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Sample records for powder metallurgy techniques

  1. Densification of powder metallurgy billets by a roll consolidation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellman, W. H.; Weinberger, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Container design is used to convert partially densified powder metallurgy compacts into fully densified slabs in one processing step. Technique improves product yield, lowers costs and yields great flexibility in process scale-up. Technique is applicable to all types of fabricable metallic materials that are produced from powder metallurgy process.

  2. Porous titanium scaffolds fabricated using a rapid prototyping and powder metallurgy technique.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Garrett E; Pandit, Abhay S; Apatsidis, Dimitrios P

    2008-09-01

    One of the main issues in orthopaedic implant design is the fabrication of scaffolds that closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the surrounding bone. This research reports on a multi-stage rapid prototyping technique that was successfully developed to produce porous titanium scaffolds with fully interconnected pore networks and reproducible porosity and pore size. The scaffolds' porous characteristics were governed by a sacrificial wax template, fabricated using a commercial 3D-printer. Powder metallurgy processes were employed to generate the titanium scaffolds by filling around the wax template with titanium slurry. In the attempt to optimise the powder metallurgy technique, variations in slurry concentration, compaction pressure and sintering temperature were investigated. By altering the wax design template, pore sizes ranging from 200 to 400 microm were achieved. Scaffolds with porosities of 66.8 +/- 3.6% revealed compression strengths of 104.4+/-22.5 MPa in the axial direction and 23.5 +/- 9.6 MPa in the transverse direction demonstrating their anisotropic nature. Scaffold topography was characterised using scanning electron microscopy and microcomputed tomography. Three-dimensional reconstruction enabled the main architectural parameters such as pore size, interconnecting porosity, level of anisotropy and level of structural disorder to be determined. The titanium scaffolds were compared to their intended designs, as governed by their sacrificial wax templates. Although discrepancies in architectural parameters existed between the intended and the actual scaffolds, overall the results indicate that the porous titanium scaffolds have the properties to be potentially employed in orthopaedic applications.

  3. Characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by powder metallurgy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Kumar, M.; Chandrasekar, P.; Chandramohan, P.; Mohanraj, M.

    2012-11-15

    In this work, a detailed characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by three powder metallurgy techniques, namely, hot isostatic pressing, spark plasma sintering and vacuum sintering, was conducted. Two composites with different volume percents of titanium boride reinforcement were used for the investigation. One was titanium with 20% titanium boride, and the other was titanium with 40% titanium boride (by volume). Characterisation was performed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro analysis - energy dispersive spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The characterisation results confirm the completion of the titanium boride reaction. The results reveal the presence of titanium boride reinforcement in different morphologies such as needle-shaped whiskers, short agglomerated whiskers and fine plates. The paper also discusses how mechanical properties such as microhardness, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio are influenced by the processing techniques as well as the volume fraction of the titanium boride reinforcement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-TiB composites were processed by HIP, SPS and vacuum sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The completion of Ti-TiB{sub 2} reaction was confirmed by XRD, SEM and EPMA studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardness and elastic properties of Ti-TiB composites were discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing techniques were compared with respect to their microstructure.

  4. Application of powder metallurgy techniques to produce improved bearing elements for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moracz, D. J.; Shipley, R. J.; Moxson, V. S.; Killman, R. J.; Munson, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to apply powder metallurgy techniques for the production of improved bearing elements, specifically balls and races, for advanced cryogenic turbopump bearings. The materials and fabrication techniques evaluated were judged on the basis of their ability to improve fatigue life, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant bearings over the currently used 440C. An extensive list of candidate bearing alloys in five different categories was considered: tool/die steels, through hardened stainless steels, cobalt-base alloys, and gear steels. Testing of alloys for final consideration included hardness, rolling contact fatigue, cross cylinder wear, elevated temperature wear, room and cryogenic fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking, and five-ball (rolling-sliding element) testing. Results of the program indicated two alloys that showed promise for improved bearing elements. These alloys were MRC-2001 and X-405. 57mm bearings were fabricated from the MRC-2001 alloy for further actual hardware rig testing by NASA-MSFC.

  5. Powder-Metallurgy Process And Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid-solidification processing yields alloys with improved properties. Study undertaken to extend favorable property combinations of I/M 2XXX alloys through recently developed technique of rapid-solidification processing using powder metallurgy(P/M). Rapid-solidification processing involves impingement of molten metal stream onto rapidly-spinning chill block or through gas medium using gas atomization technique.

  6. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  7. Novel powder metallurgy technique for development of Fe-P-based soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jiten; Chandra, K.; Misra, P. S.; Sarma, B.

    Novel powder metallurgy technique (hot forging technique) is used for the development of high-density Fe-P-based soft magnetic alloys such as Fe-P binary, Fe-P-Cr ternary and Fe-P-Cr-Si quaternary alloys. In this process, mild steel encapsulated powders were hot forged into slabs, hot rolled and annealed to relieve the residual stresses. These alloys were subjected to in-house characterization, e.g. density and theoretically calculated porosity content at various stages. Microstructural study has been carried out to compare observed porosity with the theoretically calculated porosity. X-ray diffraction studies of these alloys revealed presence of only ferrite as product phase. Various soft magnetic properties such as resistivity, coercivity, maximum flux density (at 350 G magnetic field), retentivity and total magnetic losses were also evaluated and reported. These alloys were made by hot forging using two different kinds of dies, e.g. flat die and channel die. It was observed that the flat-die forged alloys had more porosity than the channel-die forged alloys. Addition of alloying elements such as P, Cr and Si increased the resistivity of Fe. The higher the alloying addition, the higher is the alloy's resistivity. Fe-0.7P-0.7Cr-1Si alloy showed a resistivity as high as 44.1 μΩ cm. Coercivity values of the alloys ranged from 1.0 to 2.2 Oe. Addition of Si and P helped in reducing the coercivity values of the alloys. The higher the Si, P content, the lower were the coercivity values observed. Combined addition of P and Si helped in reducing the coercivity values significantly, for example Fe-0.7P-0.7Cr-1Si alloy showed coercivity value approximately 1.0 Oe. It was observed in this investigation that maximum flux densities of the alloys were linearly related with their porosity levels. Total magnetic losses of these alloys varied from 6.0 to 7.8 W/kg. The total magnetic loss of Fe-0.7P-0.7Cr-1Si alloy was the lowest (6.0 W/kg) owing to its highest resistivity

  8. Porous Materials by Powder Metallurgy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-30

    generally determine porosity and pore size of the resulting porous material. The beads can be microballoons, which are hollow inside, or they can be...proved jYi- --*;V--, - one QUALITY INSPECTED 0 Applicant: Everett Patent Application Serial Number: Navy Case Number: 78,529 5 Porous Materials...By Powder Metallurgy Background of Invention Field of Invention: This invention pertains to porous material fabrication by controlling pore size

  9. Effects of copper content on the shell characteristics of hollow steel spheres manufactured using an advanced powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazegaran, Hamid; Kiani-Rashid, Ali-Reza; Khaki, Jalil Vahdati

    2016-04-01

    Metallic hollow spheres are used as base materials in the manufacture of hollow sphere structures and metallic foams. In this study, steel hollow spheres were successfully manufactured using an advanced powder metallurgy technique. The spheres' shells were characterized by optical microscopy in conjunction with microstructural image analysis software, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microscopic evaluations revealed that the shells consist of sintered iron powder, sintered copper powder, sodium silicate, and porosity regions. In addition, the effects of copper content on various parameters such as shell defects, microcracks, thickness, and porosities were investigated. The results indicated that increasing the copper content results in decreases in the surface fraction of shell porosities and the number of microcracks and an increase in shell thickness.

  10. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  11. IMPROVED PRODUCTION OF POWDER METALLURGY ITEMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    POWDER METALLURGY, *POWDER ALLOYS , MATERIAL FORMING, PRODUCTION, NICKEL ALLOYS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS , COBALT ALLOYS , SINTERING, FORGING, PARTICLE SIZE...HIGH TEMPERATURE, SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, HOT WORKING, HEAT TREATMENT, MICROSTRUCTURE, HARDNESS, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , TITANIUM ALLOYS , ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS , CARBON ALLOYS .

  12. Application of powder metallurgy technique to produce improved bearing elements for cryogenic aerospace engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxson, V. S.; Moracz, D. J.; Bhat, B. N.; Dolan, F. J.; Thom, R.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, vacuum melted 440C stainless steel is used for high performance bearings for aerospace cryogenic systems where corrosion due to condensation is a major concern. For the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), however, 440C performance in the high-pressure turbopumps has been marginal. A basic assumption of this study was that powder metallurgy, rather than cast/wrought, processing would provide the finest, most homogeneous bearing alloy structure. Preliminary testing of P/M alloys (hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness) was used to 'de-select' alloys which did perform as well as baseline 440C. Five out of eleven candidate materials (14-4/6V, X-405, MRC-2001, T-440V, and D-5) based on preliminary screening were selected for the actual rolling-sliding five-ball testing. The results of this test were compared with high-performance vacuum-melted M50 bearing steel. The results of the testing indicated outstanding performance of two P/M alloys, X-405 and MRC-2001, which eventually will be further evaluated by full-scale bearing testing.

  13. Developments in Titanium Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froes, F. H.; Eylon, D.; Eichelman, G. E.; Burte, H. M.

    1980-02-01

    The high buy-to-fly ratio associated with many titanium components, combined with forging and machining difficulties, and recent availability problems, has led to a strong drive for near-net titanium shape fabrication. A very promising method of attaining this goal is powder metallurgy. Two major approaches are considered in this article: the "elemental" and "pre-alloyed" powder methods. Shape-making capability and mechanical properties of both technologies are presented. Consideration is given to the cost-effectiveness of the processes and mechanical performance compared to conventional fabrication methods. Design philosophies, modified to include the presence of foreign particles in the compacted article, are discussed. Emerging advances in the technology are presented and future developments forecast.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  2. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  3. Enhanced tensile, hardness and wear behaviors of pure aluminum matrix reinforced with steel chips via powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Emara, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    The mechanical properties and wear behavior of aluminum matrix reinforced with steel machining chips was investigated. Pure aluminum was reinforced with 5, 7.5, and 10 wt% steel chips with an average size of 100 μm using powder metallurgy technique. Aluminum reinforced with 5 and 10 Wt.% SiC particles were manufactured for comparison. The investigation showed clear evidence that the addition of steel machining chips resulted in significantly low porosity levels in the aluminum matrix composites compared with the use of SiC as reinforcement. The mechanical properties (tensile and hardness) as well as the wear resistance were also observed to improve with the use of the steel machining chips as reinforcement. The results demonstrate the capability of steel machining chips to act as efficient reinforcing material and a reliable cost effective candidate in the development of aluminum matrix composites.

  4. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  5. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  6. Investigation of thin layers deposited by two PVD techniques on high speed steel produced by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubéczyová, D.; Hvizdoš, P.; Selecká, M.

    2012-04-01

    This study was intended to investigate the properties and cutting performance with thin layers applied by two PVD techniques. PVD techniques ARC and LARC were used for the deposition of thin coatings onto cutting tools prepared by powder metallurgy. Advanced types of layers - monolayer AlTiCrN and nanocomposite type of nc-AlTiN/Si3N4 layer - were analyzed by standard techniques for surface status and quality assessment - roughness, hardness, layer thickness, chemical composition by GDOES, tribological properties at room and elevated temperature. Durability testing of the cutting tools was carried out according to the standard ISO 3685-1999. The nanocomposite nc-AlTiN/Si3N4 layer achieved lower roughness when compared to monolayer AlTiCrN which leads to the achievement of higher hardness and better layer quality. The HV0.5 hardness values were ∼26 GPa. The results showed a 2-3-times longer durability of the cutting tools in comparison with equivalent uncoated PM and traditional materials. The deposited coatings contributed to the improvement of their durability.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of powder metallurgy tantalum components prepared by high compaction pressure technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngmoo; Lee, Dongju; Hwang, Jaewon; Ryu, Ho Jin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-04-15

    The present study has investigated the consolidation behaviors of tantalum powders during compaction and sintering, and the characteristics of sintered components. For die compaction, the densification behaviors of the powders are simulated by finite element analyses based on the yield function proposed by Shima and Oyane. Accordingly, the green density distribution for coarser particles is predicted to be more uniform because they exhibits higher initial relative tap density owing to lower interparticle friction. It is also found that cold isostatic pressing is capable of producing higher dense compacts compared to the die pressing. However, unlike the compaction behavior, the sintered density of smaller particles is found to be higher than those of coarser ones owing to their higher specific surface area. The maximum sintered density was found to be 0.96 of theoretical density where smaller particles were pressed isostatically at 400 MPa followed by sintering at 2000 °C. Moreover, the effects of processing conditions on grain size and texture were also investigated. The average grain size of the sintered specimen is 30.29 μm and its texture is less than 2 times random intensity. Consequently, it is concluded that the higher pressure compaction technique is beneficial to produce high dense and texture-free tantalum components compared to hot pressing and spark plasma sintering. - Highlights: • Higher Ta density is obtained from higher pressure and sintering temperature. • High compaction method enables P/M Ta to achieve the density of 16.00 g·cm{sup −3}. • A P/M Ta component with fine microstructure and random orientation is developed.

  8. Review of European Powder Metallurgy of Superalloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    applications will be treated separately. 5. Nickel based Disc Materials A wide variety of routes has been followed in consolidating powder superalloys for...7 AD-AG6 682 UNIVERSITY COLL OF SWANSEA (WALES) DEPT OF METALLURGY-ETC F/S 11/A REVIEW OF EUROPEAN POWDER METALLURGY OF SUPERALLOYS (U)U NL DEC 79...EBuropean Powder Nstallurgy of Superalloys , ’I I cx~by fT (~IR7Evan B.Sc., 1%.D. fo QWG4079?9 00 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE A&h FORCE tFFICE OF

  9. Fabrication of multi-walled carbon nanotubes-aluminum matrix composite by powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, N. A.; Kozlov, D. V.; Golovanov, V. N.; Klimov, E. S.; Grebchuk, E. E.; Efimov, M. S.; Kostishko, B. B.

    We report on fabrication of an aluminum matrix composite containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced by MOCVD method and functionalized via acid treatment by a H2SO4/HNO3 mixture. Specimens were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) of the aluminum powder with different amounts of functionalized MWCNTs (FMWCNTs) in the range of 0.1-1 wt.%. We studied the effect of FMWCNTs amount on microstructure and mechanical properties of composites. It is shown that functionalization allows homogeneous dispersing of the MWCNTs in Al powder. The maximal increase in micro-hardness and tensile strength is registered at 0.1 wt.%.

  10. Preparation of Cu and Fly Ash Composite by Powder Metallurgy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, P. Y.; Lim, P. S.; Ng, M. C.; Zahi, S.; You, A. H.

    2011-03-30

    Cu and Fly Ash (FA) mixtures with different weight percentages were prepared. Pellets of the mixture powder were produced with the dimension of 17.7 mm in diameter and 10-15 mm in height. These different composites were compacted at a constant pressure of 280 MPa. One of the selected weight percentages was then compacted to form into pellet and sintered at different temperatures which were at 900, 950 and 1000 deg. C respectively for 2 hours. Density of green pellet was measured before sintered in furnace. After sintering, all the pellets with different temperatures were re-weighed and sintered density were calculated. The densification of the green and sintered pellets was required to be measured as one of the parameter in selection of the best material properties. Porosity of the pellet shall not be ignored in order to analyze the close-packed particles stacking in the pellet. SEM micrograph had been captured to observe the presence of pores and agglomeration of particles in the sample produced.

  11. Powder metallurgy of vanadium and its alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Radomysel'skii, I.D.; Solntsev, V.P.; Evtushenko, O.V.

    1987-10-01

    This article reviews the current powder metallurgy technology of vanadium and its alloys. Data are given on sintering, compacting, electrowinning and other current production techniques, as well as on the corrosion behavior and mechanical and physical properties of alloys produced by these different methods. The use of vanadium alloys as reactor and jet engine materials is also briefly discussed.

  12. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Kiggans Jr., James O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Parten, Randy J.

    2015-07-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and, at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  13. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-10-21

    A strengthened, biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed, compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: Ni, Ag, Ag--Cu, Ag--Pd, Ni--Cu, Ni--V, Ni--Mo, Ni--Al, Ni--Cr--Al, Ni--W--Al, Ni--V--Al, Ni--Mo--Al, Ni--Cu--Al; and at least one fine metal oxide powder; the article having a grain size which is fine and homogeneous; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  15. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  16. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  17. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  18. Properties of porous magnesium prepared by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2013-01-01

    Porous magnesium-based materials are biodegradable and promising for use in orthopaedic applications, but their applications are hampered by their difficult fabrication. This work reports the preparation of porous magnesium materials by a powder metallurgy technique using ammonium bicarbonate as spacer particles. The porosity of the materials depended on the amount of ammonium bicarbonate and was found to have strong negative effects on flexural strength and corrosion behaviour. However, the flexural strength of materials with porosities of up to 28 vol.% was higher than the flexural strength of non-metallic biomaterials and comparable with that of natural bone.

  19. A major advance in powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Stiglich, Jacob J., Jr.; Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultramet has developed a process which promises to significantly increase the mechanical properties of powder metallurgy (PM) parts. Current PM technology uses mixed powders of various constituents prior to compaction. The homogeneity and flaw distribution in PM parts depends on the uniformity of mixing and the maintenance of uniformity during compaction. Conventional PM fabrication processes typically result in non-uniform distribution of the matrix, flaw generation due to particle-particle contact when one of the constituents is a brittle material, and grain growth caused by high temperature, long duration compaction processes. Additionally, a significant amount of matrix material is usually necessary to fill voids and create 100 percent dense parts. In Ultramet's process, each individual particle is coated with the matrix material, and compaction is performed by solid state processing. In this program, Ultramet coated 12-micron tungsten particles with approximately 5 wt percent nickel/iron. After compaction, flexure strengths were measured 50 percent higher than those achieved in conventional liquid phase sintered parts (10 wt percent Ni/Fe). Further results and other material combinations are discussed.

  20. Electrothermal Defect Detection in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2006-03-01

    Faced with increasing market pressures, metal part manufacturers have turned to new processes and fabrication technologies. One of these processes is powder metallurgy (P/M), which is employed for low-cost, high-volume precision part manufacturing. Despite many advantages, the P/M process has created a number of challenges, including the need for high-speed quality assessment and control, ideally for each compact. Consequently, sophisticated quality assurance is needed to rapidly detect flaws early in the manufacturing cycle and at minimal cost. In this paper we will discuss our progress made in designing and refining an active infrared (IR) detection system for P/M compacts. After discussing the theoretical background in terms of underlying equations and boundary conditions, analytical and numerical solutions are presented that are capable of predicting temperature responses for various defect sizes and orientations of a dynamic IR testing system. Preliminary measurements with controlled and industrial samples have shown that this active IR methodology can successfully be employed to test both green-state and sintered P/M compacts. The developed system can overcome many limitations observed with a standard IR testing methodology such as emissivity, background calibration, and contact resistance.

  1. Powder metallurgy process for manufacturing core projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Taufik; Setyowati, Vuri Ayu; Widyastuti

    2013-09-01

    Bullets are part of the defense equipment which the development is very rapid. There are a variety of forms but the bullet Lead is a metal that has always been used for applications projectiles. Lead core constituent materials are combined with antimony. In this research will be conducted by making the material for the core projectile with Tin Lead. The addition of Tin will increase the stiffness of Lead which is soft in nature. The Lead Tin composition variation was given in 10% weight of Sn. The manufacturing process using powder metallurgy using temperature and holding time variations of sintering at 100, 150, and 200°C for 1,2, and 3 hours. XRD samples will be tested to determine the form and phase morphology was observed using SEM-EDX. These results revealed that Pb-10%wtSn Composite which is sintered in temperature 200°C for 3 hours has the greatest density, 10.695 g/cm3 as well as the smallest porosity, 2.2%. In agreement with theoretical analysis that increasing higher temperature and longer holding time give decrease in porosity level due to activation energy which further promotes grain growth. Moreover, there is no intermetallic phase formation as well as no oxide found on composites.

  2. Powder metallurgy in aerospace research: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    The various techniques by which powders can be produced, as pure metals or as alloys, are discussed; the methods by which these powders can be formed into the final parts are explained as well as further processing that may be necessary to meet specific requirements. The NASA developments are detailed, and references are provided for those who wish to obtain further information characteristic of any methodology.

  3. Study of mechanical and tribological behaviour of Al/SiC/ZrO2 hybrid composites fabricated through powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Sajjad; Tanwir Alam, Md; Ansari, Akhter H.; Arif Siddiqui, M.; Mohsin, Mohammad

    2017-07-01

    In this experimental investigation, the mechanical and tribological behaviour of aluminium (Al)-based silicon carbide (SiC, microparticles) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2, nanoparticles) particle-reinforced hybrid composites were investigated. The contents of ZrO2 (0, 3%, 6% and 9%, weight fraction) were added to Al-5%SiC composites by powder metallurgy (PM) technique. An x-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) and elemental mapping were used for characterization of composites. Elemental mapping of the composites showed uniform distribution of SiC and ZrO2 in the matrix. The wear test was conducted using a pin-on-disc apparatus with various input parameters like sliding distance (300, 500, 700 and 900 m), sliding speed (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 m s-1) and applied load (20, 30 and 40 N). The hardness and wear resistance of the Al  +  SiC  +  ZrO2 hybrid composites were found to be increased by increasing ZrO2 content. The worn surface of hybrid composites and pure aluminium were analyzed through SEM to understand the wear mechanism.

  4. The Fatigue of Powder Metallurgy Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-08

    characteristics of an ingot metallurgy product, 7075 -T76. In all alloys high closure levels are observed atR=0.05 in the near threshold region, an...of two aluminum P/M alloys, X7090 and X7091. For comparison purposes, the ingot metallurgy (I/M) alloy 7075 -76 has also been tested. The results of...described in this report were obtained in extruded form from L Alcoa via Lockheed-California Company. These alloys are: P/M X7090-T6 P/M X7091-T7E69 I/M 7075

  5. Powder metallurgy: Solid and liquid phase sintering of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Rex; Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Basic powder metallurgy (P/M) principles and techniques are presented in this laboratory experiment. A copper based system is used since it is relatively easy to work with and is commercially important. In addition to standard solid state sintering, small quantities of low melting metals such as tin, zinc, lead, and aluminum can be added to demonstrate liquid phase sintering and alloy formation. The Taguchi Method of experimental design was used to study the effect of particle size, pressing force, sintering temperature, and sintering time. These parameters can be easily changed to incorporate liquid phase sintering effects and some guidelines for such substitutions are presented. The experiment is typically carried out over a period of three weeks.

  6. One step HIP canning of powder metallurgy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) powder metallurgy composites. The binders are totally removed while the HIP can of compatible refractory metal is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  7. [Hygienic evaluation of risk factors on powder metallurgy production].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Complex hygienic, clinical, sociologic and epidemiologic studies revealed reliable relationship between work conditions and arterial hypertension, locomotory system disorders, monocytosis in powder metallurgy production workers. Findings are more probable cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, digestive tract diseases due to influence of lifestyle factors.

  8. Crack Growth Modeling in an Advanced Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Conditions Showing Changes in Curvature After Initiation of Testing. 11. Photograph of Overall Test Set-up with MTS 5 KIP Closed- 20 Loop Equipment and...Test Matrix Used in This Program. 97 X " -A LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Composition of AFI15 Powder (A1339). 2 2. Particle Size Distribution of AF115...of the gamma matrix. The initial development of AF115 involved powder metallurgy HIP + forge processing. Subsequent studies included evaluation of As

  9. Powder-metallurgy superalloy strengthened by a secondary gamma phase.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotval, P. S.

    1971-01-01

    Description of experiments in which prealloyed powders of superalloy compositions were consolidated by extrusion after the strengthening by precipitation of a body-centered tetragonal gamma secondary Ni3 Ta phase. Thin foil electron microscopy showed that the mechanical properties of the resultant powder-metallurgy product were correlated with its microstructure. The product exhibited high strength at 1200 F without loss of ductility, after thermomechanical treatment and aging.

  10. Near-Net Shape Powder Metallurgy Rhenium Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhardt, Todd; Hamister, Mark; Carlen, Jan C.; Biaglow, James; Reed, Brian

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to produce a near-net shape (NNS) powder metallurgy (PM) rhenium combustion chamber of the size 445 N (100 lbf) used in a high performance liquid apogee engine. These engines are used in low earth Orbit and geostationary orbit for satellite positioning systems. The developments in near-net shape powder metallurgy rhenium combustion chambers reported in this paper will reduce manufacturing cost of the rhenium chambers by 25 percent, and reduce the manufacturing time by 30 to 40 percent. The quantity of rhenium metal powder used to produce a rhenium chamber is reduced by approximately 70 percent and the subsequent reduction in machining schedule and costs is nearly 50 percent.

  11. An application of powder metallurgy to dentistry.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Ueno, S; Kudoh, Y

    1995-11-01

    Generally, the dental casting method is used to fabricate dental prostheses made with metal. The method of fabricating dental prostheses from sintered titanium alloy has certain advantages: the elimination of casting defects, a sintering temperature that is lower than the melting point, and a shorter processing time. By examining (1) the properties of green, sintered compacts of titanium powder, (2) the effects of adding aluminum powder on the properties of green, sintered compacts of Ti-Al compound, and (3) the effects of adding copper powder on the properties of green, sintered compacts of Ti-Al-Cu compound, the authors developed a sintered titanium alloy on a trial basis. Because the properties satisfied the requirements of dental restorations, a powder metallurgical method of making dental restorations from this sintered titanium alloy was devised. Applications of such sintered titanium alloys for the metal coping of metal-ceramic crowns and denture base plates were discussed.

  12. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A biaxially textured alloy article comprises Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacted and heat treated, then rapidly recrystallized to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  13. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  14. Microstructure and Aging of Powder-Metallurgy Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of thermal responses and aging behaviors of three new aluminum alloys. Alloys produced from rapidly solidified powders and contain 3.20 to 5.15 percent copper, 0.24 to 1.73 percent magnesium, 0.08 to 0.92 percent iron, and smaller amounts of manganese, nickel, titanium, silicon, and zinc. Peak hardness achieved at lower aging temperatures than with standard ingot-metallurgy alloys. Alloys of interest for automobile, aircraft, and aerospace applications.

  15. Modulus Dependence on Large Scale Porosity of Powder Metallurgy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, P. G.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Brown, H. R.

    2012-07-01

    This article compares the existing theoretical expressions for the porosity dependence on elastic constants to experimental data for a commercially available material, FC-0205 powder metallurgy (PM) steel. The modulus of compression, tension, effective torsion, and ultrasound-based data at varying porosity levels are plotted graphically against the theoretical expressions. An equation by McAdam ( J. Iron Steel Inst. Lond., 1950, 168, p 346) was able to most accurately predict the experimental data with the adjustment of only one material constant.

  16. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  17. IMPROVED PRODUCTION OF POWDER METALLURGY ITEMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report describes and discusses the results of exn tests made on TZM, Inco 713C , Udimet 700, and PH15-7Mo superalloys, and contains an assessment...Udimet 700 and Inco 713C , prob ably because of unsoundness in the cast extrusion billets. The pilot-plant atomized powders are fine, have irregular

  18. Effect of Ca content percentage and sintering temperature on corrosion rate in Mg-Ca composite fabricated using powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaza Nabilla, M. S.; Zuraidawani, C. D.; Nazree, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is a good element with high potential to be used in various field of work. It has the benefit of lightweight and low density its application is limited for Mg is relatively low in term of strength. Hence, calcium (Ca) is chosen to be mixed with Mg as additional element for it is lightweight and non-toxic. In this research, Mg is prepared with different weight percentage (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 wt. %) of Cavia powder metallurgy (PM) method. The samples were sintered at 500 and 550°Cin argon atmosphere and electrochemically using SBF solution as the electrolyte medium. The effect of Ca content on corrosion rateis investigated by focusing on the microstructure and properties of sintered sample. Increase of Ca content causes reduction in grain structure due to increase Mg2Ca phase at grain boundaries. Subsequently, reduce corrosion resistance. Hence, the amount of Ca content and sintering temperature of Mg-Ca composite is controlled to acquire optimum corrosion rate.

  19. Scaleup of powder metallurgy processed Nb-Al multifilamentary wire

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, C.; Foner, S.; Otubo, J.; Pourrahimi, S.; Schwartz, B.; Zhang, H.

    1983-05-01

    Power metallurgy processed Nb-Al superconducting wires were fabricated from billets up to 45 mm o.d. with nominal areal reduction ratios, R, up to 2 X 10/sup 5/, Nb powder sizes from 40 to 300 ..mu..m from various sources, Al powder sizes from 9 to 75 ..mu..m, Al concentrations from 3 to 25 wt % Al and with a wide range of heat treatments. All the compacts used tap density powder in a Cu tube and swaging and/or rod rolling and subsequent wire drawing. Both single strand and bundled wires were made. Overall critical current densities, J /SUB c/, of 2 X 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 14 T and 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 16 T were achieved for 6 to 8 wt % Al in Nb.

  20. Application of superalloy powder metallurgy for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In the last decade, Government/Industry programs have advanced powder metallurgy-near-net-shape technology to permit the use of hot isostatic pressed (HIP) turbine disks in the commercial aircraft fleet. These disks offer a 30% savings of input weight and an 8% savings in cost compared in cast-and-wrought disks. Similar savings were demonstrated for other rotating engine components. A compressor rotor fabricated from hot-die-forged-HIP superalloy billets revealed input weight savings of 54% and cost savings of 35% compared to cast-and-wrought parts. Engine components can be produced from compositions such as Rene 95 and Astroloy by conventional casting and forging, by forging of HIP powder billets, or by direct consolidation of powder by HIP. However, each process produces differences in microstructure or introduces different defects in the parts. As a result, their mechanical properties are not necessarily identical. Acceptance methods should be developed which recognize and account for the differences.

  1. Device for preparing combinatorial libraries in powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shoufeng; Evans, Julian R G

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a powder-metering, -mixing, and -dispensing mechanism that can be used as a method for producing large numbers of samples for metallurgical evaluation or electrical or mechanical testing from multicomponent metal and cermet powder systems. It is designed to make use of the same commercial powders that are used in powder metallurgy and, therefore, to produce samples that are faithful to the microstructure of finished products. The particle assemblies produced by the device could be consolidated by die pressing, isostatic pressing, laser sintering, or direct melting. The powder metering valve provides both on/off and flow rate control of dry powders in open capillaries using acoustic vibration. The valve is simple and involves no relative movement, avoiding seizure with fine powders. An orchestra of such valves can be arranged on a building platform to prepare multicomponent combinatorial libraries. As with many combinatorial devices, identification and evaluation of sources of mixing error as a function of sample size is mandatory. Such an analysis is presented.

  2. Mechanical properties of metals for biomedical applications using powder metallurgy process: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewidar, Montasser Marasy; Yoon, Ho-Chel; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2006-06-01

    The uses of biomaterials have been revolutionizing the biomedical field in deployment as implants for humans. During the past five decades, many implant materials made of metals have been put into practical use. Powder metallurgy techniques have been used to produce controlled porous structures, such as porous coatings applied for dental and orthopedic surgical implants, which allow bony tissue ingrowth within the implant surface, thereby improving fixation. This paper examines various important metals using powder metallurgy technology to produce elements of a total hip replacement. These alloys are 316L stainless steel alloy, Co-Cr-Mo alloy, and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Also, this paper examines current information on the mechanical properties. Mechanical properties are discussed as a function of type of materials and process of fabrication. This article addresses the engineering aspects concerning the advantages and disadvantages of each type of material.

  3. Corrosion inhibition of powder metallurgy Mg by fluoride treatments.

    PubMed

    Pereda, M D; Alonso, C; Burgos-Asperilla, L; del Valle, J A; Ruano, O A; Perez, P; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, M A

    2010-05-01

    Pure Mg has been proposed as a potential degradable biomaterial to avoid both the disadvantages of non-degradable internal fixation implants and the use of alloying elements that may be toxic. However, it shows excessively high corrosion rate and insufficient yield strength. The effects of reinforcing Mg by a powder metallurgy (PM) route and the application of biocompatible corrosion inhibitors (immersion in 0.1 and 1M KF solution treatments, 0.1M FST and 1M FST, respectively) were analyzed in order to improve Mg mechanical and corrosion resistance, respectively. Open circuit potential measurements, polarization techniques (PT), scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to evaluate its corrosion behavior. SECM showed that the local current of attacked areas decreased during the F(-) treatments. The corrosion inhibitory action of 0.1M FST and 1M FST in phosphate buffered solution was assessed by PT and EIS. Under the experimental conditions assayed, 0.1M FST revealed better performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analyses of Mg(PM) with 0.1M FST showed the presence of KMgF(3) crystals on the surface while a MgF(2) film was detected for 1M FST. After fluoride inhibition treatments, promising results were observed for Mg(PM) as degradable metallic biomaterial due to its higher yield strength and lower initial corrosion rate than untreated Mg, as well as a progressive loss of the protective characteristics of the F(-)-containing film which ensures the gradual degradation process.

  4. Ceramic Inclusions in Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially in turbine disk applications. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that are inherent to the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have a potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they typically do not reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where known populations of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the "natural" inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface-connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life; therefore, the quantity of ceramic "seeds" added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will intersect the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface area was needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macroscopic slices from extrusions

  5. Ceramic Inclusions In Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Pete; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially as the material chosen for turbine disks. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that arise from the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they usually don't reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where a known population of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the 'natural' inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life, therefore the volume of ceramic 'seeds' added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will occur on the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface and embedded cross-sectional areas were needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macro

  6. In vitro bioactivity of a biocomposite fabricated from HA and Ti powders by powder metallurgy method.

    PubMed

    Ning, C Q; Zhou, Y

    2002-07-01

    Traditionally, hydroxyapatite was used as a coating material on titanium substrate by various techniques. In the present work, a biocomposite was successfully fabricated from hydroxyapatite and titanium powders by powder metallurgy method. Bioactivity of the composite in a simulated body fluid (SBF) was investigated. Main crystal phases of the as-fabricated composite are found to be Ti2O, CaTiO3, CaO, alpha-Ti and a TiP-like phase. When the composite is immersed in the simulated body fluid for a certain time, a poor-crystallized, calcium-deficient, carbonate-containing apatite film will form on the surface of the composite. The time required to induce apatite nucleation is within 2 h. In addition, the apatite is also incorporated with a little magnesium and chlorine element. It is found that Ti2O has the ability to induce the formation of bone-like apatite in the SBF. And a dissolve of the CaO phase could also provide favorable conditions for the apatite formation, by forming open pores on the surface of the composite and increasing the degree of supersaturation of the SBF with respect to the apatite.

  7. N18, Powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedou, J. Y.; Lautridou, J. C.; Honnorat, Y.

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appro-priate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 °C for long-term applications and approximately 750 °C for short-term use because of micro-structural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without signifi-cant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astroloy and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk ap-plications.

  8. N18, powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guedou, J.Y.; Lautridou, J.C.; Honnorat, Y. . Materials and Processes Dept.)

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appropriate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 C for long-term applications and approximately 750 C for short-term use because of microstructural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without significant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astrology and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk applications.

  9. Phase Stability of a Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Kantzos, P.; Telesman, Jack; Gang, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Advanced powder metallurgy superalloy disks in aerospace turbine engines now entering service can be exposed to temperatures approaching 700 C, higher than those previously encountered. They also have higher levels of refractory elements, which can increase mechanical properties at these temperatures but can also encourage phase instabilities during service. Microstructural changes including precipitation of topological close pack phase precipitation and coarsening of existing gamma' precipitates can be slow at these temperatures, yet potentially significant for anticipated disk service times exceeding 1,000 h. The ability to quantify and predict such potential phase instabilities and degradation of capabilities is needed to insure structural integrity and air worthiness of propulsion systems over the full life cycle. A prototypical advanced disk superalloy was subjected to high temperature exposures, and then evaluated. Microstructural changes and corresponding changes in mechanical properties were quantified. The results will be compared to predictions of microstructure modeling software.

  10. Aluminium alloys with transition metals prepared by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, V.; Prusa, F.; Vojtech, D.

    2017-02-01

    Powder metallurgy represented by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering was used for preparation of the AlFe16 and the AlSi20Fe16 alloys. Microstructure of the both alloys consisted of very fine intermetallic phases homogenously dispersed in the matrix of α-Al solid solution. Fine nature of microstructure led to promising results of compressive stress-strain tests performed at laboratory and elevated temperature of 400 °C. The compressive strengths of the AlSi20Fe16 and the AlFe16 alloys at laboratory temperature were 780 MPa and 508 MPa, respectively. Elevated temperature resulted in drop of the compressive strengths to 480 MPa and 211 MPa, respectively. However, the results of investigated alloys outperformed the thermally stable AlSi12Cu1Mg1Ni1 (wt. %) used as reference material.

  11. Advances in powder metallurgy - 1991. Vol. 5 - P/M materials; Proceedings of the Powder Metallurgy Conference and Exhibition, Chicago, IL, June 9-12, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, L.F. III; Sansoucy, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The present volume powder metallurgy materials discusses the state of the PM industry, a metallurgical evaluation of new steel powders, design criteria for the manufacturing of low-alloy steel powders, and homogenization processing of a PM maraging steel. Attention is given to the corrosion resistance of full density sintered 316 SS, the performance characteristics of a new sinter-hardening low-alloy steel, wear performance of compositions made by low alloy iron/high alloy powder mixtures, and the strengthening of an AISI 1020 steel by aluminum-microalloying during liquid dynamic compaction. Topics addressed include the influence of alloying on the properties of water-atomized copper powders, fundamentals of high pressure gas atomization process control, advanced sensors and process control of gas atomization, and bimetallic tubulars via spray forming. Also discussed are factors affecting the delamination of PM molybdenum during stamping, applications of powder metallurgy molybdenum in the 1990s, and powder processing of high-temperature oxides.

  12. Acoustic harmonic generation measurement applications: Detection of tight cracks in powder metallurgy compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, D. J.; Foley, J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Standard linear ultrasonic testing techniques have long been employed for locating and characterizing relatively open cracks in a wide variety of materials, from metallic alloys and ceramics to composites. In all these materials, the detection of open cracks easily accomplished because the void between the two crack surfaces provides sufficient acoustic impedance mismatch to reflect the incident energy. Closed or partially closed cracks, however, may often go undetected because contacting interfaces allow transmission of ultrasound. In the green (unsintered) state, powder metallurgy compacts typically contain high residual stresses that have the ability to close cracks formed during the compaction process, a result of oxide films, improper powder lubricant, mold design, etc. After sintering, the reduction of residual stresses may no longer be sufficient to close the crack. Although the crack may be more easily detected, it is obvious most desirable to discover defects prior to sintering. It has been shown that the displacements of an interface may be highly nonlinear if a stress wave of sufficient intensity propagates across it, a result of the stress wave either opening or closing the interface. Current efforts involve the application of nonlinear acoustic techniques, in particular acoustic harmonic generation measurements, for the detection and characterization of tightly closed cracks in powder metallurgy parts. A description of the equipment and the measurement technique will be discussed and initial experimental results on sintered and green compacts will be presented.—This work was performed at the Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University under USDOE Contract No. W-7405-ENG-82.

  13. POWDER METALLURGY TiAl ALLOYS: MICROSTRUCTURES AND PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L

    2006-12-11

    The microstructures and properties of powder metallurgy TiAl alloys fabricated by hot extrusion of gas-atomized powder at different elevated temperatures were investigated. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1150 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains and coarse ordered B2 grains. Particles of ordered hexagonal {omega} phase were also observed in some B2 grains. The alloy containing B2 grains displayed a low-temperature superplastic behavior: a tensile elongation of 310% was measured when the alloy was tested at 800 C under a strain rate of 2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1250 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains, coarse {alpha}{sub 2} grains, and lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. An observation of stacking faults associated with fine {gamma} lamellae in {alpha}{sub 2} grains reveals that the stacking fault of {alpha}{sub 2} phase plays an important role in the formation of lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. Unlike the alloy fabricated at 1150{sup o}, the alloy fabricated at 1250{sup o} displayed no low-temperature superplasticity, but a tensile elongation of 260% at 1000 C was measured. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1400 C consisted of fully lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies with the colony size ranging between 50 {micro}m and 100 {micro}m, in which the width of {gamma} lamella is in a range between 100 nm and 350 nm, and the width of {alpha}{sub 2} lamella is in a range between 10 nm and 50 nm. Creep behavior of the ultrafine lamellar alloy and the effects of alloying addition on the creep resistance of the fully lamellar alloy are also investigated.

  14. Innovative technologies for powder metallurgy-based disk superalloys: Progress and proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong-Lin, Jia; Chang-Chun, Ge; Qing-Zhi, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) superalloys are an important class of high temperature structural materials, key to the rotating components of aero engines. In the purview of the present challenges associated with PM superalloys, two novel approaches namely, powder preparation and the innovative spray-forming technique (for making turbine disk) are proposed and studied. Subsequently, advanced technologies like electrode-induction-melting gas atomization (EIGA), and spark-plasma discharge spheroidization (SPDS) are introduced, for ceramic-free superalloy powders. Presently, new processing routes are sought after for preparing finer and cleaner raw powders for disk superalloys. The progress of research in spray-formed PM superalloys is first summarized in detail. The spray-formed superalloy disks specifically exhibit excellent mechanical properties. This paper reviews the recent progress in innovative technologies for PM superalloys, with an emphasis on new ideas and approaches, central to the innovation driving techniques like powder processing and spray forming. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 50974016 and 50071014).

  15. Development of an extra-high strength powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to optimize the composition of NASA IIb-11, an alloy originally developed as a wrought material, for thermal stability and to determine the feasibility for producing the alloy using powder metallurgy techniques. Seven compositions were melted and atomized, hot isostatically pressed, cross rolled to disks and heat treated. Tensile and stress rupture properties from room temperature to 870 C (1600 F) were determined in addition to thermal stability characteristics. Processing variables included hot isostatic pressing parameters and handling, cross rolling procedures and heat treatment cycles. NASA IIb-11E displayed the best combination of overall properties for service as a 760 C (1400 F) disk material. Its composition is 0.06 C, 8.5 Cr, 9.0 Co, 2.0 Mo, 7.1 W, 6.6 Ta, 4.5 Al, 0.75 Ti, 0.5 V, 0.7 Hf, 0.01 B, 0.05 Zr and balance Ni. While the alloy exhibits the highest 760 C (1400 F) rupture strength reported for any powder metallurgy disk alloy to date, additional studies to further evaluate the effects of heat treatment may be required. The alloy is not susceptible to topologically close-packed phase formation during thermal exposure at 870 C (1600 F) for 1,500 hours, but its mechanical property levels are lowered due to grain boundary carbide formation.

  16. Iron's Role in Aluminum: A Powder Metallurgy and Sustainability Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saller, Brandon Dale

    cryomilling. With respect to the powder, a differential scanning calorimetry and activation energy analysis elucidated the formation and phase transformation temperatures of the relevant intermetallic phases, and the microstructural factors that influenced them. With an understanding of the fundamental science behind the intermetallic formation in the Al-Fe system, the composition of helium atomized Al-2at.% Fe was chosen combined with high-pressure torsion processing to yield a bulk alloy that demonstrated an ultimate tensile strength of 488 MPa. This strength was achieved via a combination of two mechanisms: grain refinement (Hall-Petch) and dislocation-Al6Fe interactions (Orowan strengthening), with notable thermal stability present up until 450°C. Finally, the potential for Al-Fe as a sustainable alloy was studied and a link established between current environmental literature and metallurgy literature on the potential for incorporation of Fe into Al to create a structural alloy.

  17. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  18. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  19. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  20. Testing of electroformed deposited iridium/powder metallurgy rhenium rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Dickerson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    High-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials offer the thermal margin for high performance and extended lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets. Rhenium (Re) coated with iridium (Ir) allow hours of operation at 2200 C on Earth-storable propellants. One process for manufacturing Ir/Re rocket chambers is the fabrication of Re substrates by powder metallurgy (PM) and the application of Ir coatings by using electroformed deposition (ED). ED Ir coatings, however, have been found to be porous and poorly adherent. The integrity of ED Ir coatings could be improved by densification after the electroforming process. This report summarizes the testing of two 22-N, ED Ir/PM Re rocket chambers that were subjected to post-deposition treatments in an effort to densify the Ir coating. One chamber was vacuum annealed, while the other chamber was subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP). The chambers were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants, at mixture ratios that simulated the oxidizing environments of Earth-storable propellants. ne annealed ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 24 firings and 4.58 hr at a mixture ratio of 4.2. After only 9 firings, the annealed ED Ir coating began to blister and spall upstream of the throat. The blistering and spalling were similar to what had been experienced with unannealed, as-deposited ED Ir coatings. The HIP ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 91 firings and 11.45 hr at mixture ratios of 3.2 and 4.2. The HIP ED Ir coating remained adherent to the Re substrate throughout testing; there were no visible signs of coating degradation. Metallography revealed, however, thinning of the HIP Ir coating and occasional pores in the Re layer upstream of the throat. Pinholes in the Ir coating may have provided a path for oxidation of the Re substrate at these locations. The HIP ED Ir coating proved to be more effective than vacuum annealed and as-deposited ED Ir. Further densification is still required to

  1. Powder metallurgy approaches to high temperature components for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Research is reported for the tensile strength, ductility, and heat performance characterisitics of powder metallurgy (p/m) superalloys. Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys were also evaluated for their strength during thermal processing. The mechanical attributes evident in both p/m supperalloys and dispersion strengthened alloys are discussed in terms of research into their possible combination.

  2. [Concomitant influence of occupational and social risk factors on health of workers engaged into powder metallurgy].

    PubMed

    Shur, P Z; Zaĭtseva, N V; Kostarev, V G; Lebedeva-Nesevria, N A; Shliapnikov, D M

    2012-01-01

    Results of health risk evaluation in workers engaged into powder metallurgy, using complex of hygienic, medical, epidemiologic and sociologic studies, enable to define priority occupational and social risk factors, to assess degree of their influence on the workers' health and to identify occupationally induced diseases.

  3. Mechanical properties of modified low cobalt powder metallurgy Udimet 700 type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, Fredric H.

    1989-01-01

    Eight superalloys derived from Udimet 700 were prepared by powder metallurgy, hot isostatically pressed, heat treated and their tensile and creep rupture properties determined. Several of these alloys displayed properties superior to those of Udimet 700 similarly prepared, in one case exceeding the creep rupture life tenfold. Filter clogging by extracted gamma prime, its measurement and significance are discussed in an appendix.

  4. Properties of WZ21 (%wt) alloy processed by a powder metallurgy route.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2015-06-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of WZ21 (%wt) alloy prepared by a powder metallurgy route from rapidly solidified powders have been studied. Results were compared to those of the same alloy prepared through a conventional route of casting and extrusion. The microstructure of the extruded ingot consisted of α-Mg grains and Mg3Zn3Y2 (W-phase) and LPSO-phase particles located at grain boundaries. Moreover, stacking faults were also observed within α-Mg grains. The alloy processed by the powder metallurgy route exhibited a more homogeneous and finer microstructure, with a grain size of 2 μm. In this case W-phase and Mg24Y5 phase were identified, but not the LPSO-phase. The microstructural refinement induced by the use of rapidly solidified powders strengthened the alloy at room temperature and promoted superplasticity at higher strain rates. Corrosion behaviour in PBS medium evidenced certain physical barrier effect of the almost continuous arrangements of second phases aligned along the extrusion direction in conventionally processed WZ21 alloy, with a stable tendency around 7 mm/year. On the other hand, powder metallurgy processing promoted significant pitting corrosion, inducing accelerated corrosion rate during prolonged immersion times.

  5. Active Thermography for the Detection of Defects in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2007-03-21

    Active thermography is an established NDE technique that has become the method of choice in many industrial applications which require non-contact access to the parts under test. Unfortunately, when conducting on-line infrared (IR) inspection of powder metallic compacts, complications can arise due the generally low emissivity of metals and the thermally noisy environment typically encountered in manufacturing plants. In this paper we present results of an investigation that explores the suitability of active IR imaging of powder metallurgy compacts for the detection of surface and sub-surface defects in the pre-sinter state and in an on-line manufacturing setting to ensure complete quality assurance. Additional off-line tests can be carried out for statistical quality analyses. In this research, the IR imaging of sub-surface defects is based on a transient instrumentation approach that relies on an electric control system which synchronizes and monitors the thermal response due to an electrically generated heat source. Preliminary testing reveals that this newly developed pulsed thermography system can be employed for the detection of subsurface defects in green-state parts. Practical measurements agree well with theoretical predictions. The inspection approach being developed can be used for the testing of green-state compacts as they exit the compaction press at speeds of up to 1,000 parts per hour.

  6. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-03-04

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  7. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred. PMID:28773285

  8. Fabrication of Powder Metallurgy Pure Ti Material by Using Thermal Decomposition of TiH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimoto, Takanori; Nakanishi, Nozomi; Umeda, Junko; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys have been interested as an engineering material because they are widely used across various industrial applications, for example, motorcycle, automotive and aerospace industries, due to their light weight, high specific strength and superior corrosion resistance. Ti materials are particularly significant for the aircraft using carbon/carbon (C/C) composites, for example, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), because Ti materials are free from the problem of contact corrosion between C/C composites. However, the applications of Ti materials are limited because of their high cost. From a viewpoint of cost reduction, cost effective process to fabricate Ti materials is strongly required. In the present study, the direct consolidation of titanium hydride (TiH2) raw powders in solid-state was employed to fabricate pure Ti bulk materials by using thermal decomposition of TiH2. In general, the production cost of Ti components is expensive due to using commercially pure (CP) Ti powders after dehydrogenation. On the other hand, the novel process using TiH2 powders as starting materials is a promising low cost approach for powder metallurgy (P/M) Ti products. Furthermore, this new process is also attractive from a viewpoint of energy saving because the dehydrogenation is integrated into the sintering process. In this study, TiH2 raw powders were directly consolidated by conventional press technique at 600 MPa to prepare TiH2 powder compacted billets. To thermally decompose TiH2 and obtain sintered pure Ti billets, the TiH2 powder billets were heated in the integrated sintering process including dehydrogenation. The hot-extruded pure Ti material, which was heat treated at 1273 K for 180 min in argon gas atmosphere, showed tensile strength of 701.8 MPa and elongation of 27.1%. These tensile properties satisfied the requirements for JIS Ti Grade 4. The relationship between microstructures, mechanical properties response and heat treatment

  9. Application of superalloy powder metallurgy for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE) program initiated by NASA are presented. Mechanical properties comparisons are made for superalloy parts produced by as-HIP powder consolidation and by forging of HIP consolidated billets. The effect of various defects on the mechanical properties of powder parts are shown.

  10. Study of alumina-trichite reinforcement of a nickel-based matric by means of powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walder, A.; Hivert, A.

    1982-01-01

    Research was conducted on reinforcing nickel based matrices with alumina trichites by using powder metallurgy. Alumina trichites previously coated with nickel are magnetically aligned. The felt obtained is then sintered under a light pressure at a temperature just below the melting point of nickel. The halogenated atmosphere technique makes it possible to incorporate a large number of additive elements such as chromium, titanium, zirconium, tantalum, niobium, aluminum, etc. It does not appear that going from laboratory scale to a semi-industrial scale in production would create any major problems.

  11. Porous mandrels provide uniform deformation in hydrostatic powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gripshover, P. J.; Hanes, H. D.

    1967-01-01

    Porous copper mandrels prevent uneven deformation of beryllium machining blanks. The beryllium powder is arranged around these mandrels and hot isostatically pressed to form the blanks. The mandrels are then removed by leaching.

  12. Preparation of Three-Dimensional Graphene Foams Using Powder Metallurgy Templates.

    PubMed

    Sha, Junwei; Gao, Caitian; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Li, Yilun; Zhao, Naiqin; Tour, James M

    2016-01-26

    A simple and scalable method which combines traditional powder metallurgy and chemical vapor deposition is developed for the synthesis of mesoporous free-standing 3D graphene foams. The powder metallurgy templates for 3D graphene foams (PMT-GFs) consist of particle-like carbon shells which are connected by multilayered graphene that shows high specific surface area (1080 m(2) g(-1)), good crystallization, good electrical conductivity (13.8 S cm(-1)), and a mechanically robust structure. The PMT-GFs did not break under direct flushing with DI water, and they were able to recover after being compressed. These properties indicate promising applications of PMT-GFs for fields requiring 3D carbon frameworks such as in energy-based electrodes and mechanical dampening.

