by the rapid movement of carton material and rotating cylinders. A physically correct simulation result of the boundary flow is a premise for correct prediction of air flow in and around the machinery. Lacking experimental data (due to an inaccessible geometry) a worst case scenario was constructed by generating a grid and using turbulence models that maximised mass transport in the boundary layer region and thus emission of (tracer)gas from the machine. CFD simulations were done using the geometry preprocessor Gambit, and the finite volume solver Fluent. The results of the analysis of the emission paths from the machine were surprising and led to the construction of an effective off-take relatively far away from the emission source. The chosen position ensures low disturbance of highly sensitive flow patterns inside the machine and diffusive mixing, dilution and contamination of the surroundings. The effect of the new off-take is an immediate and significant rise in air quality in the vicinity of the laminating machine and ensures maximum allowed concentration in the plant area. The product

  16. Reactive sintering and reactive hot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. C.; German, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    NbAl3 has been synthesized from elemental powders by reactive sintering (RS) and reactive hot isostatic pressing (RHIP). Both processes involve a self-propagating exothermic reaction between the constituent powders to form an intermetallic compound. The RHIP approach uses simultaneous external pressurization to make a higher density product. This study focused on developing a method to use reactive synthesis to form high-density NbAl3 compacts. High RS and RHIP densities were possible with the appropriate raw materials and processing parameters. These include powder purity, particle sizes, degassing, heating rate, furnace temperature, and compaction pressures. Near full density was attained with RHIP, and up to 95 pct density was attained with RS.

  17. Methods for modeling impact-induced reactivity changes in small reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, Tyler N.; Radel, Tracy E.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.; Smith, Brandon M.; Radel, Ross F.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wilson, Paul Philip Hood

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes techniques for determining impact deformation and the subsequent reactivity change for a space reactor impacting the ground following a potential launch accident or for large fuel bundles in a shipping container following an accident. This technique could be used to determine the margin of subcriticality for such potential accidents. Specifically, the approach couples a finite element continuum mechanics model (Pronto3D or Presto) with a neutronics code (MCNP). DAGMC, developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is used to enable MCNP geometric queries to be performed using Pronto3D output. This paper summarizes what has been done historically for reactor launch analysis, describes the impact criticality analysis methodology, and presents preliminary results using representative reactor designs.

  18. A micro-macro coupling approach of MD-SPH method for reactive energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gui Rong; Wang, Guang Yu; Peng, Qing; De, Suvranu

    2017-01-01

    The simulation of reactive energetic materials has long been the interest of researchers because of the extensive applications of explosives. Much research has been done on the subject at macro scale in the past and research at micro scale has been initiated recently. Equation of state (EoS) is the relation between physical quantities (pressure, temperature, energy and volume) describing thermodynamic states of materials under a given set of conditions. It plays a significant role in determining the characteristics of energetic materials, including Chapman-Jouguet point and detonation velocity. Furthermore, EoS is the key to connect microscopic and macroscopic phenomenon when simulating the macro effects of an explosion. For instance, an ignition and growth model for high explosives uses two JWL EoSs, one for solid explosive and the other for gaseous products, which are often obtained from experiments that can be quite expensive and hazardous. Therefore, it is ideal to calculate the EoS of energetic materials through computational means. In this paper, the EoSs for both solid and gaseous products of β-HMX are calculated using molecular dynamics simulation with ReaxFF-d3, a reactive force field obtained from quantum mechanics. The microscopic simulation results are then compared with experiments and the continuum ignition and growth model. Good agreement is observed. Then, the EoSs obtained through micro-scale simulation is applied in a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to simulate the macro effects of explosions. Simulation results are compared with experiments.

  19. Comparative study of embedded-atom methods applied to the reactivity in the Ni-Al system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlo, V.; Baras, F.; Politano, O.

    2017-09-01

    Structural, thermodynamic, atomic and thermal transport properties of solid and liquid phases of the Ni-Al system were studied by means of MD simulations using three embedded-atom method (EAM) potentials developed by Mishin and colleagues (Mishin et al 2002 Phys. Rev. B 65 224114; Mishin 2004 Acta Mater. 52 145167; Purja Pun and Mishin 2009 Phil. Mag. 89 32453267). The extracted properties (lattice parameter, enthalpy, heat capacity, mass diffusivity and thermal conductivity) were compared with experimental data. The limitations of EAM potentials for studying different aspects of reactivity were assessed for each potential separately.

  20. Shock simulations of a single-site coarse-grain RDX model using the dissipative particle dynamics method with reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Michael S.; Lísal, Martin; Schweigert, Igor; Larentzos, James P.; Brennan, John K.

    2017-01-01

    In discrete particle simulations, when an atomistic model is coarse-grained, a tradeoff is made: a boost in computational speed for a reduction in accuracy. The Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) methods help to recover lost accuracy of the viscous and thermal properties, while giving back a relatively small amount of computational speed. Since its initial development for polymers, one of the most notable extensions of DPD has been the introduction of chemical reactivity, called DPD-RX. In 2007, Maillet, Soulard, and Stoltz introduced implicit chemical reactivity in DPD through the concept of particle reactors and simulated the decomposition of liquid nitromethane. We present an extended and generalized version of the DPD-RX method, and have applied it to solid hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Demonstration simulations of reacting RDX are performed under shock conditions using a recently developed single-site coarse-grain model and a reduced RDX decomposition mechanism. A description of the methods used to simulate RDX and its transition to hot product gases within DPD-RX is presented. Additionally, we discuss several examples of the effect of shock speed and microstructure on the corresponding material chemistry.

  1. Shock Simulations of Single-Site Coarse-Grain RDX using the Dissipative Particle Dynamics Method with Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Michael; Lisal, Martin; Schweigert, Igor; Larentzos, James; Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    In discrete particle simulations, when an atomistic model is coarse-grained, a trade-off is made: a boost in computational speed for a reduction in accuracy. Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) methods help to recover accuracy in viscous and thermal properties, while giving back a small amount of computational speed. One of the most notable extensions of DPD has been the introduction of chemical reactivity, called DPD-RX. Today, pairing the current evolution of DPD-RX with a coarse-grained potential and its chemical decomposition reactions allows for the simulation of the shock behavior of energetic materials at a timescale faster than an atomistic counterpart. In 2007, Maillet et al. introduced implicit chemical reactivity in DPD through the concept of particle reactors and simulated the decomposition of liquid nitromethane. We have recently extended the DPD-RX method and have applied it to solid hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) under shock conditions using a recently developed single-site coarse-grain model and a reduced RDX decomposition mechanism. A description of the methods used to simulate RDX and its tranition to hot product gases within DPD-RX will be presented. Additionally, examples of the effect of microstructure on shock behavior will be shown. Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.

  2. Multidimensional mapping method using an arrayed sensing system for cross-reactivity screening.

    PubMed

    Chocron, Sheryl E; Weisberger, Bryce M; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Winkler, Thomas E; Kim, Eunkyoung; Kelly, Deanna L; Payne, Gregory F; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    When measuring chemical information in biological fluids, challenges of cross-reactivity arise, especially in sensing applications where no biological recognition elements exist. An understanding of the cross-reactions involved in these complex matrices is necessary to guide the design of appropriate sensing systems. This work presents a methodology for investigating cross-reactions in complex fluids. First, a systematic screening of matrix components is demonstrated in buffer-based solutions. Second, to account for the effect of the simultaneous presence of these species in complex samples, the responses of buffer-based simulated mixtures of these species were characterized using an arrayed sensing system. We demonstrate that the sensor array, consisting of electrochemical sensors with varying input parameters, generated differential responses that provide synergistic information of sample. By mapping the sensing array response onto multidimensional heat maps, characteristic signatures were compared across sensors in the array and across different matrices. Lastly, the arrayed sensing system was applied to complex biological samples to discern and match characteristic signatures between the simulated mixtures and the complex sample responses. As an example, this methodology was applied to screen interfering species relevant to the application of schizophrenia management. Specifically, blood serum measurement of antipsychotic clozapine and antioxidant species can provide useful information regarding therapeutic efficacy and psychiatric symptoms. This work proposes an investigational tool that can guide multi-analyte sensor design, chemometric modeling and biomarker discovery.

  3. Multidimensional Mapping Method Using an Arrayed Sensing System for Cross-Reactivity Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chocron, Sheryl E.; Weisberger, Bryce M.; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Winkler, Thomas E.; Kim, Eunkyoung; Kelly, Deanna L.; Payne, Gregory F.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    When measuring chemical information in biological fluids, challenges of cross-reactivity arise, especially in sensing applications where no biological recognition elements exist. An understanding of the cross-reactions involved in these complex matrices is necessary to guide the design of appropriate sensing systems. This work presents a methodology for investigating cross-reactions in complex fluids. First, a systematic screening of matrix components is demonstrated in buffer-based solutions. Second, to account for the effect of the simultaneous presence of these species in complex samples, the responses of buffer-based simulated mixtures of these species were characterized using an arrayed sensing system. We demonstrate that the sensor array, consisting of electrochemical sensors with varying input parameters, generated differential responses that provide synergistic information of sample. By mapping the sensing array response onto multidimensional heat maps, characteristic signatures were compared across sensors in the array and across different matrices. Lastly, the arrayed sensing system was applied to complex biological samples to discern and match characteristic signatures between the simulated mixtures and the complex sample responses. As an example, this methodology was applied to screen interfering species relevant to the application of schizophrenia management. Specifically, blood serum measurement of antipsychotic clozapine and antioxidant species can provide useful information regarding therapeutic efficacy and psychiatric symptoms. This work proposes an investigational tool that can guide multi-analyte sensor design, chemometric modeling and biomarker discovery. PMID:25789880

  4. A new method for filtering of reactive "warheads" of transition-state analog protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Traube, Tamar; Shokhen, Michael; Albeck, Amnon

    2014-04-22

    In light of the major contribution of the reactive warhead to the binding energy trend in reversible covalent transition-state analog inhibitors of serine and cysteine hydrolases, would it be possible to rationally design and quickly filter such warheads, especially for large-scale screening? The previously defined W1 and W2 covalent descriptors quantitatively account for the energetic effect of the covalent bonds reorganization, accompanying enzyme-inhibitor covalent binding. The quantum mechanically calculated W1 and W2 reflect the warhead binding energy by modeling of the enzyme-inhibitor reaction core. Here, we demonstrate the use of these descriptors for warhead filtering, and examine its scope and limitations. The W1 and W2 descriptors provide a tool for rational design of various warheads as universal building blocks of real inhibitors without the requirement of 3D structural information about the target enzyme or QSAR studies. These warheads could then be used as hit structural templates in the subsequent optimization of inhibitors recognition sites.

  5. Improvements of the fluoride reactivation method for the verification of nerve agent exposure.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Carla E A M; Pleijsier, Kees; van der Schans, Marcel J; Langenberg, Jan P; Preston, Kerry E; Solano, Maria I; Maggio, V L; Barr, John R

    2004-01-01

    One of the most appropriate biomarkers for the verification of organophosphorus nerve agent exposure is the conjugate of the nerve agent to butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). The phosphyl moiety of the nerve agent can be released from the BuChE enzyme by incubation with fluoride ions, after which the resulting organophosphonofluoridate can be analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This paper describes recent improvements of the fluoride-induced reactivation in human plasma or serum samples by enhancing the sample preparation with new solid-phase extraction cartridges and the MS analysis with large volume injections. Analysis is performed with thermal desorption GC with either mass selective detection with ammonia chemical ionization or high-resolution MS with electron impact ionization. The organophosphorus chemical warfare agents analyzed in this study are O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate, ethyl methylphosphonofluoridate, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB), O-ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate, ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidofluoridate, and cyclohexyl methylphosphonfluoridate. Detection limits of approximately 10 pg/mL plasma were achieved for all analytes, which corresponds to 0.09% inhibition with GB on a sample with normal BuChE levels.

  6. Development of Modeling Methods and Tools for Predicting Coupled Reactive Transport Processes in Porous Media at Multiple Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T Prabhakar; Barnett, Mark O; Zheng, Chunmiao; Jones, Norman L

    2010-05-05

    DE-FG02-06ER64213: Development of Modeling Methods and Tools for Predicting Coupled Reactive Transport Processes in Porous Media at Multiple Scales Investigators: T. Prabhakar Clement (PD/PI) and Mark O. Barnett (Auburn), Chunmiao Zheng (Univ. of Alabama), and Norman L. Jones (BYU). The objective of this project was to develop scalable modeling approaches for predicting the reactive transport of metal contaminants. We studied two contaminants, a radioactive cation [U(VI)] and a metal(loid) oxyanion system [As(III/V)], and investigated their interactions with two types of subsurface materials, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides. We also developed modeling methods for describing the experimental results. Overall, the project supported 25 researchers at three universities. Produced 15 journal articles, 3 book chapters, 6 PhD dissertations and 6 MS theses. Three key journal articles are: 1) Jeppu et al., A scalable surface complexation modeling framework for predicting arsenate adsorption on goethite-coated sands, Environ. Eng. Sci., 27(2): 147-158, 2010. 2) Loganathan et al., Scaling of adsorption reactions: U(VI) experiments and modeling, Applied Geochemistry, 24 (11), 2051-2060, 2009. 3) Phillippi, et al., Theoretical solid/solution ratio effects on adsorption and transport: uranium (VI) and carbonate, Soil Sci. Soci. of America, 71:329-335, 2007

  7. Illuminating reactive microbial transport in saturated porous media: Demonstration of a visualization method and conceptual transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, Peter M.; Castenson, Catherine; Harvey, Charles F.; Polz, Martin; Culligan, Patricia

    2005-05-01

    We demonstrate a method to study reactive microbial transport in saturated translucent porous media using the bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL genetically engineered to carry a plasmid with bioluminescence genes inducible by salicylate. Induced bacteria were injected into a cryolite grain filled chamber saturated with a sterile non-growth-promoting (phosphorus limited) chemical mixture containing salicylate as an aromatic hydrocarbon analogue. The amount of light produced by the bacteria serves as an estimator of the relative efficiency of aerobic biodegradation since bioluminescence is dependent on both salicylate and oxygen but only consumes oxygen. Bioluminescence was captured with a digital camera and analyzed to study the evolving spatial pattern of the bulk oxygen consuming reactions. As fluid flow transported the bacteria through the chamber, bioluminescence was observed to initially increase until an oxygen depletion zone developed behind the advective front. Bacterial transport was modeled with the advection dispersion equation and oxygen concentration was modeled assuming bacterial consumption via Monod kinetics with consideration of additional effects of rate-limited mass transfer from residual gas bubbles. Consistent with previous measurements, bioluminescence was considered proportional to oxygen consumed. Using the observed bioluminescence, model parameters were fit that were consistent with literature values and produced results in good agreement with the experimental data. These findings demonstrate potential for using this method to investigate the complex spatial and temporal dynamics of reactive microbial transport in saturated porous media.

  8. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  9. Additive semi-implicit Runge-Kutta methods for computing high-speed nonequilibrium reactive flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    1996-10-01

    This paper is concerned with time-stepping numerical methods for computing stiff semi-discrete systems of ordinary differential equations for transient hypersonic flows with thermo-chemical non-equilibrium. The stiffness of the equations is mainly caused by the viscous flux terms across the boundary layers and by the source terms modeling finite-rate thermo-chemical processes. Implicit methods are needed to treat the stiff terms while more efficient explicit methods can still be used for the nonstiff terms in the equations. This paper studies three different semi-implicit Runge-Kutta methods for additively split differential equations in the form of u{prime} = f(u) + g(u), where f is treated by explicit Runge-Kutta methods and g is simultaneously treated by three implicit Runge-Kutta methods: a diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta method and two linearized implicit Runge-Kutta methods. The coefficients of up to third-order accurate additive semi-implicit Runge-Kutta methods have been derived such that the methods are both high-order accurate and strongly A-stable for the implicit terms. The results of two numerical tests on the stability and accuracy properties of these methods are also presented in the paper. 26 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. QSAR models for the reactivation of sarin inhibited acetylcholinesterase by quaternary pyridinium oximes based on Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Veselinović, Jovana B; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Nikolić, Goran M

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo method has been used as a computational tool for building QSAR models for the reactivation of sarin inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by quaternary pyridinium oximes. Simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) together with hydrogen-suppressed graph (HSG) was used to represent molecular structure. Total number of considered oximes was 46 and activity was defined as logarithm of the AChE reactivation percentage by oximes with concentration of 0.001 M. One-variable models have been calculated with CORAL software for one data split into training, calibration and test set. Computational experiments indicated that this approach can satisfactorily predict the desired endpoint. Best QSAR model had the following statistical parameters: for training set r2=0.7096, s=0.177, MAE=0.148; calibration set: r2=0.6759, s=0.330, MAE=0.271 and test set: r2=0.8620, s=0.182, MAE=0.150. Structural indicators (SMILES based molecular fragments) for the increase and the decrease of the stated activity are defined. Using defined structural alerts computer aided design of new oxime derivatives with desired activity is presented.

  11. [Preparation of Staphylococcus aureus antigens for evaluation of their immunological reactivity with the human sera by the western blot method].

    PubMed

    Tyski, S; Jarecka, K; Gut, W; Hryniewicz, W

    1991-01-01

    Extracellular antigens as well as cell wall extracts of 4 S. aureus strains isolated from different kinds of infection were analysed by Western-Blott technique. Materials obtained in two systems of bacteria cultivation (with and without aeration) were compared. Four systems of PAGE (native conditions, with 8.0 M urea, with SDS and SDS after previous reduction of the material with 2-mercaptoethanol) were compared in order to get the best differentiation of proteins and antigens. Immunological reactivity of the antigens mixture with two human sera: highly positive (with three S. aureus antigens in ELISA) from patient with staphylococcal sepsis and negative (from blood donor) were analysed. The best results were obtained after reduction of the cell wall extracted material in SDS-PAGE. The different protein patterns depending on the strain and the method of bacteria cultivation were observed. The standardisation of Western-Blott technique was performed, including titration of the sera to get the best differentiation of the antigens. The difference in immunological reactivity of the positive and negative sera with staphylococcal antigens mixture showed rather quantitative than qualitative character.

  12. Mouse model of liver ischemia and reperfusion injury: method for studying reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuta; Hines, Ian N; Zibari, Gazi; Pavlick, Kevin; Gray, Laura; Kitagawa, Yuko; Grisham, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    The mouse model of liver ischemia and reperfusion injury has proven to be valuable for our understanding of the role that reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites play in postischemic tissue injury. This methods paper provides a detailed protocol for inducing partial liver ischemia followed by reperfusion. Liver ischemia is induced in anesthetized mice by cross-clamping the hepatic artery and portal vein for varying lengths of time, resulting in deprivation of blood flow to approximately 70% of the liver. Restoration of blood flow to the ischemic lobes enhances superoxide production concomitant with a rapid and marked decrease in the bioavailability of nitric oxide, resulting in alterations in the redox state of the liver in favor of a more oxidative environment. This hepatocellular oxidative stress induces the activation of oxidant-sensitive transcription factors followed by the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and mediators that ultimately lead to liver injury. This model can be induced in any strain or sex of mouse and requires 1-2 months of practice to become proficient in the surgery and animal manipulation. The roles of various reactive metabolites of oxygen and nitrogen may be evaluated using genetically engineered mice as well as selective molecular, cellular, and/or pharmacological agents.

  13. Using the MitoB method to assess levels of reactive oxygen species in ecological studies of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K.; Villasevil, Eugenia M.; Anderson, Graeme J.; Cairns, Andrew G.; Mullen, William; Hartley, Richard C.; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years evolutionary ecologists have become increasingly interested in the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the life-histories of animals. ROS levels have mostly been inferred indirectly due to the limitations of estimating ROS from in vitro methods. However, measuring ROS (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) content in vivo is now possible using the MitoB probe. Here, we extend and refine the MitoB method to make it suitable for ecological studies of oxidative stress using the brown trout Salmo trutta as model. The MitoB method allows an evaluation of H2O2 levels in living organisms over a timescale from hours to days. The method is flexible with regard to the duration of exposure and initial concentration of the MitoB probe, and there is no transfer of the MitoB probe between fish. H2O2 levels were consistent across subsamples of the same liver but differed between muscle subsamples and between tissues of the same animal. The MitoB method provides a convenient method for measuring ROS levels in living animals over a significant period of time. Given its wide range of possible applications, it opens the opportunity to study the role of ROS in mediating life history trade-offs in ecological settings. PMID:28117373

  14. Conformational and reactivity study of dithiophenyl-fucosyl ketals with theoretical chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos-Hernandez, Angel E; García-Gutiérrez, Hugo A; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Mendoza-Espinoza, José Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Carbohydrates can be used as substrates to synthesize new complex molecules; these molecules contain several chiral centers that can be used in organic synthesis. D-Fucose diphenyl thioacetal reacts differentially with acetone, and this paper describes a study of the mechanism of this reaction using theoretical chemistry methods. The conformer distribution was studied using a Monte Carlo method for the reaction products, and the obtained conformers were validated by calculating the hydrogen spin-spin coupling constants with the DFT/B3LYP/DGDZVP method. Results agreed with the experimental coupling constants with an adequate root mean squared deviation. The free energies and enthalpies of formation of the resulting global minimum conformers were calculated with the same method and with the thermochemical compound method CBS-4 M. This technique, combined with the conformational analysis, allowed comparison of the formation enthalpies of the compounds involved in this reaction, and, with this information, we can postulate the correct reaction pathway. Graphical abstract Reaction pathway.

  15. A fluorescence high throughput screening method for the detection of reactive electrophiles as potential skin sensitizers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Skin sensitization is an important toxicological end-point in the risk assessment of chemical allergens. Because of the complexity of the biological mechanisms associated with skin sensitization integrated approaches combining different chemical, biological and in silico methods are recommended to r...

  16. Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods for reactive transport in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.E.; Wang, Hong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we present Eulerian-Lagrangian localized adjoint methods (ELLAM) to solve convection-diffusion-reaction equations governing contaminant transport in groundwater flowing through an adsorbing porous medium. These ELLAM schemes can treat various combinations of boundary conditions and conserve mass. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the strong potential of ELLAM schemes.

  17. Numerical algorithms based on Galerkin methods for the modeling of reactive interfaces in photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Michael; Gamba, Irene M.; Ren, Kui

    2016-12-01

    This work concerns the numerical solution of a coupled system of self-consistent reaction-drift-diffusion-Poisson equations that describes the macroscopic dynamics of charge transport in photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells with reactive semiconductor and electrolyte interfaces. We present three numerical algorithms, mainly based on a mixed finite element and a local discontinuous Galerkin method for spatial discretization, with carefully chosen numerical fluxes, and implicit-explicit time stepping techniques, for solving the time-dependent nonlinear systems of partial differential equations. We perform computational simulations under various model parameters to demonstrate the performance of the proposed numerical algorithms as well as the impact of these parameters on the solution to the model.

  18. Fabrication of Ce3+ doped Gd3Ga3Al2O12 ceramics by reactive sintering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yong; Liu, Peng; Yan, Dongyue; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian

    2017-09-01

    Ce3+ doped Gd3Ga3Al2O12 (Ce:GGAG) ceramics were fabricated by solid state reactive sintering method in this study. The ceramics were pre-sintered in normal muffle furnace in air at various temperature range from 1410 °C to 1550 °C for 10 h and post-treated by hot isostatic press at 1400 °C/2 h in 200 MPa Ar. The phase and microstructure evolution of Ce: GGAG samples during the densification process were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. Pure GGAG phase appeared with the temperature increased to 1200 °C. The fully dense and translucent GGAG ceramics were fabricated by pre-sintering at 1450 °C and followed by HIP treatment.

  19. Characterization of reactive ion etching of sol-gel SiO2 using Taguchi optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Terence C.; Ooi, Boon Siew; Zhou, Yan; Chan, Yuen Chuen; Lam, Yee Loy

    1999-11-01

    SiO2 films prepared using sol-gel technique have found enormous potential applications in photonics, electronics and sensor devices. However, the feasibility of the devices utilizing sol-gel technology lies on the ease of the fabrication processes such as patterns transfer using wet or dry etchings. Dry etching is preferred over wet etching as it is able to produce finer features with high anisotropic etch profile. In this paper, we report the development of a dry reactive ion etching process for sol-gel SiO2 using a mixture of CF4 and O2 plasma. Parameters such as RF power, chamber pressure, CF4 and O2 flow rate, were optimized using a statistical method called Taguchi Technique. Etch rate of as high as 50nm/min, with high anisotropy etched profile, has been obtained.

  20. Applications of the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and the Solution Element to Unsteady Chemically Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    2001-01-01

    This document reports the conclusion and findings of our research activities for this grant. The goal of the project is the development and application of the method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element, or the CE/SE method, to simulate chemically reacting flows. The product of this project will be a high-fidelity, time-accurate flow solver analyzing unsteady flow fields advanced propulsion concepts, including the low-emission turbojet engine combustion and flow fields of the Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE). Based on the documents and computer software of the CE/SE method that we have received from the CE/SE working group at NASA Lewis, we have focused our research effort on addressing outstanding technical issues related to the extension of the CE/SE method for unsteady, chemically reactive flows. In particular, we have made progresses in the following three aspects: (1) Derivation of the governing equations for reacting flows; (2) Numerical treatments of stiff source terms; and (3) Detailed simulations of ZND detonation waves.

  1. Significance of Ara h 2 in clinical reactivity and effect of cooking methods on allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Lee, Jin Young; Han, Youngshin; Ahn, Kangmo

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and clinical severity of peanut allergy vary between Western countries and Asia. It has been suggested that cooking methods are responsible for this discrepancy. To evaluate the specific IgE responses to major peanut allergens in peanut allergic Korean children and to examine the influence of different cooking methods on peanut proteins. Raw peanut protein extracts were immunolabeled with serum samples from 42 children with a level of peanut specific IgE of 15 kUA/L or higher to detect specific binding to Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3. Clinical severity scores were assessed on a scale of 0 to 5. Protein extracts from boiled, roasted, fried, and pickled peanuts were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with pooled serum samples from 7 patients. Most patients' serum samples reacted with Ara h 1 (76.2%) and Ara h 3 (78.6%) from raw peanuts, whereas only 53.0% of patients had specific IgE against Ara h 2. IgE binding to Ara h 2 was more prevalent in patients with more severe reaction than in those with mild reactions. IgE binding to Ara h 2 was increased by roasting, but there was significantly less IgE binding after vinegar treatment. Our results suggest that Ara h 2 is an important allergen to predict clinical symptoms but less prevalent in Korean children than in Western children. This finding may be attributed in part to different cooking methods and dietary habits among regions. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reactive air brazing: A novel method of sealing SOFCs and other solid-state electrochemical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Hardy, John S.

    2005-02-28

    High temperature electrochemical devices operate via an ion gradient that develops across a solid electrolyte; consequently, hermeticity across this membrane is paramount. Not only must the electrolyte contain no interconnected porosity, but it must be connected to device chassis with a gas-tight seal. Here we report a new method of brazing developed specifically for solid-state electrochemical applications. We demonstrate that the seal is hermetic and resistant to thermal aging, can be thermally cycled under rapid heating rates with no measurable loss in seal strength, and has shown promise in sealing full-size pSOFC components.

  3. A nonlinear wave mixing method for detecting Alkali-Silica reactivity of aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Tang, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.

    2012-05-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious reaction in concrete. Significant ASR damage could undermine the durability of concrete structures and may result in reduced service life. Several nondestructive techniques based on ultrasound have been used to assess ASR damage. It has been shown that nonlinear ultrasound is more sensitive to internal stresses as well as to micro-cracks induced by ASR damage. In this investigation, we developed a co-linear wave mixing method for assessing ASR damage in concrete. By mixing two longitudinal waves, a new longitudinal wave with a lower frequency is generated. The amplitude of this new wave is proportional to the acoustic nonlinear parameter β which can then be obtained from the frequency spectrum of the newly generated longitudinal wave. Our experimental results show that (i) the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is closely correlated to ASR damage in concrete, (ii) the nonlinear wave mixing technique developed here is capable of measuring the changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter caused by ASR damage, even in its early stages, and (iii) the nonlinear wave mixing method has the potential to identify the different stages of ASR damage and to track the intrinsic characteristics of the ASR damage.

  4. Isochoric Burn, an Internally Consistent Method for the Reactant to Product Transformation in Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E; Lee, E L

    2002-07-01

    Mixture rules for partially reacted explosives differ amongst various models. For instance, JWL++ uses a partial pressure addition to compute an average zonal pressure, Ignition and Growth requires pressure equilibration and thermal equilibration of temperature dependent JWL EOSs, CHEETAH In Line RF also assumes temperature and pressure equilibration. It has been suggested in the past that a more realistic equilibration scheme should comprise isentropic pressure equilibration of the separate reacted and unreacted phases. This turns out not to be a proper path for equilibration. Rather, we find that the only internally consistent method is the evaluation of the equilibrium pressure that satisfies the particular conditions of reactant and product resulting from deflagration in a fixed volume.

  5. A fully-implicit finite-volume method for multi-fluid reactive and collisional magnetized plasmas on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.; Deconinck, H.; Mansour, N. N.; Poedts, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present a Finite Volume scheme for solving Maxwell's equations coupled to magnetized multi-fluid plasma equations for reactive and collisional partially ionized flows on unstructured meshes. The inclusion of the displacement current allows for studying electromagnetic wave propagation in a plasma as well as charge separation effects beyond the standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) description, however, it leads to a very stiff system with characteristic velocities ranging from the speed of sound of the fluids up to the speed of light. In order to control the fulfillment of the elliptical constraints of the Maxwell's equations, we use the hyperbolic divergence cleaning method. In this paper, we extend the latter method applying the CIR scheme with scaled numerical diffusion in order to balance those terms with the Maxwell flux vectors. For the fluids, we generalize the AUSM+-up to multiple fluids of different species within the plasma. The fully implicit second-order method is first verified on the Hartmann flow (including comparison with its analytical solution), two ideal MHD cases with strong shocks, namely, Orszag-Tang and the MHD rotor, then validated on a much more challenging case, representing a two-fluid magnetic reconnection under solar chromospheric conditions. For the latter case, a comparison with pioneering results available in literature is provided.

  6. A quantitative method to monitor reactive oxygen species production by electron paramagnetic resonance in physiological and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Montorsi, Michela; Porcelli, Simone; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the assessment of oxidative stress in health and disease clashes with the lack of consensus on reliable quantitative noninvasive methods applicable. The study aimed at demonstrating that a recently developed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance microinvasive method provides direct evidence of the "instantaneous" presence of ROS returning absolute concentration levels that correlate with "a posteriori" assays of ROS-induced damage by means of biomarkers. The reliability of the choice to measure ROS production rate in human capillary blood rather than in plasma was tested (step I). A significant (P < 0.01) linear relationship between EPR data collected on capillary blood versus venous blood (R (2) = 0.95), plasma (R (2) = 0.82), and erythrocytes (R (2) = 0.73) was found. Then (step II) ROS production changes of various subjects' categories, young versus old and healthy versus pathological at rest condition, were found significantly different (range 0.0001-0.05 P level). The comparison of the results with antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage biomarkers concentrations showed that all changes indicating increased oxidative stress are directly related to ROS production increase. Therefore, the adopted method may be an automated technique for a lot of routine in clinical trials.

  7. Location change method for imaging chemical reactivity and catalysis with single-molecule and -particle fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blum, S A

    2014-08-21

    In the last eight years, it has become possible to image chemical reactivity at the single-molecule and -particle level with fluorescence microscopy. This Perspective describes one of the imaging techniques that enabled this state-of-the-art application: imaging by the location change of molecules and particles. In this method, the microscope and experiment are configured to produce a signal when an individual molecule or particle changes location or changes mobility concurrently with a chemical change. This imaging technique has enabled observation of single chemical reactions and unraveled mechanisms of complex chemical and physical processes in transition metal and polymerization systems. This Perspective has three major goals: (1) to unify studies of different chemical processes or of different chemical questions, which, in spite of these differences, employ a similar microscopy detection method, (2) to explain the technique to nonexperts and those who might be interested in joining this nascent field, and (3) to highlight unique information available through this cross-disciplinary technique and the value this information has for chemical reaction development generally and catalysis specifically. To this end, application of the location change method to the investigation of polymerization reactions with radical initiators and separately with metal catalysts, and to ligand exchange reactions at platinum complexes are described.

  8. Simultaneous 2D imaging of dissolved iron and reactive phosphorus in sediment porewaters by thin-film and hyperspectral methods.

    PubMed

    Cesbron, Florian; Metzger, Edouard; Launeau, Patrick; Deflandre, Bruno; Delgard, Marie-Lise; Thibault de Chanvalon, Aubin; Geslin, Emmanuelle; Anschutz, Pierre; Jézéquel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a new approach combining diffusive equilibrium in thin-film (DET) and spectrophotometric methods to determine the spatial variability of dissolved iron and dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) with a single gel probe. Its originality is (1) to postpone up to three months the colorimetric reaction of DET by freezing and (2) to measure simultaneously dissolved iron and DRP by hyperspectral imaging at a submillimeter resolution. After a few minutes at room temperature, the thawed gel is sandwiched between two monospecific reagent DET gels, leading to magenta and blue coloration for iron and phosphate, respectively. Spatial distribution of the resulting colors is obtained using a hyperspectral camera. Reflectance spectra analysis enables deconvolution of specific colorations by the unmixing method applied to the logarithmic reflectance, leading to an accurate quantification of iron and DRP. This method was applied in the Arcachon lagoon (France) on muddy sediments colonized by eelgrass (Zostera noltei) meadows. The 2D gel probes highlighted microstructures in the spatial distribution of dissolved iron and phosphorus, which are most likely associated with the occurrence of benthic fauna burrows and seagrass roots.

  9. High-affinity RNA aptamers to C-reactive protein (CRP): newly developed pre-elution methods for aptamer selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orito, N.; Umekage, S.; Sato, K.; Kawauchi, S.; Tanaka, H.; Sakai, E.; Tanaka, T.; Kikuchi, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a modified SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) method to obtain RNA aptamers with high affinity to C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a clinical biomarker present in plasma, the level of which increases in response to infections and noninfectious inflammation. The CRP level is also an important prognostic indicator in patients with several syndromes. At present, CRP content in blood is measured immunochemically using antibodies. To develop a more sensitive method using RNA aptamers, we have attempted to obtain high-affinity RNA aptamers to CRP. We succeeded in obtaining an RNA aptamer with high affinity to CRP using a CRP-immobilized Sepharose column and pre-elution procedure. Pre-elution is a method that removes the weak binding portion from a selected RNA population by washing for a short time with buffer containing CRP. By surface plasmon-resonance (SPR) analysis, the affinity constant of this aptamer for CRP was calculated to be KD = 2.25×10-9 (M). The secondary structure, contact sites with CRP protein, and application of this aptamer will be described.

  10. Fast bedside measurement of blood count and C-reactive protein in newborns compared with conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Rongioletti, M; Majolini, M B; Collegiani, V; Vaccarella, C; Notarmuzi, M L; Cortesi, M; Pasqualetti, P; Cicchese, M; Agostino, R; Liumbruno, G M

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal complete blood count (CBC) and high plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with neonatal infections and could be helpful in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and to monitor the antibiotic treatment. The aim of this work is to evaluate and compare the performance of a bedside analyzer for blood count and C-reactive protein (CRP) with a conventional analyzer in a neonatal population. 150 capillary or venous blood samples of term and preterm newborns were processed on an ABX-MicrosCRP200 analyzer and on a SysmexXE2100 (conventional hematology analyzer) for CBC, leukocyte differential, reticulocytes, and nucleated red blood cells (NRBC); high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) was performed on a ModularPE. The differences between complete blood count and CRP were regressed against their means and assessed by means of intra-class-correlation. The intra-class-correlation for white blood cell (WBC) was 0.98, for hemoglobin 0.97, for hematocrit 0.96, for mean corpuscular volume 0.95, and for platelet 0.98. ABX-MicrosCRP200 overestimated the WBC (+1.27 x 10(3)/microL; p < 0.001), hematocrit (+1.80%; p < 0.001), and platelet (+13.55 x 10(3)/microL; p < 0.001). The intra-class-correlation for CRP was high (0.97), without systematic difference between the two values (p = 0.64). The agreement between the two methods was high for both tests. However, the SD of the difference for WBC and platelet could be clinically important in leukopenic or thrombocytopenic newborns.

  11. Reactive flow model development for PBXW-126 using modern nonlinear optimization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Urtiew, P.A.

    1995-08-01

    The initiation and detonation behavior of PBXW-126 has been characterized and is described. PBXW-126 is a composite explosive consisting of approximately equal amounts of RDX, AP, AL, and NTO with a polyurethane binder. The three term ignition and growth of reaction model parameters (ignition + two growth terms) have been found using nonlinear optimization methods to determine the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} set of model parameters. The ignition term treats the initiation of up to 0.5% of the RDX The first growth term in the model treats the RDX growth of reaction up to 20% reacted. The second growth term treats the subsequent growth of reaction of the remaining AP/AL/NTO. The unreacted equation of state (EOS) was determined from the wave profiles of embedded gauge tests while the JWL product EOS was determined from cylinder expansion test results. The nonlinear optimization code, NLQPEB/GLO, was used to determine the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} set of coefficients for the three term Lee-Tarver ignition and growth of reaction model.

  12. OSO paradigm--A rapid behavioral screening method for acute psychosocial stress reactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Brzózka, M M; Unterbarnscheidt, T; Schwab, M H; Rossner, M J

    2016-02-09

    Chronic psychosocial stress is an important environmental risk factor for the development of psychiatric diseases. However, studying the impact of chronic psychosocial stress in mice is time consuming and thus not optimally suited to 'screen' increasing numbers of genetically manipulated mouse models for psychiatric endophenotypes. Moreover, many studies focus on restraint stress, a strong physical stressor with limited relevance for psychiatric disorders. Here, we describe a simple and a rapid method based on the resident-intruder paradigm to examine acute effects of mild psychosocial stress in mice. The OSO paradigm (open field--social defeat--open field) compares behavioral consequences on locomotor activity, anxiety and curiosity before and after exposure to acute social defeat stress. We first evaluated OSO in male C57Bl/6 wildtype mice where a single episode of social defeat reduced locomotor activity, increased anxiety and diminished exploratory behavior. Subsequently, we applied the OSO paradigm to mouse models of two schizophrenia (SZ) risk genes. Transgenic mice with neuronal overexpression of Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) type III showed increased risk-taking behavior after acute stress exposure suggesting that NRG1 dysfunction is associated with altered affective behavior. In contrast, Tcf4 transgenic mice displayed a normal stress response which is in line with the postulated predominant contribution of TCF4 to cognitive deficits of SZ. In conclusion, the OSO paradigm allows for rapid screening of selected psychosocial stress-induced behavioral endophenotypes in mouse models of psychiatric diseases.

  13. Reactive flow model development for PBXW-126 using modern nonlinear optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. J.; Simpson, R. L.; Urtiew, P. A.; Souers, P. C.; Garcia, F.; Garza, R. G.

    1996-05-01

    The initiation and detonation behavior of PBXW-126 has been characterized and is described. PBXW-126 is a composite explosive consisting of approximately equal amounts of RDX, AP, AL, and NTO with a polyurethane binder. The three term ignition and growth of reaction model parameters (ignition+two growth terms) have been found using nonlinear optimization methods to determine the "best" set of model parameters. The ignition term treats the initiation of up to 0.5% of the RDX. The first growth term in the model treats the RDX growth of reaction up to 20% reacted. The second growth term treats the subsequent growth of reaction of the remaining AP/AL/NTO. The unreacted equation of state (EOS) was determined from the wave profiles of embedded gauge tests while the JWL product EOS was determined from cylinder expansion test results. The nonlinear optimization code, NLQPEB/GLO, was used to determine the "best" set of coefficients for the three term Lee-Tarver ignition and growth of reaction model.

  14. Enforcing positivity in intrusive PC-UQ methods for reactive ODE systems

    DOE PAGES

    Najm, Habib N.; Valorani, Mauro

    2014-04-12

    We explore the relation between the development of a non-negligible probability of negative states and the instability of numerical integration of the intrusive Galerkin ordinary differential equation system describing uncertain chemical ignition. To prevent this instability without resorting to either multi-element local polynomial chaos (PC) methods or increasing the order of the PC representation in time, we propose a procedure aimed at modifying the amplitude of the PC modes to bring the probability of negative state values below a user-defined threshold. This modification can be effectively described as a filtering procedure of the spectral PC coefficients, which is applied on-the-flymore » during the numerical integration when the current value of the probability of negative states exceeds the prescribed threshold. We demonstrate the filtering procedure using a simple model of an ignition process in a batch reactor. This is carried out by comparing different observables and error measures as obtained by non-intrusive Monte Carlo and Gauss-quadrature integration and the filtered intrusive procedure. Lastly, the filtering procedure has been shown to effectively stabilize divergent intrusive solutions, and also to improve the accuracy of stable intrusive solutions which are close to the stability limits.« less

  15. Enforcing positivity in intrusive PC-UQ methods for reactive ODE systems

    SciTech Connect

    Najm, Habib N.; Valorani, Mauro

    2014-04-12

    We explore the relation between the development of a non-negligible probability of negative states and the instability of numerical integration of the intrusive Galerkin ordinary differential equation system describing uncertain chemical ignition. To prevent this instability without resorting to either multi-element local polynomial chaos (PC) methods or increasing the order of the PC representation in time, we propose a procedure aimed at modifying the amplitude of the PC modes to bring the probability of negative state values below a user-defined threshold. This modification can be effectively described as a filtering procedure of the spectral PC coefficients, which is applied on-the-fly during the numerical integration when the current value of the probability of negative states exceeds the prescribed threshold. We demonstrate the filtering procedure using a simple model of an ignition process in a batch reactor. This is carried out by comparing different observables and error measures as obtained by non-intrusive Monte Carlo and Gauss-quadrature integration and the filtered intrusive procedure. Lastly, the filtering procedure has been shown to effectively stabilize divergent intrusive solutions, and also to improve the accuracy of stable intrusive solutions which are close to the stability limits.

  16. Enforcing positivity in intrusive PC-UQ methods for reactive ODE systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najm, Habib N.; Valorani, Mauro

    2014-08-01

    We explore the relation between the development of a non-negligible probability of negative states and the instability of numerical integration of the intrusive Galerkin ordinary differential equation system describing uncertain chemical ignition. To prevent this instability without resorting to either multi-element local polynomial chaos (PC) methods or increasing the order of the PC representation in time, we propose a procedure aimed at modifying the amplitude of the PC modes to bring the probability of negative state values below a user-defined threshold. This modification can be effectively described as a filtering procedure of the spectral PC coefficients, which is applied on-the-fly during the numerical integration when the current value of the probability of negative states exceeds the prescribed threshold. We demonstrate the filtering procedure using a simple model of an ignition process in a batch reactor. This is carried out by comparing different observables and error measures as obtained by non-intrusive Monte Carlo and Gauss-quadrature integration and the filtered intrusive procedure. The filtering procedure has been shown to effectively stabilize divergent intrusive solutions, and also to improve the accuracy of stable intrusive solutions which are close to the stability limits.

  17. Development and validation of a FIA/UV-vis method for pK(a) determination of oxime based acetylcholinesterase reactivators.

    PubMed

    Musil, Karel; Florianova, Veronika; Bucek, Pavel; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Kuca, Kamil; Musilek, Kamil

    2016-01-05

    Acetylcholinesterase reactivators (oximes) are compounds used for antidotal treatment in case of organophosphorus poisoning. The dissociation constants (pK(a1)) of ten standard or promising acetylcholinesterase reactivators were determined by ultraviolet absorption spectrometry. Two methods of spectra measurement (UV-vis spectrometry, FIA/UV-vis) were applied and compared. The soft and hard models for calculation of pK(a1) values were performed. The pK(a1) values were recommended in the range 7.00-8.35, where at least 10% of oximate anion is available for organophosphate reactivation. All tested oximes were found to have pK(a1) in this range. The FIA/UV-vis method provided rapid sample throughput, low sample consumption, high sensitivity and precision compared to standard UV-vis method. The hard calculation model was proposed as more accurate for pK(a1) calculation.

  18. A rapid method for estimating the levels of urinary thiobarbituric Acid reactive substances for environmental epidemiologic survey.

    PubMed

    Kil, Han-Na; Eom, Sang-Yong; Park, Jung-Duck; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Kim, Yong-Dae; Kim, Heon

    2014-03-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA), used as an oxidative stress marker, is commonly assayed by measuring the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) using HPLC, as an indicator of the MDA concentration. Since the HPLC method, though highly specific, is time-consuming and expensive, usually it is not suitable for the rapid test in large-scale environmental epidemiologic surveys. The purpose of this study is to develop a simple and rapid method for estimating TBARS levels by using a multiple regression equation that includes TBARS levels measured with a microplate reader as an independent variable. Twelve hour urine samples were obtained from 715 subjects. The concentration of TBARS was measured at three different wavelengths (fluorescence: λ-ex 530 nm and λ-ex 550 nm; λ-ex 515 nm and λ-ex 553 nm; and absorbance: 532 nm) using microplate reader as well as HPLC. 500 samples were used to develop a regression equation, and the remaining 215 samples were used to evaluate the validity of the regression analysis. The induced multiple regression equation is as follows: TBARS level (μM) = -0.282 + 1.830 × (TBARS level measured with a microplate reader at the fluorescence wavelengths λ-ex 530 nm and λ-em 550 nm, μM) -0.685 × (TBARS level measured with a microplate reader at the fluorescence wavelengths λ-ex 515 nm and λ-em 553 nm, μM) + 0.035 × (TBARS level measured with a microplate reader at the absorbance wavelength 532 nm, μM). The estimated TBARS levels showed a better correlation with, and are closer to, the corresponding TBARS levels measured by HPLC compared to the values obtained by the microplate method. The TBARS estimation method reported here is simple and rapid, and that is generally in concordance with HPLC measurements. This method might be a useful tool for monitoring of urinary TBARS level in environmental epidemiologic surveys with large sample sizes.

  19. An experimental evaluation of the instrumented flux synthesis method for the real-time estimation of reactivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.C.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    One method of determining the flux density is flux synthesis which approximates the flux in the core by linear combinations of precomputed shape functions. In traditional flux synthesis, the unknown mixing coefficients are determined using a weighted residual method of solving the diffusion equation. In the instrumented synthesis method, the mixing coefficients are determined using count rates from neutron detectors in the core. In this way the mixing coefficients are linked to conditions in the reactor. Using the synthesized flux, kinetics parameters, notably reactivity, can be calculated in real time. An experimental evaluation has been performed in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor, MITR-II. Detector measurements have been collected using fission chambers placed at the periphery of the core. The reactor was put into a number of various conditions, both static and transient, and data were collected using a digital acquisition system for later combination with shape functions. Transients included increasing power, decreasing power, and a reactor scram. The shape functions were generated using Version 3.0 of the QUARTZ code, a quadratic nodal diffusion theory code in triangular-Z geometry. Supernodal analysis algorithms have been added to the original program, along with subroutines to guarantee diagonal dominance of the leakage matrix in the finite difference or quadratic current approximations in the coarse mesh. The agreement between coarse mesh and fine mesh in all cases is excellent, with finite difference coarse mesh solutions generally slightly better. The synthesis method has been shown to accurately reflect the changes from an initial condition by combining representative flux shapes. It can be concluded that, with proper calibration of the measurement system and inclusion of representative flux shapes, the instrumented synthesis method will properly predict the flux in the core under a number of conditions.

  20. Coordinated Control Method of Voltage and Reactive Power for Active Distribution Networks Based on Soft Open Point

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Peng; Ji, Haoran; Wang, Chengshan; ...

    2017-03-22

    The increasing penetration of distributed generators (DGs) exacerbates the risk of voltage violations in active distribution networks (ADNs). The conventional voltage regulation devices limited by the physical constraints are difficult to meet the requirement of real-time voltage and VAR control (VVC) with high precision when DGs fluctuate frequently. But, soft open point (SOP), a flexible power electronic device, can be used as the continuous reactive power source to realize the fast voltage regulation. Considering the cooperation of SOP and multiple regulation devices, this paper proposes a coordinated VVC method based on SOP for ADNs. Firstly, a time-series model of coordi-natedmore » VVC is developed to minimize operation costs and eliminate voltage violations of ADNs. Then, by applying the linearization and conic relaxation, the original nonconvex mixed-integer non-linear optimization model is converted into a mixed-integer second-order cone programming (MISOCP) model which can be efficiently solved to meet the requirement of voltage regulation rapidity. Here, we carried out some case studies on the IEEE 33-node system and IEEE 123-node system to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.« less

  1. An adaptive sparse-grid high-order stochastic collocation method for Bayesian inference in groundwater reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guannan; Lu, Dan; Ye, Ming; Gunzburger, Max; Webster, Clayton

    2013-10-01

    Bayesian analysis has become vital to uncertainty quantification in groundwater modeling, but its application has been hindered by the computational cost associated with numerous model executions required by exploring the posterior probability density function (PPDF) of model parameters. This is particularly the case when the PPDF is estimated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. In this study, a new approach is developed to improve the computational efficiency of Bayesian inference by constructing a surrogate of the PPDF, using an adaptive sparse-grid high-order stochastic collocation (aSG-hSC) method. Unlike previous works using first-order hierarchical basis, this paper utilizes a compactly supported higher-order hierarchical basis to construct the surrogate system, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of required model executions. In addition, using the hierarchical surplus as an error indicator allows locally adaptive refinement of sparse grids in the parameter space, which further improves computational efficiency. To efficiently build the surrogate system for the PPDF with multiple significant modes, optimization techniques are used to identify the modes, for which high-probability regions are defined and components of the aSG-hSC approximation are constructed. After the surrogate is determined, the PPDF can be evaluated by sampling the surrogate system directly without model execution, resulting in improved efficiency of the surrogate-based MCMC compared with conventional MCMC. The developed method is evaluated using two synthetic groundwater reactive transport models. The first example involves coupled linear reactions and demonstrates the accuracy of our high-order hierarchical basis approach in approximating high-dimensional posteriori distribution. The second example is highly nonlinear because of the reactions of uranium surface complexation, and demonstrates how the iterative aSG-hSC method is able to capture multimodal and

  2. Evaluation of methods of detecting cell reactive oxygen species production for drug screening and cell cycle studies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lampson M; Li, Jian-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is essential to normal cell function. However, excessive ROS production causes oxidative damage and cell death. Many pharmacological compounds exert their effects on cell cycle progression by changing intracellular redox state and in many cases cause oxidative damage leading to drug cytotoxicity. Appropriate measurement of intracellular ROS levels during cell cycle progression is therefore crucial in understanding redox-regulation of cell function and drug toxicity and for the development of new drugs. However, due to the extremely short half-life of ROS, measuring the changes in intracellular ROS levels during a particular phase of cell cycle for drug intervention can be challenging. In this article, we have provided updated information on the rationale, the applications, the advantages and limitations of common methods for screening drug effects on intracellular ROS production linked to cell cycle study. Our aim is to facilitate biomedical scientists and researchers in the pharmaceutical industry in choosing or developing specific experimental regimens to suit their research needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hot pressing titanium metal matrix composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets through an in-situ reactive method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, X. N.; Zhang, H. M.; Cai, H. N.; Fan, Q. B.; Wu, Y.; Fu, Z. J.; Wang, Q. X.

    2017-05-01

    This study proposed an in-situ reactive method that uses graphene as a reinforcement to fabricate titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) through powder metallurgy processing route. The volume fraction of graphene nanoplatelets was 1.8%vol, and the pure titanium was used as a matrix. The Archimedes density, hardness, microstructure and mechanical properties of specimens were compared under different ball milling times (20 min and 2.5 h) and hot pressing temperatures (900°C, 1150°C, and 1300°C,). The ultimate tensile strength of 630 MPa, which demonstrated a 27.3% increase compared with pure Ti, was achieved under a ball milling time of 20 min. Elongation increased with increasing temperature. When the ball milling time and hot pressing temperature were increased to 2.5 h and 1300 °C, respectively, the ultimate tensile strength of the composites reached 750 MPa, showing an increase of 51.5% compared with pure Ti.

  4. Study of ice cluster impacts on amorphous silica using the ReaxFF reactive force field molecular dynamics simulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnamoun, A.; Duin, A. C. T. van

    2016-03-07

    We study the dynamics of the collisions between amorphous silica structures and amorphous and crystal ice clusters with impact velocities of 1 km/s, 4 km/s, and 7 km/s using the ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulation method. The initial ice clusters consist of 150 water molecules for the amorphous ice cluster and 128 water molecules for the crystal ice cluster. The ice clusters are collided on the surface of amorphous fully oxidized and suboxide silica. These simulations show that at 1 km/s impact velocities, all the ice clusters accumulate on the surface and at 4 km/s and 7 km/s impact velocities, some of the ice cluster molecules bounce back from the surface. At 4 km/s and 7 km/s impact velocities, few of the water molecules dissociations are observed. The effect of the second ice cluster impacts on the surfaces which are fully covered with ice, on the mass loss/accumulation is studied. These studies show that at 1 km/s impacts, the entire ice cluster accumulates on the surface at both first and second ice impacts. At higher impact velocities, some ice molecules which after the first ice impacts have been attached to the surface will separate from the surface after the second ice impacts at 7 km/s impact velocity. For the 4 km/s ice cluster impact, ice accumulation is observed for the crystal ice cluster impacts and ice separation is observed for the amorphous ice impacts. Observing the temperatures of the ice clusters during the collisions indicates that the possibility of electron excitement at impact velocities less than 10 km/s is minimal and ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulation can predict the chemistry of these hypervelocity impacts. However, at impact velocities close to 10 km/s the average temperature of the impacting ice clusters increase to about 2000 K, with individual molecules occasionally reaching temperatures of over 8000 K and thus it will be prudent to consider the concept of electron excitation at

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of Aged AISI 316L Stainless Steel Sensitization to Intergranular Corrosion: Comparison Between Microstructural Electrochemical and Analytical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Sahlaoui, H.; Braham, C.

    2007-06-01

    The evaluation of the degree of sensitization (DOS) to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of a commercial AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel aged at temperatures ranging from 550 °C to 800 °C during 100 to 80,000 hours was carried out using three different assessment methods. (1) The microstructural method coupled with the Strauss standard test (ASTM A262). This method establishes the kinetics of the precipitation phenomenon under different aging conditions, by transmission electronic microscope (TEM) examination of thin foils and electron diffraction. The subsequent chromium-depleted zones are characterized by X-ray microanalysis using scanning transmission electronic microscope (STEM). The superimposition of microstructural time-temperature-precipitation (TTP) and ASTM A262 time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams provides the relationship between aged microstructure and IGC. Moreover, by considering the chromium-depleted zone characteristics, sensitization and desensitization criteria could be established. (2) The electrochemical method involving the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test. The operating conditions of this test were initially optimized using the experimental design method on the bases of the reliability, the selectivity, and the reproducibility of test responses for both annealed and sensitized steels. The TTS diagram of the AISI 316L stainless steel was established using this method. This diagram offers a quantitative assessment of the DOS and a possibility to appreciate the time-temperature equivalence of the IGC sensitization and desensitization. (3) The analytical method based on the chromium diffusion models. Using the IGC sensitization and desensitization criteria established by the microstructural method, numerical solving of the chromium diffusion equations leads to a calculated AISI 316L TTS diagram. Comparison of these three methods gives a clear advantage to the nondestructive DL-EPR test when it is

  6. Higher-order split operator schemes for solving the Schrödinger equation in the time-dependent wave packet method: applications to triatomic reactive scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhigang; Yang, Weitao; Zhang, Dong H

    2012-02-14

    The efficiency of the numerical propagators for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in the wave packet approach to reactive scattering is of vital importance. In this Perspective, we first briefly review the propagators used in quantum reactive scattering calculations and their applications to triatomic reactions. Then we present a detailed comparison of about thirty higher-order split operator propagators for solving the Schrödinger equation with their applications to the wave packet evolution within a one-dimensional Morse potential, and the total reaction probability calculations for the H + HD, H + NH, H + O(2), and F + HD reactions. These four triatomic reactions have quite different dynamic characteristics and thus provide a comprehensive picture of the relative advantages of these higher-order propagation methods for describing reactive scattering dynamics. Our calculations reveal that the most often used second-order split operator method is typically more efficient for a direct reaction, particularly for those involving flat potential energy surfaces. However, the optimal higher-order split operator methods are more suitable for a reaction with resonances and intermediate complexes or a reaction experiencing potential energy surface with fluctuations of considerable amplitude. Three 4th-order and one 6th-order split operator methods, which are most efficient for solving reactive scattering in various conditions among the tested ones, are recommended for general applications. In addition, a brief discussion on the relative performance between the Chebyshev real wave packet method and the split operator method is given. The results in this Perspective are expected to stimulate more applications of (high-order) split operators to the quantum reactive scattering calculation and other related problems.

  7. A new method for direct total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the troposphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently the atmospheric sinks of OH are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink term of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. The first direct measurements of total OH reactivity were performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) [1], [2]. Recently a new method for determining OH reactivity was developed called the comparative reactivity method (CRM) [3]. The measurement principle is based on a competitive reaction between a reactive molecule not normally present in air with OH, and atmospheric OH reactive molecules with OH. The reactive molecule (X), is passed through a Teflon coated glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced into the reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the competing ambient air molecules directly provides the atmospheric total OH reactivity. In the first version of this set up, molecule X is pyrrole (C5H4N) and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). In comparison to the original LIF based system, the PTR-MS has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and commercially available. However, using the PTR-MS for total OH reactivity measurements prevents it from probing the broad variety of volatile organic compounds in ambient air. Moreover, even smaller, less expensive and more portable detectors are available. This work examines the potential for a GC-PID in order to make the total OH reactivity measurement accessible to more practitioners. This study presents measurements of total OH reactivity with a custom built GC-PID (VOC-Analyzer from IUT-Berlin, now ENIT (Environics-IUT GmbH))[4]. The GC-PID is small (260

  8. An adaptive sparse-grid high-order stochastic collocation method for Bayesian inference in groundwater reactive transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guannan; Webster, Clayton G; Gunzburger, Max D

    2012-09-01

    Although Bayesian analysis has become vital to the quantification of prediction uncertainty in groundwater modeling, its application has been hindered due to the computational cost associated with numerous model executions needed for exploring the posterior probability density function (PPDF) of model parameters. This is particularly the case when the PPDF is estimated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. In this study, we develop a new approach that improves computational efficiency of Bayesian inference by constructing a surrogate system based on an adaptive sparse-grid high-order stochastic collocation (aSG-hSC) method. Unlike previous works using first-order hierarchical basis, we utilize a compactly supported higher-order hierar- chical basis to construct the surrogate system, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of computational simulations required. In addition, we use hierarchical surplus as an error indi- cator to determine adaptive sparse grids. This allows local refinement in the uncertain domain and/or anisotropic detection with respect to the random model parameters, which further improves computational efficiency. Finally, we incorporate a global optimization technique and propose an iterative algorithm for building the surrogate system for the PPDF with multiple significant modes. Once the surrogate system is determined, the PPDF can be evaluated by sampling the surrogate system directly with very little computational cost. The developed method is evaluated first using a simple analytical density function with multiple modes and then using two synthetic groundwater reactive transport models. The groundwater models represent different levels of complexity; the first example involves coupled linear reactions and the second example simulates nonlinear ura- nium surface complexation. The results show that the aSG-hSC is an effective and efficient tool for Bayesian inference in groundwater modeling in comparison with conventional

  9. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Yoon, Y S; Kim, M J

    2013-04-01

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (Te) and ion flux (Jion) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring Te and Jion for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  10. Quantitative assessment of alkali-reactive aggregate mineral content through XRD using polished sections as a supplementary tool to RILEM AAR-1 (petrographic method)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Nelia; Sorensen, Bjorn E.; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.

    2012-11-15

    The mineral content of 5 aggregate samples from 4 different countries, including reactive and non-reactive aggregate types, was assessed quantitatively by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using polished sections. Additionally, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to characterize the opal-CT identified in one of the aggregate samples. Critical review of results from polished sections against traditionally powdered specimen has demonstrated that for fine-grained rocks without preferred orientation the assessment of mineral content by XRD using polished sections may represent an advantage over traditional powder specimens. Comparison of data on mineral content and silica speciation with expansion data from PARTNER project confirmed that the presence of opal-CT plays an important role in the reactivity of one of the studied aggregates. Used as a complementary tool to RILEM AAR-1, the methodology suggested in this paper has the potential to improve the strength of the petrographic method.

  11. A new MCNP option: KCORR -- The use of the correlated sampling method to study reactivity effects due to changes of a reactor arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.

    1995-06-01

    The planned advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor has a compact core surrounded by a large pool of heavy water containing a complex arrangement of reflector experimental components. Mocking up the reactor system without the reflector components results in an azimuthally symmetric geometry for which the eigenvalue k{sub eff} can be calculated accurately with diffusion or discrete ordinates methods by using two-dimensional geometry. Here, a new option KCORR for calculating the eigenvalue k{sub eff} of fission reactor arrangements has been implemented in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. This option is based on a matrix method and has the additional feature of applying correlated sampling methods to investigate small reactivity effects that are very likely lost in the statistical uncertainties of two independent program runs with the old option KCODE. For verification of the new program option, calculations of the reactivity worths of the control rod and the safety rod of the FOEHN reactor and the reactivity effects of various components in the reflector pool of the FOEHN reactor were performed with both KCODE and KCORR and compared with measured data. The efficient of MCNP in calculating reactivity changes by using KCORR is improved not only by means of lower statistical uncertainties but also by reducing of computing time.

  12. Time-dependent wave-packet method for the complete determination of S-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael

    1990-01-01

    An alternative time-dependent wave-packet method for treating three-dimensional gas phase reactive atom-diatom collisions is presented. The method employs a nonreactive body-frame wave packet propagation procedure, made possible by judicious use of absorbing optical potentials, a novel scheme for interpolating the wave function from coordinates in one arrangement to those in another and the fact that the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is an initial-value problem. The last feature makes possible a computationally viable and accurate procedure for changing from one arrangement's coordinates to another. In addition, the method allows the determination of S-matrix elements over a wide range of energies from a single wave-packet propagation. The method is illustrated by carrying out detailed calculations of inelastic and reactive scattering in the H + H2 system using the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz potential surface.

  13. Time-dependent wave-packet method for the complete determination of S-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael

    1990-01-01

    An alternative time-dependent wave-packet method for treating three-dimensional gas phase reactive atom-diatom collisions is presented. The method employs a nonreactive body-frame wave packet propagation procedure, made possible by judicious use of absorbing optical potentials, a novel scheme for interpolating the wave function from coordinates in one arrangement to those in another and the fact that the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is an initial-value problem. The last feature makes possible a computationally viable and accurate procedure for changing from one arrangement's coordinates to another. In addition, the method allows the determination of S-matrix elements over a wide range of energies from a single wave-packet propagation. The method is illustrated by carrying out detailed calculations of inelastic and reactive scattering in the H + H2 system using the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz potential surface.

  14. Reactivation steps by 2-PAM of tabun-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase: reducing the computational cost in hybrid QM/MM methods.

    PubMed

    da Silva Gonçalves, Arlan; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Caetano, Melissa Soares; Ramalho, Teodorico Castro

    2014-01-01

    The present work describes a simple integrated Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics method developed to study the reactivation steps by pralidoxime (2-PAM) of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibited by the neurotoxic agent Tabun. The method was tested on an AChE model and showed to be able to corroborate most of the results obtained before, through a more complex and time-consuming methodology, proving to be suitable to this kind of mechanistic study at a lower computational cost.

  15. Hybrid Solution-Adaptive Unstructured Cartesian Method for Large-Eddy Simulation of Detonation in Multi-Phase Turbulent Reactive Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    pulse- detonation engines ( PDE ), stage separation, supersonic cav- ity oscillations, hypersonic aerodynamics, detonation induced structural...ADAPTIVE UNSTRUCTURED CARTESIAN METHOD FOR LARGE-EDDY SIMULATION OF DETONATION IN MULTI-PHASE TURBULENT REACTIVE MIXTURES 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550...CCL Report TR-2012-03-03 Hybrid Solution-Adaptive Unstructured Cartesian Method for Large-Eddy Simulation of Detonation in Multi-Phase Turbulent

  16. Do we really need a large number of particles to simulate bimolecular reactive transport with random walk methods? A kernel density estimation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Random walk particle tracking methods are a computationally efficient family of methods to solve reactive transport problems. While the number of particles in most realistic applications is in the order of 106-109, the number of reactive molecules even in diluted systems might be in the order of fractions of the Avogadro number. Thus, each particle actually represents a group of potentially reactive molecules. The use of a low number of particles may result not only in loss of accuracy, but also may lead to an improper reproduction of the mixing process, limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect as a proxy to model incomplete mixing in porous media. In this work, we propose using a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations that allows getting the expected results for a well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. The idea consists of treating each particle as a sample drawn from the pool of molecules that it represents; this way, the actual location of a tracked particle is seen as a sample drawn from the density function of the location of molecules represented by that given particle, rigorously represented by a kernel density function. The probability of reaction can be obtained by combining the kernels associated to two potentially reactive particles. We demonstrate that the observed deviation in the reaction vs time curves in numerical experiments reported in the literature could be attributed to the statistical method used to reconstruct concentrations (fixed particle support) from discrete particle distributions, and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing. We further explore the evolution of the kernel size with time, linking it to the diffusion process. Our results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve computational efficiency and robustness in reactive transport simulations, and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative mechanistic models and not on a

  17. Reactive transport in porous media for CO2 sequestration: Pore scale modeling using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinfang; Xing, Huilin; Tian, Zhiwei; Pearce, Julie K.; Sedek, Mohamed; Golding, Suzanne D.; Rudolph, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Injection of CO2 subsurface may lead to chemical reactivity of rock where CO2 is dissolved in groundwater. This process can modify pore networks to increase or decrease porosity through mineral dissolution and precipitation. A lattice Boltzmann (LB) based computational model study on the pore scale reactive transport in three dimensional heterogeneous porous media (sandstone consisting of both reactive and non-reactive minerals) is described. This study examines how fluid transport in porous materials subject to reactive conditions is affected by unsteady state local reactions and unstable dissolution fronts. The reaction of a calcite cemented core sub-plug from the Hutton Sandstone of the Surat Basin, Australia, is used as a study case. In particular, the work studies the interaction of acidic fluid (an aqueous solution with an elevated concentration of carbonic acid) with reactive (e.g. calcite) and assumed non-reactive (e.g. quartz) mineral surfaces, mineral dissolution and mass transfer, and resultant porosity change. The proposed model is implemented in our custom LBM code and suitable for studies of multiple mineral reactions with disparate reaction rates. A model for carbonic acid reaction with calcite cemented sandstone in the CO2-water-rock system is verified through laboratory experimental data including micro-CT characterization before and after core reaction at reservoir conditions. The experimentally validated model shows: (1) the dissolution of calcite cement forms conductive channels at the pore scale, and enables the generation of pore throats and connectivity; (2) the model is able to simulate the reaction process until the reaction equilibrium status is achieved (around 1440 days); (3) calcite constituting a volume of around 9.6% of the whole core volume is dissolved and porosity is consequently increased from 1.1% to 10.7% on reaching equilibrium; (4) more than a third of the calcite (constituting 7.4% of the total core volume) is unaffected

  18. UV-Vis microspectrophotometry as a method of differentiation between cotton fibre evidence coloured with reactive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was-Gubala, Jolanta; Starczak, Roza

    2015-05-01

    The main purposes of this study was to assess the usefulness of microspectrophotometry (MSP), both in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible (Vis) range for discriminating single cotton fibres dyed with reactive dyes coming from the same manufacturer, as well as the possibility of evaluation of the concentration of dye in an examine fibre. This study utilised woven cotton fabrics dyed with different concentrations of one-compound reactive dyes with the commercial name Cibacron® (at present Novacron®) as the focus of the MSP analysis. The spectra were recorded in the UV-Vis range between 200 and 800 nm, in transmission mode. The results from this study illustrated that all of the analysed cotton samples dyed with reactive dyes were distinguishable between each other with the use of MSP, mostly in the visible, and also in ultraviolet range. The limit for applied MSP techniques was 0.18% of the concentration of a dye in the textile sample. The results indicate that based on the absorbance measurements for fibres constituting e.g. forensic traces it was not possible to estimate the concentration of the dye in the fibre because Beer's law did not obey. The intra-sample, and inter- sample variation, as well as dichroism effect in a case of a cotton fibres dyed with reactive dye were observed. On the basis of the results obtained for each analysed cotton sample, it was concluded that there was no correlation between colour uniformity in cotton fabric (changes in lightness, red/green and yellow/blue colour) and concentration of the reactive dye.

  19. UV-Vis microspectrophotometry as a method of differentiation between cotton fibre evidence coloured with reactive dyes.

    PubMed

    Was-Gubala, Jolanta; Starczak, Roza

    2015-05-05

    The main purposes of this study was to assess the usefulness of microspectrophotometry (MSP), both in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible (Vis) range for discriminating single cotton fibres dyed with reactive dyes coming from the same manufacturer, as well as the possibility of evaluation of the concentration of dye in an examine fibre. This study utilised woven cotton fabrics dyed with different concentrations of one-compound reactive dyes with the commercial name Cibacron® (at present Novacron®) as the focus of the MSP analysis. The spectra were recorded in the UV-Vis range between 200 and 800nm, in transmission mode. The results from this study illustrated that all of the analysed cotton samples dyed with reactive dyes were distinguishable between each other with the use of MSP, mostly in the visible, and also in ultraviolet range. The limit for applied MSP techniques was 0.18% of the concentration of a dye in the textile sample. The results indicate that based on the absorbance measurements for fibres constituting e.g. forensic traces it was not possible to estimate the concentration of the dye in the fibre because Beer's law did not obey. The intra-sample, and inter- sample variation, as well as dichroism effect in a case of a cotton fibres dyed with reactive dye were observed. On the basis of the results obtained for each analysed cotton sample, it was concluded that there was no correlation between colour uniformity in cotton fabric (changes in lightness, red/green and yellow/blue colour) and concentration of the reactive dye.

  20. Combining field methods and numerical modeling to characterize the flow of a Sr-90 plume through a permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, J.; Bain, J.; Lee, D. R.; Jeen, S.; Blowes, D.

    2012-12-01

    In 1998, a passive remediation system known as the Wall-and-Curtain was installed at the Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada, to prevent a Sr-90 plume present in the lower part of a 12 m thick aquifer from discharging into a nearby swamp. To improve knowledge of the variability of aquifer hydraulic conductivities and groundwater velocities, slug tests and borehole dilution tests were conducted in isolated intervals upgradient of the Wall-and-Curtain using stainless steel drive point piezometers. The measurements from the field study were combined with previous characterization of the hydrogeology of the site to develop a three dimensional physical flow model. The numerical computer code HydroGeoSphere was used to provide an approximate representation of groundwater flow in the aquifer and through the Wall-and-Curtain. Developing a quantitative description of the groundwater flow system is an essential step in understanding the fate of the Sr-90 plume in the Wall-and-Curtain and for conducting meaningful geochemical reactive transport simulations. The model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed hydraulic heads across the site. The results from the field tests were compared with groundwater velocities simulated by the numerical model. The model shows good agreement with the observed heads and acceptable agreement with the field estimates of groundwater velocities, while also showing the deficiencies of the model in accurately simulating flow in the boundary regions of the domain. Ongoing work focuses on the detailed geochemical characterization of the aquifer and the reactive material (i.e., clinoptilolite), which will be used to construct a geochemical reactive transport model to evaluate the potential longevity of the reactive zone in the Wall-and-Curtain.

  1. Method development for thermal analyses testing on Reillex HPQ resin using the advanced reactive system screening tool (ARSST)

    SciTech Connect

    Best, D.

    2016-03-01

    Reillex™ HPQ resin was developed by Los Alamos Laboratory and Reilly Industries Inc. in an effort to increase safety and process efficiency during the recovery and purification of plutonium. Ionac™ A-641, another strong base macroporous anion exchange resin used in the nuclear industry, was known to undergo a runaway reaction in hot nitric acid solutions. Because of this, an extensive amount of thermal analyses testing on the Reillex™ HPQ resin in SRNL was performed in 1999-2001 prior to use. A report on the thermal stability qualification of the Reillex™ HPQ resin in 8M (35%) and 12M (53%) HNO3 was reported in 2000. In 2001, the reactivity of Reillex™ HPQ resin in 14.4M (64%) HNO3 was evaluated. In January of 2001, thermal stability scoping tests were performed on irradiated Reillex™ HPQ resin in 14.4M (64%) HNO3 (as a worst case scenario) and the results sent to Fauske and Associates to calculate a rupture disk size for the HB-Line resin column. A technical report by Fauske and Associates was issued in February 2001 recommending a 2.0” vent line with a rupture disk set pressure of 60 psig. This calculation was based on ARSST thermal analyses scoping tests at SRNL in which 4 grams of dried resin and 6.0 grams of 64% nitric acid in a 10 gram test cell, produced a maximum pressure rate (dP/dt) of 720 psi/min (12 psi/sec) and a maximum temperature of 250 °C. In 2015, a new batch of Reillex™ HPQ resin was manufactured by Vertellus Industries. A test sample of the resin was sent to SRNL to perform acceptance and qualification thermal stability testing using the ARSST. During these tests, method development was performed to ensure that a representative resin to acid ratios were used while running the tests in the ARSST. Fauske and Associates recommended to either use a full test cell representative of the HB-Line column or a 10 gram sample in the test cell that was representative of the ratios of resin to nitric acid in

  2. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-04-15

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  3. A GPU accelerated, discrete time random walk model for simulating reactive transport in porous media using colocation probability function based reaction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. M.; Augarde, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The simulation of reactions in flow through unsaturated porous media is a more complicated process when using particle tracking based models than in continuum based models. In the fomer particles are reacted on an individual particle-to-particle basis using either deterministic or probabilistic methods. This means that particle tracking methods, especially when simulations of reactions are included, are computationally intensive as the reaction simulations require tens of thousands of nearest neighbour searches per time step. Despite this, particle tracking methods merit further study due to their ability to eliminate numerical dispersion, to simulate anomalous transport and incomplete mixing of reactive solutes. A new model has been developed using discrete time random walk particle tracking methods to simulate reactive mass transport in porous media which includes a variation of colocation probability function based methods of reaction simulation from those presented by Benson & Meerschaert (2008). Model development has also included code acceleration via graphics processing units (GPUs). The nature of particle tracking methods means that they are well suited to parallelization using GPUs. The architecture of GPUs is single instruction - multiple data (SIMD). This means that only one operation can be performed at any one time but can be performed on multiple data simultaneously. This allows for significant speed gains where long loops of independent operations are performed. Computationally expensive code elements, such the nearest neighbour searches required by the reaction simulation, are therefore prime targets for GPU acceleration.

  4. Forebody and base region real gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. II - Equilibrium reactive gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1981-01-01

    The factored-implicit, gas-dynamic algorithm has been adapted to the numerical simulation of equilibrium reactive flows. Changes required in the perfect gas version of the algorithm are developed, and the method of coupling gas-dynamic and chemistry variables is discussed. A flow-field solution that approximates a Jovian entry case was obtained by this method and compared with the same solution obtained by HYVIS, a computer program much used for the study of planetary entry. Comparison of surface pressure distribution and stagnation line shock-layer profiles indicates that the two solutions agree well.

  5. QSAR Models for the Reactivation of Sarin Inhibited AChE by Quaternary Pyridinium Oximes Based on Monte Carlo Method.

    PubMed

    Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Veselinović, Jovana B; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Nikolić, Goran M

    2014-11-26

    For three random splits, one-variable models of oximes reactivation of sarin inhibited acetylcholinesterase (logarithm of the AChE reactivation percentage by oximes with concentration of 0.001 M) have been calculated with CORAL software. The total number of considered oximes was 42. Simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) and hydrogen-suppressed graph (HSG) are used to represent the molecular structure. Using CORAL software by means of the calculation with Monte Carlo optimization of the so called correlation weights for the molecular fragments, optimal SMILES-based descriptors were defined, which are correlated with an endpoint for the training set. The predictability of these descriptors for an external test are estimated. In this study hybrid representation HSG together with SMILES was used. The "classic" scheme (i.e. split data into the training set and test set) of building up quantitative structure-activity relationships was employed. Computational experiments indicated that this approach can satisfactorily predict the desired endpoint. Best model had following statistical characteristics n=32, r2= 0.6012, s= 0.279, F= 45 for training and n=10, r2= 0.9301, s= 0.076, Rm2=0.9206 for test set.

  6. A versatile pore-scale multicomponent reactive transport approach based on lattice Boltzmann method: Application to portlandite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ravi A.; Perko, Janez; Jacques, Diederik; De Schutter, Geert; Van Breugel, Klaas; Ye, Guang

    A versatile lattice Boltzmann (LB) based pore-scale multicomponent reactive transport approach is presented in this paper. This approach is intended to capture mineral phase and pore structure evolution resulting from geochemical interactions applicable, for example to model microstructural evolution of hardened cement paste during chemical degradation. In the proposed approach heterogeneous reactions are conceptualized as pseudo-homogenous (volumetric) reactions by introducing an additional source term in the fluid node located at the interface adjacent to a solid node, and not as flux boundaries as used in previously proposed approaches. This allows a complete decoupling of transport and reaction computations, thus different reaction systems can be introduced within the LB framework through coupling with external geochemical codes. A systematic framework for coupling an external geochemical code with the LB including pore geometry evolution is presented, with the generic geochemical code PHREEQC as an example. The developed approach is validated with a set of benchmarks. A first example demonstrates the ability of the developed approach to capture the influence of pH on average portlandite dissolution rate and surface evolution. This example is further extended to illustrate the influence of reactive surface area and spatial arrangement of mineral grains on average dissolution rate. It was demonstrated that both location of mineral grains and surface area play a crucial role in determining average dissolution rate and pore structure evolution.

  7. One pot synthesis of Curcumin-NSAIDs prodrug, spectroscopic characterization, conformational analysis, chemical reactivity, intramolecular interactions and first order hyperpolarizability by DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sangeeta; Gupta, Preeti; Sethi, Arun; Singh, Ranvijay Pratap

    2016-08-01

    A novel Curcumin-NSAIDs prodrug 4-((1E, 3Z, 6E)-3-hydroxy-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-oxohepta-1,3,3-trienyl)-2-methoxyphenyl-2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propanoate (2) derivative was synthesized by Steglich esterification in high yield and characterized with the help of 1H, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, UV, FT-IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The molecular geometry of synthesized compound was calculated in ground state by Density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) using two different basis set 6-31G (d, p) and 6-311G (d, p). Conformational analysis of 2 was carried out to determine the most stable conformation. Stability of the molecule as a result of hyperconjugative interactions and electron delocalization were analysed using Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Intramolecular interactions were analysed by AIM (Atom in molecule) approach. Global and local reactivity descriptors were calculated to study the reactive site within molecule. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies were calculated using time dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated using DFT method and assigned with the help of potential energy distribution (PED). First hyperpolarizability value has been calculated to describe the nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the synthesized compound. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) for synthesized compounds have also been determined to check their electrophilic or nucleophilic reactivity.

  8. Testing single extraction methods and in vitro tests to assess the geochemical reactivity and human bioaccessibility of silver in urban soils amended with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cruz, N; Rodrigues, S M; Tavares, D; Monteiro, R J R; Carvalho, L; Trindade, T; Duarte, A C; Pereira, E; Römkens, Paul F A M

    2015-09-01

    To assess if the geochemical reactivity and human bioaccessibility of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in soils can be determined by routine soil tests commonly applied to other metals in soil, colloidal Ag was introduced to five pots containing urban soils (equivalent to 6.8 mg Ag kg(-1) soil). Following a 45 days stabilization period, the geochemical reactivity was determined by extraction using 0.43 M and 2 M HNO3. The bioaccessibility of AgNPs was evaluated using the Simplified Bioaccessibility Extraction Test (SBET) the "Unified BARGE Method" (UBM), and two simulated lung fluids (modified Gamble's solution (MGS) and artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF)). The amount of Ag extracted by 0.43 M and 2 M HNO3 soil tests was <8% and <50%, respectively of the total amount of Ag added to soils suggesting that the reactivity of Ag present in the soil can be relatively low. The bioaccessibility of Ag as determined by the four in vitro tests ranged from 17% (ALF extraction) to 99% (SBET) indicating that almost all Ag can be released from soil due to specific interactions with the organic ligands present in the simulated body fluids. This study shows that to develop sound soil risk evaluations regarding soil contamination with AgNPs, aspects of Ag biochemistry need to be considered, particularly when linking commonly applied soil tests to human risk assessment.