  13. Hydrogen halide cleaning of powder metallurgy nickel-20 chromium-3 thoria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    The Cr2O3 content of powder metallurgy nickel-20 chromium-3 thoria was reduced with atmospheres consisting of hydrogen plus hydrogen chloride (HCl) or hydrogen bromide (HBr). The nonthoria oxygen content or 'oxygen excess' was reduced from an initial amount of greater than 50,000 ppm to less than 100 ppm. Low temperatures were effective, but lowest oxygen levels were achieved with the highest cleaning temperature of 1200 C.

  14. LACBED characterization of dislocations in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys processed by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, P. P.; Ibarra, A.; San Jean, J.; Morniro, J. P.; No, M. L.

    2003-10-01

    Powder metallurgy Cu-AI-Ni shape memory alloys show excellent thermomechanical properties, being the fracture behavior close to the one observed in single crystals. However, the microstructural mechanisms responsible of such behavior are still under study. In this paper we present the characterization of the dislocations present in these alloys by Large Angle Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction (LACBED) in two different stages of the elaboration process: after HIP compaction and after hot rolling.

  15. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  16. Method for forming biaxially textured articles by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured alloy article comprises the steps of preparing a mixture comprising Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacting the mixture, followed by heat treating and rapidly recrystallizing to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  17. Making Self-Lubricating Parts By Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Compositions and parameters of powder-metallurgical fabrication processes determined for new class of low-friction, low-wear, self-lubricating materials. Used in oxidizing or reducing atmospheres in bearings and seals, at temperatures from below 25 degrees C to as high as 900 degrees C. Thick parts made with minimal waste.

  18. A Nonvolume Preserving Plasticity Theory with Applications to Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassenti, B. N.

    1983-01-01

    A plasticity theory has been developed to predict the mechanical response of powder metals during hot isostatic pressing. The theory parameters were obtained through an experimental program consisting of hydrostatic pressure tests, uniaxial compression and uniaxial tension tests. A nonlinear finite element code was modified to include the theory and the results of themodified code compared favorably to the results from a verification experiment.

  19. Microstructures and mechanical properties of hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy Alloy APK-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, T. L.; Chari, Y. N.; Rao, E. S. Bhagiradha; Thamburaj, R.

    1983-03-01

    The influence of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and heat treatment parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of powder metallurgy alloy APK-1 (a low carbon modification of Astroloy) has been investigated. Poor mechanical properties result if carbide networks are present along the prior particle boundaries (PPBs). These networks which form during powder consolidation can be avoided by manipulating HIP parameters. Heat treatments which produce a large volume fraction of fine γ’ make this alloy susceptible to environment-assisted tensile embrittlement around 760 °C.

  20. Tribological properties of PM212 - A high temperature, self-lubricating, powder metallurgy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a research program to develop and evaluate a new high temperature, self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, PM212. PM212 has the same composition as the plasma-sprayed coating, PS212, which contains 70 wt percent metal-bonded chromium carbide, 15 wt percent silver and 15 wt percent barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The carbide acts as a wear resistant matrix and the silver and fluorides act as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. The material is prepared by sequential cold press, cold isostatic pressing and sintering techniques. In this study, hemispherically tipped wear pins of PM212 were prepared and slid against superalloy disks at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in air in a pin-on-disk tribometer. Friction coefficients range from 0.29 to 0.38 and the wear of both the composite pins and superalloy disks was moderate to low in the 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) cubic mm/N-m range. Preliminary tests indicate that the material has a compressive strength of at least 130 MPa over the entire temperature range of 25 to 900 C. This material has promise for use as seal inserts, bushings, small inside diameter parts and other applications where plasma-sprayed coatings are impractical or too costly.

  1. Tribological properties of PM212: A high-temperature, self-lubricating, powder metallurgy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a research program to develop and evaluate a new high temperature, self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, PM212. PM212 has the same composition as the plasma-sprayed coating, PS212, which contains 70 wt percent metal-bonded chromium carbide, 15 wt percent silver and 15 wt percent barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The carbide acts as a wear resistant matrix and the silver and fluorides act as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. The material is prepared by sequential cold press, cold isostatic pressing and sintering techniques. In this study, hemispherically tipped wear pins of PM212 were prepared and slid against superalloy disks at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in air in a pin-on-disk tribometer. Friction coefficients range from 0.29 to 0.38 and the wear of both the composite pins and superalloy disks was moderate to low in the 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) cubic mm/N-m range. Preliminary tests indicate that the material has a compressive strength of at least 130 MPa over the entire temperature range of 25 to 900 C. This material has promise for use as seal inserts, bushings, small inside diameter parts and other applications where plasma-sprayed coatings are impractical or too costly.

  2. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of powder metallurgy Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, L; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2017-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys are common biomedical materials owing to their combination of mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Powder metallurgy (PM) techniques can be used to fabricate biomaterials with tailored properties because changing the processing parameters, such as the sintering temperature, products with different level of porosity and mechanical performances can be obtained. This study addresses the production of the biomedical Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy by means of the master alloy addition variant of the PM blending elemental approach. The sintering parameters investigated guarantee that the complete diffusion of the alloying elements and the homogenization of the microstructure is achieved. The sintering of the Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy induces a total shrinkage between 7.4% and 10.7% and the level of porosity decreases from 6.2% to 4.7% with the increment of the sintering temperature. Vickers hardness (280-300 HV30) and tensile properties (different combination of strength and elongation around 900MPa and 3%) are achieved.

  3. Tribological properties of PM212 - A high temperature, self-lubricating, powder metallurgy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a research program to develop and evaluate a new high temperature, self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite, PM212. PM212 has the same composition as the plasma-sprayed coating, PS212, which contains 70 wt percent metal-bonded chromium carbide, 15 wt percent silver and 15 wt percent barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The carbide acts as a wear resistant matrix and the silver and fluorides act as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. The material is prepared by sequential cold press, cold isostatic pressing and sintering techniques. In this study, hemispherically tipped wear pins of PM212 were prepared and slid against superalloy disks at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in air in a pin-on-disk tribometer. Friction coefficients range from 0.29 to 0.38 and the wear of both the composite pins and superalloy disks was moderate to low in the 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) cubic mm/N-m range. Preliminary tests indicate that the material has a compressive strength of at least 130 MPa over the entire temperature range of 25 to 900 C. This material has promise for use as seal inserts, bushings, small inside diameter parts and other applications where plasma-sprayed coatings are impractical or too costly.

  4. Copper-Carbon and Aluminum-Carbon Composites Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvain, Jean-François; Veillère, Amélie; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-01

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials, with high thermal conductivity and thermal- expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. In this context, metal matrix composites: carbon fibers and diamond-reinforced copper and aluminum matrix composites among them are considered very promising as a next generation of thermal-management materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties compared to pure copper combined with lower density. This article presents the fabrication techniques of copper/carbon fibers and copper/diamond and aluminum/carbon fibers composite films by powder metallurgy and hot pressing. The thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermomechanical properties. Interfaces (through novel chemical and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly will form the right chemical/mechanical link between metal and carbon, enhancing all the desired thermal properties while minimizing the deleterious effect.

  5. Magnetic Behavior of High-Density Powder Metallurgy Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    rupture and impact resistance. Square bars were prepared from a single type of high-purity iron powder with minimal carbon content, so as to...of theoret- ical. Available dies guided the selection of sample geometry for compatibility with mechanical ( Charpy , transverse rupture) and magnetic...sturdier die was used for 96% specimens measur- ing 2.95 x 0.39 x 0.39 inches (as for Charpy tests). For comparison of the dies, additional 86% and

  6. Powder metallurgy for the fabrication of bi-axially textured Ni tapes for YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Ki Ji, Bong; Hyung Lim, Jun; Jung, Choong-Hwan; Joo, Jinho; Park, Soon-Dong; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Hong, Gye-Won; Kim, Chan-Joong

    2003-04-01

    Bi-axially textured Ni tapes for YBCO coated conductors were fabricated by forming, sintering, cold rolling and heat treatment of Ni powder compacts. The powder metallurgy process consists of filling of fine Ni powders in a rubber mold, cold isostatical pressing in a water chamber and sintering of the powder compacts. The sintered compacts were cold-rolled and made into tapes with a thickness of 100 micron and then heat-treated at 1000 °C for various time periods for the development of the (2 0 0) texture. The (2 0 0) texture of Ni tape was successfully formed through the optimization of the recrystallization heat treatment condition for the cold rolled Ni tapes. The full width half maximum of the Ni tapes was 8-10° and the atomic force microscopy surface roughness was 3-5 nm.

  7. Net-Shape HIP Powder Metallurgy Components for Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bampton, Cliff; Goodin, Wes; VanDaam, Tom; Creeger, Gordon; James, Steve

    2005-01-01

    True net shape consolidation of powder metal (PM) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) provides opportunities for many cost, performance and life benefits over conventional fabrication processes for large rocket engine structures. Various forms of selectively net-shape PM have been around for thirty years or so. However, it is only recently that major applications have been pursued for rocket engine hardware fabricated in the United States. The method employs sacrificial metallic tooling (HIP capsule and shaped inserts), which is removed from the part after HIP consolidation of the powder, by selective acid dissolution. Full exploitation of net-shape PM requires innovative approaches in both component design and materials and processing details. The benefits include: uniform and homogeneous microstructure with no porosity, irrespective of component shape and size; elimination of welds and the associated quality and life limitations; removal of traditional producibility constraints on design freedom, such as forgeability and machinability, and scale-up to very large, monolithic parts, limited only by the size of existing HIP furnaces. Net-shape PM HIP also enables fabrication of complex configurations providing additional, unique functionalities. The progress made in these areas will be described. Then critical aspects of the technology that still require significant further development and maturation will be discussed from the perspective of an engine systems builder and end-user of the technology.

  8. Powder metallurgy processing of high strength turbine disk alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Using vacuum-atomized AF2-1DA and Mar-M432 powders, full-scale gas turbine engine disks were fabricated by hot isostatically pressing (HIP) billets which were then isothermally forged using the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft GATORIZING forging process. While a sound forging was produced in the AF2-1DA, a container leak had occurred in the Mar-M432 billet during HIP. This resulted in billet cracking during forging. In-process control procedures were developed to identify such leaks. The AF2-1DA forging was heat treated and metallographic and mechanical property evaluation was performed. Mechanical properties exceeded those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability turbine disk alloys presently used.

  9. Powder metallurgy preparation of Mg-Ca alloy for biodegradable implant application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annur, D.; Suhardi, A.; Amal, M. I.; Anwar, M. S.; Kartika, I.

    2017-04-01

    Magnesium and its alloys is a promising candidate for implant application especially due to its biodegradability. In this study, Mg-7Ca alloys (in weight %) were processed by powder metallurgy from pure magnesium powder and calcium granule. Milling process was done in a shaker mill using stainless steel balls in various milling time (3, 5, and 8 hours) followed by compaction and sintering process. Different sintering temperatures were used (450°C and 550°C) to examine the effect of sintering temperature on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure evaluation was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Mechanical properties and corrosion behavior were examined through hardness testing and electrochemical testing in Hank’s solution (simulation body fluid). In this report, a prolonged milling time reduced particle size and later affected mechanical properties of Mg alloy. Meanwhile, the phase analysis showed that α Mg, Mg2Ca, MgO phases were formed after the sintering process. Further, this study showed that Mg-Ca alloy with different powder metallurgy process would have different corrosion rate although there were no difference of Ca content in the alloy.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of americium, neptunium and curium bearing MOX fuels obtained by powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Florent; Prieur, Damien; Jankowiak, Aurélien; Tribet, Magaly; Leorier, Caroline; Delahaye, Thibaud; Donnet, Louis; Dehaudt, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    MOX fuel pellets containing up to 1.4 wt% of Minor Actinides (MA), i.e. Am, Np and Cm, were fabricated to demonstrate the technical feasibility of powder metallurgy process involving, pelletizing and sintering in controlled atmosphere. The compounds were then characterized using XRD, SEM and EDX/EPMA. Dense pellets were obtained which closed porosity mean size is equal to 7 μm. The results indicate the formation of (U, Pu)O 2 solid solution. However, microstructure contains some isolated UO 2 grains. The distribution of Am and Cm appears to be homogeneous whereas Np was found to be clustered at some locations.

  11. Dose and Dose Risk Caused by Natural Phenomena - Proposed Powder Metallurgy Core Manufacturing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, W.G.

    2001-08-16

    The offsite radiological effects from high velocity straight winds, tornadoes, and earthquakes have been estimated for a proposed facility for manufacturing enriched uranium fuel cores by powder metallurgy. Projected doses range up to 30 mrem/event to the maximum offsite individual for high winds and up to 85 mrem/event for very severe earthquakes. Even under conservative assumptions on meteorological conditions, the maximum offsite dose would be about 20 per cent of the DOE limit for accidents involving enriched uranium storage facilities. The total dose risk is low and is dominated by the risk from earthquakes. This report discusses this test.

  12. Accelerated Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low DK, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = Kmin/Kmax). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of Kmax (Kmax less than 0.4 KIC). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and Kmax influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  13. Mg-Zn based composites reinforced with bioactive glass (45S5) fabricated via powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab llah, N.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Daud, Z. C.; Zaludin, M. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    Metallic implants are shifting from bio-inert to bioactive and biodegradable materials. These changes are made in order to improve the stress shielding effect and bio-compatibility and also avoid the second surgery procedure. Second surgery procedure is required if the patient experienced infection and implant loosening. An implant is predicted to be well for 15 to 20 years inside patient body. Currently, magnesium alloys are found to be the new biomaterials because of their properties close to the human bones and also able to degrade in the human body. In this work, magnesium-zinc based composites reinforced with different content (5, 15, 20 wt. %) of bioactive glass (45S5) were fabricated through powder metallurgy technique. The composites were sintered at 450˚C. Density and porosity of the composites were determined using the gas pycnometer. Microstructure of the composites was observed using an optical microscope. In-vitro bioactivity behavior was evaluated in the simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) was used to characterize the apatite forming on the samples surface. The microstructure of the composite showed that the pore segregated near the grain boundaries and bioglass clustering was observed with increasing content of bioglass. The true density of the composites increased with the increasing content of bioglass and the highest value of porosity was indicated by the Mg-Zn reinforced with 20 wt.% of bioglass. The addition of bio-glass to the Mg-Zn has also induced the formation of apatite layer after soaking in SBF solution.

  14. Initial Assessment of the Effects of Nonmetallic Inclusions on Fatigue Life of Powder-Metallurgy-Processed Udimet(TM) 720

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Telesman, J.; Kantzos, P. T.; Bonacuse, P. J.; Barrie, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue lives of modern powder metallurgy (PM) disk alloys are influenced by variabilities in alloy microstructure and mechanical properties. These properties can vary due to the different steps of materials/component processing and machining. One of these variables, the presence of nonmetallic inclusions, has been shown to significantly degrade low-cycle fatigue (LCF) life. Nonmetallic inclusions are inherent defects in powder alloys that are a by-product of powder-processing techniques. Contamination of the powder can occur in the melt, during powder atomization, or during any of the various handling processes through consolidation. In modern nickel disk powder processing facilities, the levels of inclusion contamination have been reduced to less than 1 part per million by weight. Despite the efforts of manufacturers to ensure the cleanliness of their powder production processes, the presence of inclusions remains a source of great concern for the designer. the objective of this study was to investigate the effects on fatigue life of these inclusions. Since natural inclusions occur so infrequently, elevated levels of inclusions were carefully introduced in a nickel-based disk superalloy, Udimet 720 (registered trademark of Special Metals Corporation), produced using PM processing. Multiple strain-controlled fatigue tests were then performed on this material at 650 C. Analyses were performed to compare the LCF lives and failure initiation sites as functions of inclusion content and fatigue conditions. A large majority of the failures in specimens with introduced inclusions occurred at cracks initiating from inclusions at the specimen surface. The inclusions could reduce fatigue life by up to 100 times. These effects were found to be dependent on strain range and strain ratio. Tests at lower strain ranges and higher strain ratios produced larger effects of inclusions on life.

  15. [Study on physical properties of titanium alloy sample fabricated with vacuum-sintered powder metallurgy].

    PubMed

    Ding, X; Liang, X; Chao, Y; Han, X

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the physical properties of titanium alloy fabricated with vacuum-sintered powder metallurgy. The titanium powders of three different particle sizes(-160mesh, -200 - +300mesh, -300mesh) were selected, and mixed with copper and aluminum powder in different proportions. Two other groups were made up of titanium powder(-200 - +300mesh) plated with copper and tin. The build-up and, condensation method and a double-direction press with a metal mold were used. The green compacts were sintered at 1000 degrees C for 15 minutes in a vacuum furnace at 0.025 Pa. In the double-direction press, the specimens were compacted at the pressure of 100 MPa, 200 MPa and 300 MPa respectively. Then the linear shrinkage ratio and the opening porosity of the sintered compacts were evaluated respectively. 1. The linear shrinkage ratio of specimens decreased with the increased compacted pressure(P < 0.05). There was no significant difference among the linear shrinkage ratios of three different titanium powders at the same compacted pressure(P > 0.05), but that of titanium powder plated with copper and tin was higher than those of other specimens without plating(P < 0.05). 2. The opening porosity of specimens decreased with the increased compacted pressure(P < 0.05). Three different sized particle of titanium powder did not affect the opening porosity at the same compacted pressure(P > 0.05). The composition of titanium-based metal powder mixtures and the compacted pressures affect the physical properties of sintered compacts. Titanium powder plated with copper and tin is compacted and sintered easily, and the physical properties of sintered compacts are greatly improved.

  16. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of porous iron prepared by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Capek, Jaroslav; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2014-10-01

    The demand for porous biodegradable load-bearing implants has been increasing recently. Based on investigations of biodegradable stents, porous iron may be a suitable material for such applications. In this study, we prepared porous iron samples with porosities of 34-51 vol.% by powder metallurgy using ammonium bicarbonate as a space-holder material. We studied sample microstructure (SEM-EDX and XRD), flexural and compressive behaviors (universal loading machine) and hardness HV5 (hardness tester) of the prepared samples. Sample porosity increased with the amount of spacer in the initial mixtures. Only the pore surfaces had insignificant oxidation and no other contamination was observed. Increasing porosity decreased the mechanical properties of the samples; although, the properties were still comparable with human bone and higher than those of porous non-metallic biomaterials and porous magnesium prepared in a similar way. Based on these results, powder metallurgy appears to be a suitable method for the preparation of porous iron for orthopedic applications.

  17. The synthesis and characterization of Mg-Zn-Ca alloy by powder metallurgy process

    SciTech Connect

    Annur, Dhyah; Franciska, P.L.; Erryani, Aprilia; Amal, M. Ikhlasul; Kartika, Ika; Sitorus, Lyandra S.

    2016-04-19

    Known for its biodegradation and biocompatible properties, magnesium alloys have gained many interests to be researched as implant material. In this study, Mg-3Zn-1Ca, Mg-29Zn-1Ca, and Mg-53Zn-4.3Ca (in wt%) were synthesized by means of powder metallurgy method. The compression strength and corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy were thoroughly examined. The microstructures of the alloy were characterized using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope, and also X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion resistance were evaluated using electrochemical analysis. The result indicated that Mg- Zn- Ca alloy could be synthesized using powder metallurgy method. This study showed that Mg-29Zn-1Ca would make the highest mechanical strength up to 159.81 MPa. Strengthening mechanism can be explained by precipitation hardening and grain refinement mechanism. Phase analysis had shown the formation of α Mg, MgO, and intermetallic phases: Mg2Zn11 and also Ca2Mg6Zn3. However, when the composition of Zn reach 53% weight, the mechanical strength will be decreasing. In addition, all of Mg-Zn-Ca alloy studied here had better corrosion resistance (Ecorr around -1.4 VSCE) than previous study of Mg. This study indicated that Mg- 29Zn- 1Ca alloy can be further analyzed to be a biodegradable implant material.

  18. Effect of extrusion temperature on the microstructure of a powder metallurgy TiAl-based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L.M.; Nieh, T.G.; Clemens, D.R.

    1997-01-15

    In order to balance low temperature ductility, fracture toughness and high temperature properties of {gamma}-TiAl aluminide alloys, recent developments of the alloys have focused on refining the {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} full lamellar (FL) microstructure through advanced processing such as powder metallurgy (P/M). Resulted from a refined FL microstructure (both smaller lamellar grain size and thinner lamellar interface spacing) in the P/M fabricated titanium aluminide alloys, the mechanical properties of the alloys have been demonstrated to be superior to those of the aluminide alloys fabricated by conventional ingot metallurgy (I/M). However, since the microstructure of rapidly-solidified aluminide powder used in P/M process is not in an equilibrium state, the microstructures of P/M aluminide alloys are expected to be sensitive to the processing history. Accordingly, the optimization of microstructure-property of a P/M alloy through an appropriate P/M process control becomes an important issue. The purpose of this investigation is therefore aiming at understanding the effect of extrusion temperature on the microstructure of a P/M titanium aluminide alloy.

  19. Study on Microstructures and Properties of Porous TiC Ceramics Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yana; Bao, Chonggao; Han, Longhao; Chen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Powder metallurgy process was used to fabricate porous titanium carbide (TiC) ceramics, in which TiC powders were taken as the raw materials, nickel was used as the metallic binder and urea was the space-holder. Microstructure, composition and phase of porous TiC ceramics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Flexure strength of the porous TiC ceramics was tested by a three-point bending method. The results show that macropores and micropores coexist in the prepared porous TiC ceramics. Moreover, the pore number, size and distribution in porous TiC ceramics can be controlled on demand. Particularly, the factors such as the number or size of space-holder, compacting pressure and Ni content have significant effect on the porosity and flexure strength.

  20. Effects of fine porosity on the fatigue behavior of a powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy Astroloy was obtained which contained 1.4 percent fine porosity at the grain boundaries produced by argon entering the powder container during pressing. This material was tested at 650 C in fatigue, creep fatigue, tension, and stress-rupture and the results compared with previous data on sound Astroloy. The pores averaged about 2 micrometers diameter and 20 micrometers spacing. They did influence fatigue crack initiation and produced a more intergranular mode of propagation. However, fatigue life was not drastically reduced. A large 25 micrometers pore in one specimen resulting from a hollow particle did not reduce life by 60 percent. Fatigue behavior of the porous material showed typical correlation with tensile behavior. The plastic strain range life relation was reduced proportionately with the reduction in tensile ductility, but the elastic strain range-life relation was little changed reflecting the small reduction in sigma sub u/E for the porous material.

  1. Effects of fine porosity on the fatigue behavior of a powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Hot-isostatically-pressed powder-metallurgy Astroloy was obtained which contained 1.4 percent porosity at the grain boundaries produced by argon entering the powder container during pressing. This material was tested at 650 C in fatigue, creep-fatigue, tension, and stress-rupture and the results compared with data on sound Astroloy. They influenced fatigue crack initiation and produced a more intergranular mode of propagation but fatigue life was not drastically reduced. Fatigue behavior of the porous material showed typical correlation with tensile behavior. The plastic strain range-life relation was reduced proportionately with the reduction in tensile ductility, but the elastic strain range-life relation was changed little.

  2. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of 6061Al reinforced with silicon nitride particles, processed by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Amigo, V.; Ortiz, J.L.; Salvador, M.D.

    2000-01-31

    A critical step in the processing of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) reinforced with ceramic particles is the insertion of these particles into the metal matrix alloy. This greatly influences the strength of the composite since it is controlled by the metal-particle interfacial bond strength. Because of the difficulty in wetting ceramic particles with molten metal, the Powder Metallurgy or PM route was developed. Powder Extrusion consolidates the composite to over 98% dense, and can be carried out below the Solidus Temperature of the alloy. The most important aspect of the microstructure is the distribution of the reinforcing particles, and this depends on the processing and fabrication routes involved, as well as the relative size of the matrix and reinforcing particles. Extrusion can homogenize the structure to some extent, but minimizing reinforcement inhomogeneity during initial processing is important to achieve optimum properties.

  3. Study on Microstructures and Properties of Porous TiC Ceramics Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yana; Bao, Chonggao; Han, Longhao; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Powder metallurgy process was used to fabricate porous titanium carbide (TiC) ceramics, in which TiC powders were taken as the raw materials, nickel was used as the metallic binder and urea was the space-holder. Microstructure, composition and phase of porous TiC ceramics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Flexure strength of the porous TiC ceramics was tested by a three-point bending method. The results show that macropores and micropores coexist in the prepared porous TiC ceramics. Moreover, the pore number, size and distribution in porous TiC ceramics can be controlled on demand. Particularly, the factors such as the number or size of space-holder, compacting pressure and Ni content have significant effect on the porosity and flexure strength.

  4. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Al2024 Matrix Nanocomposite Using Flake Powder Metallurgy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikhtegar, F.; Shabestari, S. G.; Saghafian, H.

    2016-12-01

    In current work, the flake powder metallurgy method was applied to achieve the uniform dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within the Al2024 powder. For this purpose, the flake morphology of Al2024 powder with suitable diameter-to-thickness ratio ( D/ t = 85) was obtained after ball milling for 4 hours at 250 rpm and ball-to-powder ratio = 10. Then, the surface of matrix was modified by a hydrophilic polymer [polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)] to obtain the sufficient -OH group on its surface. Additionally, the refluxing of CNTs in nitric acid was performed at 393 K (120 °C) for 6 hours to functionalize the reinforcement by -COOH agent. After preparation of initial materials, the Al2024-1.5 wt pct CNTs suspension was stirred in a slurry at pH 3 until the color was changed in steady state from ink-like to transparent at pH 5. The hydrogen bonding was formed between the -OH groups of PVA coated Al2024 and -COOH groups of functionalized MWCNTs during the mixing step. Also, the temporary polarity could be considered between H+ and {{{C}}_{12}}{{{H}}_{25}}{{SO}}_4^ - ions on the surface of constituents, which led to improvement in the CNT distribution due to the changing of suspension pH. Consequently, the homogenous dispersion of CNTs in Al2024 flaky powders resulted in a chemical reaction of constituents without any destructive effects of mechanical forces. The morphological changes of Al2024 powders were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and surface treatments were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The dispersion of nanocomposite powder was investigated through field emission SEM. Also, X-ray diffraction analysis was used to investigate the initial Al2024 powder and formed phases after the ball milling process.

  5. Influence of powder metallurgy route on precipitation processes in MgTbNd alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stulikova, Ivana Smola, Bohumil; Vlach, Martin; Kudrnova, Hana; Piesova, Jaroslava

    2016-02-15

    Solution treated MgTb3Nd2 alloy (nominal composition in wt.%) (ST) and the alloy prepared by hot extrusion of isostatically pressed powder (PM) were isochronally heat treated and studied by electrical resistivity and hardness measurements and by differential scanning calorimetry. Microstructure development was investigated in transmission electron microscopy. Successive precipitation of transient phases in the sequence β″ (D0{sub 19} plates) → β′(cbco) → β{sub 1} (Mg{sub 3}Gd type, fcc) → β (Mg{sub 5}Gd type, fcc) known from the ST alloy was identified also in the PM alloy. The early precipitation stage (D0{sub 19} clusters) revealed in the ST alloy as well as precipitation of equilibrium β{sub e} phase Mg{sub 41}(Tb,Nd){sub 5} manifest themselves only slightly in the PM alloy. Powder metallurgy route does not change the values of activation energies but shifts the temperature ranges of these processes. Vickers hardness of the as prepared state is higher in the PM alloy and is very resistant against the heat treatment up to 510 °C. Contrary to the ST alloy precipitation due to isochronal annealing does not lead to pronounced hardness changes in the PM alloy. - Highlights: • Powder metallurgy (PM) does not change precipitation sequence in MgTbNd alloy. • Temperature ranges of transient phase precipitations are shifted in PM alloy. • Hardness is resistant against isochronal heat treatment up to 510 °C in the PM alloy. • PM procedure does not change activation energies of precipitation.

  6. Assessment of Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Powder Metallurgy Alloy U720

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Tomothy P.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Sweeney, Joseph W.; Chatterjee, Amit; Green, Kenneth A.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue lives of modem powder metallurgy disk alloys are influenced by variabilities in alloy microstructure and mechanical properties. These properties can vary as functions of variables the different steps of materials/component processing: powder atomization, consolidation, extrusion, forging, heat treating, and machining. It is important to understand the relationship between the statistical variations in life and these variables, as well as the change in life distribution due to changes in fatigue loading conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate these relationships in a nickel-base disk superalloy, U720, produced using powder metallurgy processing. Multiple strain-controlled fatigue tests were performed at 538 C (1000 F) at limited sets of test conditions. Analyses were performed to: (1) assess variations of microstructure, mechanical properties, and LCF failure initiation sites as functions of disk processing and loading conditions; and (2) compare mean and minimum fatigue life predictions using different approaches for modeling the data from assorted test conditions. Significant variations in life were observed as functions of the disk processing variables evaluated. However, the lives of all specimens could still be combined and modeled together. The failure initiation sites for tests performed at a strain ratio R(sub epsilon) = epsilon(sub min)/epsilon(sub max) of 0 were different from those in tests at a strain ratio of -1. An approach could still be applied to account for the differences in mean and maximum stresses and strains. This allowed the data in tests of various conditions to be combined for more robust statistical estimates of mean and minimum lives.

  7. [Study on mechanical properties of titanius alloy samples fabricated with vacuum-sintered powder metallurgy].

    PubMed

    Chao, Y L; Ding, X Y; Liang, X; Han, X L

    2001-06-01

    To investigate mechanical properties of titanium alloy samples with vacuum-sintered powder metallurgy. Titanium based metal powder mixtures were compacted into green bodies in the double action press and sintered at 1000 degrees centigrade for 15 minutes in a vacuum furnace at 0.025Pa. Then the mechanical properities of the sintered compacts were evaluated. Compressive strength of sintered bodies were 111-921MPa when compacted pressure increased from 100MPa to 300MPa. Compressive strength of sintered bodies increased with compacted pressure. Three particle sizes of titanium powder, -160 mesh, -200/+300 mesh, -300 mesh, did not affect the mechanical properties of sintered bodies. The compressive strength of sintered bodies with the plating of copper and tin were higher than those without the plating. Three-point bending strength and elastic modulus of sintered bodies were respectively 102-182MPa and 12193-26630 when compacted pressure affect the mechanical properties pf sintered compacts. Titanium powder plated with copper and tin is compacted and sintered easily, the mechanical properties of sintered compacts are greatly improved.

  8. Fabrication of Fe-Cr-Mo powder metallurgy steel via a mechanical-alloying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jooyoung; Jeong, Gowoon; Kang, Singon; Lee, Seok-Jae; Choi, Hyunjoo

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we employed a mechanical-alloying process to manufacture low-alloy CrL and CrM steel powders that have similar specifications to their water-atomized counterparts. X-ray diffraction showed that Mo and Cr are alloyed in Fe after four cycles of planetary milling for 1 h at 150 RPM with 15-min pauses between the cycles (designated as P2C4 process). Furthermore, the measured powder size was found to be similar to that of the water-atomized counterparts according to both scanning electron microscope images and laser particle size analysis. The samples were sintered at 1120 °C, after which the P2C4-milled CrL showed similar hardness to that of water-atomized CrL, whereas the P2C4-milled CrM showed about 45% lower hardness than that of its water-atomized counterpart. Water-atomized CrM consists of a well-developed lathtype microstructure (bainite or martensite), while a higher fraction of polygonal ferrite is observed in P2C4-milled CrM. This phase difference causes the reduction of hardness in the P2C4-milled CrM, implying that the phase transformation behavior of specimens produced via powder metallurgy is influenced by the powder fabrication method.

  9. Mechanisms of fatigue crack retardation following single tensile overloads in powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, G. H.; Reynolds, A. P.; Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In ingot metallurgy (IM) alloys, the number of delay cycles following a single tensile overload typically increases from a minimum at an intermediate baseline stress intensity range, Delta-K(B), with decreasing Delta-K(B) approaching threshold and increasing Delta-K(B) approaching unstable fracture to produce a characteristic 'U' shaped curve. Two models have been proposed to explain this behavior. One model is based on the interaction between roughness and plasticity-induced closure, while the other model only utilizes plasticity-induced closure. This article examines these models, using experimental results from constant amplitude and single overload fatigue tests performed on two powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys, AL-905XL and AA 8009. The results indicate that the 'U'-shaped curve is primarily due to plasticity-induced closure, and that the plasticity-induced retardation effect is through-thickness in nature, occurring in both the surface and interior regions. However, the retardation effect is greater at the surface, because the increase in plastic strain at the crack tip and overload plastic zone size are larger in the plane-stress surface regions than in the plane-strain interior regions. These results are not entirely consistent with either of the proposed models.

  10. Electrochemical study of Aluminum-Fly Ash composites obtained by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Lekka, M.; Andreatta, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Itskos, G.; Koukouzas, N.

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, two different ASTM C 618 Class C fly ashes (FA) were used for the production of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMCs) using powder metallurgy (PM) technology. Calcareous FAs were sampled from the electrostatic precipitators of two different lignite-fired power stations: from Megalopolis, Southern Greece (MFA) and from Kardia, Northen Greece (KFA), under maximum electricity load. FAs were milled in order to reduce the mean particle diameter and Aluminum-FA composites containing 10% and 20% of FA were then prepared and compacted. The green products were sintered for 2 h at 600 Degree-Sign C. Sintered Al-FA MMCs showed increased hardness and wear resistance suggesting their possible use in industrial applications for example in covers, casings, brake rotors or engine blocks. As most possible industrial applications of MMCs not only require wear resistance, but also corrosion resistance in different mild aggressive medias, this paper aims to study the electrochemical behavior of FA MMCs in order to evaluate their corrosion resistance. The morphology and chemical composition of the phases in the Aluminum-FA composite samples were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). Moreover, topographic and Volta potential maps were acquired by Scanning Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (SKP-FM). Volta potential maps provide information about the electrochemical behavior of the different phases in absence of electrolyte. The electrochemical behavior was investigated by Open Circuit Potential measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, while the corrosion mechanisms were studied by SEM observations after different times of immersion in a mild corrosive medium. In all cases it could be stated that the addition of the FA particles into the Al matrix might cause an increase of the hardness and mechanical properties of the pure aluminum but deteriorates the corrosion resistance. The degradation phenomena

  11. Effect of Ca and Zn additions on the mechanical properties of Mg produced by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guleryuz, L. F.; Ipek, R.; Arıtman, I.; Karaoglu, S.

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are among important research topics in view of their excellent biocompatibility.In this study mechanical and microstructure properties of hot sintered Mg-Zn-Ca alloys were studied.The effects of the addition of different amounts Ca and Zn were added to the base material has been processed by powder metallurgy method.resulting microstructures densities and compression test behaviors of the Mg-based alloys were studied.Visual inspection using SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) analyses indicates that the microstructure of the composite is also greatly effected by these parameters. In addition, EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy) analyses were performed for reliable determination of the chemical composition.

  12. Accelerated Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Effect-Powder Metallurgy Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.; Newman, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low (Delta) K, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = K(sub min)/K(sub max)). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of K(sub max) (K(sub max) = 0.4 K(sub IC)). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and K(sub max) influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  13. Effect of glow discharge sintering in the properties of a composite material fabricated by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, A.; Pineda, Y.; Sarmiento Santos, A.; Vera, E.

    2016-02-01

    Composite samples of 316 stainless steel and SiC were produced by powder metallurgy. Starting materials were mixed in different proportions and compacted to 700MPa. Sintering stage was performed by abnormal glow discharge plasma with direct current in an inert atmosphere of argon. The process was conducted at a temperature of 1200°C±5°C with a heating rate of 100°C/min. This work shows, the effectiveness of plasma sintering process to generate the first contacts between particles and to reduce vacancies. This fact is confirmed by comparing green and sintered density of the material. The results of porosity show a decrease after plasma sintering. Wear tests showed the wear mechanisms, noting that at higher SiC contents, the wear resistance decreases due to poor matrix-reinforcement interaction and by the porosity presence which causes matrix-reinforcement sliding.

  14. Microstructure Evolution during Supersolvus Heat Treatment of a Powder Metallurgy Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; McClary, K. E.; Rollett, A. D.; Roberts, C. G.; Payton, E. J.; Zhang, F.; Gabb, T. P.

    2012-05-01

    Microstructure evolution during the supersolvus heat treatment of a powder-metallurgy, low-solvus, high-refractory (LSHR) superalloy was established. For this purpose, three lots of LSHR with varying initial carbon/boron composition and thermomechanical history were subjected to a series of short-time (induction) and long-time (furnace) heat treatments followed by scanning electron microscopy/electron backscatter diffraction and quantitative metallography. The size of the (pinned) gamma grains exhibited a limited dependence on heating rate and soak time at peak temperature, and it was generally smaller than the predictions based on the classic Smith-Zener model. The differences were rationalized in terms of stereological and pinning-particle location effects. Observations of limited coarsening of the carbide/boride pinning particles were interpreted in the context of prior experimental observations and a modified Lifshitz-Slyosov-Wagner model applied previously for the coarsening of compound phases in steels.

  15. Corrosion Resistance of Powder Metallurgy Processed TiC/316L Composites with Mo Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shaojiang; Xiong, Weihao

    2015-06-01

    To find out the effects of Mo addition on corrosion resistance of TiC/316L stainless steel composites, TiC/316L composites with addition of different contents of Mo were prepared by powder metallurgy. The corrosion resistance of these composites was evaluated by the immersion tests and polarization curves experiments. Results indicated that Mo addition decreased the corrosion rates of TiC/316L composites in H2SO4 solution in the case of Mo content below 2% whereas it displayed an opposite effect when Mo content was above that value. It was found that with an increase in the Mo content, the pitting corrosion resistance increased monotonically for TiC/316L composites in NaCl solution.

  16. Particles into 410L Stainless Steel by a Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeybek, A.; Barroso, S. Pirfo; Chong, K. B.; Edwards, L.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    Addition of yttria to steels has been proposed for the fabrication of oxide-dispersion-strengthened materials for nuclear power applications. We have investigated materials prepared from 12 Cr martensitic stainless steel, AISI 410L, produced by powder metallurgy. Materials were produced with and without yttria addition, and two different sizes of yttria were used, 0.9 µm and 50 nm. Tensile and mini-creep tests were performed to determine mechanical properties. Optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and EDX analysis were used to investigate the microstructures and deformation mechanisms and to obtain information about non-metallic inclusion particles. SiO2, MnS, and Y2Si2O7 inclusion particles were observed. An SiO2 and Y2O3 interaction was seen to have occurred during the ball milling, which impaired the final mechanical properties. Small-angle neutron scattering experiments showed that the matrix chemistry prevented effective dissolution of the yttria.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of P/M (powder metallurgy) Fe sub 3 Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knibloe, J.R.; Wright, R.N. ); Sikka, V.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al have an equilibrium DO{sub 3} structure at low temperatures and transform to a B2 structure above about 550{degree}C. The influence of different rates of quenching from the B2 region to room temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys with two different Cr contents has been examined. By optimizing the processing to maximize the amount of B2 order, room temperature ductility approaching 20% has been achieved although the fracture mode is primarily brittle cleavage. The refined microstructure resulting from P/M processing contributes to enhanced yield strength compared to ingot processed materials with similar ductility. Increasing the Cr content from 2 to 5% has little effect on mechanical properties. 8 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Microstructure, mechanical behavior and biocompatibility of powder metallurgy Nb-Ti-Ta alloys as biomedical material.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jue; Chang, Lin; Liu, Hairong; Li, Yongsheng; Yang, Hailin; Ruan, Jianming

    2017-02-01

    Microstructures, mechanical properties, apatite-forming ability and in vitro experiments were studied for Nb-25Ti-xTa (x=10, 15, 20, 25, 35at.%) alloys fabricated by powder metallurgy. It is confirmed that the alloys could achieve a relative density over 80%. Meanwhile, the increase in Ta content enhances the tensile strength, elastic modulus and hardness of the as-sintered alloys. When increasing the sintering temperatures, the microstructure became more homogeneous for β phase, resulting in a decrease in the modulus and strength. Moreover, the alloys showed a good biocompatibility due to the absence of cytotoxic elements, and were suitable for apatite formation and cell adhesion. In conclusion, Nb-25Ti-xTa alloys are potentially useful in biomedical applications with their mechanical and biological properties being evaluated in this work.

  19. Crack Formation in Powder Metallurgy Carbon Nanotube (CNT)/Al Composites During Post Heat-Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Imai, Hisashi; Li, Shufeng; Jia, Lei; Umeda, Junko; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    After the post heat-treatment (PHT) process of powder metallurgy carbon nanotubes (CNT)/Al composites, micro-cracks were observed in the composites, leading to greatly degraded mechanical properties. To understand and suppress the crack formation, an in situ observation of CNT/Al composites was performed at elevated temperatures. PHT was also applied to various bulk pure Al and CNT/Al composites fabricated under different processes. It was observed that the composites consolidated by hot-extrusion might form micro-cracks, but those consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) showed no crack after PHT. A high-temperature SPS process before hot-extrusion was effective to prevent crack formation. The release of residual stress in severe plastic deformed (SPD) materials was responsible for the cracking phenomena during the PHT process. Furthermore, a good particle bonding was essential and effective to suppress cracks for SPD materials in the PHT process.

  20. Machinability of Green Powder Metallurgy Components: Part II. Sintered Properties of Components Machined in Green State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert-Perron, Etienne; Blais, Carl; Pelletier, Sylvain; Thomas, Yannig

    2007-06-01

    The green machining process is virtually a must if the powder metallurgy (PM) industries are to solve the lower machining performances associated with PM components. This process is known for lowering the rate of tool wear. Recent improvements in binder/lubricant technologies have led to high-green-strength systems that enable green machining. Combined with the optimized cutting parameters determined in Part I of the study, the green machining of PM components seems to be a viable process for fabricating high performance parts on large scale and complete other shaping processes. This second part of our study presents a comparison between the machining behaviors and the sintered properties of components machined prior to or after sintering. The results show that the radial crush strength measured on rings machined in their green state is equal to that of parts machined after sintering.

  1. Machinability of Green Powder Metallurgy Components: Part I. Characterization of the Influence of Tool Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert-Perron, Etienne; Blais, Carl; Pelletier, Sylvain; Thomas, Yannig

    2007-06-01

    The green machining process is an interesting approach for solving the mediocre machining behavior of high-performance powder metallurgy (PM) steels. This process appears as a promising method for extending tool life and reducing machining costs. Recent improvements in binder/lubricant technologies have led to high green strength systems that enable green machining. So far, tool wear has been considered negligible when characterizing the machinability of green PM specimens. This inaccurate assumption may lead to the selection of suboptimum cutting conditions. The first part of this study involves the optimization of the machining parameters to minimize the effects of tool wear on the machinability in turning of green PM components. The second part of our work compares the sintered mechanical properties of components machined in green state with other machined after sintering.

  2. Program to Develop High Strength Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Products. Phase 4. Scale-up to 3200-lb. Billets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-05

    AD/A-005 661 PROGRAM TO DEVELOP HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM POWDER METALLURGY PRODUCTS. PHASE IV. SCALE-UP TO 3200-LB. BILLETS Walter S. Cebulak Aluminum ...aW4PAk;n Uobus-w~d ALCOA December 5, 1974 U. S. ARMY FRANKFORD ARSENAL CONTRACT DAAA25-72-CO593 PROGRAM TO DEVELOP HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM POWDER...packing in the vacuum preheat container will replace cold isostatic pressing prior to encapsulation for vacuum preheating. Eight lots of powder were

  3. An investigation of wear behaviors of different Monel alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esgin, U.; Özyürek, D.; Kaya, H.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, wear behaviors of Monel 400, Monel 404, Monel R-405 and Monel K-500 alloys produced by Powder Metallurgy (P/M) method were investigated. These compounds prepared from elemental powders were cold-pressed (600 MPa) and then, sintered at 1150°C for 2 hours and cooled down to the room temperature in furnace environment. Monel alloys produced by the P/M method were characterized through scanning electron microscope (SEM+EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness and density measurements. In wear tests, standard pin-on-disk type device was used. Specimens produced within four different Monel Alloys were tested under 1ms-1 sliding speed, under three different loads (20N, 30N and 40N) and five different sliding distances (400-2000 m). The results show that Monel Alloys have γ matrix and that Al0,9Ni4,22 intermetallic phase was formed in the structure. Also, the highest hardness value was measured with the Monel K-500 alloy. In wear tests, the maximum weight loss according to the sliding distance, was observed in Monel 400 and Monel 404 alloys while the minimum weight loss was achieved by the Monel K-500 alloy.

  4. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  5. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinationsmore » that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.« less

  6. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Jason M.; Lessing, Paul A.; Hoggan, Rita E.

    2015-11-01

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ± 0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. Pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  7. High strength bulk Fe-Co alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Turgut, Zafer; Huang Meiqing; Horwath, John C.; Fingers, Richard T.

    2008-04-01

    Fe-Co alloys are extensively used in lamination form, but there are certain power generation applications that require Fe-Co rotors in bulk form. Experiencing only a dc magnetic field, these rotors can be as large as 0.5 m in diameter, depending on the size of the generator. The forging of such large pieces of Fe-Co has proven to be difficult. The present study investigates powder metallurgy processing of a gas atomized FeCoNbV alloy through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) for manufacturing large size rotors with improved mechanical strength. Gas atomized FeCoNbV alloy powders with and without ball milling were hot isostatic pressed at temperatures between 675 and 850 deg. C at a fixed pressure of 193 MPa for up to 6 h. Ball milling prior to HIP improved the yield strength. A further improvement in yield strength and in ductility was obtained after a disordering heat treatment at 730 deg. C followed by a rapid quench to room temperature. The optimum HIP and annealing conditions resulted in samples with yield strengths of 870 MPa. The compacts exhibited average coercivity values of 6.4 Oe and maximum permeability values of 1100.

  8. Feasibility study of the production of biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, L; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2015-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys are characterized by an exceptional combination of properties like high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility which makes them suitable materials for biomedical prosthesis and devices. The wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloy is generally favored in comparison to other metallic biomaterials due to its relatively low elastic modulus and it has been long used to obtain products for biomedical applications. In this work an alternative route to fabricate biomedical implants made out of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is investigated. Specifically, the feasibility of the conventional powder metallurgy route of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering is addressed by considering two types of powders (i.e. blended elemental and prealloyed). The characterization of physical properties, chemical analysis, mechanical behavior and microstructural analysis is carried out in-depth and the properties are correlated among them. On the base of the results found, the produced alloys are promising materials for biomedical applications as well as cheaper surgical devices and tools.

  9. Niobium-titanium superconductors produced by powder metallurgy having artificial flux pinning centers

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Larbalestier, David C.

    1993-01-01

    Superconductors formed by powder metallurgy have a matrix of niobium-titanium alloy with discrete pinning centers distributed therein which are formed of a compatible metal. The artificial pinning centers in the Nb-Ti matrix are reduced in size by processing steps to sizes on the order of the coherence length, typically in the range of 1 to 10 nm. To produce the superconductor, powders of body centered cubic Nb-Ti alloy and the second phase flux pinning material, such as Nb, are mixed in the desired percentages. The mixture is then isostatically pressed, sintered at a selected temperature and selected time to produce a cohesive structure having desired characteristics without undue chemical reaction, the sintered billet is reduced in size by deformation, such as by swaging, the swaged sample receives heat treatment and recrystallization and additional swaging, if necessary, and is then sheathed in a normal conducting sheath, and the sheathed material is drawn into a wire. The resulting superconducting wire has second phase flux pinning centers distributed therein which provide enhanced J.sub.ct due to the flux pinning effects.

  10. Nb3Sn(Ti) powder metallurgy processed high field superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourrahimi, S.; Thieme, C. L. H.; Foner, S.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-06-01

    Powder metallurgy processed Nb3Sn(Ti) superconducting wires were fabricated with Sn x wt. % Ti cores for 0≤x≤3, 16 or 22 vol % cores, and a Cu 45 wt. % Nb composite. The processing used swaging, cold hydrostatic extrusions, wire drawing and heat treatments of 750 °C for two to four days. Nominal areal reductions of 104 were used. Hydride-dehydride Nb and rotating electrode processed Nb powders gave the same performance. Overall critical current densities Jc were measured between 4.2 and 1.8 K for applied fields up to 23 T. Jc increased with increased Ti and/or Sn content. The Nb3Sn(Ti) wires using a Sn 3 wt. % Ti, 22 vol % core gave Jc >104 A/cm2 at 20 T and 4.2 K and Jc =104 A/cm2 at 23 T at 1.8 K. Removal of the precompression of the matrix increased Jc by about a factor of 2 at 20 T and 4.2 K.

  11. Ultra-High Strength and Ductile Lamellar-Structured Powder Metallurgy Binary Ti-Ta Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Xu, Shenghang; Wang, Xin; Li, Kaiyang; Liu, Bin; Wu, Hong; Tang, Huiping

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and ductile powder metallurgy (PM) binary Ti-20at.%Ta alloy has been fabricated via sintering from elemental Ti and Ta powders and subsequent hot swaging and annealing. The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties in each stage were evaluated. Results show that inhomogeneous microstructures with Ti-rich and Ta-rich areas formed in the as-sintered Ti-Ta alloys due to limited diffusion of Ta. In addition, Kirkendall porosity was observed as a result of the insufficient diffusion of Ta. Annealing at 1000°C for up to 24 h failed to eliminate the pores. Hot swaging eliminated the residual sintering porosity and created a lamellar microstructure, consisting of aligned Ta-enriched and Ti-enriched phases. The hot-swaged and annealed PM Ti-20Ta alloy achieved an ultimate tensile strength of 1600 MPa and tensile elongation of more than 25%, due to its unique lamellar microstructure including the high toughness of Ta-enriched phases, the formation of α phase in the β matrix and the refined lamellae.

  12. Nb/sub 3/Sn(Ti) powder metallurgy processed high field superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrahimi, S.; Thieme, C.L.H.; Foner, S.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-06-30

    Powder metallurgy processed Nb/sub 3/Sn(Ti) superconducting wires were fabricated with Sn x-italic wt. % Ti cores for 0< or =x-italic< or =3, 16 or 22 vol % cores, and a Cu 45 wt. % Nb composite. The processing used swaging, cold hydrostatic extrusions, wire drawing and heat treatments of 750 /sup 0/C for two to four days. Nominal areal reductions of 10/sup 4/ were used. Hydride-dehydride Nb and rotating electrode processed Nb powders gave the same performance. Overall critical current densities J-italic/sub c-italic/ were measured between 4.2 and 1.8 K for applied fields up to 23 T. J-italic/sub c-italic/ increased with increased Ti and/or Sn content. The Nb/sub 3/Sn(Ti) wires using a Sn 3 wt. % Ti, 22 vol % core gave J-italic/sub c-italic/ >10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 20 T and 4.2 K and J-italic/sub c-italic/ = 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 23 T at 1.8 K. Removal of the precompression of the matrix increased J-italic/sub c-italic/ by about a factor of 2 at 20 T and 4.2 K.

  13. An investigation of wear behaviors of different Monel alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Esgin, U.; Özyürek, D.

    2016-04-21

    In the present study, wear behaviors of Monel 400, Monel 404, Monel R-405 and Monel K-500 alloys produced by Powder Metallurgy (P/M) method were investigated. These compounds prepared from elemental powders were cold-pressed (600 MPa) and then, sintered at 1150°C for 2 hours and cooled down to the room temperature in furnace environment. Monel alloys produced by the P/M method were characterized through scanning electron microscope (SEM+EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness and density measurements. In wear tests, standard pin-on-disk type device was used. Specimens produced within four different Monel Alloys were tested under 1ms{sup −1} sliding speed, under three different loads (20N, 30N and 40N) and five different sliding distances (400-2000 m). The results show that Monel Alloys have γ matrix and that Al{sub 0,9}Ni{sub 4,22} intermetallic phase was formed in the structure. Also, the highest hardness value was measured with the Monel K-500 alloy. In wear tests, the maximum weight loss according to the sliding distance, was observed in Monel 400 and Monel 404 alloys while the minimum weight loss was achieved by the Monel K-500 alloy.

  14. Interfacial reactions and wetting in Al-Mg sintered by powder metallurgy process

    SciTech Connect

    Faisal, Heny Darminto,; Triwikantoro,; Zainuri, M.