  9. Method to Prepare Processable Polyimides with Non-Reactive Endgroups Using 1,3-bis(3-Aminophenoxy) Benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polyimide copolymers were obtained containing 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene (APB) and other diamines and dianhydrides and terminating with the appropriate amount of a non-reactive endcapper, such as phthalic anhydride. Homopolymers containing only other diamines and dianhydrides which are not processable under conditions described previously can be made processable by incorporating various amounts of APB, depending on the chemical structures of the diamines and dianhydrides used. Polyimides that are more rigid in nature require more APB to impart processability than polyimides that are less rigid in nature. The copolymers that result from using APB to enhance processability have a unique combination of properties including excellent thin film properties, low pressure processing (200 psi and below), improved toughness, improved solvent resistance, improved adhesive properties, improved composite mechanical properties, long term melt stability (several hours at 390 C), and lower melt viscosities.

  10. Method To Prepare Processable Polyimides With Reactive Endogroups Using 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Polyimide copolymers were obtained containing 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene (APB) and other diamines and dianhydrides and terminating with the appropriate amount of a non-reactive endcapper, such as phthalic anhydride. Homopolymers containing only other diamines and dianhydrides which are not processable under conditions described previously can be made processable by incorporating various amounts of APB, depending on the chemical structures of the diamines and dianhydrides used. Polyimides that are more rigid in nature require more APB to impart processability than polyimides that are less rigid in nature. The copolymers that result from using APB to enhance processability have a unique combination of properties including excellent thin film properties, low pressure processing (200 psi and below), improved toughness, improved solvent resistance, improved adhesive properties, improved composite mechanical properties, long term melt stability (several hours at 390 C), and lower melt viscosities.

  11. A Method for Compensating Customer Voltage Drops due to Nighttime Simultaneous Charging of EVs Utilizing Reactive Power Injection from Battery Chargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Taku; Kabasawa, Yuichiro; Fukushima, Kentaro; Nemoto, Koshichi; Uemura, Satoshi

    When we consider the global warming, the reduction of CO2 emission is one of the most important problems which require urgent solutions. One option is to integrate low-CO2-emission generators to the grid as much as possible. Another option is to replace inefficient vehicles based on internal-combustion engines with electric ones (EVs). Due to the latter, we can easily estimate that most consumers will charge EVs' batteries at nighttime. Thus, excessive voltage drops due to the nighttime simultaneous charging are supposed to be a possible future problem. This paper proposes a method for compensating the voltage drops by injecting reactive power from EV battery chargers.

  12. A Chebyshev method for state-to-state reactive scattering using reactant-product decoupling: OH + H2 → H2O + H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvitaš, Marko T.; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2013-08-01

    We extend a recently developed wave packet method for computing the state-to-state quantum dynamics of AB + CD → ABC + D reactions [M. T. Cvitaš and S. C. Althorpe, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 4557 (2009)], 10.1021/jp8111974 to include the Chebyshev propagator. The method uses the further partitioned approach to reactant-product decoupling, which uses artificial decoupling potentials to partition the coordinate space of the reaction into separate reactant, product, and transition-state regions. Separate coordinates and basis sets can then be used that are best adapted to each region. We derive improved Chebyshev partitioning formulas which include Mandelshtam-and-Taylor-type decoupling potentials, and which are essential for the non-unitary discrete variable representations that must be used in 4-atom reactive scattering calculations. Numerical tests on the fully dimensional OH + H2 → H2O + H reaction for J = 0 show that the new version of the method is as efficient as the previously developed split-operator version. The advantages of the Chebyshev propagator (most notably the ease of parallelization for J > 0) can now be fully exploited in state-to-state reactive scattering calculations on 4-atom reactions.

  13. Simulation of reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady flows in solid rocket motors: Efficient strategy using Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibra, A.; Dupays, J.; Murrone, A.; Laurent, F.; Massot, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we tackle the issue of the accurate simulation of evaporating and reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady gaseous flows. In solid propulsion, aluminum particles are included in the propellant to improve the global performances but the distributed combustion of these droplets in the chamber is suspected to be a driving mechanism of hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities. The faithful prediction of two-phase interactions is a determining step for future solid rocket motor optimization. When looking at saving computational ressources as required for industrial applications, performing reliable simulations of two-phase flow instabilities appears as a challenge for both modeling and scientific computing. The size polydispersity, which conditions the droplet dynamics, is a key parameter that has to be accounted for. For moderately dense sprays, a kinetic approach based on a statistical point of view is particularly appropriate. The spray is described by a number density function and its evolution follows a Williams-Boltzmann transport equation. To solve it, we use Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods, based on a continuous discretization of the size phase space into sections, which offer an accurate treatment of the polydispersion. The objective of this paper is threefold: first to derive a new Two Size Moment Multi-Fluid model that is able to tackle evaporating polydisperse sprays at low cost while accurately describing the main driving mechanisms, second to develop a dedicated evaporation scheme to treat simultaneously mass, moment and energy exchanges with the gas and between the sections. Finally, to design a time splitting operator strategy respecting both reactive two-phase flow physics and cost/accuracy ratio required for industrial computations. Using a research code, we provide 0D validations of the new scheme before assessing the splitting technique's ability on a reference two-phase flow acoustic case. Implemented in the industrial

  14. A new method of wound treatment: targeted therapy of skin wounds with reactive oxygen species-responsive nanoparticles containing SDF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tao; Jiang, Hao; Yu, Yuan; He, Fang; Ji, Shi-zhao; Liu, Ying-ying; Wang, Zhong-shan; Xiao, Shi-chu; Tang, Cui; Wang, Guang-Yi; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To accelerate wound healing through promoting vascularization by using reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive nanoparticles loaded with stromal cell-derived factor-1α(SDF-1α). Methods The ROS-reactive nanomaterial poly-(1,4-phenyleneacetone dimethylene thioketal) was synthesized, and its physical and chemical properties were characterized. ROS-responsive nanoparticles containing SDF-1α were prepared through a multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method. The loading capacity, stability, activity of the encapsulated protein, toxicity, and in vivo distribution of these nanoparticles were determined. These nanoparticles were administered by intravenous infusion to mice with full-thickness skin defects to study their effects on the directed chemotaxis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, wound vascularization, and wound healing. Results The synthesized ROS-reactive organic polymer poly-(1,4-phenyleneacetone dimethylene thioketal) possessed a molecular weight of approximately 11.5 kDa with a dispersity of 1.97. ROS-responsive nanoparticles containing SDF-1α were prepared with an average diameter of 110 nm and a drug loading capacity of 1.8%. The encapsulation process showed minimal effects on the activity of SDF-1α, and it could be effectively released from the nanoparticles in the presence of ROS. Encapsulated SDF-1α could exist for a long time in blood. In mice with full-thickness skin defects, SDF-1α was effectively released and targeted to the wounds, thus promoting the chemotaxis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells toward the wound and its periphery, inducing wound vascularization, and accelerating wound healing. PMID:26527874

  15. Chemically Adjusting Plasma Temperature, Energy and Reactivity (CAPTEAR) Method Using NOx and Combustion for Selective Synthesis of Sc3N@C80 Metallic Nitride Fullerenes

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Steven; Thompson, M. Corey; Coumbe, H. Louie; Mackey, Mary A.; Coumbe, Curtis E.; Phillips, J. Paige

    2008-01-01

    Goals are (1) to selectively synthesize MNFs in lieu of empty-cage fullerenes (e.g., C60, C70) without compromising MNF yield and (2) to test our hypothesis that MNFs possess a different set of optimal formation parameters than empty-cage fullerenes. In this work, we introduce a novel approach for the selective synthesis of metallic nitride fullerenes (MNFs). This new method is “Chemically Adjusting Plasma Temperature, Energy and Reactivity” (CAPTEAR). The CAPTEAR approach with copper nitrate hydrate uses NOx vapor from NOx generating solid reagents, air and combustion to “tune” the temperature, energy and reactivity of the plasma environment. The extent of temperature, energy and reactive environment is stoichiometrically varied until optimal conditions for selective MNF synthesis are achieved. Analysis of soot extracts indicate that percentages of C60 and Sc3N@C80 are inversely related, whereas the percentages of C70 and higher empty-cage C2n fullerenes are largely unaffected. Hence, there may be a “competitive link” in the formation and mechanism of C60 and Sc3N@C80. Using this CAPTEAR method, purified MNFs (96% Sc3N@C80, 12 mg) have been obtained in soot extracts without a significant penalty in milligram yield when compared to control soot extracts (4% Sc3N@C80, 13 mg Sc3N@C80). The CAPTEAR process with Cu(NO3)2·2.5 H2O uses an exothermic nitrate moiety to suppress empty-cage fullerene formation, whereas Cu functions as a catalyst additive to offset the reactive plasma environment and boost the Sc3N@C80 MNF production. PMID:18052069

  16. Numerical methods for improving sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of virus transport simulated using sorptive-reactive processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, G.; Hill, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Using one- and two-dimensional homogeneous simulations, this paper addresses challenges associated with sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation for virus transport simulated using sorptive-reactive processes. Head, flow, and conservative- and virus-transport observations are considered. The paper examines the use of (1) observed-value weighting, (2) breakthrough-curve temporal moment observations, and (3) the significance of changes in the transport time-step size. The results suggest that (1) sensitivities using observed-value weighting are more susceptible to numerical solution variability, (2) temporal moments of the breakthrough curve are a more robust measure of sensitivity than individual conservative-transport observations, and (3) the transport-simulation time step size is more important than the inactivation rate in solution and about as important as at least two other parameters, reflecting the ease with which results can be influenced by numerical issues. The approach presented allows more accurate evaluation of the information provided by observations for estimation of parameters and generally improves the potential for reasonable parameter-estimation results. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Method to overcome photoreaction, a serious drawback to the use of dichlorofluorescin in evaluation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Matsugo, Seiichi; Sasai, Masaaki; Xu, Baohui; Aoyama, Kohji; Takeuchi, Toru

    2003-05-16

    Non-fluorescent dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) was converted to fluorescent products by photo-irradiation during observations with spectrofluorometer and fluorescence microscopy. Photo-irradiation of DCFH at 250, 300, 330, 400, 500, or 600 nm generated fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF), an oxidation product of DCFH, and an unrecognized fluorescent product. The ratio of the unknown product to DCF varied from 0.15 to 8.21 depending on wavelength. Although reactive oxygen species scavengers, such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, and sodium azide, did not suppress the increase in non-specified fluorescence, reagents such as ascorbic acid, mercaptopropionyl glycine, and methoxycinnamic acid, in a cell-free system, almost completely suppressed it with little effect on the fluorescence of DCF. Meanwhile, ascorbic acid also suppressed non-specified fluorescence in cells, but not completely. At low concentrations of DCFH, the speed of increasing fluorescence was considerably retarded, to such a degree that the fluorescence increase in cells during fluorescence microscopic observation was negligible. The addition, at the time of evaluation, of the above reagents to cell-free systems and, in cell systems, reducing the concentration of DCFH, effectively suppressed the photoreaction of DCFH.

  18. On the behavior of reduced graphene oxide based electrodes coated with dispersed platinum by alternate current methods in the electrochemical degradation of reactive dyes.

    PubMed

    Del Río, A I; García, C; Molina, J; Fernández, J; Bonastre, J; Cases, F

    2017-09-01

    The electrochemical behavior of different carbon-based electrodes with and without nanoparticles of platinum electrochemically dispersed on their surface has been studied. Among others, reduced graphene oxide based electrodes was used to determine the best conditions for the decolorization/degradation of the reactive dye C.I. Reactive Orange 4 in sulfuric medium. Firstly, the electrochemical behavior was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Secondly, different electrolyses were performed using two cell configurations: cell with anodic and cathodic compartments separated (divided configuration) and without any separation (undivided configuration). The best results were obtained when reduced graphene oxide based anodes were used. The degree of decolorization was monitored by spectroscopic methods and high performance liquid chromatography. It was found that all of them followed pseudo-first order kinetics. When reduced graphene oxide-based electrodes coated with dispersed platinum by alternate current methods electrodes were used, the lowest energy consumption and the higher decolorization kinetics rate were obtained. Scanning Electronic Microscopy was used to observe the morphological surface differences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Solution to Reactive Transport in Porous Media Using the Preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov Method

    SciTech Connect

    Luanjing Guo; Hai Huang; Derek Gaston; Cody Permann; David Andrs; George Redden; Chuan Lu; Don Fox; Yoshiko Fujita

    2013-03-01

    Modeling large multicomponent reactive transport systems in porous media is particularly challenging when the governing partial differential algebraic equations (PDAEs) are highly nonlinear and tightly coupled due to complex nonlinear reactions and strong solution-media interactions. Here we present a preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solution approach to solve the governing PDAEs in a fully coupled and fully implicit manner. A well-known advantage of the JFNK method is that it does not require explicitly computing and storing the Jacobian matrix during Newton nonlinear iterations. Our approach further enhances the JFNK method by utilizing physics-based, block preconditioning and a multigrid algorithm for efficient inversion of the preconditioner. This preconditioning strategy accounts for self- and optionally, cross-coupling between primary variables using diagonal and off-diagonal blocks of an approximate Jacobian, respectively. Numerical results are presented demonstrating the efficiency and massive scalability of the solution strategy for reactive transport problems involving strong solution-mineral interactions and fast kinetics. We found that the physics-based, block preconditioner significantly decreases the number of linear iterations, directly reducing computational cost; and the strongly scalable algebraic multigrid algorithm for approximate inversion of the preconditioner leads to excellent parallel scaling performance.

  20. Adjusting for bias in C-reactive protein levels when using a vitros slide method in infants.

    PubMed

    Elabiad, Mohamad T; Arheart, Kristopher L; Korones, Sheldon B; Pourcyrous, Massroor

    2014-11-01

    Low total serum protein levels may cause a positive bias on C-reactive protein (CRP) detected by the Vitros 250 Chemistry System (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics, Inc., Johnson & Johnson Co., Raritan, NJ). Low total serum protein levels are observed in some infants. Our objective was to define a cutoff value for normal levels of CRP measured on the Vitros System that is comparable to the cutoff value of 1.0 mg/dL measured by rate nephelometry on a Beckman Array System (Beckman Instruments Inc., Fullerton, CA). CRP was prospectively measured on the same serum sample on Vitros and Beckman systems. Using a result of ≥1.0 as the "gold standard" definition of an abnormal CRP, measures of association were calculated. CRP was measured in 981 blood samples that were collected from 361 infants. A cutoff CRP level using the Vitros system at 1.5 mg/dL had the highest sensitivity and negative predictive value comparable to 1.0 mg/dL measured by nephelometry. By regression analysis, each increase by 1 mg/dL by nephelometry caused an increase by 1.5 mg/dL on the Vitros system (R(2) = 0.94; p < 0.001; slope = 0.66; 95% confidence intervals, 0.65, 0.67). In infants, when measuring CRP levels by Vitros CRP slide system, a normal reference level of 1.5 mg/dL instead of 1 mg/dL should be used. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Most Anti-BrdU Antibodies React with 2′-Deoxy-5-Ethynyluridine — The Method for the Effective Suppression of This Cross-Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strunin, Dmytro; Rosenberg, Ivan; Koberna, Karel

    2012-01-01

    5-Bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and 2′-deoxy-5-ethynyluridine (EdU) are widely used as markers of replicated DNA. While BrdU is detected using antibodies, the click reaction typically with fluorescent azido-dyes is used for EdU localisation. We have performed an analysis of ten samples of antibodies against BrdU with respect to their reactivity with EdU. Except for one sample all the others evinced reactivity with EdU. A high level of EdU persists in nuclear DNA even after the reaction of EdU with fluorescent azido-dyes if the common concentration of dye is used. Although a ten-time increase of azido-dye concentration resulted in a decrease of the signal provided by anti-BrdU antibodies, it also resulted in a substantial increase of the non-specific signal. We have shown that this unwanted reactivity is effectively suppressed by non-fluorescent azido molecules. In this respect, we have tested two protocols of the simultaneous localisation of incorporated BrdU and EdU. They differ in the mechanism of the revelation of incorporated BrdU for the reaction with antibodies. The first one was based on the use of hydrochloric acid, the second one on the incubation of samples with copper(I) ions. The use of hydrochloric acid resulted in a significant increase of the non-specific signal. In the case of the second method, no such effect was observed. PMID:23272138

  2. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture

    DOE PAGES

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B.; ...

    2015-12-16

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. We observed several geometric parameters in order to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. Additionally, the architecture offers a route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials.

  3. A method for predicting the performance of packed columns operating with a reactive scrubbing liquid that control gaseous air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Clayton R

    2002-04-01

    A method for predicting the performance of packed columns that control gaseous air pollutants has been developed that exploits the advances in both computer software and hardware commonly used by practicing engineers. The solution of the simultaneous partial differential equations that describe the absorption process in packed columns that occurs in the presence of chemical reaction is obtained by converting the partial differential equations to systems of ordinary differential equations. These systems of ordinary differential equations are then solved using the method of lines along with a variable step, variable order numerical method. The method is applicable to systems in which there are multiple reactions within the liquid phase. The reactions can be of any order and can be reversible. The programming is simple and the machine running time is minimal. The method is illustrated here with an example.

  4. Piezoelectric Properties of Bismuth Layer-Structured Ferroelectric Ceramics with a Preferred Orientation Processed by the Reactive Templated Grain Growth Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Tsuguto; Tani, Toshihiko; Saito, Yasuyoshi

    1999-09-01

    Dense CaBi4Ti4O15 (CBT) and Na0.475Ca0.05Bi4.475Ti4O15 (NCBT) ceramics with a highly preferred {001} orientation were prepared by the reactive templated grain growth (RTGG) method. Plate-like Bi4Ti3O12 (BIT) particles were synthesized by a molten salt technique and used as the reactive template. The template particles were mixed with other oxide and carbonate powders and aligned by tape-casting. During the sintering, oriented CBT and NCBT were formed in situ topotaxially on the oriented BIT particles, and textured CBT and NCBT ceramics were eventually fabricated by the templated grain growth and densification. The Lotgering {001} orientation degree of the textured ceramics exceeded 90% for secondary-laminate sintered specimens. Textured CBT and NCBT ceramics poled in the perpendicular direction to the preferred <001> axis exhibited electromechanical coupling coefficient (k33) and piezoelectric coefficients (d33 and g33) three times higher than the values for nontextured ceramics with the same composition.

  5. Development and validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography method for the evaluation of niflumic acid cross-reactivity of two commercial immunoassays for cannabinoids in urine.

    PubMed

    Kovatsi, Leda; Pouliopoulos, Athanasios; Papadaki, Antonia; Samanidou, Victoria; Tsoukali, Heleni

    2010-05-01

    Niflumic acid is a nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug widely prescribed in Greece. We recently noticed that this drug cross-reacts for cannabinoids in a kinetic interaction of microparticles in a solution (KIMS) immunoassay method but does not in an enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) immunoassay method. The objective of the study was to develop and validate a high-performance liquid chromatographic method in order to evaluate niflumic acid cross-reactivity in two commercial immunoassays for cannabinoids in urine, both in niflumic acid standards as well as in urine specimens obtained from subjects receiving niflumic acid. Urine niflumic acid standards were prepared in drug-free urine at 13 concentrations ranging from 1.25 to 1000 microg/mL. The standards gave presumptive positive cannabinoids results when analyzed by the KIMS immunoassay method when the concentration was above 2.5 microg/mL. None of the prepared standards gave a false-positive cannabinoid result when analyzed by the EMIT immunoassay method. By applying a 50 ng/mL cutoff for cannabinoids in these assays, all 55 urine specimens collected from the 5 subjects who participated gave negative results by the EMIT and false-positive results by the KIMS immunoassay method. It is concluded that KIMS is more prone to cross-reactions by niflumic acid compared to EMIT. Therefore, all positive screening tests for cannabinoids obtained by KIMS should be confirmed by another technique.

  6. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  7. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  8. Finite temperature application of the corrected propagator method to reactive dynamics in a condensed-phase environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    The recently proposed mixed quantum-classical method is extended to applications at finite temperatures. The method is designed to treat complex systems consisting of a low-dimensional quantum part (the primary system) coupled to a dissipative bath described classically. The method is based on a formalism showing how to systematically correct the approximate zeroth-order evolution rule. The corrections are defined in terms of the total quantum Hamiltonian and are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The evolution of the primary system is governed by the corrected propagator yielding the exact quantum dynamics. The method has been tested on a standard model system describing proton transfer in a condensed-phase environment: a symmetric double-well potential bilinearly coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. Flux correlation functions and thermal rate constants have been calculated at two different temperatures for a range of coupling strengths. The results have been compared to the fully quantum simulations of Topaler and Makri [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 7500 (1994)] with the real path integral method.

  9. Reactivity of H 2O 2 with radiation produced free radicals: Steady state radiolysis methods for estimating the rate constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Moorthy, P. N.; Rao, K. N.

    A new steady state radiolysis method for the determination of the rate constants of reaction of H 2O 2 with solute radicals derived by reaction with radiation produced OH radicals is described. The values so obtained are comparable with the ones obtained by the method described by Soylemez and Balkas in the past. A method similar to the latter has been employed to determine the rate constant of reaction of H 2O 2 with solute radicals derived from e -aq reaction. In the case of the (CH 3) 2 COH radical which can be generated by either reaction of OH with isopropanol or e -aq with acetone, the three methods give values agreeing with each other within ± 15% (viz. 2.7 ± 0.4 × 10 5 dm 3 mol -1 s -1). The reaction of the solute radicals with H 2O 2 is considered in the light of known one-electron redox potentials, and the limitations of the applicability of the methods described here are discussed.

  10. In situ visualization of plasma cells producing antibodies reactive to Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis: the application of the enzyme-labeled antigen method

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Y; Tsuge, S; Takeda, H; Hasegawa, Y; Shiogama, K; Onouchi, T; Inada, K; Sawasaki, T; Tsutsumi, Y

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone periodontal pathogen. Histologocally, the gingival tissue in periodontitis shows dense infiltration of plasma cells. However, antigens recognized by antibodies secreted from the immunocytes remain unknown. The enzyme-labeled antigen method was applied to detecting plasma cells producing P. gingivalis-specific antibodies in biopsied gingival tissue of periodontitis. N-terminally biotinylated P. gingivalis antigens, Ag53 and four gingipain domains (Arg-pro, Arg-hgp, Lys-pro and Lys-hgp) were prepared by the cell-free protein synthesis system using wheatgerm extract. With these five labeled proteins as probes, 20 lesions of periodontitis were evaluated. With the AlphaScreen method, antibodies against any one of the five P. gingivalis antigens were detected in 11 (55%) serum samples and 17 (85%) tissue extracts. Using the enzyme-labeled antigen method on paraformaldehyde-fixed frozen sections of gingival tissue, plasma cells were labeled with any one of the five antigens in 17 (94%) of 18 specimens, in which evaluable plasma cells were detected. The positivity rates in periodontitis were significantly higher than those found previously in radicular cysts (20% in sera and 33% in tissue extracts with the AlphaScreen method, and 25% with the enzyme-labeled antigen method). Our findings directly indicate that antibodies reactive to P. gingivalis are locally produced in the gingival lesions, and that inflammatory reactions against P. gingivalis are involved in periodontitis. PMID:24698402

  11. Interactive chemical reactivity exploration.

    PubMed

    Haag, Moritz P; Vaucher, Alain C; Bosson, Maël; Redon, Stéphane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-10-20

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the samson programming environment.

  12. Evaluation of scavenging rate constants of DOPA and tyrosine enantiomers against multiple reactive oxygen species and methyl radical as measured with ESR trapping method.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Takemoto, Tsubasa

    2015-04-15

    The scavenging rates of DOPA (dl- and l-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)alanine) and Tyr (tyrosine (dl- and l-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)alanine)) against five reactive oxygen species (ROS) and methyl radical were measured with the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping method and the scavenging rate constants of DOPA and Tyr were determined. The scavenging rate constants for multiple active species increased in the order of O2(-)

  13. A Facile, Non-reactive Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) Detection Method Enabled by Ion Chromatography with UV Detector.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingrui; Wang, Junli; Chen, Baiyang; Wang, Lei

    2017-07-24

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present ubiquitously in natural environment and nowadays widely used in water and wastewater treatment processes for pollutant control. However, current analytical methods for H2O2 inevitably require reactions between H2O2 and other reactants to yield signals, thus likely subjective to interferences of coexisting colored, oxidative, and reductive compounds. In order to overcome these barriers, we herein for the first time propose to analyze H2O2 by ion chromatography (IC) equipped with ultraviolet (UV) detector. The proposal lies in the principles that H2O2 can deprotonate to hydroperoxyl ion (HO2-) when eluent pH is greater than the acid-dissociation coefficient of H2O2 (pKa = 11.6), and after separation from other compounds via IC column H2O2 can be quantified by a UV detector. Under favorable operation conditions, this method has successfully achieved acceptable recoveries (> 92%) of H2O2 dosed to ultrapure and natural waters, a calibration curve with R2 > 0.99 for a wide range of H2O2 concentrations from 0.1 to 50 mg/L, and a relatively lower method detection limit (0.027 mg/L) than conventional spectrophotometric methods (usually 0.1 mg/L). In addition, this approach was shown to be capable of distinguishing H2O2 from neighboring anions (e.g., fluoride) and organics (e.g., glycolate) or in the presence of monochloramine, suggesting that it is more insensitive to colored compound, oxidants, or reductants as long as it does not react quickly with H2O2. Hence, this study proves the combination of IC and UV detector a facile and reliable method for H2O2 measurement in water.

  14. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  15. A comparison of the ability of a new bispyridinium oxime--1-(4-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)-4-(4-carbamoylpyridinium)butane dibromide and currently used oximes to reactivate nerve agent-inhibited rat brain acetylcholinesterase by in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Kuca, K; Kassa, J

    2003-12-01

    The efficacy of a new bispyridinium oxime 1-(4-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)-4-(4-carbamoylpyridinium)butane dibromide, called K048, and currently used oximes (pralidoxime, obidoxime, the oxime HI-6) to reactivate acetylcholinesterase inhibited by various nerve agents (sarin, tabun, cyclosarin, VX) was tested by in vitro methods. The new oxime K048 was found to be a more efficacious reactivator of nerve agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase than pralidoxime (in the case of VX, tabun and cyclosarin), obidoxime (cyclosarin and tabun) and HI-6 (tabun) but it did not reach the efficacy of currently used oximes for the reactivation of acetylcholinesterase inhibited by sarin. Thus, the oxime K048 seems to be a relatively efficacious broad spectrum acetylcholinesterase reactivator and, therefore, it could be useful for the treatment of a nerve agent-exposed population if information about detection of the type of nerve agent is not available.

  16. The photoactivity of titanium dioxide coatings with silver nanoparticles prepared by sol-gel and reactive magnetron sputtering methods - comparative studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kądzioła, Kinga; Piwoński, Ireneusz; Kisielewska, Aneta; Szczukocki, Dominik; Krawczyk, Barbara; Sielski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited on silicon substrates using two different methods: sol-gel dip-coating (SG) and reactive magnetron sputtering (MS). In order to obtain anatase phase, as-prepared coatings were calcined at 500 °C in air. Subsequently, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were grown on the surface of TiO2 coatings by photoreduction of silver ions, initiated by illumination of the UV lamp operated at λ = 365 nm. The concentrations of silver ions were 0.1 mmol dm-3 and 1.0 mmol dm-3. Coatings immersed in these solutions were illuminated during 5 min and 30 min. The coating thicknesses, evaluated by ellipsometry, were 118 nm and 147 nm for SG and MS methods, respectively. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging revealed that the surface roughness of TiO2 coating prepared by MS is about 6 times larger as compared to coatings prepared by SG method. The size of AgNPs deposited on SG and MS coatings were in the range of 17-132 nm and 54-103 nm respectively. The photoactivity of AgNPs/TiO2 coatings was determined by the measurement of the decomposition rate of bisphenol A (BPA). The concentration of BPA before and after illumination under UV light (λ = 365 nm) was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It was found that AgNPs enhance the photoactivity of the TiO2 coatings.

  17. Detection of reactive oxygen species during the cell cycle under normal culture conditions using a modified fixed-sample staining method.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Chia-Ling; Yang, Kao-Chi; Ma, Ching-Ting; Choi, Pui-Ching; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    We developed an alternative method of simultaneously monitoring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular oxidative responses using the oxidation-sensitive fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein (DCF) in fixed samples. In this study, we evaluated the ability of this method to detect ROS generation during the cell cycle under normal culture conditions using flow cytometric analyses. Among the fixatives tested, only acetone and paraformaldehyde did not alter the endogenous oxidation of the responsive dye 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-H2DCFDA), which is a chloromethyl derivative of H2DCFDA. Only acetone fixation followed by staining with propidium iodide was able to detect ROS generation during the cell cycle without altering DCF oxidation. Further thymidine treatment led to cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase followed by the downregulation of total intracellular ROS. Paraformaldehyde-based fixation enabled the evaluation of ROS generation by immunostaining at a different phase of the cell cycle, whereas MPM2 co-staining enabled identification of the specific mitotic phase. This study demonstrates a modified fixed-sample method that can be used to measure intracellular ROS production during the cell cycle using standard immunostaining techniques.

  18. [Development of a method for measuring dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and dissolved ferrous iron in large batch in pore water samples of sediments with micro-volumes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhu, Chun-Gang; Di, Xu; Ding, Shi-Ming

    2014-04-01

    A method was established to measure the concentrations of dissolved reactive phosphate (DRP) and dissolved ferrous iron (Fe) in micro-volume solution samples through colorimetric determination in large batch using a 384-well Microplate Spectrophotometer. Concentrations of DRP and dissolved Fe were determined by the molybdenum blue and phenanthroline colorimetric methods, respectively. The results showed that the sample consumption used for each parameter was between 20 and 50 microL after dilution, and the detection limits for DRP and dissolved Fe were 0.006 mg x L(-1) and 0.010 mg x L(-1) respectively, while the analytical precision varied between 1% and 5%. The established method was applied to measure DRP and dissolved Fe in pore waters of sediment profiles in Lake Taihu, which were collected by a high-resolution Peeper (HR-Peeper) device with a vertical resolution of 2 mm. The results showed a simultaneous increase of DRP and dissolved Fe in their concentrations with the depth of two sediment profiles investigated.

  19. Efficient method for the determination of extreme-ultraviolet optical constants in reactive materials: application to scandium and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspenskii, Yu. A.; Seely, John F.; Popov, N. L.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Pershin, Yu. P.; Kondratenko, V. V.

    2004-02-01

    The chemical reaction of a sample with atmospheric gases causes a significant error in the determinantion of the complex refractive index n=1-δ+iβ in the extreme-ultraviolet region. The protection of samples removes this effect but hampers the interpretation of measurements. To overcome this difficulty, we derive the exact dependences on film thickness of the reflectivity and transmissivity of a protected film. These dependences greatly simplify the determination of δ and β when the spectra of several films with different thickness and identical protection are measured. They also allow the verification of the δ(ω) obtained from the Kramers-Kronig relation and even make the Kramers-Kronig method unnecessary in many cases. As a practical application, the optical constants of Sc and Ti are determined at ℏω=18-70 eV and 18-99 eV, respectively. The essential feature of our experimental technique is deposition of a film sample directly on a silicon photodiode that allows easy operation with both thin (~10-nm) and thick (~100-nm) films. The comparison of calculated reflectivities of Si-Sc multilayers with the measured values shows the high accuracy of the determined δ(ω) and β(ω).

  20. Modelling of Thermal Advective Reactive Flow in Hydrothermal Mineral Systems Using an Implicit Time-stepped Finite Element Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, P. G.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding chemical and thermal processes taking place in hydrothermal mineral deposition systems could well be a key to unlocking new mineral reserves through improved targeting of exploration efforts. To aid in this understanding it is very helpful to be able to model such processes with sufficient fidelity to test process hypotheses. To gain understanding, it is often sufficient to obtain semi-quantitative results that model the broad aspects of the complex set of thermal and chemical effects taking place in hydrothermal systems. For example, it is often sufficient to gain an understanding of where thermal, geometric and chemical factors converge to precipitate gold (say) without being perfectly precise about how much gold is precipitated. The traditional approach is to use incompressible Darcy flow together with the Boussinesq approximation. From the flow field, the heat equation is used to advect-conduct the heat. The flow field is also used to transport solutes by solving an advection-dispersion-diffusion equation. The reactions in the fluid and between fluid and rock act as source terms for these advection-dispersion equations. Many existing modelling systems that are used for simulating such systems use explicit time marching schemes and finite differences. The disadvantage of this approach is the need to work on rectilinear grids and the number of time steps required by the Courant condition in the solute transport step. The second factor can be particularly significant if the chemical system is complex, requiring (at a minimum) an equilibrium calculation at each grid point at each time step. In the approach we describe, we use finite elements rather than finite differences, and the pressure, heat and advection-dispersion equations are solved implicitly. The general idea is to put unconditional numerical stability of the time integration first, and let accuracy assume a secondary role. It is in this sense that the method is semi-quantiative. However

  1. Investigate the complex process in particle-fluid based surface generation technology using reactive molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuesong; Li, Haiyan; Zhao, Fu

    2017-07-01

    Particle-fluid based surface generation process has already become one of the most important materials processing technology for many advanced materials such as optical crystal, ceramics and so on. Most of the particle-fluid based surface generation technology involves two key process: chemical reaction which is responsible for surface softening; physical behavior which is responsible for materials removal/deformation. Presently, researchers cannot give a reasonable explanation about the complex process in the particle-fluid based surface generation technology because of the small temporal-spatial scale and the concurrent influence of physical-chemical process. Molecular dynamics (MD) method has already been proved to be a promising approach for constructing effective model of atomic scale phenomenon and can serve as a predicting simulation tool in analyzing the complex surface generation mechanism and is employed in this research to study the essence of surface generation. The deformation and piles of water molecule is induced with the feeding of abrasive particle which justifies the property mutation of water at nanometer scale. There are little silica molecule aggregation or materials removal because the water-layer greatly reduce the strength of mechanical interaction between particle and materials surface and minimize the stress concentration. Furthermore, chemical effect is also observed at the interface: stable chemical bond is generated between water and silica which lead to the formation of silconl and the reaction rate changes with the amount of water molecules in the local environment. Novel ring structure is observed in the silica surface and it is justified to be favored of chemical reaction with water molecule. The siloxane bond formation process quickly strengthened across the interface with the feeding of abrasive particle because of the compressive stress resulted by the impacting behavior.

  2. A Flow Cytometry-based Method for the Screening of Nanomaterial-induced Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Leukocytes Subpopulations in Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jantzen, Kim; Brown, David M; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen

    2017-07-10

    To date, the use and translation of nanomedicine from the laboratory to the clinic has been relatively slow. Among other issues, one of the reasons for this tardiness is the lack of the availability of quick and reliable toxicity tools for the screening of nanomaterials (NMs). In this investigation, we apply a flow cytometry-based method for the detection of nanomaterial-induced oxidative stress by measurement of reactive oxygen species production in specific leukocyte subpopulations in human whole blood. The screening of a panel of relevant nanomedical-associated materials (liposomes, silica, iron oxide and functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes) demonstrated that only the carbon nanotubes induced oxidative stress in human circulating leukocytes. In summary, we apply and corroborate a flow cytometry-based method for the simple and effective measurement of NM-induced oxidative stress in human blood subpopulations after realistic and relevant exposure scenarios which is extremely useful in future toxicological applications. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  3. Development and testing of an online method to measure ambient fine particulate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) based on the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, L. E.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-04-01

    An online, semi-continuous instrument to measure fine particle (PM2.5) reactive oxygen species (ROS) was developed based on the fluorescent probe 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH). Parameters that influence probe response were first characterized to develop an optimal method for use in a field instrument. The online method used a mist chamber scrubber to collect total (gas plus particle) ROS components (ROSt) alternating with gas phase ROS (ROSg) by means of an inline filter. Particle phase ROS (ROSp) was determined by difference between ROSt and ROSg. The instrument was deployed in urban Atlanta, Georgia, and at a rural site during various seasons. Concentrations from the online instrument generally agreed well with those from an intensive filter measurement of ROSp. Concentrations of the ROSp measurements made with this instrument were lower than reported in other studies, often below the instrument's average limit of detection (0.15 nmol H2O2 equivalents m-3). Mean ROSp concentrations were 0.26 nmol H2O2 equivalents m-3 at the Atlanta urban sites compared to 0.14 nmol H2O2 equivalents m-3 at the rural site.

  4. Development and testing of an online method to measure ambient fine particulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) based on the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, L. E.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-07-01

    An online, semi-continuous instrument to measure fine particle (PM2.5) reactive oxygen species (ROS) was developed based on the fluorescent probe 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH). Parameters that influence probe response were first characterized to develop an optimal method for use in a field instrument. The online method used a mist chamber scrubber to collect total (gas plus particle) ROS components (ROSt) alternating with gas phase ROS (ROSg) by means of an inline filter. Particle phase ROS (ROSp) was determined by the difference between ROSt and ROSg. The instrument was deployed in urban Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and at a rural site during various seasons. Concentrations from the online instrument generally agreed well with those from an intensive filter measurement of ROSp. Concentrations of the ROSp measurements made with this instrument were lower than reported in other studies, often below the instrument's average limit of detection (0.15 nmol H2O2 equivalents m-3). Mean ROSp concentrations were 0.26 nmol H2O2 equivalents m-3 at the Atlanta urban sites compared to 0.14 nmol H2O2 equivalents m-3 at the rural site.

  5. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  6. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  7. Effect of cooking method on carnosine and its homologues, pentosidine and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance contents in beef and turkey meat.

    PubMed

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Medana, Claudio; Visentin, Sonja; Dal Bello, Federica; Meineri, Giorgia

    2012-05-01

    Commercial samples of beef and turkey meat were prepared by commonly used cooking methods with standard cooking times: (1) broiled at 200°C for 10min, (2) broiled at a medium temperature (140°C) for 10min, (3) cooked by microwave (MW) for 3min and then grilled (MW/grill) for 7min, (4) cooked in a domestic microwave oven for 10min, and (5) boiled in water for 10min. The raw and cooked meats were then analysed to determine the carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine, pentosidine, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) contents. It was observed that boiling beef caused a loss of approximately 50% of the carnosine, probably because of the high water solubility of carnosine and its homologues; cooking by microwave caused a medium loss of the anti-oxidants of approximately 20%; cooking by MW/grill led to a reduction in carnosine of approximately 10%. As far as the anserine and homocarnosine contents were concerned, a greater loss was observed for the boiling method (approximately 70%) while, for the other cooking methods, the value ranged from 30% to 70%. The data oscillate more for the turkey meat: the minimum carnosine decrease was observed in the cases of MW/grill and broiling at high temperature (25%). Analogously, the anserine and homocarnosine contents decreased slightly in the case of MW/grill and broiling at a high temperature (2-7%) and by 10-30% in the other cases. No analysed meat sample showed any traces of pentosidine above the instrumental determination limits. The cooked beef showed an increased TBARS value compared to the raw meat, and the highest values were found when the beef was broiled at a high temperature, cooked by microwave or boiled in water. The TBARS value of the turkey meat decreased for all the cooking methods in comparison to the TBARS value of the fresh meat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The 'reactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The Ligurian ophiolitic peridotites [South Lanzo, Erro-Tobbio, Internal Ligurides and Corsica] are characterized by the abundance of spinel(Sp) peridotites showing depleted compositions and ranging from Cpx-poor Sp lherzolites to Sp harzburgites. They were recognized in the last decades as refractory residua by MORB-forming partial melting of the asthenosphere, and were similar to abyssal peridotites. Recent structural and compositional studies promoted a better understanding of their structural and compositional features and their genetic processes. In the field these depleted peridotites replace with primary contacts pyroxenite-bearing fertile Sp lherzolites that have been recognized as sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Field relationships evidence that decametric-hectometric bodies of pristine pyroxenite-veined lithospheric Sp lherzolites are preserved as structural remnants within the km-scale masses of depleted peridotites. The depleted peridotites show coarse-grained recrystallized textures and reaction micro-structures indicating pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation that have been considered as records of melt/peridotite interaction during reactive diffuse porous flow of undersaturated melts. They show, moreover, contrasting bulk and mineral chemistries that cannot be produced by simple partial melting and melt extraction. In particular, their bulk compositions are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in FeO with respect to refractory residua after any kind of partial melting, as calculated by Niu (1997), indicating that they cannot be formed by simple partial melting and melt extraction processes. Moreover, TiO2 content in Sp is usually significantly higher (up to 0.8-1.0 wt%) than typical TiO2 contents of spinels (usually < 0.1-0.2 wt %) in fertile mantle peridotites and melting refractory residua, indicating that spinel attained element equilibration with a Ti-bearing basaltic melt. The depleted peridotites usually show strongly variable Cpx modal

  9. Effect of N doping on hole density of Cu2O:N films prepared by the reactive magnetron sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B. B.; Lin, L.; Shen, H. L.; Boafo, F. E.; Chen, Z. F.; Liu, B.; Zhang, R.