    2016-04-19

    Was conducted to analyze the effect of temperature variation on the bonding interface sintered composite Al-Mg and analyze the effect of variations of the density and hardness sinter. Research carried out by the base material powders of Al, Mg powder and solvent n-butanol. The method used in this study is a powder metallurgy, with a composition of 60% volume fraction of Al - 40% Mg. Al-Mg mixing with n-butanol for 1 hour at 500 rpm. Then the emphasis (cold comression) with a size of 1.4 cm in diameter dies and height of 2.8 cm, is pressed with a force of 20 MPa and held for 15 minutes. After the sample into pellets, then sintered at various temperatures 300 °C, 350 °C, 400 °C and 450 °C. Characterization is done by using the testing green density, sintered density, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), vickers microhardness, and press test. XRD data analysis done by using X’Pert High Score Plus (HSP) to determine whether there is a new phase is formed. Test results show that the sintered density increasing sintering temperature, the resulting density is also increasing (shrinkage). However, at a temperature of 450 °C decreased (swelling). With the increased sinter density, interfacial bonding getting Kuta and more compact so that its hardness is also increased. From the test results of SEM / EDX, there Mg into Al in the border area. At temperatures of 300 °C, 350 °C, 400 °C, the phase formed is Al, Mg and MgO. While phase is formed at a temperature of 450 °C is aluminum magnesium (Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2}), Aluminum Magnesium Zinc (AlMg{sub 2}Zn).

  15. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder-Metallurgy-Produced Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, T. R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Frederick, D. A.; Contescu, C. I.; Chen, W.; Lim, Y. C.; Peter, W. H.; Feng, Z.

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was undertaken using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas-forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap, where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal and minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders are critical for achieving equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  16. Spray forming and mechanical properties of a new type powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chong-Lin; Ge, Chang-Chun; Xia, Min; Gu, Tian-Fu

    2015-11-01

    The deposited billet of a new type powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy FGH4095M for use in turbine disk manufacturing has been fabricated using spray forming technology. The metallurgical quality of the deposited billet was analyzed in terms of density, texture, and grain size. Comparative research was done on the microstructure and mechanical properties between the flat disk preform prepared with hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and the same alloy forgings prepared with HIP followed by isothermal forging (IF). The results show that the density of the spray-formed and nitrogen-atomized deposit billet is above 99% of the theoretical density, indicating a compact structure. The grains are uniform and fine. The billet has weak texture with a random distribution in the spray deposition direction and perpendicular to the direction of deposition. A part of atomizing nitrogen exists in the preform in the form of carbonitride. Nitrogen-induced microporosity causes the density reduction of the preform. Compared with the process of HIP+IF, the superalloy FGH4095M after HIP has better mechanical properties at both room temperature and high temperature. The sizes of the γ‧ phase are finer in microstructure of the preform after HIP in comparison with the forgings after HIP+IF. This work shows that SF+HIP is a viable processing route for FGH4095M as a turbine-disk material. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 50974016 and 50071014).

  17. Factors Influencing Dwell Fatigue Cracking in Notches of Powder Metallurgy Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Telesman, J.; Ghosn, L.; Garg, A.; Gayda, J.

    2011-01-01

    The influences of heat treatment and cyclic dwells on the notch fatigue resistance of powder metallurgy disk superalloys were investigated for low solvus high refractory (LSHR) and ME3 disk alloys. Disks were processed to produce material conditions with varied microstructures and associated mechanical properties. Notched specimens were first subjected to baseline dwell fatigue cycles having a dwell at maximum load, as well as tensile, stress relaxation, creep rupture, and dwell fatigue crack growth tests at 704 C. Several material heat treatments displayed a bimodal distribution of fatigue life with the lives varying by two orders-of-magnitude, while others had more consistent fatigue lives. This response was compared to other mechanical properties, in search of correlations. The wide scatter in baseline dwell fatigue life was observed only for material conditions resistant to stress relaxation. For selected materials and conditions, additional tests were then performed with the dwells shifted in part or in total to minimum tensile load. The tests performed with dwells at minimum load exhibited lower fatigue lives than max dwell tests, and also exhibited early crack initiation and a substantial increase in the number of initiation sites. These results could be explained in part by modeling evolution of peak stresses in the notch with continued dwell fatigue cycling. Fatigue-environment interactions were determined to limit life for the fatigue cycles with dwells.

  18. A Novel Ni-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Ultrahigh Impact, Fatigue, and Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Bing-Hao

    2014-08-01

    The impact toughness of powder metallurgy (PM) steel is typically inferior, and it is further impaired when the microstructure is strengthened. To formulate a versatile PM steel with superior impact, fatigue, and tensile properties, the influences of various microstructures, including ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and Ni-rich areas, were identified. The correlations between impact toughness with other mechanical properties were also studied. The results demonstrated that ferrite provides more resistance to impact loading than Ni-rich martensite, followed by bainite and pearlite. However, Ni-rich martensite presents the highest transverse rupture strength (TRS), fatigue strength, tensile strength, and hardness, followed by bainite, pearlite, and ferrite. With 74 pct Ni-rich martensite and 14 pct bainite, Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel achieves the optimal combination of impact energy (39 J), TRS (2170 MPa), bending fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles (770 MPa), tensile strength (1323 MPa), and apparent hardness (38 HRC). The impact energy of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel is twice as high as those of the ordinary high-strength PM steels. These findings demonstrate that a high-strength PM steel with high-toughness can be produced by optimized alloy design and microstructure.

  19. Residual Stresses in a NiCrY-Coated Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Rogers, Richard B.; Nesbitt, James A.; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Miller, Robert A.; Telesman, Ignacy; Draper, Susan L.; Locci, Ivan E.

    2017-01-01

    Protective ductile coatings will be necessary to mitigate oxidation and corrosion attack on superalloy disks exposed to increasing operating temperatures in some turbine engine environments. However, such coatings must be resistant to harmful surface cracking during service. The objective of this study was to investigate how residual stresses evolve in such coatings. Cylindrical gage fatigue specimens of powder metallurgy-processed disk superalloy LSHR were coated with a NiCrY coating, shot peened, and then subjected to fatigue in air at room and high temperatures. The effects of shot peening and fatigue cycling on average residual stresses and other aspects of the coating were assessed. Shot peening did induce beneficial compressive residual stresses in the coating and substrate. However, these stresses became more tensile in the coating with subsequent heating and contributed to cracking of the coating in long intervals of cycling at 760 C. Substantial compressive residual stresses remained in the substrate adjacent to the coating, sufficient to suppress fatigue cracking. The coating continued to protect the substrate from hot corrosion pitting, even after fatigue cracks initiated in the coating.

  20. Processing Map of Powder Metallurgy Al-W Alloys at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yong; Du, Yue; Zhang, Zhimin; Huang, Youwang; Guo, Lafeng

    2017-07-01

    An Al-0.71 wt.% W alloy was prepared via powder metallurgy (PM) using a room-temperature pressing process and a subsequent hot-pressing process. Studies of the deformation behavior of the PM Al-W alloy were conducted using hot-compression tests in the temperature range from 420 to 570 °C and a strain rate range from 0.001 to 5 s-1. After the stress-strain data were acquired as a function of temperature and strain rate, processing maps that depict the variation in the power dissipation efficiency were constructed and interpreted via the dynamic materials model. The optimum temperature and strain rate combination for PM billet conditioning were demonstrated to be 560-570 °C and 0.001 s-1, respectively. Additionally, a secondary metal working process with a higher production efficiency on the PM billet was conducted at a higher strain rate from 0.01 to 0.1 s-1 and at a low temperature from 500 to 540 °C. The PM Al-W alloy was successfully extruded at 540 °C with a ram speed of 2 mm min-1 and an extrusion ratio of 5:1. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the test sample taken from the 15-mm-diameter as-extruded rods were 478 MPa and 15.4%, respectively.

  1. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of gamma-prime particles in a gamma matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest gamma-prime particles, and had the lowest gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650 gamma C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760 C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the gamma-prime particle size distribution and the gamma-gamma-prime mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  2. Analysis of Load Transfer Mechanism in Cu Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarpour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-01

    In this research, ductile and high-strength Cu-carbon nanotube (Cu-CNT) composites with different volume fractions of CNTs were fabricated using powder metallurgy route including mechanical milling and hot pressing and microstructure and tensile properties of the resulting materials were studied. Microstructural characterization through scanning electron microscope and quantifying the CNT agglomeration revealed that uniform dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrix decreases with increasing CNT volume fraction. In case of the higher volume fraction of CNTs (i.e., 8 vol.%), ~ 40% of CNTs were observed as agglomerates in the microstructure. Compared to unreinforced Cu, the yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased considerably (about 33% and 12%, respectively) with incorporation of CNTs up to 4 vol.%, but remained constant afterward. Meanwhile, the elongation decreased from 15.6% for Cu to 6.9% for Cu with 8 vol.% CNT. The relationship between the change in yield strength of the composite and the microstructure was investigated using analytical models. The results showed good consistency between calculated and measured data when the negative effect of CNT agglomerates in the models were taken into account.

  3. Superplastic behavior in a powder-metallurgy TiAl alloy with a metastable microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T.G.; Hsiung, L.M.; Wadsworth, J.

    1997-12-01

    Superplasticity in a powder-metallurgy TiAl alloy (Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb) with a metastable microstructure has been studied. Samples were tested at temperatures ranging from 650 to 1100{degrees}C, and at strain rate ranging from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}. An elongation value of over 300 obtained at a strain rate of 2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and at a temperature as lo as 800{degrees}C, which is close to the ductile-to-brittle-transition temperature. This is in contrast to the prior major observations of superplastic behaviors in TiAl in which typical temperatures of 1000{degrees}C have usually been required for superplasticity. It is proposed that the occurrence of superplasticity at 8000{degrees}C in the present alloy is caused by the presence of a B2 phase. During superplastic deformation (grain boundary sliding), the soft P grains accommodate sliding strains to reduce the propensity for cavitation at grain triple junctions and, thus, delays the fracture process. The final microstructure consists of stable, equiaxed y+a{sub 2} grains.

  4. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of gamma-prime particles in a gamma matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest gamma-prime particles, and had the lowest gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650 gamma C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760 C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the gamma-prime particle size distribution and the gamma-gamma-prime mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  5. Characterization of the carbides and the martensite phase in powder-metallurgy high-speed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, Matjaz; Batic, Barbara Setina; Mandrino, Djordje; Nagode, Ales; Leskovsek, Vojteh; Skapin, Sreco D.; Jenko, Monika

    2010-04-15

    A microstructural characterization of the powder-metallurgy high-speed-steel S390 Microclean was performed based on an elemental distribution of the carbide phase as well as crystallographic analyses. The results showed that there were two types of carbides present: vanadium-rich carbides, which were not chemically homogeneous and exhibited a tungsten-enriched or tungsten-depleted central area; and chemically homogeneous tungsten-rich M{sub 6}C-type carbides. Despite the possibility of chemical inhomogenities, the crystallographic orientation of each of the carbides was shown to be uniform. Using electron backscatter diffraction the vanadium-rich carbides were determined to be either cubic VC or hexagonal V{sub 6}C{sub 5}, while the tungsten-rich carbides were M{sub 6}C. The electron backscatter diffraction results were also verified using X-ray diffraction. Several electron backscatter diffraction pattern maps were acquired in order to define the fraction of each carbide phase as well as the amount of martensite phase. The fraction of martensite was estimated using band-contrast images, while the fraction of carbides was calculated using the crystallographic data.

  6. Dwell Notch Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of a Powder Metallurgy Nickel Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Yamada, Y.; Ghosn, L. J.; Jayaraman, N.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the processes which govern dwell notch low cycle fatigue (NLCF) behavior of a powder metallurgy (P/M) ME3 disk superalloy. The emphasis was placed on the environmentally driven mechanisms which may embrittle the highly stressed notch surface regions and reduce NLCF life. In conjunction with the environmentally driven notch surface degradation processes, the visco-plastic driven mechanisms which can significantly change the notch root stresses were also considered. Dwell notch low cycle fatigue testing was performed in air and vacuum on a ME3 P/M disk alloy specimens heat treated using either a fast or a slow cooling rate from the solutioning treatment. It was shown that dwells at the minimum stress typically produced a greater life debit than the dwells applied at the maximum stress, especially for the slow cooled heat treatment. Two different environmentally driven failure mechanisms were identified as the root cause of early crack initiation in the min dwell tests. Both of these failure mechanisms produced mostly a transgranular crack initiation failure mode and yet still resulted in low NLCF fatigue lives. The lack of stress relaxation during the min dwell tests produced higher notch root stresses which caused early crack initiation and premature failure when combined with the environmentally driven surface degradation mechanisms. The importance of environmental degradation mechanisms was further highlighted by vacuum dwell NLCF tests which resulted in considerably longer NLCF lives, especially for the min dwell tests.

  7. The substitution of nickel for cobalt in hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy UDIMET 700 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harf, Fredric H.

    1985-06-01

    Nickel was substituted in various proportions for cobalt in a series of five hot-isostatically-pressed powder metallurgy alloys based on the UDIMET 700 composition. These alloys were given 5-step heat treatments appropriate for use in turbine engine disks. The resultant microstructures displayed three distinct sizes of γ' particles in a γ matrix. The higher cobalt-content alloys contained larger amounts of the finest γ' particles, and had the lowest γ-γ' lattice mismatch. While all alloys had approximately the same tensile properties at 25 and 650°C, the rupture lives at 650 and 760°C peaked in the alloys with cobalt contents between 12.7 and 4.3 pct. Minimum creep rates increased as cobalt contents were lowered, suggesting their correlation with the γ' particle size distribution and the γ-γ' mismatch. It was also found that, on overaging at temperatures higher than suitable for turbine disk use, the high cobalt-content alloys were prone to sigma phase formation.

  8. Effects of carbon and hafnium concentrations in wrought powder-metallurgy superalloys based on NASA 2B-11 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A candidate alloy for advanced-temperature turbine engine disks, and four modifications of that alloy with various C and Hf concentrations were produced as cross-rolled disks from prealloyed powder that was hot isostatically compacted. The mechanical properties, microstructures, and phase relations of the alloys are discussed in terms of their C and Hf concentrations. A low-C and high-Hf modification of IIB-11 had the best balance of mechanical properties for service below about 750 C. Because of their finer grain sizes, none of the powder-metallurgy alloys produced had the high-temperature rupture strength of conventionally cast and wrought IIB-11.

  9. In vitro degradation and cytotoxicity of Mg/Ca composites produced by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y F; Gu, X N; Xi, Y L; Chai, D L

    2010-05-01

    Mg/Ca (1 wt.%, 5 wt.%, 10 wt.% Ca) composites were prepared from pure magnesium and calcium powders using the powder metallurgy method, aiming to enlarge the addition of Ca content without the formation of Mg(2)Ca. The microstructures, mechanical properties and cytotoxicities of Mg/Ca composite samples were investigated. The corrosion of Mg/Ca composites in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) for various immersion intervals was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and environmental scanning electron microscope, with the concentrations of released Mg and Ca ions in DMEM for various immersion time intervals being measured. It was shown that the main constitutional phases were Mg and Ca, which were uniformly distributed in the Mg matrix. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of experimental composites decreased with increasing Ca content, and the UTS of Mg/1Ca composite was comparable with that of as-extruded Mg-1Ca alloy. The corrosion potential increased with increasing Ca content, whereas the current density and the impedance decreased. It was found that the protective surface film formed quickly at the initial immersion stage. With increasing immersion time, the surface film became compact, and the corrosion rate of Mg/Ca composites slowed down. The surface film consisted mainly of CaCO(3), MgCO(3)x3H(2)O, HA and Mg(OH)(2) after 72 h immersion in DMEM. Mg/1Ca and Mg/5Ca composite extracts had no significant toxicity (p>0.05) to L-929 cells, whereas Mg/10Ca composite extract induced approximately 40% reduced cell viability.

  10. Studies on induction hardening of powder-metallurgy-processed Fe-Cr/Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Sandeep; Verma, Vikas; Prakash, Ujjwal; Tewari, P. C.; Khanduja, Dinesh

    2017-08-01

    Induction hardening of dense Fe-Cr/Mo alloys processed via the powder-metallurgy route was studied. The Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo, Fe-1.5Cr-0.2Mo, and Fe-0.85Mo pre-alloyed powders were mixed with 0.4wt%, 0.6wt%, and 0.8wt% C and compacted at 500, 600, and 700 MPa, respectively. The compacts were sintered at 1473 K for 1 h and then cooled at 6 K/min. Ferrite with pearlite was mostly observed in the sintered alloys with 0.4wt% C, whereas a carbide network was also present in the alloys with 0.8wt% C. Graphite at prior particle boundaries led to deterioration of the mechanical properties of alloys with 0.8wt% C, whereas no significant induction hardening was achieved in alloys with 0.4wt% C. Among the investigated samples, alloys with 0.6wt% C exhibited the highest strength and ductility and were found to be suitable for induction hardening. The hardening was carried out at a frequency of 2.0 kHz for 2-3 s. A case depth of 2.5 mm was achieved while maintaining the bulk (interior) hardness of approximately HV 230. A martensitic structure was observed on the outer periphery of the samples. The hardness varied from HV 600 to HV 375 from the sample surface to the interior of the case hardened region. The best combination of properties and hardening depth was achieved in case of the Fe-1.5Cr-0.2Mo alloy with 0.6wt% C.

  11. Effects of porosity on corrosion resistance of Mg alloy foam produced by powder metallurgy technology

    SciTech Connect

    Aghion, E. Perez, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Magnesium alloy foams have the potential to serve as structural material for regular light-weight applications as well as for biodegradable scaffold implants. However, their main disadvantage relates to the high reactivity of magnesium and consequently their natural tendency to corrode in regular service conditions and in physiological environments. The present study aims at evaluating the effect of porosity on the corrosion resistance of MRI 201S magnesium alloy foams in 0.9% NaCl solution and in phosphate buffer saline solution as a simulated physiological electrolyte. The magnesium foams were produced by powder metallurgy technology using space-holding particles to control the porosity content. Machined chips were used as raw material for the production of Mg alloy powder by milling process. The microstructure of the foams was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the porosity has a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the tested foams. Foams with 14–19% porosity have a corrosion rate of 4–10 mcd and 7–15 mcd in NaCl and phosphate buffer saline solution, respectively, compared to only 0.10 mcd for the same alloy in as cast conditions. This increased corrosion degradation of the Mg foams by more than one order of magnitude compared to the cast alloy may limit their potential application in regular and physiological environments. - Highlights: • Porosity has a detrimental effect on corrosion resistance of MRI 201S Mg foams. • 14–19% porosity increases the corrosion rate by more than one order of magnitude. • Accelerated corrosion limits the use of foams in regular/physiological environments.

  12. Titanium dental copings prepared by a powder metallurgy method: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Mikael; Andersson, Matts; Carlström, Elis

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the Procera pressed-powder method can be used to fabricate titanium copings. Commercially pure titanium powder was used to prepare the copings. The powder was pressed onto an enlarged tooth preparation die of aluminum using cold isostatic pressing. The outer shape of the coping was formed using a Procera milling machine, and the copings were vacuum sintered. Titanium copings could be prepared using this method. The density of the sintered copings reached 97% to 99%+ of theoretic density, and the copings showed ductile behavior after sintering. Enlarging the tooth preparation die to compensate for the sintering shrinkage could optimize the final size of the copings. Ductile and dense titanium dental copings can be produced with powder-metal processing using cold isostatic pressing, followed by milling and sintering to final shape. The forming technique has, if properly optimized, a potential of becoming a more cost-efficient production method than spark erosion.

  13. Distribution of Inclusion-Initiated Fatigue Cracking in Powder Metallurgy Udimet 720 Characterized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kantzos, Pete T.; Barrie, Robert; Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.; Gabb, Timothy P.

    2004-01-01

    In the absence of extrinsic surface damage, the fatigue life of metals is often dictated by the distribution of intrinsic defects. In powder metallurgy (PM) alloys, relatively large defects occur rarely enough that a typical characterization with a limited number of small volume fatigue test specimens will not adequately sample inclusion-initiated damage. Counterintuitively, inclusion-initiated failure has a greater impact on the distribution in PM alloy fatigue lives because they tend to have fewer defects than their cast and wrought counterparts. Although the relative paucity of defects in PM alloys leads to higher mean fatigue lives, the distribution in observed lives tends to be broader. In order to study this important failure initiation mechanism without expending an inordinate number of specimens, a study was undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center where known populations of artificial inclusions (seeds) were introduced to production powder. Fatigue specimens were machined from forgings produced from the seeded powder. Considerable effort has been expended in characterizing the crack growth rate from inclusion-initiated cracks in seeded PM alloys. A rotating and translating positioning system, with associated software, was devised to map the surface inclusions in low-cycle fatigue (LCF) test bars and to monitor the crack growth from these inclusions. The preceding graph illustrates the measured extension in fatigue cracks from inclusions on a seeded LCF test bar subjected to cyclic loading at a strain range of 0.8 percent and a strain ratio (max/min) of zero. Notice that the observed inclusions fall into three categories: some do not propagate at all (arrest), some propagate with a decreasing crack growth rate, and a few propagate at increasing rates that can be modeled by fracture mechanics. The following graph shows the measured inclusion-initiated crack growth rates from 10 interrupted LCF tests plotted against stress intensities calculated for semi

  14. Rapid Synthesis of a Near-β Titanium Alloy by Blended Elemental Powder Metallurgy (BEPM) with Induction Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Mingtu; Gabbitas, Brian

    2015-10-01

    A near-β Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al alloy was produced by blended elemental powder metallurgy combining warm compaction and induction sintering. Two Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al powder compacts with different oxygen content were manufactured by mixing PREP and HDH Ti powders with Cr and AlV master alloy powders, respectively. The effect of isothermal holding time, at a sintering temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C), on pore characteristics and compositional homogeneity was investigated in this study. Pore coarsening by Ostwald ripening occurred with an increase in the isothermal holding time and Kirkendall voids were produced by a reaction between Ti and Cr. After an isothermal holding time of 10 minutes, the two sintered powder compacts had a homogeneous composition. Ti/AlV and Ti/Cr diffusion couples were used to predict the distribution of alloying elements, and the binary Ti-V, Ti-Al, and Ti-Cr interdiffusion coefficients were consistent with the distribution of alloying elements after isothermal holding. The mechanical properties of sintered powder compacts, prepared using PREP Ti powder as the raw powder, were optimized by sintered density and pore size.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ti-Mo-Zr-Cr Biomedical Alloys by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshalakany, Abou Bakr; Ali, Shady; Amigó Mata, A.; Eessaa, Ashraf K.; Mohan, P.; Osman, T. A.; Amigó Borrás, V.

    2017-03-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used as biometals due to their excellent biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and moderate mechanical properties. Ti-15Mo-6Zr-based alloys and a series of Ti-15Mo-6Zr-xCr ( x = 1, 2, 3, 4 wt.%) alloys were designed and fabricated by powder metallurgy for the first time to develop novel biomedical materials. The microstructure, internal porosity and mechanical properties of the sintered Ti-15Mo-6Zr and Ti-15Mo-6Zr-xCr alloys were investigated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and bending and compression tests. The experimental results indicated that the microstructure and mechanical properties of these alloys changed as different Cr levels were added. The addition of small Cr levels further increased the β-phase stability, improving the properties of the Ti-15Mo-6Zr-xCr alloy. However, all of the alloys had good ductility, and the Ti-15Mo-6Zr-2Cr alloy had lower bending and compression moduli (31 and 23 GPa, respectively) than the Ti-15Mo-6Zr-based alloys (40 and 36 GPa, respectively). Moreover, the Ti-15Mo-6Zr-2Cr alloys exhibited higher bending and compression strength/modulus ratios, which were as large as 48.4 and 52.2, respectively; these were higher than those of the Ti-15Mo-6Zr-based alloy (41.3 and 33.6, respectively). In the search for a better implant material, β phase Ti-15Mo-6Zr-2Cr, with its low modulus, ductile properties and reasonably high strength, is a promising candidate.

  16. Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Chromium and Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Fan, Yu-Chi; Huang, Her-Yueh; Cai, Wen-Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Liquid phase sintering is an effective method to improve the densification of powder metallurgy materials. Boron is an excellent alloying element for liquid phase sintering of Fe-based materials. However, the roles of chromium and carbon, and particularly that of the former, on liquid phase sintering are still undetermined. This study demonstrated the effects of chromium and carbon on the microstructure, elemental distribution, boride structure, liquid formation, and densification of Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels during liquid phase sintering. The results showed that steels with 0.5 wt pct C densify faster than those without 0.5 wt pct C. Moreover, although only one liquid phase forms in Fe-B-Cr steel, adding 0.5 wt pct C reduces the formation temperature of the liquid phase by about 50 K (°C) and facilitates the formation of an additional liquid, resulting in better densification at 1473 K (1200 °C). In both Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels, increasing the chromium content from 1.5 to 3 wt pct raises the temperature of liquid formation by about 10 K (°C). Thermodynamic simulations and experimental results demonstrated that carbon atoms dissolved in austenite facilitate the eutectic reaction and reduce the formation temperature of the liquid phase. In contrast, both chromium and molybdenum atoms dissolved in austenite delay the eutectic reaction. Furthermore, the 3Cr-0.5Mo additive in the Fe-0.4B steel does not change the typical boride structure of M2B. With the addition of 0.5 wt pct C, the crystal structure is completely transformed from M2B boride to M3(B,C) boro-carbide.

  17. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich

  18. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual Phase Precipitation Hardened Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Increasing demand for high strength powder metallurgy (PM) steels has resulted in the development of dual phase PM steels. In this work, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 538°C in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite hardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties. Due to the complex non-uniform stresses and strains associated with conventional nanoindentation, micropillar compression has become an attractive method to probe local mechanical behavior while limiting strain gradients and contributions from surrounding features. In this study, micropillars of ferrite and martensite were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels. Compression testing was conducted using a nanoindenter equipped with a flat punch indenter. The stress-strain curves of the individual microconstituents were calculated from the load-displacement curves less the extraneous displacements of the system. Using a rule of mixtures approach in conjunction with porosity corrections, the mechanical properties of ferrite and martensite were combined for comparison to tensile tests of the bulk material, and reasonable agreement was found for the ultimate tensile

  19. Effect of coating time on corrosion behavior of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated powder metallurgy iron specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Dube, R.K.

    1995-08-01

    Powder metallurgy iron specimens with porosities in the range 0% to 2% were electroless coated with nickel-phosphorus alloy from baths containing sodium hypophosphite (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O). The effect of coating time on thickness and phosphorus content of the deposit was analyzed. The free corrosion potentials and corrosion rates of the coated specimens were obtained by the Tafel extrapolation method in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Corrosion rates of the coated specimens after heat treatment also were studied. The observed corrosion characteristics were explained by the mixed-potential theory.

  20. Computerized Powder Metallurgy (P/M) Forging Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    these rules to complex components requires an understanding of the behavior of porous materials with respect to densification, flow and fracture and...shape for densification and non-aggravating metal flow . This was accomplished by recognizing characteristic deformation modes in the input shape for...FORCINGS 27 3.1 Introduction 27 iv ’ 3.2 Basic Equations 28 3.2.1 Yield Behavior 28 3.2.2 Flow Rule 29 3.2.3 Densification 31 3.3 Application

  1. Phase identification in boron-containing powder metallurgy steel using EBSD in combination with EPMA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ming-Wei Cai, Wen-Zhang

    2016-03-15

    Boron (B) is extensively used to induce liquid phase sintering (LPS) in powder metallurgy (PM) steels and thereby increase the densification. The alloying elements in B-containing PM steels affect the boride phase, stability of the boride, the temperature of liquid formation, and the progress of LPS. However, the boride phase has not been systematically identified yet. The main objective of this study was to clarify the influences of alloying elements, including C, Cr, and Ni, on the boride phases using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in combination with electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Network structures consisting of ferrite, Fe{sub 2}B boride, and Fe{sub 3}C carbide were extensively observed in the Fe–0.4B–0.5C steel. The portions of Fe{sub 2}B were sufficiently larger than those of Fe{sub 3}C, and Fe{sub 3}C was mostly distributed at the interfaces between ferrite and Fe{sub 2}B. Adding 1.5 wt.% Cr or 1.8 wt.% Ni to Fe–0.4B–0.5C steel completely changes the Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 3}C phases to a M{sub 3}(B,C) phase, where M represents the metallic elements, including Fe, Cr, Mo, and Ni. Furthermore, Cr, Mo, B, and C atoms tend to concentrate on the M{sub 3}(B,C) phase, but Ni atoms do not. - Highlights: • Network structures consisting of ferrite, Fe{sub 2}B boride, and Fe{sub 3}C carbide were extensively observed in the Fe–0.4B–0.5C steel. • Adding 1.5 wt.% Cr or 1.8 wt.% Ni to Fe–0.4B–0.5C steel completely transforms the Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 3}C phases to a M{sub 3}(B,C) phase. • Cr, Mo, B, and C atoms tend to concentrate on the M{sub 3}(B,C) phase, but Ni atoms do not.

  2. Effect of sintering conditions on the microstructural and mechanical characteristics of porous magnesium materials prepared by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2014-02-01

    There has recently been an increased demand for porous magnesium materials in many applications, especially in the medical field. Powder metallurgy appears to be a promising approach for the preparation of such materials. Many works have dealt with the preparation of porous magnesium; however, the effect of sintering conditions on material properties has rarely been investigated. In this work, we investigated porous magnesium samples that were prepared by powder metallurgy using ammonium bicarbonate spacer particles. The effects of the purity of the argon atmosphere and sintering time on the microstructure (SEM, EDX and XRD) and mechanical behaviour (universal loading machine and Vickers hardness tester) of porous magnesium were studied. The porosities of the prepared samples ranged from 24 to 29 vol.% depending on the sintering conditions. The purity of atmosphere played a significant role when the sintering time exceeded 6h. Under a gettered argon atmosphere, a prolonged sintering time enhanced diffusion connections between magnesium particles and improved the mechanical properties of the samples, whereas under a technical argon atmosphere, oxidation at the particle surfaces caused deterioration in the mechanical properties of the samples. These results suggest that a refined atmosphere is required to improve the mechanical properties of porous magnesium.

  3. Phase Transformation Behavior of Porous TiNi Alloys Produced by Powder Metallurgy Using Magnesium as a Space Holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydoğmuş, Tarik; Bor, Elif Tarhan; Bor, Şakir

    2011-09-01

    Porous TiNi alloys with porosities in the range of 51 to 73 pct were prepared successfully applying a new powder metallurgy fabrication route in which magnesium was used as a space holder, resulting in either single austenite phase or a mixture of austenite and martensite phases dictated by the composition of the starting powders, but entirely free from secondary brittle intermetallics, oxides, nitrides, and carbonitrides. Since transformation temperatures are very sensitive to composition, deformation, and oxidation, for the first time, transformation temperatures of porous TiNi alloys were investigated using chemically homogeneous specimens in as-sintered and aged conditions eliminating secondary phase, contamination, and deformation effects. It was found that the porosity content of the foams has no influence on the phase transformation temperatures both in as-sintered and aged conditions, while deformation, oxidation, and aging treatment are severely influential.

  4. U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ from resin for powder-metallurgy fabrication of reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine if cation exchange resin could be used to produce U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder suitable for use in powder metallurgy fabrication of fuel tubes for production reactors at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powders have been produced from three cation exchange resins: DOWEX (Dow Chemical Co.) 50W, AG (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Richmond, California) MP-50, and Bio-REX (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Richmond, California). This study included characterization of the thermal decomposition of uranium-loaded resins, measurement of properties of resin-based U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powders, and metallographic examination of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Al cores in extruded fuel tubes. Results to date show that AG MP-50 appears to be the best resin for producing U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder suitable for the PM process. 20 figures.

  5. Powder metallurgy inspired low-temperature fabrication of high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide products with good optical transparency.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongyu; Liu, Huili; Bai, Hongwei; Zhang, Qin; Fu, Qiang

    2016-02-03

    Stereocomplexation between enantiomeric poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(d-lactide) (PDLA) provides an avenue to greatly enhance performance of eco-friendly polylactide (PLA). Unfortunately, although the manufacturing of semicrystalline polymers generally involves melt processing, it is still hugely challenging to create high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide (sc-PLA) products from melt-processed high-molecular-weight PLLA/PDLA blends due to the weak crystallization memory effect of stereocomplex (sc) crystallites after complete melting as well as the substantial degradation of PLA chains at elevated melt-processing temperatures of ca. 240-260 °C. Inspired by the concept of powder metallurgy, here we report a new facile route to address these obstacles by sintering of sc-PLA powder at temperatures as low as 180-210 °C, which is distinctly different from traditional sintering of polymer powders performed at temperatures far exceeding their melting temperatures. The enantiomeric PLA chain segments from adjacent powder particles can interdiffuse across particle interfaces and co-crystallize into new sc crystallites capable of tightly welding the interfaces during the low-temperature sintering process, and thus highly transparent sc-PLA products with outstanding heat resistance, mechanical strength, and hydrolytic stability have been successfully fabricated for the first time.

  6. Powder metallurgy inspired low-temperature fabrication of high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide products with good optical transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongyu; Liu, Huili; Bai, Hongwei; Zhang, Qin; Fu, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Stereocomplexation between enantiomeric poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(D-lactide) (PDLA) provides an avenue to greatly enhance performance of eco-friendly polylactide (PLA). Unfortunately, although the manufacturing of semicrystalline polymers generally involves melt processing, it is still hugely challenging to create high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide (sc-PLA) products from melt-processed high-molecular-weight PLLA/PDLA blends due to the weak crystallization memory effect of stereocomplex (sc) crystallites after complete melting as well as the substantial degradation of PLA chains at elevated melt-processing temperatures of ca. 240-260 °C. Inspired by the concept of powder metallurgy, here we report a new facile route to address these obstacles by sintering of sc-PLA powder at temperatures as low as 180-210 °C, which is distinctly different from traditional sintering of polymer powders performed at temperatures far exceeding their melting temperatures. The enantiomeric PLA chain segments from adjacent powder particles can interdiffuse across particle interfaces and co-crystallize into new sc crystallites capable of tightly welding the interfaces during the low-temperature sintering process, and thus highly transparent sc-PLA products with outstanding heat resistance, mechanical strength, and hydrolytic stability have been successfully fabricated for the first time.

  7. Powder metallurgy inspired low-temperature fabrication of high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide products with good optical transparency

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongyu; Liu, Huili; Bai, Hongwei; Zhang, Qin; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Stereocomplexation between enantiomeric poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(d-lactide) (PDLA) provides an avenue to greatly enhance performance of eco-friendly polylactide (PLA). Unfortunately, although the manufacturing of semicrystalline polymers generally involves melt processing, it is still hugely challenging to create high-performance stereocomplexed polylactide (sc-PLA) products from melt-processed high-molecular-weight PLLA/PDLA blends due to the weak crystallization memory effect of stereocomplex (sc) crystallites after complete melting as well as the substantial degradation of PLA chains at elevated melt-processing temperatures of ca. 240–260 °C. Inspired by the concept of powder metallurgy, here we report a new facile route to address these obstacles by sintering of sc-PLA powder at temperatures as low as 180–210 °C, which is distinctly different from traditional sintering of polymer powders performed at temperatures far exceeding their melting temperatures. The enantiomeric PLA chain segments from adjacent powder particles can interdiffuse across particle interfaces and co-crystallize into new sc crystallites capable of tightly welding the interfaces during the low-temperature sintering process, and thus highly transparent sc-PLA products with outstanding heat resistance, mechanical strength, and hydrolytic stability have been successfully fabricated for the first time. PMID:26837848

  8. The roles of rare earth dispersoids and process route on the low cycle fatigue behavior of a rapidly solidified powder metallurgy titanium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gigliotti, M.F.X. ); Woodfield, A.P. )

    1993-08-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests were conducted at 482C (900F) on forgings and extrusions of a rapidly solidified powder metallurgy titanium base alloy with and without rare earth additions. The variables studied were process temperature and heat treatment. Rare earth dispersions reduced fatigue life, and fracture surfaces indicated internal fatigue crack initiation at rare earth particles.

  9. Mechanical strength and thermophysical properties of PM212: A high temperature self-lubricating powder metallurgy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Phillip M.; Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Martineau, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A powder metallurgy composite, PM212, composed of metal bonded chromium carbide and solid lubricants is shown to be self-lubricating to a maximum application temperature of 900 C. The high temperature compressive strength, tensile strength, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity data needed to design PM212 sliding contact bearings and seals are reported for sintered and isostatically pressed (HIPed) versions of PM212. Other properties presented are room temperature density, hardness, and elastic modulus. In general, both versions appear to have adequate strength to be considered as sliding contact bearing materials, but the HIPed version, which is fully dense, is much stronger than the sintered version which contains about 20 percent pore volume. The sintered material is less costly to make, but the HIPed version is better where high compressive strength is important.

  10. The wear properties of in-situ 7075 Al-Ti composites produced by powder metallurgy route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, H.; Özyurek, D.; Yıldırım, M.; Bostan, B.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the wear properties of in-situ 7075 Al-Ti composites produced by powder metallurgy route were investigated. Different amount of Ti (2, 4, 6 %) added to gas atomized 7075 Al alloy powders and they were mixed in turbula with 47rpm for 45 minutes. Then the mixed powders were pre-shaped by press under 600 MPa pressure. The samples were cooled in the furnace after sintered at 580 °C for 4 hours in the atmosphere controlled furnace. Standard metallographic process such as grinding, polishing and etching were applied to sintered samples. The hardness values were measured. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) examines were carried out. The wear tests were performed in a pin-on disc type wear apparatus with 1 ms-1 sliding speed at six different sliding distance (500-3000 m) under 30 N loads. As a result of studies, hardness values were increased with increasing Ti content, in addition the weight losses were decreased with increasing Ti amount.

  11. Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Hot-Working Characteristics of a Hot Isostatic-Pressed Powder Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Litao; Sun, Wenru; Cui, Yuyou; Yang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    A series of microstructure observation, tensile, and hot compression tests were conducted to investigate the variation of microstructure, tensile properties, and hot-working characteristics of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy with hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) temperature, to establish a basis for the parameter selection for PM superalloy preparation. The results show that the dendritic structure from the powder was not completely removed until the HIPing temperature is above the γ' solvus; γ/γ' eutectic formed when the powder particles were HIPed at 1533 K (1260 °C) or above. Prior particle boundaries (PPBs) were observed in alloys HIPed at 1513 K (1240 °C) and below; the PPB decoration is serious in alloys HIPed at 1483 K and 1513 K (1210 °C and 1240 °C), owing to melting and aggregation of the boride phase at the particle boundaries during HIPing; the PPBs were eliminated when the HIPing was done at 1533 K (1260 °C) or above. Tensile fracture mode of the alloy changes from inter-particle and transgranular mixed fracture to transgranular fracture with increasing HIPing temperature, which is in accordance with the change in precipitate distribution at the PPBs. The hot workability of alloy is poor for all combinations of HIPing/deformation conditions except for HIPing at sub-solvus temperature and deformation at low strain rates.

  12. The wear properties of in-situ 7075 Al-Ti composites produced by powder metallurgy route

    SciTech Connect

    Ay, H.; Özyurek, D.; Yıldırım, M.

    2016-04-21

    In this study, the wear properties of in-situ 7075 Al-Ti composites produced by powder metallurgy route were investigated. Different amount of Ti (2, 4, 6 %) added to gas atomized 7075 Al alloy powders and they were mixed in turbula with 47rpm for 45 minutes. Then the mixed powders were pre-shaped by press under 600 MPa pressure. The samples were cooled in the furnace after sintered at 580 °C for 4 hours in the atmosphere controlled furnace. Standard metallographic process such as grinding, polishing and etching were applied to sintered samples. The hardness values were measured. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) examines were carried out. The wear tests were performed in a pin-on disc type wear apparatus with 1 ms{sup −1} sliding speed at six different sliding distance (500-3000 m) under 30 N loads. As a result of studies, hardness values were increased with increasing Ti content, in addition the weight losses were decreased with increasing Ti amount.

  13. Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Hot-Working Characteristics of a Hot Isostatic-Pressed Powder Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Litao; Sun, Wenru; Cui, Yuyou; Yang, Rui

    2017-03-01

    A series of microstructure observation, tensile, and hot compression tests were conducted to investigate the variation of microstructure, tensile properties, and hot-working characteristics of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy with hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) temperature, to establish a basis for the parameter selection for PM superalloy preparation. The results show that the dendritic structure from the powder was not completely removed until the HIPing temperature is above the γ' solvus; γ/γ' eutectic formed when the powder particles were HIPed at 1533 K (1260 °C) or above. Prior particle boundaries (PPBs) were observed in alloys HIPed at 1513 K (1240 °C) and below; the PPB decoration is serious in alloys HIPed at 1483 K and 1513 K (1210 °C and 1240 °C), owing to melting and aggregation of the boride phase at the particle boundaries during HIPing; the PPBs were eliminated when the HIPing was done at 1533 K (1260 °C) or above. Tensile fracture mode of the alloy changes from inter-particle and transgranular mixed fracture to transgranular fracture with increasing HIPing temperature, which is in accordance with the change in precipitate distribution at the PPBs. The hot workability of alloy is poor for all combinations of HIPing/deformation conditions except for HIPing at sub-solvus temperature and deformation at low strain rates.

  14. Effects of MgO Nano Particles on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite prepared via Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghchesara, Mohammad Amin; Abdizadeh, Hossein; Baharvandi, Hamid Reza

    The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructural and mechanical properties of Al/nano MgO composite prepared via powder metallurgy method. Pure atomized aluminum powder with an average particle size of 1μm and MgO particulate with an average particle size between 60 to 80 nm were used. Composites containing 1.5, 2.5 and 5 percent of volume fraction of MgO were prepared by powder metallurgy method. The specimens were pressed by Cold Isostatic Press machine (CIP), subsequently were sintered at 575, 600 and 625°C. After sintering and preparing the samples, mechanical properties were measured. The results of microstructure, compression and hardness tests indicated that addition of MgO particulates to aluminum matrix composites improves the mechanical properties.

  15. A Novel Powder Metallurgy Processing Approach to Prepare Fine-Grained Cu-Al-Ni Shape-Memory Alloy Strips from Elemental Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajpai, S. K.; Dube, R. K.; Chatterjee, P.; Sangal, S.

    2012-07-01

    The current work describes the experimental results related to the successful preparation of fine-grained, Cu-Al-Ni, high-temperature shape-memory alloy (SMA) strips from elemental Cu, Al, and Ni powders via a novel powder metallurgy (P/M) processing approach. This route consists of short time period ball milling of elemental powder mixture, preform preparation from milled powder, sintering of preforms, hot-densification rolling of unsheathed sintered powder preforms under protective atmosphere, and postconsolidation homogenization treatment of the hot-rolled strips. It has been shown that it is possible to prepare chemically homogeneous Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips consisting of equiaxed grains of average size approximately 6 μm via the current processing approach. It also has been shown that fine-grained microstructure in the finished Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips resulted from the pinning effect of nanosized alumina particles present on the grain boundaries. The finished SMA strips were almost fully martensitic in nature, consisting of a mixture of β1^' } - and γ1^' } -type martensites. The Cu-Al-Ni SMA strips had 677 MPa average fracture strength, coupled with 13 pct average fracture strain. The fractured surfaces of the specimens exhibited primarily dimpled ductile type of fracture, together with some transgranular mode of fracture. The Cu-Al-Ni strips exhibited an almost 100 pct one-way shape recovery after bending followed by unconstrained heating at 1, 2, and 4 pct applied deformation prestrain. The two-way shape-memory strain was found approximately 0.35 pct after 15 training cycles at 4 pct applied training prestrain.

  16. Processing condition for the development of cube texture in Ni and Ni alloy tapes fabricated by powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bong Ki; Lee, Dong-Wook; Kim, Min-Woo; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Park, Pyeong Yeal; Jung, Kyu-Dong; Kim, Chan-Joong

    2004-10-01

    Bi-axially textured Ni, Ni-W (1, 3 and 5 at.%) and Ni-Cu alloy tapes for YBCO coated conductors were fabricated by powder metallurgy process including powder compaction, cold isostatic pressing, cold rolling and recrystallization heat treatment. The rod-like Ni and Ni alloy compacts were sintered at 1100 °C for 6 h in 96% Ar-4% H 2 atmosphere. The sintered Ni and Ni-W rods were successfully cold-rolled into thin tapes of 80-100 μm thickness with 5% reduction at each path, but the Ni-Cu alloy rods with Cu content less than 20 at.% were made into tapes. The Ni and Ni alloy tapes were heat-treated at 800-1200 °C for the development of cube texture. The good (2 0 0) texture was obtained for both Ni and Ni-W alloy tapes, while it was obtained only for the Ni-Cu tapes with low Cu contents. The W and Cu addition to Ni improved the mechanical properties by solid solution hardening. Critical current density ( Jc) of YBCO film deposited on the CeO 2/YSZ/CeO 2(CYC)/Ni template was 0.25 MA/cm 2 at 77 K and self-field.

  17. Deformation and Fracture of P/M (Powder/Metallurgy) Titanium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-05

    the graduate students involved. The following students have been supported by this program during part or all of the past fiscal year: Barbara Loqrasso...holes/voids. Hot Isostatic Pressing (with Barbara Lograsso) The use of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) to compact both powders and castings to full density...17 19. N. A. Fleck and R. A. Smith, Powder Metall. 24, 126 (1981). 20. F. A. McClintock , J. Appl

  18. An Investigation on the Sinterability and the Compaction Behavior of Aluminum/Graphene Nanoplatelets (GNPs) Prepared by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboori, A.; Novara, C.; Pavese, M.; Badini, C.; Giorgis, F.; Fino, P.

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the densification response of Al matrix reinforced with different weight percentages (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 wt.%) of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) was studied. These composites were produced by a wet method followed by a conventional powder metallurgy. The Raman spectrum of graphene indicates that preparation of the composites through the wet mixing method did not affect the disordering and defect density in the GNPs structure. The nanocomposite powder mixture was consolidated via a cold uniaxial compaction. The samples were sintered at different temperatures (540, 580 and 620 °C) under nitrogen flow so as to assess the sinterability of the nanocomposites. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been carried out to check the possible reaction between GNPs and aluminum. According to the XRD patterns, it seems that Al4C3 did not form during the fabrication process. The relative density, compressibility, sinterability and Vickers hardness of the nanocomposites were also evaluated. The effects of GNPs on the consolidation behavior of the matrix were studied using the Heckel, Panelli and Ambrosio Filho, and Ge equations. The outcomes show that at early stage of consolidation the rearrangement of particles is dominant, while by increasing the compaction pressure, due to the load partitioning effect of GNPs, the densification rate of the powder mixture decreases. Moreover, the fabricated nanocomposites exhibited high Vickers hardness of 67 HV5, which is approximately 50% higher than monolithic aluminum. The effect of graphene addition on the thermal conductivity of Al/GNPs nanocomposites was evaluated by means of thermal diffusivity measurement, and the results showed that the higher thermal conductivity can be only achieved at lower graphene content.

  19. An Investigation on the Sinterability and the Compaction Behavior of Aluminum/Graphene Nanoplatelets (GNPs) Prepared by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboori, A.; Novara, C.; Pavese, M.; Badini, C.; Giorgis, F.; Fino, P.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the densification response of Al matrix reinforced with different weight percentages (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 wt.%) of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) was studied. These composites were produced by a wet method followed by a conventional powder metallurgy. The Raman spectrum of graphene indicates that preparation of the composites through the wet mixing method did not affect the disordering and defect density in the GNPs structure. The nanocomposite powder mixture was consolidated via a cold uniaxial compaction. The samples were sintered at different temperatures (540, 580 and 620 °C) under nitrogen flow so as to assess the sinterability of the nanocomposites. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been carried out to check the possible reaction between GNPs and aluminum. According to the XRD patterns, it seems that Al4C3 did not form during the fabrication process. The relative density, compressibility, sinterability and Vickers hardness of the nanocomposites were also evaluated. The effects of GNPs on the consolidation behavior of the matrix were studied using the Heckel, Panelli and Ambrosio Filho, and Ge equations. The outcomes show that at early stage of consolidation the rearrangement of particles is dominant, while by increasing the compaction pressure, due to the load partitioning effect of GNPs, the densification rate of the powder mixture decreases. Moreover, the fabricated nanocomposites exhibited high Vickers hardness of 67 HV5, which is approximately 50% higher than monolithic aluminum. The effect of graphene addition on the thermal conductivity of Al/GNPs nanocomposites was evaluated by means of thermal diffusivity measurement, and the results showed that the higher thermal conductivity can be only achieved at lower graphene content.

  20. Effect of Cu addition on the martensitic transformation of powder metallurgy processed Ti–Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon-wook; Choi, Eunsoo

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • M{sub s} of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} powders is 22 °C, while M{sub s} of SPS-sintered porous bulk increases up to 50 °C. • M{sub s} of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 40}Cu{sub 20} porous bulk is only 2 °C higher than that of the powders. • Recovered stain of porous TiNi and TiNiCu alloy is more than 1.5%. - Abstract: Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Cu{sub 20} powders were prepared by gas atomization and their transformation behaviors were examined by means of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. One-step B2–B19’ transformation occurred in Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} powders, while Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Cu{sub 20} powders showed B2–B19 transformation behavior. Porous bulks with 24% porosity were fabricated by spark plasma sintering. The martensitic transformation start temperature (50 °C) of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} porous bulk is much higher than that (22 °C) of the as-solidified powders. However, the martensitic transformation start temperature (35 °C) of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Cu{sub 20} porous bulk is almost the same as that (33 °C) of the powders. When the specimens were compressed to the strain of 8% and then unloaded, the residual strains of Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}Cu{sub 20} alloy bulks were 3.95 and 3.7%, respectively. However, these residual strains were recovered up to 1.7% after heating by the shape memory phenomenon.

  1. Toxicology and occupational hazards of new materials and processes in metal surface treatment, powder metallurgy, technical ceramics, and fiber-reinforced plastics.

    PubMed

    Midtgård, U; Jelnes, J E

    1991-12-01

    Many new materials and processes are about to find their way from the research laboratory into industry. The present paper describes some of these processes and provides an overview of possible occupational hazards and a list of chemicals used or produced in the processes. The technological areas that are considered are metal surface treatment (ion implantation, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying), powder metallurgy, advanced technical ceramics, and fiber-reinforced plastics.

  2. The combination of precipitation and dispersion hardening in powder metallurgy produced Cu-Ti-Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozic, D.; Dimcic, O.; Dimcic, B. Cvijovic, I.; Rajkovic, V.

    2008-08-15

    Microstructure and microhardness properties of precipitation hardened Cu-Ti and precipitation/dispersion hardened Cu-Ti-Si alloys have been analyzed. Cu-1.2Ti and Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} (wt.%) atomized powders were characterized before and after consolidation by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing). Rapidly solidified powders and HIP-ed compacts were subsequently subjected to thermal treatment in hydrogen at temperatures between 300 and 600 deg. C. Compared to Cu-Ti powder particles and compacts, obtained by the same procedure, the strengthening effect in Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} powder particles and compacts was much greater. The binary and ternary powders both reveal properties superior to those of Cu-1.2Ti and Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} compacts. Microhardness analysis as a function of the aging temperature of Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} alloy shows an interaction between precipitation and dispersion hardening which offers possibilities for an application at elevated temperatures.

  3. Fatigue Performance of Powder Metallurgy (PM) Ti-6Al-4V Alloy: A Critical Analysis of Current Fatigue Data and Metallurgical Approaches for Improving Fatigue Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Ravi Chandran, K. S.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive assessment of fatigue performance of powder metallurgy (PM) Ti-6Al-4V alloy, manufactured using various powder-based processing approaches to-date, is performed in this work. The focus is on PM processes that use either blended element (BE) or pre-alloyed (PA) powder as feedstock. Porosity and the microstructure condition have been found to be the two most dominant material variables that control the fatigue strength. The evaluation reveals that the fatigue performance of PM Ti-6Al-4V, in the as-sintered state, is far lower than that in the wrought condition. This is largely caused by residual porosity, even if it is present in small amounts, or, by the coarse lamellar colony microstructure. The fatigue strength is significantly improved by the closure of pores, and it approaches the levels of wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloys, after hot-isostatic-pressing (HIPing). Further thermo-mechanical and heat treatments lead to additional increases in fatigue strength-in one case, a high fatigue strength level, exceeding that of the mill-annealed condition, was achieved. The work identifies the powder, process and microstructure improvements that are necessary for achieving high fatigue strength in powder metallurgical Ti-6Al-4V alloys in order for them to effectively compete with wrought forms. The present findings, gathered from the traditional titanium powder metallurgy, are also directly applicable to additively manufactured titanium, because of the similarities in pores, defects, and microstructures between the two manufacturing processes.