    2012-05-01

    N-doped Cu2O thin films have been deposited on glass substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering method under various N2/O2 flow ratios from 0 to 1.0. The structural and electronic properties of Cu2O:N films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), four-point probe and Hall effect measurements. XRD pattern showed that crystalline structures of all the samples retained single phase of Cu2O with the increase of N2/O2 flow ratio from 0 to 1.0. However, the crystalline quality of Cu2O:N films reduced with the increase of the N2/O2 flow ratio. The phenomenon of peak shift of Cu2O(1 1 1) implied that N atoms have been doped into Cu2O film. The square resistance of Cu2O:N films linearly decreased from 28.1 to 1.5 (104 Ω/☐) with the increase of N2/O2 flow ratio from 0.2 to 0.6 initially, and then it changed slowly with the increase of N2/O2 flow ratio from 0.8 to 1.0. Hole density of Cu2O:N films with various N2/O2 flow ratios from 0 to 0.6 was measured using the Van der Pauw method. All the samples are p-type, and the hole density of Cu2O:N films was enhanced from 1.2 × 1016 cm-3 to 3.1 × 1019 cm-3 with the increase of N2/O2 flow ratio from 0 to 0.6. The experimental results demonstrated that N doping was an effective method to enhance hole density of p-type Cu2O film.

  10. Roles of reactive oxygen species in UVA-induced oxidation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid-melanin as studied by differential spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shosuke; Kikuta, Marina; Koike, Shota; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Sarna, Michal; Zadlo, Andrzej; Sarna, Tadeusz; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-05-01

    Eumelanin photoprotects pigmented tissues from ultraviolet (UV) damage. However, UVA-induced tanning seems to result from the photooxidation of preexisting melanin and does not contribute to photoprotection. We investigated the mechanism of UVA-induced degradation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA)-melanin taking advantage of its solubility in a neutral buffer and using a differential spectrophotometric method to detect subtle changes in its structure. Our methodology is suitable for examining the effects of various agents that interact with reactive oxygen species (ROS) to determine how ROS is involved in the UVA-induced oxidative modifications. The results show that UVA radiation induces the oxidation of DHICA to indole-5,6-quinone-2-carboxylic acid in eumelanin, which is then cleaved to form a photodegraded, pyrrolic moiety and finally to form free pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid. The possible involvement of superoxide radical and singlet oxygen in the oxidation was suggested. The generation and quenching of singlet oxygen by DHICA-melanin was confirmed by direct measurements of singlet oxygen phosphorescence.

  11. Effect of titanium incorporation on the structural, mechanical and biocompatible properties of DLC thin films prepared by reactive-biased target ion beam deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathy, P. Vijai; Nataraj, D.; Chu, Paul K.; Wang, Huaiyu; Yang, Q.; Kiran, M. S. R. N.; Silvestre-Albero, J.; Mangalaraj, D.

    2010-10-01

    Amorphous diamond like carbon (DLC) and titanium incorporated diamond like carbon (Ti-DLC) thin films were deposited by using reactive-biased target ion beam deposition method. The effects of Ti incorporation and target bias voltage on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited films were investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nano-indentation. It was found that the Ti content in Ti-DLC films gets increased with increasing target bias voltage. At about 4.2 at.% of Ti, uniform sized well dispersed nanocrystals were seen in the DLC matrix. Using FFT analysis, a facility available in the TEM, it was found that the nanocrystals are in cubic TiC phase. Though at the core, the incorporated Ti atoms react with carbon to form cubic TiC; most of the surface exposed Ti atoms were found to react with the atmospheric oxygen to form weakly bonded Ti-O. The presence of TiC nanocrystals greatly modified the sp 3/sp 2 hybridized bonding ratio and is reflected in mechanical hardness of Ti-DLC films. These films were then tested for their biocompatibility by an invitro cell culturing test. Morphological observation and the cell proliferation test have demonstrated that the human osteoblast cells well attach and proliferate on the surface of Ti incorporated DLC films, suggesting possible applications in bone related implant coatings.

  12. The role of nano-Ni catalyst in MgH2 obtained by reactive mechanical milling method for solid hydrogen storage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil, Zulkarnain; Rahwanto, Adi; Handoko, Erfan; Mustanir

    2017-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is regarded as one of the candidate material for absorbing hydrogen, because theoretically, has the ability to absorb hydrogen in the large quantities (7.6 wt%). However, Mg has shortage, namely its kinetic reaction is very slow, it takes time to absorb hydrogen at least 60 minutes with very high operating temperatures (300-400°C). The aim of this study is to improve the hydrogen desorption temperature of Mg-based hydrogen storage material. In this work, we used nano-nickel (Ni) as catalyst in MgH2 and obtained by reactive mechanical milling method. The duration of milling was done in 2 hours (soft milling) with the 2 mol% Ni catalyst and milled under hydrogen atmosphere (10 bar). As the results, small amount of 2 mol% Ni in nanometer scale acts as a suitable catalyst for improvement the kinetics of MgH2 which could absorp 5.5 wt% of hydrogen within 10 minutes at 300°C. It is obvious that small amount has much better as catalyst in nanoparticle size and at the same time allowed to reduce the milling process in short time.

  13. A new multi-species pore-scale reactive transport modeling of arsenic sorption in dissolving porous media using lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafei, B.; Huber, C.; Parmigiani, A.; Taillefert, M.

    2012-12-01

    Physical and chemical heterogeneities associated with biogeochemical processes influence the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface environments. We develop a new multi-species pore-scale reactive transport model based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to examine the temporal and spatial evolution of chemical species during the sorption of Arsenic. This model couples a fluid flow solver to an optimal advection-diffusion transport model where transport and reactions between chemical species are solved iteratively yielding a better stability and accuracy over a wide range of peclet numbers. It has already been applied to study 1) the permeability change of a porous medium during dissolution and precipitation and 2) the effect of spatial and chemical heterogeneities on the uptake of arsenic from the aqueous solution. By combining these two scenarios, we extend the model to incorporate arsenic speciation (i.e. As(III) and As(V)) and solid iron phase transformation, explore the distribution of iron, arsenic and partitioning of arsenic on various iron bearing solid phases. We investigate how the multitude of pore-domains affects the formation of redox gradients. As(III) and magnetite concentrations increase toward the anoxic zones while ferrihydrite and As(V) remains the dominant species in oxic conditions. The proposed reaction network includes: biotic reduction of ferrihydrite and magnetite to Fe2+(aq), of ferrihydrite to magnetite, biologically-mediated organic matter oxidation coupled with reduction of O2(aq) and As(V) , abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by O2(aq) and sorption of As(V) and As(III) on Fe (hydr)oxide(s). All of these reactions are treated as kinetically controlled except As(V) and As(III) adsorption/desorption reactions which are expressed by equilibrium mass action laws. Similar set of reactions has been applied to simulate the distribution of As within constructed soil aggregates using continuum-scale model MIN3P (Masue-Slowey et al., 2010

  14. Do procedures for verbal reporting of thinking have to be reactive? A meta-analysis and recommendations for best reporting methods.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mark C; Ericsson, K Anders; Best, Ryan

    2011-03-01

    Since its establishment, psychology has struggled to find valid methods for studying thoughts and subjective experiences. Thirty years ago, Ericsson and Simon (1980) proposed that participants can give concurrent verbal expression to their thoughts (think aloud) while completing tasks without changing objectively measurable performance (accuracy). In contrast, directed requests for concurrent verbal reports, such as explanations or directions to describe particular kinds of information, were predicted to change thought processes as a consequence of the need to generate this information, thus altering performance. By comparing performance of concurrent verbal reporting conditions with their matching silent control condition, Ericsson and Simon found several studies demonstrating that directed verbalization was associated with changes in performance. In contrast, the lack of effects of thinking aloud was merely suggested by a handful of experimental studies. In this article, Ericsson and Simon's model is tested by a meta-analysis of 94 studies comparing performance while giving concurrent verbalizations to a matching condition without verbalization. Findings based on nearly 3,500 participants show that the "think-aloud" effect size is indistinguishable from zero (r = -.03) and that this procedure remains nonreactive even after statistically controlling additional factors such as task type (primarily visual or nonvisual). In contrast, procedures that entail describing or explaining thoughts and actions are significantly reactive, leading to higher performance than silent control conditions. All verbal reporting procedures tend to increase times to complete tasks. These results suggest that think-aloud should be distinguished from other methods in future studies. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Reactive Air Aluminization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  16. OH reactivity for screening crop volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannoni, N.; Gros, V.; Truong, F.; Ciuraru, R.; Lafouge, F.; Gonzaga, L.; Boissard, C.; Laville, P.; Bonsang, B.; Baisnee, D.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Durand, B.; Geudet, J. C.; Zurfluh, O.; Fanucci, O.; Loubet, B.

    2016-12-01

    Total OH reactivity is the first-order total loss rate of the hydroxyl radical in the atmosphere due to reactive molecules. The tremendous potential of measuring OH reactivity is to directly know the complete budget of reactive trace molecules in ambient air. An original approach is combining the total OH reactivity with the summed OH reactivity of trace gases measured at a field site. This serves to determine whether the composition of reactive compounds is fully understood. So far, sites characterized by opposite types of emissions have been investigated, including, forests, megacities and remote sites. Here, we apply this method to investigate agricultural crops emissions. Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) is globally one of the most diffused crop cultivation and emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wheat croplands implemented in models are affected by high uncertainty. We measured OH reactivity and reactive gases over a winter wheat cropland located in North-West Europe during June 2016. Specifically, the total OH reactivity was measured through the Comparative Reactivity Method while reactive gases as VOCs, CH4, O3, NOx were measured through a number of additional techniques, including proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) and gas chromatography (GC-FID). We will present preliminary results of our measurements.

  17. Extraction of pulmonary vascular compliance, pulmonary vascular resistance, and right ventricular work from single-pressure and Doppler flow measurements in children with pulmonary hypertension: a new method for evaluating reactivity: in vitro and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Craig E; Hertzberg, Jean R; Ivy, D Dunbar; Kirby, K Scott; Chan, K Chen; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam; Shandas, Robin

    2004-10-26

    Current evaluation of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in children involves measurement of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR); however, PVR neglects important pulsatile components. Pulmonary artery (PA) input impedance and ventricular power (VP) include mean and pulsatile effects and have shown promise as alternative measures of vascular function. Here we report the utility of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured instantaneous flow and pressure measurements for estimation of input impedance and VP and use this method to develop a novel parameter: reactivity in compliance. An in vitro model of the general pulmonary vasculature was used to obtain impedance and VP, measured by PW Doppler and a reference flow meter. The method was then tested in a preliminary clinical study in subjects with normal PA hemodynamics (n=4) and patients with PH undergoing reactivity evaluation (8 patients; 23 data points). In vitro results showed good agreement between the impedance spectra computed from both flow-measurement methods. Excellent correlation was seen in vitro between actual resistance and the zero-frequency (Z(o)) impedance value (r2=0.984). Excellent agreement was also found between Z(o) and PVR in the clinical measurements (y=1.075x+0.73; r=0.993). Furthermore, total VP and VP/cardiac output increased significantly with hypertension (128.73 to 365.91 mW and 2.42 to 6.69 mW x mL(-1) x s(-1), respectively). The first-harmonic value of impedance (Z1) was used as a measure of compliance reactivity; older patients exhibited markedly less compliance reactivity than did younger patients. Input impedance and VP calculated from Doppler measurements and a single-catheter pressure measurement provide comprehensive characterization of PH and reactivity.

  18. Direct numerical calculation of the kinematic tortuosity of reactive mixture flow in the anode layer of solid oxide fuel cells by the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asinari, Pietro; Quaglia, Michele Calì; von Spakovsky, Michael R.; Kasula, Bhavani V.

    Mathematical models that predict performance can aid in the understanding and development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Of course, various modeling approaches exist involving different length scales. In particular, very significant advances are now taking place using microscopic models to understand the complex composite structures of electrodes and three-phase boundaries. Ultimately these advances should lead to predictions of cell behavior, which at present are measured empirically and inserted into macroscopic cell models. In order to achieve this ambitious goal, simulation tools based on these macroscopic models must be redesigned by matching them to the complex microscopic phenomena, which take place at the pore scale level. As a matter of fact, the macroscopic continuum approach essentially consists of applying some type of homogenization technique, which properly averages the underlying microscopic phenomena for producing measurable quantities. Unfortunately, these quantities in the porous electrodes of fuel cells are sometimes measurable only in principle. For this reason, this type of approach introduces additional uncertainties into the macroscopic models, which can significantly affect the numerical results, particularly their generality. This paper is part of an ongoing effort to address the problem by following an alternative approach. The key idea is to numerically simulate the underlying microscopic phenomena in an effort to bring the mathematical description nearer to actual reality. In particular, some recently developed mesoscopic tools appear to be very promising since the microscopic approach is, in this particular case, partially included in the numerical method itself. In particular, the models based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) treat the problem by reproducing the collisions among particles of the same type, among particles belonging to different species, and finally among the species and the solid obstructions. Recently, a

  19. Multifunctional reactive nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatis, Demitrios

    Many multifunctional nanocomposite materials have been developed for use in propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics, and reactive structures. These materials exhibit high reaction rates due to their developed reaction interfacial area. Two applications addressed in this work include nanocomposite powders prepared by arrested reactive milling (ARM) for burn rate modifiers and reactive structures. In burn rate modifiers, addition of reactive nanocomposite powders to aluminized propellants increases the burn rate of aluminum and thus the overall reaction rate of an energetic formulation. Replacing only a small fraction of aluminum by 8Al·MoO3 and 2B·Ti nanocomposite powders enhances the reaction rate with little change to the thermodynamic performance of the formulation; both the rate of pressure rise and maximum pressure measured in the constant volume explosion test increase. For reactive structures, nanocomposite powders with bulk compositions of 8Al·MoO3, 12Al·MoO3, and 8Al·3CuO were prepared by ARM and consolidated using a uniaxial die. Consolidated samples had densities greater than 90% of theoretical maximum density while maintaining their high reactivity. Pellets prepared using 8Al·MoO3 powders were ignited by a CO2 laser. Ignition delays increased at lower laser powers and greater pellet densities. A simplified numerical model describing heating and thermal initiation of the reactive pellets predicted adequately the observed effects of both laser power and pellet density on the measured ignition delays. To investigate the reaction mechanisms in nanocomposite thermites, two types of nanocomposite reactive materials with the same bulk compositions 8Al·MoO3 were prepared by different methods. One of the materials was manufactured by ARM and the other, so called metastable interstitial composite (MIC), by mixing of nano-scaled individual powders. Clear differences in the low-temperature redox reactions, welldetectable by differential scanning calorimetry

  20. Reactively sputtered thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a reactively sputtered thin film CdS - Cu2S solar cell is proven. Identification of the reactively sputtered Cu2S film is made by X-ray diffractometer and spectro-transmission measurements. Because of its simplicity, economical use of material, and high yield, the reactive sputtering process promises to be a low cost method for producing CdS - Cu2S solar cells.

  1. Mesozoic reactivation of the Talas-Fergana Fault in the Kyrgyz Tien Shan revealed by multi-method low-temperature geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachtergaele, Simon; De Pelsmaeker, Elien; Jolivet, Marc; Glorie, Stijn; Zhimulev, Fedor; Batalev, Vlad; De Grave, Johan

    2017-04-01

    The Kyrgyz Tien Shan is a mountain belt that represents a part of the vast intracontinental Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). It assembled at the end of the Paleozoic as a result of the closure of the Turkestan Ocean and consists of three main tectonic domains: the Northern, Middle and Southern Tien Shan. These blocks were displaced with an offset of over 100 km by the Talas-Fergana Fault (TFF) since they amalgamated at the end of the Paleozoic. The reactivated TFF remains in fact a dominant structural feature of the Mesozoic (and Cenozoic) Tien Shan, and kilometers of Mesozoic sediments accumulated in intracontinental basins along the TFF. New zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He (ZHe) and apatite fission track (AFT) age data obtained on crystalline basement samples close to the TFF indicate a multi-staged reactivation history during the Mesozoic. The reactivation of the Kyrgyz Tien Shan is probably a result of Mesozoic accretion events to the growing Eurasian continent. Strike-slip movement of the TFF occurred during the Late Jurassic (±200 Ma) as a result of the collision of the Qiangtang block to the CAOB. The collision of the Lhasa block to the CAOB that occurred around 150 to 120 Ma ago reactivated the TFF again, as recorded in our data. A sedimentary hiatus in the Cretaceous east of the TFF and a continued sedimentation west of the TFF suggests that the TFF fault geometry changed and movements progressed from a dominant horizontal direction (Late Jurassic) to a more vertical one (Cretaceous) The Paleogene history of the Kyrgyz Tien Shan is a tectonic quiet period in which paleosols could formed. This tectonic quiet episode is followed by a major tectonic reactivation event in the Neogene induced by the India-Eurasia collision. It is ultimately responsible for the modern topography of the Kyrgyz Tien Shan. This is confirmed by low temperature thermochronological data and the deposition of kilometers of coarse-grained Neogene sediments. Detrital AFT results obtained on

  2. Reaction titration: a convenient method for titering reactive hydride agents (Red-Al, LiAlH4, DIBALH, L-Selectride, NaH, and KH) by No-D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Thomas R; Aspaas, Andrew W; Eklov, Brian M; Ryba, Troy D

    2005-05-26

    The concentration of reactive metal hydride (Met-H) reducing agents can be determined (in < or = 20 min) using No-D NMR spectroscopy. The method involves (i) reacting Met-H with an excess of p-methoxybenzaldehyde, (ii) quenching with excess acetic acid, (iii) recording the No-D NMR spectrum of this homogeneous mixture, and (iv) deducing the concentration of Met-H from the % conversion (as measured by integration). By a conceptually related method, the titer of the basic alkali metal hydrides KH and NaH can also be determined.

  3. DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Dessauer, G.

    1960-05-10

    A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

  4. Reactivity of transition metal solvates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Boris D.

    1991-09-01

    Reactivity data are generalised for one of the most important classes of complexes, solvates, which are quantitatively nearly unstudied. Various approaches to studying and describing the reactivity are compared with respect to solvation of the reagents and the transition state. The specifics and mechanism of ligand substitution in pure and mixed organic solvents are found. The reactivity of simple (homoleptic) and mixed solvates toward macrocycles is examined in detail using porphyrins as an example. The kinetic method of indicator reactions is applied to porphyrins in order to study the state of transition metal salts in organic solvents and the stability of the coordination spheres of acidosalts (MXnn-2), acidosolvates (MX2Sn-2) and their transition states. The concentration dependence of the rate constant of an indicator reaction is demonstrated to be due to a change in the inner coordination sphere and a shift of equilibria between the various coordination complexes. The bibliography includes 38 references.

  5. Total internal reflection ellipsometry as a label-free assessment method for optimization of the reactive surface of bioassay devices based on a functionalized cycloolefin polymer.

    PubMed

    Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Gubala, Vladimir; Gandhiraman, Ram P; Coyle, Conor; Daniels, Stephen; Williams, David E

    2010-11-01

    We report a label-free optical detection technique, called total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE), which can be applied to study the interactions between biomolecules and a functionalized polymer surface. Zeonor (ZR), a cycloolefin polymer with low autofluorescence, high optical transmittance and excellent chemical resistance, is a highly suitable material for optical biosensor platforms owing to the ease of fabrication. It can also be modified with a range of reactive chemical groups for surface functionalization. We demonstrate the applications of TIRE in monitoring DNA hybridization assays and human chorionic gonadotrophin sandwich immunoassays on the ZR surface functionalized with carboxyl groups. The Ψ and Δ spectra obtained after the binding of each layer of analyte have been fitted to a four-layer ellipsometric model to quantitatively determine the amount of analytes bound specifically to the functionalized ZR surface. Our proposed TIRE technique with its very low analyte consumption and its microfluidic array format could be a useful tool for evaluating several crucial parameters in immunoassays, DNA interactions, adsorption of biomolecules to solid surfaces, or assessment of the reactivity of a functionalized polymer surface towards a specific analyte.

  6. Comparison of Reactive Inkjet Printing and Reactive Sintering to Fabricate Metal Conductive Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheawhom, Soorathep; Foithong, Kamolrat

    2013-05-01

    Two methods to fabricate metal conductive patterns including reactive inkjet printing and reactive sintering were investigated. The silver printed lines were prepared from reactive inkjet printing of silver nitrate and L-ascorbic acid. Alternatively, the silver lines were prepared by the reactive sintering process of ethylene glycol vapor at 250 °C and formic acid vapor at 150 °C. In reactive printing, we investigated the effect of the number of printing cycles and the effect of silver nitrate concentration on the properties of the conductive patterns obtained. In reactive sintering, we investigated the usage of formic acid and ethylene glycol as reducing agents. The effect of reactive sintering time on the properties of the conductive patterns obtained was studied. As compared to reactive inkjet printing, the reactive sintering process gives more smooth and contiguous pattern resulting in lower resistivity. The resistivity of the silver line obtained by ethylene glycol vapor reduction at 250 °C for 30 min was 12 µΩ cm, which is about eight times higher than that of bulk silver. In contrast, the copper lines were fabricated by reactive inkjet printing and reactive sintering using various conditions of formic acid, ethylene glycol and hydrogen atmosphere, the copper lines printed have no conductivity due to the formation of copper oxide.

  7. Phenylethynyl reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having a specified general structure is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having a specified general structure is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react with to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  8. First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV

  9. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Holdren, Jr., George R.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  10. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  11. Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands

    DOEpatents

    Maya, L.

    1981-11-05

    A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

  12. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  13. Reactive biomolecular divergence in genetically altered yeast cells and isolated mitochondria as measured by biocavity laser spectroscopy: rapid diagnostic method for studying cellular responses to stress and disease.

    PubMed

    Gourley, Paul L; Hendricks, Judy K; McDonald, Anthony E; Copeland, R Guild; Yaffe, Michael P; Naviaux, Robert K

    2007-01-01

    We report an analysis of four strains of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The four strains are grouped in two pairs (wild type and altered), in which one strain differs genetically at a single locus, affecting mitochondrial function. In one pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho0 strain differ by complete removal of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In the second pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho- strain differ by knock-out of the nuclear gene encoding Cox4, an essential subunit of cytochrome c oxidase. The biocavity laser is used to measure the biophysical optic parameter Deltalambda, a laser wavelength shift relating to the optical density of cell or mitochondria that uniquely reflects its size and biomolecular composition. As such, Deltalambda is a powerful parameter that rapidly interrogates the biomolecular state of single cells and mitochondria. Wild-type cells and mitochondria produce Gaussian-like distributions with a single peak. In contrast, mutant cells and mitochondria produce leptokurtotic distributions that are asymmetric and highly skewed to the right. These distribution changes could be self-consistently modeled with a single, log-normal distribution undergoing a thousand-fold increase in variance of biomolecular composition. These features reflect a new state of stressed or diseased cells that we call a reactive biomolecular divergence (RBD) that reflects the vital interdependence of mitochondria and the nucleus.

  14. Maintaining memories by reactivation.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Björn; Born, Jan

    2007-12-01

    According to a widely held concept, the formation of long-term memories relies on a reactivation and redistribution of newly acquired memory representations from temporary storage to neuronal networks supporting long-term storage. Here, we review evidence showing that this process of system consolidation takes place preferentially during sleep as an 'off-line' period during which memories are spontaneously reactivated and redistributed in the absence of interfering external inputs. Moreover, postlearning sleep leads to a reorganization of neuronal representations and qualitative changes of memory content. We propose that memory reactivations during sleep are accompanied by a transient destabilization of memory traces. Unlike wake reactivations that form part of an updating of memories with respect to current perceptual input, reactivations during sleep allow for gradually adapting newly acquired memories to pre-existing long-term memories whereby invariants and certain other features of these memories become extracted.

  15. Reactive collision terms for fluid transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eccles, J. V.; Raitt, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    A modified Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collision method is used for the derivation of reactive collision terms to allow for complete higher-moment approximations in fluid transport theory. The general reactive collision terms for the 8-, 10- and 13-moment approximation for binary reactions are derived. Then, reactive collision terms for specific chemistry are derived with the assumptions: (1) all reactants and products have 13-moment distribution functions; (2) simple, classical assumptions provide sufficient models for reaction dynamics; and (3) the reaction rate is energy-independent. The derived specific formulas reflect two extremes in reactive collision dynamics: direct and indirect reaction mechanisms. Finally, considerations for correct use of the reactive collision terms are discussed in the context of space plasma environments.

  16. Reactive polymer fused deposition manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad E.; Johs, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    Methods and compositions for additive manufacturing that include reactive or thermosetting polymers, such as urethanes and epoxies. The polymers are melted, partially cross-linked prior to the depositing, deposited to form a component object, solidified, and fully cross-linked. These polymers form networks of chemical bonds that span the deposited layers. Application of a directional electromagnetic field can be applied to aromatic polymers after deposition to align the polymers for improved bonding between the deposited layers.

  17. Exploring the potential ramifications of missing reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of OH reactivity, the inverse lifetime of the OH radical, are becoming an increasingly common method of quantifying the total amount of reactive carbon in an airmass. Several studies have demonstrated discrepancies between measured OH reactivity and the OH reactivity calculated from the summation of measured and modeled species, especially in forested regions. This missing reactivity is the product of the total mass of unmeasured compounds ([X]) and its effective reaction rate with OH (kX+OH). The impact of this unmeasured, underpredicted reactive carbon is dependent on the distribution of the total (kX+OH[X]) between each of these components. In this study, we examine possible ranges of kX+OH and [X] that could account for the total missing reactivity, and discuss the air-quality relevant implications. For example, fast reaction rates and low concentrations could lead to production of reaction products on smaller spatial and temporal scales. In contrast, slower rates and higher concentrations could produce an enhancement of the regional background of oxidized organic compounds. Additionally, while the quantification of total reactivity is tied to the production of peroxy radicals, its capacity to form secondary organic aerosol is dependent on its speciation. We discuss these concepts in the framework of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign, and extend our analysis to a variety of forested environments.

  18. Heterogeneity of reactive astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Ao, Yan; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes respond to injury and disease in the central nervous system (CNS) with a process referred to as reactive astrogliosis. Recent progress demonstrates that reactive astrogliosis is not a simple all-or-none phenomenon, but is a finely gradated continuum of changes that range from reversible alterations in gene expression and cell hypertrophy, to scar formation with permanent tissue rearrangement. There is now compelling evidence that reactive astrocytes exhibit a substantial potential for heterogeneity at multiple levels, including gene expression, cell morphology, topography (distance from lesions), CNS regions, local (among neighboring cells), cell signaling and cell function. Structural and functional changes are regulated in reactive astrocytes by many different potential signaling events that occur in a context dependent manner. It is noteworthy that different stimuli of astrocyte reactivity can lead to similar degrees of GFAP upregulation while causing substantially different changes in transcriptome profiles and cell function. Thus, it is not possible to equate simple and uniform measures such as cell hypertrophy and upregulation of GFAP expression with a single, uniform concept of astrocyte reactivity. Instead, it is necessary to recognize the considerable potential for heterogeneity and determine the functional implications of astrocyte reactivity in a context specific manner as regulated by specific signaling events. PMID:24361547

  19. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  20. Reactivity of Metal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhixun; Castleman, A W; Khanna, Shiv N

    2016-12-14

    We summarize here the research advances on the reactivity of metal clusters. After a simple introduction of apparatuses used for gas-phase cluster reactions, we focus on the reactivity of metal clusters with various polar and nonpolar molecules in the gas phase and illustrate how elementary reactions of metal clusters proceed one-step at a time under a combination of geometric and electronic reorganization. The topics discussed in this study include chemical adsorption, addition reaction, cleavage of chemical bonds, etching effect, spin effect, the harpoon mechanism, and the complementary active sites (CAS) mechanism, among others. Insights into the reactivity of metal clusters not only facilitate a better understanding of the fundamentals in condensed-phase chemistry but also provide a way to dissect the stability and reactivity of monolayer-protected clusters synthesized via wet chemistry.

  1. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  2. Reactive capability limitation of synchronous machines

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Milanicz, D.P. )

    1994-02-01

    Achievable generator reactive capability (GRC) is generally much less than indicated by manufacturers' reactive capability curves, due to constraints imposed by plant auxiliaries and the power system itself. The nature of these constraints is explained and a method for calculating them is provided and verified by field tests on a unit at high and low system voltage levels. Several recommendations are made to enhance the GRC of the tested unit.

  3. Electrochemical evaluation of sensitization in austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized specimens*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inazumi, T.; Bell, G. E. C.; Kiuchi, K.

    1991-03-01

    An electrochemical testing system was developed to evaluate the sensitization of neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized disk-type specimens, 3 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm thick. The system consists of a specimen holder in which a miniaturized specimen is mounted as the working electrode, a test cell designed to handle radioactive materials and waste, a computer-controlled potentiostat/galvanostat and a surface preparation equipment. Sensitization of a thermally-aged Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel was successfully detected by the single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (SL-EPR) method.

  4. The use of methods involving semi-empirical molecular orbital theory to study the structure and reactivity of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Matthias; McNamara, Jonathan P; Wang, Hong; Rajeev, Surendran A; Ge, Jun; Morgado, Claudio A; Hillier, Ian H

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of molecular systems containing transition metal atoms is traditionally studied using methods based on density functional theory (DFT). Although such an approach has been quite successful, the treatment of large systems, be they transition metal complexes, bioinorganic molecules or the solid state, is still extremely computationally demanding at this level, and may not be practical for many systems of interest. In this paper we describe how semi-empirical MO methods can be used to overcome these computational bottlenecks, yet still provide predictions of the necessary accuracy. We describe strategies to achieve this by focussing on: (i) obtaining appropriate parameters for transition metal atoms via a genetic algorithm, to be used within a parallelised implementation of neglect of differential diatomic overlap (NDDO) methods, and (ii) the use of multilevel treatments which involve DFT and semi-empirical methods to describe different regions of the molecule. Here we show by reference to histidine and porphyrin complexes, the importance of a correct partitioning of the organic substrate. We illustrate the potential of such a dual level approach by reporting preliminary results showing the catalytic role of the enzyme, dimethyl sulfoxide reductase.

  5. Do Procedures for Verbal Reporting of Thinking Have to Be Reactive? A Meta-Analysis and Recommendations for Best Reporting Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Mark C.; Ericsson, K. Anders; Best, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Since its establishment, psychology has struggled to find valid methods for studying thoughts and subjective experiences. Thirty years ago, Ericsson and Simon (1980) proposed that participants can give concurrent verbal expression to their thoughts (think aloud) while completing tasks without changing objectively measurable performance (accuracy).…

  6. Numerical simulation of air and oxy-fuel combustion of single coal particles using the reactive implicit continuous-fluid Eulerian (RICE) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewtak, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents the mathematical model of air and oxy-fuel combustion of single coal particles. The combustion process has been treated as a spherically-symmetric one. The 1-dimensional time-dependent conservation equations governing the process have been numerically solved using the RICE method. The presence of a coal particle, which was treated as a discrete Lagrange particle, has modified the boundary conditions at the gas-solid interface. Numerical results show good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chengwen; Wang, Yao; Gong, Yu; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qian; Shi, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC) is a rare form of transepithelial elimination, in which altered collagen is extruded through the epidermis. There are 2 types of RPC, acquired RPC (ARPC) and inherited RPC, while the latter is extremely rare. Here we report on 1 case of ARPC. Methods: A 73-year-old female was presented with strongly itchy papules over her back and lower limbs for 3 months. She denied the history of oozing or vesiculation. A cutaneous examination showed diffusely distributed multiple well-defined keratotic papules, 4 to 10 mm in diameter, on the bilateral lower limbs and back as well as a few papules on her chest and forearm. Scratching scars were over the resolved lesions while Koebner phenomenon was negative. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Laboratory examinations showed elevated blood glucose level. Skin lesion biopsy showed a well-circumscribed area of necrosis filled with a keratotic plug. Parakeratotic cells and lymphocytic infiltration could be seen in the necrosed area. In dermis, sparse fiber bundles were seen perforating the epidermis. These degenerated fiber bundles were notarized as collagen fiber by elastic fiber stain, suggesting a diagnosis of RPC. Results: Then a diagnosis of ARPC was made according to the onset age and the history of diabetes mellitus. She was treated with topical application of corticosteroids twice a day and oral antihistamine once a day along with compound glycyrrhizin tablets 3 times a day. And the blood glucose was controlled in a satisfying range. Two months later, a significant improvement was seen in this patient. Conclusion: Since there is no efficient therapy to RPC, moreover, ARPC is considered to be associated with some systemic diseases, the management of the coexisting disease is quite crucial. The patient in this case received a substantial improvement due to the control of blood glucose and application of compound glycyrrhizin tablets. PMID

  8. Integrating planning and reactive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kaelbling, Leslie Pack

    1989-01-01

    Artificial intelligence research on planning is concerned with designing control systems that choose actions by manipulating explicit descriptions of the world state, the goal to be achieved, and the effects of elementary operations available to the system. Because planning shifts much of the burden of reasoning to the machine, it holds great appeal as a high-level programming method. Experience shows, however, that it cannot be used indiscriminately because even moderately rich languages for describing goals, states, and the elementary operators lead to computational inefficiencies that render the approach unsuitable for realistic applications. This inadequacy has spawned a recent wave of research on reactive control or situated activity in which control systems are modeled as reacting directly to the current situation rather than as reasoning about the future effects of alternative action sequences. While this research has confronted the issue of run-time tractability head on, in many cases it has done so by sacrificing the advantages of declarative planning techniques. Ways in which the two approaches can be unified are discussed. The authors begin by modeling reactive control systems as state machines that map a stream of sensory inputs to a stream of control outputs. These machines can be decomposed into two continuously active subsystems: the planner and the execution module. The planner computes a plan, which can be seen as a set of bits that control the behavior of the execution module. An important element of this work is the formulation of a precise semantic interpretation for the inputs and outputs of the planning system. They show that the distinction between planned and reactive behavior is largely in the eye of the beholder: systems that seem to compute explicit plans can be redescribed in situation-action terms and vice versa. They also discuss practical programming techniques that allow the advantages of declarative programming and guaranteed

  9. Effects of histoplasmin M antigen chemical and enzymatic deglycosylation on cross-reactivity in the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot method.

    PubMed Central

    Zancopé-Oliveira, R M; Bragg, S L; Reiss, E; Wanke, B; Peralta, J M

    1994-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) method was evaluated as a suitable method for detecting antibodies against M antigen of Histoplasma capsulatum by use of both glycosylated and deglycosylated M protein of histoplasmin (HMIN). Sera from patients with histoplasmosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis were tested by the EITB with glycosylated M protein of HMIN. This assay demonstrated 100% sensitivity with histoplasmosis serum samples, all of which reacted with the 94-kDa glycoprotein (M antigen). Although the EITB is highly sensitive, it is not specific for histoplasmosis when glycosylated M protein is used as an antigen. A total of 81% of paracoccidioidomycosis, 25% of blastomycosis, 33% of coccidioidomycosis, 73% of aspergillosis, and 16% of tuberculosis serum samples cross-reacted with M protein of HMIN and yielded patterns indistinguishable from those obtained with histoplasmosis serum samples. The EITB reactions with both untreated M antigen and M antigen altered by periodate oxidation or by deglycosylation with endoglycosidases were compared. Cross-reactions with heterologous sera in the EITB could be attributed to periodate-sensitive carbohydrate epitopes, as reflected by the increase in the test specificity from 46.1 to 91.2% after periodate treatment of M protein. The EITB for the detection of antibodies to M antigen is a potential diagnostic test for histoplasmosis, provided that periodate-treated M protein is used as an antigen. Images PMID:8556474

  10. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Chipinda, Itai; Hettick, Justin M.; Siegel, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Low molecular weight chemical (LMW) allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed. PMID:21785613

  11. Phytate, reactive oxygen species and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, R W; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    1998-05-01

    Reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography methods have been developed and validated which allow an accurate quantification of phytic acid in faeces and food and reactive oxygen species in an in vitro model system and in faecal specimens. When applied to the evaluation of reactive oxygen species generation by faeces, this method has shown that 1:100 dilutions of matrix obtained from stool samples of adenoma patients are capable of generating significant quantities of reactive oxygen species as evinced by the production of diphenols from salicylic acid. Moreover, it has been shown that the major product of HO. attack on salicylic acid is 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid and not 2, 3-dihydroxy benzoic acid as previously reported. In the presence of the antioxidant ascorbic acid the inhibitory capacity of phytic acid on the generation of reactive oxygen species is completely subverted. Therefore, the kinetics of reactive oxygen species production by faeces is currently under further investigation by high-performance liquid chromatography and chemiluminescence in various patient groups and may give an insight into the role of reactive oxygen species in the aetiology of colorectal cancer.

  12. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  13. A semi-experimental nodal synthesis method for the on-line reconstruction of three-dimensional neutron flux-shapes and reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, R.P.

    1991-12-10

    The safety and optimal performance of large, commercial, light-water reactors require the knowledge at all time of the neutron-flux distribution in the core. In principle, this information can be obtained by solving the time-dependent neutron diffusion equations. However, this approach is complicated and very expensive. Sufficiently accurate, real-time calculations (time scale of approximately one second) are not yet possible on desktop computers, even with fast-running, nodal kinetics codes. A semi-experimental, nodal synthesis method which avoids the solution of the time-dependent, neutron diffusion equations is described. The essential idea of this method is to approximate instantaneous nodal group-fluxes by a linear combination of K, precomputed, three-dimensional, static expansion-functions. The time-dependent coefficients of the combination are found from the requirement that the reconstructed flux-distribution agree in a least-squares sense with the readings of J ({ge}K) fixed, prompt-responding neutron-detectors. Possible numerical difficulties with the least-squares solution of the ill-conditioned, J-by-K system of equations are brought under complete control by the use of a singular-value-decomposition technique. This procedure amounts to the rearrangement of the original, linear combination of K expansion functions into an equivalent more convenient, linear combination of R ({le}K) orthogonalized modes'' of decreasing magnitude. Exceedingly small modes are zeroed to eliminate any risk of roundoff-error amplification, and to assure consistency with the limited accuracy of the data. Additional modes are zeroed when it is desirable to limit the sensitivity of the results to measurement noise.

  14. A semi-experimental nodal synthesis method for the on-line reconstruction of three-dimensional neutron flux-shapes and reactivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, R.P.

    1991-12-10

    The safety and optimal performance of large, commercial, light-water reactors require the knowledge at all time of the neutron-flux distribution in the core. In principle, this information can be obtained by solving the time-dependent neutron diffusion equations. However, this approach is complicated and very expensive. Sufficiently accurate, real-time calculations (time scale of approximately one second) are not yet possible on desktop computers, even with fast-running, nodal kinetics codes. A semi-experimental, nodal synthesis method which avoids the solution of the time-dependent, neutron diffusion equations is described. The essential idea of this method is to approximate instantaneous nodal group-fluxes by a linear combination of K, precomputed, three-dimensional, static expansion-functions. The time-dependent coefficients of the combination are found from the requirement that the reconstructed flux-distribution agree in a least-squares sense with the readings of J ({ge}K) fixed, prompt-responding neutron-detectors. Possible numerical difficulties with the least-squares solution of the ill-conditioned, J-by-K system of equations are brought under complete control by the use of a singular-value-decomposition technique. This procedure amounts to the rearrangement of the original, linear combination of K expansion functions into an equivalent more convenient, linear combination of R ({le}K) orthogonalized ``modes`` of decreasing magnitude. Exceedingly small modes are zeroed to eliminate any risk of roundoff-error amplification, and to assure consistency with the limited accuracy of the data. Additional modes are zeroed when it is desirable to limit the sensitivity of the results to measurement noise.

  15. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    7.9) near the optimal value of pKa - 8. This compound is the best nonqua- ternary AChE reactivator studied to date 5-Hydroxyiminomethyl-3-phenyl-l,2,4...activities under different reaction conditions and at different time points. The values determined were: Ao - uninhibited AChE activity At - AChE...uninhibited) values . The effect of AChE level on reactivation rates indicates that reinhi- bition of the enzyme by phosphonyl oxime [reaction (14)] was

  16. Improved accuracy of an LC-MS/MS method measuring 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D metabolites in serum using unspiked controls and its application to determining cross-reactivity of a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Kirsten G; Hull, George; Sundvall, Jouko; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel; Cashman, Kevin D

    2017-03-23

    Measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is considered the best indicator of vitamin D status. Two minor vitamin D metabolites are common interferences encountered in 25(OH)D assays. The first is 3-epi-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [3-epi-25(OH)D3], which if not chromatographically resolved from 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3], can overestimate 25(OH)D concentrations. The second is 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3], which can cross-react with the antibodies in 25(OH)D immunoassays. Our aim was to develop an LC-MS/MS method capable of detecting both 3-epi-25(OH)D3 and 24R,25(OH)2D3 in serum without the use of a derivatization agent. We report an isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method, with electrospray ionization in the positive mode, that can simultaneously detect 24R,25(OH)2D3, 25(OH)D3, 3-epi-25(OH)D3, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D2. The method employs a cost-effective liquid-liquid extraction using only 150μL of sera and a total run time of 10min. Method performance was assessed by using quality controls made from pooled sera as an alternative to sera spiked with analytes. Biobanked samples, originally analyzed by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA), were re-analyzed with this method to determine the contribution of 24R,25(OH)2D3 cross-reactivity to 25(OH)D measurement bias. The CMIA over-estimation of 25(OH)D measurements relative to LC-MS/MS was found to depend on both 25(OH)D and 24R,25(OH)2D3 concentrations.

  17. Working Memory and Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goo, Jaemyung

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC) and think-alouds, focusing on the issue of reactivity. Two WM span tasks (listening span and operation span) were administered to 42 English-speaking learners of Spanish. Learner performance on reading comprehension and written production was measured under two…

  18. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  19. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  20. Reactive transport modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This special section in the Vadose Zone Journal focusing on reactive transport modeling was developed from a special symposium jointly sponsored by the Soil Physics and Soil Chemistry Divisions of the Soil Science Society of America at the 2010 annual meetings held in Long Beach, CA. It contains eig...

  1. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  2. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  3. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaka, F.

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  4. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Griendling, Kathy K.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Zweier, Jay L.; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species. PMID:27418630

  5. Development of Male Proactive and Reactive Physical Aggression during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Edward D.; Tremblay, Richard E.; Nagin, Daniel S.; Vitaro, Frank; Lacourse, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Background: Different developmental courses have been postulated for proactive and reactive aggression. Objective: Investigated the developmental course of proactive and reactive aggression in a large sample of adolescent boys from low socioeconomic areas. Method: A dual group-based joint trajectory method was used to identify distinct…

  6. A novel and simple method for generation of human dendritic cells from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 2 days: its application for induction of HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cells in the hu-PBL SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Akira; Tanaka, Reiko; Saito, Mineki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2013-01-01

    Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, they have been ideal candidates for cell-based immunotherapy of cancers and infections in humans. Generally, monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) were generated from purified monocytes by multiple steps of time-consuming physical manipulations for an extended period cultivation. In this study, we developed a novel, simple and rapid method for the generation of type-1 helper T cell (Th1)-stimulating human DCs directly from bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were cultivated in the presence of 20 ng/ml of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, 20 ng/ml of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and 1,000 U/ml of interferon-β for 24 h followed by 24 h maturation with a cytokine cocktail containing 10 ng/ml of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), 10 ng/ml of IL-1β and 1 μg/ml of prostaglandin E2. The phenotype and biological activity of these new DCs for induction of allogeneic T cell proliferation and cytokine production were comparable to those of the MDDCs. Importantly, these new DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV-1 could generated HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cell responses in humanized mice reconstituted with autologous PBMCs from HIV-1-negative donors. This simple and quick method for generation of functional DCs will be useful for future studies on DC-mediated immunotherapies.

  7. Optimal reactive planning with security constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.R.; Cheng, D.T.Y.; Dixon, A.M.; Thorp, J.D.; Dunnett, R.M.; Schaff, G.

    1995-12-31

    The National Grid Company (NGC) of England and Wales has developed a computer program, SCORPION, to help system planners optimize the location and size of new reactive compensation plant on the transmission system. The reactive power requirements of the NGC system have risen as a result of increased power flows and the shorter timescale on which power stations are commissioned and withdrawn from service. In view of the high costs involved, it is important that reactive compensation be installed as economically as possible, without compromising security. Traditional methods based on iterative use of a load flow program are labor intensive and subjective. SCORPION determines a near-optimal pattern of new reactive sources which are required to satisfy voltage constraints for normal and contingent states of operation of the transmission system. The algorithm processes the system states sequentially, instead of optimizing all of them simultaneously. This allows a large number of system states to be considered with an acceptable run time and computer memory requirement. Installed reactive sources are treated as continuous, rather than discrete, variables. However, the program has a restart facility which enables the user to add realistically sized reactive sources explicitly and thereby work towards a realizable solution to the planning problem.

  8. Total OH reactivity emissions from Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, Anke; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Bonn, Boris; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Lelieveld, Jos; Williams, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Forest emissions represent a strong potential sink for the main tropospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH). In forested environments, the comparison of the directly determined overall sink of OH radicals, the total OH reactivity, and the individually measured OH sink compounds often exposes a significant gap. This "missing" OH reactivity can be high and influenced by both direct biogenic emissions and secondary photo-oxidation products. To investigate the source of the missing OH sinks in forests, total OH reactivity emission rates were determined for the first time from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) throughout spring, summer and autumn 2011. The total OH reactivity was measured inside a branch enclosure using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) as the detector. In parallel, separate volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission rates were monitored by a second PTR-MS, including the signal of isoprene, acetaldehyde, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes. The comparison of known and PTR-MS detected OH sink compounds and the directly measured total OH reactivity emitted from Norway spruce revealed unmeasured and possibly unknown primary biogenic emissions. These were found to be highest in late summer during daytime coincident with highest temperatures and ozone levels.

  9. Studying chemical reactivity in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Haag, Moritz P; Reiher, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactivity of a set of reactants is determined by its potential (electronic) energy (hyper)surface. The high dimensionality of this surface renders it difficult to efficiently explore reactivity in a large reactive system. Exhaustive sampling techniques and search algorithms are not straightforward to employ as it is not clear which explored path will eventually produce the minimum energy path of a reaction passing through a transition structure. Here, the chemist's intuition would be of invaluable help, but it cannot be easily exploited because (1) no intuitive and direct tool for the scientist to manipulate molecular structures is currently available and because (2) quantum chemical calculations are inherently expensive in terms of computational effort. In this work, we elaborate on how the chemist can be reintroduced into the exploratory process within a virtual environment that provides immediate feedback and intuitive tools to manipulate a reactive system. We work out in detail how this immersion should take place. We provide an analysis of modern semi-empirical methods which already today are candidates for the interactive study of chemical reactivity. Implications of manual structure manipulations for their physical meaning and chemical relevance are carefully analysed in order to provide sound theoretical foundations for the interpretation of the interactive reactivity exploration.

  10. Measurement of reactive species for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Plasma medicine has been intensively studied over the last decade. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are responsible for the therapeutic effects in plasma medicine. To examine the therapeutic effects of reactive species, the densities of OH, O, and NO were measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). A helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (10 kV, 10 kHz of 40 μs pulses) and a nanosecond streamer discharge (24 kV, 8 ns, 30 Hz) were utilized to treat mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium. Correlation between the dose of reactive species and deactivation rate of melanoma cells was measured with the aid of LIF. The results showed that the rate of cell death correlates with OH density, but not with O and NO densities. Next, a method to supply a specific reactive species to living organisms was developed. It utilizes photolysis of helium-buffered H2O and O2 by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light to produce reactive species. The VUV method was utilized to sterilize Bacillus atrophaeus on agar plate. With the VUV method, it was succeeded to show sterilization only by OH radicals. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals caused visible sterilization.

  11. Reactivity Network: Secondary Sources for Inorganic Reactivity Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an eclectic annotated bibliography of secondary sources for inorganic reactivity information of interest to reactivity network review authors and to anyone seeking information about simple inorganic reactions in order to develop experiments and demonstrations. Gives 119 sources. (MVL)

  12. Reactivity Network: Secondary Sources for Inorganic Reactivity Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an eclectic annotated bibliography of secondary sources for inorganic reactivity information of interest to reactivity network review authors and to anyone seeking information about simple inorganic reactions in order to develop experiments and demonstrations. Gives 119 sources. (MVL)

  13. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem.

    PubMed

    Nick, H M; Raoof, A; Centler, F; Thullner, M; Regnier, P

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Immune reactivities against gums.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Different kinds of gums from various sources enjoy an extremely broad range of commercial and industrial use, from food and pharmaceuticals to printing and adhesives. Although generally recognized as safe by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), gums have a history of association with sensitive or allergic reactions. In addition, studies have shown that gums have a structural, molecular similarity to a number of common foods. A possibility exists for cross-reactivity. Due to the widespread use of gums in almost every aspect of modern life, the overall goal of the current investigation was to determine the degree of immune reactivity to various gum antigens in the sera of individuals representing the general population. The study was a randomized, controlled trial. 288 sera purchased from a commercial source. The sera was screened for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies against extracts of mastic gum, carrageenan, xantham gum, guar gum, gum tragacanth, locust bean gum, and β-glucan, using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing. For each gum antigen, inhibition testing was performed on the 4 sera that showed the highest IgG and IgE immune reactivity against the different gums used in the study. Inhibition testing on these same sera for sesame albumin, lentil, corn, rice, pineapple, peanut, pea protein, shrimp, or kidney bean was used to determine the cross-reactivity of these foods with the gum. Of the 288 samples, 4.2%-27% of the specimens showed a significant elevation in IgG antibodies against various gums. Only 4 of 288, or 1.4%, showed a simultaneous elevation of the IgG antibody against all 7 gum extracts. For the IgE antibody, 15.6%-29.1% of the specimens showed an elevation against the various gums. A significant percentage of the specimens, 12.8%, simultaneously produced IgE antibodies against all 7 tested extracts. Overall, the percentage of elevation in IgE antibodies against different gum extracts, with

  15. Towards a quantitative understanding of total OH reactivity: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yudong; Shao, Min; Wang, Xuemei; Nölscher, Anke C.; Kessel, Stephan; Guenther, Alex; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past fifty years, considerable efforts have been devoted to measuring the concentration and chemical speciation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air and emissions. Recently, it has become possible to directly determine the overall effect of atmospheric trace gases on the oxidant hydroxyl radicals (OH), by measuring OH reactivity (OH loss frequency). Quantifying total OH reactivity is one way to characterize the roles of VOCs in formation of ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Approaches for measuring total OH reactivity in both emissions and ambient air have been progressing and have been applied in a wide range of studies. Here we evaluate the main techniques used to measure OH reactivity, including two methods directly measuring OH decay and one comparative reactivity method (CRM), and summarize the existing experimental and modeling studies. Total OH reactivity varies significantly on spatial, diurnal, seasonal and vertical bases. Comparison with individually detected OH sinks often reveals a significant missing reactivity, ranging from 20% to over 80% in some environments. Missing reactivity has also been determined in most source emission studies. These source measurements, as well as numerical models, have indicated that both undetected primary emissions and unmeasured secondary products could contribute to missing reactivity. A quantitative understanding of total OH reactivity of various sources and ambient environments will enhance our understanding of the suite of compounds found in emissions as well as chemical processes, and will also provide an opportunity for the improvement of atmospheric chemical mechanisms.

  16. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  17. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  18. Skylab reactivation mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    On July 11, 1979, Skylab impacted the Earth's surface. The debris dispersion area stretched from the South Eastern Indian Ocean across a sparsely populated section of Western Australia. The events leading to the reentry of Skylab are discussed and a final assessment of the Skylab debris impact footprint is presented. Also included are detailed evaluations of the various Skylab systems that were reactivated when control of Skylab was regained in mid-1978 after having been powered down since February 4, 1974.

  19. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-30

    Methylphosphonyl-AChE by la, lb, 2, and 3 . .............................................. 83 Chapter III 1 Lineweaver - Burke Plot for Compound 3a...Not determined. I11 ................ ."--..-. . . .S . -. -.. .i.,...,. _. o, . ’._ -. .-. . , , I I 1 .. .! 8.08.O 1I i i 7.0 LINEWEAVER - BURKE ...10 15 20 25 30 35 40 [AcSCh] - 1 , M -1 x 10 -4 JA-1 043-23 FIGURE 1 LINEWEAVER - BURKE PLOT FOR COMPOUND 3a 112 nonquaternary reactivators with ethyl

  20. Becoming Reactive by Concretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieditis, Armand; Janakiraman, Bhaskar

    1992-01-01

    One way to build a reactive system is to construct an action table indexed by the current situation or stimulus. The action table describes what course of action to pursue for each situation or stimulus. This paper describes an incremental approach to constructing the action table through achieving goals with a hierarchical search system. These hierarchies are generated with transformations called concretizations, which add constraints to a problem and which can reduce the search space. The basic idea is that an action for a state is looked up in the action table and executed whenever the action table has an entry for that state; otherwise, a path is found to the nearest (cost-wise in a graph with costweighted arcs) state that has a mappring from a state in the next highest hierarchy. For each state along the solution path, the successor state in the path is cached in the action table entry for that state. Without caching, the hierarchical search system can logarithmically reduce search. When the table is complete the system no longer searches: it simply reacts by proceeding to the state listed in the table for each state. Since the cached information is specific only to the nearest state in the next highest hierarchy and not the goal, inter-goal transfer of reactivity is possible. To illustrate our approach, we show how an implemented hierarchical search system can completely reactive.

  1. Energy transfer in reactive and non-reactive H/sub 2/ + OH collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rashed, O.; Brown, N.J.

    1985-04-01

    We have used the methods of quasi-classical dynamics to compute energy transfer properties of non-reactive and reactive H/sub 2/ + OH collisions. Energy transfer has been investigated as function of translational temperature, reagent rotational energy, and reagent vibrational energy. The energy transfer mechanism is complex with ten types of energy transfer possible, and evidence was found for all types. There is much more exchange between the translational degree of freedom and the H/sub 2/ vibrational degree of freedom than there is between translation and OH vibration. Translational energy is transferred to the rotational degrees of freedom of each molecule. There is a greater propensity for the transfer of translation to OH rotation than H/sub 2/ rotation. In reactive collisions, increases in reagent translational temperature predominantly appear as vibrational energy in the water molecule. Energy transfer in non-reactive and reactive collisions does not depend strongly on the initial angular momentum in either molecule. In non-reactive collisions, vibrational energy is transferred to translation, to the rotational degree of freedom of the same molecule, and to the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the other molecule. In reactive collisions, the major effect of increasing the vibrational energy in reagent molecules is that, on the average, the vibrational energy of the reagents appears as product vibrational energy. 18 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. C/SiC Gradient Oxidation Protective Coating on Graphite by Modified Reactive Melt Infiltration Method: Effects of Processing Parameters on Transition Interface Thickness and High-Temperature Anti-oxidation Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Alireza; Ehsani, Naser

    2017-01-01

    In this research, it was found that the C/SiC transition interface thickness increases without a significant decrease in toughness by modifying the reactive melt infiltration method through the addition of SiC nanoparticles. Also, the effect of the infiltration temperature on the transition interface thickness, isothermal oxidation behavior, and thermal shock resistance of the C/SiC graded coating were investigated. Coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Microstructural observations showed that with an increase in the heat treatment temperature, a higher amount of β-SiC (as a product of the infiltration process) is produced, which results in lower surface continuity in the coatings produced at a lower temperature. Moreover, the transition interface thickness increased with a decreasing infiltration temperature. The addition of SiC nanoparticles increased the transition interface thickness and oxidation resistance. After isothermal oxidation at 1773 K (1500 °C) for 10 hours, samples containing 7 wt pct SiC nanoparticles heat treated at 1773 K and 1873 K (1500 °C and 1600 °C) showed 13.3 and 5.03 pct weight loss, respectively.

  3. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo textile dye (C.I. Reactive Red 195 (3BF)) in aqueous solution over copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Rezvani, Zoya

    2015-08-01

    The degradation of C.I. Reactive Red 195 (3BF) in aqueous solution using copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method was studied. Structural, optical and morphological properties of nanocomposite coatings were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The nanoparticles exhibit a particle size of 31 nm, showing a good nanoscale crystalline morphology. The photocatalytic activity of copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass was studied by performing the photocatalytic degradation of 3BF at different irradiation time. The effect of irradiation time on the degradation of 3BF was studied and the results showed that more than 85% of the 3BF was degraded in 45 min of irradiation. The pseudo-first-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated with pseudo first order rate constants of 4.10 × 10-2 min-1. The main advantage of the photocatalyst coated on glass overcomes the difficulties in separation and recycle of photocatalyst suspensions.

  4. Cobalt ferrite nano-composite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method for photo-catalytic degradation of an azo textile dye Reactive Red 4: XRD, FESEM and DRS investigations.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Parhizkar, Janan

    2015-11-05

    Cobalt ferrite nano-composite was prepared by hydrothermal route using cobalt nitrate, iron nitrate and ethylene glycol as chelating agent. The nano-composite was coated on glass by Doctor Blade method and annealed at 300 °C. The structural, optical, and photocatalytic properties have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). Powder XRD analysis confirmed formation of CoFe2O4 spinel phase. The estimated particle size from FESEM data was 50 nm. The calculated energy band gaps, obtained by Tauc relation from UV-Vis absorption spectra was 1.3 eV. Photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 4 as an azo textile was investigated in aqueous solution under irradiation showed 68.0% degradation of the dye within 100 min. The experimental enhanced activity compare to pure Fe2O3 can be ascribed to the formation of composite, which was mainly attributable to the transfer of electron and hole to the surface of composite and hinder the electron hole recombination.

  5. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo textile dye (C.I. Reactive Red 195 (3BF)) in aqueous solution over copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Rezvani, Zoya

    2015-08-05

    The degradation of C.I. Reactive Red 195 (3BF) in aqueous solution using copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method was studied. Structural, optical and morphological properties of nanocomposite coatings were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The nanoparticles exhibit a particle size of 31 nm, showing a good nanoscale crystalline morphology. The photocatalytic activity of copper cobaltite nanocomposite coated on glass was studied by performing the photocatalytic degradation of 3BF at different irradiation time. The effect of irradiation time on the degradation of 3BF was studied and the results showed that more than 85% of the 3BF was degraded in 45 min of irradiation. The pseudo-first-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated with pseudo first order rate constants of 4.10 × 10(-2) min(-1). The main advantage of the photocatalyst coated on glass overcomes the difficulties in separation and recycle of photocatalyst suspensions.

  6. A novel combined chemical kinetic and trapping method for probing the relationships between chemical reactivity and interfacial H2O, Br(-) and H(+) ion molarities in CTAB/C12E6 mixed micelles.

    PubMed

    Dar, Aijaz Ahmad; Romsted, Laurence S; Nazir, Nighat; Zhang, Yongliang; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Qing; Liu, Changyao

    2017-09-13

    A delicate balance-of-forces governs the interactions responsible for surfactant self-assembly and chemical reactivity within them. Chemical reactions in micellar media generally occur in the interfacial region of micelles that is a complex mixture of: water, headgroups, counterions, co-ions, acids or bases, organic solvents, and the reactants themselves. We have carried out a detailed study of a complex chemical reaction in mixed CTAB/C12E6 micelles by using the chemical kinetic (CK) and chemical trapping (CT) methods. The results provide a detailed quantitative treatment of the reaction of the anion of the antioxidant t-butylhydroquinone, TBHQ(-), with 4-hexadecylbenzenediazonium, 16-ArN2(+), within the interfacial region of the mixed micelles in the C12E6 mole fraction range of 0 to 1 at three different total surfactant concentrations. CK experiments showed that this reaction is monophasic in C12E6 micelles, but biphasic in mixed micelles. The results were fully consistent with a complex mechanism in which TBHQ(-) reacts with 16-ArN2(+) to give a transient diazoether intermediate that competitively breaks down into products and or reverts to starting materials. The kinetics are the same in mixed micelles of CTAB/C12E6 (grow) and CTAB/C12E8 (don't grow) showing that the rates only depend on micelle composition, not shape. CT results provided estimates of interfacial molarities of H2O are approximately constant at ca. 39 and Br(-) decreases from ca. 2.75 to 0.05 moles per liter of interfacial volume as C12E6 mole fraction increases from 0 to 1. Combined CK/CT results provided values for interfacial pH, ranging from ca. 4.25 in cationic micelles to 1.5 in nonionic micelles despite a constant bulk pH of 1.5 and the TBHQ interfacial pKa = 3.8 at all C12E6 molar fractions. In totality, these results yielded an extraordinary amount of quantitative information about the relationships between the chemical reactivity and interfacial compositions of the mixed micelles.

  7. Reactive Attachment Disorder in Maltreated Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Scheeringa, Michael; Boris, Neil W.; Heller, Sherryl S.; Smyke, Anna T.; Trapani, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine if Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) can be reliably identified in maltreated toddlers in foster care, if the two types of RAD are independent, and to estimate the prevalence of RAD in these maltreated toddlers. Methods: Clinicians treating 94 maltreated toddlers in foster care were interviewed regarding signs of…

  8. Predicting the reactivity of adhesive starting materials

    Treesearch

    Anthony H. Conner

    1999-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are important in the production of bonded-wood products. Phenolic compounds in addition to phenol and resorcinol are potential alternative feedstocks for producing adhesives. The reactivity of a wide variety of phenolic compounds with formaldehyde was investigated using semi-empirical and ab initio computational chemistry methods...

  9. Design and synthesis of reactive separation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    During the last decade there has been a rapid upturn in interest in reactive distillation. The chemical process industry recognizes the favorable economics of carrying out reaction simultaneously with distillation for certain classes of reacting systems, and many new processes have been built based on this technology. Interest is also increasing by academics and software vendors. Systematic design methods for reactive distillation systems have only recently begun to emerge. In this report we survey the available design techniques and point out the contributions made by our group at the University of Massachusetts.

  10. Silsesquioxane nanoparticles with reactive internal functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozek, Eric M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Zharov, Ilya

    2017-02-01

    A series of silsesquioxane nanoparticles containing reactive internal organic functionalities throughout the entire particle body have been synthesized using a surfactant-free method with organosilanes as the sole precursors and a base catalyst. The organic functional groups incorporated are vinyl, allyl, mercapto, cyanoethyl, and cyanopropyl groups. The sizes and morphologies of the particles were characterized using SEM and nitrogen adsorption, while the compositions were confirmed using TGA, FT-IR, solid state NMR, and elemental analysis. The accessibility and reactivity of the functional groups inside the particles were demonstrated by performing bromination and reduction reactions in the interior of the particles.

  11. Reactive collisions of atoms with diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolniewicz, L.; Hinze, Juergen; Alijah, Alexander

    1993-08-01

    The theory of the reactive collision of an atom with a diatomic molecule is formulated in 'democratic' hyperspherical coordinates. An adiabatic ansatz is used to separate the distance coordinate from the angular coordinates. The angular eigenvalue problem is solved, using the hyperspherical harmonics as basis functions, while the R-matrix propagation method is used to integrate the resulting coupled equations along the distance coordinate. As an example, reactive collision probabilities for H + H2 are computed, using the Porter-Karplus surface. The symmetry requirements, when dealing with three identical Fermions in the collision, are considered explicitly.

  12. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  13. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  14. Using qualitative maps to direct reactive robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, Randolph; Pendleton, Tom

    1992-01-01

    The principal advantage of mobile robots is that they are able to go to specific locations to perform useful tasks rather than have the tasks brought to them. It is important therefore that the robot be used to reach desired locations efficiently and reliably. A mobile robot whose environment extends significantly beyond its sensory horizon must maintain a representation of the environment, a map, in order to attain these efficiency and reliability requirements. We believe that qualitative mapping methods provide useful and robust representation schemes and that such maps may be used to direct the actions of a reactively controlled robot. In this paper we describe our experience in employing qualitative maps to direct, through the selection of desired control strategies, a reactive-behavior based robot. This mapping capability represents the development of one aspect of a successful deliberative/reactive hybrid control architecture.

  15. Using qualitative maps to direct reactive robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, Randolph; Pendleton, Tom

    1992-01-01

    The principal advantage of mobile robots is that they are able to go to specific locations to perform useful tasks rather than have the tasks brought to them. It is important therefore that the robot be used to reach desired locations efficiently and reliably. A mobile robot whose environment extends significantly beyond its sensory horizon must maintain a representation of the environment, a map, in order to attain these efficiency and reliability requirements. We believe that qualitative mapping methods provide useful and robust representation schemes and that such maps may be used to direct the actions of a reactively controlled robot. In this paper we describe our experience in employing qualitative maps to direct, through the selection of desired control strategies, a reactive-behavior based robot. This mapping capability represents the development of one aspect of a successful deliberative/reactive hybrid control architecture.

  16. Validation of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index in a Chinese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Andrew M. H.; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (C-IRI) for the assessment of empathy in Chinese people were examined. Method: The Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) was translated to Chinese, and an expert panel reviewed its content validity and cultural relevance. The translated instrument…

  17. Validation of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index in a Chinese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Andrew M. H.; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (C-IRI) for the assessment of empathy in Chinese people were examined. Method: The Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) was translated to Chinese, and an expert panel reviewed its content validity and cultural relevance. The translated instrument…

  18. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO2 and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  19. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    SciTech Connect

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO{sub 2} and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  20. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in cell-free model using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA) assay-limitations of method.

    PubMed

    Szychowski, Konrad A; Rybczyńska-Tkaczyk, Kamila; Leja, Marcin L; Wójtowicz, Anna K; Gmiński, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant, applied in a variety of commercial and household products, mainly electronic ones. Since the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered one of the principal cytotoxicity mechanisms, numerous studies undertake that aspect of TBBPA's mechanism of action. The present study verifies if the fluorogenic substrate 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA) should be used to detect ROS production induced by TBBPA. To determine the ability of TBBPA alone to stimulate the conversion of H2DCFDA to its fluorescent product 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), we used a cell-free model. In the experiments we check different cultured media also in combination with free radical scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Additionally, experiments with stable free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) have been made. The presented data showed that TBBPA in all tested concentrations interacts with H2DCFDA in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer while in micromolar concentrations in the DMEM/F12 medium with and without serum. The addition of NAC inhibited the interaction of TBBPA with H2DCFDA. Experiments with DPPH· showed that, in the presence of NAC, TBBPA acts like a free radical. TBBPA has similar properties to free radical and is susceptible to free radical scavenging properties of NAC. Our results indicated that H2DCFDA assay cannot be used to evaluate cellular ROS production in TBBPA studies. The study connected with TBBPA-stimulated ROS production in cell culture models using the H2DCFDA assay should be revised using a different method. However, due to the free radical-like nature of TBBPA, it can be very difficult. Therefore, further investigation of the nature of TBBPA as a compound with similar properties to free radical is required.

  1. A Potentiokinetic Determination of Corrosion Rates in Artificial Seawater-Hypochlorite Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICS from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL June 1976 Author__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ A:- Tesis Advisor i - Second Rae...METALLIC SAMPLES --------------- 84 | . ... l .. i J lilml l i madmu i l i ll im ~ iia a -- ,. APPENDIX C TABLES OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA...3 4 x >17. > X0 a, x0 -, 10 X0 X0 X0 Figure 16. Nickel in seawater treated with 26.24~ ppm OC1l. -x 0 am - Im 0.2I -0I OI0 10 17

  2. Introducing new reactivity descriptors: "Bond reactivity indices." Comparison of the new definitions and atomic reactivity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Márquez, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    A new methodology to obtain reactivity indices has been defined. This is based on reactivity functions such as the Fukui function or the dual descriptor and makes it possible to project the information of reactivity functions over molecular orbitals instead of the atoms of the molecule (atomic reactivity indices). The methodology focuses on the molecule's natural bond orbitals (bond reactivity indices) because these orbitals (with physical meaning) have the advantage of being very localized, allowing the reaction site of an electrophile or nucleophile to be determined within a very precise molecular region. This methodology gives a reactivity index for every Natural Bond Orbital (NBO), and we have verified that they have equivalent information to the reactivity functions. A representative set of molecules has been used to test the new definitions. Also, the bond reactivity index has been related with the atomic reactivity one, and complementary information has been obtained from the comparison. Finally, a new atomic reactivity index has been defined and compared with previous definitions.

  3. Stability and reactivity of dimethylethoxysilane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Richard E.; Ford, Douglas I.

    1992-01-01

    Dimethylethoxysilane (DMES) is currently used to treat the High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) shuttle tiles in order to provide a hydrophobic surface on the silica. DMES is a volatile, reactive silane that incorporates two reactive sites, the ethoxy group and the silica-hydride group. The work reported in this paper focused on the reactivity of these two groups with silica, water, quantitative reagents, and within DMES itself.

  4. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  5. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  6. Reactive attachment disorder.

    PubMed

    Hornor, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect affects the lives of many American children and can result in physical injury and disability as well as psychological trauma. Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) is one possible psychological consequence of child abuse and neglect for very young children, younger than 5 years of age. RAD is described as markedly disturbed and developmentally inappropriate social relatedness usually beginning before age 5 years. These behavioral manifestations are the direct result of and come after pathogenic care. To better understand RAD, it is first necessary to understand attachment; therefore, attachment theory is examined. Risk factors for the development of RAD are presented. Implications for pediatric nurse practitioner practice are explored. The pediatric nurse practitioner can play a vital role in recognizing RAD and ensuring that children with this disorder receive prompt mental health assessment and therapy.

  7. Reactive flow in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassart, Laurence; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    When guest atoms diffuse into a host solid and react, the host may flow inelastically. Often a reaction can stimulate flow in a host too brittle to flow under a mechanical load alone. We formulate a theory of reactive flow in solids by regarding both flow and reaction as nonequilibrium processes, and placing the driving forces for flow and reaction on equal footing. We construct chemomechanical rate-dependent kinetic models without yield strength. In a host under constant stress and chemical potential, flow will persist indefinitely, but reaction will arrest. We also construct chemomechanical yield surface and flow rule by extending the von Mises theory of plasticity. We show that the host under a constant deviatoric stress will flow gradually in response to ramp chemical potential, and will ratchet in response to cyclic chemical potential.

  8. Reactive chemicals and cancer.

    PubMed

    Blair, A; Kazerouni, N

    1997-05-01

    Epidemiologic evidence on the relation between reactive chemicals and cancer is reviewed. These highly reactive chemicals (acrylonitrile; bis[chloromethyl]ether and chloromethyl methyl ether; 1,3-butadiene, ethylene oxide; formaldehyde; mustard gas; sulfuric acid; and vinyl chloride) vary in use and exposure. All are animal carcinogens that also have received considerable epidemiologic attention. Acrylonitrile is a chemical of current economic importance. The epidemiologic evidence is quite weak, but the available studies were very small. Epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrate that bis (chloromethyl) ether and chloromethyl methyl ether cause lung cancer. Continued follow-up of exposed workers is encouraged to provide information on risks for other cancers. Results from epidemiologic studies of butadiene-exposed workers are somewhat inconsistent, but the largest study with the best exposure assessment found the largest relative risk for leukemia. The failure of several larger studies to replicate the early Swedish findings of a very strong association between leukemia and ethylene oxide has not been adequately explained. Epidemiologic studies of formaldehyde provide limited evidence for an association with cancer of the nasopharynx and possibly with nasal cancer. These very rare tumors, however, are difficult to study epidemiologically. Mustard gas is a well-established lung carcinogen, but a recent follow-up of the English cohort suggests that other sites also may be affected. Sulfuric acid appears to cause laryngeal cancer. A suggested relationship with lung cancer in a few studies is of concern because of the widespread opportunity for exposure from ambient air pollution. Vinyl chloride causes angiosarcoma of the liver, but a large, multi-country study provided no clear evidence that other sites are affected.

  9. Modeling multicomponent reactive membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2007-05-01

    Using analytical calculations and computer simulations, we study binary AB and ternary ABC membranes that respond to an external stimulus by interconverting A and B components. The C component is assumed to be nonreactive and is incompatible with both A and B . We also assume that A and B have different spontaneous curvatures. The dynamics of the ternary system is described in terms of three order parameters: two specify the local composition and a third characterizes the local height of the membrane. Our description of the two-component membrane is based on a recent model proposed by Reigada [Phys. Rev. E. 72, 051921 (2005)]; we extend the latter approach by explicitly including the effects of the membrane’s surface tension on the phase behavior of the system. By performing a linear stability analysis, we determine the behavior of the reactive AB membrane for a given bending elasticity and surface tension at different values of the reaction rate coefficients. We also numerically integrate the governing dynamic equations, and the results of these simulations are in agreement with the analytical predictions. For the two-component membranes, we calculate two critical values of the reaction rate coefficients, which define the behavior of the system, and plot the phase diagrams in terms of different parameters. We illustrate that the surface tension of the membrane strongly affects these critical values of the reaction rate coefficients and therefore the location of the phase boundaries. We also pinpoint the regions on the phase diagram where the late-time behavior is affected by the initial fluctuations, i.e., where such a reactive system has some “memory” of its prior state. In the case of the three-component system, we show that the presence of the nonreactive C component strongly affects the composition and topology of the membrane, as well as critically altering the propagation of the traveling waves within the system.

  10. Parameters estimation for reactive transport: A way to test the validity of a reactive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Mohit; Cheikh Anta Ndiaye, Mame; Carrayrou, Jérôme

    The chemical parameters used in reactive transport models are not known accurately due to the complexity and the heterogeneous conditions of a real domain. We will present an efficient algorithm in order to estimate the chemical parameters using Monte-Carlo method. Monte-Carlo methods are very robust for the optimisation of the highly non-linear mathematical model describing reactive transport. Reactive transport of tributyltin (TBT) through natural quartz sand at seven different pHs is taken as the test case. Our algorithm will be used to estimate the chemical parameters of the sorption of TBT onto the natural quartz sand. By testing and comparing three models of surface complexation, we show that the proposed adsorption model cannot explain the experimental data.

  11. Toward an operationalization of reactive paranoid psychoses (reactive delusional disorder).

    PubMed

    Opjordsmoen, S

    1987-01-01

    Reactive psychoses are relatively often diagnosed in Norway, although they are not operationalized in any classificatory system and the reliability may be questioned. The aim of this study was to define a group of reactive paranoid psychoses and compare its long-term outcome to the group of nonreactive paranoid psychoses and to paranoid schizophrenia. Approximately 200 out of 301 delusional subjects earlier studied by Retterstöl have recently been interviewed semistructurally, making a total follow-up period of 22-38 years. Diagnoses at discharge have been assessed retrospectively before the present interview, with a polydiagnostic approach. Based upon Kendler's criteria of delusional disorder and influenced by Jaspers, the concept of reactive delusional disorder has been operationalized. Results from the first 125 interviews show 31 cases of Kendler's delusional disorder, of which 16 are diagnosed as reactive delusional disorder. Outcome in this group is most favorable, and especially good outcome is found in acute reactive delusional disorder.

  12. A quantum-classical study of the OH + H2 reactive and inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, Carles; Pacifici, Leonardo; Laganà, Antonio; Coletti, Cecilia

    2017-04-01

    We carried out a study of OH + H2 scattering using a quantum-classical method, treating quantally vibrations and classically both translations and rotations. The good agreement between the state specific quantum-classical reactive probabilities and the corresponding quantum ones prompted the extension of the study to state to state probabilities for non reactive vibrational energy exchange. The study showed that H2 reactive dynamics depends on the vibrational excitation, while the non reactive one is mainly vibrationally adiabatic. On the contrary, OH reactive dynamics is not affected by its vibrational excitation, whereas the non reactive one might produce some pumping up to higher vibrational states.

  13. Latent Virus Reactivation: From Space to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Donald H.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Castro, Victoria A.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    Reactivation of latent viruses is a recognized consequence of decreased immunity. More recently viral reactivation has been identified as an important in vivo indicator of clinically relevant immune changes. Viral reactivation can be determined quickly and easily by the presence of virus in saliva and other body fluids. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a highly sensitive and specific molecular method to detect the presence of specific viral DNA. Studies in astronauts demonstrated that herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivate at rates above normal during and after spaceflight in response to moderately decreased T-cell immunity. This technology was expanded to patients on Earth beginning with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) immuno-compromised patients. The HIV patients shed EBV in saliva at rates 9-fold higher than observed in astronauts demonstrating that the level of EBV shedding reflects the severity of impaired immunity. Whereas EBV reactivation is not expected to produce serious effects in astronauts on missions of 6 months or less, VZV reactivation in astronauts could produce shingles. Reactivation of live, infectious VZV in astronauts with no symptoms was demonstrated in astronauts during and after spaceflight. We applied our technology to study VZV-induced shingles in patients. In a study of 54 shingles patients, we showed salivary VZV was present in every patient on the day antiviral (acyclovir) treatment was initiated. Pain and skin lesions decreased with antiviral treatment. Corresponding decreases in levels of VZV were also observed and accompanied recovery. Although the level of VZV in shingles patients before the treatment was generally higher than those found in astronauts, lower range of VZV numbers in shingles patients overlapped with astronaut s levels. This suggests a potential risk of shingles to astronauts resulting from reactivation of VZV. In

  14. Latent Virus Reactivation: From Space to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gilden, Donald H.; Tyring, Stephen K.; Castro, Victoria A.; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    Reactivation of latent viruses is a recognized consequence of decreased immunity. More recently viral reactivation has been identified as an important in vivo indicator of clinically relevant immune changes. Viral reactivation can be determined quickly and easily by the presence of virus in saliva and other body fluids. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a highly sensitive and specific molecular method to detect the presence of specific viral DNA. Studies in astronauts demonstrated that herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivate at rates above normal during and after spaceflight in response to moderately decreased T-cell immunity. This technology was expanded to patients on Earth beginning with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) immuno-compromised patients. The HIV patients shed EBV in saliva at rates 9-fold higher than observed in astronauts demonstrating that the level of EBV shedding reflects the severity of impaired immunity. Whereas EBV reactivation is not expected to produce serious effects in astronauts on missions of 6 months or less, VZV reactivation in astronauts could produce shingles. Reactivation of live, infectious VZV in astronauts with no symptoms was demonstrated in astronauts during and after spaceflight. We applied our technology to study VZV-induced shingles in patients. In a study of 54 shingles patients, we showed salivary VZV was present in every patient on the day antiviral (acyclovir) treatment was initiated. Pain and skin lesions decreased with antiviral treatment. Corresponding decreases in levels of VZV were also observed and accompanied recovery. Although the level of VZV in shingles patients before the treatment was generally higher than those found in astronauts, lower range of VZV numbers in shingles patients overlapped with astronaut s levels. This suggests a potential risk of shingles to astronauts resulting from reactivation of VZV. In

  15. Initiator Effects in Reactive Extrusion of Starch Graft Copolymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Graft copolymers of starch with water-soluble polymers such as polyacrylamide have potential applications including hydrogels, superabsorbents, and thickening agents. Reactive extrusion is a rapid, continuous method for production of starch graft copolymers with high reaction and grafting efficienc...

  16. A reactive torque control law for gyroscopically controlled space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method of control is developed based on the reactive torques as seen by the individual CMG gimbals. The application of a torque to the gimbal of a CMG rotates the momentum vector and applies a torque to the spacecraft according to well-known laws. The response (rotation) of the vehicle produces a reverse or reaction torque opposing the torque producing the gimbal movement. The reactive torque and the pseudoinverse control schemes are contrasted in order to point out the simplicity of the first method. Simulation was performed only to the extent necessary to prove that reactive torque stabilization and control is feasible.