  4. Microwave Heating, Isothermal Sintering, and Mechanical Properties of Powder Metallurgy Titanium and Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. D.; Guan, C. L.; Yang, Y. F.; Schaffer, G. B.; Qian, M.

    2013-04-01

    This article presents a detailed assessment of microwave (MW) heating, isothermal sintering, and the resulting tensile properties of commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti), Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al (wt pct), by comparison with those fabricated by conventional vacuum sintering. The potential of MW sintering for titanium fabrication is evaluated accordingly. Pure MW radiation is capable of heating titanium powder to ≥1573 K (1300 °C), but the heating response is erratic and difficult to reproduce. In contrast, the use of SiC MW susceptors ensures rapid, consistent, and controllable MW heating of titanium powder. MW sintering can consolidate CP-Ti and Ti alloys compacted from -100 mesh hydride-dehydride (HDH) Ti powder to ~95.0 pct theoretical density (TD) at 1573 K (1300 °C), but no accelerated isothermal sintering has been observed over conventional practice. Significant interstitial contamination occurred from the Al2O3-SiC insulation-susceptor package, despite the high vacuum used (≤4.0 × 10-3 Pa). This leads to erratic mechanical properties including poor tensile ductility. The use of Ti sponge as impurity (O, N, C, and Si) absorbers can effectively eliminate this problem and ensure good-to-excellent tensile properties for MW-sintered CP-Ti, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al, and Ti-6Al-4V. The mechanisms behind various observations are discussed. The prime benefit of MW sintering of Ti powder is rapid heating. MW sintering of Ti powder is suitable for the fabrication of small titanium parts or titanium preforms for subsequent thermomechanical processing.

  5. Wear and Corrosion Behavior of Functionally Graded Nano-SiC/2014Al Composites Produced by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Guo; Li, Chuan-Peng; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Functionally graded 2014Al/SiC composites (FGMs) with varying volume fractions (1-7%) of nano-SiC particulates (n-SiCp) were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The effect of n-SiCp content on corrosion and wear behaviors was studied. The microstructures of composites were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion behavior of the composites was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization scans in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Corrosion results show that corrosion current of composite layer with 3 vol.% n-SiC was much lower than that of 2014Al matrix. Mechanical properties of the composites were assessed by microhardness tests and ball-on-disk wear tests. As the applied load changed from 15 to 30 N, wear rates of the composites increased significantly and the wear mechanism transformed from mild to severe wear regime. It also shows that 3 vol.% n-SiCp/2014Al composite layer observed the lowest wear rate where adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms played a major role. These results suggest that the n-SiCp are effective candidates for fabricating FGMs for the applications demanding a tough core and a hard, wear or corrosion resisting surface.

  6. Effect of Microstructure on the Hot Deformation Behavior of TiAl-Based Alloys Prepared by Powder Metallurgy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DongJun; Zhang, Rui; Yuan, Hao; Qiang, JianMing

    2017-10-01

    To investigate microstructural influence on deformation behavior, TiAl-based alloys were prepared by spark plasma sintering and heat treatment was conducted to optimize the microstructures of as-sintered samples. The near-γ microstructure of the sintered alloy transformed into a duplex microstructure after heat treatment. Furthermore, isothermal compression tests were carried out at different temperatures in the range 1100-1200°C with a strain rate of 0.01 s-1. The resistances to deformation of the heat-treated samples were smaller than those of the as-sintered samples under the same deformation conditions. In particular, the heat-treated sample had fewer and smaller α2 phases than did the sintered alloy, and it exhibited a well-deformed appearance and homogeneous microstructure after deformation at a temperature 100°C lower than the sintered alloy. The results revealed that TiAl-based alloys with an optimal microstructure fabricated by powder metallurgy had good formability and a homogeneous deformed microstructure, which was preferable for hot-working and further secondary processing.

  7. Effect of Microstructure on the Hot Deformation Behavior of TiAl-Based Alloys Prepared by Powder Metallurgy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DongJun; Zhang, Rui; Yuan, Hao; Qiang, JianMing

    2017-06-01

    To investigate microstructural influence on deformation behavior, TiAl-based alloys were prepared by spark plasma sintering and heat treatment was conducted to optimize the microstructures of as-sintered samples. The near-γ microstructure of the sintered alloy transformed into a duplex microstructure after heat treatment. Furthermore, isothermal compression tests were carried out at different temperatures in the range 1100-1200°C with a strain rate of 0.01 s-1. The resistances to deformation of the heat-treated samples were smaller than those of the as-sintered samples under the same deformation conditions. In particular, the heat-treated sample had fewer and smaller α2 phases than did the sintered alloy, and it exhibited a well-deformed appearance and homogeneous microstructure after deformation at a temperature 100°C lower than the sintered alloy. The results revealed that TiAl-based alloys with an optimal microstructure fabricated by powder metallurgy had good formability and a homogeneous deformed microstructure, which was preferable for hot-working and further secondary processing.

  8. The Effect of Forging Variables on the Supersolvus Heat-Treatment Response of Powder-Metallurgy Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Shank, J. M.; Shiveley, A. R.; Saurber, W. M.; Gaussa, E. F.; Pilchak, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of subsolvus forging temperature and strain rate on the grain size developed during final supersolvus heat treatment (SSHT) of two powder-metallurgy, gamma-gamma prime superalloys, IN-100 and LSHR, was established. For this purpose, isothermal, hot compression tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 1144 K (871 °C) and 22 K (22 °C) below the respective gamma-prime solvus temperatures ( T γ') and strain rates between 0.0003 and 10 s-1. Deformed samples were then heat treated 20 K (20 °C) above the solvus for 1 h with selected additional samples exposed for shorter and longer times. For both alloys, the grain size developed during SSHT was in the range of 15 to 30 μm, except for those processing conditions consisting of pre-deformation at the highest temperature, i.e., T γ'—22 K ( T γ'—22 °C), and strain rates in the range of ~0.001 to 0.1 s-1. In these latter instances, the heat-treated grain size was approx. four times as large. The observations were interpreted in terms of the mechanisms of deformation during hot working and their effect on the driving forces for grain-boundary migration which controls the evolution of the gamma-grain size.

  9. Human alveolar bone cell proliferation, expression of osteoblastic phenotype, and matrix mineralization on porous titanium produced by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; Crippa, Grasiele Edilaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco; Taba, Mario; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Beloti, Marcio Mateus

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the influence of the porous titanium (Ti) structure on the osteogenic cell behaviour. Porous Ti discs were fabricated by the powder metallurgy process with the pore size typically between 50 and 400 microm and a porosity of 60%. Osteogenic cells obtained from human alveolar bone were cultured until subconfluence and subcultured on dense Ti (control) and porous Ti for periods of up to 17 days. Cultures grown on porous Ti exhibited increased cell proliferation and total protein content, and lower levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity than on dense Ti. In general, gene expression of osteoblastic markers-runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, bone morphogenetic protein-7, and osteocalcin was lower at day 7 and higher at day 17 in cultures grown on porous Ti compared with dense Ti, a finding consistent with the enhanced growth rate for such cultures. The amount of mineralized matrix was greater on porous Ti compared with the dense one. These results indicate that the porous Ti is an appropriate substrate for osteogenic cell adhesion, proliferation, and production of a mineralized matrix. Because of the three-dimensional environment it provides, porous Ti should be considered an advantageous substrate for promoting desirable implant surface-bone interactions.

  10. Microstructure and Strengthening Mechanisms in an Ultrafine Grained Al-Mg-Sc Alloy Produced by Powder Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Tammy J. Harrell; Troy D. Topping; Haiming Wen; Tao Hu; JULIE M. SCHOENUNG; ENRIQUE J. LAVERNIA

    2014-12-01

    Additions of Sc to an Al-Mg matrix were investigated, paying particular attention to the influence of Al3Sc precipitates and other dispersoids, as well as grain size, on mechanical behavior. Prior studies have shown that Sc significantly increases the strength of coarse-grained Al-Mg alloys. Prompted by these findings, we hypothesized that it would be of fundamental and technological interest to study the behavior of Sc additions to an ultrafine-grained (UFG) microstructure (e.g., 100’s nm). Accordingly, we investigated the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of a cryomilled ultrafine grained Al-5Mg-0.4Sc (wt pct) and compared the results to those of an equivalent fine-grained material (FG) produced by powder metallurgy. Experimental materials were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP’ing) followed by extrusion or dual mode dynamic forging. Under identical processing conditions, UFG materials generate large Al3Sc precipitates with an average diameter of 154 nm and spaced approximately 1 to 3 µm apart, while precipitates in the FG materials have a diameter of 24 nm and are spaced 50 to 200 nm apart. The strengthening mechanisms are calculated for all materials and it is determined that the greatest strengthening contributions for the UFG and FG materials are Mg-O/N dispersion strengthening and precipitate strengthening, respectively.

  11. Wear and Corrosion Behavior of Functionally Graded Nano-SiC/2014Al Composites Produced by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Guo; Li, Chuan-Peng; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2017-02-01

    Functionally graded 2014Al/SiC composites (FGMs) with varying volume fractions (1-7%) of nano-SiC particulates (n-SiCp) were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The effect of n-SiCp content on corrosion and wear behaviors was studied. The microstructures of composites were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion behavior of the composites was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization scans in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Corrosion results show that corrosion current of composite layer with 3 vol.% n-SiC was much lower than that of 2014Al matrix. Mechanical properties of the composites were assessed by microhardness tests and ball-on-disk wear tests. As the applied load changed from 15 to 30 N, wear rates of the composites increased significantly and the wear mechanism transformed from mild to severe wear regime. It also shows that 3 vol.% n-SiCp/2014Al composite layer observed the lowest wear rate where adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms played a major role. These results suggest that the n-SiCp are effective candidates for fabricating FGMs for the applications demanding a tough core and a hard, wear or corrosion resisting surface.

  12. Application of powder metallurgy to an advanced-temperature nickel-base alloy, NASA-TRW 6-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.; Waters, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Bar stock of the NASA-TRW 6-A alloy was made by prealloyed powder techniques and its properties evaluated over a range of temperatures. Room temperature ultimate tensile strength was 1894 MN/sq m (274 500 psi). The as-extruded powder product showed substantial improvements in strength over the cast alloy up to 649 C (1200 F) and superplasticity at 1093 C (2000 F). Both conventional and autoclave heat treatments were applied to the extruded powder product. The conventional heat treatment was effective in increasing rupture life at 649 and 704 C (1200 and 1300 F); the autoclave heat treatment, at 760 and 816 C (1400 and 1500 F).

  13. Deformation Behavior of Powder Metallurgy Connecting Rod Preform During Hot Forging Based on Hot Compression and Finite Element Method Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengxian; Yi, Jianhong; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Powder-forged connecting rod with a complex geometry shape always has a problem with nonuniform density distribution. Moreover, the physical property of preform plays a critical role for optimizing the connecting rod quality. The flow behavior of a Fe-3Cu-0.5C (wt pct) alloy with a relative density of 0.8 manufactured by powder metallurgy (P/M, Fe-Cu-C) was studied using isothermal compression tests. The material constitutive equation, power dissipation ( η) maps, and hot processing maps of the P/M Fe-Cu-C alloy were established. Then, the hot forging process of the connecting rod preforms was simulated using the material constitutive model based on finite element method simulation. The calculated results agree well with the experimental ones. The results show that the flow stress increases with decreasing temperature and increasing strain rate. The activation energy of the P/M Fe-Cu-C alloy with a relative density of 0.8 is 188.42 kJ/mol. The optimum temperature at the strain of 0.4 for good hot workability of sintered Fe-Cu-C alloy ranges from 1333 K to 1380 K (1060 °C to 1107 °C). The relative density of the hot-forged connecting rod at the central part changed significantly compared with that at the big end and that at the small end. These present theoretical and experimental investigations can provide a methodology for accurately predicting the densification behavior of the P/M connecting rod preform during hot forging, and they help to optimize the processing parameters.

  14. Development of superalloys by powder metallurgy for use at 1000 - 1400 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, C. D.

    1971-01-01

    Consolidated powders of four nickel-base superalloys were studied for potential application as compressor and turbine discs in jet engines. All of the alloys were based on the Rene' 95 chemistry. Three of these had variations in carbon and A12O3 contents, and the fourth alloy was chemically modified to a higher volume fraction. The A12O3 was added by preoxidation of the powders prior to extrusion. Various levels of four experimental factors (1) alloy composition, (2) grain size, (3) thermomechanical processing, and (4) room temperature deformation plus final age were evaluated by tensile and stress rupture testing at 1200 F. Various levels of the four factors were assumed in order to construct the statistically-designed experiment, but the actual levels investigated were established in preliminary studies that preceded the statistical process development study.

  15. Development of Rare-Earth Free Mn-Al Permanent Magnet Employing Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Shyam, R.; Upadhyay, N. K.; Dhar, A.

    2015-02-01

    Most widely used high-performance permanent magnets are currently based on intermetallics of rare-earths in combination with Fe and Co. Rare-earth elements required for these magnets are getting expensive by the day. Consequently, there is a thrust worldwide to develop economical rare-earth free permanent magnets. It is acknowledged that the phase in Mn-Al alloys possesses magnetic properties without the presence of ferromagnetic elements such as Fe, Co, and Ni. In the present study, we report the synthesis of magnetic phase of Mn54Al46 alloy synthesized using mechanical alloying followed by solutionizing and annealing to obtain the desired magnetic phase. It is well known that Al dissolves partially in Mn matrix hence supersaturated solid solution of Mn54Al46 alloy powder was obtained by mechanical alloying using a planetary high-energy ball mill. For this purpose elemental Mn and Al powders were ball-milled in Argon atmosphere at 400 rpm using stainless steel bowl with ball to powder ratio of 15:1. These mechanically alloyed Mn54Al46 powders were then consolidated using spark plasma sintering at 550°C for 20 min. followed by solution treatment at 1050°C for 5 hrs and then water quenched to retain high temperature phase. Subsequently, the Mn54Al46 samples were annealed in the temperature range 450°C-650°C to obtain the magnetic phase. These samples were characterized by XRD and SEM and the magnetic properties were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It was observed that the magnetization and coercivity of MnAl magnets exhibited strong dependence on annealing temperature and annealing time.

  16. Low-temperature synthesis of MgB2 via powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel

    2016-12-01

    Ball-milled Mg/B2O3 powder blends reveal interpenetrating layers of deformed magnesium and boron oxide grains that are increasingly refined with increasing milling time. Boron oxide is reduced by Mg and MgO thus formed reacts with the remaining B2O3 to produce Mg3(BO3)2 during ball milling for 30 min. Both B2O3 and Mg3(BO3)2 react with Mg to produce MgB2 upon further ball milling. An annealing treatment can be employed when ball milling is performed for less than 1 h as thermal exposure of the ball-milled Mg/B2O3 powder blends also leads to the formation of MgB2. The above reactions take place between 500 and 700 °C when the Mg/B2O3 powder blend is ball milled for 30 min, and between 450 and 550 °C, after ball milling for 1 h. This is a very attractive route owing to processing temperatures where the volatility of Mg is no longer a problem.

  17. Study of the mechanical stability and bioactivity of Bioglass(®) based glass-ceramic scaffolds produced via powder metallurgy-inspired technology.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Elena; Melli, Virginia; Catignoli, Gabriele; Altomare, Lina; Jahromi, Maryam Tavafoghi; Cerruti, Marta; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; De Nardo, Luigi

    2016-02-02

    Large bone defects are challenging to heal, and often require an osteoconductive and stable support to help the repair of damaged tissue. Bioglass-based scaffolds are particularly promising for this purpose due to their ability to stimulate bone regeneration. However, processing technologies adopted so far do not allow for the synthesis of scaffolds with suitable mechanical properties. Also, conventional sintering processes result in glass de-vitrification, which generates concerns about bioactivity. In this work, we studied the bioactivity and the mechanical properties of Bioglass(®) based scaffolds, produced via a powder technology inspired process. The scaffolds showed compressive strengths in the range of 5-40 MPa, i.e. in the upper range of values reported so far for these materials, had tunable porosity, in the range between 55 and 77%, and pore sizes that are optimal for bone tissue regeneration (100-500 μm). We immersed the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 28 d and analyzed the evolution of the scaffold mechanical properties and microstructure. Even if, after sintering, partial de-vitrification occurred, immersion in SBF caused ion release and the formation of a Ca-P coating within 2 d, which reached a thickness of 10-15 μm after 28 d. This coating contained both hydroxyapatite and an amorphous background, indicating microstructural amorphization of the base material. Scaffolds retained a good compressive strength and structural integrity also after 28 d of immersion (6 MPa compressive strength). The decrease in mechanical properties was mainly related to the increase in porosity, caused by its dissolution, rather than to the amorphization process and the formation of a Ca-P coating. These results suggest that Bioglass(®) based scaffolds produced via powder metallurgy-inspired technique are excellent candidates for bone regeneration applications.

  18. Technological Aspects of High Speed Direct Laser Deposition Based on Heterophase Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Zemlyakov, E. V.; Babkin, K. D.; Kolodyazhnyy, D. Yu.; Shamray, F. A.; Travyanov, A. Ya.; Petrovskiy, P. V.

    The article deals with physical peculiarities and technology of high speed processes of direct laser deposition. On the base of theoretic research and computer modeling the powder transfer has been optimized, increasing process stability and productivity. Principles of nozzles design also have been developed in accordance with technological needs. An influence of process mode on product properties and material structure was defined for heat resisted Ni-based superalloys. Developed technology provided the mechanic properties of products on the level of rolled material and allows avoid heat treatment and HIP in production process. Possible ways for increasing process performance and economic efficiency also have been discussed.

  19. Precipitation in cold-rolled Al–Sc–Zr and Al–Mn–Sc–Zr alloys prepared by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Vlach, M.; Stulikova, I.; Smola, B.; Kekule, T.; Kudrnova, H.; Danis, S.; Gemma, R.; Ocenasek, V.; Malek, J.; Tanprayoon, D.; Neubert, V.

    2013-12-15

    The effects of cold-rolling on thermal, mechanical and electrical properties, microstructure and recrystallization behaviour of the AlScZr and AlMnScZr alloys prepared by powder metallurgy were studied. The powder was produced by atomising in argon with 1% oxygen and then consolidated by hot extrusion at 350 °C. The electrical resistometry and microhardness together with differential scanning calorimetry measurements were compared with microstructure development observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction. Fine (sub)grain structure developed and fine coherent Al{sub 3}Sc and/or Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) particles precipitated during extrusion at 350 °C in the alloys studied. Additional precipitation of the Al{sub 3}Sc and/or Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) particles and/or their coarsening was slightly facilitated by the previous cold rolling. The presence of Sc,Zr-containing particles has a significant antirecrystallization effect that prevents recrystallization at temperatures minimally up to 420 °C. The precipitation of the Al{sub 6}Mn- and/or Al{sub 6}(Mn,Fe) particles of a size ∼ 1.0 μm at subgrain boundaries has also an essential antirecrystallization effect and totally suppresses recrystallization during 32 h long annealing at 550 °C. The texture development of the alloys seems to be affected by high solid solution strengthening by Mn. The precipitation of the Mn-containing alloy is highly enhanced by a cold rolling. The apparent activation energy of the Al{sub 3}Sc particles formation and/or coarsening and that of the Al{sub 6}Mn and/or Al{sub 6}(Mn,Fe) particle precipitation in the powder and in the compacted alloys were determined. The cold deformation has no effect on the apparent activation energy values of the Al{sub 3}Sc-phase and the Al{sub 6}Mn-phase precipitation. - Highlights: • The Mn, Sc and Zr additions to Al totally suppresses recrystallization at 550 °C. • The Sc,Zr-containing particle

  20. Effect of reduced cobalt contents on hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy U-700 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of reducing the cobalt content of prealloyed powders of UDIMET 700 (U-700) alloys to 12.7, 8.6, 4.3, and 0% was examined. The powders were hot isostatically pressed into billets, which were given heat treatments appropriate for turbine disks, namely partial solutioning at temperatures below the gamma prime solvus and four step aging treatments. Chemical analyses, metallographic examinations, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the materials. Minor effects on gamma prime content and on room temperature and 650 C tensile properties were observed. Creep rupture lives at 650 C reached a maximum at the 8.4% concentration, while at 760 C a maximum in life was reached at the 4.3% cobalt level. Minimum creep rates increased with decreasing cobalt content at both test temperatures. Extended exposures at 760 and 815 C resulted in decreased tensile strengths and rupture lives for all alloys. Evidence of sigma phase formation was also found.

  1. Effect of reduced cobalt contents on hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy U-700 alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of reducing the cobalt content of prealloyed powders of UDIMET 700 (U-700) alloys to 12.7, 8.6, 4.3, and 0% was examined. The powders were hot isostatically pressed into billets, which were given heat treatments appropriate for turbine disks, namely partial solutioning at temperatures below the gamma prime solvus and four step aging treatments. Chemical analyses, metallographic examinations, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the materials. Minor effects on gamma prime content and on room temperature and 650 C tensile properties were observed. Creep rupture lives at 650 C reached a maximum at the 8.4% concentration, while at 760 C a maximum in life was reached at the 4.3% cobalt level. Minimum creep rates increased with decreasing cobalt content at both test temperatures. Extended exposures at 760 and 815 C resulted in decreased tensile strengths and rupture lives for all alloys. Evidence of sigma phase formation was also found.

  2. Self-passivating bulk tungsten-based alloys manufactured by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ruiz, P.; Ordás, N.; Lindig, S.; Koch, F.; Iturriza, I.; García-Rosales, C.

    2011-12-01

    Self-passivating tungsten-based alloys are expected to provide a major safety advantage compared to pure tungsten, which is at present the main candidate material for the first wall armour of future fusion reactors. WC10Si10 alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) in a Planetary mill and subsequent hot isostatic pressing (HIP), achieving densities above 95%. Different MA conditions were studied. After MA under optimized conditions, a core with heterogeneous microstructure was found in larger powder particles, resulting in the presence of some large W grains after HIP. Nevertheless, the obtained microstructure is significantly refined compared to previous work. First MA trials were also performed on the Si-free system WCr12Ti2.5. In this case a very homogeneous structure inside the powder particles was obtained, and a majority ternary metastable bcc phase was found, indicating that almost complete alloying occurred. Therefore, a very fine and homogeneous microstructure can be expected after HIP in future work.

  3. Preparation and properties of Cobalt-based soft magnetic material prepared by novel powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Yogesh; Srivastava, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    The present work deals with the development of nanocrystalline 60Co-26Fe-14Al (wt%) soft magnetic materials via mechanical milling of elemental powders. The evolution of solid solution during milling proceeded with continuous decrease in atomic order and the crystallite size, and an introduction of internal strain and dislocations. The milling-induced lattice defects, crystallite size reduction, and atomic disorder exhibited a decrease in saturation magnetization, remanence magnetization, squareness ratio, and blocking temperature with increasing milling time. It has been demonstrated that, at subzero temperatures, the magnetization decreases with increasing temperature due to the development of an effective anisotropy caused by an evolution of canted spin structure owing to the introduction of lattice defects during milling.

  4. Tribological properties of the babbit B83-based composite materials fabricated by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, I. E.; Bolotova, L. K.; Bykov, P. A.; Kobeleva, L. I.; Katin, I. V.; Mikheev, R. S.; Kobernik, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    Technological processes are developed to fabricate composite materials based on B83 babbit using hot pressing of a mixture of powders in the presence of a liquid phase. As a result, the structure of the matrix B83 alloy is dispersed, the morphology of intermetallic phases is changed, and reinforcing micro- and nanosized fillers are introduced and uniformly distributed in the matrix. The tribological properties of the synthesized materials are studied. The friction of the B83 babbit + 0.5 wt % MSR + 3 wt % SiC (MSR is modified schungite rock) composite material at high loads is characterized by an increase in the stability coefficient, and the wear resistance of the material increases by a factor of 1.8 as compared to the as-cast alloy at comparable friction coefficients.

  5. System development for the nondestructive assessment of density in green-state powder metallurgy compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Reinhold; Makarov, Sergey; Leuenberger, Georg; Apelian, Diran

    2001-04-01

    In this research we discuss an electrostatic measurement approach whereby electric current is injected into green-state compacts and the resulting surface voltages are recorded in an effort to determine the density distribution. We present results of pure iron powder with and without lubricants compacted to various densities and their measured electric resistivities in an effort to establish a statistical correlation. The electric measurements will ultimately be utilized to predict density distributions throughout the green-state P/M compact. The constant current is injected through point and aperture electrodes and voltages are recorded along the surface of the compact. The recorded voltages of the controlled cylindrical samples are compared to a mathematical Green's function model involving an analytical electrostatic solution of Poisson's equation.

  6. Oxidation and the Effects of High Temperature Exposures on Notched Fatigue Life of an Advanced Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Draper, Susan L.; Gorman, Timothy T.; Telesman, Jack; Gab, Timothy P.; Hull, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation and the effects of high temperature exposures on notched fatigue life were considered for a powder metallurgy processed supersolvus heat-treated ME3 disk superalloy. The isothermal static oxidation response at 704 C, 760 C, and 815 C was consistent with other chromia forming nickel-based superalloys: a TiO2-Cr2O3 external oxide formed with a branched Al2O3 internal subscale that extended into a recrystallized - dissolution layer. These surface changes can potentially impact disk durability, making layer growth rates important. Growth of the external scales and dissolution layers followed a cubic rate law, while Al2O3 subscales followed a parabolic rate law. Cr- rich M23C6 carbides at the grain boundaries dissolved to help sustain Cr2O3 growth to depths about 12 times thicker than the scale. The effect of prior exposures was examined through notched low cycle fatigue tests performed to failure in air at 704 C. Prior exposures led to pronounced debits of up to 99 % in fatigue life, where fatigue life decreased inversely with exposure time. Exposures that produced roughly equivalent 1 m thick external scales at the various isotherms showed statistically equivalent fatigue lives, establishing that surface damage drives fatigue debit, not exposure temperature. Fractographic evaluation indicated the failure mode for the pre-exposed specimens involved surface crack initiations that shifted with exposure from predominately single intergranular initiations with transgranular propagation to multi-initiations from the cracked external oxide with intergranular propagation. Weakened grain boundaries at the surface resulting from the M23C6 carbide dissolution are partially responsible for the intergranular cracking. Removing the scale and subscale while leaving a layer where M23C6 carbides were dissolved did not lead to a significant fatigue life improvement, however, also removing the M23C6 carbide dissolution layer led to nearly full recovery of life, with a

  7. Fatigue behavior of highly porous titanium produced by powder metallurgy with temporary space holders.

    PubMed

    Özbilen, Sedat; Liebert, Daniela; Beck, Tilmann; Bram, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Porous titanium cylinders were produced with a constant amount of temporary space holder (70 vol.%). Different interstitial contents were achieved by varying the starting powders (HDH vs. gas atomized) and manufacturing method (cold compaction without organic binders vs. warm compaction of MIM feedstocks). Interstitial contents (O, C, and N) as a function of manufacturing were measured by chemical analysis. Samples contained 0.34-0.58 wt.% oxygen, which was found to have the greatest effect on mechanical properties. Quasi-static mechanical tests under compression at low strain rate were used for reference and to define parameters for cyclic compression tests. Not unexpectedly, increased oxygen content increased the yield strength of the porous titanium. Cyclic compression fatigue tests were conducted using sinusoidal loading in a servo-hydraulic testing machine. Increased oxygen content was concomitant with embrittlement of the titanium matrix, resulting in significant reduction of compression cycles before failure. For samples with 0.34 wt.% oxygen, R, σ(min) and σ(max) were varied systematically to estimate the fatigue limit (~4 million cycles). Microstructural changes induced by cyclic loading were then characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and EBSD.

  8. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  9. Stress corrosion evaluation of powder metallurgy aluminum alloy 7091 with the breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.

    1987-01-01

    The stress corrosion behavior of the P/M aluminum alloy 7091 is evaluated in two overaged heat treatment conditions, T7E69 and T7E70, using an accelerated test technique known as the breaking load test method. The breaking load data obtained in this study indicate that P/M 7091 alloy is highly resistant to stress corrosion in both longitudinal and transverse orientations at stress levels up to 90 percent of the material yield strength. The reduction in mean breaking stress as a result of corrosive attack is smallest for the more overaged T7E70 condition. Details of the test procedure are included.

  10. Comparison of the microstructure and phase stability of as-cast, CAD/CAM and powder metallurgy manufactured Co-Cr dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai Chun; Prior, David J; Waddell, J Neil; Swain, Michael V

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the different microstructures produced by CC, PM and as-cast techniques for Co-Cr alloys and their phase stability following porcelain firings. Three bi-layer porcelain veneered Co-Cr specimens and one monolithic Co-Cr specimen of each alloy group [cast, powder metallurgy (PM), CAD/CAM (CC)] were manufactured and analyzed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Specimens were treated to incremental numbers of porcelain firings (control 0, 5, 15) with crystallographic data, grain size and chemical composition subsequently obtained and analyzed. EBSD datasets of the cast alloy indicated large grains >200 μm whereas PM and CC alloy consisted of mean arithmetic grain sizes of 29.6 μm and 19.2 μm respectively. XRD and EBSD results both indicated the highest increase in hcp content (>13vol%) for cast Co-Cr alloy after treatment with porcelain firing while PM and CC indicated <2vol% hcp content. A fine grain interfacial layer developed on all surfaces of the alloy after porcelain firing. The depth of this layer increased with porcelain firings for as-cast and PM but no significant increase (p>.05) was observed in CC. EDS line scans indicated an increase in Cr content at the alloy surface after porcelain firing treatment for all three alloys. PM and CC produced alloy had superior fcc phase stability after porcelain firings compared to a traditional cast alloy. It is recommended that PM and CC alloys be used for porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrostatic Detection of Density Variations in Green-State Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, Georg; Ludwig, Reinhold

    2003-03-01

    Producing P/M compacts is generally a low-cost, high-volume manufacturing effort with very special quality assurance requirements. When considering the three basic P/M steps of mixing, compacting, and sintering, it is the compaction process producing the green-state parts that offer the highest pay-off for quality control through nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. A detection of compacting-related problems in the green-state samples permits early process intervention, and thus prevents the creation of potentially significant numbers of faulty parts. Work at WPI currently has concentrated on extending the previously developed method for crack detections to measure density variations within the parts. In this paper a physical model and a mathematical formulation are reported that are capable of relating green-state density to electric conductivity for various lubricant concentrations. Electrostatic measurements of cylindrical compacts have so far confirmed the theoretical model assumptions. Specifically, the green-state conductivity increases as the sample density increases up to approximately 6.9 - 7.0 g/ccm. Any further density increase results in a decrease in conductivity. Preliminary measurements with a range of cylindrical samples support the theoretical model.

  12. Application of Box-Behnken Design and Response Surface Methodology for Surface Roughness Prediction Model of CP-Ti Powder Metallurgy Components Through WEDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arunangsu; Sarkar, Susenjit; Karanjai, Malobika; Sutradhar, Goutam

    2017-06-01

    The present work was undertaken to investigate and characterize the machining parameters (such as surface roughness, etc.) of uni-axially pressed commercially pure titanium sintered powder metallurgy components. Powder was uni-axially pressed at designated pressure of 840 MPa to form cylindrical samples and the green compacts were sintered at 0.001 mbar for about 4 h with sintering temperature varying from 1350 to 1450 °C. The influence of the sintering temperature, pulse-on and pulse-off time at wire-EDM on the surface roughness of the preforms has been investigated thoroughly. Experiments were conducted under different machining parameters in a CNC operated wire-cut EDM. The surface roughness of the machined surface was measured and critically analysed. The optimum surface roughness was achieved under the conditions of 6 μs pulse-on time, 9 μs pulse-off time and at sintering temperature of 1450 °C.

  13. Development of cube textured Ni 5at.%W alloy substrates for YBCO coated conductor application using a powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-S.; Tak, J.-S.; Bae, S.-Y.; Chung, J.-K.; Ahn, I.-S.; Kim, C.-J.; Kim, K.-W.; Cho, K.-K.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, Ni-5at.%W alloy substrate for YBCO coated conductor was fabricated by a dry powder metallurgy process including powder compaction, cold isostatic pressing (CIP), cold rolling and annealing for recrystallization. Ni and W powders were ball-milled at this process for various times of 10, 30, 50 and 100 h in argon atmosphere. The rod-like Ni-W alloy compacts were sintered at 1150 °C for 1 h in 96%Ar-4%H2 atmosphere. The sintered rods were cold rolling into thin tape of 70-90 μm thickness with 5% reduction at each path. The Ni-W alloy tapes were annealed at 800-1200 °C in an atmosphere of 96%Ar-4%H2 mixing gas for the development of cube texture. The tape with the best properties of low surface roughness, small grain size and strong cube texture was obtained at the condition annealed at 1200 °C using ball-milled powder for 30 min. The W addition to Ni improved the mechanical properties by solid solution hardening and inhibited grain growth for annealing heat treatment. The tapes were characterized by X-ray pole-figure, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  14. Development of cube textured Ni W alloy tapes using powder metallurgy along with high energy ball milling for HTS coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. X.; Naguib, R.; Fang, H.; Salama, K.

    2004-07-01

    Ni based alloys have received considerable attention as the substrates for HTS coated conductors due to improved mechanical properties and reduced magnetization. Powder metallurgy is one of the promising processes for the fabrication of long alloy textured substrates. In this paper, Ni-3 at.% W alloy substrates were prepared by using high purity metal powders as starting materials. The Ni and 3 at.% W powder mixture was high energy ball milled for different periods, isostatically pressed, sintered, rolled and texture annealed. The high energy ball milling process made the powders mix uniformly and the grain sizes decrease significantly, which led to higher boundary energy and residual strain energy. The longer ball milling period resulted in a finer grain size and sharper texture in the substrate, which were confirmed by EBSD and SEM analysis. SEM and AFM observations indicate the surface of textured Ni-3 at.% W substrates is smooth and the roughness value (Rrms) is about 1.126 nm, which is suitable for deposition of buffer layers.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by power metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Enhancement on wettability and intermetallic compound formation with an addition of Al on Sn-0.7Cu lead-free solder fabricated via powder metallurgy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adli, Nisrin; Razak, Nurul Razliana Abdul; Saud, Norainiza

    2016-07-01

    Due to the toxicity of lead (Pb), the exploration of another possibility for lead-free solder is necessary. Nowadays, SnCu alloys are being established as one of the lead-free solder alternatives. In this study, Sn-0.7Cu lead-free solder with an addition of 1wt% and 5wt% Al were investigated by using powder metallurgy method. The effect of Al addition on the wettability and intermetallic compound thickness (IMC) of Sn-0.7Cu-Al lead-free solder were appraised. Results showed that Al having a high potential to enhance Sn-0.7Cu lead-free solder due to its good wetting and reduction of IMC thickness. The contact angle and IMC of the Sn-0.7Cu-Al lead-free solder were decreased by 14.32% and 40% as the Al content increased from 1 wt% to 5 wt%.

  17. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual-Phase, Precipitation-Hardened, Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J. L.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual-phase, precipitation-hardened, powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels, and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 811 K (538 °C) in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite nanohardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties.

  18. High damping Al-Fe-Mo-Si/Zn-Al composites produced by rapidly solidified powder metallurgy process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.Y.; Dai, S.L.; Chai, S.C.; Li, Y.R.

    2000-05-10

    The metallic materials commonly used in aircraft and aerospace fields, such as aluminum and titanium alloys, steels, etc., show extremely low damping capacity (usually of the order of or less than 10{sup {minus}3}). Thus, some problems related to vibration may emerge and influence the reliability, safety and life of airplanes, satellites, etc. It has been reported that almost two thirds of errors for rockets and satellites are related to vibration and noise. One effective way to solve these vibration-related problems is to adopt high damping metallic materials. Conventional high damping alloys exhibit damping capacity above 10{sup {minus}2}, however, their densities are usually great than 5 x 10{sup 3} kg m{sup {minus}3}, or their strengths are less than 200 MPa (for alloys based on dislocation damping), making them impossible to be applied to aircraft and aerospace areas. Recently, some low-density high-damping metal/metal composites based on aluminum and high damping alloys have been developed in Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials (BIAM) by the rapidly solidified power metallurgy process. This paper aims to report the properties of the composites based on a high temperature Al-Fe-Mo-Si alloy and a high damping Zn-Al alloy, and compare them with that of 2618-T61 alloy produced by the ingot metallurgy process.

  19. Phase composition, microstructure, and mechanical properties of porous Ti-Nb-Zr alloys prepared by a two-step foaming powder metallurgy method.

    PubMed

    Rao, X; Chu, C L; Zheng, Y Y

    2014-06-01

    Porous Ti-Nb-Zr alloys with different porosities from 6.06 to 62.8% are prepared by a two-step foaming powder metallurgy method using TiH2, Nb, and Zr powders together with 0 to 50wt% of NH4HCO3. The effects of the amounts of Nb and Zr as well as the sintering temperature (1473 to 1673K) on their phase composition, porosity, morphology, and mechanical characteristics are investigated. By controlling the porosity, Nb and Zr concentrations as well as the sintering temperature, porous Ti-Nb-Zr alloys with different mechanical properties can be obtained, for example, the hardness between 290 and 63HV, the compressive strength between 1530.5 and 73.4MPa, and the elastic modulus between 10.8 and 1.2GPa. The mechanical properties of the sintered porous Ti-Nb-Zr alloys can be tailored to match different requirements for the human bones and are thus potentially useful in the hard tissue implants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution.

  1. The effect of annealing temperature on the properties of powder metallurgy processed Ti-35Nb-2Zr-0.5O alloy.

    PubMed

    Málek, Jaroslav; Hnilica, František; Veselý, Jaroslav; Smola, Bohumil; Medlín, Rostislav

    2017-11-01

    Ti-35Nb-2Zr-0.5O (wt%) alloy was prepared via a powder metallurgy process (cold isostatic pressing of blended elemental powders and subsequent sintering) with the primary aim of using it as a material for bio-applications. Sintered specimens were swaged and subsequently the influence of annealing temperature on the mechanical and structural properties was studied. Specimens were annealed at 800, 850, 900, 950, and 1000°C for 0.5h and water quenched. Significant changes in microstructure (i.e. precipitate dissolution or grain coarsening) were observed in relation to increasing annealing temperature. In correlation with those changes, the mechanical properties were also studied. The ultimate tensile strength increased from 925MPa (specimen annealed at 800°C) to 990MPa (900°C). Also the elongation increased from ~ 13% (800°C) to more than 20% (900, 950, and 1000°C). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Powder Metallurgy Processing of a WxTaTiVCr High-Entropy Alloy and Its Derivative Alloys for Fusion Material Applications.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Owais Ahmed; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2017-05-16

    The WxTaTiVCr high-entropy alloy with 32at.% of tungsten (W) and its derivative alloys with 42 to 90at.% of W with in-situ TiC were prepared via the mixing of elemental W, Ta, Ti, V and Cr powders followed by spark plasma sintering for the development of reduced-activation alloys for fusion plasma-facing materials. Characterization of the sintered samples revealed a BCC lattice and a multi-phase structure. The selected-area diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of TiC in the high-entropy alloy and its derivative alloys. It revealed the development of C15 (cubic) Laves phases as well in alloys with 71 to 90at.% W. A mechanical examination of the samples revealed a more than twofold improvement in the hardness and strength due to solid-solution strengthening and dispersion strengthening. This study explored the potential of powder metallurgy processing for the fabrication of a high-entropy alloy and other derived compositions with enhanced hardness and strength.

  3. Deformation mechanisms and strain storage during forging of powder-metallurgy nickel-base turbine disk alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wen J.

    Nickel-based superalloys account for 50% of the total weight of high temperature gas turbine engines. Increasing the lifespan and temperature capabilities of superalloy turbine blades and disks can significantly increase the efficiency and cost of the engines. The properties of superalloy disk materials, including strength and fatigue resistance, are sensitive to the grain structure at the end of a series of thermomechanical processing. To date, there have been few fundamental studies on deformation mechanisms and microstructural evolution under conditions relevant to forging of superalloy disk materials. In this study, high temperature compression testing combined with high resolution Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis has been used to analyze microstructural-scale straining processes that occur during high temperature deformation of a powder-consolidated nickel-based superalloy, Rene 88DT. Orientation imaging has been employed to study grain-level straining and strain storage at temperatures, strains, and strain rates of interest. Two distinct deformation mechanisms were observed using these techniques. At strain rates below 0.001/s, superplastic deformation dominates at temperature between 1241K (968°C) and 1323K (1050°C). At strain rates above 0.001/s, a combination of superplastic and power-law creep deformation mechanisms is evident. At the highest strain rates, power-law creep deformation dominates. Using experimental evidence along with previous studies, constitutive models of deformation mechanisms and microstructure evolution during high temperature compression are proposed. The proposed models predict the boundaries of deformation mechanisms along with the material response to imposed deformation conditions such as superplasticity-enhanced grain growth and dynamic recrystallization.

  4. Shape memory characteristics and mechanical properties of powder metallurgy processed Ti50Ni40Cu10 alloy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Wook

    2014-10-01

    Ti-Ni-Cu alloy powders were prepared by gas atomization and porous bulk specimens were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The microstructure of as-solidified powders exhibited a cellular structure and they contained a high density of nano-sized porosities which were located in the intercellular regions. XRD analysis showed that one-step martensitic transformation of B2-B19 occurred in all alloy powders and SPS specimens. When the martensitic transformation start temperature (M(s)) and austenite transformation finish temperature (A(f)) were determined in order to analyze the dependence of powder size on transformation temperatures, the M(s) increased slightly from -17.5 degrees C to - 14.6 degrees C as increasing the powder size ranging from between 25 and 50 μm to ranging between 100 and 150 μm. However, the M(s) and A(f) of the as-atomized powders is much smaller than those of SPS specimens and the M(s) of porous specimen was about 10.9 degrees C. Loading-unloading compressive tests were carried out to investigate the mechanical properties of porous Ti-Ni-Cu specimen. The specimen was compressed to the strain of 6% at a temperature higher than A,. After unloading, the residual strain was 2.1%. After the compressed specimen was heated to 60 degrees C and held for 30 minutes and then cooled to room temperature, the changes in the length of the specimens were measured. Then it was found that the recovered strain ascribed to shape memory effect was 1.5%.

  5. Consolidation processing parameters and alternative processing methods for powder metallurgy Al-Cu-Mg-X-X alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, K. K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of varying the vacuum degassing parameters on the microstructure and properties of Al-4Cu-1Mg-X-X (X-X = 1.5Li-0.2Zr or 1.5Fe-0.75Ce) alloys processed from either prealloyed (PA) or mechanically alloyed (M) powder, and consolidated by either using sealed aluminum containers or containerless vacuum hot pressing were studied. The consolidated billets were hot extruded to evaluate microstructure and properties. The MA Li-containing alloy did not include Zr, and the MA Fe- and Ce-containing alloy was made from both elemental and partially prealloyed powder. The alloys were vacuum degassed both above and below the solution heat treatment temperature. While vacuum degassing lowered the hydrogen content of these alloys, the range over which the vacuum degassing parameters were varied was not large enough to cause significant changes in degassing efficiency, and the observed variations in the mechanical properties of the heat treated alloys were attributed to varying contributions to strengthening by the sub-structure and the dispersoids. Mechanical alloying increased the strength over that of alloys of similar composition made from PA powder. The inferior properties in the transverse orientation, especially in the Li-containing alloys, suggested deficiencies in degassing. Among all of the alloys processed for this study, the Fe- and Ce-containing alloys made from MA powder possessed better combinations of strength and toughness.

  6. Fabrication of Nano-SiC Particulate Reinforced Mg-8Al-1Sn Composites by Powder Metallurgy Combined with Hot Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Peng; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhu, Xian; Wu, Min; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    Nano-SiC particulates (n-SiCp) reinforced Mg-8Al-1Sn (AT81) composites with different volume fractions (0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 vol.%) were fabricated by powder metallurgy process (P/M) combined with hot extrusion. The mechanical properties of the composite increased as the n-SiCp content increased until the n-SiCp content exceeded 0.5 vol.%, at which point they began to decrease. For this reason, the 0.5 vol.% n-SiCp/AT81 composite was considered optimal. The 0.2% offset yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (ɛ) of 0.5 vol.% n-SiCp/AT81 composites increased from 175, 318 MPa and 4.5% to 239, 381 MPa and 8.3%, respectively, compared to AT81. Both, the strength and plasticity of the 0.5 vol.% n-SiCp/AT81 composites were improved as well. The improvement in mechanical properties can be attributed to the progressively refined matrix grain size, relatively uniform distribution of n-SiCP and the well-bonded interfaces between n-SiCp and the matrix.

  7. Influence of pre-heating on the surface modification of powder-metallurgy processed cold-work tool steel during laser surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šturm, Roman; Štefanikova, Maria; Steiner Petrovič, Darja

    2015-01-01

    In this study we determine the optimal parameters for surface modification using the laser surface melting of powder-metallurgy processed, vanadium-rich, cold-work tool steel. A combination of steel pre-heating, laser surface melting and a subsequent heat treatment creates a hardened and morphologically modified surface of the selected high-alloy tool steel. The pre-heating of the steel prior to the laser surface melting ensures a crack- and pore-free modified surface. Using a pre-heating temperature of 350 °C, the extremely fine microstructure, which typically evolves during the laser-melting, became slightly coarser and the volume fraction of retained austenite was reduced. In the laser-melted layer the highest values of microhardness were achieved in the specimens where a subsequent heat treatment at 550 °C was applied. The performed thermodynamic calculations were able to provide a very valuable assessment of the liquidus temperature and, especially, a prediction of the chemical composition as well as the precipitation and dissolution sequence for the carbides.

  8. Effect of inclusion size on the high cycle fatigue strength and failure mode of a high V alloyed powder metallurgy tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Qu, Xuan-hui; He, Xin-bo; Zhang, Lin

    2012-07-01

    The fatigue strength of a high V alloyed powder metallurgy tool steel with two different inclusion size levels, tempered at different temperatures, was investigated by a series of high cycle fatigue tests. It was shown that brittle inclusions with large sizes above 30 μm prompted the occurrence of subsurface crack initiation and the reduction in fatigue strength. The fracture toughness and the stress amplitude both exerted a significant influence on the fish-eye size. A larger fish-eye area would form in the sample with a higher fracture toughness subjected to a lower stress amplitude. The stress intensity factor of the inclusion was found to lie above a typical value of the threshold stress intensity factor of 4 MPa·m1/2. The fracture toughness of the sample with a hardness above HRC 56 could be estimated by the mean value of the stress intensity factor of the fish-eye. According to fractographic evaluation, the critical inclusion size can be calculated by linear fracture mechanics.

  9. The Influences of Carbon and Molybdenum on the Progress of Liquid Phase Sintering and the Microstructure of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Boron is an optimal alloying element for liquid phase sintering (LPS) of powder metallurgy (PM) Fe-based materials. However, the influences of various alloying elements on the progress of LPS are still undetermined. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of carbon and molybdenum on the LPS and microstructure of boron-containing PM steel. The results showed that adding 0.5 wt pct C and 1.5 wt pct Mo, and particularly the former, promotes the LPS and increases the sintered density. With the addition of 0.5 wt pct C, liquid can be generated in two distinct regions, and the secondary liquid improves the densification. After 1523 K (1250 °C) sintering, the increases in sintered densities of Fe-0.4B, Fe-0.4B-1.5Mo, Fe-0.4B-0.5C, and Fe-0.4B-1.5Mo-0.5C steels were 0.33, 0.47, 0.56, and 0.64 g/cm3, respectively. Thermodynamic simulation also demonstrated that the increases in sintered densities were correlated with the liquid volumes formed at 1523 K (1250 °C). In conclusion, adding 0.5 wt pct C to B-containing PM steels facilitates the formation of a secondary liquid phase and higher liquid volume, resulting in better densification.

  10. Physical and chemical characterization techniques for metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Watson, S. S.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. An extensive array of characterization techniques were applied to these two powders. The physical techniques included laser-diffraction particle-size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry included X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analytical X-ray analysis. The background of these techniques will be summarized and some typical findings comparing different samples of virgin additive manufacturing powders, taken from the same lot, will be given. The techniques were used to confirm that different samples of powder from the same lot were essentially identical, within the uncertainty of the measurements.

  11. Ultra-High Strength TiC/Refractory High-Entropy-Alloy Composite Prepared by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Jingshi; Chen, Jian; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Yong

    2017-02-01

    A TiC-based ceramic composite with refractory high-entropy-alloy (HEA) binders was developed through a novel reactive sintering method. In the process, refractory carbide powders were reacted with Ti powder at high temperature, and in situ formation of Ti carbides and refractory HEA phases occurred. The results indicate that only body-centered-cubic HEA phases and TiC phases are formed after the reactive sintering. The microstructure of the composite is homogeneous, consisting of ultra-fine TiC particles with an average size of 0.85 μm and HEA grains with an average grain size of 1.8 μm. The TiC/HEA composite shows an ultra-high room-temperature compressive strength (>3000 MPa), compared to 1790-2210 MPa for the conventional TiC cermets.

  12. Ultra-High Strength TiC/Refractory High-Entropy-Alloy Composite Prepared by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Jingshi; Chen, Jian; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Yong

    2017-04-01

    A TiC-based ceramic composite with refractory high-entropy-alloy (HEA) binders was developed through a novel reactive sintering method. In the process, refractory carbide powders were reacted with Ti powder at high temperature, and in situ formation of Ti carbides and refractory HEA phases occurred. The results indicate that only body-centered-cubic HEA phases and TiC phases are formed after the reactive sintering. The microstructure of the composite is homogeneous, consisting of ultra-fine TiC particles with an average size of 0.85 μm and HEA grains with an average grain size of 1.8 μm. The TiC/HEA composite shows an ultra-high room-temperature compressive strength (>3000 MPa), compared to 1790-2210 MPa for the conventional TiC cermets.

  13. Application of powder metallurgy techniques for the development of non-toxic ammunition. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, R.; Kelly, R.

    1997-05-30

    The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and Delta Frangible Ammunition (DFA), was to identify and evaluate composite materials for the development of small arms ammunition. Currently available small arms ammunition utilizes lead as the major component of the projectile. The introduction of lead into the environment by these projectiles when they are expended is a rapidly increasing environmental problem. At certain levels, lead is a toxic metal to the environment and a continual health and safety concern for firearm users as well as those who must conduct lead recovery operations from the environment. DFA is a leading supplier of high-density mixtures, which will be used to replace lead-based ammunition in specific applications. Current non-lead ammunition has several limitations that prevent it from replacing lead-based ammunition in many applications (such as applications that require ballistics, weapon recoil, and weapon function identical to that of lead-based ammunition). The purpose of the CRADA was to perform the research and development to identify cost-effective materials to be used in small arms ammunition that eventually will be used in commercially viable, environmentally conscious, non-lead, frangible and/or non-frangible, ammunition.

  14. Effects of C and Hf concentration on phase relations and microstructure of a wrought powder-metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    NASA IIB-11, a candidate alloy for advanced temperature turbine engine disks, and four modifications with varying C and Hf concentrations were produced from prealloyed powders. Several notable effects of C and Hf concentration in the alloys were observed. Both the amount of the gamma-prime phase and its solvus temperature increased with decreasing C, but only the gamma-prime solvus was affected by Hf, increasing with increasing Hf. Hf also promoted a cellular gamma-prime precipitation. Hf was, however, about equally distributed between gamma-prime and gamma. Hf and C both affected the carbides formed. Increasing both promoted formation of an MC relative to that of an M6C.

  15. Tailoring the microstructure and the mechanical properties of ultrafine grained high strength ferritic steels by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, B.; Boulnat, X.; Fabrègue, D.; Perez, M.; de Carlan, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Three model powder materials (i) atomized, (ii) atomized + milled, and, (iii) atomized + milled + alloyed with yttria (Y2O3) and titanium were consolidated within Spark Plasma Sintering device at 850, 950 and 1050°C. Depending on the materials, nanostructured, or even bimodal grain size distribution can be observed. These structures lead to a wide range of mechanical behavior: the tensile strength at room temperature can be tailored from 500 to 1200 MPa with total elongation from 8 to 35%. The bimodal grain size distribution is believed to provide both good yield stress and ductility. Finally, a yield stress model based on the effect of solute atoms, dislocations, grains boundaries and precipitates is presented and it permits to predict accurately the experimental values for all specimens and conditions.

  16. Synthesis, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of powder metallurgy processed Fe/Mg2Si composites for biodegradable implant applications.