  17. Reactivity of San Andres dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.S. )

    1991-05-01

    The San Andres formation is routinely stimulated with acid. Although numerous acidizing simulators are available to aid in treatment optimization, existing reactivity data were generated with quarried rock rather than formation samples. This paper presents reactivity data for five San Andres dolomite samples. These data can be used in most fracture-acidizing-design simulators to allow more accurate simulation of the acidizing process.

  18. Nitrite reactivity with magnetite.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, P; Matocha, C J; Huggins, F E; Vandiviere, M M

    2013-06-18

    Under Fe(3+)-reducing conditions, soil Fe(2+) oxidation has been shown to be coupled with nitrate (NO3(-)) reduction. One possible secondary reaction is the involvement of NO3(-) and nitrite (NO2(-)) with magnetite, a mixed valence Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) mineral found in many natural environments. Currently, little information exists on NO3(-) and NO2(-) reactivity with magnetite. This study investigates NO3(-) and NO2(-) reactivity with magnetite under anoxic conditions using batch kinetic experiments across a range of pH values (5.5-7.5) and in the presence of added dissolved Fe(2+). Solid phase products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nitrate removal by magnetite was much slower when compared with NO2(-). There was a pH-dependence in the reduction of NO2(-) by magnetite; the initial rate of NO2(-) removal was two times faster at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.5. The influence of pH was explained by the binding of NO2(-) to positively charged sites on magnetite (≡ S-OH2(+)) and to neutral sites (≡ S-OH(0)). As NO2(-) was removed from solution, nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were identified as products confirming that nitrite was reduced. Structural Fe(2+) in magnetite was determined to be the reductant of NO2(-) based on the lack of measurable dissolved Fe(2+) release to solution coupled with Mössbauer spectra and XRD analysis of solid phase products. Addition of dissolved Fe(2+) to magnetite slurries resulted in adsorption and an acceleration in the rate of nitrite reduction at a given pH value. In summary, findings reported in this study demonstrate that if magnetite is present in Fe(3+)-reducing soil and NO2(-) is available, it can remove NO2(-) from solution and reduce a portion of it abiotically to NO and subsequently to N2O by a heterogeneous electron transfer process.

  19. Substrate dependence of graphene reactivity towards hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.; Holroyd, C.; Clough, J.; Horn, A.; Koehler, S. P. K.; Casiraghi, C.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to functionalize graphene with several methods, such as radical reactions, cyclo-additions, hydrogenation, and oxidations, allows this material to be used in a large range of applications. In this framework, it is essential to be able to control the efficiency and stability of the functionalization process—this requires understanding how the graphene reactivity is affected by the environment, including the substrate. In this work we provide an insight on the substrate dependence of graphene reactivity towards hydrogenation by comparing three different substrates: silicon, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). Although MoS2 and h-BN have flatter surfaces than silicon, we found that the H coverage of graphene on h-BN is about half of the H coverage on graphene on both silicon and MoS2. Therefore, graphene shows strongly reduced reactivity towards hydrogenation when placed on h-BN. The difference in hydrogenation reactivity between h-BN and MoS2 may indicate a stronger van der Waals force between graphene and h-BN, compared to MoS2, or may be related to the chemical properties of MoS2, which is a well-known catalyst for hydrogen evolution reactions.

  20. Osteopontin expression in reactive lesions of gingiva.

    PubMed

    Elanagai, Rathinam; Veeravarmal, Veeran; Nirmal, Ramdas Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive proliferations of the gingiva comprise lesions such as pyogenic granuloma (PG), inflammatory fibroepithelial hyperplasia (IFH), peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF), and peripheral giant cell lesion. Osteopontin (OPN) has a dual role, it promotes mineralization when it is bound to solid substrate, and on the other hand, it inhibits mineralization when it is seen in association with solution. Objectives The study aimed to evaluate the expression of osteopontin in normal gingival tissue and different types of focal reactive proliferations of gingival tissue, and its role in the development of calcification within it. Material and Methods The presence and distribution of osteopontin was assessed using immunohistochemistry in five cases of normal gingival tissue and 30 cases of focal reactive proliferations of gingiva. Results There was no expression of osteopontin in normal subjects. Few cases of pyogenic granuloma, inflammatory fibroepithelial hyperplasia, and all the cases of peripheral ossifying fibroma showed positivity for osteopontin in the inflammatory cells, stromal cells, extracellular matrix, and in the calcifications. Conclusion The expression of osteopontin in all the cases of peripheral ossifying fibroma speculates that the majority of the cases of peripheral ossifying fibroma originate from the periodontal ligament cells. The treatment modalities for peripheral ossifying fibroma should differ from other focal reactive proliferations of gingiva.

  1. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce

  2. Nucleophilic Addition of Reactive Dyes on Amidoximated Acrylic Fabrics

    PubMed Central

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M.; El-Zawahry, Manal M.; Abdelghaffar, Fatma; Ahmed, Nahed S. E.

    2014-01-01

    Seven reactive dyes judiciously selected based on chemical structures and fixation mechanisms were applied at 2% owf of shade on amidoximated acrylic fabrics. Amidoximated acrylic fabric has been obtained by a viable amidoximation process. The dyeability of these fabrics was evaluated with respect to the dye exhaustion, fixation, and colour strength under different conditions of temperature and dyeing time. Nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes show higher colour data compared to nucleophilic substitution ones. FTIR studies further implicate the binding of reactive dyes on these fabrics. A tentative mechanism is proposed to rationalize the high fixation yield obtained using nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes. Also, the levelling and fastness properties were evaluated for all dyes used. Excellent to good fastness and levelling properties were obtained for all samples irrespective of the dye used. The result of investigation offers a new method for a viable reactive dyeing of amidoximated acrylic fabrics. PMID:25258720

  3. Reactive Attachment Disorder: A Preventable Mental Health Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, James J.; Jegtvig, Shereen K.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss attachment disorders; most specifically, Reactive Attachment Disorder, its etiology, background causes, symptoms, and its prevention with the intervention of allopathic, chiropractic, naturopathic, and osteopathic physicians. Methods An online search and review of the literature regarding Reactive Attachment Disorder was performed through Pubmed and Google. The articles, interview information, and books utilized for this paper were selected by historical significance, date of publication, pertinent information, and, most specifically, those sources of pertinent data regarding Reactive Attachment Disorder. Discussion Reactive Attachment Disorder is a mental health disease with neurological implications, which may be caused by abuse during the first five years of life. Recognition of this disease, its background causes, and knowledge of effective parenting guidelines, are reasonable expectations for all physicians and mental health care providers. Conclusion A collaborative effort by all physicians to prevent Reactive Attachment Disorder through the implementation of effective parenting might reduce the incidence of this mental health disease in children and adults. PMID:19674627

  4. Hydrothermal reactivity of saponite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and extent of the reactions of synthetic Fe-free saponite have been investigated under experimental hydrothermal conditions as a first step towards understanding saponite reactivity under relatively simple conditions. Saponite crystallizes from amorphous gel of ideal saponite composition within 7 days at 300o-550oC under P = 1 kbar. Reactions subsequent to this initial crystallization depend on reaction T and interlayer cations. Saponite is found to react hydrothermally, over a period of 200 days, at T down to 400oC, at least 150oC lower than previously reported, but showed no signs of reaction below 400oC. At 450oC, a mixture of talc/saponite and saponite/phlogopite clays forms from K-saponite via intracrystalline layer transformations, while above 450oC the initial K-saponite dissolves, with talc and phlogopite forming as discrete phases. After 200 days reactions at 400-450oC were not complete, so that given sufficient time to reach equilibrium, a lower hydrothermal stability limit for saponite is possible. Further study of the Fe-bearing saponite system will be required before experimental results can be applied to natural systems.-D.F.B.

  5. Differentiating Challenge Reactivity from Psychomotor Activity in Studies of Children's Psychophysiology: Considerations for Theory and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Nicole R.; Alkon, Abbey; Obradovic, Jelena; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Current methods of assessing children's physiological "stress reactivity" may be confounded by psychomotor activity, biasing estimates of the relation between reactivity and health. We examined the joint and independent contributions of psychomotor activity and challenge reactivity during a protocol for 5- and 6-year-old children (N = 338).…

  6. Differentiating Challenge Reactivity from Psychomotor Activity in Studies of Children's Psychophysiology: Considerations for Theory and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Nicole R.; Alkon, Abbey; Obradovic, Jelena; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Current methods of assessing children's physiological "stress reactivity" may be confounded by psychomotor activity, biasing estimates of the relation between reactivity and health. We examined the joint and independent contributions of psychomotor activity and challenge reactivity during a protocol for 5- and 6-year-old children (N = 338).…

  7. Cumulative Relative Reactivity: A Concept for Modeling Aquifer-Scale Reactive Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschko, M.; Cirpka, O. A.; Wöhling, T.; Rudolph, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative understanding of pollutant fluxes from diffuse input and turnover of pollutants at catchment scale requires process-based numerical models that can explain observed time series of heads, fluxes, and concentrations. To deal with the high level of uncertainty a probabilistic framework is necessary. Due to the high computational effort, such evaluations cannot be done with a spatially explicit reactive-transport model. Conceptual simplifications are needed. The proposed approach is based on travel times and relative reactivity. The latter quantifies the intensity of the chemical reaction relative to a reference reaction rate and can be interpreted as the strength of electron-donor (or electron-acceptor) released by the matrix. In general, the relative reactivity is a spatially variable property reflecting the geology of the formation. In this approach, the paths of individual water parcels are tracked through the aquifer, the age of the water parcels is evaluated, and the relative reactivity is integrated along their trajectories. By switching from space-time discretization to cumulative relative reactivity, advective-reactive transport can be simulated by solving a single system of ordinary differential equations for each combination of concentrations in the inflow. In comparison to solving the advection-dispersion-reaction equation in a spatially explicit way, solving a limited number of ordinary differential equations is computationally significantly less costly. This permits the application of Monte-Carlo methods within a stochastic framework. The validity of the approach was tested in a two-dimensional test case, where the errors introduced by neglecting dispersive mixing were analyzed. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated in a synthetic case study of aerobic respiration and denitrification in the saturated zone using a three-dimensional steady-state groundwater flow model combined with the simplified reactive transport approach.

  8. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yan; Gohar, Yousry; Zhong, Zhaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  9. Microscopic Control of Semiconductor Interface Reactivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-10

    St. Louis, MO). Enhanced Control of Interface Reactivity for Mercury- Cadmium -Telluride. - "Purdue University, Department of Physics (Professors R...Te interfaces with simple and noble metals. Mercury- cadmium -telluride is probably the most studied 5 X 10- " Torr with coverage 0 monitored by a...were grown at McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratories using a modified Bridgman method. The bulk crystals exhibited a band gap of 0. 175 ± 0.01 eV nI

  10. Electrostatically Self-Assembled Nanocomposite Reactive Microspheres

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    steady and range from approximately 100 to 700 m/s, depending on a variety of parameters, including the oxidizer and diluent species , * To whom...the reactivity are larger due to the aggregation of like species . Furthermore, sonica- tion is not a viable method for mixing if the production of...constant-volume equilibrium calculations were per- formed ( CHEETAH 4.0 (19) with the JCZS product library (20)) and the equilibrium temperature was

  11. Scientific Basis for the VOC Reactivity Issues Raised by Section 183(e) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

    PubMed

    Dimitriades, Basil

    1996-10-01

    This article deals with reactivity and photochemical modeling methods needed to develop emission control strategies for ambient ozone reduction, and with the uncertainties associated with relevant data and methods. Specifically, the article identifies and describes existing reactivity data for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from consumer and commercial products (CCF), and methods for developing control strategies for such emissions that take into account emissions reactivities. Existing reactivity data consist of Incremental Reactivity data and KOH-reactivity data. Both types of data are subject to uncertainties associated with • lack of experimental evidence, which is particularly severe for CCP emissions species; • theoretical derivation and/or experimental measurement of reactivity; and • variation of VOC reactivity with ambient conditions. Methods are described for using the reactivity concept to estimate the contribution of CCP emissions to ambient ozone. Also, to comply with one of the requirements of Section 183(e) of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and with current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy on reactivity, existing reactivity data were used to classify VOCs into three reactivity classes: "negligibly reactive"; "reactive", and "highly reactive".

  12. Approximating axially dependent radial-displacement reactivities of EBR-II subassembly rows

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.

    1994-12-31

    Reactivities resulting from radial displacement of the Experimental Breeder reactor II (EBR-II) subassembly rows are used in calculations of bowing components of reactivity and of grid-plate expansion reactivity. The method uses perturbation-quantity outputs from a modified R-Z geometry diffusion theory calculation to obtain axially delineated reactivity coefficients for an azimuthally homogenized approximation of an EBR-II configuration.

  13. Sexual Orientation Modulates Endocrine Stress Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Juster, Robert-Paul; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Mendrek, Adrianna; Pfaus, James G.; Smith, Nathan Grant; Johnson, Philip Jai; Lefebvre-Louis, Jean-Philippe; Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Sindi, Shireen; Lupien, Sonia J.; Pruessner, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Biological sex differences and sociocultural gender diversity influence endocrine stress reactivity. Although numerous studies have shown that men typically activate stronger stress responses than women when exposed to laboratory-based psychosocial stressors, it is unclear whether sexual orientation further modulates stress reactivity. Given that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals frequently report heightened distress secondary to stigma-related stressors, we investigated whether cortisol stress reactivity differs between LGB individuals and heterosexual individuals in response to a well-validated psychosocial stressor. METHODS The study population comprised 87 healthy adults (mean age, 25 years) who were grouped according to their biological sex and their gendered sexual orientation: lesbian/bisexual women (n = 20), heterosexual women (n = 21), gay/bisexual men (n = 26), and heterosexual men (n = 20). Investigators collected 10 salivary cortisol samples throughout a 2-hour afternoon visit involving exposure to the Trier Social Stress Test modified to maximize between-sex differences. RESULTS Relative to heterosexual women, lesbian/bisexual women showed higher cortisol stress reactivity 40 min after exposure to the stressor. In contrast, gay/bisexual men displayed lower overall cortisol concentrations throughout testing compared with heterosexual men. Main findings were significant while adjusting for sex hormones (estradiol-to-progesterone ratio in women and testosterone in men), age, self-esteem, and disclosure status (whether LGB participants had completed their “coming out”). CONCLUSIONS Our results provide novel evidence for gender-based modulation of cortisol stress reactivity based on sexual orientation that goes beyond well-established between-sex differences. This study raises several important avenues for future research related to the physiologic functioning of LGB populations and gender diversity more broadly. PMID:25444167

  14. One-step purification of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase using reactive dye-affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cunxi; Lee, Thomas C; Crowley, Kathleen S; Bell, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Reactive dye purification is an affinity purification technique offering unique selectivity and high purification potential. Historically, purification of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) has involved several steps of precipitation and column chromatography. Here, we describe a novel purification method that is simple, time-saving, inexpensive, and reproducible. The novel method employs a single chromatography step using a reactive dye resin, Reactive brown 10-agarose. Reactive brown 10 preferentially binds the PAT protein, which can then be specifically released by one of its substrates, acetyl-CoA. Using Reactive brown 10-agarose, PAT protein can be purified to homogeneity from E. coli or plant tissue with high recovery efficiency.

  15. Reactive Simulations for Biochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boero, M.

    After a brief review of the hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics scheme and its coupling to the metadynamics method, I will show how such a combination of computational tools can be used to study chemical reactions of general biological interest. Specifically, by using such a reactive hybrid paradigm, where the QM driver is a Car-Parrinello Lagrangian dynamics, we have inspected the ATP hydrolysis reaction in the anti-freezing protein known as heat shock cognate protein (Hsc70) and the unconventional propagation of protons across peptide groups in the H-path of the bovine cytochrome c oxidase. While the former represents a fundamental reaction operated by all living beings in a wealth of processes and functions, the second one is involved in cell respiration. For both systems accurate X-ray data are available, yet the actual reaction mechanism escapes experimental probes. The simulations presented here provide the complementary information missing in experiments, offer a direct insight into the reaction mechanisms at a molecular level, and allow to understand which pathways nature can follow to realize these processes fundamental to living organisms.

  16. Shear-Induced Reactive Gelation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bastian; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-11-24

    In this work, we describe a method for the production of porous polymer materials in the form of particles characterized by narrow pore size distribution using the principle of shear-induced reactive gelation. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) primary particles with diameter ranging from 80 to 200 nm are used as building blocks, which are assembled into fractal-like clusters when exposed to high shear rates generated in a microchannel. It was found that independent of the primary particle size, it is possible to modulate the internal structure of formed fractal-like aggregates having fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 by varying the residence time in the microchannel. Thermally induced postpolymerization was used to increase the mechanical resilience of such formed clusters. Primary particle interpenetration was observed by SEM and confirmed by light scattering resulting in an increase of fractal dimension. Nitrogen sorption measurements and mercury porosimetry confirmed formation of a porous material with surface area ranging from 20 to 40 m(2)/g characterized by porosity of 70% and narrow pore size distribution with an average diameter around 700 nm without the presence of any micropores. The strong perfusive character of the synthesized material was confirmed by the existence of a plateau of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate measured at high reduced velocities using a chromatographic column packed with the synthesized microclusters.

  17. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  18. Hydrothermal Reactivity of Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, K.; Shock, E.; Hartnett, H. E.; Williams, L. B.; Gould, I.

    2013-12-01

    The reactivity of aqueous amines depends on temperature, pH, and redox state [1], all of which are highly variable in hydrothermal systems. Temperature and pH affect the ratio of protonated to unprotonated amines (R-NH2 + H+ = R-NH3+), which act as nucleophiles and electrophiles, respectively. We hypothesize that this dual nature can explain the pH dependence of reaction rates, and predict that rates will approach a maximum at pH = pKa where the ratio of protonated and unprotonated amines approaches one and the two compounds are poised to react with one another. Higher temperatures in hydrothermal systems allow for more rapid reaction rates, readily reversible reactions, and unique carbon-nitrogen chemistry in which water acts as a reagent in addition to being the solvent. In this study, aqueous benzylamine was used as a model compound to explore the reaction mechanisms, kinetics, and equilibria of amines under hydrothermal conditions. Experiments were carried out in anoxic silica glass tubes at 250°C (Psat) using phosphate-buffered solutions to observe changes in reaction rates and product distributions as a function of pH. The rate of decomposition of benzylamine was much faster at pH 4 than at pH 9, consistent with the prediction that benzylamine acts as both nucleophile and an electrophile, and our estimate that the pKa of benzylamine is ~5 at 250°C and Psat. Accordingly, dibenzylamine is the primary product of the reaction of two benzylamine molecules, and this reaction is readily reversible under hydrothermal conditions. Extremely acidic or basic pH can be used to suppress dibenzylamine production, which also suppresses the formation of all other major products, including toluene, benzyl alcohol, dibenzylimine, and tribenzylamine. This suggests that dibenzylamine is the lone primary product that then itself reacts as a precursor to produce the above compounds. Analog experiments performed with ring-substituted benzylamine derivatives and chiral

  19. Menstrual cycle and cue reactivity in women smokers

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Stacia M.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Saladin, Michael E.; LaRowe, Steven D.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Emerging research suggests potential effects of the menstrual cycle on various aspects of smoking behavior in women, but results to date have been mixed. The present study sought to explore the influence of menstrual cycle phase on reactivity to smoking in vivo and stressful imagery cues in a sample of non–treatment-seeking women smokers. Methods: Via a within-subjects design, nicotine-dependent women (N = 37) participated in a series of four cue reactivity sessions, each during a distinct biologically verified phase of the menstrual cycle (early follicular [EF], mid-follicular [MF], mid-luteal [ML], and late luteal [LL]). Subjective (Questionnaire of Smoking Urges–Brief; QSU-B) and physiological (skin conductance and heart rate) measures of craving and reactivity were collected and compared across phases. Results: Subjective reactive craving (QSU-B) to smoking in vivo cues varied significantly across the menstrual cycle (p = .02) and was higher in both EF and MF phases versus ML and LL phases, but this finding was not sustained when controlling for reactivity to neutral cues. Heart rate reactivity to stressful imagery cues (p = .01) and skin conductance reactivity to smoking in vivo cues (p = .05) varied significantly across the menstrual cycle upon controlling for reactivity to neutral cues, with highest reactivity during the MF phase. Discussion: Menstrual cycle phase may have an effect on reactivity to smoking-related and stressful cues among women smokers. These findings contribute to an expanding literature, suggesting menstrual cycle effects on smoking behaviors in women. PMID:19996146

  20. Peer victimization (and harsh parenting) as developmental correlates of cognitive reactivity, a diathesis for depression.

    PubMed

    Cole, David A; Martin, Nina C; Sterba, Sonya K; Sinclair-McBride, Keneisha; Roeder, Kathryn M; Zelkowitz, Rachel; Bilsky, Sarah A

    2014-05-01

    Prior research has shown cognitive reactivity to be a diathesis for depression. Seeking evidence for the developmental origins of such diatheses, the current study examined peer victimization and harsh parenting as developmental correlates of cognitive reactivity in 571 children and adolescents (ages 8-13 years). Four major findings emerged. First, a new method for assessing cognitive reactivity in children and adolescents showed significant reliability and demonstrated construct validity vis-à-vis its relation to depression. Second, history of more severe peer victimization was significantly related to cognitive reactivity, with verbal victimization being more strongly tied to cognitive reactivity than other subtypes of peer victimization. Third, harsh parenting was also significantly related to cognitive reactivity. Fourth, both peer victimization and harsh parenting made unique statistical contributions to cognitive reactivity, after controlling for the effects of the other. Taken together, these findings provide preliminary support for a developmental model pertaining to origins of cognitive reactivity in children and adolescents.

  1. Adolescents’ Emotional Reactivity across Relationship Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Emily C.; Buehler, Cheryl; Blair, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents’ emotional reactivity in family, close friendships, and romantic relationships was examined in a community-based sample of 416 two-parent families. Six waves of annual data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Emotional reactivity to interparental conflict during early adolescence was associated prospectively with adolescents’ reactivity to conflict in friendships and romantic relationships during middle adolescence. Close friendship reactivity partially explained the prospective association between reactivity to interparental conflict and romantic relationship reactivity. The association between perceived emotional reactivity and relationship conflict was stronger for girls than boys. Results have important developmental implications regarding adolescents’ emotional reactivity across salient interpersonal contexts during adolescence. PMID:22545839

  2. Cyanine polyene reactivity: scope and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gorka, Alexander P; Nani, Roger R; Schnermann, Martin J

    2015-07-28

    Cyanines are indispensable fluorophores that form the chemical basis of many fluorescence-based applications. A feature that distinguishes cyanines from other common fluorophores is an exposed polyene linker that is both crucial to absorption and emission and subject to covalent reactions that dramatically alter these optical properties. Over the past decade, reactions involving the cyanine polyene have been used as foundational elements for a range of biomedical techniques. These include the optical sensing of biological analytes, super-resolution imaging, and near-IR light-initiated uncaging. This review surveys the chemical reactivity of the cyanine polyene and the biomedical methods enabled by these reactions. The overarching goal is to highlight the multifaceted nature of cyanine chemistry and biology, as well as to point out the key role of reactivity-based insights in this promising area.

  3. Reactivity monitoring. Final report, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Reier, M.; Ching, J.

    1980-05-05

    A study has been made of a pulsed neutron technique which can be used to estimate the reactivity worth of spent fuel assemblies prior to storage. Nuclear design has been performed of a subcritical facility which can accommodate a test assembly of fresh fuel as well as one with a high degree of burnup. Calculations include the k/sub eff/ of the system and the gamma shielding required to protect personnel and instrumentation from fission product radiation. In addition, the technique and relevant equations to analyze the data are discussed. The calculations indicate that the technique can provide a rough differentiation between assemblies based on reactivity. However, practical problems involving the shield and neutron source impose severe limitations on the use of this method.

  4. Synchronous reactive programming in Ptolemy

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, F.; Vidal-Naquet, G.

    1996-12-31

    Synchronous reactive languages allow a high level deterministic description of reactive systems such as control-command systems. Their well defined mathematical semantics makes it possible to check formal properties on the control of a system. In previous work, we developed an object-oriented execution model for synchronous reactive modules. This model is implemented as a set of tools and a C++ class library, and allows us to use object-oriented methodologies and tools for the design of complex applications with both transformational and reactive parts. Among these design tools, the Ptolemy system stands as an object-oriented framework that supports various execution models, or {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}. We are currently working on a translator from the output format of the Lustre and Esterel compilers to the Ptolemy language. Since no existing domain matches the reactive synchronous execution model, we also plan to develop a SEC (Synchronous Execution and Communication) domain. Such a domain will provide support for the execution of synchronous modules in Ptolemy. One of the most interesting features of Ptolemy is the communication between domains. Therefore we discuss the interface of the SEC domain to other domains to determine the meaning of communications between them. The main goal is to allow the use of synchronous reactive modules for the control of the behavior of data-flow or discrete event processes.

  5. Cross-reactivities and structure-reactivity relationships of six benzodiazepines to EMIT(®) immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Bertol, Elisabetta; Vaiano, Fabio; Furlanetto, Sandra; Mari, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently prescribed drugs due to their sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, muscle relaxant and antiepileptic properties. Considering the high consumption of benzodiazepines worldwide, there is increased potential for addiction and abuse in cases of crime, driving under the influence of drugs, suicide and drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA). For these reasons, this class of drugs and their metabolites are frequently present in both clinical and forensic cases. In a forensic toxicology laboratory, typical screening analysis for benzodiazepine involves various immunoassay screening methods. The present study investigates the cross-reactivity profiles of six benzodiazepines not included in the manufacturer's instructions (3-hydroxy-flunitrazepam, 7-amino-nitrazepam, brotizolam, delorazepam, pinazepam, α-hydroxy-midazolam) to EMIT(®) II Plus Benzodiazepine Assay. Pinazepam, delorazepam and brotizolam are the most reactive molecules, while the other ones present a very low cross-reactivity. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to confirm the concentrations of the spiked urines for immunoassay test and to make a comparison between the quantitative results of the different methods. Structure-reactivity relationships to EMIT(®) II Plus Benzodiazepine Assay were also evaluated. This paper draws attention to the problem of careless use of immunoassay tests for forensic purposes as they may provide false positive and/or negative results.

  6. Reactive decontamination formulation

    DOEpatents

    Giletto, Anthony; White, William; Cisar, Alan J.; Hitchens, G. Duncan; Fyffe, James

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a universal decontamination formulation and method for detoxifying chemical warfare agents (CWA's) and biological warfare agents (BWA's) without producing any toxic by-products, as well as, decontaminating surfaces that have come into contact with these agents. The formulation includes a sorbent material or gel, a peroxide source, a peroxide activator, and a compound containing a mixture of KHSO.sub.5, KHSO.sub.4 and K.sub.2 SO.sub.4. The formulation is self-decontaminating and once dried can easily be wiped from the surface being decontaminated. A method for decontaminating a surface exposed to chemical or biological agents is also disclosed.

  7. Evaluation of mineral reactive surface area estimates for prediction of reactivity of a multi-mineral sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Mitnick, Elizabeth H.; Steefel, Carl I.; Zhang, Shuo; Voltolini, Marco; Swift, Alexander M.; Yang, Li; Cole, David R.; Sheets, Julia M.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Mito, Saeko; Xue, Ziqiu

    2016-09-01

    Our limited understanding of mineral reactive surface area contributes to significant uncertainties in quantitative simulations of reactive chemical transport in subsurface processes. Continuum formulations for reactive transport typically use a number of different approximations for reactive surface area, including geometric, specific, and effective surface area. In this study, reactive surface area estimates are developed and evaluated for their ability to predict dissolution rates in a well-stirred flow-through reactor experiment using disaggregated samples from the Nagaoka pilot CO2 injection site (Japan). The disaggregated samples are reacted with CO2 acidified synthetic brine under conditions approximating the field conditions and the evolution of solute concentrations in the reactor effluent is tracked over time. The experiments, carried out in fluid-dominated conditions at a pH of 3.2 for 650 h, resulted in substantial dissolution of the sample and release of a disproportionately large fraction of the divalent cations. Traditional reactive surface area estimation methods, including an adjusted geometric surface area and a BET-based surface area, are compared to a newly developed image-based method. Continuum reactive transport modeling is used to determine which of the reactive surface area models provides the best match with the effluent chemistry from the well-stirred reactor. The modeling incorporates laboratory derived mineral dissolution rates reported in the literature and the initial modal mineralogy of the Nagaoka sediment was determined from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) characterization. The closest match with the observed steady-state effluent concentrations was obtained using specific surface area estimates from the image-based approach supplemented by literature-derived BET measurements. To capture the evolving effluent chemistry, particularly over the first 300 h of the experiment, it was also necessary to account for the grain size

  8. Euphorbia Kansui Reactivates Latent HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV infected individuals, these treatments are unable to eradicate the virus. Current approaches to reactivate the virus have been limited by toxicity, lack of an orally available therapy, and limited responses in primary CD4+ T cells and in clinical trials. The PKC agonist ingenol, purified from Euphorbia plants, is a potent T cell activator and reactivates latent HIV. Euphorbia kansui itself has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat ascites, fluid retention, and cancer. We demonstrate that an extract of this plant, Euphorbia kansui, is capable of recapitulating T cell activation induced by the purified ingenol. Indeed, Euphorbia kansui induced expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69 and P-TEFb in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Euphorbia kansui reactivated latent HIV in a CD4+ T cell model of latency and in HIV+ HAART suppressed PBMC. When combined with the other latency reversing agents, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui required to reactive HIV was reduced 10-fold and resulted in synergistic reactivation of latent HIV. We conclude that Euphorbia Euphorbia kansui reactivates latent HIV and activates CD4+ T cells. When used in combination with a latency reversing agent, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui is reduced; which suggests its application as a combination strategy to reactivate latent HIV while limiting the toxicity due to global T cell activation. As a natural product, which has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, Euphorbia kansui is attractive as a potential treatment strategy, particularly in resource poor countries with limited treatment options. Further clinical testing will be required to determine its safety with current anti-retroviral therapies. PMID:27977742

  9. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions

    PubMed Central

    LaRowe, Steven D.; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held one week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions. PMID:17537583

  10. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    PubMed

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

  11. Measurements of total OH reactivity during PROPHET-AMOS 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, S.; Sigler, P. S. R.; Stevens, P. S.; Bottorff, B.; Lew, M.; Sklaveniti, S.; Leonardis, T.; Locoge, N.

    2016-12-01

    As the main oxidant in the daytime atmosphere, the hydroxyl radical (OH) initiates the oxidation of organic trace gases and the formation of pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Understanding both the sources and sinks of OH is therefore important to address issues related to air quality and climate change. However, previous measurements of the total loss frequency of OH, also referred to as total OH reactivity have found discrepancies between measured values and those calculated from collocated measurements of OH radical sinks, especially in forested environments characterized by high concentrations of biogenic volatile organic carbon (BVOCs). Additional measurements of total OH reactivity together with measurements of BVOCs are needed to understand the source of this missing reactivity and to further constrain atmospheric chemistry models. Measurements of total OH reactivity were performed during the PROPHET 2016 - AMOS field campaign (Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemisty, Emissions, & Transport - Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in Summer) using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the Total OH Loss Rate Method (TOHLM). The monitoring site, a Northen Michigan forest where previous measurements of total OH reactivity revealed an incomplete understanding of OH sinks, is characterized by large emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes and a low impact of anthropogenic emissions. In this presentation, we will show a comparison of the two methods to assess the reliability of OH reactivity measurements in this environment. In addition, concomitant measurements of volatile organic compounds and inorganic species were used to perform a comprehensive apportionment of OH sinks. We will provide insights into the OH reactivity budget and will show how it compares to previous studies performed at the same site.

  12. Geotechnical techniques for the construction of reactive barriers

    PubMed

    Day; O'Hannesin; Marsden

    1999-06-30

    One of the newest and most promising remediation techniques for the treatment of contaminated groundwater and soil is the reactive barrier wall (commonly known as PRB for permeable reactive barrier or reactive barrier). Although a variety of treatment media and strategies are available, the most common technique is to bury granular iron in a trench so that contaminated groundwater passes through the reactive materials, the contaminants are removed and the water becomes 'clean'. The principal advantages of the technique are the elimination of pumping, mass excavation, off-site disposal, and a very significant reduction in costs. The use of this technology is now becoming better known and implemented. Special construction considerations need to be made when planning the installation of reactive barriers or PRBs to ensure the design life of the installation and to be cost-effective. Geotechnical techniques such as slurry trenching, deep soil mixing, and grouting can be used to simplify and improve the installation of reactive materials relative to conventional trench and fill methods. These techniques make it possible to reduce the hazards to workers during installation, reduce waste and reduce costs for most installations. To date, most PRBs have been installed to shallow depths using construction methods such as open trenching and/or shored excavations. While these methods are usable, they are limited to shallow depths and more disruptive to the site's normal use. Geotechnical techniques are more quickly installed and less disruptive to site activities and thus more effective. Recently, laboratory studies and pilot projects have demonstrated that geotechnical techniques can be used successfully to install reactive barriers. This paper describes the factors that are important in designing a reactive barrier or PRB installation and discusses some of the potential problems and pitfalls that can be avoided with careful planning and the use of geotechnical techniques

  13. Campylobacter Reactive Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet E.; Krizova, Adriana; Garg, Amit X.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Ouimet, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Methods A Medline (PubMed) search identified studies from 1966–2006 that investigated the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Search terms included: “reactive arthritis”, “spondyloarthropathy”, “Reiter’s syndrome”, “gastroenteritis”, “diarrhea”, “epidemiology”, “incidence”, “prevalence”, and “Campylobacter”. Results The literature available to date suggests that the incidence of Campylobacter reactive arthritis may occur in 1 to 5% of those infected. The annual incidence of ReA after Campylobacter or Shigella may be 4.3 and 1.3 respectively per 100,000. The duration of acute ReA varies considerably between reports, and the incidence and impact of chronic reactive arthritis from Campylobacter infection is virtually unknown. Conclusions Campylobacter associated ReA incidence and prevalence varies widely from reviews such as: case ascertainment differences, exposure differences, lack of diagnostic criteria for ReA and perhaps genetics and ages of exposed individuals. At the population level it may not be associated with HLA-B27 and inflammatory back involvement is uncommon. Follow up for long-term sequelae is largely unknown. Five percent of Campylobacter ReA may be chronic or relapsing (with respect to musculoskeletal symptoms). PMID:17360026

  14. Xurography for microfluidics on a reactive solid.

    PubMed

    Neuville, Amélie; Renaud, Louis; Luu, Thi Thuy; Minde, Mona Wetrhus; Jettestuen, Espen; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Hiorth, Aksel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2017-01-17

    In this paper, we propose a simple method to embed transparent reactive materials in a microfluidic cell, and to observe in situ the dissolution of the material. As an example, we show how to obtain the dissolution rate of a calcite window of optical quality, dissolved in water and hydrochloric acid (HCl). These fluids circulate at controlled flowrates in a channel which is obtained by xurography: double sided tape is cut out with a cutter plotter and placed between the calcite window and a non-reactive support. While the calcite window reacts in contact with the acid, its topography is measured in situ every 10 s using an interference microscope, with a pixel resolution of 4.9 μm and a vertical resolution of 50 nm. In order to avoid inlet influence on the reaction, a thin layer of photoresist is added on the calcite surface at the inlet and outlet. This layer is also used as a non reactive reference surface.

  15. Stability of gas atomized reactive powders through multiple step in-situ passivation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Steinmetz, Andrew D.; Byrd, David J.

    2017-05-16

    A method for gas atomization of oxygen-reactive reactive metals and alloys wherein the atomized particles are exposed as they solidify and cool in a very short time to multiple gaseous reactive agents for the in-situ formation of a protective reaction film on the atomized particles. The present invention is especially useful for making highly pyrophoric reactive metal or alloy atomized powders, such as atomized magnesium and magnesium alloy powders. The gaseous reactive species (agents) are introduced into the atomization spray chamber at locations downstream of a gas atomizing nozzle as determined by the desired powder or particle temperature for the reactions and the desired thickness of the reaction film.

  16. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    nanoparticle that photoluminesces after exposure to UV; TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles---photocatalytic nanoparticles that generate reactive oxygen species upon UV irradition; and, fullerene nanoparticles used in the filtration experiments, selected for their potential use, small size, and surface chemistry. Our primary methods used to characterize particle and aggregate characteristics include dynamic light scattering used to describe particle size, static light scattering used to characterize aggregate structure (fractal dimension), transmission electron microscopy used to verify primary particle sizes, and electrophoretic mobility measurements to evaluate suspension stability. The reactive property of ZnS that was measured as a function of aggregation was photoluminescence, which was measured using a spectrofluorometer. The reactive property of TiO2 and ZnO that was studied was their ability to generate hydroxyl radicals; these were measured by employing a fluorescent probe that becomes luminescent upon interaction with the hydroxyl radical. To detect the presence of fullerene nanoparticles and calculate removal efficiencies, we used total organic carbon measurements. Additionally, we used UV-vis spectroscopy to approximate the impact of particle shadowing in TiO2 and ZnO aggregates, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy to determine how different electrolytes interact with fullerene surface groups. Our findings indicate that the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactivity is material specific. ZnS nanoparticles exhibit a 2-fold increase in band-edge photoluminescence alongside a significant decrease in defect-site photoluminescence. This is attributed to aggregate size-dependent surface tension. Additionally, we used photoluminescence measurements to develop a new method for calculating the critical coagulation concentration of a nanoparticle suspension. The ability of both TiO2 and ZnO to generate hydroxyl radicals was significantly hampered by aggregation. The

  17. Neurobehavioral foundation of environmental reactivity.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah R; Depue, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Sensitivity to environmental context has been of interest for many years, but the nature of individual differences in environmental sensitivity has become of particular focus over the past 2 decades. What is particularly uncertain are the neural variables and processes that mediate the effects of environment on developmental outcomes. Accordingly, we provide a neurobehavioral foundation of reactivity to the environment in several steps. First, the different patterns of environmental sensitivity are defined to identify the significant factors involved in the manifestation of these patterns. Second, we focus on neurobiological reactivity as the construct underlying variation in sensitivity to the environment by (a) providing an organizing threshold model of elicitation of neurobiology by environmental context; and (b) integrating the literature on 2 sets of neuromodulators in terms of each modulator's (a) contribution to neural and behavioral reactivity to stimulation, and (b) relation to emotional-motivational systems (dopamine, opiates and oxytocin, corticotropin-releasing hormone) or the general modulation of those systems (serotonin, norepinephrine, and GABA). Discussion concludes with (a) a comprehensive neurobehavioral framework of environmental reactivity based on a combinatorial model of a supertrait, (b) methodological implications of the model, and (c) a developmental perspective on environmental reactivity. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  19. Multiple factor design for reactive mixture selection for use in reactive walls in mine drainage treatment.

    PubMed

    Cocos, Ioana A; Zagury, Gerald J; Clément, Bernard; Samson, Réjean

    2002-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing reactive walls installed in situ in the path of acid mine drainage contaminated groundwater, present a promising passive treatment technology. However, a rigorous and methodical selection of the most appropriate reactive mixture composition still needs to be investigated. The aim of this study was the selection of the most reactive medium using a multiple factor design and the modeling of the sulfate-reduction rate. Reactivity of 17 mixtures was assessed in batch reactors (in duplicates) using a synthetic AMD. Results indicate that within 41 days, sulfate concentrations decreased from initial concentrations of 2,000-3,200 mg/l to final concentrations of <90 mg/l. Metal removal efficiencies ranged between 51-84% for Ni and 73-93% for Zn. Generated sulfate-reduction rate predictive models which had very satisfactory parameters (R2 = 0.86, F = 62.38 (p-level < 10(-13)) and R2 = 0.90. F = 62.30 (p-level < 10(-13))) identified poultry manure and two other carbon sources as the critical variables for sulfate-reduction rate.

  20. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1987-10-27

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for improving the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hog coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. The reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point in a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor. The durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain its reactivity and other important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and regeneration. Two base case sorbents, spherical pellets and cylindrical extrudes used in related METC sponsored projects, are being used to provide a basis for the comparison of physical characteristics and chemical reactivity.

  1. Reactive iron in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of reactive iron oxides on sediment pore-water chemistry is considered in detail. A carefully calibrated extraction scheme is used to determine the depth distributions of reactive iron phases at two very different localities: the relatively iron-rich Mississippi Delta and the relatively iron-poor FOAM site in Long Island Sound. Closed system incubations are used to characterize the rates of reaction between sulfide and both naturally occurring and pure iron mineral phases. Rates of iron liberation to pore solution are measured in the presence and absence of sulfate reduction, and the origin of dissolved iron in organic-rich sediments is speculated upon.

  2. Reactivity of Nucleic Acid Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid oxidation plays a vital role in the etiology and treatment of diseases, as well as aging. Reagents that oxidize nucleic acids are also useful probes of the biopolymers’ structure and folding. Radiation scientists have contributed greatly to our understanding of nucleic acid oxidation using a variety of techniques. During the past two decades organic chemists have applied the tools of synthetic and mechanistic chemistry to independently generate and study the reactive intermediates produced by ionizing radiation and other nucleic acid damaging agents. This approach has facilitated resolving mechanistic controversies and lead to the discovery of new reactive processes. PMID:28529390

  3. Memory reactivation improves visual perception.

    PubMed

    Amar-Halpert, Rotem; Laor-Maayany, Rony; Nemni, Shlomi; Rosenblatt, Jonathan D; Censor, Nitzan

    2017-10-01

    Human perception thresholds can improve through learning. Here we report findings challenging the fundamental 'practice makes perfect' basis of procedural learning theory, showing that brief reactivations of encoded visual memories are sufficient to improve perceptual discrimination thresholds. Learning was comparable to standard practice-induced learning and was not due to short training per se, nor to an epiphenomenon of primed retrieval enhancement. The results demonstrate that basic perceptual functions can be substantially improved by memory reactivation, supporting a new account of perceptual learning dynamics.

  4. Reactive iron in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of reactive iron oxides on sediment pore-water chemistry is considered in detail. A carefully calibrated extraction scheme is used to determine the depth distributions of reactive iron phases at two very different localities: the relatively iron-rich Mississippi Delta and the relatively iron-poor FOAM site in Long Island Sound. Closed system incubations are used to characterize the rates of reaction between sulfide and both naturally occurring and pure iron mineral phases. Rates of iron liberation to pore solution are measured in the presence and absence of sulfate reduction, and the origin of dissolved iron in organic-rich sediments is speculated upon.

  5. Reactivity of Nucleic Acid Radicals.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Marc M

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid oxidation plays a vital role in the etiology and treatment of diseases, as well as aging. Reagents that oxidize nucleic acids are also useful probes of the biopolymers' structure and folding. Radiation scientists have contributed greatly to our understanding of nucleic acid oxidation using a variety of techniques. During the past two decades organic chemists have applied the tools of synthetic and mechanistic chemistry to independently generate and study the reactive intermediates produced by ionizing radiation and other nucleic acid damaging agents. This approach has facilitated resolving mechanistic controversies and lead to the discovery of new reactive processes.

  6. Modeling Reactivity to Biological Macromolecules with a Deep Multitask Network.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Tyler B; Dang, Na Le; Miller, Grover P; Swamidass, S Joshua

    2016-08-24

    Most small-molecule drug candidates fail before entering the market, frequently because of unexpected toxicity. Often, toxicity is detected only late in drug development, because many types of toxicities, especially idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs), are particularly hard to predict and detect. Moreover, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the most frequent reason drugs are withdrawn from the market and causes 50% of acute liver failure cases in the United States. A common mechanism often underlies many types of drug toxicities, including both DILI and IADRs. Drugs are bioactivated by drug-metabolizing enzymes into reactive metabolites, which then conjugate to sites in proteins or DNA to form adducts. DNA adducts are often mutagenic and may alter the reading and copying of genes and their regulatory elements, causing gene dysregulation and even triggering cancer. Similarly, protein adducts can disrupt their normal biological functions and induce harmful immune responses. Unfortunately, reactive metabolites are not reliably detected by experiments, and it is also expensive to test drug candidates for potential to form DNA or protein adducts during the early stages of drug development. In contrast, computational methods have the potential to quickly screen for covalent binding potential, thereby flagging problematic molecules and reducing the total number of necessary experiments. Here, we train a deep convolution neural network-the XenoSite reactivity model-using literature data to accurately predict both sites and probability of reactivity for molecules with glutathione, cyanide, protein, and DNA. On the site level, cross-validated predictions had area under the curve (AUC) performances of 89.8% for DNA and 94.4% for protein. Furthermore, the model separated molecules electrophilically reactive with DNA and protein from nonreactive molecules with cross-validated AUC performances of 78.7% and 79.8%, respectively. On both the site- and molecule-level, the

  7. Modeling Reactivity to Biological Macromolecules with a Deep Multitask Network

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most small-molecule drug candidates fail before entering the market, frequently because of unexpected toxicity. Often, toxicity is detected only late in drug development, because many types of toxicities, especially idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs), are particularly hard to predict and detect. Moreover, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the most frequent reason drugs are withdrawn from the market and causes 50% of acute liver failure cases in the United States. A common mechanism often underlies many types of drug toxicities, including both DILI and IADRs. Drugs are bioactivated by drug-metabolizing enzymes into reactive metabolites, which then conjugate to sites in proteins or DNA to form adducts. DNA adducts are often mutagenic and may alter the reading and copying of genes and their regulatory elements, causing gene dysregulation and even triggering cancer. Similarly, protein adducts can disrupt their normal biological functions and induce harmful immune responses. Unfortunately, reactive metabolites are not reliably detected by experiments, and it is also expensive to test drug candidates for potential to form DNA or protein adducts during the early stages of drug development. In contrast, computational methods have the potential to quickly screen for covalent binding potential, thereby flagging problematic molecules and reducing the total number of necessary experiments. Here, we train a deep convolution neural network—the XenoSite reactivity model—using literature data to accurately predict both sites and probability of reactivity for molecules with glutathione, cyanide, protein, and DNA. On the site level, cross-validated predictions had area under the curve (AUC) performances of 89.8% for DNA and 94.4% for protein. Furthermore, the model separated molecules electrophilically reactive with DNA and protein from nonreactive molecules with cross-validated AUC performances of 78.7% and 79.8%, respectively. On both the site- and molecule

  8. Etching Semiconductors With Beams Of Reactive Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Giapis, Konstantinos P.; Moore, Teresa A.

    1995-01-01

    Method of etching semiconductors with energetic beams of electrically neutral, but chemically reactive, species undergoing development. Enables etching of straight walls into semiconductor substrates at edges of masks without damage to underlying semiconductor material. In addition to elimination of charge damage, technique reduces substrate bombardment damage because translational energy of neutral species in range 2-12 eV, below damage threshold of many semiconductor materials. Furthermore, low-energy neutrals cause no mask erosion allowing for etching features with very high aspect ratios.

  9. Termination of nanoscale zero-valent iron reactivity by addition of bromate as a reducing reactivity competitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mines, Paul D.; Kaarsholm, Kamilla M. S.; Droumpali, Ariadni; Andersen, Henrik R.; Lee, Wontae; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2017-09-01

    Remediation of contaminated groundwater by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is widely becoming a leading environmentally friendly solution throughout the globe. Since a wide range of various nZVI-containing materials have been developed for effective remediation, it is necessary to determine an appropriate way to terminate the reactivity of any nZVI-containing material for a practical experimental procedure. In this study, bimetallic Ni/Fe-NPs were prepared to enhance overall reduction kinetics owing to the catalytic reactivity of nickel on the surface of nZVI. We have tested several chemical strategies in order to terminate nZVI reactivity without altering the concentration of volatile compounds in the solution. The strategies include surface passivation in alkaline conditions by addition of carbonate, and consumption of nZVI by a reaction competitor. Four halogenated chemicals, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, atrazine, and 4-chlorophenol, were selected and tested as model groundwater contaminants. Addition of carbonate to passivate the nZVI surface was not effective for trichloroethylene. Nitrate and then bromate were applied to competitively consume nZVI by their faster reduction kinetics. Bromate proved to be more effective than nitrate, subsequently terminating nZVI reactivity for all four of the tested halogenated compounds. Furthermore, the suggested termination method using bromate was successfully applied to obtain trichloroethylene reduction kinetics. Herein, we report the simple and effective method to terminate the reactivity of nZVI by addition of a reducing reactivity competitor.

  10. Reuse of reactive dyes for dyeing of jute fabric.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S N; Pan, N C; Day, A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the work was to find out suitable method of dyeing so that costly reactive dye can be reused without draining them. The bleached jute fabric was dyed with four different class of reactive dyes namely, cold brand, hot brand, vinyl sulphone and high exhaustion (HE) brand. It is found that the two-step two-bath method of reactive dyeing, where exhaustion and fixation step is separated, is most ideal for reuse of dye bath. Separate original samples produced K/S value same as that of original sample and the K/S value of separate reuse sample varied from 50% to 80% of the original sample depending on the class of dye. In case of same bath method, colour yield of original reuse samples varies from only 10% to maximum 30% of the original samples depending on the class of dyes. Reuse of reactive dyes following separate bath method is particularly suitable for higher depth of shade (4% and above). This process not only utilises costly reactive dyes to the maximum extent but it also produces low water pollution as the effluent contain minimum amount of dye. So the process is economic and eco-friendly as well.

  11. Silica fractionation and reactivity in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzué Belmonte, Dácil; Barão, Lúcia; Vandevenne, Floor; Schoelynck, Jonas; Struyf, Eric; Meire, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The Si cycle is a globally important biogeochemical cycle, with strong connections to other biogeochemical cycles, including C. Silica is taken up by plants to form protective structures called phytoliths, which become a part of the soil and contribute strongly to soil Si cycling upon litter burial. Different silica fractions are found in soils, with phytoliths among the most easily soluble, especially compared to silicate minerals. A whole set of secondary non-biogenic fractions exist, that also have a high reactivity (adsorbed Si, reactive secondary minerals…). A good characterization of the different fractions of reactive silica is crucial to move forward knowledge on ecosystem Si cycling, which has been recognized in the last decade as crucial for terrestrial Si fluxes. A new method to analyze the different fractions of silica in soils has been described by Koning et al. (2002) and adapted by our research team (Barão et al. 2013). Using a continuous extraction of Si and aluminum in 0.5M NaOH, biogenic and non-biogenic reactive fractions are separated based on their Si/Al ratios and their reactivity in NaOH. Applying this new method I will investigate three emerging ideas on how humans can affect directly terrestrial Si fluxes. -Land use. I expect strong silica fractionation and reactivity differences in different land uses. These effects due to agricultural and forestry management have already been shown earlier in temperate soils (Vandevenne et al. 2012). Now we will test this hypothesis in recently deforested soils, in the south of Brazil. 'Pristine' forest, managed forest and tobacco field soils (with and without rotation crops) will be studied. This research belongs to an interdisciplinary project on soils and global change. -Fire. According to the IPCC report, extreme events such as fires (number and intensity) would increase due to climate change. We analyzed litter from spruce forest, beech forest and peat soils at two burning levels, after 350°C and

  12. Quantitative reactive modeling and verification.

    PubMed

    Henzinger, Thomas A

    Formal verification aims to improve the quality of software by detecting errors before they do harm. At the basis of formal verification is the logical notion of correctness, which purports to capture whether or not a program behaves as desired. We suggest that the boolean partition of software into correct and incorrect programs falls short of the practical need to assess the behavior of software in a more nuanced fashion against multiple criteria. We therefore propose to introduce quantitative fitness measures for programs, specifically for measuring the function, performance, and robustness of reactive programs such as concurrent processes. This article describes the goals of the ERC Advanced Investigator Project QUAREM. The project aims to build and evaluate a theory of quantitative fitness measures for reactive models. Such a theory must strive to obtain quantitative generalizations of the paradigms that have been success stories in qualitative reactive modeling, such as compositionality, property-preserving abstraction and abstraction refinement, model checking, and synthesis. The theory will be evaluated not only in the context of software and hardware engineering, but also in the context of systems biology. In particular, we will use the quantitative reactive models and fitness measures developed in this project for testing hypotheses about the mechanisms behind data from biological experiments.

  13. PROCEEDINGS: MULTIPOLLUTANT SORBENT REACTIVITY WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a compilation of technical papers and visual aids presented by representatives of industry, academia, and government agencies at a workshop on multipollutant sorbent reactivity that was held at EPA's Environmental Research Center in Research Triangle Park, NC, on Ju...

  14. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  15. PROCEEDINGS: MULTIPOLLUTANT SORBENT REACTIVITY WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a compilation of technical papers and visual aids presented by representatives of industry, academia, and government agencies at a workshop on multipollutant sorbent reactivity that was held at EPA's Environmental Research Center in Research Triangle Park, NC, on Ju...

  16. Emotional Reactivity and Psychological Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Rosen, Karen H.; Stith, Sandra M.

    2002-01-01

    This article reports on an empirical test of Bowen's hypothesized relationships between differentiation of self and psychological symptoms, and examines further evidence for the construct validity of a newly developed instrument, the Behavioral and Emotional Reactivity Index (BERI). Finds an indirect relationship between emotional reactivity…

  17. Generation of reactive oxygen species by the faecal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Reactive oxygen species are implicated in the aetiology of a range of human diseases and there is increasing interest in their role in the development of cancer.
AIM—To develop a suitable method for the detection of reactive oxygen species produced by the faecal matrix.
METHODS—A refined high performance liquid chromatography system for the detection of reactive oxygen species is described.
RESULTS—The method allows baseline separation of the products of hydroxyl radical attack on salicylic acid in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system, namely 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol. The increased efficiency and precision of the method has allowed a detailed evaluation of the dynamics of reactive oxygen species generation in the faecal matrix. The data show that the faecal matrix is capable of generating reactive oxygen species in abundance. This ability cannot be attributed to the bacteria present, but rather to a soluble component within the matrix. As yet, the nature of this soluble factor is not entirely clear but is likely to be a reducing agent.
CONCLUSIONS—The soluble nature of the promoting factor renders it amenable to absorption, and circumstances may exist in which either it comes into contact with either free or chelated iron in the colonocyte, leading to direct attack on cellular DNA, or else it initiates lipid peroxidation processes whereby membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids are attacked by reactive oxygen species propagating chain reactions leading to the generation of promutagenic lesions such as etheno based DNA adducts.


Keywords: colorectal cancer; faecal matrix; hypoxanthine; phytic acid; reactive oxygen species; xanthine oxidase PMID:10644317

  18. RSA Reactivity in Current and Remitted Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bylsma, Lauren M.; Salomon, Kristen; Taylor-Clift, April; Morris, Bethany H.; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Low resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) levels and blunted RSA reactivity are thought to index impaired emotion regulation capacity. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been associated with abberant RSA reactivity and recovery to a speech stressor task relative to healthy controls. Whether impaired RSA functioning reflects aspects of the depressed mood state or a stable vulnerability marker for depression is unknown. Methods We compared resting RSA and RSA reactivity between individuals with MDD (n=49), remitted depression (RMD, n=24), and healthy controls (n=45). ECG data were collected during a resting baseline, a paced-breathing baseline, and two reactivity tasks (speech stressor, cold exposure). Results A group by time quadratic effect emerged (F=4.36(2,109), p=.015) for RSA across phases of the speech stressor (baseline, instruction, preparation, speech, recovery). Follow-up analyses revealed that those with MDD uniquely exhibited blunted RSA reactivity, whereas RMD and controls both exhibited normal task-related vagal withdrawal and post-task recovery. The group by time interaction remained after covariation for age, sex, waist circumference, physical activity, and respiration, but not sleep quality. Conclusions These results provide new evidence that abberant RSA reactivity marks features that track the depressed state, such as poor sleep, rather than a stable trait evident among asymtomatic persons. PMID:24367127

  19. [Formation of reactive oxygen species during pollen grain germination].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, A V; Matveeva, N P; Polesskaia, O G; Ermakov, I P

    2009-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen species in pollen at the early germination stage, which precedes the formation of the pollen tube, was studied. During this period, pollen grain is being hydrated, abruptly increasing its volume, and it passes from the resting state to active metabolism. Fluorescent methods have made it possible to reveal reactive oxygen species in the cytoplasm and inner layer of the pollen wall, intine. The cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species were mostly found in mitochondria, while extracellular ones were localized in aperture zones of intine, as well as in the solution surrounding pollen grains in vitro. The content of extracellular reactive oxygen species decreased after superoxide dismutase (100 units per ml) and diphenylene iodonium (100 microM), which indicates NADPH oxidase as one of possible producent of them. In conditions of suppression of extracellular reactive oxygen species production (100 microM diphenilene iodonium) or their promoted removal (after addition of 10 to 100 microM ascorbic acid), the number of germinating pollen grains increased. This effect disappeared after further increase in the concentration of the listed reagents. The result is evidence of the significance of processes of generation/removal of extracellular reactive oxygen species for pollen germination.

  20. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  1. Reactive biomolecular divergence in genetically altered yeast cells and isolated mitochondria as measured by biocavity laser spectroscopy : a rapid diagnostic method for studying cellular responses to stress and disease.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, Michael P.; Gourley, Paul Lee; Copeland, Robert Guild; McDonald, Anthony Eugene; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2006-12-01

    We report an analysis of four strains of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The four strains are grouped in two pairs (wild type and altered), in which one strain differs genetically at a single locus, affecting mitochondrial function. In one pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho0 strain differ by complete removal of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In the second pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho- strain differ by knock-out of the nuclear gene encoding Cox4, an essential subunit of cytochrome c oxidase. The biocavity laser is used to measure the biophysical optic parameter Deltalambda, a laser wavelength shift relating to the optical density of cell or mitochondria that uniquely reflects its size and biomolecular composition. As such, Deltalambda is a powerful parameter that rapidly interrogates the biomolecular state of single cells and mitochondria. Wild-type cells and mitochondria produce Gaussian-like distributions with a single peak. In contrast, mutant cells and mitochondria produce leptokurtotic distributions that are asymmetric and highly skewed to the right. These distribution changes could be self-consistently modeled with a single, log-normal distribution undergoing a thousand-fold increase in variance of biomolecular composition. These features reflect a new state of stressed or diseased cells that we call a reactive biomolecular divergence (RBD) that reflects the vital interdependence of mitochondria and the nucleus.

  2. Persistent Latent Tuberculosis Reactivation Risk in United States Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Painter, John; Parker, Matthew; Lowenthal, Phillip; Flood, Jennifer; Fu, Yunxin; Asis, Redentor; Reves, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Current guidelines limit latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) evaluation to persons in the United States less than or equal to 5 years based on the assumption that high TB rates among recent entrants are attributable to high LTBI reactivation risk, which declines over time. We hypothesized that high postarrival TB rates may instead be caused by imported active TB. Objectives: Estimate reactivation and imported TB in an immigrant cohort. Methods: We linked preimmigration records from a cohort of California-bound Filipino immigrants during 2001–2010 with subsequent TB reports. TB was likely LTBI reactivation if the immigrant had no evidence of active TB at preimmigration examination, likely imported if preimmigration radiograph was abnormal and TB was reported less than or equal to 6 months after arrival, and likely reactivation of inactive TB if radiograph was abnormal but TB was reported more than 6 months after arrival. Measurements and Main Results: Among 123,114 immigrants, 793 TB cases were reported. Within 1 year of preimmigration examination, 85% of TB was imported; 6 and 9% were reactivation of LTBI and inactive TB, respectively. Conversely, during Years 2–9 after U.S. entry, 76 and 24% were reactivation of LTBI and inactive TB, respectively. The rate of LTBI reactivation (32 per 100,000) did not decline during Years 1–9. Conclusions: High postarrival TB rates were caused by detection of imported TB through active postarrival surveillance. Among immigrants without active TB at baseline, reported TB did not decline over 9 years, indicating sustained high risk of LTBI reactivation. Revised guidelines should support LTBI screening and treatment more than 5 years after U.S. arrival. PMID:24308495

  3. On Spurious Numerics in Solving Reactive Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotov, D. V; Yee, H. C.; Wang, W.; Shu, C.-W.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of the behavior of high order shock-capturing schemes for problems with stiff source terms and discontinuities and on corresponding numerical prediction strategies. The studies by Yee et al. (2012) and Wang et al. (2012) focus only on solving the reactive system by the fractional step method using the Strang splitting (Strang 1968). It is a common practice by developers in computational physics and engineering simulations to include a cut off safeguard if densities are outside the permissible range. Here we compare the spurious behavior of the same schemes by solving the fully coupled reactive system without the Strang splitting vs. using the Strang splitting. Comparison between the two procedures and the effects of a cut off safeguard is the focus the present study. The comparison of the performance of these schemes is largely based on the degree to which each method captures the correct location of the reaction front for coarse grids. Here "coarse grids" means standard mesh density requirement for accurate simulation of typical non-reacting flows of similar problem setup. It is remarked that, in order to resolve the sharp reaction front, local refinement beyond standard mesh density is still needed.

  4. Measurements of total OH reactivity at the PROPHET site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickly, Pamela; Sakowski, Joseph; Bottorff, Brandon; Lew, Michelle; Stevens, Philip; Sklaveniti, Sofia; Léonardis, Thierry; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2017-04-01

    As the main oxidant in the daytime atmosphere, the hydroxyl radical (OH) initiates the oxidation of organic trace gases and the formation of pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Understanding both the sources and sinks of OH is therefore important to address issues related to air quality and climate change. Total OH reactivity measurements have proved to be of interest to investigate the OH budget and have highlighted an incomplete understanding of OH sinks in forested environments, which are characterized by high concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and their oxidation products. A research facility located in a Michigan forest, US, has hosted several campaigns of OH reactivity measurements over the last 15 years through the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emission and Transport) program. This site is characterized by deciduous trees emitting isoprene and other BVOCs and a low impact of anthropogenic emissions. Measurements of OH reactivity were performed during PROPHET 1998 and CABINEX 2009. More recently, OH reactivity was measured during the PROPHET 2016 - AMOS (Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in summer) field campaign using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the Total OH Loss Rate Method (TOHLM). In this presentation, we will show that the two measurement techniques agree within uncertainties, giving confidence in the measured OH reactivity. In addition, concomitant measurements of trace gases (VOCs, NOx, O3) made by online and offline instruments were used to perform a comprehensive apportionment of OH sinks. We will provide insights into the OH reactivity budget and will show how it compares to the previous abovementioned studies.

  5. Characterizing Reactive Flow Paths in Fractured Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Huerta, N. J.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration can be a viable method for reducing anthropogenic CO2 flux into the atmosphere. However, the technology must be economically feasible and pose acceptable risk to stakeholders. One key risk is CO2 leakage out of the storage reservoir. Potential driving forces for leakage are the overpressure due to CO2 injection and the buoyancy of free phase CO2. Potential hazards of leakage are contamination of Underground Sources of Drinking Water or the atmosphere and would be deemed an unacceptable risk. Wells potentially provide a fast path for leakage from the reservoir. While the well's cement casing is reactive with CO2 and CO2-saturated brine, the low cement matrix permeability and slow diffusion rate make it unlikely that CO2 will escape through a properly constructed wellbore. However, highly permeable fractures with micrometer scale apertures can occur in cement casings. Reactions that occur in the flow in these fractures can either be self-limiting or self-enhancing. Therefore, understanding the reactive flow is critical to understanding of leakage evolution through these fractures. The goal of our work is to characterize the modification of the flow paths in the fracture due to reaction with acidic brine. With this aim we have characterized both the initial flow path of un-reactive flow and the final flow path after introduction of low-pH acid along the same fracture. Class H cement cores 3-6 cm in length and 2.5 cm diameter are created and a single natural and unique fracture is produced in each core using the Brazilian method. Our experimental fluid is injected at a constant rate into the cement core housed in a Hassler Cell under confining pressure. A solution of red dye and deionized water is pumped through the fracture to stain the un-reactive flow paths. Deionized water is then pumped through the core to limit diffusion of the dye into non-flowing portions of the fracture. After staining the initial flow path, low pH water due to

  6. Assessment of parametric uncertainty for groundwater reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaoqing; Ye, Ming; Curtis, Gary P.; Miller, Geoffery L.; Meyer, Philip D.; Kohler, Matthias; Yabusaki, Steve; Wu, Jichun

    2014-05-01

    The validity of using Gaussian assumptions for model residuals in uncertainty quantification of a groundwater reactive transport model was evaluated in this study. Least squares regression methods explicitly assume Gaussian residuals, and the assumption leads to Gaussian likelihood functions, model parameters, and model predictions. While the Bayesian methods do not explicitly require the Gaussian assumption, Gaussian residuals are widely used. This paper shows that the residuals of the reactive transport model are non-Gaussian, heteroscedastic, and correlated in time; characterizing them requires using a generalized likelihood function such as the formal generalized likelihood function developed by Schoups and Vrugt (2010). For the surface complexation model considered in this study for simulating uranium reactive transport in groundwater, parametric uncertainty is quantified using the least squares regression methods and Bayesian methods with both Gaussian and formal generalized likelihood functions. While the least squares methods and Bayesian methods with Gaussian likelihood function produce similar Gaussian parameter distributions, the parameter distributions of Bayesian uncertainty quantification using the formal generalized likelihood function are non-Gaussian. In addition, predictive performance of formal generalized likelihood function is superior to that of least squares regression and Bayesian methods with Gaussian likelihood function. The Bayesian uncertainty quantification is conducted using the differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM(zs)) algorithm; as a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, it is a robust tool for quantifying uncertainty in groundwater reactive transport models. For the surface complexation model, the regression-based local sensitivity analysis and Morris- and DREAM(ZS)-based global sensitivity analysis yield almost identical ranking of parameter importance. The uncertainty analysis may help select appropriate likelihood

  7. Assessment of parametric uncertainty for groundwater reactive transport modeling,

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, Xiaoqing; Ye, Ming; Curtis, Gary P.; Miller, Geoffery L.; Meyer, Philip D.; Kohler, Matthias; Yabusaki, Steve; Wu, Jichun

    2014-01-01

    The validity of using Gaussian assumptions for model residuals in uncertainty quantification of a groundwater reactive transport model was evaluated in this study. Least squares regression methods explicitly assume Gaussian residuals, and the assumption leads to Gaussian likelihood functions, model parameters, and model predictions. While the Bayesian methods do not explicitly require the Gaussian assumption, Gaussian residuals are widely used. This paper shows that the residuals of the reactive transport model are non-Gaussian, heteroscedastic, and correlated in time; characterizing them requires using a generalized likelihood function such as the formal generalized likelihood function developed by Schoups and Vrugt (2010). For the surface complexation model considered in this study for simulating uranium reactive transport in groundwater, parametric uncertainty is quantified using the least squares regression methods and Bayesian methods with both Gaussian and formal generalized likelihood functions. While the least squares methods and Bayesian methods with Gaussian likelihood function produce similar Gaussian parameter distributions, the parameter distributions of Bayesian uncertainty quantification using the formal generalized likelihood function are non-Gaussian. In addition, predictive performance of formal generalized likelihood function is superior to that of least squares regression and Bayesian methods with Gaussian likelihood function. The Bayesian uncertainty quantification is conducted using the differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM(zs)) algorithm; as a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, it is a robust tool for quantifying uncertainty in groundwater reactive transport models. For the surface complexation model, the regression-based local sensitivity analysis and Morris- and DREAM(ZS)-based global sensitivity analysis yield almost identical ranking of parameter importance. The uncertainty analysis may help select appropriate likelihood

  8. Permeable Reactive Zones for Groundwater Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will cover aspects of the application of permeable reactive zones to treat contaminated ground water. Specific field studies will be discussed covering both granular iron-based and organic carbon-based reactive barriers. Specific contaminants addressed include:...

  9. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-06-28

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  10. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  11. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2015-07-14

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  12. Permeable Reactive Zones for Groundwater Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will cover aspects of the application of permeable reactive zones to treat contaminated ground water. Specific field studies will be discussed covering both granular iron-based and organic carbon-based reactive barriers. Specific contaminants addressed include:...

  13. Reactive behavior, learning, and anticipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Steven D.; Ballard, Dana H.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive systems always act, thinking only long enough to 'look up' the action to execute. Traditional planning systems think a lot, and act only after generating fairly precise plans. Each represents an endpoint on a spectrum. It is argued that primitive forms of reasoning, like anticipation, play an important role in reducing the cost of learning and that the decision to act or think should be based on the uncertainty associated with the utility of executing an action in a particular situation. An architecture for an adaptable reactive system is presented and it is shown how it can be augmented with a simple anticipation mechanism that can substantially reduce the cost and time of learning.

  14. Perceptual basis for reactive teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young S.; Ewing, Thomas F.; Boyle, James M.; Yule, Thomas J.

    2001-10-01

    To improve task performance in partially structured environments, enhancements to teleoperation have been proposed by introducing autonomous behaviors. Such autonomy is implemented based on a reactive robotic architecture, where reactive motor agents that directly couple sensory inputs and motor actions become the building blocks. To this end, a perceptual basis for the motor agents is presented in this paper. The perceptual basis consists of perceptual agents that extract environmental information from a structured light vision system and provide action-oriented perception for the corresponding motor agents. Rather than performing general scene reconstruction, a perceptual agent directly provides the motion reference for the motor behavior. Various sensory mechanisms - sensor fission, fusion, and fashion - become basic building blocks of the perception process. Since perception is a process deeply intertwined with the motor actions, active perception may also incorporate motor behaviors as an integral perceptual process.

  15. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Toivanen, P.; Toivanen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most important, HLA-B27 associated arthritis may occur identical to the Reiter's syndrome with accompanying uretheritis and/or conjunctivitis, whereas in the B27 non-associated form this has not been clearly described. Likewise, only the B27 associated form belongs to the group of spondyloarthropathies.

 PMID:10577958

  16. Reactive cutaneous cytophagocytosis in nocardiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Heung; Lee, Won-Sup; Lee, Ai-Young

    2002-01-01

    Cutaneous nocardiosis, which usually manifests in the form of pustules, abscesses, or subcutaneous nodules, is occasionally found in immunocompromised patients. A 59-yr-old Korean man with myasthenia gravis and thymoma developed nodular skin lesions on his trunk. Histopathologically, abscess formation with a dense infiltrate of neutrophils and many cytophagic histiocytes were observed. Numerous filamentous organisms, which turned out to be Nocardia asteroides by culture, were also found. After sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim therapy, all of the skin lesions rapidly decreased in size, with a marked diminution of the number of cytophagic histiocytes, and cleared up within four months. On reporting a case of cutaneous nocardiosis showing unusual histopathologic findings, we considered that reactive conditions should be included in the differential diagnosis of the cutaneous cytophagocytosis, and that nocardiosis could be one of the diseases showing reactive cytophagocytosis. PMID:11961320

  17. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-05-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia.

  18. Perceptual basis for reactive teleoperation.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S.; Ewing, T. F.; Boyle, J. M.; Yule, T. J.

    2001-08-28

    To enhance task performance in partially structured environment, enhancement of teleoperation was proposed by introducing autonomous behaviors. Such autonomy is implemented based on reactive robotic architecture, where reactive motor agents that directly couples sensory inputs and motor actions become the building blocks. To this end, presented in this paper is a perceptual basis for the motor agents. The perceptual basis consists of perceptual agents that extracts environmental information from a structured light vision system and provide action oriented perception for the corresponding motor agents. Rather than performing general scene reconstruction, a perceptual agent directly provides the motion reference for the motor behavior. Various sensory mechanisms--sensor fission, fusion, and fashion--becomes basic building blocks of the perception process. Since perception is a process deeply intertwined with the motor actions, active perception may also incorporate motor behaviors as an integral perceptual process.

  19. A Search of Reactivated Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2017-05-01

    Dormant or near-dormant short-period comets can unexpectedly regain the ability to eject dust. In many known cases, the resurrection is short-lived and lasts less than one orbit. However, it is possible that some resurrected comets can remain active in later perihelion passages. We search the archival images of various facilities to look for these “reactivated” comets. We identify two candidates, 297P/Beshore and 332P/Ikeya-Murakami, both of which were found to be inactive or weakly active in the previous orbit before their discovery. We derive a reactivation rate of ˜ 0.007 {{comet}}-1 {{orbit}}-1, which implies that typical short-period comets only become temporarily dormant a few times or less. Smaller comets are prone to rotational instability and may undergo temporary dormancy more frequently. Next generation high-cadence surveys may find more reactivation events of these comets.

  20. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    HD Reactive polymer GD  16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...deposited on fabrics, polymers , or other solid materials. The purpose of the method is to determine whether the analyte is reactive and converts to...reactions of reagents including chemical weapons on materials like concrete, soil, and sand, as well as reactive polymers .3,4,5,6,7 There are

  1. A Quantitative Mass-Spectrometry Platform to Monitor Changes in Cysteine Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2017-01-01

    Summary Cysteine residues on proteins serve diverse functional roles in catalysis and regulation and are susceptible to numerous posttranslational modifications. Methods to monitor the reactivity of cysteines within the context of a complex proteome have facilitated the identification and functional characterization of cysteine residues on disparate proteins. Here, we describe the use of a cysteine-reactive iodoacetamide probe coupled to isotopically labeled, cleavable linkers to identify and quantify cysteine-reactivity changes from two biological samples. PMID:27778278

  2. Nitric oxide and airway reactivity.

    PubMed

    Strapkova, A; Nosalova, G

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a neurotransmitter of the inhibitory nonadrenergic noncholinergic mediation in the respiratory system. Its participation in the regulation of airways functions is determined by its level in the organism. We examined participation of nitric oxide in the changes of the airway reactivity evoked by toluene exposure as the source of the free radicals. The changes of nitric oxide level in the organism were evoked by administration of its indirect donor isosorbide dinitrate. Thiol groups were provided by administration of antioxidative mucolytic N-acetylcysteine. Used drugs--isosorbide dinitrate (5 mg/kg b.w.) and N-acetylcysteine (300 mg/kg b.w.) were administered intraperitoneally or by inhalation 30 minutes before each exposure to the toluene vapours. The control group was not treated with drugs. After toluene exposure (2 hours in each of 3 consecutive days) tracheal and lung strips smooth muscle reactivity to histamine was observed under in "in vitro" conditions. The administration of isosorbide dinitrate decreased especially the lung strip smooth muscle reactivity to histamine. We revealed more expressive effect of the pretreatment with intraperitoneally administered isosorbide dinitrate in the comparison with inhalation. Simultaneous pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine intensified beneficial effect of isosorbide dinitrate probably by increasing of the intracellullary level of thiols. In our experimental conditions possible participation of nitric oxide in changes of airways smooth muscle reactivity after exposure to the toluene follows from results, as well as the importance of thiol groups for the activity of its indirect donors. (Fig. 6, Tab. 3, Ref. 35.)

  3. Stress Reactivity in Chronic Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Linda T.; Mühlberger, Andreas; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus is primarily an auditory symptom. Yet not only patients and clinicians, but also current pathophysiological models relate the onset and maintenance of tinnitus to stress. Here physiological and psychological stress reactivity was investigated in 19 patients with subjective chronic tinnitus and 19 comparable healthy controls. All participants underwent five consecutive measurements in one session including three resting conditions and two stress tasks in between (mental arithmetic and concentration on tinnitus/ear noise). Stress reactivity was assessed by heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV) and subjective ratings for each of the five measurements. In patients with tinnitus, mean HR was overall decreased and blunted in response to acute stress induced by mental arithmetic compared to controls. HRV measures did not differ between both groups. Tinnitus sufferers indicated more subjective stress and increased awareness of tinnitus after the mental arithmetic task (during both resting and concentration on tinnitus measurements), but perceived similar levels of stress during mental arithmetic stress. In contrast to controls, HR and HRV were not correlated and also strain reports and physiological data were not associated in tinnitus. Our data show hints for a de-synchronization of physiological and psychological stress reactivity in chronic tinnitus. PMID:28134346

  4. Microcapsules with three orthogonal reactive sites

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Brian P.; Hira, Steven M.; Strouse, Geoffrey F.; McQuade, D. Tyler

    2009-01-01

    Polymeric microcapsules containing reactive sites on the shell surface and two orthogonally reactive polymers encapsulated within the interior are selectively labeled. The capsules provide three spatially separate and differentially reactive sites. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is used to characterize the distribution of labels. Polymers encapsulated are distributed homogeneously within the core and do not interact with the shell even when oppositely charged. PMID:19254010

  5. Transient transport of reactive and non-reactive solutes in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, Y. R.; Giacobbe, D.

    2004-06-01

    A numerical model capable of predicting the transient changes in concentration levels of a solute along a homogeneous aquifer system is presented. The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) is utilised in predicting the concentration levels for cases of continuous and instantaneous release modes. The Crank-Nicholson equation is employed in the presented finite difference model. The numerical calculations are carried out using the implicit Gauss-Seidel method with over- and under-relaxation coefficients depending on the state of convergence. The correction terms resulting from the removal of zero- and first-order truncation errors in the ADE with a reaction term have significantly improved the performance of the numerical scheme. Comparisons between the numerically predicted concentrations with analytical and measured values were carried out for cases of non-reactive (tracer) and reactive (organic) solutes with continuous injection in homogeneous isotropic soils. The overshooting problems experienced in the numerical calculations are minimised by refining the finite grid size. The analysis of results has shown that the model can produce reliable simulations for cases of non-reactive solutes. While for the case of solutes undergoing adsorption, accurate concentrations can be predicted by adjusting the influent pore water velocity through the use of a retardation factor, which is suitable for aquifers with low organic carbon content and undergoing hydrophobic partitioning.

  6. Investigation of the reactivity of organic materials in liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D.; Irwin, K.; Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.; Stringham, R.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of impact-ignition sensitivity and studies of the relative reactivity of t-butoxy and t-butyl peroxy radicals toward a variety of organic compounds reveal improved methods of selection of materials for safe use in a liquid oxygen environment.

  7. OH Reactivity Observations during the MAPS-Seoul Campaign: Contrasts between Urban and Suburban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, D.; Jeong, D.; Blake, D. R.; Wang, M. D.; Kim, D. S.; Lee, G.; Lee, M.; Jung, J.; Ahn, J.; Cho, G.; Guenther, A. B.; Kim, S.

    2015-12-01

    Direct total OH reactivity was observed in the urban and suburban environments of Seoul, South Korea using a comparative reactivity method (CRM) during the MAPS-Seoul field campaign. In addition, CO, NOx, SO2, ozone, VOCs, aerosol, physical, and chemical parameters were also deployed. By comparing the observed total OH reactivity results with calculated OH reactivity from the trace gas observational datasets, we will evaluate our current status in constraining reactive gases in the urban and suburban environments in the East Asian megacity. Observed urban OH reactivity will be presented in the context of the ability to constrain anthropogenic reactive trace gas emissions. It will then be compared to the observed suburban results from Taehwa Research Forest (located ~ 50 km from the Seoul City Center). Our understanding of reactive trace gases in an environment of high BVOC emissions in a mildly aged anthropogenic influences will be evaluated. Using an observational constrained box model with detailed VOC oxidation schemes (e.g. MCM), we will discuss: 1) what is the amount of missing OH reactivity 2) what are the potential sources of the missing OH reactivity, and 3) what are the implications on regional air quality?

  8. Total OH Reactivity Measurements in the Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praplan, A. P.; Hellén, H.; Hakola, H.; Hatakka, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION Atmospheric total OH reactivity (Rtotal) can be measured (Kovacs and Brune, 2001; Sinha et al., 2008) or it can be calculated according to Rtotal = ∑i kOH+X_i [Xi] where kOH+X_i corresponds to the reaction rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with a given compound Xi and [Xi] its concentration. Studies suggest that in some environments a large fraction of missing reactivity, comparing calculated Rtotal with ambient total OH reactivity measurements (Di Carlo et al., 2004; Hofzumahaus et al., 2009). In this study Rtotal has been measured using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008). Levels of the reference compound (pyrrole, C4H5N) are monitored by gas chromatography every 2 minutes and Rtotal is derived from the difference of reactivity between zero and ambient air. RESULTS Around 36 hours of preliminary total OH reactivity data (30 May until 2 June 2015) are presented in Fig. 1. Its range matches previous studies for this site (Nölscher et al., 2012; Sinha et al., 2010) and is similar to values in another pine forest (Nakashima et al., 2014). The setup used during the period presented here has been updated and more recent data will be presented, as well as a comparison with calculated OH reactivity from measured individual species. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was supported by Academy of Finland (Academy Research Fellowship No. 275608). The authors acknowledge Juuso Raine for technical support. REFERENCES Di Carlo et al. (2004). Science 304, 722-725.Hofzumahaus et al. (2009). Science 324, 1702-1704.Kovacs and Brune (2001). J. Atmos. Chem. 39, 105-122.Nakashima et al. (2014). Atmos. Env. 85, 1-8.Nölscher et al. (2012). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 12, 8257-8270.Sinha et al. (2008). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 2213-2227.Sinha et al. (2010). Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 6614-6620.