    PubMed

    Sikora-Jasinska, M; Paternoster, C; Mostaed, E; Tolouei, R; Casati, R; Vedani, M; Mantovani, D

    2017-12-01

    Recently, Fe and Fe-based alloys have shown their potential as degradable materials for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, the slow corrosion rate limits their performance in certain situations. The shift to iron matrix composites represents a possible approach, not only to improve the mechanical properties, but also to accelerate and tune the corrosion rate in a physiological environment. In this work, Fe-based composites reinforced by Mg2Si particles were proposed. The initial powders were prepared by different combinations of mixing and milling processes, and finally consolidated by hot rolling. The influence of the microstructure on mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Fe/Mg2Si was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used for the assessment of the composite structure. Tensile and hardness tests were performed to characterize the mechanical properties. Potentiodynamic and static corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the corrosion behavior in a pseudo-physiological environment. Samples with smaller Mg2Si particles showed a more homogenous distribution of the reinforcement. Yield and ultimate tensile strength increased when compared to those of pure Fe (from 400MPa and 416MPa to 523MPa and 630MPa, respectively). Electrochemical measurements and immersion tests indicated that the addition of Mg2Si could increase the corrosion rate of Fe even twice (from 0.14 to 0.28mm·year(-1)). It was found that the preparation method of the initial composite powders played a major role in the corrosion process as well as in the corrosion mechanism of the final composite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlations between the in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of the Ti/HA composites fabricated by a powder metallurgy method.

    PubMed

    Ning, Congqin; Zhou, Yu

    2008-11-01

    Ti/HA composites were successfully prepared by a powder metallurgy method and the effect of phase composition on the in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of the Ti/HA composites was investigated in the present study. The correlations between the in vitro and in vivo biological behaviors were highlighted. The results showed that the in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of the Ti/HA composites was dependent on their phase composition. The in vitro bioactivity of the Ti/HA composites was evaluated in simulated body fluid with ion concentrations similar to those of human plasma. After immersion in the simulated body fluid for a certain time, apatite precipitations formed on the surface of the composites with an initial titanium content of 50 and 70 wt.%, and no apatite was found on the surface of the composite with 30% titanium. Ti(2)O was responsible for the apatite formation on the surfaces of the composites. For in vivo analysis, Ti/HA cylinders were implanted in the metaphases of the rabbit femur. At the early stage of implantation, the new bone formed on the surface of the composite with 30% titanium was much less than that on the surfaces of the composites with 50% and 70% titanium. All the Ti/HA composites formed a chemical bone-bonding interface with the host bone by 6 months after implantation. The Ti/HA composites formed the bone-bonding interface with the surrounding bone through an apatite layer. The results in the present study suggested that the in vivo results agreed well with the in vitro results.

  18. Effect of Thermal Cycling on Creep Behavior of Powder-Metallurgy-Processed and Hot-Rolled Al and Al-SiC Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sharmilee; Bhanuprasad, V. V.; Mitra, R.; Ray, K. K.

    2009-12-01

    The tensile creep behavior of powder metallurgy (P/M)-processed and hot-rolled commercially pure Al and Al-5 or Al-10 vol pct SiC particulate composites has been evaluated after subjecting to 0, 2, and 8 thermal cycles between 500 °C and 0 °C with rapid quenching. The images of microstructures obtained using scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as changes in the electrical resistivity, Young’s modulus, and microhardness have been examined in the samples subjected to thermal cycling, in order to compare the effects of structural damage and strengthening by dislocation generation. The damage is caused by voids formed by vacancy coalescence, and is more severe in pure Al than in Al-SiCp composites, because the particle-matrix interfaces in the composites act as effective sinks for vacancies. Creep tests have shown that the application of 2 thermal cycles lowers the creep strain rates in both pure Al and Al-SiCp composites. However, the creep resistance of pure Al gets significantly deteriorated, unlike the mild deterioration in the Al-5 SiCp composite, while the time to rupture for the Al-10 SiCp composite is increased. The dislocation structure and subgrain sizes in the Al and in the matrices of the Al-SiCp composites in the as-rolled condition, after thermal cycling, and after creep tests, have been compared and related to the creep behavior. The dimple sizes of the crept fracture surfaces appear to be dependent on the void density, tertiary component of strain, and time to rupture.

  19. αTCP ceramic doped with dicalcium silicate for bone regeneration applications prepared by powder metallurgy method: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Pablo; Luklinska, Zofia B; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Mate-Sanchez de Val, Jose E; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael A; Calvo-Guirado, Jose L; Ramirez-Fernandez, Ma P; de Aza, Piedad N

    2013-07-01

    This study reports on the in vitro and in vivo behavior of α-tricalcium phosphate (αTCP) and also αTCP doped with either 1.5 or 3.0 wt % of dicalcium silicate (C2 S). The ceramics were successfully prepared by powder metallurgy method combined with homogenization and heat treatment procedures. All materials were composed of a single-phase, αTCP in the case of a pure material, or solid solution of C2 S in αTCP for the doped αTCP, which were stable at room temperature. The ceramics were tested for bioactivity in simulated body fluid, cell culture medium containing adult mesenchymal stem cells of human origin, and in animals. Analytical scanning electron microscopy combined with chemical elemental analysis was used and Fourier transform infrared and conventional histology methods. The in vivo behavior of the ceramics matched the in vitro results, independently of the C2 S content in αTCP. Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) layer was formed on the surface and within the inner parts of the specimens in all cases. A fully mineralized new bone growing in direct contact with the implants was found under the in vivo conditions. The bioactivity and biocompatibility of the implants increased with the C2 S content in αTCP. The C2 S doped ceramics also favoured a phase transformation of αTCP into CHA, important for full implant integration during the natural bone healing processes. αTCP ceramic doped with 3.0 wt % C2 S showed the best bioactive in vitro and in vivo properties of all the compositions and hence could be of interest in specific applications for bone restorative purposes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Synthesis of Al₂Ca Dispersoids by Powder Metallurgy Using a Mg-Al Alloy and CaO Particles.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Junji; Umeda, Junko; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    2017-06-28

    The elemental mixture of Mg-6 wt %Al-1 wt %Zn-0.3 wt %Mn (AZ61B) alloy powder and CaO particles was consolidated by an equal-channel angular bulk mechanical alloying (ECABMA) process to form a composite precursor. Subsequently, the precursor was subjected to a heat treatment to synthesize fine Al₂Ca particles via a solid-state reaction between the Mg-Al matrix and CaO additives. Scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and electron probe micro-analysis on the precursor indicated that 4.7-at % Al atoms formed a supersaturated solid solution in the α-Mg matrix. Transmission electron microscopy-EDS and X-ray diffraction analyses on the AZ61B composite precursor with 10-vol % CaO particles obtained by heat treatment confirmed that CaO additives were thermally decomposed in the Mg-Al alloy, and the solid-soluted Ca atoms diffused along the α-Mg grain boundaries. Al atoms also diffused to the grain boundaries because of attraction to the Ca atoms resulting from a strong reactivity between Al and Ca. As a result, needle-like (Mg,Al)₂Ca intermetallics were formed as intermediate precipitates in the initial reaction stage during the heat treatment. Finally, the precipitates were transformed into spherical Al₂Ca particles by the substitution of Al atoms for Mg atoms in (Mg,Al)₂Ca after a long heat treatment.

  1. Effect of a supersolvus heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a powder metallurgy processed nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Darryl Slade

    Powder Metallurgy (P/M) processed nickel-base superalloys are used as turbine disk materials in jet engines. The P/M processing results in a homogenous microstructure. Large amounts of strengthening elements can be incorporated into the chemistry of these P/M alloys. In addition, the ability to produce near net-shaped parts with powder consolidation may offer the potential for large cost savings. However, the fatigue properties of P/M superalloys in the as-consolidated form have suffered because of the defect sensitivity of the as-consolidated microstructure. Expensive, thermomechanical steps are necessary to break down defects, so that the P/M parts can be considered defect-tolerant. As a result, the true potential cost savings for using P/M superalloys in turbines have never been realized. This program was undertaken to examine the potential for utilizing an alternate heat treatment with P/M Alloy 720LI to generate a potentially defect-tolerant microstructure. This heat treatment had a soak above the gamma' solvus temperature followed by a controlled cool through the solvus. This produced gamma grains with a regular array of large dendritic-shaped secondary gamma' within the grains. Mechanical testing was carried out to fully evaluate the effect of this alternate heat treatment on the mechanical properties of Alloy 720LI. The standard heat treatment had longer lifetimes at the lower stress range conditions during high cycle fatigue; however, the alternate heat treatment was superior at the highest stress range. Fracture analysis suggests that this is due to the grain size difference. During tensile testing, the standard heat treatment had higher yield and ultimate strengths but lower ductility than the alternate heat treatment. This is thought to be due to the larger amounts of tertiary gamma ' present in the microstructure produced by the standard heat treatment. Finally, the standard heat treatment had longer creep lifetimes at the lowest test temperature. The

  2. A Comparison of the Plastic-Flow Response of a Powder-Metallurgy Nickel-Base Superalloy Under Nominally-Isothermal and Transient-Heating Hot-Working Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Tung, D. J.; Zhang, W.; Senkov, O. N.

    2017-04-01

    The flow-stress behavior at hot-working temperatures and strain rates of the powder-metallurgy superalloy LSHR was determined under nominally-isothermal and transient-heating conditions. Two conventional methods, compression of right-circular cylinders and torsion of thin-walled tubes, were used for isothermal tests. A direct-resistance-heating technique utilizing torsion of round-bar specimens in a Gleeble® machine was applied for both isothermal and transient-heating conditions. When expressed in terms of effective stress and strain, baseline data determined by the two conventional methods showed good agreement. With the aid of a flow-localization analysis to assess the confounding influence of axial (and radial) temperature gradients on deformation uniformity, the flow stresses determined from nominally-isothermal Gleeble® torsion tests were shown to be broadly similar to those from the conventional tests. With regard to transient phenomena, Gleeble® tests were also useful in quantifying the effect of rapid heating and short soak time on the observed higher flow stress associated with a metastable microstructure. The present work also introduces two new test techniques using direct-resistance-heated torsion specimens. One involves continuous heating under constant-torque conditions, and the other comprises testing an individual specimen at a series of temperatures and strain rates. Using a single specimen, the former method enabled the determination of the apparent activation energy for plastic flow, which was similar to that determined from the series of isothermal tests; the latter provided a low-cost, high-throughput approach to quantify the flow behavior.

  3. A Comparison of the Plastic-Flow Response of a Powder-Metallurgy Nickel-Base Superalloy Under Nominally-Isothermal and Transient-Heating Hot-Working Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Tung, D. J.; Zhang, W.; Senkov, O. N.

    2017-01-01

    The flow-stress behavior at hot-working temperatures and strain rates of the powder-metallurgy superalloy LSHR was determined under nominally-isothermal and transient-heating conditions. Two conventional methods, compression of right-circular cylinders and torsion of thin-walled tubes, were used for isothermal tests. A direct-resistance-heating technique utilizing torsion of round-bar specimens in a Gleeble® machine was applied for both isothermal and transient-heating conditions. When expressed in terms of effective stress and strain, baseline data determined by the two conventional methods showed good agreement. With the aid of a flow-localization analysis to assess the confounding influence of axial (and radial) temperature gradients on deformation uniformity, the flow stresses determined from nominally-isothermal Gleeble® torsion tests were shown to be broadly similar to those from the conventional tests. With regard to transient phenomena, Gleeble® tests were also useful in quantifying the effect of rapid heating and short soak time on the observed higher flow stress associated with a metastable microstructure. The present work also introduces two new test techniques using direct-resistance-heated torsion specimens. One involves continuous heating under constant-torque conditions, and the other comprises testing an individual specimen at a series of temperatures and strain rates. Using a single specimen, the former method enabled the determination of the apparent activation energy for plastic flow, which was similar to that determined from the series of isothermal tests; the latter provided a low-cost, high-throughput approach to quantify the flow behavior.

  4. Synthesis of Al2Ca Dispersoids by Powder Metallurgy Using a Mg–Al Alloy and CaO Particles

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Junji; Umeda, Junko; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The elemental mixture of Mg-6 wt %Al-1 wt %Zn-0.3 wt %Mn (AZ61B) alloy powder and CaO particles was consolidated by an equal-channel angular bulk mechanical alloying (ECABMA) process to form a composite precursor. Subsequently, the precursor was subjected to a heat treatment to synthesize fine Al2Ca particles via a solid-state reaction between the Mg–Al matrix and CaO additives. Scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and electron probe micro-analysis on the precursor indicated that 4.7-at % Al atoms formed a supersaturated solid solution in the α-Mg matrix. Transmission electron microscopy-EDS and X-ray diffraction analyses on the AZ61B composite precursor with 10-vol % CaO particles obtained by heat treatment confirmed that CaO additives were thermally decomposed in the Mg–Al alloy, and the solid-soluted Ca atoms diffused along the α-Mg grain boundaries. Al atoms also diffused to the grain boundaries because of attraction to the Ca atoms resulting from a strong reactivity between Al and Ca. As a result, needle-like (Mg,Al)2Ca intermetallics were formed as intermediate precipitates in the initial reaction stage during the heat treatment. Finally, the precipitates were transformed into spherical Al2Ca particles by the substitution of Al atoms for Mg atoms in (Mg,Al)2Ca after a long heat treatment. PMID:28773074

  5. History of ``NANO''-Scale VERY EARLY Solid-State (and Liquid-State) Physics/Chemistry/Metallurgy/ Ceramics; Interstitial-Alloys Carbides/Nitrides/Borides/...Powders and Cermets, Rock Shocks, ...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiden, Colin; Siegel, Edward

    History of ``NANO'': Siegel-Matsubara-Vest-Gregson[Mtls. Sci. and Eng. 8, 6, 323(`71); Physica Status Solidi (a)11,45(`72)] VERY EARLY carbides/nitrides/borides powders/cermets solid-state physics/chemistry/metallurgy/ ceramics FIRST-EVER EXPERIMENTAL NANO-physics/chemistry[1968 ->Physica Status Solidi (a)11,45(`72); and EARLY NANO-``physics''/NANO-``chemistry'' THEORY(after: Kubo(`62)-Matsubara(`60s-`70s)-Fulde (`65) [ref.: Sugano[Microcluster-Physics, Springer('82 `98)

  6. Study on effects of powder and flake chemistry and morphology on the properties of Al-Cu-Mg-X-X-X powder metallurgy advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, P. J.; Lederich, R. J.; Oneal, J. E.; Pao, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of alloy chemistry and particulate morphology on consolidation behavior and consolidated product properties in rapid solidification processed, powder-metallurgical Al-3Li-1.5Cu-1Mg-0.5Co-0.2Zr and Al-4.4Cu-1.5Mg-Fe-Ni-0.2Zr extrusions and forgings were studied. Microstructures and mechanical properties of both alloys are largely unaffected by particulate production method (vacuum atomization, ultrasonic atomization, or twin-roller quenching) and by particulate solidification rates between 1000 and 100,000 K/s. Consolidation processing by canning, cold compaction, degassing, and hot extrusion is sufficient to yield mechanical properties in the non-Li-containing alloy extrusions which are similar to those of 7075-Al, but ductilities and fracture toughnesses are inferior owing to poor interparticle bonding caused by lack of a vacuum-hot-pressing step during consolidation. Mechanical properties of extrusions are superior to those of forgings owing to the stronger textures produced by the more severe hot working during extrusion. The effects on mechanical properties of dispersoid size and volume fraction, substructural refinement, solid solution strengthening by Mg, and precipitate size and distribution are elucidated for both alloy types.

  7. Application of physical and chemical characterization techniques to metallic powders

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Watson, S. S.; Stutzman, P. E.; Ferraris, C. F.; Peltz, M. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Systematic studies have been carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to chemistry, including X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, were also employed. Results of these analyses will be used to shed light on the question: how does virgin powder change after being exposed to and recycled from one or more additive manufacturing build cycles? In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  8. Production of ultra clean gas-atomized powder by the plasma heated tundish technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tingskog, T.A.; Andersson, V.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes the improvements in cleanliness for different types of gas atomized powders produced by holding the melt in a Plasma Heated Tundish (PHT) before atomization. The cleanliness is measured on Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) or extruded samples. Significant improvements in slag levels and material properties have been achieved. On extruded powder metallurgy stainless steel and nickel alloy tubes, the rejection rate in ultra-sonic testing was reduced drastically. Tool steels and high speed steels have greatly improved ductility and bend strength.

  9. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    DOEpatents

    McKechnie, Timothy N.; Antony, Leo V. M.; O'Dell, Scott; Power, Chris; Tabor, Terry

    2009-11-10

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  10. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Antony, Leo V. M. (Inventor); O'Dell, Scott (Inventor); Power, Chris (Inventor); Tabor, Terry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  11. Powder Metallurgy Forged Gear Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Unclassified) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) D. H. Ro, B. L. Ferguson, S. Pillay, D. T. Ostberg 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month...Method Water Atomized SelecCion -Initial Alloy Distribution Prealloyed -Particle Size Distribution -100 Mesh kForging Quality) Uxmtpaction -Lubricant Zinc

  12. Plutonium Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Freibert, Franz J.

    2012-08-09

    Due to its nuclear properties, Pu will remain a material of global interest well into the future. Processing, Structure, Properties and Performance remains a good framework for discussion of Pu materials science Self-irradiation and aging effects continue to be central in discussions of Pu metallurgy Pu in its elemental form is extremely unstable, but alloying helps to stabilize Pu; but, questions remain as to how and why this stabilization occurs. Which is true Pu-Ga binary phase diagram: US or Russian? Metallurgical issues such as solute coring, phase instability, crystallographic texture, etc. result in challenges to casting, processing, and properties modeling and experiments. For Ga alloyed FCC stabilized Pu, temperature and pressure remain as variables impacting phase stability.

  13. Development and characterization of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 2XXX series Al alloy products and Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) 2XXX Al/SiC materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Gurganus, T. B.; Walker, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a series of material studies performed by the Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company over the time period from 1980 to 1991 are discussed. The technical objective of these evaluations was to develop and characterize advanced aluminum alloy materials with temperature capabilities extending to 350 F. An overview is given of the first five alloy development efforts under this contract. Prior work conducted during the first five modifications of the alloy development program are listed. Recent developments based on the addition of high Zr levels to an optimum Al-Cu-Mg alloy composition by powder metallurgy processing are discussed. Both reinforced and SiC or B4C ceramic reinforced alloys were explored to achieve specific target goals for high temperature aluminum alloy applications.

  14. Recent trends in extractive metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Metallurgists and solution geochemists are joining forces to develop processes for extraction of metals from low-grade ores. The processes, which come under the name hydrometallurgy, include several new applications of solvent extraction techniques. Aqueous solutions are employed, leaching metals from ores, mine waste dumps, and even from deposits still in the ground. It was notable, for example, that Chemical and Engineering News (Feb. 8, 1982) recently featured the subject of hydrometallurgy in a special report. They noted that ‘recovering metals by use of aqueous solutions at relatively low temperatures increasingly is competing with dry, high-temperature pyrometallurgical methods.’ The relatively new techniques have caused a revolution, of sorts, in engineering programs of university metallurgy departments. The challenge of developing selective metal dissolution processes is drawing upon the best national talent in the fields of solution geochemistry and metallurgy.

  15. Effect of process control agent on the porous structure and mechanical properties of a biomedical Ti-Sn-Nb alloy produced by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Nouri, A; Hodgson, P D; Wen, C E

    2010-04-01

    The influence of different amounts and types of process control agent (PCA), i.e., stearic acid and ethylene bis-stearamide, on the porous structure and mechanical properties of a biomedical Ti-16Sn-4Nb (wt.%) alloy was investigated. Alloy synthesis was performed on elemental metal powders using high-energy ball milling for 5h. Results indicated that varying the PCA content during ball milling led to a drastic change in morphology and particle-size distribution of the ball-milled powders. Porous titanium alloy samples sintered from the powders ball milled with the addition of various amounts of PCA also revealed different pore morphology and porosity. The Vickers hardness of the sintered titanium alloy samples exhibited a considerable increase with increasing PCA content. Moreover, the addition of larger amounts of PCA in the powder mixture resulted in a significant increase in the elastic modulus and peak stress for the sintered porous titanium alloy samples under compression. It should also be mentioned that the addition of PCA introduced contamination (mainly carbon and oxygen) into the sintered porous product.

  16. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; ...

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developedmore » for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.« less

  17. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developed for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.

  18. Strength-Ductility Property Maps of Powder Metallurgy (PM) Ti-6Al-4V Alloy: A Critical Review of Processing-Structure-Property Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Chandran, K. S. Ravi

    2017-02-01

    A comprehensive assessment of tensile properties of powder metallurgical (PM) processed Ti-6Al-4V alloy, through the mapping of strength-ductility property domains, is performed in this review. Tensile property data of PM Ti-6Al-4V alloys made from blended element (BE) and pre-alloyed powders including that additive manufactured (AM) from powders, as well as that made using titanium hydride powders, have been mapped in the form of strength-ductility domains. Based on this, porosity and microstructure have been identified as the dominant variables controlling both the strength and the tensile ductility of the final consolidated materials. The major finding is that tensile ductility of the PM titanium is most sensitive to the presence of pores. The significance of extreme-sized pores or defects in inducing large variations in ductility is emphasized. The tensile strength, however, has been found to depend only weakly on the porosity. The effect of microstructure on properties is masked by the variations in porosity and to some extent by the oxygen level. It is shown that any meaningful comparison of the microstructure can only be made under a constant porosity or density level. The beneficial effect of a refined microstructure is also brought out by logically organizing the data in terms of microstructure groups. The advantages of new processes, using titanium hydride powder to produce PM titanium alloys, in simultaneously increasing strength and ductility, are also highlighted. The tensile properties of AM Ti-6Al-4V alloys are also brought to light, in comparison with the other PM and wrought alloys, through the strength-ductility maps.

  19. Strength-Ductility Property Maps of Powder Metallurgy (PM) Ti-6Al-4V Alloy: A Critical Review of Processing-Structure-Property Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Chandran, K. S. Ravi

    2017-05-01

    A comprehensive assessment of tensile properties of powder metallurgical (PM) processed Ti-6Al-4V alloy, through the mapping of strength-ductility property domains, is performed in this review. Tensile property data of PM Ti-6Al-4V alloys made from blended element (BE) and pre-alloyed powders including that additive manufactured (AM) from powders, as well as that made using titanium hydride powders, have been mapped in the form of strength-ductility domains. Based on this, porosity and microstructure have been identified as the dominant variables controlling both the strength and the tensile ductility of the final consolidated materials. The major finding is that tensile ductility of the PM titanium is most sensitive to the presence of pores. The significance of extreme-sized pores or defects in inducing large variations in ductility is emphasized. The tensile strength, however, has been found to depend only weakly on the porosity. The effect of microstructure on properties is masked by the variations in porosity and to some extent by the oxygen level. It is shown that any meaningful comparison of the microstructure can only be made under a constant porosity or density level. The beneficial effect of a refined microstructure is also brought out by logically organizing the data in terms of microstructure groups. The advantages of new processes, using titanium hydride powder to produce PM titanium alloys, in simultaneously increasing strength and ductility, are also highlighted. The tensile properties of AM Ti-6Al-4V alloys are also brought to light, in comparison with the other PM and wrought alloys, through the strength-ductility maps.

  20. Peering through the flames: imaging techniques for reacting aluminum powders

    DOE PAGES

    Zepper, Ethan T.; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Bhattacharya, Sukalyan; ...

    2017-03-17

    Combusting metals burn at high temperatures and emit high-intensity radiation in the visible spectrum which can over-saturate regular imaging sensors and obscure the field of view. Filtering the luminescence can result in limited information and hinder thorough combustion characterization. A method for “seeing through the flames” of a highly luminescent aluminum powder reaction is presented using copper vapor laser (CVL) illumination synchronized with a high-speed camera. A statistical comparison of combusting aluminum particle agglomerate between filtered halogen and CVL illumination shows the effectiveness of this diagnostic approach. When ignited by an electrically induced plasma, aluminum particles are entrained as solidmore » agglomerates that rotate about their centers of mass and are surrounded by emitted, burning gases. Furthermore, the average agglomerate diameter appears to be 160 micrometers when viewed with standard illumination and a high-speed camera. But, a significantly lower diameter of 50 micrometers is recorded when imaged with CVL illumination. Our results advocate that alternative imaging techniques are required to resolve the complexities of metal particle combustion.« less

  1. Review of the Methods for Production of Spherical Ti and Ti Alloy Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pei; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Zhang, Ying; Xia, Yang

    2017-10-01

    Spherical titanium alloy powder is an important raw material for near-net-shape fabrication via a powder metallurgy (PM) manufacturing route, as well as feedstock for powder injection molding, and additive manufacturing (AM). Nevertheless, the cost of Ti powder including spherical Ti alloy has been a major hurdle that prevented PM Ti from being adopted for a wide range of applications. Especially with the increasing importance of powder-bed based AM technologies, the demand for spherical Ti powder has brought renewed attention on properties and cost, as well as on powder-producing processes. The performance of Ti components manufactured from powder has a strong dependence on the quality of powder, and it is therefore crucial to understand the properties and production methods of powder. This article aims to provide a cursory review of the basic techniques of commercial and emerging methods for making spherical Ti powder. The advantages as well as limitations of different methods are discussed.

  2. Review of the Methods for Production of Spherical Ti and Ti Alloy Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pei; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Zhang, Ying; Xia, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Spherical titanium alloy powder is an important raw material for near-net-shape fabrication via a powder metallurgy (PM) manufacturing route, as well as feedstock for powder injection molding, and additive manufacturing (AM). Nevertheless, the cost of Ti powder including spherical Ti alloy has been a major hurdle that prevented PM Ti from being adopted for a wide range of applications. Especially with the increasing importance of powder-bed based AM technologies, the demand for spherical Ti powder has brought renewed attention on properties and cost, as well as on powder-producing processes. The performance of Ti components manufactured from powder has a strong dependence on the quality of powder, and it is therefore crucial to understand the properties and production methods of powder. This article aims to provide a cursory review of the basic techniques of commercial and emerging methods for making spherical Ti powder. The advantages as well as limitations of different methods are discussed.

  3. The Effect of Milling Time on the Microstructural Characteristics and Strengthening Mechanisms of NiMo-SiC Alloys Prepared via Powder Metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Muránsky, Ondrej; Zhu, Hanliang; Thorogood, Gordon J; Avdeev, Maxim; Huang, Hefei; Zhou, Xingtai

    2017-04-06

    A new generation of alloys, which rely on a combination of various strengthening mechanisms, has been developed for application in molten salt nuclear reactors. In the current study, a battery of dispersion and precipitation-strengthened (DPS) NiMo-based alloys containing varying amounts of SiC (0.5-2.5 wt %) were prepared from Ni-Mo-SiC powder mixture via a mechanical alloying (MA) route followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and rapid cooling. Neutron Powder Diffraction (NPD), Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were employed in the characterization of the microstructural properties of these in-house prepared NiMo-SiC DPS alloys. The study showed that uniformly-dispersed SiC particles provide dispersion strengthening, the precipitation of nano-scale Ni₃Si particles provides precipitation strengthening, and the solid-solution of Mo in the Ni matrix provides solid-solution strengthening. It was further shown that the milling time has significant effects on the microstructural characteristics of these alloys. Increased milling time seems to limit the grain growth of the NiMo matrix by producing well-dispersed Mo₂C particles during sintering. The amount of grain boundaries greatly increases the Hall-Petch strengthening, resulting in significantly higher strength in the case of 48-h-milled NiMo-SiC DPS alloys compared with the 8-h-milled alloys. However, it was also shown that the total elongation is considerably reduced in the 48-h-milled NiMo-SiC DPS alloy due to high porosity. The porosity is a result of cold welding of the powder mixture during the extended milling process.

  4. The Effect of Milling Time on the Microstructural Characteristics and Strengthening Mechanisms of NiMo-SiC Alloys Prepared via Powder Metallurgy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Muránsky, Ondrej; Zhu, Hanliang; Thorogood, Gordon J.; Avdeev, Maxim; Huang, Hefei; Zhou, Xingtai

    2017-01-01

    A new generation of alloys, which rely on a combination of various strengthening mechanisms, has been developed for application in molten salt nuclear reactors. In the current study, a battery of dispersion and precipitation-strengthened (DPS) NiMo-based alloys containing varying amounts of SiC (0.5–2.5 wt %) were prepared from Ni-Mo-SiC powder mixture via a mechanical alloying (MA) route followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and rapid cooling. Neutron Powder Diffraction (NPD), Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were employed in the characterization of the microstructural properties of these in-house prepared NiMo-SiC DPS alloys. The study showed that uniformly-dispersed SiC particles provide dispersion strengthening, the precipitation of nano-scale Ni3Si particles provides precipitation strengthening, and the solid-solution of Mo in the Ni matrix provides solid-solution strengthening. It was further shown that the milling time has significant effects on the microstructural characteristics of these alloys. Increased milling time seems to limit the grain growth of the NiMo matrix by producing well-dispersed Mo2C particles during sintering. The amount of grain boundaries greatly increases the Hall–Petch strengthening, resulting in significantly higher strength in the case of 48-h-milled NiMo-SiC DPS alloys compared with the 8-h-milled alloys. However, it was also shown that the total elongation is considerably reduced in the 48-h-milled NiMo-SiC DPS alloy due to high porosity. The porosity is a result of cold welding of the powder mixture during the extended milling process. PMID:28772747

  5. Metallurgy and Heat Treating. Welding Module 7. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in metallurgy and heat treating. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles of metallurgy and heat treatment and techniques for…

  6. Metallurgy and Heat Treating. Welding Module 7. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in metallurgy and heat treating. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles of metallurgy and heat treatment and techniques for…

  7. Effect of Pre-Oxidation Treatment of Nano-SiC Particulates on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of SiC/Mg-8Al-1Sn Composites Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Combined with Hot Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-Peng; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Yu, Hong-Chen; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-11-26

    Nano-SiC particulates (n-SiCp) reinforced Mg-8Al-1Sn (AT81) composites with different pre-oxidation parameters were fabricated by powder metallurgy (P/M) process combined with hot extrusion. The effects of pre-oxidization treatment of n-SiCp on the microstructure and tensile properties of 0.5 vol % n-SiCp/AT81 composites were investigated accordingly. The distribution of n-SiCp with different pre-oxidation parameters was homogeneous in the composites. Moreover, it was found that a thin MgAl₂O₄ layer formed at the interface when the n-SiCp were pre-oxidized at 1073 K for 2 h, while the MgAl₂O₄ layer became much thicker with pre-oxidization temperature increasing to 1273 K for 2 h. After an appropriate pre-oxidization treatment of n-SiCp at 1073 K for 2 h, the as-extruded 0.5 vol % n-SiCp/AT81 composites exhibited an enhanced strength. It was found that the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) increased from 168 MPa and 311 MPa to 255 MPa and 393 MPa compared with the as-extruded AT81 alloy, reflecting 51.8% and 26.4% increments, respectively. The improvement of mechanical properties should be mainly attributed to the grain refinement and homogeneous distribution of n-SiCp in the composites. Moreover, a well-bonded interface and the formation of an appropriate amount of interfacial product (MgAl₂O₄) benefited the material's mechanical properties.

  8. Effect of Pre-Oxidation Treatment of Nano-SiC Particulates on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of SiC/Mg-8Al-1Sn Composites Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Combined with Hot Extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan-Peng; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Yu, Hong-Chen; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Nano-SiC particulates (n-SiCp) reinforced Mg-8Al-1Sn (AT81) composites with different pre-oxidation parameters were fabricated by powder metallurgy (P/M) process combined with hot extrusion. The effects of pre-oxidization treatment of n-SiCp on the microstructure and tensile properties of 0.5 vol % n-SiCp/AT81 composites were investigated accordingly. The distribution of n-SiCp with different pre-oxidation parameters was homogeneous in the composites. Moreover, it was found that a thin MgAl2O4 layer formed at the interface when the n-SiCp were pre-oxidized at 1073 K for 2 h, while the MgAl2O4 layer became much thicker with pre-oxidization temperature increasing to 1273 K for 2 h. After an appropriate pre-oxidization treatment of n-SiCp at 1073 K for 2 h, the as-extruded 0.5 vol % n-SiCp/AT81 composites exhibited an enhanced strength. It was found that the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) increased from 168 MPa and 311 MPa to 255 MPa and 393 MPa compared with the as-extruded AT81 alloy, reflecting 51.8% and 26.4% increments, respectively. The improvement of mechanical properties should be mainly attributed to the grain refinement and homogeneous distribution of n-SiCp in the composites. Moreover, a well-bonded interface and the formation of an appropriate amount of interfacial product (MgAl2O4) benefited the material’s mechanical properties. PMID:28774083

  9. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  10. U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder from uranyl-loaded cation exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ powder has been produced from uranyl-loaded cation exchange resin with density, particle size distribution, and grain size suitable for powder metallurgy fabrication of reactor fuel tubes with Al-U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ cores. Macroporous sulfonate resin in granular form is used in the process. Resin conversion techniques that were evaluated include batch, rotary, and fluidized bed calcination. 2 refs., 16 figs.

  11. Synchrotron and laboratory studies utilizing a new powder diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.S.; Beno, M.A.; Jennings, G.; Engbretson, M.; Ramanathan, M.

    1992-10-01

    We have developed a new type of powder diffractometer that is much more efficient than existing methods. The diffractometer has the potential of both high count rates and very high resolution when used at a synchrotron source. The laboratory based instrument has an order of magnitude improvement in count rate over existing methods. The method uses a focusing diffracted beam monochromator in combination with a multichannel detector. The incident x-rays fall on a flat plate or capillary sample and are intercepted by a bent focusing monochromator which has the focus of the bend at the sample surface. The powder diffraction lines emerging from the bent crystal monochromator are detected by a linear or 2-dimensional detector. This allows us to eliminate the background from fluorescence or other scattering and to take data over a range of 3[degrees] to 4[degrees] instead of one angle at a time thereby providing a large improvement over conventional diffractometers. Results are presented for fluorapatite Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3], and a high-TC superconductor.

  12. Synchrotron and laboratory studies utilizing a new powder diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, G.S.; Beno, M.A.; Jennings, G.; Engbretson, M.; Ramanathan, M.

    1992-10-01

    We have developed a new type of powder diffractometer that is much more efficient than existing methods. The diffractometer has the potential of both high count rates and very high resolution when used at a synchrotron source. The laboratory based instrument has an order of magnitude improvement in count rate over existing methods. The method uses a focusing diffracted beam monochromator in combination with a multichannel detector. The incident x-rays fall on a flat plate or capillary sample and are intercepted by a bent focusing monochromator which has the focus of the bend at the sample surface. The powder diffraction lines emerging from the bent crystal monochromator are detected by a linear or 2-dimensional detector. This allows us to eliminate the background from fluorescence or other scattering and to take data over a range of 3{degrees} to 4{degrees} instead of one angle at a time thereby providing a large improvement over conventional diffractometers. Results are presented for fluorapatite Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a high-TC superconductor.

  13. Tungsten and tungsten-alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications-excluding lamps. November 1971-July 1989 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for November 1971-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys including various applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying-element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of various cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 60 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  14. Development of powder metallurgy 2XXX series Al alloy plate and sheet materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications, FY 1983/1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to fabricate and evaluate PM 2124 Al alloy plate and sheet materials according to NASA program goals for damage tolerance and fatigue resistance. Previous research has indicated the outstanding strength-toughness relationship available with PM 2124 Al-Zr modified alloy compositions in extruded product forms. The range of processing conditions was explored in the fabrication of plate and sheet gage materials, as well as the resultant mechanical and metallurgical properties. The PM composition based on Al-3.70 Cu-1.85 Mg-0.20 Mn with 0.60 wt. pct. Zr was selected. Flat rolled material consisting of 0.250 in. thick plate was fabricated using selected thermal mechanical treatments (TMT). The schedule of TMT operations was designed to yield the extreme conditions of grain structure normally encountered in the fabrication of flat rolled products, specifically recrystallized and unrecrystallized. The PM Al alloy plate and sheet materials exhibited improved strength properties at thin gages compared to IM Al alloys, as a consequence of their enhanced ability to inhibit recrystallization and grain growth. In addition, the PM 2124 Al alloys offer much better combinations of strength and toughnessover equivalent IM Al. The alloy microstructures were examined by optical metallographic texture techniques in order to establish the metallurgical basis for these significant property improvements.

  15. NIRS and MIRS technique for the determination of protein and fat content in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Feng, Shuijuan; He, Chao; He, Yong

    2008-03-01

    It is very important to detect the protein and fat content in milk powder fast and non-destructively. Near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared(MIR) spectroscopy techniques have been compared and evaluated for the determination of the protein and fat content in milk powder with the use of Least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM). LS-SVM models have been developed by using both NIR and MIR spectra. Both methods have shown good correlations between infrared transmission values and two nutrition contents. MIRS provided better prediction performance over NIRS. It is concluded that infrared spectroscopy technique can quantify of the protein and fat content in milk powder fast and nondestructively. The process is simple and easy to operate than chemistry methods. The results can be beneficial for designing a simple and non-destructive instrument with MIRS or NIRS spectral sensor for the determination of the protein fat content in milk powder.

  16. Modified Powder-in-Tube Technique Based on the Consolidation Processing of Powder Materials for Fabricating Specialty Optical Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Jean-Louis; Humbert, Georges; Leparmentier, Stéphanie; Kudinova, Maryna; Martin, Pierre-Olivier; Delaizir, Gaëlle; Schuster, Kay; Litzkendorf, Doris

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the interest of a consolidation process associated with the powder-in-tube technique in order to fabricate a long length of specialty optical fibers. This so-called Modified Powder-in-Tube (MPIT) process is very flexible and paves the way to multimaterial optical fiber fabrications with different core and cladding glassy materials. Another feature of this technique lies in the sintering of the preform under reducing or oxidizing atmosphere. The fabrication of such optical fibers implies different constraints that we have to deal with, namely chemical species diffusion or mechanical stress due to the mismatches between thermal expansion coefficients and working temperatures of the fiber materials. This paper focuses on preliminary results obtained with a lanthano-aluminosilicate glass used as the core material for the fabrication of all-glass fibers or specialty Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs). To complete the panel of original microstructures now available by the MPIT technique, we also present several optical fibers in which metallic particles or microwires are included into a silica-based matrix. PMID:28788176

  17. Comparison of particle sizing techniques in the case of inhalation dry powders.

    PubMed

    Bosquillon, C; Lombry, C; Preat, V; Vanbever, R

    2001-12-01

    The objectives of this work were (i) to validate electrical zone sensing and laser diffraction for the analysis of primary particle size in the case of inhalation dry powders and (ii) to study the influence of the aggregation state of the powder on the sizing techniques. Free-flowing dry powders were prepared by spray-drying with a combination of albumin, lactose, and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. The replacement of lactose by mannitol, the removal of albumin, and the atomization at high relative humidity all increased powder cohesion. Automated measurements were compared with primary particle sizes collected by light and electron microscopy. The mass mode obtained by electrical zone sensing and the mass median diameter measured by laser diffraction following dispersion with compressed air at a pressure of 3 bar or following suspension in water and ultrasonic dispersion at a power of 60 W for 30 s each provided primary particle sizes close to microscopy measurements. However, these conditions only applied in the case of slightly to moderately aggregated powders. For strongly agglomerated powders, an exact measurement of the size was only collected by laser diffraction in the wet state combined with ultrasonic dispersion. Our study underlies how measurement of primary particle size highly depends on both powder material and proper particle dispersion.

  18. The Fatigue of Powder Metallurgy Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    EEEEEEEEEEEEEE I EEEEEEEE 1.0 4 t HLI, 111125 1111 .6II1IIII1 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART * ~WUONAL BURL AV OF STANOANOS - 1963 - A 9 ...5- 0,a a,- 70 U a,- 4.. I U In F-I’I Ip PSI -4- / E .0 4- A to 4J A 0 °0 x x C a 0o L. S(IOdW) xoWD 41> o 9 Lo, ° 9 ’U L*’ 0X7090 T6 (T-L) a:in air...of the cycle in which the crack tip is open. The crack growth rates plotted in terms of this parameter are shown in Fig. 9 . Much of the dependency of

  19. Measurement techniques in dry-powdered processing of spent nuclear fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, D. L.; Hong, J.-S.; Kim, H.-D.; Persiani, P. J.; Wolf, S. F.

    1999-07-21

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) detection, {alpha}-spectrometry ({alpha}-S), and {gamma}-spectrometry ({gamma}-S) were used for the determination of nuclide content in five samples excised from a high-burnup fuel rod taken from a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The samples were prepared for analysis by dissolution of dry-powdered samples. The measurement techniques required no separation of the plutonium, uranium, and fission products. The sample preparation and analysis techniques showed promise for in-line analysis of highly-irradiated spent fuels in a dry-powdered process. The analytical results allowed the determination of fuel burnup based on {sup 148}Nd, Pu, and U content. A goal of this effort is to develop the HPLC-ICPMS method for direct fissile material accountancy in the dry-powdered processing of spent nuclear fuel.

  20. Detection and original dose assessment of egg powders subjected to gamma irradiation by using ESR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Talat

    2015-09-01

    ESR (electron spin resonance) techniques were applied for detection and original dose estimation to radiation-processed egg powders. The un-irradiated (control) egg powders showed a single resonance line centered at g=2.0086±0.0005, 2.0081±0.0005, 2.0082±0.0005 (native signal) for yolk, white and whole egg, respectively. Irradiation induced at least one additional intense singlet overlapping to the control signal and caused a significant increase in signal intensity without any changes in spectral patterns. Responses of egg powders to different gamma radiation doses in the range 0-10 kGy were examined. The stability of the radiation-induced ESR signal of irradiated egg powders were investigated over a storage period of about 5 months. Additive reirradiation of the egg powders produces a reproducible dose response function, which can be used to assess the initial dose by back-extrapolation. The additive dose method gives an estimation of the original dose within ±12% at the end of the 720 h storage period.

  1. Power metallurgy approaches to high temperature components for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Work conducted by NASA and NASA contractors on prealloyed superalloy powders and materials strengthened by oxide dispersion is reviewed. Fabrication, tensile strength, superplasticity, grain growth control, stress rupture life, and grain-size and dispersion-level effects are covered. Distinct strength advantages of powder metallurgy superalloys over conventional wrought alloys are noted.

  2. Material accountancy measurement techniques in dry-powdered processing of nuclear spent fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, S. F.

    1999-03-24

    The paper addresses the development of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS), thermal ionization-mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha-spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry techniques for in-line analysis of highly irradiated (18 to 64 GWD/T) PWR spent fuels in a dry-powdered processing cycle. The dry-powdered technique for direct elemental and isotopic accountancy assay measurements was implemented without the need for separation of the plutonium, uranium and fission product elements in the bulk powdered process. The analyses allow the determination of fuel burn-up based on the isotopic composition of neodymium and/or cesium. An objective of the program is to develop the ICPMS method for direct fissile nuclear materials accountancy in the dry-powdered processing of spent fuel. The ICPMS measurement system may be applied to the KAERI DUPIC (direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) experiment, and in a near-real-time mode for international safeguards verification and non-proliferation policy concerns.

  3. Effects of the Adulteration Technique on the Near-Infrared Detection of Melamine in Milk Powder.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Peter F; Bergana, Marti Mamula; Yakes, Betsy Jean; Xie, Zhuohong; Zbylut, Steven; Downey, Gerard; Mossoba, Magdi; Jablonski, Joseph; Magaletta, Robert; Holroyd, Stephen E; Buehler, Martin; Qin, Jianwei; Hurst, William; LaPointe, Joseph H; Roberts, Dean; Zrybko, Carol; Mackey, Andrew; Holton, Jason D; Israelson, Greg A; Payne, Anitra; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Moore, Jeffrey C

    2017-07-19

    The United States Pharmacopeial Convention has led an international collaborative project to develop a toolbox of screening methods and reference standards for the detection of milk powder adulteration. During the development of adulterated milk powder reference standards, blending methods used to combine melamine and milk had unanticipated strong effects on the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum of melamine. The prominent absorbance band at 1468 nm of melamine was retained when it was dry-blended with skim milk powder but disappeared in wet-blended mixtures, where spray-dried milk powder samples were prepared from solution. Analyses using polarized light microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mass spectrometry indicated that wet blending promoted reversible and early Maillard reactions with lactose that are responsible for differences in melamine NIR spectra between wet- and dry-blended samples. Targeted detection estimates based solely on dry-blended reference standards are likely to overestimate NIR detection capabilities in wet-blended samples as a result of previously overlooked matrix effects arising from changes in melamine hydrogen-bonding status, covalent complexation with lactose, and the lower but more homogeneous melamine local concentration distribution produced in wet-blended samples. Techniques used to incorporate potential adulterants can determine the suitability of milk reference standards for use with rapid detection methods.

  4. Metallurgy Beyond Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    Metallurgy is one of the oldest sciences. Its history can be traced back to 6000 BCE with the discovery of Gold, and each new discovery - Copper, Silver, Lead, Tin, Iron and Mercury - marked the beginning of a new era of civilization. Currently there are 86 known metals, but until the end of the 17th century, only 12 of these were known. Steel (Fe-C alloy) was discovered in the 11th century BCE; however, it took until 1709 CE before we mastered the smelting of pig-iron by using coke instead of charcoal and started the industrial revolution. The metallurgy of nowadays is mainly about discovering better materials with superior properties to fulfil the increasing demand of the global market. Promising are the Glassy Metals or Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) - discovered at first in the late 50s at the California Institute of Technology - which are several times stronger than the best industrial steels and 10-times springier. The unusual structure that lacks crystalline grains makes BMGs so promising. They have a liquid-like structure that means they melt at lower temperatures, can be moulded nearly as easily as plastics, and can be shaped into features just 10 nm across. The best BMG formers are based on Zr, Pd, Pt, Ca, Au and, recently discovered, also Fe. They have typically three to five components with large atomic size mismatch and a composition close to a deep eutectic. Packing in such liquids is very dense, with a low content of free volume, resulting in viscosities that are several orders of magnitude higher than in pure metal melts.

  5. NON-MELT PROCESSING OF "LOW-COST", ARMSTRONG TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOY POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A; Clive, Scorey; Ernst, Bill; McKernan, John; Kiggans, Jim; Rivard, John D; Yu, Dr. Charlie

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade, a considerable effort has been made to develop new methods for producing low cost titanium and titanium powders. The Armstrong process is a new method of producing titanium powder via reducing TiCl4 vapor in molten sodium. The process is scalable, and can be used to produce pre-alloyed powders. Non-melt processing and powder metallurgy approaches are economically viable with the commercially pure powders. In this investigation, several non-melt processing technologies, including vacuum hot pressing, extrusion, roll compaction, and forging techniques, will be evaluated using the Armstrong titanium powders. The metallurgical, chemical, and mechanical properties of the processed titanium samples will be discussed.

  6. Developments in Die Pressing Strategies for Low-Cost Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Weil, K. Scott; Lavender, Curt A.

    2009-05-01

    Recent developments in the production of low-cost titanium powders have rejuvenated interest in manufacturing titanium powder metallurgy components by direct press and sinter techniques. However excessive friction typically observed during titanium powder pressing operations leads to numerous problems ranging from non-homogeneous green densities of the compacted powder to excessive part ejection forces and reduced die life due to wear and galling. An instrumented double-acting die press was developed to both investigate the mechanics of titanium powder pressing (particularly for the new low-cost powder morphologies) and to screen potential lubricants that could reduce frictional effects. As will be discussed, the instrument was used to determine friction coefficients and to evaluate a number of candidate lubricants. These results were then used to optimize the lubricant system to reduce die-wall stresses and improve part density uniformity.

  7. A sol-powder coating technique for fabrication of yttria stabilised zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Wattanasiriwech, Darunee . E-mail: darunee@mfu.ac.th; Wattanasiriwech, Suthee; Stevens, Ron

    2006-08-10

    Yttria stabilised zirconia has been prepared using a simple sol-powder coating technique. The polymeric yttria sol, which was prepared using 1,3 propanediol as a network modifier, was homogeneously mixed with nanocrystalline zirconia powder and it showed a dual function: as a binder which promoted densification and a phase modifier which stabilised zirconia in the tetragonal and cubic phases. Thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction revealed that the polymeric yttria sol which decomposed at low temperature into yttrium oxide could change the m {sup {yields}} t phase transformation behaviour of the zirconia, possibly due to the small particle size and very high surface area of both yttria and zirconia particles allowing rapid alloying. The sintered samples exhibited three crystalline phases: monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic, in which cubic and tetragonal are the major phases. The weight fractions of the individual phases present in the selected specimens were determined using quantitative Rietveld analysis.

  8. Extractive Metallurgy Program funded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In an effort to concentrate research on ore dressing and metal production, the National Science Foundation (NSF) formed a new basic research program as a part of its Chemical and Process Engineering Division. This program will be under the auspices of NSF's Engineering Directorate. Research is to be supported on every step of extractive metallurgy, from mining to processing to production, and even to reprocessing and disposal. Budgeting for the new program is expected to be on the order of $1.2 million for fiscal year 1981.A program of this nature was apparently considered seriously by the Carter administration as a joint Department of Interior-private industry project of considerable size. Then-Secretary of Interior Cecil Andrus evidently did not support the program, but there is wide agreement throughout the mineral industries and the university community that such research is badly needed for the U.S. to compete. A joint program could benefit by cutting across the many difficult regulations that now are blamed for slowing research in minerals processing in this country.

  9. Effect of layered manufacturing techniques, alloy powders, and layer thickness on metal-ceramic bond strength.

    PubMed

    Ekren, Orhun; Ozkomur, Ahmet; Ucar, Yurdanur

    2017-07-06

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) and direct metal laser melting (DMLM) have become popular for fabricating the metal frameworks of metal-ceramic restorations. How the type of layered manufacturing device, layer thickness, and alloy powder may affect the bond strength of ceramic to metal substructure is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of dental porcelain to metal frameworks fabricated using different layered manufacturing techniques (DMLS and DMLM), Co-Cr alloy powders, and layer thicknesses and to evaluate whether a correlation exists between the bond strength and the number of ceramic remnants on the metal surface. A total of 75 bar-shaped metal specimens (n=15) were fabricated using either DMLS or DMLM. The powder alloys used were Keramit NP-S and EOS-Cobalt-Chrome SP-2 with layer thicknesses of 20 μm and 30 μm. After ceramic application, the metal-ceramic bond strength was evaluated with a 3-point-bend test. Three-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey honest significance difference test were used for statistical analysis (α=.05). De-bonding surface microstructure was observed with scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlation between ceramic remnants on the metal surface and bond strength values. The mean bond strength value of DMLS was significantly higher than that of DMLM. While no statistically significant difference was found between layer thicknesses, alloy powders closely affected bond strength. Statistical comparisons revealed that the highest bond strength could be achieved with DMLS-Cobalt-Chrome SP2-20μm, and the lowest bond strength was observed in DMLS-Keramit NP-S-20μm (P≤.05). No correlation was found between porcelain remnants on the metal surface and bond strength values. The layered manufacturing device and the alloy powders evaluated in the current study closely affected the bond strength of dental porcelain to a metal framework

  10. Improvement of the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of biodegradable β-Ca3(PO4)2/Mg-Zn composites prepared by powder metallurgy: the adding β-Ca3(PO4)2, hot extrusion and aging treatment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yang; Kang, Yijun; Li, Ding; Yu, Kun; Xiao, Tao; Deng, Youwen; Dai, Han; Dai, Yilong; Xiong, Hanqing; Fang, Hongjie

    2017-05-01

    In this study, 10%β-Ca3(PO4)2/Mg-6%Zn (wt.%) composites with Mg-6%Zn alloy as control were prepared by powder metallurgy. After hot extrusion, the as-extruded composites were aged for 72h at 150°C. The effects of the adding β-Ca3(PO4)2, hot extrusion and aging treatment on their microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance were investigated. The XRD results identified α-Mg, MgZn phase and β-Ca3(PO4)2 phase in these composites. After hot extrusion, grains were significantly refined, and the larger-sized β-Ca3(PO4)2 particles and coarse MgZn phases were broken into linear-distributed β-Ca3(PO4)2 and MgZn phases along the extrusion direction. After aging treatment, the elements of Zn, Ca, P and O presented a more homogeneous distribution. The compressive strengths of the β-Ca3(PO4)2/Mg-Zn composites were approximately double those of natural bone, and their densities and elastic moduli matched those of natural bone. The immersion tests and electrochemical tests revealed that the adding β-Ca3(PO4)2, hot extrusion and aging treatment could promote the formation of protective corrosion product layer on the sample surface in Ringer's solution, which improved corrosion resistance of the β-Ca3(PO4)2/Mg-Zn composites. The XRD results indicated that the corrosion product layer contained Mg(OH)2, β-Ca3(PO4)2 and hydroxyapatite (HA). The cytotoxicity assessments showed the as-extruded β-Ca3(PO4)2/Mg-Zn composite aged for 72h was harmless to L-929 cells. These results suggested that the β-Ca3(PO4)2/Mg-Zn composites prepared by powder metallurgy were promising to be used for bone tissue engineering.