  9. Sequence conservation predicts T cell reactivity against ragweed allergens

    PubMed Central

    Pham, John; Oseroff, Carla; Hinz, Denise; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Greenbaum, Jason; Vita, Randi; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Ragweed is a major cause of seasonal allergy, affecting millions of people worldwide. Several allergens have been defined based on IgE reactivity, but their relative immunogenicity in terms of T cell responses has not been studied. Objective We comprehensively characterized T cell responses from atopic, ragweed-allergic subjects to Amb a 1, Amb a 3, Amb a 4, Amb a 5, Amb a 6, Amb a 8, Amb a 9, Amb a 10, Amb a 11, and Amb p 5, and examined their correlation with serological reactivity and sequence conservation in other allergens. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors positive for IgE toward ragweed extracts after in vitro expansion for secretion of IL-5 (a representative Th2 cytokine) and IFNγ (Th1) in response to a panel of overlapping peptides spanning the above listed allergens. Results Three previously identified dominant T cell epitopes (Amb a 1 176–191, 200–215, and 344–359) were confirmed and three novel dominant epitopes (Amb a 1 280–295, 304–319, and 320–335) were identified. Amb a 1, the dominant IgE allergen, was also the dominant T cell allergen, but dominance patterns for T cell and IgE responses for the other ragweed allergens did not correlate. Dominance for T cell responses correlated with conservation of ragweed epitopes with sequences of other well-known allergens. Conclusion and clinical relevance These results provide the first assessment of the hierarchy of T cell reactivity in ragweed allergens, which is distinct from that observed for IgE reactivity and influenced by T cell epitope sequence conservation. The results suggest that ragweed allergens associated with lesser IgE reactivity and significant T cell reactivity may be targeted for T cell immunotherapy, and further support the development of immunotherapies against epitopes conserved across species to generate broad reactivity against many common allergens. PMID:27359111

  10. Reactive composite compositions and mat barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, Christine A.; Narasimhan, Rajendran; Karraker, David G.

    2001-01-01

    A hazardous material storage area has a reactive multi-layer composite mat which lines an opening into which a reactive backfill and hazardous material are placed. A water-inhibiting cap may cover the hazardous material storage area. The reactive multi-layer composite mat has a backing onto which is placed an active layer which will neutralize or stabilize hazardous waste and a fronting layer so that the active layer is between the fronting and backing layers. The reactive backfill has a reactive agent which can stabilize or neutralize hazardous material and inhibit the movement of the hazardous material through the hazardous material storage area.

  11. Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles are derived. As a starting point of analysis the kinetic equation with a binary collision operator written in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and with a reactive collision integral allowing for arbitrary chemical reactions is used. The linearized variant of Grad's moment method is applied to deduce the systems of moment equations for plasma and also full and reduced transport equations for plasma species nonequilibrium parameters.

  12. Formation of dielectric silicon compounds by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselov, D. S.; Voronov, Yu A.

    2016-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of reactive magnetron sputtering of the silicon target in the ambient of inert argon gas with reactive gas, nitrogen or oxygen. The magnetron was powered by two mid-frequency generators of a rectangular pulse of opposite polarity. The negative polarity pulse provides the sputtering of the target. The positive polarity pulse provides removal of accumulated charge from the surface of the target. This method does not require any special devices of resistances matching and provides continuous sputtering of the target.

  13. Design and synthesis of reactive separation systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, M.F.

    1992-12-31

    During the last decade there has been a rapid upturn in interest in reactive distillation. The chemical process industry recognizes the favorable economics of carrying out reaction simultaneously with distillation for certain classes of reacting systems, and many new processes have been built based on this technology. Interest is also increasing by academics and software vendors. Systematic design methods for reactive distillation systems have only recently begun to emerge. In this report we survey the available design techniques and point out the contributions made by our group at the University of Massachusetts.

  14. Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-06-08

    Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles are derived. As a starting point of analysis the kinetic equation with a binary collision operator written in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and with a reactive collision integral allowing for arbitrary chemical reactions is used. The linearized variant of Grad’s moment method is applied to deduce the systems of moment equations for plasma and also full and reduced transport equations for plasma species nonequilibrium parameters.

  15. Plasma & reactive ion etching to prepare ohmic contacts

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a low-resistance electrical contact between a metal and a layer of p-type CdTe surface by plasma etching and reactive ion etching comprising: a) placing a CdS/CdTe layer into a chamber and evacuating said chamber; b) backfilling the chamber with Argon or a reactive gas to a pressure sufficient for plasma ignition; and c) generating plasma ignition by energizing a cathode which is connected to a power supply to enable the plasma to interact argon ions alone or in the presence of a radio-frequency DC self-bias voltage with the p-CdTe surface.

  16. Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles are derived. As a starting point of analysis the kinetic equation with a binary collision operator written in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and with a reactive collision integral allowing for arbitrary chemical reactions is used. The linearized variant of Grad's moment method is applied to deduce the systems of moment equations for plasma and also full and reduced transport equations for plasma species nonequilibrium parameters.

  17. A Gas-Kinetic Scheme for Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lian,Youg-Sheng; Xu, Kun

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the gas-kinetic BGK scheme for the compressible flow equations is extended to chemical reactive flow. The mass fraction of the unburnt gas is implemented into the gas kinetic equation by assigning a new internal degree of freedom to the particle distribution function. The new variable can be also used to describe fluid trajectory for the nonreactive flows. Due to the gas-kinetic BGK model, the current scheme basically solves the Navier-Stokes chemical reactive flow equations. Numerical tests validate the accuracy and robustness of the current kinetic method.

  18. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.

    1987-02-23

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  19. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  20. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1988-08-19

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  1. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-03-06

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  2. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.; Berggren, M.H.

    1987-08-28

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  3. COYOTE: A computer program for 2-D reactive flow simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1990-04-01

    We describe the numerical algorithm used in the COYOTE two- dimensional, transient, Eulerian hydrodynamics program for reactive flows. The program has a variety of options that provide capabilities for a wide range of applications, and it is designed to be robust and relatively easy to use while maintaining adequate accuracy and efficiency to solve realistic problems. It is based on the ICE method, and it includes a general species and chemical reaction network for simulating reactive flows. It also includes swirl, turbulence transport models, and a nonuniform mesh capability. We describe several applications of the program. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Silaban, A.; Harrison, D.P. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  5. Reactive nitrogen species in cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Levi; Franco, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    The transduction of cellular signals occurs through the modification of target molecules. Most of these modifications are transitory, thus the signal transduction pathways can be tightly regulated. Reactive nitrogen species are a group of compounds with different properties and reactivity. Some reactive nitrogen species are highly reactive and their interaction with macromolecules can lead to permanent modifications, which suggested they were lacking the specificity needed to participate in cell signaling events. However, the perception of reactive nitrogen species as oxidizers of macromolecules leading to general oxidative damage has recently evolved. The concept of redox signaling is now well established for a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In this context, the post-translational modifications introduced by reactive nitrogen species can be very specific and are active participants in signal transduction pathways. This review addresses the role of these oxidative modifications in the regulation of cell signaling events. PMID:25888647

  6. Reactivity to sorbitan sesquioleate affects reactivity to fragrance mix I.

    PubMed

    Geier, Johannes; Schnuch, Axel; Lessmann, Holger; Uter, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Fragrance mix I (FM I) and its single constituents contain 5% and 1% sorbitan sesquioleate (SSO), respectively. SSO is a rare sensitizer and a potential irritant. To determine whether the outcome of the FM I breakdown test is affected by positive patch test reactivity to SSO. A retrospective analysis of data from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology, 1998-2013, was performed. The full FM I breakdown test including SSO was tested in 2952 patients. Of these, 154 (5.2%) had a positive patch test reaction to SSO 20% pet. and 2709 (91.8%) had a negative patch test reaction. Positive reactions to one or more of the single fragrances contained in the mix were significantly more common (82.5% versus 57.3%) in SSO-positive patients, who also had more multiple reactions than FM I-positive patients with negative SSO reactions (61.5% versus 21.3% patients with reactions to two or more fragrances). Our results indicate that reactivity to SSO markedly affects the outcome of patch testing with FM I and its single constituents. SSO must be an obligatory part of the full FM I breakdown test, and should ideally be included in the baseline series. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. New learning following reactivation in the human brain: targeting emotional memories through rapid serial visual presentation.

    PubMed

    Wirkner, Janine; Löw, Andreas; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    Once reactivated, previously consolidated memories destabilize and have to be reconsolidated to persist, a process that might be altered non-invasively by interfering learning immediately after reactivation. Here, we investigated the influence of interference on brain correlates of reactivated episodic memories for emotional and neutral scenes using event-related potentials (ERPs). To selectively target emotional memories we applied a new reactivation method: rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). RSVP leads to enhanced implicit processing (pop out) of the most salient memories making them vulnerable to disruption. In line, interference after reactivation of previously encoded pictures disrupted recollection particularly for emotional events. Furthermore, memory impairments were reflected in a reduced centro-parietal ERP old/new difference during retrieval of emotional pictures. These results provide neural evidence that emotional episodic memories in humans can be selectively altered through behavioral interference after reactivation, a finding with further clinical implications for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modification of chemical reactivity of enzymatic hydrolysis lignin by ultrasound treatment in dilute alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhuoming; Li, Shujun; Fang, Guizhen; Patil, Nikhil; Yan, Ning

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we have explored various ultrasound treatment conditions for structural modification of enzymatic hydrolysis lignin (EHL) for enhanced chemical reactivity. The key structural modifications were characterized by using a combination of analytical methods, including, Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR), Gel permeation chromatography (GPC), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Folin-Ciocalteu (F-C) method. Chemical reactivity of the modified EHL samples was determined by both 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity and their reactivity towards formaldehyde. It was observed that the modified EHL had a higher phenolic hydroxyl group content, a lower molecular weight, a higher reactivity towards formaldehyde, and a greater antioxidant property. The higher reactivity demonstrated by the samples after treatment suggesting that ultrasound is a promising method for modifying enzymatic hydrolysis lignin for value-added applications.

  9. Integrating planning and reactive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, David E.; Myers, Karen L.

    1994-01-01

    Our research is developing persistent agents that can achieve complex tasks in dynamic and uncertain environments. We refer to such agents as taskable, reactive agents. An agent of this type requires a number of capabilities. The ability to execute complex tasks necessitates the use of strategic plans for accomplishing tasks; hence, the agent must be able to synthesize new plans at run time. The dynamic nature of the environment requires that the agent be able to deal with unpredictable changes in its world. As such, agents must be able to react to unanticipated events by taking appropriate actions in a timely manner, while continuing activities that support current goals. The unpredictability of the world could lead to failure of plans generated for individual tasks. Agents must have the ability to recover from failures by adapting their activities to the new situation, or replanning if the world changes sufficiently. Finally, the agent should be able to perform in the face of uncertainty. The Cypress system, described here, provides a framework for creating taskable, reactive agents. Several features distinguish our approach: (1) the generation and execution of complex plans with parallel actions; (2) the integration of goal-driven and event driven activities during execution; (3) the use of evidential reasoning for dealing with uncertainty; and (4) the use of replanning to handle run-time execution problems. Our model for a taskable, reactive agent has two main intelligent components, an executor and a planner. The two components share a library of possible actions that the system can take. The library encompasses a full range of action representations, including plans, planning operators, and executable procedures such as predefined standard operating procedures (SOP's). These three classes of actions span multiple levels of abstraction.

  10. Quick monitoring of pozzolanic reactivity of waste ashes.

    PubMed

    Sinthaworn, Suppachai; Nimityongskul, Pichai

    2009-05-01

    This article proposes a quick method of monitoring for pozzolanic reactivity of waste ashes by investigating the electrical conductivity of the suspension at an elevated temperature. This suspension is obtained by mixing tested pozzolan with an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) solution produced by mixing ordinary Portland cement with water. For comparison, silica fume, metakaolin, rice husk ash and river sand - whose pozzolanic reactivities range from reactive to inert - were used in the experimental investigation. The electrical conductivity of the suspension was continually recorded by using an electrical conductivity meter and stored by using a personal computer for a period of slightly over 1day. The indicative parameters that can be related to pozzolanic reactivity were discussed and analyzed in detail. It was found that it is possible to determine the pozzolanic reactivity of fly ash within 28h by using the proposed technique, as compared to 7 or 28 days for the determination of strength activity index according to ASTM. This technique would help concrete technologists to speedily investigate the quality of fly ash for use as a cement replacement in order to alleviate pollution caused by cement production and solve disposal problems of waste ashes.

  11. Preparation and Reactivity of Gasless Nanostructured Energetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Manukyan, Khachatur V.; Shuck, Christopher E.; Rogachev, Alexander S.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    High-Energy Ball Milling (HEBM) is a ball milling process where a powder mixture placed in the ball mill is subjected to high-energy collisions from the balls. Among other applications, it is a versatile technique that allows for effective preparation of gasless reactive nanostructured materials with high energy density per volume (Ni+Al, Ta+C, Ti+C). The structural transformations of reactive media, which take place during HEBM, define the reaction mechanism in the produced energetic composites. Varying the processing conditions permits fine tuning of the milling-induced microstructures of the fabricated composite particles. In turn, the reactivity, i.e., self-ignition temperature, ignition delay time, as well as reaction kinetics, of high energy density materials depends on its microstructure. Analysis of the milling-induced microstructures suggests that the formation of fresh oxygen-free intimate high surface area contacts between the reagents is responsible for the enhancement of their reactivity. This manifests itself in a reduction of ignition temperature and delay time, an increased rate of chemical reaction, and an overall decrease of the effective activation energy of the reaction. The protocol provides a detailed description for the preparation of reactive nanocomposites with tailored microstructure using short-term HEBM method. It also describes a high-speed thermal imaging technique to determine the ignition/combustion characteristics of the energetic materials. The protocol can be adapted to preparation and characterization of a variety of nanostructured energetic composites. PMID:25868065

  12. Preparation and reactivity of gasless nanostructured energetic materials.

    PubMed

    Manukyan, Khachatur V; Shuck, Christopher E; Rogachev, Alexander S; Mukasyan, Alexander S

    2015-04-02

    High-Energy Ball Milling (HEBM) is a ball milling process where a powder mixture placed in the ball mill is subjected to high-energy collisions from the balls. Among other applications, it is a versatile technique that allows for effective preparation of gasless reactive nanostructured materials with high energy density per volume (Ni+Al, Ta+C, Ti+C). The structural transformations of reactive media, which take place during HEBM, define the reaction mechanism in the produced energetic composites. Varying the processing conditions permits fine tuning of the milling-induced microstructures of the fabricated composite particles. In turn, the reactivity, i.e., self-ignition temperature, ignition delay time, as well as reaction kinetics, of high energy density materials depends on its microstructure. Analysis of the milling-induced microstructures suggests that the formation of fresh oxygen-free intimate high surface area contacts between the reagents is responsible for the enhancement of their reactivity. This manifests itself in a reduction of ignition temperature and delay time, an increased rate of chemical reaction, and an overall decrease of the effective activation energy of the reaction. The protocol provides a detailed description for the preparation of reactive nanocomposites with tailored microstructure using short-term HEBM method. It also describes a high-speed thermal imaging technique to determine the ignition/combustion characteristics of the energetic materials. The protocol can be adapted to preparation and characterization of a variety of nanostructured energetic composites.

  13. Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: combining simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Tomas; Vlcek, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has recently been used for preparation of various oxide films with high application potential, such as TiO2, ZrO2, Ta2O5, HfO2, VO2. Using our patented method of pulsed reactive gas flow control with an optimized reactive gas inlet, we achieved significantly higher deposition rates compared to typical continuous dc magnetron depositions. We have developed a time-dependent model of the reactive HiPIMS. The model includes a depth-resolved description of the sputtered target (featuring sputtering, implantation and knock-on implantation processes) and a parametric description of the discharge plasma (dissociation of reactive gas, ionization and return of sputtered atoms and gas rarefaction). The model uses a combination of experimental and simulation data as input. We have calculated the composition of the target and substrate for several deposition conditions. The simulations predict a reduced compound coverage of the target in HiPIMS compared to the continuous dc sputtering regime which explains the increased deposition rate. The simulations show that an increased dissociation of oxygen in a HiPIMS discharge is beneficial to achieve stoichiometric films on the substrate at high deposition rates.

  14. Emotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Werner, K.H.; Roberts, N.A.; Rosen, H.J.; Dean, D.L.; Kramer, J.H.; Weiner, M.W.; Miller, B.L.; Levenson, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is associated with a profound decline in social and emotional behavior; however, current understanding regarding the specific aspects of emotional functioning that are preserved and disrupted is limited. Objective To assess preservation of function and deficits in two aspects of emotional processing (emotional reactivity and emotion recognition) in FTLD. Methods Twenty-eight FTLD patients were compared with 16 controls in emotional reactivity (self-reported emotional experience, emotional facial behavior, and autonomic nervous system response to film stimuli) and emotion recognition (ability to identify a target emotion of fear, happy, or sad experienced by film characters). Additionally, the neural correlates of emotional reactivity and emotion recognition were investigated. Results FTLD patients were comparable to controls in 1) emotional reactivity to the fear, happy, and sad film clips and 2) emotion recognition for the happy film clip. However, FTLD patients were significantly impaired compared with controls in emotion recognition for the fear and sad film clips. Volumetric analyses revealed that deficits in emotion recognition were associated with decreased lobar volumes in the frontal and temporal lobes. Conclusions The socioemotional decline typically seen in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients may result more from an inability to process certain emotions in other people than from deficits in emotional reactivity. PMID:17620547

  15. Molecular simulation studies on chemical reactivity of methylcyclopentadiene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingsheng; Zhang, Yingchun; Rogers, William J; Mannan, M Sam

    2009-06-15

    Molecular simulations are important to predict thermodynamic values for reactive chemicals especially when sufficient experimental data are not available. Methylcyclopentadiene (MCP) is an example of a highly reactive and hazardous compound in the chemical process industry. In this work, chemical reactivity of 2-methylcyclopentadiene, including isomerization, dimerization, and oxidation reactions, is investigated in detail by theoretical computational chemistry methods and empirical thermodynamic-energy correlation. On the basis of molecular simulations, an average value of -15.2 kcal/mol for overall heat of dimerization and -45.6 kcal/mol for overall heat of oxidation were obtained in gaseous phase at 298 K and 1 atm. These molecular simulation studies can provide guidance for the design of safer chemical processes, safer handling of MCP, and also provide useful information for an investigation of the T2 Laboratories explosion on December 19, 2007, in Florida.

  16. Selective Catalytic Combustion Sensors for Reactive Organic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innes, W. B.

    1971-01-01

    Sensors involving a vanadia-alumina catalyst bed-thermocouple assembly satisfy requirements for simple, reproducible and rapid continuous analysis or reactive organics. Responses generally increase with temperature to 400 C and increase to a maximum with flow rate/catalyst volume. Selectivity decreases with temperature. Response time decreases with flow rate and increases with catalyst volume. At chosen optimum conditions calculated response which is additive and linear agrees better with photochemical reactivity than other methods for various automotive sources, and response to vehicle exhaust is insensitive to flow rate. Application to measurement of total reactive organics in vehicle exhaust as well as for gas chromatography detection illustrate utility. The approach appears generally applicable to high thermal effect reactions involving first order kinetics.

  17. Modeling and processing of laser Doppler reactive hyperaemia signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huiller, Jean-Pierre

    2003-07-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry is a non-invasive method used in the medical domain to monitor the microvascular blood cell perfusion through tissue. Most commercial laser Doppler flowmeters use an algorithm calculating the first moment of the power spectral density to give the perfusion value. Many clinical applications measure the perfusion after a vascular provocation such as a vascular occlusion. The response obtained is then called reactive hyperaemia. Target pathologies include diabetes, hypertension and peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. In order to have a deeper knowledge on reactive hyperaemia acquired by the laser Doppler technique, the present work first proposes two models (one analytical and one numerical) of the observed phenomenon. Then, a study on the multiple scattering between photons and red blood cells occurring during reactive hyperaemia is carried out. Finally, a signal processing that improves the diagnosis of peripheral arterial occlusive diseases is presented.

  18. Selective Catalytic Combustion Sensors for Reactive Organic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innes, W. B.

    1971-01-01

    Sensors involving a vanadia-alumina catalyst bed-thermocouple assembly satisfy requirements for simple, reproducible and rapid continuous analysis or reactive organics. Responses generally increase with temperature to 400 C and increase to a maximum with flow rate/catalyst volume. Selectivity decreases with temperature. Response time decreases with flow rate and increases with catalyst volume. At chosen optimum conditions calculated response which is additive and linear agrees better with photochemical reactivity than other methods for various automotive sources, and response to vehicle exhaust is insensitive to flow rate. Application to measurement of total reactive organics in vehicle exhaust as well as for gas chromatography detection illustrate utility. The approach appears generally applicable to high thermal effect reactions involving first order kinetics.

  19. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M.; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B.D.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here, we describe a proteomics method to quantitatively profile the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyperreactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyperreactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and involved in iron-sulfur protein biogenesis. Finally, we demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can also form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs. PMID:21085121

  20. Apparatus for making environmentally stable reactive alloy powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for making powder from a metallic melt by atomizing the melt to form droplets and reacting the droplets downstream of the atomizing location with a reactive gas. The droplets are reacted with the gas at a temperature where a solidified exterior surface is formed thereon and where a protective refractory barrier layer (reaction layer) is formed whose penetration into the droplets is limited by the presence of the solidified surface so as to avoid selective reduction of key reactive alloyants needed to achieve desired powder end use properties. The barrier layer protects the reactive powder particles from environmental constituents such as air and water in the liquid or vapor form during subsequent fabrication of the powder to end-use shapes and during use in the intended service environment. 7 figs.

  1. Typical Reactive Armor Safety Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-02

    way. etc.). c. Penetration measurements into the backup armor of the dynamic or static rounds (i.e., partial or comple e penetration, depth of...ZP Oe) Alberdeen Prc~ving Ground , MD 21005-5059 Aberdeen Proving Ground , HD 21005-5055 as NAVE 0ýu- TLD,%G 57ON5ORNG 16 (VEif N8 9...OPFJPATIONS PROCEDURE AMSTE-RP-702-10 Test Operatiuns Procedure (TOP) 2-2-623 AD No. 2 April 1993 TYPICAL REACTIVE ARMOR SAFETY TESTS Paragraph 1

  2. Clinical assessment of reactive postural control among physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sibley, K M; Inness, E L; Straus, S E; Salbach, N M; Jaglal, S B

    2013-09-01

    Reactive postural control, the ability to recover from an external perturbation to stability, ultimately determines whether an individual will fall following a loss of balance and should be routinely incorporated in balance assessment. The purpose of this study was to identify (1) methods used to assess reactive postural control in clinical practice and (2) factors associated with regular assessment of reactive postural control. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Three hundred and fifty-seven physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada who treated adults with balance impairments answered questions about the components of balance they assess and how they assess reactive control in their practice. Of the 273 respondents who assessed reactive postural control at least some of the time, 15.4% used a standardized measure, 79.1% used a non-standardized approach, and 5.5% used both. Forty-five methods of assessing reactive control were reported. The most common methods used were non-standardized perturbations (43.5%; 104/239 respondents) and movement observation (18.8%; 45/239). The remaining 43 methods were each used by less than 8% of respondents. Practice area had the strongest association with regular assessment of reactive postural control (>60% of the time), and respondents working with neurological disorders were more likely to regularly evaluate reactive control than those working with people with orthopedic conditions. Despite the availability of valid standardized measures to evaluate reactive postural control, respondents relied primarily on non-standardized approaches and observational assessment. Future work should examine the factors influencing choice of reactive control assessment tools and awareness of standardized measures for reactive postural control.

  3. Predictors of Restrictive Reactive Strategy Use in People with Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David; Lowe, Kathy; Brophy, Sam; Moore, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intrusive reactive strategies (physical restraint, emergency medication and seclusion) are frequently used procedures in the management of challenging behaviour. The present study identifies predictors for reactive strategy use in an attempt to more clearly delineate at risk service users. Method: Eight hundred and thirty-nine agencies…

  4. Predictors of Restrictive Reactive Strategy Use in People with Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David; Lowe, Kathy; Brophy, Sam; Moore, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intrusive reactive strategies (physical restraint, emergency medication and seclusion) are frequently used procedures in the management of challenging behaviour. The present study identifies predictors for reactive strategy use in an attempt to more clearly delineate at risk service users. Method: Eight hundred and thirty-nine agencies…

  5. An Experiment with Manifold Purposes: The Chemical Reactivity of Crystal Defects upon Crystal Dissolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzarini, Annaluisa Fantola; Lazzarini, Ennio

    1983-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for an experiment designed to introduce (1) crystal defects and their reactivity upon crystal dissolution; (2) hydrates electron and its reactivity; (3) application of radiochemical method of analysis; and (4) the technique of competitive kinetics. Suggested readings and additional experiments are…

  6. An Experiment with Manifold Purposes: The Chemical Reactivity of Crystal Defects upon Crystal Dissolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzarini, Annaluisa Fantola; Lazzarini, Ennio

    1983-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for an experiment designed to introduce (1) crystal defects and their reactivity upon crystal dissolution; (2) hydrates electron and its reactivity; (3) application of radiochemical method of analysis; and (4) the technique of competitive kinetics. Suggested readings and additional experiments are…

  7. Derivatization of isothiocyanates and their reactive adducts for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Agerbirk, Niels; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Olsen, Carl Erik; Müller, Caroline; Iori, Renato

    2015-10-01

    Isothiocyanates form adducts with a multitude of biomolecules, and these adducts need analytical methods. Likewise, analytical methods for hydrophilic isothiocyanates are needed. We considered reaction with ammonia to form thiourea derivatives. The hydrophilic, glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin, 4-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate, was efficiently derivatized to the thiourea derivative by incubation with ammonia. The hydrophobic benzyl isothiocyanate was also efficiently derivatized to the thiourea derivative. The thiourea group provided a UV absorbing chromophore, and the derivatives showed expectable sodium and hydrogen adducts in ion trap mass spectrometry and were suitable for liquid chromatography analysis. Reactive dithiocarbamate adducts constitute the major type of reactive ITC adduct expected in biological matrices. Incubation of a model dithiocarbamate with ammonia likewise resulted in conversion to the corresponding thiourea derivative, suggesting that a variety of matrix-bound reactive isothiocyanate adducts can be determined using this strategy. As an example of the application of the method, recovery of moringin and benzyl isothiocyanate applied to cabbage leaf discs was studied in simulated insect feeding assays. The majority of moringin was recovered as native isothiocyanate, but a major part of benzyl isothiocyanate was converted to reactive adducts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and reactivity study of ethoxytriisothiocyanatosilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurjaspreet; Promila, Saroa, Amandeep; Sharma, Geetika; Kalra, Pooja

    2017-07-01

    This paper defines the synthesis of ethoxytriisothiocyanatosilane (EtO)Si(NCS)4 and its novel silicon (IV) complexes (5-8). Silane 4 constitutes a unique class of silicon source with three reactive Si-NCS functionality. The synthesis of silicon complexes were carried out by reacting the 4 with four ligands viz. 2-hydroxy-5-methylazobenzene HL1, benzatriazoleHL2, 2-picolinic acid HL3and2-((3-methylpyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol HL4. Compounds 5-8 were well characterized by1H, 13C, 29Si NMR, FT-IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The redox properties of the complexes were investigated by electrochemical method using cyclic voltammetry.

  9. Reactive Chemical Transport Under Multiphase System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y.; Yeh, G.

    2001-12-01

    A numerical model, HYDROBIOGEOCHEM, is developed for modeling reactive chemical transport under multiphase flow systems. The chemistry part of this model is derived from BIOGEOCHEM, which is a general computer code that simulates biogeochemial processes from a reaction-based mechanistic point of view. To reduce primary dependent variables (PDVs), Gauss-Jordan decomposition is applied to the governing matrix equations for transport, resulting in mobile components and mobile kinetic variables as PDVs. Options of sequential iteration approach (SIA), predictor corrector and operator splitting method are incorporated in the code to make it versatile. The model is a practical tool for assessing migration of subsurface contamination and proper designing of remediation technologies. Examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of the new model.

  10. Metallacyclopentadienes: synthesis, structure and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wangyang; Yu, Chao; Chen, Tianyang; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Wen-Xiong; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2017-02-20

    Metallacyclopentadienes, which possess two M-C(sp(2)) bonds and feature the structure of M(C[upper bond 1 start]R(1)[double bond, length as m-dash]CR(2)-CR(3)[double bond, length as m-dash]C[upper bond 1 end]R(4)), are an important class of five-membered metallacycles. They are considered as both reactive intermediates in the stoichiometric and catalytic transformations of organic molecules and useful precursors to main group element compounds, and have received considerable attention in organometallic chemistry, coordination chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry over the past six decades because of their unique metallacyclic structure. This review comprehensively presents the synthesis, structure and reactivity of the s-, p-, d- and f-block metallacyclopentadienes distributed in the whole periodic table. In addition, their application in synthetic organic chemistry and polymer chemistry is summarized. This review aims to be beneficial for the design and synthesis of novel metallacyclopentadienes, and for promoting the rapid development of metallacyclic chemistry.

  11. Quantum Entanglement and Chemical Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Molina-Espíritu, M; Esquivel, R O; López-Rosa, S; Dehesa, J S

    2015-11-10

    The water molecule and a hydrogenic abstraction reaction are used to explore in detail some quantum entanglement features of chemical interest. We illustrate that the energetic and quantum-information approaches are necessary for a full understanding of both the geometry of the quantum probability density of molecular systems and the evolution of a chemical reaction. The energy and entanglement hypersurfaces and contour maps of these two models show different phenomena. The energy ones reveal the well-known stable geometry of the models, whereas the entanglement ones grasp the chemical capability to transform from one state system to a new one. In the water molecule the chemical reactivity is witnessed through quantum entanglement as a local minimum indicating the bond cleavage in the dissociation process of the molecule. Finally, quantum entanglement is also useful as a chemical reactivity descriptor by detecting the transition state along the intrinsic reaction path in the hypersurface of the hydrogenic abstraction reaction corresponding to a maximally entangled state.

  12. [Biodegradation of reactive turquoise blue].

    PubMed

    Fu, L; Wen, X; Xu, L; Qian, Y

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the anaerobic degradation and the aerobic degradation of a kind of reactive dye--Reactive Turquoise Blue(RTB) were compared. The results proved that anaerobic sludge could only decompose RTB in the presence of glucose while aerobic sludge decomposed RTB with or without the presence of glucose (RTB of 20 mg/L was reduced by 37.4% through 24 hours' aerobic treatment with RTB as sole carbon source). The enhancement of glucose concentration was beneficial for both anaerobic and aerobic degradation of RTB: the anaerobic and the aerobic removal efficiencies were respectively 81.5% and 73.6% with RTB of 20 mg/L and glucose of 1200 mg/L. In the influent RTB concentration also had influence on the activity of anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms. When glucose concentration was 800 mg/L or 1200 mg/L and RTB concentration was 20 mg/L to 100 mg/L, anaerobic removal efficiency of RTB was higher than aerobic removal efficiency by 4.9%-27.2%, which meant that anaerobic bacteria is more powerful than aerobic bacteria in terms of RTB removal.

  13. Multiscale Models for Reactive Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Under certain conditions, Darcy-scale reactive transport equations cannot provide sufficiently accurate predictions of multiphase flow and reactive transport. Pore-scale models are based on fundamental conservation laws and, in general, are more accurate than the Darcy-scale models. But, for domains of practical importance, number of unknowns in the pore-sale models may be on the order of billions or trillions and a direct solution of the pore-scale equations is often unfeasible even on modern super-computes. Several novel multiscale methods including a Langevin approach and a dimension reduction method based on a computational closure will be presented. The purpose of these methods is to provide an accurate description of the system averages while retaining critical pore-scale information. The advantages, range of applicability and limitations of the mentioned above multiscale methods will be discussed.

  14. Improving intergranular corrosion resistance of sensitized type 316 austenitic stainless steel by laser surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudali, U. K.; Dayal, R. K.

    1992-06-01

    An attempt was made to modify the surface microstructure of a sensitized austenitic stainless steel, without affecting the bulk properties, using laser surface melting techniques. AISI type 316 stainless steel specimens sensitized at 923 K for 20 hr were laser surface melted using a pulsed ruby laser at 6 J energy. Two successive pulses were given to ensure uniform melting and homogenization. The melted layers were characterized by small angle X- ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Intergranular corrosion tests were carried out on the melted region as per ASTM A262 practice A (etch test) and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The results indicated an improvement in the intergranular corrosion resistance after laser surface melting. The results are explained on the basis of homogeneous and nonsensitized microstructure obtained at the surface after laser surface melting. It is concluded that laser surface melting can be used as an in situ method to increase the life of a sensitized component by modifying the surface microstructure.

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Hot Isostatically Pressed-Produced Stainless Steel/High Alloy Tool Steel Compound Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, Greta; Flyg, Jesper; Frisk, Karin; Sandberg, Odd

    2011-05-01

    Consolidation of tool steel powders and simultaneous joining to a stainless 316L steel are performed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Two tool steel grades are considered: a high vanadium alloyed carbon tool steel, and a high vanadium and chromium alloyed nitrogen tool steel. The boundary layer arising during diffusion bonding is in focus and, in particular, the diffusion of carbon and nitrogen over the joint. Measurements of the elemental concentration profiles and corrosion tests by the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) method are performed. Comparative calculations with the DICTRA software are performed and are found to be in agreement with the experimental results. It is found that the carbon tool steel grade has a more critical influence on the corrosion resistance of the stainless 316L steel in comparison to the nitrogen tool steel grade.

  16. Phenylethynyl endcapping reagents and reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A phenylethynyl composition which can be used to endcap nucleophilic species is employed in the production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers exclusively. These phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers display unique thermal characteristics, as exemplified by the model compound, 4-phenoxy 4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, which is relatively stable at 200 C, but reacts at 350 C. In addition, a reactive diluent was prepared which decreases the melt viscosity of the phenylethynyl terminated oligomers and subsequently reacts therewith to increase density of the resulting thermoset. The novelty of this invention resides in the phenylethynyl composition used to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent was also employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to increase the crosslink density of the resulting thermoset. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  17. Evaluation of the NIOSH draft method 5525 for determination of the total reactive isocyanate group (TRIG) for aliphatic isocyanates in autobody repair shops. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    PubMed

    Bello, D; Streicher, R P; Woskie, S R

    2002-06-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of the NIOSH draft method 5525 for analysis of monomeric and TRIG aliphatic isocyanates in autobody repair shops. It was found that an optimized pH gradient enhanced noticeably the resolution and, therefore, identification of aliphatic isocyanates. Samples proved to be very stable for at least a year when stored at -13 degrees C in the freezer, and no major stability problems were found for the MAP reagent. The detector response factor RSD for selected MAP ureas was 40% in the fluorescence (FLD), 3% in the UV at 254 nm (UV254), and 1% in the UV at 370 nm (UV370). The mean FLD/UV254 and UV254/UV370 detector response ratios of standards were 31.7 (RSD = 37.8) and 17.1 (RSD = 5.4), respectively. The FLD/UV254 ratio in bulks varied from 0.41 to 1.97 times the HDI monomer ratio. The mean UV254/UV370 ratio in bulks was 16.1 (range 14.1 to 19.2, N = 38). Mean (range) recovery of 92 (91.2-93.2)% was found for the N3300 (isocyanurate) spiked on 25 mm quartz fiber filters in the range 0.07 to 2.2 microg NCO ml(-1). Mean (range) recovery for impingers was 100.7 (91.7-106.0)% for N3300 in the concentration range of 0.018 to 2.5 microg NCO ml(-1) and 81.0 (76.1-89.1)% for IPDI in the concentration range of 0.016 to 1.87 microg NCO ml(-1). Analytical method precision was 3.4% and mean bias 7.4% (range = 0-25%). The NIOSH draft method 5525 provides flexibility, enhanced sensitivity and specificity, powerful resolution, and very small compound-to-compound variability in the UV254, resulting in a more reliable identification and quantification of aliphatic isocyanates.

  18. Reactivation of immobilized acetylcholinesterase-tabun complex by pralidoxime, its isomers, and homologs.

    PubMed

    Hoskovcová, Monika; Halámek, Emil; Kobliha, Zbynek; Tusarová, Ivana

    2010-06-01

    Reactivation efficacy of three homologous and three isomeric series of pralidoxime-type reactivators with aldoxime group in position 2, 3 and 4 of the heterocycle was tested in reactivation of tabun-inhibited AChE. The experiments were performed with immobilized and stabilized porcine brain AChE. The enzyme activity was measured by Ellman method. Reactivation efficacy was determined by measurement of indicator fabric coloration intensity as a measure of AChE activity. Of the studied group of nine reactivators, isomers with the functional group in position 2 were the most effective. The highest value (30 %) for reactivation of inhibited AChE was found for 2PAE after treatment for 15 min at concentration 0.5 mg/cm(3). The efficacy of the isomers decreased in the order ortho > para > meta. No marked effect on the efficacy of the reactivators was observed on prolongation of the reactivation time. The reactivators efficacy decreased with decreasing concentration of their solutions.

  19. Determination of Reactive Surface Area of Melt Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier,W.L.; Roberts, S.; Smith, D.K.; Hulsey, S.; Newton,L.; Sawvel, A.; Bruton, C.; Papelis, C.; Um, W.; Russell, C. E.; Chapman,J.

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of natural and manmade silicate glasses, and nuclear melt glass was undertaken in order to derive an estimate of glass reactive surface area. Reactive surface area is needed to model release rates of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass in the subsurface. Because of the limited availability of nuclear melt glasses, natural volcanic glass samples were collected which had similar textures and compositions as those of melt glass. A flow-through reactor was used to measure the reactive surface area of the analog glasses in the presence of simplified NTS site ground waters. A measure of the physical surface area of these glasses was obtained using the BET gas-adsorption method. The studies on analog glasses were supplemented by measurement of the surface areas of pieces of actual melt glass using the BET method. The variability of the results reflect the sample preparation and measurement techniques used, as well as textural heterogeneity inherent to these samples. Based on measurements of analog and actual samples, it is recommended that the hydraulic source term calculations employ a range of 0.001 to 0.01 m{sup 2}/g for the reactive surface area of nuclear melt glass.

  20. Systolic Blood Pressure Reactivity During Submaximal Exercise and Acute Psychological Stress in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Joan; Roemmich, James N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies in youth show an association between systolic blood pressure (SBP) reactivity to acute psychological stress and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT). Submaximal exercise produces similar cardiovascular responses as acute psychological stress and may be a valuable tool to assess SBP reactivity in youth. However, it has not yet been determined whether SBP reactivity during submaximal exercise in youth is associated with CIMT, as it is during psychological stress. METHODS Fifty-four adolescents aged 13–16 years completed 3 visits. On one visit, adolescents completed three, 4-minute stages of increasing intensity on a treadmill. On another visit, adolescents completed measures of acute psychological stress reactivity (star tracing, speech preparation, speech). On a third visit, adolescents completed an ultrasound scan to measure CIMT. RESULTS SBP reactivity during lower- (β = 0.29, P = 0.03) and higher-intensity (β = 0.31, P = 0.02) submaximal exercise was associated with greater CIMT. SBP reactivity during higher-intensity submaximal exercise was positively associated with SBP reactivity during star tracing (β = 0.34, P = 0.01), speech preparation (β = 0.37, P = 0.007), and speech (β = 0.41, P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS Greater SBP reactivity during submaximal exercise in healthy adolescents was associated with greater CIMT, similar to SBP reactivity during acute psychological stress. Adolescents who had greater SBP reactivity during exercise also demonstrated greater SBP reactivity during the psychological stress tasks. Given that exercise testing can be standardized for comparison across studies, submaximal exercise tests may be a valuable tool to assess SBP reactivity in youth. PMID:23382492