  11. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. As a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.

  12. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; ...

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. Asmore » a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.« less

  13. Plasma preparation and low-temperature sintering of spherical TiC-Fe composite powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-jun; Hao, Jun-jie; Guo, Zhi-meng; Wang, Song

    2015-12-01

    A spherical Fe matrix composite powder containing a high volume fraction (82vol%) of fine TiC reinforcement was produced using a novel process combining in situ synthesis and plasma techniques. The composite powder exhibited good sphericity and a dense structure, and the fine sub-micron TiC particles were homogeneously distributed in the α-Fe matrix. A TiC-Fe cermet was prepared from the as-prepared spherical composite powder using powder metallurgy at a low sintering temperature; the product exhibited a hardness of HRA 88.5 and a flexural strength of 1360 MPa. The grain size of the fine-grained TiC and special surface structure of the spherical powder played the key roles in the fabrication process.

  14. Copper Bronze Powder Surface Studied by XPS and HR SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvab, R.; Hryha, E.; Tahir, A. M.; Nyborg, L.

    2016-10-01

    The state of the powder surface represents one of the main interests in the whole cycle of components' production using powder metallurgy (PM) route. Large specific surface area of the powder in combination with often alloying with oxygen sensitive elements results in oxidation of the powder surface in most of the cases. The information about surface chemistry of the powder is of vital importance for further consolidation and sintering steps. Surface sensitive analytical techniques - X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (HR SEM+EDX) were used for surface chemical analysis of the 60Cu-40Sn bronze powder. Determination of the compositional profiles and estimation of the surface oxide layer thickness was done by altering of ion etching and XPS analysis. The results showed tin oxide enrichment and presence of copper hydroxide on the surface of the powder particles. The impurities of P, Zn and Ca were also detected on the top surface of the powder in trace amounts.

  15. Diamond Field Emission Source using Transfer Mold Technique Prepared by Diamond Powder Seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Sachiaki; Matsuba, Yohei; Takahashi, Kohro

    Diamond thin films fabricated by MPCVD (microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition) are available for use as a field emitter material, because of its high mechanical quality, thermal conductivity, chemical stability, environmental tolerance, and NEA (negative electron affinity). Diode and triode emitter arrays using P-doped polycrystalline diamond were manufactured on a SiO2/Si(100) substrate with reverse pyramids formed by the transfer mold technique. As the diamond nucleation process, spin-coat seeding with pure diamond powder dispersed in isoamyl acetate has been introduced in place of the bias method. SEM (scanning electron microscopy) images and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the crystal quality of the diamond thin film fabricated by spin-coat seeding is superior to that fabricated by the bias method. The diamond crystal completely grew on top of the diode emitter by the US (ultrasonic) treatment in a diamond powder solution before spin-coat seeding. The tip radius was smaller than 50 nm. The beginning voltage of the emission of the diode emitter is 3 V after the DC glow discharge treatment in H2, which is lower than that of an emitter array fabricated by the bias method, 40 V. On the other hand, the emission of the diamond triode emitter starts at a gate voltage of only 0.5 V, and the emission current of 50∼60 mA is obtained at a gate voltage of 2 V.

  16. Use of Cation Exchange Resins for Production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Suitable for the Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Powder Metallurgy Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    2001-09-17

    This report describes the production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powders from three types of cation exchange resins: Dowex 50W, a strong acid, sulfonate resin; AG MP-50, a macroporous form of sulfonate resin; and Bio-Rex 70, a weak acid, carboxylic resin.

  17. Magnetic and microstructural properties of Fe3O4-coated Fe powder soft magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo Sunday, Katie; Hanejko, Francis G.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2017-02-01

    Soft magnetic composites (SMCs) comprised of ferrite-coated ferrous powder permit isotropic magnetic flux capabilities, lower core losses, and complex designs through the use of traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Current coating materials and methods are vastly limited by the nonmagnetic properties of organic and some inorganic coatings and their inability to withstand high heat treatments for proper stress relief of core powder after compaction. Ferrite-based coatings are ferrimagnetic, highly resistive, and possess high melting temperatures, thus providing adequate electrical barriers between metallic particles. In this work, iron powder was coated with Fe3O4 particles via mechanical milling, then compacted and cured in an inert gas environment. We find density and coercivity to improve with increasing temperatures; however, core loss greatly increases, which is attributed to the formation of a more conductive iron-oxide phase and less resistive Fe volume. Our work begins to exemplify the unique qualities and potential for ferrite-based coatings using traditional powder metallurgy techniques and higher curing temperatures for electromagnetic devices.

  18. Characterization and Sintering of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Nash, Philip; Mangabhai, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys have a high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance but also need longer time and have a higher cost on machining. Powder metallurgy offers a viable approach to produce near net-shape complex components with little or no machining. The Armstrong titanium powders are produced by direct reduction of TiCl4 vapor with liquid sodium, a process which has a relatively low cost. This paper presents a systematic research on powder characterization, mechanical properties, and sintering behavior and of Armstrong process powder metallurgy, and also discusses the sodium issue, and the advantages and disadvantages of Armstrong process powders.

  19. Concurrent use of metered dose inhalers without spacer and dry powder inhalers by asthmatic children adversely affect proper inhalation technique

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Saad; Hassan, Walid M; Alhashimi, Hashim

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease of children. A good control of symptoms will improve quality of patient life. Inhalation technique is an important aspect in the management of asthma. The better the inhalation technique the better the lung deposition of asthma therapy especially inhaled corticosteroids. This will lead to better control of symptoms and improve adherence to treatment. In the following study the inhalation technique of asthma devices were compared using inhalation technique score system. The asthma devices studied were metered dose inhalers (pressurized MDI) without spacers and dry powder inhalers (DPI). The hypothesis studied was that the inhalation technique score of dry powder inhalers will be adversely affected with concurrent use of metered dose inhalers without spacers. PMID:21760757

  20. Concurrent use of metered dose inhalers without spacer and dry powder inhalers by asthmatic children adversely affect proper inhalation technique.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Saad; Hassan, Walid M; Alhashimi, Hashim

    2011-06-14

    Asthma is a common chronic disease of children. A good control of symptoms will improve quality of patient life. Inhalation technique is an important aspect in the management of asthma. The better the inhalation technique the better the lung deposition of asthma therapy especially inhaled corticosteroids. This will lead to better control of symptoms and improve adherence to treatment. In the following study the inhalation technique of asthma devices were compared using inhalation technique score system. The asthma devices studied were metered dose inhalers (pressurized MDI) without spacers and dry powder inhalers (DPI). The hypothesis studied was that the inhalation technique score of dry powder inhalers will be adversely affected with concurrent use of metered dose inhalers without spacers.

  1. Optimization of headspace solid-phase microextraction technique for extraction of volatile smokeless powder compounds in forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2014-07-01

    Smokeless powders are low explosives and are potentially found in cases involving firearms and improvised explosive devices. Apart from inorganic compound analysis, forensic determination of organic components of these materials appears as a promising alternative, especially the chromatographic techniques. This work describes the optimization of a solid-phase microextraction technique using an 85 μm polyacrylate fiber followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection for smokeless powder. A multivariate experimental design was performed to optimize extraction-influencing parameters. A 2(4) factorial first-order design revealed that sample temperature and extraction time were the major influencing parameters. Doehlert matrix design has subsequently selected 66°C and 21 min as the compromised conditions for the two predetermined parameters. This extraction technique has successfully detected the headspace compounds of smokeless powders from different ammunition types and allowed for their differentiation. The novel technique allows more rapid sample preparation for chromatographic detection of smokeless powders. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Modified Sol-Gel Technique as a Cost-Effective Method of Ultradispersed Metal Oxide Powders Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmintcev, K. V.; Konstantinov, O. V.; Belousov, V. V.

    2013-05-01

    A modified sol-gel technique was developed for fabrication of ultradispersed metal oxides powders of Bi2O3, CeO2, Cr2O3, Y2O3, ZnO2 and ZrO2. Hexamethylenetetramine, monoethanolamine and acetylacetone were used for the sol formation and gel stabilization.

  3. Raman spectral imaging technique on detection of melamine in skim milk powder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A point-scan Raman spectral imaging system was used for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial resoluti...

  4. Spectrochemical determination of thorium in monazite by the powder-d.c. arc technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutra, C.V.; Murata, K.J.

    1954-01-01

    Thorium in monazite is determined by a d.c. carbon-arc technique using zirconium as the internal standard. The analytical curve for Th II 2870.413 A??/Zr II 2844-579 A?? is established by means of synthetic standards containing graduated amounts of thoria and 0.500 per cent zirconia in pegmatite base (60 parts quartz, 40 parts microchne, and 1 part ferric oxide). Monazite samples are diluted 14-fold with pegmatite base that contains 0.538 per cent ZrO2, so that the zirconia content of the resulting mixture is also 0.500 per cent. In addition, both the standards and the diluted monazites are mixed with one-half their weight of powdered graphite. Approximately 25 mg of the prepared samples are arced to completion at 15.5 to 17.5 amperes. With the 14-fold dilution employed, the accurate range of the method is 3 to 20 per cent thoria in the original monazite. The coefficient of variation for a single determination is 4 per cent at the 7 per cent thoria level. Tests with synthetic unknowns and chemically analyzed monazites show a maximum error of ??10 per cent of the thoria content. If niobium is substituted for zirconium as the internal standard, there is a loss of precision. Platinum as the internal standard gives results of good precision but introduces a marked sensitivity to matrix effects. ?? 1954.

  5. Production of inhalation phage powders using spray freeze drying and spray drying techniques for treatment of respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Sharon S.Y.; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Gao, Fiona G.; Carrigy, Nicholas B.; Vehring, Reinhard; Finlay, Warren H.; Morales, Sandra; Britton, Warwick J; Kutter, Elizabeth; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The potential of aerosol phage therapy for treating lung infections has been demonstrated in animal models and clinical studies. This work compared the performance of two dry powder formation techniques, spray freeze drying (SFD) and spray drying (SD), in producing inhalable phage powders. Method A Pseudomonas podoviridae phage, PEV2, was incorporated into multi-component formulation systems consisting of trehalose, mannitol and L-leucine (F1 = 60:20:20 and F2 = 40:40:20). The phage titer loss after the SFD and SD processes and in vitro aerosol performance of the produced powders were assessed. Results A significant titer loss (~ 2 log) was noted for droplet generation using an ultrasonic nozzle employed in the SFD method, but the conventional two-fluid nozzle used in the SD method was less destructive for the phage (~0.75 log loss). The phage were more vulnerable during the evaporative drying process (~0.75 log further loss) compared with the freeze drying step, which caused negligible phage loss. In vitro aerosol performance showed that the SFD powders (~80% phage recovery) provided better phage protection than the SD powders (~20% phage recovery) during the aerosolization process. Despite this, higher total lung doses were obtained for the SD formulations (SD-F1 = 13.1 ± 1.7 × 104 pfu and SD-F2 = 11.0 ± 1.4 × 104 pfu) than from their counterpart SFD formulations (SFD-F1 = 8.3 ± 1.8 × 104 pfu and SFD-F2 = 2.1 ± 0.3 × 104 pfu). Conclusion Overall, the SD method caused less phage reduction during the powder formation process and the resulted powders achieved better aerosol performance for PEV2. PMID:26928668

  6. Physical-Chemical Characterization of Nanodispersed Powders Produced by a Plasma-Chemical Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, M.; Vissokov, Grancharov G., IV

    2007-06-01

    This article presents a review on the physical-chemical properties and characteristics of plasma-chemically produced nanodispersed powders (NDP), such as metals, oxides, nitrides, carbides, and catalysts. The plasma-chemical preparation of the powders was carried out in thermal plasma (TP) created by means of high-current electric arcs, plasma jets, high-frequency (HF) discharges, etc. We also discuss certain properties and characteristics of the NDPs, which are determined largely by the conditions of preparation.

  7. Nanospray Drying as a Novel Technique for the Manufacturing of Inhalable NSAID Powders

    PubMed Central

    Rita Patrizia, Aquino; Mariateresa, Stigliani; Pasquale, Del Gaudio; Teresa, Mencherini; Francesca, Sansone; Paola, Russo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential of the nanospray drier as a novel apparatus for the manufacturing of a dry powder for inhalation containing ketoprofen lysinate, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug able to control the inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients. We produced several ketoprofen lysinate and leucine powder batches by means of nanospray dryer, studying the influence of process parameters on yield, particle properties (size distribution and morphology), and, mainly, aerodynamic properties of powders. Micronized particles were prepared from different hydroalcoholic solutions (alcohol content from 0 to 30% v/v) using ketoprofen in its lysine salt form and leucine as dispersibility enhancer in different ratios (from 5 to 15% w/w) with a total solid concentration ranging from 1 to 7% w/v. Results indicated that the spray head equipped with a 7 µm nozzle produced powders too big to be inhaled. The reduction of nozzle size from 7 to 4 µm led to smaller particles suitable for inhalation but, at the same time, caused a dramatic increase in process time. The selection of process variables, together with the nozzle pretreatment with a surfactant solution, allowed us to obtain a free flowing powder with satisfying aerosol performance, confirming the usefulness of the nanospray drier in the production of powder for inhalation. PMID:25580462

  8. Process Metallurgy an Enabler of Resource Efficiency: Linking Product Design to Metallurgy in Product Centric Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Markus; van Schaik, Antoinette

    In this paper the link between process metallurgy, classical minerals processing, product centric recycling and urban/landfill mining is discussed. The depth that has to be achieved in urban mining and recycling must glean from the wealth of theoretical knowledge and insight that have been developed in the past in minerals and metallurgical processing. This background learns that recycling demands a product centric approach, which considers simultaneously the multi-material interactions in man-made complex `minerals'. Fast innovation in recycling and urban mining can be achieved by further evolving from this well developed basis, evolving the techniques and tools that have been developed over the years. This basis has already been used for many years to design, operate and control industrial plants for metal production. This has been the basis for Design for Recycling rules for End-of-Life products. Using, among others, the UNEP Metal Recycling report as a basis (authors are respectively Lead and Main authors of report), it is demonstrated that a common theoretical basis as developed in metallurgy and minerals processing can help much to level the playing field between primary processing, secondary processing, recycling, and urban/landfill mining and product design hence enhancing resource efficiency. Thus various scales of detail link product design with metallurgical process design and its fundamentals.

  9. Printability of calcium phosphate: calcium sulfate powders for the application of tissue engineered bone scaffolds using the 3D printing technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zuoxin; Buchanan, Fraser; Mitchell, Christina; Dunne, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    In this study, calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were blended with a three-dimensional printing (3DP) calcium sulfate (CaSO4)-based powder and the resulting composite powders were printed with a water-based binder using the 3DP technology. Application of a water-based binder ensured the manufacture of CaP:CaSO4 constructs on a reliable and repeatable basis, without long term damage of the printhead. Printability of CaP:CaSO4 powders was quantitatively assessed by investigating the key 3DP process parameters, i.e. in-process powder bed packing, drop penetration behavior and the quality of printed solid constructs. Effects of particle size, CaP:CaSO4 ratio and CaP powder type on the 3DP process were considered. The drop penetration technique was used to reliably identify powder formulations that could be potentially used for the application of tissue engineered bone scaffolds using the 3DP technique. Significant improvements (p<0.05) in the 3DP process parameters were found for CaP (30-110 μm):CaSO4 powders compared to CaP (<20 μm):CaSO4 powders. Higher compressive strength was obtained for the powders with the higher CaP:CaSO4 ratio. Hydroxyapatite (HA):CaSO4 powders showed better results than beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP):CaSO4 powders. Solid and porous constructs were manufactured using the 3DP technique from the optimized CaP:CaSO4 powder formulations. High-quality printed constructs were manufactured, which exhibited appropriate green compressive strength and a high level of printing accuracy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Rules of Ferrous Metallurgy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The ways in which the sciences have been delineated and categorized throughout history provide insights into the formation, stabilization, and establishment of scientific systems of knowledge. The Dresdener school’s approach for explaining and categorizing the genesis of the engineering disciplines is still valid, but needs to be complemented by further-reaching methodological and theoretical reflections. Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of social practice is applied to the question of how individual agents succeed in influencing decisively a discipline’s changing object orientation, institutionalisation and self-reproduction. Through the accumulation of social, cultural and economic capital, they succeed in realising their own organisational ideas and scientific programs. Key concepts for the analysis include the struggle for power and resources, monopolies of interpretation, and the degree of autonomy. A case study from the Aachener Technische Hochschule shows that the consolidation of ferrous metallurgy can be conceived as a symbolical struggle between Fritz Wüst, professor for ferrous metallurgy, and the German Iron and Steel Institute, leading to a construction of a system of differences in which scientists accepted being scientists rather than entrepreneurs, and entrepreneurs accepted becoming entrepreneurs and renounced science.

  11. Simultaneous determination of urea and melamine in milk powder by nonlinear chemical fingerprint technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongjie; Dong, Wenbin; Bao, Hongliang; Fang, Yue; Fan, Cheng

    2017-04-15

    This paper proposed a nonlinear chemical fingerprint method for simultaneous determination of urea and melamine in milk powder using "H(+)+Ce(4+)+BrO3(-)+malonic acid" as reaction system. A multiple linear relationship was obtained between the adulterants content in milk powder and inductive time of corresponding mixed milk powder. System analysis model established with classical least squares (CLS) method was then used to calculate the content of urea and melamine in milk powder. The method was successfully applied to milk powder samples and had good recoveries in the range of 99.17-100.25%, with the relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 0.60-4.12%. The limits of detection for urea and melamine were 0.33μg·g(-1) and 0.05μg·g(-1), respectively. The limits of quantification were 1.11μg·g(-1) and 0.18μg·g(-1), respectively. The results indicated that the new method was feasible and had the advantages of low cost, simple operation and without pretreatment of samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of metallurgy on the formation of welding aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Anthony T

    2002-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that insoluble ultrafine aerosols (ie., particles whose physical diameters are less than 100 nm) may cause adverse health effects due to their small size, and that toxicological response may be more appropriately represented by particle number or particle surface area. Unfortunately, current exposure criteria and the associated air-sampling techniques are primarily mass-based. Welding processes are high-temperature operations that generate substantial number concentrations of ultrafine aerosols. Welding aerosols are formed primarily through the nucleation of metal vapors followed by competing growth mechanisms such as coagulation and condensation. Experimental results and mathematical tools are presented to illustrate how welding metallurgy influences the chemical aspects and dynamic processes that initiate and evolve the resultant aerosol. This research suggests that a fundamental understanding of metallurgy and aerosol physics can be exploited to suppress the formation of undesirable chemical species as well as the amount of aerosol generated during a welding process.

  13. Unusual high B{sub s} for Fe-based amorphous powders produced by a gas-atomization technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Bito, M.; Kageyama, J.; Shimizu, Y.; Abe, M.; Makino, A.

    2016-05-15

    Fe-based alloy powders with a high Fe content of about 81 at.% were produced by a gas-atomization technique. Powders of Fe{sub 81}Si{sub 1.9}B{sub 5.7}P{sub 11.4} (at.%) alloy showed a good glass forming ability and exhibited unusual high saturation magnetic flux density of 1.57 T. The core-loss property at a frequency of 100 kHz for the compacted core made of the Fe{sub 81}Si{sub 1.9}B{sub 5.7}P{sub 11.4} powder is evaluated to be less than 500 kW/m{sup 3} under a maximum induction of 100 mT. Moreover, good DC-superposition characteristic of the core was also confirmed. These results suggest that the present Fe-based alloy powder is promising for low-loss magnetic-core materials and expected to contribute in miniaturization of electric parts in the near future.

  14. In-situ fabrication of nanostructured cobalt oxide powders by spray pyrolysis technique.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z W; Konstantinov, K; Yuan, L; Liu, H K; Dou, S X

    2004-09-01

    Nano-crystalline Co3O4 and CoO powders have been prepared by a spray pyrolysis approach. The effects of the reaction temperature and initial salts on the crystallinity and phase composition have been studied. Based on the TEM and XRD results, the crystal sizes were in the range of 1-10 nm. SEM and TEM observations also reveal that the nano-powders easily create micron-scale spherical agglomerates. The Co3O4 powders obtained by spraying nitrate solution at 500 degrees C show high specific surface area, which according to the BET method is 82.37 m2/g. The time/temperature phase diagram of cobalt oxides developed from XRD and DTA/TGA analyses shows the existence of a CoO phase at low and high temperature ranges when some specific preparation conditions are applied.

  15. Unraveling the nature of electric field- and stress- induced structural transformations in soft PZT by a new powder poling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyani, Ajay Kumar; V, Lalitha K.; James, Ajit R.; Fitch, Andy; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2015-02-01

    A ‘powder-poling’ technique was developed to study electric field induced structural transformations in ferroelectrics exhibiting a morphotropic phase boundary (MPB). The technique was employed on soft PZT exhibiting a large longitudinal piezoelectric response (d33 ˜ 650 pC N-1). It was found that electric poling brings about a considerable degree of irreversible tetragonal to monoclinic transformation. The same transformation was achieved after subjecting the specimen to mechanical stress, which suggests an equivalence of stress and electric field with regard to the structural mechanism in MPB compositions. The electric field induced structural transformation was also found to be accompanied by a decrease in the spatial coherence of polarization.

  16. Unraveling the nature of electric field- and stress- induced structural transformations in soft PZT by a new powder poling technique.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Ajay Kumar; V, Lalitha K; James, Ajit R; Fitch, Andy; Ranjan, Rajeev

    2015-02-25

    A 'powder-poling' technique was developed to study electric field induced structural transformations in ferroelectrics exhibiting a morphotropic phase boundary (MPB). The technique was employed on soft PZT exhibiting a large longitudinal piezoelectric response (d(33) ∼ 650 pC N(-1)). It was found that electric poling brings about a considerable degree of irreversible tetragonal to monoclinic transformation. The same transformation was achieved after subjecting the specimen to mechanical stress, which suggests an equivalence of stress and electric field with regard to the structural mechanism in MPB compositions. The electric field induced structural transformation was also found to be accompanied by a decrease in the spatial coherence of polarization.

  17. Detection and quantification of adulterants in milk powder using high-throughput Raman chemical imaging technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Milk is a vulnerable target for economically motivated adulteration. In this study, a line-scan high-throughput Raman imaging system was used to authenticate milk powder. A 5 W 785 nm line laser (240 mm long and 1 mm wide) was used as a Raman excitation source. The system was used to acquire hypersp...

  18. Determination of the Microstructure of Powder Tool Steels by Different Etching Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atapek, Ş. H.; Polat, Ş.; Gümüş, S.; Erişir, E.; Altuğ, G. S.

    2014-07-01

    The microstructure of three powder high-speed steels is studied in quenched and tempered conditions by methods of light and scanning electron microscopy. Several types of carbides with different morphology are detected by using various methods of etching of specimens. The composition of the carbide phases is determined by the method of energy dispersive local analysis.

  19. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  20. Ionic liquids for simultaneous preconcentration of some lanthanoids using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique in uranium dioxide powder.

    PubMed

    Mallah, Mohammad H; Shemirani, Farzaneh; Maragheh, Mohammad G

    2009-03-15

    Ionic liquids in a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique were used for determination of lanthanoids such as samarium, europium, gadolinium, and dysprosium in uranium dioxide powder. In this process, an appropriate mixture of extraction solvent and disperser is rapidly injected into an aqueous sample containing samarium, europium, gadolinium, and dysprosium ions complexes with 1-hydroxy-2, 5-pyrrolidinedione, and consequently a cloudy solution is formed. It consists of fine droplets of extraction solventwhich are dispersed entirely into the aqueous phase. After centrifugation of this solution, the whole enriched phase was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. In the present work, the preconcentration factor, limit of detection, and relative standard deviation were investigated for samarium, europium, gadolinium, and dysprosium in uranium dioxide powder.

  1. Spray Drying as a Processing Technique for Syndiotactic Polystyrene to Powder Form for Part Manufacturing Through Selective Laser Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mys, N.; Verberckmoes, A.; Cardon, L.

    2017-03-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS) is a rapidly expanding field of the three-dimensional printing concept. One stumbling block in the evolution of the technique is the limited range of materials available for processing with SLS making the application window small. This article aims at identifying syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) as a promising material. sPS pellets were processed into powder form with a lab-scale spray dryer with vibrating nozzle. This technique is the focus of this scope as it almost eliminates the agglomeration phenomenon often encountered with the use of solution-based processing techniques. Microspheres obtained were characterized in shape and size by scanning electron microscopy and evaluation of the particle size distribution. The effect the processing technique imparts on the intrinsic properties of the material was examined by differential scanning calorimetry analysis.

  2. Spray Drying as a Processing Technique for Syndiotactic Polystyrene to Powder Form for Part Manufacturing Through Selective Laser Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mys, N.; Verberckmoes, A.; Cardon, L.

    2016-11-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS) is a rapidly expanding field of the three-dimensional printing concept. One stumbling block in the evolution of the technique is the limited range of materials available for processing with SLS making the application window small. This article aims at identifying syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) as a promising material. sPS pellets were processed into powder form with a lab-scale spray dryer with vibrating nozzle. This technique is the focus of this scope as it almost eliminates the agglomeration phenomenon often encountered with the use of solution-based processing techniques. Microspheres obtained were characterized in shape and size by scanning electron microscopy and evaluation of the particle size distribution. The effect the processing technique imparts on the intrinsic properties of the material was examined by differential scanning calorimetry analysis.

  3. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    PubMed

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  4. Processing of a porous titanium alloy from elemental powders using a solid state isothermal foaming technique.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, Aris W; Leadbeater, Garry; Davies, Ian J

    2010-12-01

    The authors have conducted a preliminary investigation with regard to the potential to manufacture porous titanium alloys for biomedical applications using toxic-free elemental powders, i.e., Ti, Nb, Ta, Zr, in combination with the pressurised gas bubble entrapment method and in contrast to standard processing routes that generally utilise prealloyed powder containing potentially toxic elements. Elemental powder compacts were either hot isostatic pressed (HIP-ed) at 1000°C and then foamed at 1150°C or else HIP-ed at 1100°C and foamed at 1350°C. Porous α + β alloys containing up to 45 vol% of porosity in the size range 20-200 μm were successfully produced, thus highlighting the potential of this manufacturing route. It was expected that further optimisation of the processing route would allow full development of the preferred β-Ti phase (from the point of view of elastic modulus compatibility between implant and bone) with this being the subject of future work by the authors.

  5. Advances in gamma titanium aluminides and their manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-11-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides display attractive properties for high temperature applications. For over a decade in the 1990s, the attractive properties of titanium aluminides were outweighed by difficulties encountered in processing and machining at room temperature. But advances in manufacturing technologies, deeper understanding of titanium aluminides microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and advances in micro-alloying, has led to the production of gamma titanium aluminide sheets. An in-depth review of key advances in gamma titanium aluminides is presented, including microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and alloy development. Traditional manufacturing techniques such as ingot metallurgy and investment casting are reviewed and advances via powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques are discussed. Finally, manufacturing challenges facing gamma titanium aluminides, as well as avenues to overcome them, are discussed.

  6. A Fundamental Study of Fatigue in Powder Metallurgy Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    Rearick (20) have confirmed the beneficial effect of material flow during densification; endurance limits in rotating bend on P/M processed compositions...INTRODUCTION Recent studies on aluminum alloys have shown that lateral flow during consolidation, aimed at eliminating porosity and the fragmentation of surface...removed from each forging. Slices cut from the forgings were solution treated at a temperature of 488C (910*F) for two hours and water quenched. The

  7. Methods of increasing the erosion resistance of powder metallurgy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kulu, P.A.

    1987-09-01

    The authors comparatively assess the effects of a variety of surface hardening methods--including carburizing, boriding, chromizing, and carbochromizing, as well as the flame, plasma arc, and detonation spraying of nickel and molybdenum coatings--on the wear, corrosion resistance, and pore structure of steel 45, and outline testing procedures used to arrive at their results.

  8. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Powder Metallurgy Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    BiSrCaCu205#5±( S , Superconducting Characteristics 101 Bi System Oxide Superconductors by Oxalate Method, I 103 Bi System Oxide Superconductors by...0 System Superconductors 109 Crystal Structure, Superconductivity of YBa2Cu307_, s Ill Crystal Structure, Superconductivity of SmxBai_xCuOy...constant within the limit of 500°~650°C. The evaporation speed is in a 4~6 A/ s range. Figure 1 shows X-ray diffraction patterns for an as-grown YBCO

  9. Aluminum base alloy powder metallurgy process and product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A metallurgical method including cooling molten aluminum particles and consolidating resulting solidified particles into a multiparticle body, wherein the improvement comprises the provision of greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn. Aluminum containing greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn.

  10. Powder metallurgy Rene 95 rotating turbine engine parts, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbers, L. G.; Redden, T. K.

    1981-01-01

    A Rene 95 alloy as-HIP high pressure turbine aft shaft in the CF6-50 engine and a HIP plus forged Rene 95 compressor disk in the CFM56 engine were tested. The CF6-50 engine test was conducted for 1000 C cycles and the CFM56 test for 2000 C cycles. Post test evaluation and analysis of the CF6-50 shaft and the CFM56 compressor disk included visual, fluorescent penetrant, and dimensional inspections. No defects or otherwise discrepant conditions were found. These parts were judged to have performed satisfactorily.

  11. Dual-Alloy Disks are Formed by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.; Miner, R. V.; Kortovich, C. S.; Marder, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    High-performance disks have widely varying properties from hub to rim. Dual property disk is fabricated using two nickel-base alloys, AF-115 for rim and Rene 95 for hub. Dual-alloy fabrication may find applications in automobiles, earth-moving equipment, and energy conversion systems as well as aircraft powerplants. There is potential for such applications as shafts, gears, and blades.

  12. Development of Improved High Strength Alumiunum Powder Metallurgy Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-31

    can significantly increase the applied stress required for crack nucleation. The reduced scatter in the P/M product’s response, and therefore a...exhaustion of cyclic ductility and therefore crack initiation at a lower number of cycles, or equivalently, at a lower applied stress for a given number of...nucleate at particle matrix interfaces from a high stress intensity overload, divide the stress intensity over many secondary crack sites and decrease

  13. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED

  14. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni-Se-O-Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal-organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods

  15. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines. Volume 1; Power Metallurgy Rene 95 Rotating Turbine Engine Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfouts, W. R.; Shamblen, C. E.; Mosier, J. S.; Peebles, R. E.; Gorsler, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve methods for producing powder metallurgy aircraft gas turbine engine parts from the nickel base superalloy known as Rene 95. The parts produced were the high pressure turbine aft shaft for the CF6-50 engine and the stages 5 through 9 compressor disk forgings for the CFM56/F101 engines. A 50% cost reduction was achieved as compared to conventional cast and wrought processing practices. An integrated effort involving several powder producers and a major forging source were included.

  16. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C.

    2012-07-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  17. Chemiluminescence measurements on irradiated garlic powder by the single photon counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvaiz, P.

    1995-02-01

    The feasibility of identifying irradiated garlic powder measuring chemiluminescence by liquid scintillation spectrometry was studied. Samples packed in 100 μm thick polyethylene bags were irradiated in a 60Co semi-industrial facility, with doses of 10 and 30 kGy. Control and irradiated samples were stored at 20 ± 4°C and 70 ± 10% RH in darkness for 2 years. Assays were performed to establish the best sample concentration and pH of the buffer solution in which garlic powder was to be suspended for its measurement. The water content of garlic samples was also analyzed throughout storage time, as it related to the stability of the species causing luminescence. Chemiluminescence values diminished in every sample over storage time following an exponential pattern. Irradiated samples showed values significantly higher than those of the control samples, according to the radiation dose, throughout the storage period. This does not necessarily imply that the identification of the irradiated samples would be certain, since values of control samples coming from different origins have been found to fluctuate within a rather wide range. Nonetheless, in principle, the method looks promising for the measurement of chemiluminescence in irradiated samples

  18. Powder and particulate production of metallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments of particulate metallurgy of alloyed materials where the final products is a fully dense body are discussed. Particulates are defined as powders, flakes, foils, silvers, ribbons and strip. Because rapid solidification is an important factor in particulate metallurgy, all of the particulates must have at least one dimension which is very fine, sometimes as fine as 10 to 50 microns, but move typically up to several hundred microns, provided that the dimension permits a minimum solidification rate of at least 100 K/s.

  19. Emerging Applications Using Magnesium Alloy Powders: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Rajiv; Madan, Deepak

    The use of powder metallurgy offers a potential processing route based on tailored compositions and unique microstructures to achieve high performance in magnesium alloys. This paper highlights recent advances in the production, qualification, and characterization of gas atomized AZ91E, WE43 and Elektron21 alloy powders. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to understand the bulk and surface structure of the atomized powder. The potential for using these magnesium alloy powders for emerging applications involves establishing compatibility with viable consolidation processes such as cold spray, laser assisted deposition, forging and extrusion. This study summarizes the preliminary results for various ongoing investigations using WE43 powder as an example. Results show that powder metallurgy processed WE43 results in comparable properties to those obtained from cast and wrought and offers potential for improvement.

  20. [Atmospheric emission of PCDD/Fs from secondary aluminum metallurgy industry in the southwest area, China].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Zhi-Shun; Jian, Chuan; Zhu, Ming-Ji; Deng, Li; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Five secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises in the southwest area of China were measured for emissions of PCDD/Fs. The results indicated that the emission levels of PCDD/Fs (as TEQ) were 0.015-0.16 ng x m(-3), and the average was 0.093 ng x m(-3) from secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises. Emission factors of PCDD/Fs (as TEQ) from the five secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises varied between 0.041 and 4.68 microg x t(-1) aluminum, and the average was 2.01 microg x t(-1) aluminum; among them, PCDD/Fs emission factors from the crucible smelting furnace was the highest. Congener distribution of PCDD/F in stack gas from the five secondary aluminum metallurgies was very different from each other. Moreover, the R(PCDF/PCDD) was the lowest in the enterprise which was installed only with bag filters; the R(PCDF/PCDD) were 3.8-12.6 (the average, 7.7) in the others which were installed with water scrubbers. The results above indicated that the mechanism of PCDD/Fs formation was related to the types of exhaust gas treatment device. The results of this study can provide technical support for the formulation of PCDD/Fs emission standards and the best available techniques in the secondary aluminum metallurgy industry.

  1. Safety evaluation of a milk-based protein powder produced by a novel manufacturing technique.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, A; Matulka, R; Comstock, B

    2017-05-01

    TruActive™ NF is a novel, fat-free, milk-based protein powder to be added to food to increase protein content and is manufactured using non-thermal treatment to reduce potential pathogens most relevant to protecting public health. TruActive™ NF was evaluated for potential pathogens of concern to public health regulators; none were detected. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of TruActive™ NF at a 90(th) percentile consumption for the powder in nutritional beverages and bars is 14,700 mg/day. In vitro genotoxicity testing revealed that concentrations of TruActive™ NF up to 5000 μg/plate did not induce point mutations in selected strains. Oral administration of TruActive™ NF to male Sprague-Dawley rats in an in vivo mammalian chromosomal aberration assay did not induce chromosomal aberrations or significantly affect mitosis in bone marrow cells at 2000 mg/kg. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered TruActive™ NF at concentrations of 7.5%, 15%, and 30% of the diet during a 28-day subacute dietary study followed by a 14-day recovery period. Some parameters were altered at the 30% diet concentration. The No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) in the 28-day dietary study was at 15% of the diet (11,812 mg/kg bw/day for male rats and 11,521 mg/kg bw/day for female rats). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New technique for the direct analysis of food powders confined in a small hole using transversely excited atmospheric CO(2) laser-induced gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Deguchi, Yoji; Lee, Yong Inn; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2008-12-01

    Taking advantage of the differences between the interactions of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) lasers with metal and with organic powder, a new technique for the direct analysis of food powder samples has been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were placed into a small hole with a diameter of 2 mm and a depth of 3 mm and covered by a metal mesh. The TEA CO(2) laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces, passing through the metal mesh, at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off of sample, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are then ablated by laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited; this method cannot be applied for the case of Nd:YAG lasers because in such case the metal mesh itself was ablated by the laser irradiation. A quantitative analysis of a milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  3. Quantification of febuxostat polymorphs using powder X-ray diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jing-bo; Li, Gang; Sheng, Yue; Zhu, Mu-rong

    2015-03-25

    Febuxostat is a pharmaceutical compound with more than 20 polymorphs of which form A is most widely used and usually exists in a mixed polymorphic form with form G. In the present study, a quantification method for polymorphic form A and form G of febuxostat (FEB) has been developed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Prior to development of a quantification method, pure polymorphic form A and form G are characterized. A continuous scan with a scan rate of 3° min(-1) over an angular range of 3-40° 2θ is applied for the construction of the calibration curve using the characteristic peaks of form A at 12.78° 2θ (I/I0100%) and form G at 11.72° 2θ (I/I0100%). The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots shows good linear relationship with R(2)=0.9985 with respect to peak area in the concentration range 10-60 wt.%. The method is validated for precision, recovery and ruggedness. The limits of detection and quantitation are 1.5% and 4.6%, respectively. The obtained results prove that the method is repeatable, sensitive and accurate. The proposed developed PXRD method can be applied for the quantitative analysis of mixtures of febuxostat polymorphs (forms A and G). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Application of infrared spectroscopy technique to protein content fast measurement in milk powder based on support vector machines].

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Cao, Fang; Feng, Shui-Juan; He, Yong

    2008-05-01

    spectral analysis. Moreover, the study compared the prediction results based on near infrared spectral data and mid-infrared spectral data. The results showed that the performance of the model with mid-infrared spectral data was better than the one with near infrared spectra data. It was concluded that infrared spectroscopy technique can do the quantification of protein content in milk powder fast and non-destructively and the process was simple and easy to operate. The results of this study can be used for the design of a simple and non-destructive spectra sensor for the quantitative of protein content in milk powder.

  5. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sabelström, N. Hayashi, M.; Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100 °C could be observed.

  6. Investigation of Appropriate Inhalation Technique for Mometasone Furoate Dry Powder Inhaler.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Haruko; Ito, Kanako; Mihashi, Hirokazu; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Takayanagi, Risa; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish an appropriate inhalation method with a mometasone furoate dry powder inhaler (MF-DPI). Utilizing a tone-based inhalation training device, we investigated the maximum peak inspiratory flow rate time (Tmax PIFR) and peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR) to determine whether either had an influence on lung deposition with use of an MF-DPI. A low tone indicated a PIFR of 28 L/min and a high tone that of 40 L/min, while 60 L/min was considered to be the standard. We established an inhalation profile in consideration of a human inhalation pattern, in which Tmax PIFR was set at 0.5 s (Tmax PIFR 0.5 s) and 2.5 s (Tmax PIFR 2.5 s). The reference cut-off value derived with a cascade impactor test was used for evaluation of the rate of delivered dose in the lung, which was the amount of drug from stage 3 to 7 at all PIFRs. We then investigated the relationship of the fine particle fraction (FPF) with the claimed dose at Tmax PIFR of 0.5 s and PIFR. There were no differences among the Tmax PIFR values for the doses emitted from the device or for the rate of delivered doses in stages 3-7. However, FPF for the claimed dose at 40 L/min was significantly lower than that at 60 L/min, which was dependent on PIFR. Our results showed that PIFR but not Tmax PIFR has an effect on lung deposition after inhalation with an MF-DPI.

  7. Characteristics of hydroxyapatite film formed on human enamel with the powder jet deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Ryo; Sasaki, Keiichi; Zahmaty, Mohammed Saeed Sepasy; Noji, Miyoko; Anada, Takahisa; Suzuki, Osamu; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to create hydroxyapatite (HAp) film by powder jet deposition with manipulating the blasting nozzle above human enamel and to examine the microstructural and mechanical properties of the HAp film and the bonding strength at the interface between the HAp film and the enamel substrate. HAp particles calcinated at 1200°C with an average size of 4.7 μm were used. The HAp particles were mixed with carrier gas (N₂) to form an aerosol flow and was accelerated and blasted from the nozzle onto the enamel substrate at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. To evaluate the microstructure, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the surface and cross section of the HAp films and a three-dimensional profile of the HAp films were observed. To evaluate the mechanical properties, the micro-Vickers hardness and the bonding strength of the HAp films to the enamel substrate were measured. The deposition area of the HAp film was over 3 × 4 mm. The average and maximum thickness were about 30 and 40 μm, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the hardness of the HAp film and the enamel (p > 0.05). The bonding strength of the HAp film was the same as the bonding strength between composite resin and enamel. Compared with previous reports, wider and thicker HAp film was created on the enamel substrate successfully. The HAp film, which has same hardness with enamel and same bonding strength to the enamel with composite resin, would be a candidate as dental restorative materials.

  8. Preparation of redispersible liposomal dry powder using an ultrasonic spray freeze-drying technique for transdermal delivery of human epithelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fei; Guo, Shiyan; Gan, Yong; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an ultrasonic spray freeze-drying (USFD) technique was used to prepare a stable liposomal dry powder for transdermal delivery of recombinant human epithelial growth factor (rhEGF). Morphology, particle size, entrapment efficiency, in vitro release, and skin permeability were systematically compared between rhEGF liposomal dry powder prepared using USFD and that prepared using a conventional lyophilization process. Porous and spherical particles with high specific area were produced under USFD conditions. USFD effectively avoided formation of ice crystals, disruption of the bilayer structure, and drug leakage during the liposome drying process, and maintained the stability of the rhEGF liposomal formulation during storage. The reconstituted rhEGF liposomes prepared from USFD powder did not show significant changes in morphology, particle size, entrapment efficiency, or in vitro release characteristics compared with those of rhEGF liposomes before drying. Moreover, the rhEGF liposomal powder prepared with USFD exhibited excellent enhanced penetration in ex vivo mouse skin compared with that for powder prepared via conventional lyophilization. The results suggest that ultrasonic USFD is a promising technique for the production of stable protein-loaded liposomal dry powder for application to the skin. PMID:24729702

  9. Preparation of redispersible liposomal dry powder using an ultrasonic spray freeze-drying technique for transdermal delivery of human epithelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Guo, Shiyan; Gan, Yong; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an ultrasonic spray freeze-drying (USFD) technique was used to prepare a stable liposomal dry powder for transdermal delivery of recombinant human epithelial growth factor (rhEGF). Morphology, particle size, entrapment efficiency, in vitro release, and skin permeability were systematically compared between rhEGF liposomal dry powder prepared using USFD and that prepared using a conventional lyophilization process. Porous and spherical particles with high specific area were produced under USFD conditions. USFD effectively avoided formation of ice crystals, disruption of the bilayer structure, and drug leakage during the liposome drying process, and maintained the stability of the rhEGF liposomal formulation during storage. The reconstituted rhEGF liposomes prepared from USFD powder did not show significant changes in morphology, particle size, entrapment efficiency, or in vitro release characteristics compared with those of rhEGF liposomes before drying. Moreover, the rhEGF liposomal powder prepared with USFD exhibited excellent enhanced penetration in ex vivo mouse skin compared with that for powder prepared via conventional lyophilization. The results suggest that ultrasonic USFD is a promising technique for the production of stable protein-loaded liposomal dry powder for application to the skin.

  10. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a

  11. Simultaneous determination of metronidazole and spiramycin in bulk powder and in tablets using different spectrophotometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Fatma I; Ramadan, Nesrin K; Hegazy, Maha A; Ghoniem, Nermine S

    2010-01-01

    Metronidazole (MZ) is an anti-infective drug used in the treatment of anaerobic bacterial and protozoa infections in humans. It is also used as a veterinary antiparasitic drug. Spiramycin (SP) is a medium-spectrum antibiotic with high effectiveness against Gram-positive bacteria. Three simple, sensitive, selective and precise spectrophotometric methods were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of MZ and SP in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations. In methods A and B, MZ was determined by the application of direct spectrophotometry and by measuring its zero-order (D(0)) absorption spectra at its λ(max) = 311 nm. In method A, SP was determined by the application of first derivative spectrophotometry (D(1)) and by measuring the amplitude at 218.3 nm. In method B, the first derivative of the ratio spectra (DD(1)) was applied, and SP was determined by measuring the peak amplitude at 245.6 nm. Method C entailed mean centering of the ratio spectra (MCR), which allows the determination of both MZ and SP. The methods developed were used for the determination of MZ and SP over a concentration range of 5-25 µg ml(-1). The proposed methods were used to determine both drugs in their pure, powdered forms with mean percentage recoveries of 100.16 ± 0.73 for MZ in methods A and B, 101.10 ± 0.90 in method C, 100.09 ± 0.70, 100.02 ± 0.88 and 100.49 ± 1.26 for SP in methods A, B and C, respectively. The proposed methods were proved using laboratory-prepared mixtures of the two drugs and were successfully applied to the analysis of MZ and SP in tablet formulation without any interference from each other or from the excipients. The results obtained by applying the proposed methods were compared statistically with a reported HPLC method and no significant difference was observed between these methods regarding both accuracy and precision.

  12. The Mechanical Metallurgy of Armour Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    battlefield threats and continue to be highly competitive armour materials . The relationship between armour steel mechanical properties, specifically...their mechanical metallurgy, and ballistic performance is explained, where such performance is primarily determined by material strength, hardness and...armour materials . However, the factors that are most important for the ballistic and structural performance of armour steels are not commonly well

  13. Synthesis and Thermal Characterization of Hydroxyapatite Powders Obtained by Sol-Gel Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Flores, Y.; Camacho, N.; Rojas-Trigos, J. B.; Suárez, M.

    The development of bioactive materials presents an interesting and an extremely relevant problem to solve, in the development of customized cranial and maxillofacial prosthesis, bioactive coating, and cements, for example. In such areas, one of the more employed materials is the synthetic hydroxyapatite, due to its proved biocompatibility with the human body; however, there are few studies about the thermal affinity with the biological surroundings, and most of them are centered in the thermal stability of the hydroxyapatite instead of its transient thermal response. In the present paper, the synthesis and physical-chemical characterization of hydroxyapatite samples, obtained by the sol-gel technique employing ultrasonic mixing, are reported. Employing X-ray diffraction patterns, XEDS and FTIR spectra, the crystal symmetry, chemical elements, and the present functional groups of the studied samples were determined and found to correspond to those reported in the literature, with a stoichiometry close to the ideal for biological applications. Additionally, by means of the photoacoustic detection and infrared photothermal radiometry (IPTR) techniques, the thermal response of the samples was obtained. Analyzing the photoacoustic data, the synthetized samples show photoacoustic opaqueness, responding in the thermally thick regime in the measurement range, and their thermal effusivity was also determined, having values of 1.47 folds the thermal effusivity of the mandibular human bone. Finally, from the IPTR measurements, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the samples were also determined, having good agreement with the reported values for synthetic hydroxyapatite. The structural and thermophysical properties of the here reported samples show that the synthesized samples have good thermal affinity with the mandibular human bone tissue, and are suitable for biomedical applications.

  14. Application of ultrasound irradiation on sol-gel technique for corrosion protection of Al65Cu20Fe15 alloy powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Baoyan; Wang, Guodong; Li, Di; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2013-11-01

    Al65Cu20Fe15 alloy powder was firstly encapsulated by the conventional sol-gel technique utilizing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as the precursor in order to improve its corrosion resistance. The optimization was based on nine well-planned orthogonal experiments (L9 (34)). Four main factors in the encapsulation process (i.e. reaction temperature, ethylenediamine concentration, TEOS concentration and feeding method) were investigated. According to the visual analyses of the result, the optimum condition was obtained. Based on the optimal condition in the conventional sol-gel technique, the encapsulation process was then conducted under ultrasonic irradiation. The effects of ultrasound amplitude and irradiation time on the encapsulation process were also studied. FTIR, XRD, SEM, DLS and EDS were also used to characterize the resulting sample. Finally, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of encapsulated powder attained 99.3% in the acidic condition of pH 1, and the average grain size (d50) of the encapsulated powder was just 4.8% larger than that of the raw powder, implying that there was a thin silica film on the surface of powder.

  15. Wrought processing of ingot-metallurgy gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    The wrought processing of ingot-metallurgy, gamma titanium aluminide alloys is reviewed. Attention is focused on five major areas in the development of thermomechanical processes for these materials: (1) ingot structure and homogenization, (2) ingot breakdown via existing techniques, (3) novel processes for ingot breakdown, (4) secondary processing, and (5) process scaleup considerations. The nature of the cast microstructure and the influence of composition and ingot size on grain size and segregation are described. The design of existing processes for ingot breakdown deals with the selection of process variables and the design of cans for nonisothermal metalworking techniques. Novel breakdown processes, including smart forging, alpha forging, controlled dwell extrusion, and equal channel angular extrusion, are reviewed. In the area of secondary processing, developments related to pack rolling of sheet, superplastic sheet forming, and isothermal, closed-die forging are summarized. Lastly, scaleup considerations such as thermal cracking during ingot production are addressed.

  16. Enhanced Magnetic Properties of Nd15Fe77B8 Alloy Powders Produced by Melt-Spinning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Sultan; İcin, Kürşat; Öztürk, Bülent; Topal, Uğur; Odabaşı, Hülya Kaftelen; Göbülük, Metin; Cora, Ömer Necati

    2017-10-01

    Rapidly solidified Nd15Fe77B8 alloy powders were produced by means of melt-spinning method in high-vacuum atmosphere to achieve improved magnetic and thermal properties. To this goal, a vacuum milling apparatus was designed and constructed to ball-mill the melt-spun powders in a surfactant active atmosphere. Various milling times were experimented to reveal the effect of the milling time on the mean particle size and other size-dependent properties such as magnetism and Curie temperature. Grain structure, cooling rate, and phase structure of the produced powders were also investigated. The Curie points shifted to higher temperatures from the ingot condition to surfactant active ball-milling and the values for Nd15Fe77B8 ingot alloy, melt-spun powders, and surfactant active ball-milled powders were 552 K, 595 K, and 604 K (279 °C, 322 °C, and 331 °C), respectively. It was noted that the surfactant active ball-milling process improved the magnetic and thermal properties of melt-spun Nd15Fe77B8 alloy powders. Compared to relevant literature, the coercivity of powders increased significantly with increasing milling time and decreasing in powder size. The coercivity value as high as 3427 kA m-1 was obtained.

  17. Enhancement of aged and denatured fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming technique following dusting with amino acid-containing powders.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Carly; Almond, Matthew J; Baum, John V; Bond, John W

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out experiments to investigate the aging of latent fingerprints deposited on black PVC over a period of 4-15 weeks. A thumbprint was used in each case and before deposition of the print the donor rubbed their thumb around their nose to add sebaceous deposits. We have studied the effect of heat, light, and moisture and we find that moisture is the most significant factor in the degradation of the latent print. We have attempted to enhance these latent prints by dusting with valine powder or powders composed of valine mixed with gold or red fluorescent commercial fingerprint powders. To make a direct comparison between "treated" and "untreated" prints, the prints were cut in half with one-half being "treated" and one-half not. Our studies show the best results being obtained when powders of valine and red fluorescent powders are applied prior to cyanoacrylate fuming. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Powder-Metallurgical Bearings For Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.; Humphries, T. S.; Thom, R. L.; Moxson, V.; Friedman, G. I.; Dolan, F. J.; Shipley, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Bearings fabricated by powder metallurgy developed for use in machines subjected to extremes of temperature, rolling-contact cyclic stresses, and oxidizing or otherwise corrosive fluids. Bearings also extend operating lives of other machines in which bearings required to resist extreme thermal, mechanical, and chemical stresses. One alloy exhibiting outstanding properties was MRC-2001. Resistance to fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear found superior to that of 440C stainless steel.

  19. Evaluation of the safety and efficiency of novel metallic implant scaler tips manufactured by the powder injection molding technique.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kyung A; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, Woo-Cheol; Baek, Seung-Ho; Choi, Hae-Won; Shon, Won-Jun

    2017-07-11

    Although many studies have compared the properties of ultrasonic scaling instruments, it remains controversial as to which is most suitable for implant scaling. This study evaluated the safety and efficiency of novel metallic ultrasonic scaler tips made by the powder injection molding (PIM) technique on titanium surfaces. Mechanical instrumentation was carried out using four types of metal scaler tips consisting of copper (CU), bronze (BR), 316 L stainless steel (316 L), and conventional stainless steel (SS) tips. The instrumented surface alteration image of samples was viewed with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface profile of the each sample was investigated with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Arithmetic mean roughness (Ra) and maximum height roughness (Rmax) of titanium samples were measured and dissipated power of the scaler tip was estimated for scaling efficiency. The average Ra values caused by the 316 L and SS tip were about two times higher than those of the CU and BR tips (p < 0.05). The Rmax value showed similar results. The efficiency of the SS tip was about 3 times higher than that of CU tip, the 316 L tip is about 2.7 times higher than that of CU tip, and the BR tip is about 1.2 times higher than that of CU tip. Novel metallic bronze alloy ultrasonic scaler tip minimally damages titanium surfaces, similar to copper alloy tip. Therefore, this bronze alloy scaler tip may be promising instrument for implant maintenance therapy.

  20. The EDM surface: Topography, chemistry, and metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The surface created by the electric discharge machining (EDM) process is of special interest because it has been shown to have a negative effect on the fatigue properties of many alloys. An understanding of the surface metallurgy and chemistry is important in predicting those alloys which are most susceptible to failure. Remedial actions, including thickness minimization, alteration, or removal of the surface layer are addressed.

  1. Modeling of Ladle Metallurgy in Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Gordon; Krishnapisharody, Krishnakumar; Graham, Kevin

    Ladle or secondary metallurgy in steelmaking is an essential process step for the production of high-quality steel. Professor David Robertson was a pioneer in the modeling of these processes, in particular gas-metal fluid dynamic interactions and the rates of slag-metal reactions. This is now a highly active area of research, and some of the recent developments in this area will be reviewed.

  2. Improved L-C resonant decay technique for Q measurement of quasilinear power inductors: New results for MPP and ferrite powdered cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Gerber, Scott S.

    1995-01-01

    The L-C resonant decay technique for measuring circuit Q or losses is improved by eliminating the switch from the inductor-capacitor loop. A MOSFET switch is used instead to momentarily connect the resonant circuit to an existing voltage source, which itself is gated off during the decay transient. Very reproducible, low duty cycle data could be taken this way over a dynamic voltage range of at least 10:1. Circuit Q is computed from a polynomial fit to the sequence of the decaying voltage maxima. This method was applied to measure the losses at 60 kHz in inductors having loose powder cores of moly permalloy and an Mn-Zn power ferrite. After the copper and capacitor losses are separated out, the resulting specific core loss is shown to be roughly as expected for the MPP powder, but anomalously high for the ferrite powder. Possible causes are mentioned.

  3. Powder Processing of High Temperature Cermets and Carbides at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Pat; Panda, Binayak; Hickman, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    The Materials and Processing Laboratory at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is developing Powder Metallurgy (PM) processing techniques for high temperature cermet and carbide material consolidation. These new group of materials would be utilized in the nuclear core for Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR). Cermet materials offer several advantages for NTR such as retention of fission products and fuels, better thermal shock resistance, hydrogen compatibility, high thermal conductivity, and high strength. Carbide materials offer the highest operating temperatures but are sensitive to thermal stresses and are difficult to process. To support the effort, a new facility has been setup to process refractory metal, ceramic, carbides and depleted uranium-based powders. The facility inciudes inert atmosphere glove boxes for the handling of reactive powders, a high temperature furnace, and powder processing equipment used for blending, milling, and sieving. The effort is focused on basic research to identify the most promising compositions and processing techniques. Several PM processing methods including Cold and Hot Isostatic Pressing are being evaluated to fabricate samples for characterization and hot hydrogen testing.

  4. Characterization and Control of Powder Properties for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strondl, A.; Lyckfeldt, O.; Brodin, H.; Ackelid, U.

    2015-03-01

    Powder characterization and handling in powder metallurgy are important issues and the required powder properties will vary between different component manufacturing processes. By understanding and controlling these, the final material properties for different applications can be improved and become more reliable. In this study, the metal powders used in additive manufacturing (AM) in terms of electron beam melting and selective laser melting have been investigated regarding particle size and shape using dynamic image analysis. In parallel, powder flow characteristics have been evaluated with a powder rheometer. Correlations within the results have been found between particle shape and powder flow characteristics that could explain certain effects of the powder processing in the AM processes. The impact, however, in the processing performance as well as in ultimate material properties was found to be limited.

  5. Investigation of the Surface Stress in SiC and Diamond Nanocrystals by In-situ High Pressure Powder Diffraction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines key properties of the materials. For such materials the serious experimental problem lies in obtaining sufficiently accurate measurements of the structural parameters of the crystals, since very small crystals constitute rather a two-phase than a uniform crystallographic phase system. As a result, elastic properties of nanograins may be expected to reflect a dual nature of their structure, with a corresponding set of different elastic property parameters. We studied those properties by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique. For nanocrystalline, even one-phase materials such measurements are particularly difficult to make since determination of the lattice parameters of very small crystals presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard elaboration of powder diffractograms. In this investigation we used our methodology of the structural analysis, the 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) concept. The methodology allowed us to avoid the traps (if applied to nanocrystals) of standard powder diffraction evaluation techniques. The experiments were performed for nanocrystalline Sic and GaN powders using synchrotron sources. We applied both hydrostatic and isostatic pressures in the range of up to 40 GPa. Elastic properties of the samples were examined based on the measurements of a change of the lattice parameters with pressure. The results show a dual nature of the mechanical properties (compressibilities) of the materials, indicating a complex, core-shell structure of the grains.

  6. Investigation of the Surface Stress in SiC and Diamond Nanocrystals by In-situ High Pressure Powder Diffraction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines key properties of the materials. For such materials the serious experimental problem lies in obtaining sufficiently accurate measurements of the structural parameters of the crystals, since very small crystals constitute rather a two-phase than a uniform crystallographic phase system. As a result, elastic properties of nanograins may be expected to reflect a dual nature of their structure, with a corresponding set of different elastic property parameters. We studied those properties by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique. For nanocrystalline, even one-phase materials such measurements are particularly difficult to make since determination of the lattice parameters of very small crystals presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard elaboration of powder diffractograms. In this investigation we used our methodology of the structural analysis, the 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) concept. The methodology allowed us to avoid the traps (if applied to nanocrystals) of standard powder diffraction evaluation techniques. The experiments were performed for nanocrystalline Sic and GaN powders using synchrotron sources. We applied both hydrostatic and isostatic pressures in the range of up to 40 GPa. Elastic properties of the samples were examined based on the measurements of a change of the lattice parameters with pressure. The results show a dual nature of the mechanical properties (compressibilities) of the materials, indicating a complex, core-shell structure of the grains.

  7. Advanced NDE Technologies for Powder Metal Components

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P; Haskins, J; Thomas, G; Dolan, K

    2003-05-01

    Nondestructive evaluation encompasses numerous technologies that assess materials and determine important properties. This paper demonstrates the applicability of several of these technologies to the field of powder metallurgy. The usual application of nondestructive evaluation is to detect and quantify defects in fully sintered product. But probably its most appealing role is to sense problems earlier in the manufacturing process to avoid making defects at all. Also nondestructive evaluation can be incorporated into the manufacturing processes to monitor important parameters and control the processes to produce defect free product. Nondestructive evaluation can characterize powders, evaluate components in the green state, monitor the sintering process, and inspect the final component.

  8. Impact of Clarence Zener upon metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, Mats

    1986-09-01

    A review is given of Clarence Zener's impact on physical metallurgy, based upon his famous paper on the kinetics of the decomposition of austenite. He demonstrated how basic physical principles could be applied to explain the general features of this complicated reaction. However, his models were general and many of them have been accepted for general use and are still being further developed. Zener also demonstrated the usefulness of simple mathematical treatments based upon dimensional arguments or dilute solution thermodynamics and he thus inspired the following generation of metallurgists to investigate the fundamental principles behind complicated phenomena.

  9. The effect of boron powder on the microstructure of MgB2 filaments prepared by the modified internal magnesium diffusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosová, A.; Kulich, M.; Kováč, P.; Brunner, B.; Scheiter, J.; Häßler, W.

    2017-05-01

    We have analyzed the microstructure of MgB2 prepared by the modified internal magnesium diffusion technique resulting in filaments without a central hole. Three different amorphous boron powders with a nominal purity of 98.5%-99.0% and a different particle size were used. It was shown that the real purity of the powders was different from the nominal purity, and the microstructure as well as the critical current densities of the MgB2 were affected by using boron. Larger B particles with a size of 400-500 nm led to the presence of large B-rich grains inside the MgB2 matrix. For one wire series, boron powder containing residual chlorine from the boron preparation process was used. It was found that just a small quantity of chlorine in the B powder caused significant MgB2 filament inhomogeneity, an apparent decrease in the critical current density and high reactivity with air. We estimated the ideal packing density for achieving a large volume of dense MgB2.

  10. Detection and quantification of adulterants in milk powder using a high-throughput Raman chemical imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar; Lee, Hoonsoo; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Mo, Changyeun

    2017-02-01

    Milk is a vulnerable target for economically motivated adulteration. In this study, a line-scan high-throughput Raman imaging system was used to authenticate milk powder. A 5 W 785 nm line laser (240 mm long and 1 mm wide) was used as a Raman excitation source. The system was used to acquire hyperspectral Raman images in a wave number range of 103-2881 cm(-)(1) from the skimmed milk powder mixed with two nitrogen-rich adulterants (i.e., melamine and urea) at eight concentrations (w/w) from 50 to 10,000 ppm. The powdered samples were put in sample holders with a surface area of 150 ×100 mm and a depth of 2 mm for push-broom image acquisition. Varying fluorescence signals from the milk powder were removed using a correction method based on adaptive iteratively reweighted penalised least squares. Image classifications were conducted using a simple thresholding method applied to single-band fluorescence-corrected images at unique Raman peaks selected for melamine (673 cm(-)(1)) and urea (1009 cm(-)(1)). Chemical images were generated by combining individual binary images of melamine and urea to visualise identification, spatial distribution and morphological features of the two adulterant particles in the milk powder. Limits of detection for both melamine and urea were estimated in the order of 50 ppm. High correlations were found between pixel concentrations (i.e., percentages of the adulterant pixels in the chemical images) and mass concentrations of melamine and urea, demonstrating the potential of the high-throughput Raman chemical imaging method for the detection and quantification of adulterants in the milk powder.

  11. Military Process Specification for Type 46XX Powder-Forged Weapon Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-20

    one with low carbon or carburizing steels (Figure 18). Fracture Toughness Only one paper contained fracture toughness data for P/F 10XX steels . The...201-213. 8. Brown, G. T., "The Core ’Properties of a Range of Powder-Forged Steels ’ for Carburizing Applications," Powder Metallurgy, vol. 20, no...621205H84001, Dover, NJ: ARRADC0M, October 1980. Smith, A. 0., "Hardenability of Forged Alloy Steel Powders for Carburizing Ap- plications," Inland

  12. Effect of precursor concentrations on structural, microstructural and optical properties of nanocrystalline ZnO powder synthesized by an ultrasonic atomization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, L. A.; Bari, A. R.; Shinde, M. D.; Deo, Vinita; Kaushik, M. P.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we report on the effect of concentration on nanocrystalline ZnO powder prepared by an ultrasonic atomization technique, which is a promising method because of its simplicity, inexpensiveness and safety. The morphology and size of ZnO nanocrystallites associated with nanopowder were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It revealed that the powder consisted of nanocrystallites with grain sizes between 8 and 15 nm. These values match the grain sizes (8-14 nm) calculated from x-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD and TEM studies of ZnO nanopowder showed that crystallite sizes were observed to increase with an increase in the concentration of solution. The d values calculated from electron diffraction patterns (TEM) of ZnO nanopowder were also in agreement with the d values calculated from XRD. The synthesized nanopowders exhibited a direct band gap (Eg) in the range of 3.36-3.42 eV.

  13. A combined powder melt and infiltration growth technique for fabricating nano-composited Y-Ba-Cu-O single-grain superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo-Zheng; Li, Jia-Wei; Yang, Wan-Min

    2015-10-01

    The top-seeded melt growth (MG) and infiltration growth (IG) techniques are the two most popular methods of fabricating single-grain Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors, which are also considered as two distinctly different processes. In this study, we report a combined powder melt and infiltration growth (PM-IG) technique for fabricating nano-composited YBCO single-grain superconductors using raw metallic oxides. In this new technique, a solid source pellet (SSP) of composition nano-Y2O3 + BaO + CuO + 1 wt.%CeO2 and a liquid source pellet (LSP) of composition nano-Y2O3 + 10BaO + 16CuO are employed, thus during heat treatment process the powder melt in SSP (corresponding to the final YBCO bulk) and liquid infiltration from LSP to SSP coexist. Because the process of precursor powder synthesis is avoided, the fabrication flow is much simplified and the experimental efficiency is increased significantly. Microstructural observation indicates that a large number of Y2BaCuO5 nano-inclusions (around 100 nm) are trapped in the YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconducting matrix. Measurements of levitation force and trapped field prove the superior performance of the nano-composited YBCO sample. The calculated zero-field J c at 77 K reaches 6.98 × 104 A cm-2, nearly 23% higher than the sample fabricated by the conventional IG technique. Thus, this study supplies a practical method for fabricating nano-composited YBCO bulk superconductors with high performance.

  14. Predictive modeling, simulation, and optimization of laser processing techniques: UV nanosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of polymers and selective laser melting of powder metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criales Escobar, Luis Ernesto

    One of the most frequently evolving areas of research is the utilization of lasers for micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing purposes. The use of laser beam as a tool for manufacturing arises from the need for flexible and rapid manufacturing at a low-to-mid cost. Laser micro-machining provides an advantage over mechanical micro-machining due to the faster production times of large batch sizes and the high costs associated with specific tools. Laser based additive manufacturing enables processing of powder metals for direct and rapid fabrication of products. Therefore, laser processing can be viewed as a fast, flexible, and cost-effective approach compared to traditional manufacturing processes. Two types of laser processing techniques are studied: laser ablation of polymers for micro-channel fabrication and selective laser melting of metal powders. Initially, a feasibility study for laser-based micro-channel fabrication of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) via experimentation is presented. In particular, the effectiveness of utilizing a nanosecond-pulsed laser as the energy source for laser ablation is studied. The results are analyzed statistically and a relationship between process parameters and micro-channel dimensions is established. Additionally, a process model is introduced for predicting channel depth. Model outputs are compared and analyzed to experimental results. The second part of this research focuses on a physics-based FEM approach for predicting the temperature profile and melt pool geometry in selective laser melting (SLM) of metal powders. Temperature profiles are calculated for a moving laser heat source to understand the temperature rise due to heating during SLM. Based on the predicted temperature distributions, melt pool geometry, i.e. the locations at which melting of the powder material occurs, is determined. Simulation results are compared against data obtained from experimental Inconel 625 test coupons fabricated at the National

  15. Ancient metallurgy and nuclear waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Goodway, M.

    1993-12-31

    Archaeological artifacts of glass, ceramic, and metal provide examples of long term durability and as such have been surveyed by the nuclear agencies of several countries as a possible guide to choices of materials for the containment of nuclear waste. In the case of metals evaluation is difficult because of the loss of many artifacts to recycling and corrosion processes, as well as by uncertainty as to the environmental history under which the remainder survived. More recently the study of ancient metallurgy has expanded to included other materials associated with metals processing. It is suggested that an impermeable ceramic composite used in ancient metals processing installations should be reproduced and tested for its resistance to radiation damage. This material was synthesized more than two millennia ago and has a proven record of durability. These installations have had no maintenance but are intact, some still holding water.

  16. Physical metallurgy of direct-quenched steels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.A. ); Thompson, S.W. ); Fletcher, F.B. )

    1993-01-01

    This symposium was held during November 2-4, 1992 in Chicago as part of Materials Week '92''. This symposium focused on the metallurgy of steels containing martensitic or bainitic microstructures formed from thermomechanically processed austenite, and builds upon two recent topical meetings on the related subject of ferritic accelerated cooled steels. Papers in the first section deal with thermodynamics and kinetics of austenite transformation, the morphology of austenite transformation products, and alloy carbide precipitation. Results of investigations of relationships between processing variables, microstructure, and mechanical properties are contained in the following section. Section III is devoted specifically to boron hardenability effects. papers in the final section are concerned with product development; included here is a comprehensive overview of industrial accelerated cooling/direct quenching technology by researchers from the Nippon Steel Corporation.

  17. Electrodeposition in extractive metallurgy: An emerging technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Thomas J.

    1992-04-01

    The electrowinning and electrorefining of metals from aqueous solutions continues to be one of the essential unit processes employed in nonferrous extractive metallurgy. Current processes effectively address both ohmic and mass transport of the primary metal ion in their design. Some deficiencies exist, however, in the basic understanding of the other two critical elements essential in cathodic deposition: activation kinetics and electrocrystallization. The understanding of the latter two must be elevated to the level of understanding of ohmic and mass transport if truly new and innovative advances are to occur. Because of the increasingly demanding standards for electrometallurgy processes and products, technical progress must be made if a competitive edge is to be maintained in the future.

  18. Mechanisms of Corrosion Fatigue in High Strength I/M (Ingot Metallurgy) and P/M (Powder Metallurgy) Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    second year effort was devoted to the study of 7075 -T651 (I/Il) alloy, and X7091-T7E69 and X7091-T7E70 (P/M) alloys. The kinetics of fatigue crack...Qualification and Microstructural Characterization 6 3.2 Kinetics of Fatigue Crack Growth 7 3.2.1 7075 -T651 (I/M) Aluminum Alloy 8 3.2.2 X7091-T7E69...and X7091-T7E70 (P/M) Aluminum Alloys 10 3.2.3 Comparison between I/M and P/M Alloys and Discussions 12 3.3 Fractographic Analysis 14 3.3.1 7075 -T651

  19. A Comparison of Microstructure and Properties of Equivalent Strength Ingot Metallurgy and Powder Metallurgy 7XXX Aluminum Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    conjunction with other corrosion susceptibility evaluations. Rockwell B hardness testing was performed in accordance with ASTM Standard E18 -74 (Reference 286...M-T6 89 I/M-T73 85 P/M-T6 88 P/M-T73 84 (average of five tests) * ASTM E18 -74 TABLE 16 CONDUCTIVITY* DATA Material % IACS I/M-T6 32 I/M-T73 37 P/M-T6...282. 6. Dieter, op. cit., 409. 283. D. Voss, op. cit., 83. 284. W. Neenning, Int’l J. of Fract., 11, (1), (1975), 123. 286. ASTM STD E18 -74. Amer. Soc

  20. Determination of tungsten in tantalum-tungsten alloy by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using fusion, thin layer, and pressed powder pellet techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lunfu; Zou, Deshuang; Dai, Yichun; Tang, Guangping

    2015-08-01

    A method is described for the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) determination of tungsten in tantalum-tungsten alloy over the range of 10.5%-13.5%. The sample was prepared by three methods, namely, borate fusion, filter paper disk, and pressed powder pellet, respectively. We compared the feature of the three methods of specimen preparation and found that filter paper disk method was the most suitable technique for specimen preparation. Furthermore, the results were compared with those given by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and the relative standard deviation was less than 2%, which could meet the requirement of this application.

  1. [Features of chronic occupational bronchitis in nonferrous metallurgy workers].

    PubMed

    Roslaia, N A; Likhacheva, E I; Vagina, E R; Roslyĭ, O F; Zhovtiak, E P; Iarina, A L; Varzina, N V

    2004-01-01

    The authors summarized results of periodic medical examinations and deep clinical studies of metallurgy workers with bronchial and pulmonary disorders. The article covers clinical and functional characteristics of toxic and dust bronchitis, clinical course and manifestations.

  2. Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  3. 1. Photocopy from J. L. Bray, The Principles of Metallurgy, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy from J. L. Bray, The Principles of Metallurgy, Ginn & Company, New York, 1929 - International Smelting & Refining Company, Tooele Smelter, Sinter Plant, State Route 178, Tooele, Tooele County, UT

  4. Development of a Power Metallurgy Superalloy for Use at 1800-2000 F (980-1090 C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortovich, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop a powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy for 1800-2000 F (980-1090 C) temperature applications. The feasibility of a unique concept for alloying carbon into a superalloy powder matrix and achieving both grain growth and a discrete particle grain boundary carbide precipitation was demonstrated. The process consisted of blending metastable carbides with a carbon free base alloy and consolidating this blend by hot extrusion. This was followed by heat treatment to grow a desired ASTM No. 2-3 grain size and to solution the metastable carbides to allow precipitation of discrete particle grain boundary carbides during subsequent aging heat treatments. The best alloy developed during this program was hydrogen-atomized, thermal-mechanically processed, modified MAR-M246 base alloy plus VC (0.28 w/o C). Although below those for cast MAR-M246, the mechanical properties exhibited by this alloy represent the best combination offered by conventional powder metallurgy processing to date.

  5. Fatigue-crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys processed by power and ingot metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Kim, N.J. ); Pizzo, P.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Fatigue-crack propagation behavior in powder-metallurgy (P/M) aluminum-lithium alloys, namely, mechanically-alloyed (MA) Al-4.0Mg-1.5Li-1.1C-0.80{sub 2} (Inco 905-XL) and rapid-solidification-processed (RSP) Al-2.6Li-1.0Cu-0.5Mg-0.5Zr (Allied 644-B) extrusions, has been studied, and results compared with data on an equivalent ingot-metallurgy (I/M) Al-Li alloy, 2090-T81 plate. Fatigue-crack growth resistance of the RSP Al-Li alloy is found to be comparable to the I/M Al-Li alloy; in contrast, crack velocities in MA 905-XL extrusions are nearly three orders of magnitude faster. Growth-rate response in both P/M Al-Li alloys, however, is high anisotropic. Results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural influence of strengthening mechanism, slip mode, grain morphology and texture on the development of crack-tip shielding from crack-path deflection and crack closure. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The development and evaluation of an alternative powder prepregging technique for use with LaRC-TPI/graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogden, Andrea L.; Hyer, Michael W.; Wilkes, Garth L.; Loos, Alfred C.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An alternative powder prepregging method for use with LaRC-TPI (a thermoplastic polyimide)/graphite composites is investigated. The alternative method incorporates the idea of moistening the fiber prior to powder coating. Details of the processing parameters are given and discussed. The material was subsequently laminated into small coupons which were evaluated for processing defects using electron microscopy. After the initial evaluation of the material, no major processing defects were encountered but there appeared to be an interfacial adhesion problem. As a result, prepregging efforts were extended to include an additional fiber system, XAS, and a semicrystalline form of the matrix. The semicrystalline form of the matrix was the result of a complex heat treating cycle. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the fiber/matrix adhesion was evaluated in these systems relative to the amorphous/XAS coupons. Based on these results, amorphous and semicrystalline/AS-4 and XAS materials were prepregged and laminated for transverse tensile testing. The results of these tests are presented, and in an effort to obtain more information on the effect of the matrix, remaining semicrystalline transverse tensile coupons were transformed back to the amorphous state and tested. The mechanical properties of the transformed coupons returned to the values observed for the original amorphous coupons, and the interfacial adhesion, as observed by SEM, was better than in any previous sample.

  7. Processes of interaction on the interface of a bimetal billet produced by the method of rolling unsintered powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kal'ner, V. D.; Goryushina, M. N.; Sychuzhnikova, L. A.

    1984-03-01

    The use of rolling as a method of compacting of powder bimetal green parts provides the obtaining of a dense structure of the powder metallurgy steel and a high-quality joint between the layers as a result of pressing of particles of the 10R6M5-MP high-speed steel powder into the material of the U10A steel core and also as a result of the combined deformation at high temperatures.

  8. Fluidized reduction of oxides on fine metal powders without sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    In the process of reducing extremely fine metal particles (av. particle size or = 1000 angstroms) covered with an oxide layer, the metal particles are fluidized by a gas flow contg. H, heated, and reduced. The method uniformly and easily reduces surface oxide layers of the extremely fine metal particles without causing sintering. The metal particles are useful for magnetic recording materials, conductive paste, powder metallurgy materials, chem. reagents, and catalysts.

  9. Do Face-to-Face Training and Telephonic Reminder Improve Dry Powder Inhaler Technique in Patients with COPD?

    PubMed Central

    Bhatta, Pawan; Piryani, Rano Mal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Current modes of instruction on inhaler technique are inadequate. We aimed to evaluate the value of face-to-face training and telephonic reminder (FFTTR) for improving Rotahaler technique in experienced patients with COPD. Materials and Methods. A single group pre-/postinterventional study was conducted at Chitwan Medical College Teaching Hospital, Nepal. We assessed the Rotahaler technique of thirty consecutive patients using Rotahaler device for more than one year. Patients with incorrect technique (n = 20) were instructed and trained by a pharmacist. Telephonic reminder was used to reinstruct patients on the correct technique on weekly basis for two weeks and technique was reassessed after 4 weeks of their first training. Descriptive statistics including Wilcoxon Signed Rank test were applied. Results. The mean age was 66.06 ± 10.6. Of 30 patients, 10 (33.3%) performed Rotahaler technique correctly at baseline and were excluded from FFTTR intervention. FFTTR corrected the technique in 18 (90%) patients and the median (IQR) score increased from 6 (5-6) to 8 (8-8) (p < 0.001). The most incorrect steps were “breathe out gently but not towards the inhaler mouthpiece” (16, 80%) and “hold breath for about 10 seconds” (18, 90%) at baseline which improved after intervention. Conclusion. FFTTR approach markedly improved Rotahaler technique in patients with COPD. PMID:28386274

  10. Effects of long-time elevated temperature exposures on hot-isostatically-pressed power-metallurgy Udimet 700 alloys with reduced cobalt contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    Because almost the entire U.S. consumption of cobalt depends on imports, this metal has been designated "strategic'. The role and effectiveness of cobalt is being evaluated in commercial nickel-base superalloys. Udiment 700 type alloys in which the cobalt content was reduced from the normal 17% down to 12.7%, 8.5%, 4.3%, and 0% were prepared by standard powder metallurgy techniques and hot isostatically pressed into billets. Mechanical testing and microstructural investigations were performed. The mechanical properties of alloys with reduced cobalt contents which were heat-treated identically were equal or better than those of the standard alloy, except that creep rates tended to increase as cobalt was reduced. The effects of long time exposures at 760 C on mechanical properties and at 760 C and 845 C on microstructures were determined. Decreased tensile properties and shorter rupture lives with increased creep rates were observed in alloy modifications. The exposures caused gamma prime particle coarsening and formation of sigma phase in the alloys with higher cobalt contents. Exposure at 845 C also reduced the amount of MC carbides.

  11. Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry-Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction: A Powerful Technique for Physical Form Characterization in Pharmaceutical Materials.

    PubMed

    Clout, Alexander; Buanz, Asma B M; Prior, Timothy J; Reinhard, Christina; Wu, Yue; O'Hare, Dermot; Williams, Gareth R; Gaisford, Simon

    2016-10-18

    We report a powerful new technique: hyphenating synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This is achieved with a simple modification to a standard laboratory DSC instrument, in contrast to previous reports which have involved extensive and complex modifications to a DSC to mount it in the synchrotron beam. The high-energy X-rays of the synchrotron permit the recording of powder diffraction patterns in as little as 2 s, meaning that thermally induced phase changes can be accurately quantified and additional insight on the nature of phase transitions obtained. Such detailed knowledge cannot be gained from existing laboratory XRD instruments, since much longer collection times are required. We demonstrate the power of our approach with two model systems, glutaric acid and sulfathiazole, both of which show enantiotropic polymorphism. The phase transformations between the low and high temperature polymorphs are revealed to be direct solid-solid processes, and sequential refinement against the diffraction patterns obtained permits phase fractions at each temperature to be calculated and unit cell parameters to be accurately quantified as a function of temperature. The combination of XRD and DSC has further allowed us to identify mixtures of phases which appeared phase-pure by DSC.

  12. Mechanical and tribological behavior of red clay ceramic tiles coated with fly ash powders by thermal spraying technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Rodríguez, G.; Dulce-Moreno, H.; Daza-Ramírez, J.; Orozco-Hernández, S.; Vargas-Galvis, F.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical and tribological performance of red clay ceramic tiles uncoated and coated by oxy-fuel thermal spraying process from fly ash powders was evaluated. The ceramic tile substrates were manufactured by uniaxial pressing at 26.17 bar pressure, and sintered at 1100 °C. The coating thickness was determined based on the number of projection-cycles oxyacetylene flame over substrate. Coal fly ash coatings were deposited, with average thickness of 56.18±12.18 μm, 180.42±20.32 μm, and 258.26±25.88μm. The mechanical resistance to bending and wear by abrasion deep, were studied using ISO 10545-4 standards and ISO 10545-6 respectively; adhesion was measured using Elcometer equipment Type III according to ASTM D-4541-02 and the average roughness (Ra) was found according to ASTM standard D7127-13, using the profilometer Mitutoyo SJ 201. The surface morphology presented the heterogeneous molten or semi molten splats with average size of 35.262±3.48 micrometers with good adhesion, justifying increased mechanical resistance to bending by 5%, as well as wear by abrasion deep. These results contribute to the development of ceramic products with added value, to be used in various technological applications.

  13. Pressurized metallurgy for high performance special steels and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Zhu, H. C.; Li, H. B.; Li, Y.; Liu, F. B.

    2016-07-01

    The pressure is one of the basic parameters which greatly influences the metallurgical reaction process and solidification of steels and alloys. In this paper the history and present situation of research and application of pressurized metallurgy, especially pressurized metallurgy for special steels and alloys have been briefly reviewed. In the following part the physical chemistry of pressurized metallurgy is summarized. It is shown that pressurizing may change the conditions of chemical reaction in thermodynamics and kinetics due to the pressure effect on gas volume, solubility of gas and volatile element in metal melt, activity or activity coefficient of components, and change the physical and chemical properties of metal melt, heat transfer coefficient between mould and ingot, thus greatly influencing phase transformation during the solidification process and the solidification structure, such as increasing the solidification nucleation rate, reducing the critical nucleation radius, accelerating the solidification speed and significant macro/micro-structure refinement, and eliminating shrinkage, porosity and segregation and other casting defects. In the third part the research works of pressured metallurgy performed by the Northeastern University including establishment of pressurized induction melting (PIM) and pressurized electroslag remelting (PESR) equipments and development of high nitrogen steels under pressure are described in detail. Finally, it is considered in the paper that application of pressurized metallurgy in manufacture of high performance special steels and alloys is a relatively new research area, and its application prospects will be very broad and bright.

  14. Bio-mimetic scaling of mechanical behavior of thin films, coatings, and surfaces by Laser Interference Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Balk, Thomas John; Wobben, Thomas; M�cklich, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Biological solutions to enhance strength and stability often use hierarchical composite structures. The effect is not based on large chemical variations, but instead is realized by structural composites with long-range order. Laser Interference Metallurgy is a newly developed technique that utilizes this biological approach to optimize the mechanical properties of surfaces and thin films. The possibility of scaling mechanical properties is quantitatively analyzed and compared with the biological approach.

  15. A technique to measure heats of reaction of titanium-boron, aluminim-titanium-boron, and aluminum-titanium-boron-carbon powder blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andrew H.

    In this research, a modification to initiation aid ignition in bomb calorimetry that involves systemically blending levels of boron and potassium nitrate initiation aids with a bulk structural energetic elemental power blend is developed. A regression is used to estimate the nominal heat of reaction for the primary reaction. The technique is first applied to the synthesis of TiB 2 as a validation study to see if close proximity to literature values can be achieved. The technique is then applied to two systems of interest, Al-Ti-B, and Al-Ti-B4C. In all three investigations, x-ray diffraction is used to characterize the product phases of the reactions to determine the extent and identity of the product phases and any by-products that may have formed as a result of adding the initiation aid. The experimental data indicates the technique approximates the heat of reaction value for the synthesis of TiB2 from Ti-B powder blends and the formation of TiB2 is supported by volume fraction analysis by x-ray diffraction. Application to the Al-Ti-B and Al-Ti-B4C blends show some correlation with variation of the initiation aid, with x-ray diffraction showing the formation of equilibrium products. However, these blends require further investigation to resolve more complex interactions and rule out extraneous variables.

  16. Differences in estimates of size distribution of beryllium powder materials using phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and liquid suspension counter techniques.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Hoover, Mark D; Dickerson, Robert M; Day, Gregory A; Breysse, Patrick N; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2007-02-28

    Accurate characterization of the physicochemical properties of aerosols generated for inhalation toxicology studies is essential for obtaining meaningful results. Great emphasis must also be placed on characterizing particle properties of materials as administered in inhalation studies. Thus, research is needed to identify a suite of techniques capable of characterizing the multiple particle properties (i.e., size, mass, surface area, number) of a material that may influence toxicity. The purpose of this study was to characterize the morphology and investigate the size distribution of a model toxicant, beryllium. Beryllium metal, oxides, and alloy particles were aerodynamically size-separated using an aerosol cyclone, imaged dry using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), then characterized using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), a liquid suspension particle counter (LPC), and computer-controlled SEM (CCSEM). Beryllium metal powder was compact with smaller sub-micrometer size particles attached to the surface of larger particles, whereas the beryllium oxides and alloy particles were clusters of primary particles. As expected, the geometric mean (GM) diameter of metal powder determined using PCM decreased with aerodynamic size, but when suspended in liquid for LPC or CCSEM analysis, the GM diameter decreased by a factor of two (p < 0.001). This observation suggested that the smaller submicrometer size particles attached to the surface of larger particles and/or particle agglomerates detach in liquid, thereby shifting the particle size distribution downward. The GM diameters of the oxide materials were similar regardless of sizing technique, but observed differences were generally significant (p < 0.001). For oxides, aerodynamic cluster size will dictate deposition in the lung, but primary particle size may influence biological activity. The GM diameter of alloy particles determined using PCM became smaller with decreasing aerodynamic size fraction; however, when

  17. Differences in estimates of size distribution of beryllium powder materials using phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and liquid suspension counter techniques

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Hoover, Mark D; Dickerson, Robert M; Day, Gregory A; Breysse, Patrick N; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2007-01-01

    Accurate characterization of the physicochemical properties of aerosols generated for inhalation toxicology studies is essential for obtaining meaningful results. Great emphasis must also be placed on characterizing particle properties of materials as administered in inhalation studies. Thus, research is needed to identify a suite of techniques capable of characterizing the multiple particle properties (i.e., size, mass, surface area, number) of a material that may influence toxicity. The purpose of this study was to characterize the morphology and investigate the size distribution of a model toxicant, beryllium. Beryllium metal, oxides, and alloy particles were aerodynamically size-separated using an aerosol cyclone, imaged dry using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), then characterized using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), a liquid suspension particle counter (LPC), and computer-controlled SEM (CCSEM). Beryllium metal powder was compact with smaller sub-micrometer size particles attached to the surface of larger particles, whereas the beryllium oxides and alloy particles were clusters of primary particles. As expected, the geometric mean (GM) diameter of metal powder determined using PCM decreased with aerodynamic size, but when suspended in liquid for LPC or CCSEM analysis, the GM diameter decreased by a factor of two (p < 0.001). This observation suggested that the smaller submicrometer size particles attached to the surface of larger particles and/or particle agglomerates detach in liquid, thereby shifting the particle size distribution downward. The GM diameters of the oxide materials were similar regardless of sizing technique, but observed differences were generally significant (p < 0.001). For oxides, aerodynamic cluster size will dictate deposition in the lung, but primary particle size may influence biological activity. The GM diameter of alloy particles determined using PCM became smaller with decreasing aerodynamic size fraction; however, when

  18. Structural, magnetic and gas sensing properties of nanosized copper ferrite powder synthesized by sol gel combustion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumangala, T. P.; Mahender, C.; Barnabe, A.; Venkataramani, N.; Prasad, Shiva

    2016-11-01

    Stoichiometric nano sized copper ferrite particles were synthesized by sol gel combustion technique. They were then calcined at various temperatures ranging from 300-800 °C and were either furnace cooled or quenched in liquid nitrogen. A high magnetisation value of 48.2 emu/g signifying the cubic phase of copper ferrite, was obtained for sample quenched to liquid nitrogen temperature from 800 °C. The ethanol sensing response of the samples was studied and a maximum of 86% response was obtained for 500 ppm ethanol in the case of a furnace cooled sample calcined at 800 °C. The chemical sensing is seen to be correlated with the c/a ratio and is best in the case of tetragonal copper ferrite.

  19. Iron Metallurgy: Technical Terminology Bulletin. Terminotech, Vol. 2, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co. of Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Quebec.

    This issue of a bulletin of technological terminology is devoted to iron metallurgy. Various aspects of iron production are described in both French and English. An English-French dictionary of terms comprises the bulk of the document. Explanatory illustrations are appended. (JB)

  20. NSF: A "Populist" Pattern in Metallurgy, Materials Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Deborah

    1975-01-01

    Describes the testimony of a University of Virginia professor of applied science, who charged that the National Science Foundation grants disproportionately small funds to the best university departments in the field of metallurgy and materials, while preferentially funding middle-ranked departments. (MLH)

  1. Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System Design Document

    SciTech Connect

    Bargelski, C. J.; Berrett, D. E.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the system architecture of the Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the course of the document observations are made concerning the objectives, constraints and limitations, technical approaches, and the technical deliverables.

  2. 39. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING BUILDING NO. 318, METALLURGY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING BUILDING NO. 318, METALLURGY LAB, ON RIGHT, BUILDING NO. 319, GENERAL PURPOSE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, ON LEFT AND BUILDING NO. 355, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT, IN BACKGROUND LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  3. Iron Metallurgy: Technical Terminology Bulletin. Terminotech, Vol. 2, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co. of Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Quebec.

    This issue of a bulletin of technological terminology is devoted to iron metallurgy. Various aspects of iron production are described in both French and English. An English-French dictionary of terms comprises the bulk of the document. Explanatory illustrations are appended. (JB)

  4. NSF: A "Populist" Pattern in Metallurgy, Materials Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Deborah

    1975-01-01

    Describes the testimony of a University of Virginia professor of applied science, who charged that the National Science Foundation grants disproportionately small funds to the best university departments in the field of metallurgy and materials, while preferentially funding middle-ranked departments. (MLH)

  5. Pipeline failure: The roles played by corrosion, flow and metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.; Barrett, N.; Wilson, O.

    1999-11-01

    Carbon dioxide corrosion has been widely studied in the field and laboratory. It is recognized that flow regime and metallurgy are important factors that influence in-situ corrosion rates but there are relatively few documented case studies that are able to separate the individual contributions of corrosion, flow regime and metallurgy on the observed corrosion damage. This paper deals with failure of a pipeline where high quality inspection data together with comprehensive as-built records and stable production conditions allowed the separate influences of flow and metallurgy on corrosion to be studied. The flow regimes in the pipeline ranged from low velocity, stratified flow to high velocity, slug flow. The inspection data showed that the affect of turbulent flow was to increase the frequency of corrosion pits and, in the case of weld corrosion, the mean corrosion rate. The pipeline was constructed from two grades of steel and welded using two types of welding consumable. One grade of pipeline steel corroded at a significantly higher rate and with a higher frequency of corrosion pits than another, apparently similar steel. However, no significant relationship was found between weld metallurgy and corrosion rate or frequency.

  6. The effect of molybdenum on the physical and mechanical metallurgy of advanced titanium-aluminide alloys and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quast, Jeffrey Paul

    This dissertation represents a systematic study of microstructure-mechanical property relationships of titanium-aluminum-niobium-molybdenum (Ti-Al-Nb-Mo) alloys and metal matrix composites (MMCs). The aspects investigated were the microstructures, elevated-temperature creep behavior, room-temperature and elevated-temperature tensile behavior, and the out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue behavior. The specific alloy compositions investigated were: Ti-24Al-17Nb-0.66Mo (at.%) and Ti-24Al-17Nb-2.3Mo (at.%). The MMCs were reinforced with Ultra SCS-6 fibers and the specific compositions of the matrices were: Ti-24Al-17Nb-0.66Mo (at.%), Ti-24Al-17Nb-1.1Mo (at.%), and Ti-24Al-17Nb-2.3Mo (at.%). All of the materials were fabricated using a powder-metallurgy, tape casting technique. A subtransus heat-treatment produced microstructures containing a hexagonal close-packed a2 phase, orthorhombic (O) phase, and a body-centered cubic (BCC) phase. The higher Mo contents were shown to stabilize the BCC phase and result in an increase the O+BCC phase volume percent and a subsequent decrease in the a2 phase volume percent. The creep deformation behavior of the alloys and MMCs was the main focus of this dissertation. Creep experimentation was performed to understand the deformation mechanisms as a function of stress, temperature, and strain rate. Higher Mo contents significantly increased the creep resistance of the alloys, which was attributed to the decrease in the number of a2/a2 grain boundaries, increased O+BCC colony size, and Mo solid solution strengthening. This was one of the major findings of the work. In-situ tensile-creep experiments indicated that grain boundaries were the locus of deformation and cracking in each of the alloys investigated. MMC creep experimentation was performed with the fibers aligned perpendicular to the loading direction. Similar to alloy creep results, higher Mo contents increased the creep resistance of the MMCs. However, the creep resistance of

  7. Concurrent use of metered-dose and dry powder inhalers by children with persistent asthma does not adversely affect spacer/inhaler technique.

    PubMed

    Chan, Debora S; Callahan, Charles W; Hatch-Pigott, Virginia B; Lawless, Annette; Proffitt, H Lorraine; Manning, Nola E; Schweikert, Mary P

    2006-10-01

    Studies conducted in adults have suggested that patients who use a metered-dose inhaler/holding chamber spacer (MDI/S) and dry powder inhaler (DPI) concurrently will have poorer MDI/S technique than that of patients who use MDI/S exclusively. To our knowledge, as of August 31, 2006, no studies have been performed in pediatric patients. To compare MDI/S technique scores of children using only MDI/S with scores of those using both MDI/S and DPIs. The MDI/S technique of children aged 6-17 years, with persistent asthma, recruited from a general pediatric practice population for an asthma intervention study project was scored using a standardized checklist. MDI/S scores of children who were being treated with maintenance and rescue medication delivered only by MDI/S were compared with those treated with both MDI/S (rescue) and DPI (maintenance). Scores lower than 70% were considered to be inadequate. A total of 117 patients (73 male, 44 female), aged 9.70 +/- 3.1 years (mean +/- SD), with persistent asthma, participated in the study. There were 83 children (54 male, 29 female, age 9.4 +/- 3.2 y) in the MDI/S only group and 34 (19 male, 15 female, age 10.3 +/- 2.9 y) in the MDI/S + DPI group. In the MDI/S + DPI group, Diskus was the DPI used for 32 patients, and Turbuhaler was used by 2 children. Sixteen patients had severe persistent asthma, 80 had moderate persistent asthma, and 21 had mild persistent asthma as classified by National Heart Lung and Blood Institute guidelines. No difference in sex and age demographics existed; however, there was a difference in the distribution of asthma severity between groups (ie, no patients with mild persistent asthma in the MDI/S + DPI group; p < or = 0.01). Mean score for the MDI/S only group was 86 +/- 17% and, for the MDI/S + DPI group, 90.1 +/- 12% (p = 0.15). More patients in the MDI/S group had inadequate scores (18%) compared with those in the MDI/S + DPI group (3%; p < 0.05). While DPI and MDI/S techniques are markedly

  8. A laboratory means to produce tough aluminum sheet from powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, O. R.; Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.

    The rapid solidification of aluminum alloys as powder and the subsequent fabrication processes can be used to develop and tailor alloys to satisfy specific aerospace design requirements, including high strength and toughness. Laboratory procedures to produce aluminum powder-metallurgy (PM) materials are efficient but require evidence that the laboratory methods used can produce a product with superior properties. This paper describes laboratory equipment and procedures which can be used to produce tough aluminum PM sheet. The processing of a 2124 + 0.9 percent Zr aluminum alloy powder is used as an example. The fully hardened sheet product is evaluated in terms of properties and microstructure. The key features of the vacuum hot press pressing operation used to consolidate the powder are described. The 2124 + 0.9 percent Zr - T8 temper aluminum sheet produced was both strong (460-490 MPa yield strength) and tough (Kahn Tear unit-propagation- energy values over three times those typical for ingot metallurgy 2024-T81). Both the longitudinal and longitudinal-transverse directions of the sheet were tested. The microstructure was well refined with subgrains of one or two micrometers. Fine dispersoids of Al3Zr in the precipitate free regions adjacent to boundaries are believed to contribute to the improved toughness.

  9. A laboratory means to produce tough aluminum sheet from powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleton, O. R.; Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid solidification of aluminum alloys as powder and the subsequent fabrication processes can be used to develop and tailor alloys to satisfy specific aerospace design requirements, including high strength and toughness. Laboratory procedures to produce aluminum powder-metallurgy (PM) materials are efficient but require evidence that the laboratory methods used can produce a product with superior properties. This paper describes laboratory equipment and procedures which can be used to produce tough aluminum PM sheet. The processing of a 2124 + 0.9 percent Zr aluminum alloy powder is used as an example. The fully hardened sheet product is evaluated in terms of properties and microstructure. The key features of the vacuum hot press pressing operation used to consolidate the powder are described. The 2124 + 0.9 percent Zr - T8 temper aluminum sheet produced was both strong (460-490 MPa yield strength) and tough (Kahn Tear unit-propagation- energy values over three times those typical for ingot metallurgy 2024-T81). Both the longitudinal and longitudinal-transverse directions of the sheet were tested. The microstructure was well refined with subgrains of one or two micrometers. Fine dispersoids of Al3Zr in the precipitate free regions adjacent to boundaries are believed to contribute to the improved toughness.

  10. Nanoporous mannitol carrier prepared by non-organic solvent spray drying technique to enhance the aerosolization performance for dry powder inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tingting; Zhang, Xuejuan; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Ziyu; Liao, Qiuying; Xu, Jing; Huang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Jiwen; Wu, Chuan-yu; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2017-01-01

    An optimum carrier rugosity is essential to achieve a satisfying drug deposition efficiency for the carrier based dry powder inhalation (DPI). Therefore, a non-organic spray drying technique was firstly used to prepare nanoporous mannitol with small asperities to enhance the DPI aerosolization performance. Ammonium carbonate was used as a pore-forming agent since it decomposed with volatile during preparation. It was found that only the porous structure, and hence the specific surface area and carrier density were changed at different ammonium carbonate concentration. Furthermore, the carrier density was used as an indication of porosity to correlate with drug aerosolization. A good correlation between the carrier density and fine particle fraction (FPF) (r2 = 0.9579) was established, suggesting that the deposition efficiency increased with the decreased carrier density. Nanoporous mannitol with a mean pore size of about 6 nm exhibited 0.24-fold carrier density while 2.16-fold FPF value of the non-porous mannitol. The enhanced deposition efficiency was further confirmed from the pharmacokinetic studies since the nanoporous mannitol exhibited a significantly higher AUC0-8h value than the non-porous mannitol and commercial product Pulmicort. Therefore, surface modification by preparing nanoporous carrier through non-organic spray drying showed to be a facile approach to enhance the DPI aerosolization performance. PMID:28462948

  11. In vitro and in vivo evaluations of ketoprofen extended release pellets prepared using powder layering technique in a rotary centrifugal granulator.

    PubMed

    Pai, Raveendra; Kohli, Kanchan; Jain, Gaurav; Srivastava, Birendra

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, an extended release pellet dosage form of ketoprofen was prepared using powder layering technique. A combination of ethyl cellulose (45 cps) and shellac polymers was used as a binder (12% w/w polymer) during drug layering and an extended release coating (1:3 ratio at 2%, 4% and 7% w/w polymer) within the same apparatus. The coated pellets were characterized for sphericity, Hardness-Friability Index, and drug content, and also underwent scanning electron microscopy. In vitro dissolution was performed in 900 mL of phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) using paddle apparatus at 100 rpm. Ethyl cellulose and shellac when used as binders during drug loading did not extend ketoprofen release beyond 3 h. However, coating of the drug loaded pellets using ethyl cellulose and shellac resulted in an extended release profile of about 10 h. Using Higuchi's model and the Korsmeyer equation, the drug release mechanism from the pellets was found to be an anomalous type involving diffusion and erosion. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the pellet morphology and drug release mechanism during dissolution testing. In vivo evaluations of the extended release pellets in rats indicated a significant increase in the time to reach maximum concentration (t(max)) and extent of absorption (AUC(0-∞)) compared to the ketoprofen immediate release tablet blend dispersed and dosed. In conclusion, extended release pellets of ketoprofen could perform therapeutically better than conventional dosage forms, leading to improved efficacy for a prolonged period.

  12. Polymer powder prepregging: Scoping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throne, James L.

    1988-01-01

    Early on, it was found that NEAT LARC-TPI thermoplastic polyimide powder behaved elastoplastically at pressures to 20 ksi and temperatures to 260 degrees celcius (below MP). At high resin assay, resin powder could be continuously cold-flowed around individual carbon fibers in a metal rolling mill. At low resin assay (2:1, C:TPI), fiber breakage was prohibitive. Thus, although processing of TPI below MP would be quite unique, it appears that the polymer must be melted and flowed to produce low resin assay prepreg. Fiber tow was spread to 75 mm using a venturi slot tunnel. This allowed intimate powder/fiber interaction. Two techniques were examined for getting room temperature powder onto the room temperature fiber surface. Electrostatic powder coating allows the charged powder to cling tenaciously to the fiber, even while heated with a hot air gun to above its melt temperature. A variant of the wet slurry coating process was also explored. The carbon fibers are first wetted with water. Then dry powder is sprinkled onto the wet tow and doctor-rolled between the fibers. The wet structure is then taken onto a heated roll, with hot air guns drying and sinter-melting the powder onto the fiber surfaces. In both cases SEM shows individual fibers coated with powder particles that have melted in place and flowed along the fiber surface via surface tension.

  13. Metallurgy, environmental pollution and the decline of Etruscan civilisation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Adrian P; Cattani, Ilenia; Turfa, Jean M

    2010-01-01

    The Etruscans were justifiably famous in antiquity for their advanced metallurgy and for the rich mineral resources of their region (including La Tolfa, the Colline Metallifere, Mont'Amiata and Elba). We offer a new perspective on certain Iron Age and Archaic (ca. 1,000-480 BC: ) Etruscan industrial and habitation sites, and on the problem of heavy metal poisoning, still being investigated today, coincidentally in some of the same areas that originally saw Etruscan mines and workshops. This study investigates ancient sources, including literature and excavation reports, in the light of modern studies of heavy metal poisoning on human beings, plant and animal life. Furthermore, it is the first to use non-invasive Niton X-ray fluorescence analysis of samples of Etruscan (strictly ethnically Faliscan) hair (c. 350 BCE: ). The findings show the strong likelihood of heavy metal poisoning in areas of Etruscan metallurgical activity with the effects of this being responsible for or contributing to the abandonment of a number of these sites around the 6th century BC: . No thoroughly satisfactory explanation of this phenomenon has previously been offered. However, findings suggest that Faliscan women, represented by sample CG 2004-6-2, were not exposed to high levels of arsenic in life, which is not perhaps surprising for an urban aristocratic woman of the mid-4th century BC: . The reasons for the abandonment of several flourishing settlements are without doubt complex, and include political and social change. We suggest heavy metal contamination as an additional stimulus to the noted phenomenon of the peaceful abandonment, at the beginning, and at the end of the 6th century BC: , of sites in southern and northern Etruria such as Marsiliana d'Albegna (late 7th c.), Lago dell'Accesa, Acquarossa and Poggio Civitate-Murlo (late 6th c.). While the historical truth of the demise of Etruscan civilisation is much more complex, an interim set of related events, the desertion of

  14. Rapid Screening Technique To Identify Sudan Dyes (I to IV) in Adulterated Tomato Sauce, Chilli Powder, and Palm Oil by Innovative High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Simona; Esposito, Giovanna; Dell'Atti, Luana; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Martucci, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Sudan dyes are synthetic azo dyes used by industry in a variety of applications. Classified as carcinogenic, they are not allowed in foodstuffs; however, their presence as adulterants in food products has been regularly reported. Here, we describe an innovative screening method to detect Sudan I, II, III, and IV in tomato sauce, palm oil, and chilli powder. The method entails minimal sample preparation, completely avoiding the liquid chromatography phase, followed by detection and identification through atmospheric pressure chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, in positive ionization mode. Analytes were efficiently identified and detected in samples, fortified both with individual analytes and with their mixture, with an error in mass identification less than 5 ppm. Limits of identification of the analytes in the fortified samples were 0.5 to 1 mg/kg, depending on the dye and matrix. The method had a linear range of 0.05 to 5 mg/kg and good linear relationships (R(2) > 0.98). Repeatability was satisfactory, with a coefficient of variation lower than 20%. The method was applied to detect the dyes in real adulterated chilli samples, previously found positive by confirmatory high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and ELISA, and in commercial products purchased from supermarkets. In all positive samples, analytes were correctly identified with an error in mass identification lower than 5 ppm, while none of the 45 commercial samples analyzed were found to be contaminated. The proposed new assay is sensitive, with a limit of identification, for all the three matrices, complying with the limits defined by the European Union (0.5 to 1 mg/kg) for analytical methods. Compared with conventional methods, the new assay is rapid and inexpensive and characterized by a high throughput; thus, it could be suitable as screening technique to identify Sudan dyes in adulterated food products.

  15. Evaluation of inhaler technique, adherence to therapy and their effect on disease control among children with asthma using metered dose or dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Capanoglu, Murat; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Toyran, Muge; Civelek, Ersoy; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2015-10-01

    To address the problems about correct use of inhaler devices, adherence to inhaler corticosteroid treatment and the effects of these problems on the control of asthma. Children with asthma were evaluated for the correct use of inhaler devices and adherence to therapy using a questionnaire. Effect of these on control of asthma was defined. A hundred and seventy-one patients and/or their families were interviewed. The mean age was 8.29 ± 4.65 years (1-19) and 62.6% were male. Metered dose inhaler (MDI) with spacer was used by 119 (69.5%) patients and 52 (30.5%) used dry powder inhalers (DPIs). The devices were used correctly by 68.1% of patients using MDI and 34.6% of patients using DPI (p < 0.001). The most common improper step was "breathe in from the spacer 5-6 times or 10 s" for MDI (24.4%) and "exhale to residual volume" for DPI (51.9%). Frequency of correct use was higher in patients trained 3 times (p < 0.001). Asthma was controlled more frequently among correct users (p < 0.001). Partial or poor adherence was showed 22.8% of patients. Patients with mothers who had lower educational status had higher frequency of incorrect use of inhaler device (p = 0.007). It was found that asthma control was better among correct users. Repetitive training about using devices may contribute improving inhaler technique. Especially children whose mothers had low education level and patients using DPI should be evaluated more carefully.

  16. The physical metallurgy of mechanically-alloyed, dispersion-strengthened Al-Li-Mg and Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Powder processing of Al-Li-Mg and Al-Li-Cu alloys by mechanical alloying (MA) is described, with a discussion of physical and mechanical properties of early experimental alloys of these compositions. The experimental samples were mechanically alloyed in a Szegvari attritor, extruded at 343 and 427 C, and some were solution-treated at 520 and 566 C and naturally, as well as artificially, aged at 170, 190, and 210 C for times of up to 1000 hours. All alloys exhibited maximum hardness after being aged at 170 C; lower hardness corresponds to the solution treatment at 566 C than to that at 520 C. A comparison with ingot metallurgy alloys of the same composition shows the MA material to be stronger and more ductile. It is also noted that properly aged MA alloys can develop a better combination of yield strength and notched toughness at lower alloying levels.

  17. Highly Thermally Stable Microstructure in Mg Fabricated Via Powder Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Imai, H.; Chen, B.; Ye, X.; Umeda, J.; Kondoh, K.

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate a fascinating microstructure that ensures Mg has a high thermal stability. This is achieved by fabricating the Mg sample via powder rolling followed by powder metallurgy method. It is found that after Mg powders are pretreated for 15 rolling passes at room temperature and then consolidated by using spark plasma sintering, the Mg specimen exhibits a much finer grain structure. Such a grain structure then shows a super high thermal stability. Worthy of note is that many fractions of tensile twins were presented in the Mg specimen and survived a heat treatment at 500°C. After the heat treatment, the microhardness of the sample remained almost unchanged. The finding then gives rise to the possibility of using Mg as structural material at elevated temperatures.

  18. Near-Net Shape Fabrication Using Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David M. Bowden; Dr. William H. Peter

    2012-03-31

    feasibility studies were performed to identify the most viable approaches to NNS preform fabrication using basic powder metallurgy mill product forms as the building blocks and advanced joining techniques including fusion and solid state joining to assemble these building blocks into efficient machining performs.

  19. Demonstration of Shear Localization in Ultrafine Grained Tungsten Alloys via Powder Metallurgy Processing Route

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    deformation route. These samples showed localization as the grain size approached 100 nm though the microstructure was heavily textured as a result of...and microcracking in some specimens. Mechanical test specimens (2-mm cubes ) were cut from each sample group by electrical discharge machining (EDM...performed with a 9.5-mm diameter Vascomax C350 steel Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) (24). UFG tungsten tends to behave in a brittle manner, so small copper

  20. Effect of the Machining Processes on Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of a Powder Metallurgy Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Kantzos, P.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    A study has been performed to investigate the effect of various machining processes on fatigue life of configured low cycle fatigue specimens machined out of a NASA developed LSHR P/M nickel based disk alloy. Two types of configured specimen geometries were employed in the study. To evaluate a broach machining processes a double notch geometry was used with both notches machined using broach tooling. EDM machined notched specimens of the same configuration were tested for comparison purposes. Honing finishing process was evaluated by using a center hole specimen geometry. Comparison testing was again done using EDM machined specimens of the same geometry. The effect of these machining processes on the resulting surface roughness, residual stress distribution and microstructural damage were characterized and used in attempt to explain the low cycle fatigue results.

  1. Precipitation in Powder Metallurgy, Nickel Base Superalloys: Review of Modeling Approach and Formulation of Engineering (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    increase of the average precipitate size was interpreted in terms of the classical Lifshitz-Slyozov- Wagner (LSW) theory modified to treat the coarsening of...the induction and steady-state effects. Adv Colloid Interface Sci 13:205–318 11. Haasen P, Gerold V, Wagner R, Ashby MF (1984) Decomposition of alloys...Solids 19:35–51 16. Wagner C (1961) Theorie der alterung von niederschlägen durch umlösen (Ostwald‐reifung). Zeit Elektrochem 65: 581–591 Semiatin et al

  2. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  3. Development of powder metallurgy 2XXX series Al alloys for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to improve the strength and fracture toughness combination of P/M 2124 Al alloys in accordance with NASA program goals for damage tolerance and fatigue resistance. Two (2) P/M compositions based on Al-3.70 Cu-1.85 Mg-0.20 Mn with 0.12 and 0.60 wt. pct. Zr were selected for investigation. The rapid solidification rates produced by atomization were observed to prohibit the precipitation of coarse, primary Al3Zr in both alloys. A major portion of the Zr precipitated as finely distributed, coherent Al3Zr phases during vacuum preheating and solution heat treatment. The proper balance between Cu and Mg contents eliminated undissolved, soluble constituents such as Al2CuMg and Al2Cu during atomization. The resultant extruded microstructures produced a unique combination of strength and fracture toughness. An increase in the volume fraction of coherent Al3Zr, unlike incoherent Al20Cu2Mn3 dispersoids, strengthened the P/M Al base alloy either directly by dislocation-precipitate interactions, indirectly by a retardation of recrystallization, or a combination of both mechanisms. Furthermore, coherent Al3Zr does not appear to degrade toughness to the extent that incoherent Al20Cu2Mn3 does. Consequently, the addition of 0.60 wt. pct. Zr to the base alloy, incorporated with a 774K (935 F) solution heat treatment temperature, produces an alloy which exceeds all tensile property and fracture toughness goals for damage tolerant and fatigue resistant applications in the naturally aged condition.

  4. A Study of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Powder Metallurgy Hot Isotatically Pressed Nickel-Base Alloy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-31

    strength of delay cycles after an overload, an attempt was made to normalize the delay results published recently by Antolovich and Jayaraman.3 They noted...343 2. R. S. Vecchio, Master’s Thesis, Lehigh University, 1983. 3. S. D. Antolovich and N. Jayaraman, Fatigue, Environment and Temperature Effects, J...2.0 5.0 10 20 50 O.L. Plastic Zone Size /I Fig. 1. Normalized data from Antolovich and Jayaraman3 revealing influence of grain size on overload

  5. Development of powder metallurgy Al alloys for high temperature aircraft structural applications, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    In this continuing study, the development of mechanically alloyed heat resistant aluminum alloys for aircraft were studied to develop higher strength targets and higher service temperatures. The use of higher alloy additions to MA Al-Fe-Co alloys, employment of prealloyed starting materials, and higher extrusion temperatures were investigated. While the MA Al-Fe-Co alloys exhibited good retention of strength and ductility properties at elevated temperatures and excellent stability of properties after 1000 hour exposure at elevated temperatures, a sensitivity of this system to low extrusion strain rates adversely affected the level of strength achieved. MA alloys in the Al-Li family showed excellent notched toughness and property stability after long time exposures at elevated temperatures. A loss of Li during processing and the higher extrusion temperature 482 K (900 F) resulted in low mechanical strengths. Subsequent hot and cold working of the MA Al-Li had only a mild influence on properties.

  6. Effects of thermally induced porosity on an as-HIP powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of thermally induced porosity on the mechanical properties of an as-hot-isostatically pressed and heat-treated pressing made from low carbon Astroloy is examined. Tensile, stress-rupture, creep, and low cycle fatigue tests were performed and the results were compared with industrial acceptance criteria. It is shown that the porous pressing has a porosity gradient from the rim to the bore with the bore having 1-1/2% greater porosity. Mechanical properties of the test ring below acceptance level are tensile reduction in area at room temperature and 538 C and time for 0.1% creep at 704 C. It is also found that the strength, ductility, and rupture life of the rim are slightly inferior to those of the rim of the sound pressings, while those of the bore are generally below the acceptable level. At strain ranges typical of commercial aircraft engines, the low cycle fatigue life of the rim of the porous pressings is slightly lower than that of the sound pressings.

  7. Effect of thermally induced porosity on an as-HIP powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of thermally induced porosity on the mechanical properties of an as-hot-isostatically-pressed and heat treated pressing made from low carbon Astroloy was determined. Porosity in the disk-shape pressing studied ranged from 2.6 percent at the bore to 1.4 percent at the rim. Tensile, yield strength, ductility, and rupture life of the rim of the porous pressing was only slightly inferior to the rim of sound pressings. The strength, ductility, and rupture life of the bore of the porous pressing was severely degraded compared to sound pressings. At strain ranges typical of commercial jet engine designs, the rim of the porous pressing had slightly inferior fatigue life to sound pressings.

  8. Utilization of Space Shuttle External Tank materials by melting and powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    The Crucible Melt Extraction Process was demonstrated to convert scraps of aluminum alloy 2219, used in the Space Shuttle External Tank, into fibers. The cast fibers were then consolidated by cold welding. The X-ray diffraction test of the cast fibers was done to examine the crystallinity and oxide content of the fibers. The compressive stress-strain behavior of the consolidated materials was also examined. Two conceptual schemes which would adapt the as-developed Crucible Melt Extraction Process to the microgravity condition in space were finally proposed.

  9. Metals for bone implants. Part 1. Powder metallurgy and implant rendering.

    PubMed

    Andani, Mohsen Taheri; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael J; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    New metal alloys and metal fabrication strategies are likely to benefit future skeletal implant strategies. These metals and fabrication strategies were looked at from the point of view of standard-of-care implants for the mandible. These implants are used as part of the treatment for segmental resection due to oropharyngeal cancer, injury or correction of deformity due to pathology or congenital defect. The focus of this two-part review is the issues associated with the failure of existing mandibular implants that are due to mismatched material properties. Potential directions for future research are also studied. To mitigate these issues, the use of low-stiffness metallic alloys has been highlighted. To this end, the development, processing and biocompatibility of superelastic NiTi as well as resorbable magnesium-based alloys are discussed. Additionally, engineered porosity is reviewed as it can be an effective way of matching the stiffness of an implant with the surrounding tissue. These porosities and the overall geometry of the implant can be optimized for strain transduction and with a tailored stiffness profile. Rendering patient-specific, site-specific, morphology-specific and function-specific implants can now be achieved using these and other metals with bone-like material properties by additive manufacturing. The biocompatibility of implants prepared from superelastic and resorbable alloys is also reviewed.

  10. On modeling the CNC end milling characteristics of Al-7075/WC powder metallurgy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuman, N. S. V. N.; Rao, P. Gangadhara; Kumar, B. Sudheer; Karthik, N.

    2017-07-01

    Surface finish and material removal rate are two important factors in the manufacturing which affect acceptability of the product which in turn reflects on the profitability of the organization. The worth of the production setup to produce the components with high material removal rate (MRR) without sacrificing the surface requirements can play vital role in sustainability and profitability of the organization. In this paper, the effect of process parameters on metal removal rate and surface roughness has been investigated in milling of Al7075-MMC with WC as reinforcement element. Cutting speed, feed and depth of cut have been taken as input factors in three level response surface methodologies used for experimentation. Mathematical models have been developed using response surface methodology to predict surface finish, and metal removal rate in term of machining parameters. Depth of cut and feed rate are found to be a dominant parameter for surface roughness; whereas feed rate mainly affects the metal removal rate. The results of mathematical models have been compared with the experimental and found to be in good agreement. The results of predicted model can be used in selection of process parameters to insure desired quality and improved productivity.

  11. Fabrication of single crystalline diamond reinforced aluminum matrix composite by powder metallurgy route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc; Heintz, Jean-Marc; Silvain, Jean-François; Kawasaki, Akira

    2011-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated highly densified aluminum (Al)-diamond composite materials by a simple hot press method. The thermal conductivity of the Al-diamond composite materials was measured. These materials had different types, sizes and fractions of diamond. These obtained values were discussed based on theoretically calculated values. The thermal conductivity of the composite materials, measured by Laser-Flash method, was found to have slightly increased compared to that of pure bulk Al. The obtained microstructures of the composite materials showed a lot of cleavage existing in the interface between the Al matrix and the diamond particles, which led to the low increment of the thermal conductivity. Moreover, Al-diamond bulk materials with different sintering temperatures in solid state, liquid phase, and transient region between solid and liquid of Al, have been synthesized.

  12. Initial Evaluation of Advanced Powder Metallurgy Magnesium Alloys for Armor Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    INSTITUT FUR KURZZEITDYNAMIK ERNST MACH INSTITUT V HOHLER E STRASSBURGER R TRAM K THOMA ECKERSTRASSE4 D 79 104 FREIBURG GERMANY...1X5 CANADA 2 DEUTSCH FRANZOSISCHES FORSCHUNGSINSTITUT ST LOUIS H ERNST H LERR CEDEX 5 RUE DU GENERAL CASSAGNOU F 68301 SAINT

  13. Al and Mg Alloys for Aerospace Applications Using Rapid Solidification and Powder Metallurgy Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-28

    presence of Si resulted in the formation of the compound-&-AlFeSi, with space group determined to be Im3 by convergent beam electron diffraction. The...a study of the evolution of the microstructures of rapidly soldified alloys, and an assessment of their tensile and oxidation properties. It has been...BCC Brav4,, ’attice for this phase was confirrmed by convergent beam electron diffraction. On continued aging to 50 hrs, the orthorhombic 0’ A13Fe

  14. Grain-shape parameters for high-temperature creep resistance in powder metallurgy tungsten fine wires

    SciTech Connect

    Tanoue, K.

    1998-02-01

    Three grain-shape parameters, f{sub 1}, f{sub 2}, and f{sub 3}, are defined to clarify the morphological effect of grains on the high-temperature creep resistance under the condition that no grain boundary cavitation occurs. The parameter f{sub 1} is characteristic of complicated grain shapes, suggesting that it can be a measure of the interlocking grain structure. The parameter f{sub 2} is an important parameter when torsional stresses are imposed on coiled wires, and f{sub 3} is characteristic of the short-range roughness of grain boundaries only when f{sub 1} is not greatly changed. The minimum creep rate decreases as the grain aspect ratio, R, increases for R < 30, and the creep rate increases as R increases for R > 30. The parameter f{sub 1}, as well as Raj and Ashby`s model, gives a satisfactory explanation for the former behavior. On the other hand, it is proven that their model must be modified using f{sub 3} to explain the latter behavior because of the highly elongated grain configuration that is associated with R > 30.

  15. Aging of powder metallurgy N14K7M5T2 maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, V.N.; Grevnov, L.M.; Maslenikov, N.N.

    1985-04-01

    The authors study the aging process of sintered N14K7M5T2 marging steel at temperatures of 460-590 C with an isothermal hold of 40 min to 10 h. Electron microscopy was used. The purpose of the investigations was establishment of the type of precipitated phases and their size, form, and kinetics of growth in relation to the aging cycles. An analysis of the electrondiffraction patterns of specimens aged under different conditions made it possible to identify Ni/sub 3/ Ti as the hardening phase.

  16. Producing Fe-W-Co-Cr-C Alloy Cutting Tool Material Through Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta Banik, Bibhas; Dutta, Debasish; Ray, Siddhartha

    2016-06-01

    High speed steel tools can withstand high impact forces as they are tough in nature. But they cannot retain their hardness at elevated temperature i.e. their hot hardness is low. Therefore permissible cutting speed is low and tools wear out easily. Use of lubricants is essential for HSS cutting tools. On the other hand cemented carbide tools can withstand greater compressive force, but due to lower toughness the tool can break easily. Moreover the cost of the tool is comparatively high. To achieve a better machining economy, Fe-W-Co-Cr-C alloys are being used nowadays. Their toughness is as good as HSS tools and hardness is very near to carbide tools. Even, at moderate cutting speeds they can be safely used in old machines having vibration. Moreover it is much cheaper than carbide tools. This paper highlights the Manufacturing Technology of the alloy and studies the comparative tribological properties of the alloy and tungsten mono carbide.

  17. Producing Fe-W-Co-Cr-C Alloy Cutting Tool Material Through Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta Banik, Bibhas; Dutta, Debasish; Ray, Siddhartha

    2017-04-01

    High speed steel tools can withstand high impact forces as they are tough in nature. But they cannot retain their hardness at elevated temperature i.e. their hot hardness is low. Therefore permissible cutting speed is low and tools wear out easily. Use of lubricants is essential for HSS cutting tools. On the other hand cemented carbide tools can withstand greater compressive force, but due to lower toughness the tool can break easily. Moreover the cost of the tool is comparatively high. To achieve a better machining economy, Fe-W-Co-Cr-C alloys are being used nowadays. Their toughness is as good as HSS tools and hardness is very near to carbide tools. Even, at moderate cutting speeds they can be safely used in old machines having vibration. Moreover it is much cheaper than carbide tools. This paper highlights the Manufacturing Technology of the alloy and studies the comparative tribological properties of the alloy and tungsten mono carbide.

  18. A Comparison of the Plastic Flow Response of a Powder Metallurgy Nickel Base Superalloy (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    Interim Report Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. © 2017 THE MINERALS, METALS & MATERIALS SOCIETY AND ASM...INTL (STINFO COPY) AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-7750 AIR... Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7750 Air Force Materiel Command United States Air Force AFRL/RXCM

  19. WPI Nanosat-3 Final Report: PANSAT - Powder Metallurgy and Navigation Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-06

    and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188), Washington, DC 20503 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2...designed a custom SEPIC based power management and conversion system that was both highly efficient and reliable. The design managed the power flow from 7...direct and reliable communications path has been established and when sufficient power is available to operate the electronics. Bench top SEPIC

  20. Ductilization of Mo-Si solid solutions manufactured by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Saage, H.; Krueger, M.; Sturm, D.; Heilmaier, M.; Schneibel, J H; George, Easo P; Heatherly Jr, Lee; Somsen, Ch.; Eggeler, G.; Yang, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Mo-1.5 at.% Si alloys with additions of either Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Zr were manufactured by mechanical alloying. The Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles reduced the grain size and increased the room temperature strength, but did not alleviate the brittleness of previously investigated Mo-1.5 at.% Si without Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Additions of Zr, on the other hand, resulted not only in a fine grain size and an extremely high bend strength ({approx}2 GPa), but also in limited bend ductility at room temperature. Zr additions are seen to be beneficial for three reasons. First, Zr reduces the grain size. Second, Zr getters detrimental oxygen by forming ZrO{sub 2} particles (which in turn help to pin the grain boundaries). Third, in situ Auger analysis shows that Zr reduces the concentration of Si segregated at the grain boundaries. This is thought to enhance the grain boundary cohesive strength and thus leads to the observed ductility.

  1. Production of refractory compound Materials for electronic engineering Applications by the powder metallurgy Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kosolapova, T.Y.; Dvorina, L.A.; Sasov, A.M.

    1986-02-01

    This paper presents the most important properties of bulk specimens of refractory metal disilicides having both high and low values of resistivity. The electrical properties and electrotransport data for Period IV metal silicides exhibit transitions from metallic (TiSi/sub 2/) to semiconductor (CrSi/sub 2/, MnSi /SUB 2-n/ , and FeSi/sub 2/) and once again to metallic (CoSi/sub 2/ and NiSi/sub 2/) conductivity. Chromium, manganese, and iron silicides have very good resistance to oxidation in air up to comparatively high temperatures, and in this series CrSi/sub 2/--one of the most air-oxidation resistant disilicide-is discussed at length in this paper.

  2. Electrostatic detection of density variations in green-state powder metallurgy compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, Georg; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2002-05-01

    In this paper progress is reported on relating the density of green-state compacts in the presence of various lubricant concentrations to electric conductivity. This relationship lies at the core of the electrostatic NDE methodology to predict density distributions. It will be shown that density and material conductivity follow a complex functional behavior that is determined by the type and concentration of the lubricant. Specifically, the material conductivity increases as the sample density increases up to approximately 6.9-7.0 g/cm3. Any further density increases cause a decrease in conductivity. Theoretical and experimental data will be provided to explain this phenomenon.

  3. Al and Mg Alloys for Aerospace Applications Using Rapid Solidification and Powder Metallurgy Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-14

    ifato pten o h gvnoinain * 25 .4 ~ 4, .4 .4.. I I- 𔃾 * r~. V 4’ .4 4 E2 -S N 4. 4. 4.Fig. 11. (Continued). 26 *4 4-.. ~i... - - i. Pt ;M ." • b 2 c d .(a...much larger, on the order of 10- 20am , with large needles in the grain interior, as shown in Fig. 42. Coarse particles are also present at grain 44 I 4

  4. A comparison of the sintering of various titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press- and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics; with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  5. Microstructural changes in NiFe2O4 ceramics prepared with powders derived from different fuels in sol-gel auto-combustion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Lalita; Bokolia, Renuka; Sreenivas, K.

    2016-05-01

    Structural properties of Nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) ceramics prepared from powders derived from sol gel auto-combustion method using different fuels (citric acid, glycine and Dl-alanine) are compared. Changes in the structural properties at different sintering temperatures are investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms the formation of single phase material with cubic structure. Ceramics prepared using the different powders obtained from different fuels show that that there are no significant changes in lattice parameters. However increasing sintering temperatures show significant improvement in density and grain size. The DL-alanine fuel is found to be the most effective fuel for producing NIFe2O4 powders by the sol-gel auto combustion method and yields highly crystalline powders in the as-burnt stage itself at a low temperature (80 °C). Subsequent use of the powders in ceramic manufacturing produces dense NiFe2O4 ceramics with a uniform microstructure and a large grain size.

  6. Microstructural changes in NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics prepared with powders derived from different fuels in sol-gel auto-combustion technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, Lalita Sreenivas, K.; Bokolia, Renuka

    2016-05-23

    Structural properties of Nickel ferrite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) ceramics prepared from powders derived from sol gel auto-combustion method using different fuels (citric acid, glycine and Dl-alanine) are compared. Changes in the structural properties at different sintering temperatures are investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms the formation of single phase material with cubic structure. Ceramics prepared using the different powders obtained from different fuels show that that there are no significant changes in lattice parameters. However increasing sintering temperatures show significant improvement in density and grain size. The DL-alanine fuel is found to be the most effective fuel for producing NIFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders by the sol-gel auto combustion method and yields highly crystalline powders in the as-burnt stage itself at a low temperature (80 °C). Subsequent use of the powders in ceramic manufacturing produces dense NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics with a uniform microstructure and a large grain size.

  7. Anodization Mechanism on SiC Nanoparticle Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by Power Metallurgy

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Sonia C.; Conde, Ana; Arenas, María A.; Rocha, Luis A.; Velhinho, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Specimens of aluminum-based composites reinforced by silicon carbide nanoparticles (Al/SiCnp) produced by powder metallurgy (PM) were anodized under voltage control in tartaric-sulfuric acid (TSA). In this work, the influence of the amount of SiCnp on the film growth during anodizing was investigated. The current density versus time response and the morphology of the porous alumina film formed at the composite surface are compared to those concerning a commercial aluminum alloy (AA1050) anodized under the same conditions. The processing method of the aluminum alloys influences the efficiency of the anodizing process, leading to a lower thicknesses for the unreinforced Al-PM alloy regarding the AA1050. The current density versus time response is strongly dependent on the amount of SiCnp. The current peaks and the steady-state current density recorded at each voltage step increases with the SiCnp volume fraction due to the oxidation of the SiCnp. The formation mechanism of the anodic film on Al/SiCnp composites is different from that occurring in AA1050, partly due the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcement particles in the metallic matrix, but also to the entrapment of SiCnp in the anodic film. PMID:28788295

  8. Anodization Mechanism on SiC Nanoparticle Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by Power Metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sonia C; Conde, Ana; Arenas, María A; Rocha, Luis A; Velhinho, Alexandre

    2014-12-19

    Specimens of aluminum-based composites reinforced by silicon carbide nanoparticles (Al/SiCnp) produced by powder metallurgy (PM) were anodized under voltage control in tartaric-sulfuric acid (TSA). In this work, the influence of the amount of SiCnp on the film growth during anodizing was investigated. The current density versus time response and the morphology of the porous alumina film formed at the composite surface are compared to those concerning a commercial aluminum alloy (AA1050) anodized under the same conditions. The processing method of the aluminum alloys influences the efficiency of the anodizing process, leading to a lower thicknesses for the unreinforced Al-PM alloy regarding the AA1050. The current density versus time response is strongly dependent on the amount of SiCnp. The current peaks and the steady-state current density recorded at each voltage step increases with the SiCnp volume fraction due to the oxidation of the SiCnp. The formation mechanism of the anodic film on Al/SiCnp composites is different from that occurring in AA1050, partly due the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcement particles in the metallic matrix, but also to the entrapment of SiCnp in the anodic film.

  9. Powder Injection Molding (PIM) for Low Cost Manufacturing of Intricate Parts to Net-Shape

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Molding (PIM) for Low Cost Manufacturing of Intricate Parts to Net-Shape 7 - 6 RTO-MP-AVT-139 high temperature materials find applications in...offers significant cost savings, increased design and materials flexibility, increased possibility of miniaturization, high mechanical properties, good...surface finish and high speed production. The activities and expertise in powder metallurgy as well as in process numerical modeling related to

  10. Energetic powder

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Danen, Wayne C.

    2003-12-23

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles. The particles have a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer. The particles may be prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  11. Ceramic Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In developing its product line of specialty ceramic powders and related products for government and industrial customers, including companies in the oil, automotive, electronics and nuclear industries, Advanced Refractory Technologies sought technical assistance from NERAC, Inc. in specific areas of ceramic materials and silicon technology, and for assistance in identifying possible applications of these materials in government programs and in the automotive and electronics industry. NERAC conducted a computerized search of several data bases and provided extensive information in the subject areas requested. NERAC's assistance resulted in transfer of technologies that helped ART staff develop a unique method for manufacture of ceramic materials to precise customer specifications.

  12. Physical Metallurgy of Rene 65, a Next-Generation Cast and Wrought Nickel Superalloy for use in Aero Engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessman, Andrew Ezekiel

    Advancements in the design of turbine engines are in large part made possible by advancements in the capability of nickel based superalloys. Greater temperature and stress capabilities in these materials allow for increased operating temperatures and speeds in the engines, which lead to increased fuel efficiency. Early jet engines were built using austenitic stainless steels, and moved to cast and wrought nickel alloys as higher temperatures were required. By the 1970s, the state of the art nickel superalloy was Inconel 718, which is strengthened by the Ni3Nb phase known as gamma double prime. This alloy performs well and is still in heavy use in turbine engines at temperatures up to approximately 650°C (1200°F), but at higher temperatures the main strengthening precipitate phase, gamma', is thermodynamically unstable, resulting in a loss of strength following exposure to high temperature. Further advancements in nickel superalloys generally involved alloys strengthened by the Ni3Al phase known as gamma'. This precipitate is stable at much higher temperatures, but due to compositional segregation in cast and wrought processing, these alloys were processed using powder metallurgy methods, at considerable economic cost. This study will examine the microstructure of a next generation cast and wrought nickel superalloy that can provide increased temperature capability relative to Inconel 718, at lower cost than powder metallurgy superalloys. The alloy chemistry is similar to that of the powder metallurgy superalloy Rene 88DT, with changes to make it better suited for cast and wrought processing and with a different processing route from billet processing through to final part heat treatment. It is a gamma prime strengthened superalloy. The alloy has been recently introduced into service in turbine engines by GE Aviation as the alloy Rene 65, the composition of which is shown below. In this work, the following has been shown: • Rene 65 gamma' precipitate structure

  13. System Applies Polymer Powder To Filament Tow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Snoha, John J.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer powder applied uniformly and in continuous manner. Powder-coating system applies dry polymer powder to continuous fiber tow. Unique filament-spreading technique, combined with precise control of tension on fibers in system, ensures uniform application of polymer powder to web of spread filaments. Fiber tows impregnated with dry polymer powders ("towpregs") produced for preform-weaving and composite-material-molding applications. System and process valuable to prepreg industry, for production of flexible filament-windable tows and high-temperature polymer prepregs.

  14. 78 FR 8202 - Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting...

  15. AI-Li/SiCp composites and Ti-AI alloy powders and coatings prepared by a plasma spray atomization (PSA) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Boey, F. Y. C.; Murakoshi, Y.; Sano, T.

    1994-06-01

    There has been increasing use of Al-Li alloys in the aerospace industry, due mainly to the low density and high elastic modulus of this material. However, the problem of low ductility and fracture toughness of this material has limited its present application to only weight- and stiffness-critical components. Development of Al-Li/ceramic composites is currently being investigated to enhance the service capabilities of this material. The Ti-Al alloy is also of interest to aerospace-type applications, engine components in particular, due to its attractive high-temperature properties. Preparation of fine powders by plasma melting of composite feedstock and coatings formed by plasma spraying was carried out to examine the effect of spray parameters on the microstructure and properties of these materials. Characterization of the powders and coatings was performed using the scanning electron microscope and image analyzer. Examination of the plasma-sprayed powders and coatings has shown that in the Al-Li/SiC composite there is melting of both materials to form a single composite particle. The SiC reinforcement was in the submicron range and contributed to additional strengthening of the composite body, which was formed by a cold isostatic press and consolidated by hot extrusion or hot forging processes. The plasma-sprayed Ti-Al powder showed four categories of microstructures: featureless, dendritic, cellular, and martensite-like.

  16. Production of fine calcium powders by centrifugal atomization with rotating quench bath

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Liang; Anderson, Iver; Riedemann, Trevor; ...

    2016-02-08

    Recently, a novel Al/Ca composite was produced by severe plastic deformation of Al powders and Ca granules for possible use as a high-voltage power transmission conductor. Since the strength of such composites is inversely proportional to the Ca filament size, fine Ca powders (less than ~250 μm) are needed to achieve the desired high strength for the powder metallurgy production of an Al-matrix composite reinforced by nano-scale Ca filaments. However, fine Ca powders are not commercially available. Therefore, we have developed a method to produce fine Ca powders via centrifugal atomization to supply Ca powder for prototype development of Al/Camore » composite conductor. A secondary goal of the project was to demonstrate that Ca powder can be safely prepared, stored, and handled and could potentially be scaled for commercial production. Our results showed that centrifugal atomization can yield as much as 83 vol. % Ca powder particles smaller than 250 μm. The mean particle size sometimes matches, sometimes deviates substantially from the predictions of the Champagne & Anger equation likely due to unexpected secondary atomization. The particle size distribution is typical for a ligament-disintegration atomization mode. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the morphology of these Ca powders varied with powder size. Spark testing and auto-ignition tests indicated that the atomized powders were difficult to ignite, providing confidence that this material can be handled safely in air.« less

  17. Production of fine calcium powders by centrifugal atomization with rotating quench bath

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liang; Anderson, Iver; Riedemann, Trevor; Russell, Alan

    2016-02-08

    Recently, a novel Al/Ca composite was produced by severe plastic deformation of Al powders and Ca granules for possible use as a high-voltage power transmission conductor. Since the strength of such composites is inversely proportional to the Ca filament size, fine Ca powders (less than ~250 μm) are needed to achieve the desired high strength for the powder metallurgy production of an Al-matrix composite reinforced by nano-scale Ca filaments. However, fine Ca powders are not commercially available. Therefore, we have developed a method to produce fine Ca powders via centrifugal atomization to supply Ca powder for prototype development of Al/Ca composite conductor. A secondary goal of the project was to demonstrate that Ca powder can be safely prepared, stored, and handled and could potentially be scaled for commercial production. Our results showed that centrifugal atomization can yield as much as 83 vol. % Ca powder particles smaller than 250 μm. The mean particle size sometimes matches, sometimes deviates substantially from the predictions of the Champagne & Anger equation likely due to unexpected secondary atomization. The particle size distribution is typical for a ligament-disintegration atomization mode. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the morphology of these Ca powders varied with powder size. Spark testing and auto-ignition tests indicated that the atomized powders were difficult to ignite, providing confidence that this material can be handled safely in air.

  18. Welding Metallurgy and Processing Issues for Joining of Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lienert, Thomas J.; Reardon, Patrick T.

    2012-08-14

    Weldability issues with the pertinent alloys have been reviewed and preliminary results of our work on Haynes 25 have been presented. Further results on the mechanical properties and metallography on the EB welds are imminent. Hot-ductility experiments will commence within a few weeks. Aging studies on the effects of heat treatment using the Gleeble are also planned. MST-6 has extensive background in the welding metallurgy of the pertinent alloys. We also have considerable experience with the various welding processes to be used.

  19. Techniques for Controlling Heat Transfer in the Mould-Strand Gap in Order to Use Fluoride Free Mould Powder for Continuous Casting of Peritectic Steel Grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Adam; Stewart, Bridget

    When casting peritectic steel grades, control of heat transfer from the steel shell is critical for minimising surface defects. Cuspidine (3CaO.2SiO2.CaF2) is the preferred crystal phase to control horizontal heat flux, due to its high crystallisation temperature and low incubation time. However, the presence of fluoride creates environmental and operational problems. Research into fluoride-free mould powder for peritectic steel grades has still to yield a fully effective substitute.

  20. Powder treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, John D.

    1988-01-01

    (1) A process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder.

  1. Powder treatment process

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, J.D.

    1988-02-09

    Disclosed are: (1) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the slurry containing a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, while reducing the tendency for oxidation of the constituent by including as a liquid constituent of the slurry an organic liquid; (2) a process comprising spray drying a powder-containing slurry, the powder having been pretreated to reduce content of a powder constituent susceptible of oxidizing under the temperature conditions of the spray drying, the pretreating comprising heating the powder to react the constituent; and (3) a process comprising reacting ceramic powder, grinding the reacted powder, slurrying the ground powder, spray drying the slurried powder, and blending the dried powder with metal powder. 2 figs.

  2. Manufacturing techniques for titanium aluminide based alloys and metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Kunal B.

    Dual phase titanium aluminides composed vastly of gamma phase (TiAl) with moderate amount of alpha2 phase (Ti3Al) have been considered for several high temperature aerospace and automobile applications. High specific strength coupled with good high temperature performance in the areas of creep and oxidation resistance makes titanium aluminides "materials of choice" for next generation propulsion systems. Titanium alumnides are primarily being considered as potential replacements for Ni-based superalloys in gas turbine engine components with aim of developing more efficient and leaner engines exhibiting high thrust-to-weight ratio. Thermo-mechanical treatments have shown to enhance the mechanical performance of titanium aluminides. Additionally, small additions of interstitial elements have shown further and significant improvement in the mechanical performance of titanium alumnide alloys. However, titanium aluminides lack considerably in room temperature ductility and as a result manufacturing processes of these aluminides have greatly suffered. Traditional ingot metallurgy and investment casting based methods to produce titanium aluminide parts in addition to being expensive, have also been unsuccessful in producing titanium aluminides with the desired mechanical properties. Hence, the manufacturing costs associated with these methods have completely outweighed the benefits offered by titanium aluminides. Over the last two decades, several powder metallurgy based manufacturing techniques have been studied to produce titanium aluminide parts. These techniques have been successful in producing titanium aluminide parts with a homogeneous and refined microstructure. These powder metallurgy techniques also hold the potential of significant cost reduction depending on the wide market acceptance of titanium aluminides. In the present study, a powder metallurgy based rapid consolidation technique has been used to produce near-net shape parts of titanium aluminides. Micron

  3. Etude des proprietes mecaniques statiques et dynamiques de pieces d'acier elaborees par metallurgie des poudres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Fabrice

    The main objective of this thesis ais to gain a better understanding of the effects of processing variables on the porosity and microstructure of powder metallurgy (P/M) steel and their effect on mechanical properties, both static and dynamic. The effects of processing variables on porosity and microstructure were evaluated by advanced microstructural characterization using both optical and electron microscopies. Then the impacts of porosity and microstructure on both static and dynamic properties were measured. Static mechanical properties were characterized by hardness measurements and by tensile tests while fatigue testing was used for evaluating dynamic properties. Fractographic observations were made on tensile and fatigue fracture samples to correlate the microstructural features to the mechanical performance of P/M steels. The experimental work covered in this Ph.D. thesis enables to further understand the mechanisms by which process variables affect the microstructure and the mechanical properties of samples. In the first paper, the effect of prealloying MnS up to 1.0 wt pct on the microstructural features of non-metallic inclusions and their impact on tensile and fatigue properties of a 7.0 g/cm3 P/M steel (Fe-2.0Cu-0.7C) have been investigated. As the MnS content increases, larger, more irregular and more closely spaced inclusions are obtained. Whilst no significant impact on both static and dynamic properties was observed when prealloying up to 0.65 wt pct MnS, a decrease of more than 15 pct of the ultimate tensile strength and of the endurance limit was found when the MnS content reaches 1.0 wt pct. The decrease in the ultimate tensile strength is attributed to a lower ductility of the sinternecks, as void initiation and void growth were promoted at lower stress levels by larger inclusions. The larger size of the MnS particles and the lower mean free path between non-metallic inclusions also favor microcrack initiation and their coalescence into cracks

  4. Microactuator fabricated by powder particle assemblage using microprobe technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Takeshi; Egashira, Mitsuru; Shinya, Norio

    1997-06-01

    In the previous paper, preliminary research results on powder particle assemblage technique using a microprobe was reported. It was shown that the technique makes it possible to manipulate powder particles one by one, etch microscopically and weld the powder particle into a substrate or other powder particles. In this work, the welding mechanism of this method and metallurgical properties of welded parts were investigated, and micro- actuators were fabricated by means of powder particle assemblage technique using the microprobe. The results indicated the potentiality of this technique for application to assemblage of micro-machine and micro-devices.

  5. Preparation of Orally Disintegrating Tablets Containing Powdered Tea Leaves with Enriched Levels of Bioactive Compounds by Means of Microwave Irradiation Technique.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hironori; Iwao, Yasunori; Izumikawa, Masahiro; Sano, Syusuke; Ishida, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a microwave treatment process has been applied to prepare orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) containing powdered tea leaves with enriched levels of the anti-inflammatory compounds such as chafuroside A (CFA) and chafuroside B (CFB). The use of distilled water as the adsorbed and granulation solvents in this preparation process afforded tablets with a long disintegration time (more than 120 s). The CFA and CFB contents of these tablets did not also change after 4 min of microwave irradiation due to the tablet temperature, which only increased to 100°C. In contrast, the tablet temperature increased up to 140°C after 3 min of microwave irradiation when a 1.68 M Na2HPO4 solution instead of distilled water. Notably, the disintegration time of these tablets was considerably improved (less than 20 s) compared with the microwave-untreated tablets, and there were 7- and 11-fold increases in their CFA and CFB contents. In addition, the operational conditions for the preparation of the tablets were optimized by face-centered composite design based on the following criteria: tablet hardness greater than 13 N, disintegration time less than 30 s and friability less than 0.5%. The requirements translated into X1 (the amount of granulation solvent), X2 (tableting pressure) and X3 (content of the powdered tea leaves) values of 45%, 0.43 kN and 32%, respectively, and the ODTs containing powdered tea leaves prepared under these optimized conditions were found to show excellent tablet properties and contain enriched levels of CFA and CFB.

  6. Metalworking Techniques Unlock a Unique Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Approached by West Hartford, Connecticut-based Abbot Ball Company, Glenn Research Center agreed to test an intriguing alloy called Nitinol 60 that had been largely unused for a half century. Using powdered metallurgy, the partners developed a method for manufacturing and working with the material, which Abbott Ball has now commercialized. Nitinol 60 provides a unique combination of qualities that make it an excellent material for ball bearings, among other applications.

  7. Simultaneous determination of bromine and iodine in milk powder for adult and infant nutrition by plasma based techniques after digestion using microwave-induced combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoloto, Rochele S.; Doneda, Morgana; Flores, Eder L. M.; Mesko, Marcia F.; Flores, Erico M. M.; Mello, Paola A.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, bromine and iodine determination in milk powder for adult and infant nutrition was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after digestion by microwave-induced combustion (MIC). Contrarily to previous works using MIC, a higher sample mass was digested (700 mg). Water and ammonium hydroxide (10 to 100 mmol L- 1) were investigated as absorbing solutions and accurate results were achieved using a 25 mmol L- 1 NH4OH solution. Moreover, the high stability of analytes after digestion (up to 30 days) using this solution was observed. The accuracy of the proposed MIC method was evaluated using certified and reference materials of milk powder (NIST 1549 and NIST 8435). No statistical difference was observed between results obtained by MIC-ICP-MS and reference values. Results for samples were also compared with those obtained by ICP-OES and no statistical difference was observed. Microwave-assisted alkaline extraction (MW-AE) was also evaluated for milk powder using NH4OH and tetramethylammonium hydroxide solutions. Solutions obtained after digestion by MIC (whole milk powder) presented low carbon content in digests (< 25 mg L- 1) while solutions obtained after alkaline extraction presented up to 10,000 mg L- 1 of C. MIC method was preferable in view of the possibility of obtaining solutions with low carbon content even using a relatively high sample mass (up to 700 mg) avoiding additional dilution prior to ICP-MS analysis, thus allowing better detection limits. Limits of detection obtained by MIC-ICP-MS were 0.007 and 0.003 μg g- 1 for Br and I, respectively, while for MW-AE were 0.1 and 0.05 μg g- 1 respectively for Br and I. Among the main advantages of the proposed method are the use of diluted alkaline solutions that is in agreement with green analytical chemistry recommendations, the high stability of analytes in solution and the suitability of digests for

  8. Effect of Surface Densification on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Powder Metallurgical Gears by Using a Surface Rolling Process

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jingguang; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Di; Li, Kiade; Lu, Wei; Yan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) components are widely used in the auto industry due to the advantage of net-shape forming, low cost, and high efficiency. Still, usage of PM components is limited in the auto industry when encountering rigorous situations, like heavy load, due to lower strength, hardness, wear resistance, and other properties compared to wrought components due to the existence of massive pores in the PM components. In this study, through combining the powder metallurgy process and rolling process, the pores in the PM components were decreased and a homogenous densified layer was formed on the surface, which resulted in the enhancement of the strength, hardness, wear resistance, and other properties, which can expand its range of application. In this paper, we study the impact of different rolling feeds on the performance of the components’ surfaces. We found that with the increase of the rolling feed, the depth of the densified layer increased. PMID:28773970

  9. Effect of Surface Densification on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Powder Metallurgical Gears by Using a Surface Rolling Process.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jingguang; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Di; Li, Kiade; Lu, Wei; Yan, Biao

    2016-10-19

    Powder metallurgy (PM) components are widely used in the auto industry due to the advantage of net-shape forming, low cost, and high efficiency. Still, usage of PM components is limited in the auto industry when encountering rigorous situations, like heavy load, due to lower strength, hardness, wear resistance, and other properties compared to wrought components due to the existence of massive pores in the PM components. In this study, through combining the powder metallurgy process and rolling process, the pores in the PM components were decreased and a homogenous densified layer was formed on the surface, which resulted in the enhancement of the strength, hardness, wear resistance, and other properties, which can expand its range of application. In this paper, we study the impact of different rolling feeds on the performance of the components' surfaces. We found that with the increase of the rolling feed, the depth of the densified layer increased.

  10. Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Genau, Amber Lynn

    2004-01-01

    Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

  11. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  12. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  13. Preparation of metal diboride powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group of consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  14. Autoclave heat treatment for prealloyed powder products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Technique could be applied directly to loose powders as part of hot pressing process of forming them to any required shapes. This would eliminate initial extrusion step commonly applied to prealloyed powders, substantially reduce cost of forming operation, and result in optimum properties.

  15. Microwave Power Absorption in Materials for Ferrous Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Yang, Mengshen; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    The characteristics of microwave power absorption in materials for ferrous metallurgy, including iron oxides (Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and Fe0.925O) and bitumite, were explored by evaluating their dielectric loss (Q E) and/or magnetic loss (Q H) distributions in the 0.05-m-thick slabs of the corresponding materials exposed to 1.2-kW and 2.45-GHz microwave radiation at temperatures below 1100°C. It is revealed that the dielectric loss contributes primarily to the power absorption in Fe2O3, Fe0.925O and the bitumite at all of the examined temperatures. Their Q E values at room temperature and slab surface are 9.1311 × 103 W m-3, 23.7025 × 103 W m-3, and 49.5999 × 103 W m-3, respectively, showing that the materials have the following heating rate initially under microwave irradiation: bitumite > Fe0.925O > Fe2O3. Compared with the other materials, Fe3O4 has much stronger power absorption, primarily originated from its magnetic loss (e.g., Q H = 1.0615 × 106 W m-3, Q H/Q E = 2.4185 at 24°C and slab surface), below its Curie point, above which the magnetic susceptibility approaches to zero, thereby causing a very small Q H value at even the surface (Q H = 1.0416 × 105 W m-3 at 880°C). It is also demonstrated that inhomogeneous power distributions occur in all the slabs and become more pronounced with increasing temperature mainly due to rapid increase in permittivity. Characterizing power absorption in the oxides and the coal is expected to offer a strategic guide for improving use of microwave energy in ferrous metallurgy.

  16. Microwave Power Absorption in Materials for Ferrous Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Yang, Mengshen; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The characteristics of microwave power absorption in materials for ferrous metallurgy, including iron oxides (Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and Fe0.925O) and bitumite, were explored by evaluating their dielectric loss ( Q E) and/or magnetic loss ( Q H) distributions in the 0.05-m-thick slabs of the corresponding materials exposed to 1.2-kW and 2.45-GHz microwave radiation at temperatures below 1100°C. It is revealed that the dielectric loss contributes primarily to the power absorption in Fe2O3, Fe0.925O and the bitumite at all of the examined temperatures. Their Q E values at room temperature and slab surface are 9.1311 × 103 W m-3, 23.7025 × 103 W m-3, and 49.5999 × 103 W m-3, respectively, showing that the materials have the following heating rate initially under microwave irradiation: bitumite > Fe0.925O > Fe2O3. Compared with the other materials, Fe3O4 has much stronger power absorption, primarily originated from its magnetic loss (e.g., Q H = 1.0615 × 106 W m-3, Q H/ Q E = 2.4185 at 24°C and slab surface), below its Curie point, above which the magnetic susceptibility approaches to zero, thereby causing a very small Q H value at even the surface ( Q H = 1.0416 × 105 W m-3 at 880°C). It is also demonstrated that inhomogeneous power distributions occur in all the slabs and become more pronounced with increasing temperature mainly due to rapid increase in permittivity. Characterizing power absorption in the oxides and the coal is expected to offer a strategic guide for improving use of microwave energy in ferrous metallurgy.

  17. A method to obtain homogeneously dispersed carbon nanotubes in Al powders for preparing Al/CNTs nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh Pham, Van; Nguyen, Van An; Thang Bui, Hung; Chung Le, Danh; Chuc Nguyen, Van; Luan Nguyen, Van; Phuong Doan, Dinh; Phan, Ngoc Minh

    2013-06-01

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their promising properties. Most research on metallic matrix-CNTs composites (MMCs-CNTs) show that uniform dispersion of CNTs has been by far the most significant challenge in the field of CNTs-reinforced composites. In this research we will present an approach to obtain homogeneously dispersed CNTs in Al powders for preparing Al/CNTs nanocomposite. A novel polyester binder-assisted (PBA) mixing method was used for achieving uniform dispersion of CNTs, and power metallurgy (PM) technique was used for preparing Al/CNTs nanocomposite. The distribution quality of CNTs in Al matrix nanocomposites was also qualified based on image analysis technique. The morphologies, structures and mechanical properties of the Al/CNTs nanocomposite were also investigated in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and mechanical measurement methods. Experimental results show that this method not only achieves good dispersion but it also avoids the damage on structure of CNTs by conventional mixing methods.

  18. Carbonylation as a separation technique for removal of non-radioactive species for tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Visnapuu, A.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Creed, R.F. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    Much of the waste generated from five decades of weapons production in the US Department of Energy complex contains highly radioactive constituents. With the high cost of permanent disposal space, it is necessary to separate as many of the nonradioactive species from the radioactive as possible. This paper discusses the transfer of carbonyl processing technology from mineral beneficiation and powder metallurgy operations to the separation of Fe and Ni from radioactively contaminated waste streams. Samples of simulated composite Hanford Tank Waste residue were first processed with a calcine/dissolution technique which resulted in a residue powder consisting of 31.9 pct Fe and 3.3 pct Ni. Because of the specification for waste glass compositions, these two constituents become important in determining the number of waste glass logs produced. Pyrometallurgical reduction of the residue powders, followed by subsequent carbonylation, extracted up to 92.0 pct of the Fe and 95.7 pct of the Ni. The resultant product contained as little as 4.9 pct Fe and 0.3 pct Ni. At this level, Fe would no longer be a limiting constituent in the waste glass.

  19. Atom probe tomography analysis of WC powder.

    PubMed

    Weidow, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    A tantalum doped tungsten carbide powder, (W,Ta)C, was prepared with the purpose to maximise the amount of Ta in the hexagonal mixed crystal carbide. Atom probe tomography (APT) was considered to be the best technique to quantitatively measure the amount of Ta within this carbide. As the carbide powder consisted in the form of very small particles (<1 μm), a method to produce APT specimens of such a powder was developed. The powder was at first embedded in copper and a FIB-SEM workstation was used to make an in-situ lift-out from a selected powder particle. The powder particle was then deposited on a post made from a WC-Co based cemented carbide specimen. With the use of a laser assisted atom probe, it was shown that the method is working and the Ta content of the (W,Ta)C could be measured quantitatively.

  20. Rapid breakdown anodization technique for the synthesis of high aspect ratio and high surface area anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotube powders

    SciTech Connect

    Antony, Rajini P.; Mathews, Tom; Dasgupta, Arup; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-03-15

    Clusters of high aspect ratio, high surface area anatase-TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with a typical nanotube outer diameter of about 18 nm, wall thickness of approximately 5 nm and length of 5-10 {mu}m were synthesized, in powder form, by breakdown anodization of Ti foils in 0.1 M perchloric acid, at 10 V (299 K) and 20 V ({approx}275 and 299 K). The surface area, morphology, structure and band gap were determined from Brunauer Emmet Teller method, field emmission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopic studies. The tubular morphology and anatase phase were found to be stable up to 773 K and above 773 K anatase phase gradually transformed to rutile phase with disintegration of tubular morphology. At 973 K, complete transformation to rutile phase and disintegration of tubular morphology were observed. The band gap of the as prepared and the annealed samples varied from 3.07 to 2.95 eV with increase in annealing temperature as inferred from photoluminescence and diffuse reflectance studies. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} High aspect ratio anatase-titania nanotube powders were synthesized electrochemically. {yields} The surface area of the nanotubes were much higher than those reported. {yields} The annealing temperature limit for maintaining tubular morphology was established. {yields} The photoluminiscence spectroscopy reflected the presence of defects, annealing of defects and phase transformation. {yields} The nanotubes were of {approx}5 nm wall thickness as revealed by TEM studies.